Science.gov

Sample records for active support training

  1. Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities," [ED495181] and is an added resource for further information. That study examined the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to…

  2. Active Component Support to Reserve Component Training, Changes to Training Support XXI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    provide support to reserve units in the Pacific Command area of responsibility. Training Support Mobilization Compliance MACA Hybrid Alternative eSB...mobilization, compliance, and Military Assistance to Civil Authorities ( MACA ).”16 The plan establishes and explains the command relationship between the CONUSA...CA TSBn TSB TSD CSS TSBn CONUSA OCAR USARC RPA Execution RSC Integrated Active Reserve l OMA l RPA RPA request MACA XXXX XXXX $ RPA Guidance

  3. The Effectiveness of Staff Support: Evaluating Active Support Training Using a Conditional Probability Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felce, David; Bowley, Clare; Baxter, Helen; Jones, Edwin; Lowe, Kathy; Emerson, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Active Support, a package of procedures which includes activity planning, support planning, and training on providing effective assistance, was evaluated in five community residences serving 19 adults with severe mental retardation. Findings indicated that the likelihood of a resident engaging in activity significantly increased following staff…

  4. The Effect of Active Support Training on Engagement, Opportunities for Choice, Challenging Behaviour and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa; Hamilton, David; Leighton, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate active support (AS) training and to investigate changes to perceived engagement in domestic tasks, opportunities for choice, frequency of challenging behaviour, and level of support needs. Method: Participants were 12 adults with ID aged 27-57 years (M = 37 years) residing in three group homes, and…

  5. Effects of training and weight support on muscle activation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rose, Martin H; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jensen, Bente R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity locomotor training on knee extensor and flexor muscle activation and adaptability to increased body-weight (BW) support during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients with idiopathic PD and eight healthy participants were included. The PD patients completed an 8-week training program on a lower-body, positive-pressure treadmill. Knee extensor and flexor muscles activation during steady treadmill walking (3 km/h) were measured before, at the mid-point, and after training. Increasing BW support decreased knee extensor muscle activation (normalization) and increased knee flexor muscle activation (abnormal) in PD patients when compared to healthy participants. Training improved flexor peak muscle activation adaptability to increased (BW) support during walking in PD patients. During walking without BW support shorter knee extensor muscle off-activation time and increased relative peak muscle activation was observed in PD patients and did not improve with 8 weeks of training. In conclusion, patients with PD walked with excessive activation of the knee extensor and flexor muscles when compared to healthy participants. Specialized locomotor training may facilitate adaptive processes related to motor control of walking in PD patients.

  6. The Effect of Active Support Interactive Training on the Daily Lives of Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totsika, Vasiliki; Toogood, Sandy; Hastings, Richard P.; McCarthy, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interactive training (IT) is one of the two staff training components of the active support (AS) model. The present study explores how effective IT is when offered to staff divorced in time from the AS workshops, the other training component. We explored the effects of IT on resident activity engagement, challenging behaviours and…

  7. NASA/SPoRt: GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew; Stano, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    SPoRT is using current capabilities of MODIS and VIIRS, combined with current GOES (i.e. Hybrid Imagery) to demonstrate mesoscale capabilities of future ABI instrument. SPoRT is transitioning RGBs from EUMETSAT standard "recipes" to demonstrate a method to more efficiently handle the increase channels/frequency of ABI. Challenges for RGB production exist. Internal vs. external production, Bit depth needed, Adding quantitative information, etc. SPoRT forming group to address these issues. SPoRT is leading efforts on the application of total lightning in operations and to educate users of this new capability. Training in many forms is used to support testbed activities and is a key part to the transition process.

  8. NASA/SPoRT's GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuell, K. K.; Jedlovec, G.; Molthan, A.; Stano, G. T.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports many activities within the GOES-R Proving Grounds (PG). These include the development of imagery from existing instrumentation as a proxy to future Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities on GOES-R. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments are used to provide a glimpse of the multi-spectral capabilities that will become the norm as the number of channels and data rate dramatically increase with GOES-R. The NOAA/NWS has plans to provide operational users with all ABI channels at the highest resolution. Data fusion of individual channels into composite red, green, and blue imagery products will assist the end user with this future wave of information. While increasing the efficiency in the operational use of ABI channels, these composites provide only qualitative information. Within the GOES-R PG, SPoRT and other partners are exploring ways to include quantitative information as part of the composite imagery. However, limitations in local hardware processing and/or data bandwidth for users of the GOES-R data stream are challenges to overcome. This presentation will discuss the creation of these composite images as well as possible solutions to address these processing challenges. In a similar manner the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) to be launched on GOES-R presents several data management challenges. The GLM is a pioneering instrument to quantify total lightning from a geostationary platform. The expected data frequency from the GLM is to be at a sub-minute interval. Users of such a data set may have little experience in handling such a rapid update of information. To assist users, SPoRT is working with the NWS to develop tools within the user's decision support system to allow tracking and analysis of total lightning from a storm-based perspective. This presentation will discuss the

  9. NASA/SPoRT's GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew L.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports many activities within the GOES-R Proving Grounds (PG). These include the development of imagery from existing instrumentation as a proxy to future Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities on GOES-R. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments are used to provide a glimpse of the multi-spectral capabilities that will become the norm as the number of channels and data rate dramatically increase with GOES-R. The NOAA/NWS has plans to provide operational users with all ABI channels at the highest resolution. Data fusion of individual channels into composite red, green, and blue imagery products will assist the end user with this future wave of information. While increasing the efficiency in the operational use of ABI channels, these composites provide only qualitative information. Within the GOES-R PG, SPoRT and other partners are exploring ways to include quantitative information as part of the composite imagery. However, limitations in local hardware processing and/or data bandwidth for users of the GOES-R data stream are challenges to overcome. This presentation will discuss the creation of these composite images as well as possible solutions to address these processing challenges. In a similar manner the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) to be launched on GOES-R presents several data management challenges. The GLM is a pioneering instrument to quantify total lightning from a geostationary platform. The expected data frequency from the GLM is to be at a sub-minute interval. Users of such a data set may have little experience in handling such a rapid update of information. To assist users, SPoRT is working with the NWS to develop tools within the user fs decision support system to allow tracking and analysis of total lightning from a storm-based perspective. This presentation will discuss the

  10. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  11. Meeting Northern Arizona's Supported Employment Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William E., Jr.; And Others

    In 1989 Northern Arizona University established a Supported Employment Training Center (SETC) to increase the number of trained job coaches in northern Arizona and provide knowledge and skills in supported employment to personnel from cooperating schools and agencies. First-year SETC activities focused on assessment of the training needs of…

  12. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American... following: (a) Classroom training. This program activity is any training of the type normally conducted in... classroom training, employment and training services, or supportive services, costs for which the...

  13. Basic Life Support (BLS) Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-19

    Healthcare Standards Manual," •• current edition 2 A (d) American Heart Association , "Basic Life Support," current Ii~ curriculum3 (e) American Red Cross...Training. Training based on the specifications of the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross. "- 1Available from the Joint Commission on...Maintain the instructor’s rating in BLS from the American Heart Association or the American Red Cross. G. EFFECTIVE DATE AND IMPLEMENTATION This

  14. Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.

    2007-01-01

    The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities' (AAIDD's) Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum," Second Edition" ("PBSTC"), is a curriculum for training direct support personnel and their supervisors in the values and practices of Positive Behavior Support. The curriculum is designed for direct support persons and…

  15. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = −0.29, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future

  16. Interactive Naval Gunfire Support Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    THIS PAGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Ok .O 00F18 la. H ,P..HI E.UHIIY L FAIt-IA 1IOlb. HEIIGIIMARKINC& 5 UNCLASSIFIED 2a SECURITY CLASSIFICATION... 5 C. OVERCOMING INERTIA: WINNING THE TRAINING WAR ... 6 D. SCOPE OF THE PROGRAM...one person. The 5 ship’s Gunfire Liaison Officer ( GLO ) broke his foot on the passage to the range. The Executive Officer stepped in to fill the spot

  17. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American grantees shall design and operate programs funded under the Act which support growth and development as... an institutional setting, including vocational education, and designed to provide individuals...

  18. Training and Support for Successful Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Online education is growing rapidly as colleges seek to increase enrollment without investing in physical infrastructure. To keep up with the increasing demand for courses, some colleges are asking faculty to teach classes online with little training, few resources, and minimal support. The purpose of this study was to determine how the training…

  19. Embedded Inservice Training in Positive Behavioral Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Richard W.

    In order for schools and community agencies to develop the capacity to support persons with severe patterns of problem behaviors in typical community settings, they need to be knowledgeable about recent behavioral advances and have processes in place for implementation of these advances. This need creates a new challenge for inservice training of…

  20. Transforming Staff Practice through Active Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C.; Harman, Anthony D.; Keen, Deb; Pennell, Donna; Harley, Jane H.; Walker, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active support is being introduced in many residential and respite homes in an effort to improve engagement in meaningful activity of people with intellectual disability. Method: A train-the-trainer approach was used in a large government organisation that supports people with intellectual disability in Australia. Five apprentice…

  1. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  2. Intelligent Agent Supported Training in Virtual Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Security, and Safety P.O. Box 23, 3769 ZG Soesterberg, the Netherlands 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Intelligent Agent Supported Training in Virtual Simulations...of plans. A plan is a recipe for achieving a goal, given particular preconditions. The plan library may contain multiple plans for the achievement

  3. Multidirectional transparent support for overground gait training.

    PubMed

    Vallery, H; Lutz, P; von Zitzewitz, J; Rauter, G; Fritschi, M; Everarts, C; Ronsse, R; Curt, A; Bolliger, M

    2013-06-01

    Gait and balance training is an essential ingredient for locomotor rehabilitation of patients with neurological impairments. Robotic overhead support systems may help these patients train, for example by relieving them of part of their body weight. However, there are only very few systems that provide support during overground gait, and these suffer from limited degrees of freedom and/or undesired interaction forces due to uncompensated robot dynamics, namely inertia. Here, we suggest a novel mechanical concept that is based on cable robot technology and that allows three-dimensional gait training while reducing apparent robot dynamics to a minimum. The solution does not suffer from the conventional drawback of cable robots, which is a limited workspace. Instead, displaceable deflection units follow the human subject above a large walking area. These deflection units are not actuated, instead they are implicitly displaced by means of the forces in the cables they deflect. This leads to an underactuated design, because the deflection units cannot be moved arbitrarily. However, the design still allows accurate control of a three-dimensional force vector acting on a human subject during gait. We describe the mechanical concept, the control concept, and we show first experimental results obtained with the device, including the force control performance during robot-supported overground gait of five human subjects without motor impairments.

  4. Medical Support for ISS Crewmember Training in Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chough, Natacha; Pattarini, James; Cole, Richard; Patlach, Robert; Menon, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Medical support of spaceflight training operations across international lines is a unique circumstance with potential applications to other aerospace medicine support scenarios. KBRwyle's Star City Medical Support Group (SCMSG) has fulfilled this role since the Mir-Shuttle era, with extensive experience and updates to share with the greater AsMA community. OVERVIEW: The current Soyuz training flow for assigned ISS crewmembers takes place in Star City, Russia. Soyuz training flow involves numerous activities that pose potential physical and occupational risks to crewmembers, including centrifuge runs and pressurized suit simulations at ambient and hypobaric pressures. In addition, Star City is a relatively remote location in a host nation with variable access to reliable, Western-standard medical care. For these reasons, NASA's Human Health & Performance contract allocates full-time physician support to assigned ISS crewmembers training in Star City. The Star City physician also treats minor injuries and illnesses as needed for both long- and short-term NASA support personnel traveling in the area, while working to develop and maintain relationships with local health care resources in the event of more serious medical issues that cannot be treated on-site. The specifics of this unique scope of practice will be discussed. SIGNIFICANCE: ISS crewmembers training in Star City are at potential physical and occupational risk of trauma or dysbarism during nominal Soyuz training flow, requiring medical support from an on-duty aerospace medicine specialist. This support maintains human health and performance by preserving crewmember safety and well-being for mission success; sharing information regarding this operational model may contribute to advances in other areas of international, military, and civilian operational aerospace medicine.

  5. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  6. Progressive Reduction Versus Fixed Level of Support During Training: When Less is Less

    PubMed Central

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Wang, Xiaoye Michael; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous empirical and theoretical work suggests that effective skill acquisition requires movements to be generated actively and that learning new skills supports the acquisition of prospective control. However, there are many ways in which practice can be structured, that may affect the acquisition and use of prospective control after training. Here, we tested whether the progressive modulation and reduction of support during training was required to yield good performance after training without support. The task was to use a stylus to push a bead over a complex 3D wire path. The support “magnetically” attracted and held the stylus onto the wire. Three groups of adult participants each experienced one of three training regimes: gradual reduction of magnetic attraction, only a medium level of attraction, or low magnetic attraction. The results showed that use of a single (medium) level of support was significantly less effective in yielding good performance with low support after training. Training with low support yielded post-training performance that was equally good as that yielded by training with progressive reduction of support; however, performance during training was significantly poorer in the former. Thus, less support during training yields effective learning but more difficult training sessions. The results are discussed in the context of application to training with special populations. PMID:26684725

  7. Progressive reduction versus fixed level of support during training: When less is less.

    PubMed

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Wang, Xiaoye Michael; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Previous empirical and theoretical work suggests that effective skill acquisition requires movements to be generated actively and that learning new skills supports the acquisition of prospective control. However, there are many ways in which practice can be structured, that may affect the acquisition and use of prospective control after training. Here, we tested whether the progressive modulation and reduction of support during training was required to yield good performance after training without support. The task was to use a stylus to push a bead over a complex 3D wire path. The support "magnetically" attracted and held the stylus onto the wire. Three groups of adult participants each experienced one of three training regimes: gradual reduction of magnetic attraction, only a medium level of attraction, or low magnetic attraction. The results showed that use of a single (medium) level of support was significantly less effective in yielding good performance with low support after training. Training with low support yielded post-training performance that was equally good as that yielded by training with progressive reduction of support; however, performance during training was significantly poorer in the former. Thus, less support during training yields effective learning but more difficult training sessions. The results are discussed in the context of application to training with special populations.

  8. US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) Program - Training Support and the Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    1UNCLASSIFIED Supporting 7th ArmyReady Thru Training! Integrated Training Area Management Jeff Andrews USAREUR ITAM Operations Coordinator...Jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management ( ITAM ) Program – Training Support and...Management ( ITAM ) Program - Training Support and the Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  9. In Support Of Adventure Training: A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Charles C.

    1976-01-01

    The author responds to criticisms of training resident assistants by means of adventure training. This type of training is designed to meet the needs and objectives of housing departments who feel that development of interpersonal skills is best accomplished through adventure training. (Author/HLM)

  10. Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory.

    PubMed

    Dresler, Martin; Shirer, William R; Konrad, Boris N; Müller, Nils C J; Wagner, Isabella C; Fernández, Guillén; Czisch, Michael; Greicius, Michael D

    2017-03-08

    Memory skills strongly differ across the general population; however, little is known about the brain characteristics supporting superior memory performance. Here we assess functional brain network organization of 23 of the world's most successful memory athletes and matched controls with fMRI during both task-free resting state baseline and active memory encoding. We demonstrate that, in a group of naive controls, functional connectivity changes induced by 6 weeks of mnemonic training were correlated with the network organization that distinguishes athletes from controls. During rest, this effect was mainly driven by connections between rather than within the visual, medial temporal lobe and default mode networks, whereas during task it was driven by connectivity within these networks. Similarity with memory athlete connectivity patterns predicted memory improvements up to 4 months after training. In conclusion, mnemonic training drives distributed rather than regional changes, reorganizing the brain's functional network organization to enable superior memory performance.

  11. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Aircrew Training Devices: Instructional Support Features.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    146 REFERENCES Breaux, R. and Goldstein, I. "Development of Machine Speech Understanding for Automated Instructional Systems." In 8th NTEC/ Industr ...8th NTEC/ Industr Conference Proceedings. New Concepts for Training Sytems. Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL, November, 1975. Caro, P. W...Simulation." In 11th NTEC/ Industr Conference Proceedings. Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL, November, 1978. Hughes, R. G. Advanced Training

  13. TAP 3: Training Program Support Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Training Accreditation Program (TAP) establishes objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine readiness for accreditation. TAP 3 has been developed to assist the contractor in preparing the initial Self-Evaluation Report, Training Program Accreditation Plan, and the CSER (contractor self-evaluation report).

  14. Pre-Apprenticeship Training Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Paul; Blomberg, Davinia

    2011-01-01

    Pre-apprenticeships are becoming an increasingly important component of the Australian vocational education and training (VET) system. The purpose of this report is to investigate the level of pre-apprenticeship activity occurring in Australia and to examine the characteristics of pre-apprenticeship courses and the students undertaking those…

  15. Training Needs of Paraprofessionals Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kira M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand professional development for paraprofessionals supporting students with ASD in Virginia. This understanding was reached through explanatory, sequential mixed methods design. Surveys and interviews provided insight into training practices, training needs, and training barriers. An interpretation of their…

  16. Training in Phonemic Segmentation: The Effects of Visual Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerstholt, Mariette T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examines the effects of different types of computer-assisted phonemic segmentation training on phonemic segmentation, reading, and spelling of children with learning disabilities. Finds that phonemic segmentation training using visual support has no advantage over auditory training alone. Suggests that preschoolers and children with reading and…

  17. ECLSS medical support activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crump, William J.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    During the period from April 10, 1990 to April 9, 1991, the Consortium for the Space Life Sciences provided technical assistance to the NASA/MSFC water recovery efforts. This assistance was in the form of literature reviews, technical recommendations, and presentations. This final report summarizes the activities completed during this period and identifies those areas requiring additional efforts. The tasks which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) water recovery team addressed were either identified by MSFC technical representatives or chosen from those outlined in the subject statement of work.

  18. Training Materials and Data Requirements for Combat Training Theater (CTT) Training Test Support Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    NUMBER() James H. Harris (HumRRO) David W. Bessemer (ARI) MDA 903-80-C-0223 Kevin J. McAleese (Honeywell, Inc.)______________ 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Prepared with conceptual contributions from Dr. D.W. Bessemer , ARI Field Unit, Fort Knox. IS. KEY WORDS (Continue on tevocee side it...TRAINING TEST SUPPORT PLAN James H. Harris Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) David W. Bessemer U.S. Army Research Institute for the

  19. Emergency medical support system for extravehicular activity training held at weightless environment test building (WETS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) : future prospects and a look back over the past decade.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Isao; Tachibana, Masakazu; Ohashi, Noriyoshi; Imai, Hiroshi; Asari, Yasushi; Matsuyama, Shigenori

    2011-12-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides extravehicular activity (EVA) training to astronauts in a weightless environment test building (WETS) located in Tsukuba City. For EVA training, Tsukuba Medial Center Hospital (TMCH) has established an emergency medical support system, serving as operations coordinator. Taking the perspective of emergency physicians, this paper provides an overview of the medical support system and examines its activities over the past decade as well as future issues. Fortunately, no major accident has occurred during the past 10 years of NBS. Minor complaints (external otitis, acute otitis media, transient dizziness, conjunctival inflammation, upper respiratory inflammation, dermatitis, abraded wounds, etc.) among the support divers have been addressed onsite by attending emergency physicians. Operations related to the medical support system at the WETS have proceeded smoothly for the former NASDA and continue to proceed without event for JAXA, providing safe, high-quality emergency medical services. If an accident occurs at the WETS, transporting the patient by helicopter following initial treatment by emergency physicians can actually exacerbate symptoms, since the procedure exposes a patient who was recently within a hyperbaric environment to the low-pressure environment involved in air transportation. If a helicopter is used, the flight altitude should be kept as low as possible by taking routes over the river.

  20. Training and Consultation to Promote Implementation of an Empirically Supported Treatment: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Marcus, Steven C.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated the efficacy of three training modalities and the impact of ongoing consultation after training. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety among youths, an empirically supported treatment, was used as the exemplar. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three one-day workshops to examine the efficacy of training modality: routine training (training as usual), computer training (computerized version of training as usual), and augmented training (training that emphasized active learning). After training, all participants received three months of ongoing consultation that included case consultation, didactics, and problem solving. Methods Participants were 115 community therapists (mean age of 35.9 years; 90% were women). Outcome measures included the Adherence and Skill Checklist, used to rate a performance-based role-play; a knowledge test; and the Training Satisfaction Rating Scale. Results All three training modalities resulted in limited gains in therapist adherence, skill, and knowledge. There was no significant effect of modality on adherence, skill, or knowledge from pretraining to posttraining. Participants were more satisfied with augmented and routine training than with computer training. Most important, number of consultation hours after training significantly predicted higher therapist adherence and skill at the three-month follow-up. Conclusions The findings suggest that training alone did not result in therapist behavior change. The inclusion of ongoing consultation was critical to influencing therapist adherence and skill. Implications for implementation science and mental health services research are discussed. PMID:22549401

  1. Training telescope operators and support astronomers at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, Henri M. J.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Anderson, Joe; Pino, Andres; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Girard, Julien H. V.

    2016-07-01

    The operations model of the Paranal Observatory relies on the work of efficient staff to carry out all the daytime and nighttime tasks. This is highly dependent on adequate training. The Paranal Science Operations department (PSO) has a training group that devises a well-defined and continuously evolving training plan for new staff, in addition to broadening and reinforcing courses for the whole department. This paper presents the training activities for and by PSO, including recent astronomical and quality control training for operators, as well as adaptive optics and interferometry training of all staff. We also present some future plans.

  2. Effects of Video-Based Staff Training with Manager-Led Exercises in Residential Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of video-based staff training with manager-led exercises in improving the performance of six staffers in residential support for persons with disabilities was examined. The training procedures improved performance in hand-washing, glove usage, and frequency of positive interaction, but not in the frequency of valued activities.…

  3. Food Service Supervisor. Dietetic Support Personnel Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Ellen; And Others

    This curriculum guide, part of a multi-volume dietetic support personnel training program, consists of materials for use in training future food service supervisors. The first unit provides an overview of the field of dietetics. Addressed next are various aspects of nutrition and diet therapy as well as the functions and sources of nutrients,…

  4. Food Production Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Ellen; And Others

    This curriculum guide, part of a multi-volume dietetic support personnel training program, consists of materials (15 units) for use in training future food production workers. Covered in the first part of the guide are nutrition in food production and diet therapy. The second part of the guide deals with sanitation and safety in food production.…

  5. Business Simulations Applied in Support of ERP Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, George

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, quasi-experimental study examined the application of a business simulation against training in support of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Defining more effective training strategies is a critical concern for organizational leaders and stakeholders concerned by today's economic challenges. The scope of this…

  6. Professional knowledge of child support staff: evidence from the New Jersey child support training program.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Blake, Allison; Edwards, Richard L; Liu, Chieh-Wen; Nolan, Robert B; Rusen, Barbara; Thompson, Dina

    2010-02-01

    Child support enforcement (CSE) has experienced dramatic changes in the last decade; however, it is not clear whether child support staff is fully aware of the development. Using data from the New Jersey child support training program (n = 530), this article aims to evaluate the professional knowledge of child support staff. The results show that participants answered 55% of the questions on CSE correctly in the pretraining assessment. After the training, the participants answered 77% of all questions correctly. The findings reveal an urgent need for training for child support staff in a rapidly changing profession.

  7. Project support of practical training in biophysics.

    PubMed

    Mornstein, V; Vlk, D; Forytkova, L

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Biophysics ensures practical training in biophysics and related subjects for students of medical and health study programmes. Demonstrations of medical technology are an important part of this training. Teaching for Faculty of Sciences in biophysical study programmes becomes also very important. Some lectures and demonstrations of technology are involved, but the practical trainig is missing. About 1 mil. CZK for additional laboratory equipment was obtained from the HEIDF project No. 1866/ 2005 "The demonstration and measuring technology for education in medical biophysics and radiological physics" for measuring system DEWETRON for high frequency signal analysis, Fluke Ti30 IR camera, PM 9000B patient monitor, ARSENAL AF 1 fluorescence microscope, and Nikon Coolpix 4500 digital camera with accessories for microphotography. At the present time, further financial resources are being provided by a development project of Ministry of Education "Inter-university co-operation in biomedical technology and engineering using top technologies" in total amount of almost 5 mil CZK, whereas over 2 mil CZK from this project are reserved for student laboratory equipment. The main goal of this project is to ensure the participation of Medical Faculty in educational co-operation in the biomedical technology and engineering, namely with the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication (FEEC), Brno University of Technology. There will be taught those areas of biophysics which are not covered by FEEC, thus forming a separate subject "General Biophysics". The following instruments will be installed: UV-VIS spectrophotometers, rotation viscometers, tensiometers, microscopes with digital image processing, cooled centrifuge, optical benches, and some smaller instruments for practical measurements.

  8. Professional Knowledge of Child Support Staff: Evidence from the New Jersey Child Support Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Blake, Allison; Edwards, Richard L.; Liu, Chieh-Wen; Nolan, Robert B.; Rusen, Barbara; Thompson, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Child support enforcement (CSE) has experienced dramatic changes in the last decade; however, it is not clear whether child support staff is fully aware of the development. Using data from the New Jersey child support training program (n = 530), this article aims to evaluate the professional knowledge of child support staff. The results show that…

  9. Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Giselle; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models," (ED495138) and is an added resource for further information. This support document is divided into the following sections: (1) The Retail Industry--A Snapshot; (2) Case Studies--Hardware, Retail…

  10. Exploring Differential Effects of Supervisor Support on Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijman, Derk-Jan J. M.; Nijhof, Wim J.; Wognum, A. A. M.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of other transfer-influencing factors in a systemic approach of the transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: A review of studies on factors affecting transfer of…

  11. Research in Rehabilitation Counselor Training on Supported Employment and Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trach, John S.

    This monograph contains eight studies on supported employment and transition conducted by graduate students in rehabilitation counselor training programs. Chapter 1, "Income Allowance Policies of State Medicaid Agencies as Work Incentives or Disincentives for ICR/MR Residents" (James A. Mayer and others), found in a survey of six…

  12. Parents' Reasons and Motivations for Supporting Their Child's Music Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, David Yun; Schader, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Parents whose children were attending pre-college music programs (N=203) responded to 14 statements regarding reasons for supporting their child's music lessons. Parents generally reported more intrinsic than extrinsic reasons and expectations relating to the benefits of music training. Results are discussed in the context of cultural values and…

  13. Aviation Support Equipment Technician E 3 & 2. Rate Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The training manual is designed as a self study text for use by Navy and Naval Reserve personnel preparing to meet the professional qualifications for advancement to Petty Officer Third Class and Petty Officer Second Class in the rating of Aviation Support Equipment (ASE) Technician E (Electrical). The first chapter provides information on the…

  14. [Support and training of nursing teams in elective abortions].

    PubMed

    Paulard, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    The pathway of patients requesting an elective abortion, while improved, is not always easy. To investigate this observation further, it is interesting to analyse the existing structures and the professionals working in this field. Do the health policies and training envisaged for supporting these caregivers enable them to meet women's needs everywhere across the country?

  15. Planetary gear train ring gear and support structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valco, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Most helicopter transmissions utilize a planetary gear train as the final speed reduction stage. Due to weight constraints these transmissions have high power-to-weight ratios and relatively flexible structures. This investigation addresses the analysis of planetary gear trains with the ring gear mounted on a flexible support structure. The approach utilizes recent advances in automated contact methods for nonlinear finite element analysis. Rather than using a line of action spring to model gear pair mesh stiffness, finite element models of complete gears are developed, and the elastic gear members are engaged and rolled through mesh. The procedure includes detailed gear tooth geometry with profile modifications. A nonlinear approach is required due to large displacements associated with gear rotation and nonlinear boundary conditions associated with the gear tooth surface contact. The updated Lagrangian formulation and the MARC K-4.1 automated contact features are applied in the analysis. The ring gear support structure is modeled by an elastic foundation linking the ring gear to a rigid support. Calculation of gear pair deflections, stresses, transmission error, and mesh stiffness through the gear meshing cycle are demonstrated for external and internal spur gear pairs and a planetary gear train. Issues relating to the accuracy of the nonlinear finite element contact method, gear mesh stiffness, transmission error, and the planetary gear train elastic support structure are discussed.

  16. Efficacy of Teachers Training Paraprofessionals to Implement Peer Support Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Matthew E.; Carter, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although peer support arrangements are a promising strategy to promote inclusion in general education classrooms, previous studies have not addressed how paraprofessionals might implement this strategy under typical circumstances without extensive researcher involvement. In this single-case design study, four special education teachers trained and…

  17. Support Workers within Learning/Intellectual Disability Services Perception of Their Role, Training and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windley, Debbie; Chapman, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of support workers working with adults with learning/intellectual disabilities, training and support needs. Data was collected by focus group (n = 3) and semi-structured interviews (n = 5). Participants saw their key role as maximising quality of life, identified "Trial and error" as the main mode of skill…

  18. ISS Remote User Payload Operations Training and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Karl

    2012-01-01

    For more than ten years hundreds of payloads have been, and are currently being, successfully operated onboard the ISS. These payloads are operated by a diverse set of users all over the world. Due to the current international economic environment payload operations are being streamlined, in more and more cases, by using the payload investigators and scientists to also fill the role of operators. Taking this into consideration, increasingly, we have payload operators that are new to space operations and practices, therefore ground systems training and support have become a more critical aspect in ensuring a successful payload mission. The ISS ground systems payload interface is the Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC), located at Marshall Space Flight Center. ISS ground systems training for all remote ISS payload operators, as well as the ISS POIC CADRE, are centralized at this facility. The POIC is the starting point for a remote payload operator to learn how to integrate, and operate their payload, successfully onboard the ISS. Additionally, the CADRE that supports the payload user community are trained and operate from this facility. This paper will give an overview of the ISS ground systems at the POIC, as it relates to the payload user/operator and CADRE community. The entire training process from initial contact with the POIC to in-flight operations will be reviewed and improvements to this process will be presented. More importantly we will present current training methods and proposed methodology whereby the user community will be trained more efficiently and thoroughly. Also, we will discuss how we can more effectively support users in their operations concept to programmatically conduct certain aspects of payload operations to reduce costs.

  19. Robust support vector machine-trained fuzzy system.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Yahya; Yazdi, Hadi Sadoghi

    2014-02-01

    Because the SVM (support vector machine) classifies data with the widest symmetric margin to decrease the probability of the test error, modern fuzzy systems use SVM to tune the parameters of fuzzy if-then rules. But, solving the SVM model is time-consuming. To overcome this disadvantage, we propose a rapid method to solve the robust SVM model and use it to tune the parameters of fuzzy if-then rules. The robust SVM is an extension of SVM for interval-valued data classification. We compare our proposed method with SVM, robust SVM, ISVM-FC (incremental support vector machine-trained fuzzy classifier), BSVM-FC (batch support vector machine-trained fuzzy classifier), SOTFN-SV (a self-organizing TS-type fuzzy network with support vector learning) and SCLSE (a TS-type fuzzy system with subtractive clustering for antecedent parameter tuning and LSE for consequent parameter tuning) by using some real datasets. According to experimental results, the use of proposed approach leads to very low training and testing time with good misclassification rate.

  20. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  1. The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Training and Human Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Queirolo,A.

    2008-06-13

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) priority of training and human resources is aimed at providing the Department of Safeguards with an appropriate mixture of regular staff and extrabudgetary experts who are qualified to meet the IAEA's technical needs and to provide personnel with appropriate instruction to improve the technical basis and specific skills needed to perform their job functions. The equipment and methods used in inspection activities are unique, complex, and evolving. New and experienced safeguards inspectors need timely and effective training to perform required tasks and to learn new skills prescribed by new safeguards policies or agreements. The role of the inspector has changed from that of strictly an accountant to include that of a detective. New safeguards procedures are being instituted, and therefore, experienced inspectors must be educated on these new procedures. The USSP also recognizes the need for training safeguards support staff, particularly those who maintain and service safeguards equipment (SGTS), and those who perform information collection and analysis (SGIM). The USSP is committed to supporting the IAEA with training to ensure the effectiveness of all staff members and will continue to offer its assistance in the development and delivery of basic, refresher, and advanced training courses. This paper will discuss the USSP ongoing support in the area of training and IAEA staffing.

  2. 78 FR 4135 - Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Training Mission and Mission Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Support Activities at Fort Campbell, KY AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Intent... Fort Campbell, Kentucky (portions of Fort Campbell are also located in Tennessee). The PEIS is being... Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The PEIS will assess range construction, associated training and...

  3. Active training paradigm for motor imagery BCI.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Zhang, Liqing

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) allows the use of brain activities for people to directly communicate with the external world or to control external devices without participation of any peripheral nerves and muscles. Motor imagery is one of the most popular modes in the research field of brain-computer interface. Although motor imagery BCI has some advantages compared with other modes of BCI, such as asynchronization, it is necessary to require training sessions before using it. The performance of trained BCI system depends on the quality of training samples or the subject engagement. In order to improve training effect and decrease training time, we proposed a new paradigm where subjects participated in training more actively than in the traditional paradigm. In the traditional paradigm, a cue (to indicate what kind of motor imagery should be imagined during the current trial) is given to the subject at the beginning of a trial or during a trial, and this cue is also used as a label for this trial. It is usually assumed that labels for trials are accurate in the traditional paradigm, although subjects may not have performed the required or correct kind of motor imagery, and trials may thus be mislabeled. And then those mislabeled trials give rise to interference during model training. In our proposed paradigm, the subject is required to reconfirm the label and can correct the label when necessary. This active training paradigm may generate better training samples with fewer inconsistent labels because it overcomes mistakes when subject's motor imagination does not match the given cues. The experiments confirm that our proposed paradigm achieves better performance; the improvement is significant according to statistical analysis.

  4. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis—A Randomised, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Tallner, Alexander; Streber, René; Hentschke, Christian; Morgott, Marc; Geidl, Wolfgang; Mäurer, Mathias; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training) for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week) and strength training (2×/week) intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003), knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015)), peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039), and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001) after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support. PMID:27706046

  5. GUSTO (Gateway User Support and Training Office): Training Tailored to User Needs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    A1 81 105 C, GUSTO : Training Tailored to User Needs Marjorie E. Powell JL1 41987). May 1987 D.. efense T:.* echnical nformation C enter...address those issues, and GUSTO will continue to actively provide the needed service. %% 4..:- -4.. 𔃾 4. I 0lEU IY LASSIIrlA|NO Tt BG[ *’, 4 9...o -.- - - -%,.-’, % ’- - - ,. . ’ - .. , -.. .. , .. , GUSTO : Training Tailored to Users Needs Marjorie E. Powell May 1987 Defense Technical

  6. The Effect of Counselling-Based Training on Online Peer Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekka, Foteini; Efstathiou, Giorgos; Kalantzi-Azizi, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the impact of counselling-based training on online peer support by comparing the interventions of trained peer supporters as opposed to non-trained peer supporters. Two independent raters analysed 746 support posts published during a period of one year at the "Student to Student" online peer…

  7. Harmonizing and supporting infection control training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Brusaferro, S; Arnoldo, L; Cattani, G; Fabbro, E; Cookson, B; Gallagher, R; Hartemann, P; Holt, J; Kalenic, S; Popp, W; Privitera, G; Prikazsky, V; Velasco, C; Suetens, C; Varela Santos, C

    2015-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), patient safety, and the harmonization of related policies and programmes are the focus of increasing attention and activity in Europe. Infection control training for healthcare workers (HCWs) is a cornerstone of all patient safety and HCAI prevention and control programmes. In 2009 the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) commissioned an assessment of needs for training in infection control in Europe (TRICE), which showed a substantial increase in commitment to HCAI prevention. On the other hand, it also identified obstacles to the harmonization and promotion of training in infection control and hospital hygiene (IC/HH), mostly due to differences between countries in: (i) the required qualifications of HCWs, particularly nurses; (ii) the available resources; and (iii) the sustainability of IC/HH programmes. In 2013, ECDC published core competencies for infection control and hospital hygiene professionals in the European Union and a new project was launched ['Implementation of a training strategy for infection control in the European Union' (TRICE-IS)] that aimed to: define an agreed methodology and standards for the evaluation of IC/HH courses and training programmes; develop a flexible IC/HH taxonomy; and implement an easily accessible web tool in 'Wiki' format for IC/HH professionals. This paper reviews several aspects of the TRICE and the TRICE-IS projects.

  8. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-01-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  9. A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Treadmill Training and Body Weight Support in Pediatric Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Diane L.; DeJong, Stacey L.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Purpose Given the extensive literature on body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) in adult rehabilitation, a systematic review was undertaken to explore the strength, quality and conclusiveness of the scientific evidence supporting the use of treadmill training and body weight support in those with pediatric motor disabilities. A secondary goal was to ascertain whether sufficient protocol guidelines for BWSTT are as yet available to guide pediatric physical therapy practice. Methods The database search included MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database), Cochrane Library databases, and ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) from January 1, 1980 until May 31, 2008 for all articles that included treadmill training and body weight support alone or in combination for individuals under 21 years of age, with or at risk for having a motor disability. We identified 277 unique articles from which 29 met all inclusion criteria Results Efficacy of treadmill training in accelerating walking development in Down syndrome has been well-demonstrated. Evidence supporting the efficacy or effectiveness of BWSTT in pediatric practice for improving gait impairments and level of activity and participation in those with cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, and other central nervous system disorders remains insufficient even though many studies noted positive, yet small, effects. Increased use of randomized designs, studies with treadmill training only groups, and dosage studies are needed before practice guidelines can be formulated. Neural changes in response to training warrant greater exploration, especially given the capacity for change in developing nervous systems. Discussion and Conclusion Large scale controlled trials are critically needed to support the use of BWSTT in specific pediatric patient sub-groups and to define optimal protocol parameters. PMID:19265768

  10. Tribal Training Support for the Community and Tribal Air Quality Programs - Closed Announcement FY 2016

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tribal Training Support for the Community and Tribal Air Quality Programs request for applications for FY 2016. Training and technical support to tribal governments seeking develop and establish air quality management programs for tribal lands.

  11. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    climate-sensitive decisions. Course evaluation survey collected 20 responses and indicated a high level of satisfaction. Valuable written comments offered an input for further improvement of the training services. The course offers a prototype for the conduct of training activities developed in partnership with climate information providers and the intended user group(s), in this case the California DWR.

  12. Information in Support of Population Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    As part of UNESCO's World Population Year, information services in support of population programs are explained and listed. The information system of the International Planned Parenthood Federation is described and the management of population literature discussed. Information needs of population workers and special aspects of the training and…

  13. 15 CFR 917.42 - Categories of support available for the conducting of Sea Grant activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... have substantial strength in the three basic Sea Grant activities: research, education and training... generally for a single item of research, education and training, or advisory service, but may be renewed... may be in research, education, training, or advisory services. Support for a project is made to...

  14. Guide to good practices for line and training manager activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide direction for line and training managers in carrying out their responsibilities for training and qualifying personnel and to verify that existing training activities are effective.

  15. Understanding the Initial Impact of Early Support and Key Working Training through the Voices of Trainers, Training Participants, and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brito, Ana Teresa; Lindsay, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    An exploratory study is reported of the delivery of the Early Support and Key Working (ES&KW) training program in England for multiagency professionals and parents. This qualitative study examined how ES&KW training principles and content relate to contemporary pillars in early childhood intervention; how this training is structured to…

  16. A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-25

    and managers need to allow the time to train their personnel. • Training is critical to the underpinnings of a good PSM. Experience and training go...Running head: PRODUCT SUPPORT MANAGER (PSM) TRAINING 1 A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training John C...presented to the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) for partial fulfillment of the academic requirements for the Army’s Senior Service College

  17. Activity recognition with smartphone support.

    PubMed

    Guiry, John J; van de Ven, Pepijn; Nelson, John; Warmerdam, Lisanne; Riper, Heleen

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the authors describe a method of accurately detecting human activity using a smartphone accelerometer paired with a dedicated chest sensor. The design, implementation, testing and validation of a custom mobility classifier are also presented. Offline analysis was carried out to compare this custom classifier to de-facto machine learning algorithms, including C4.5, CART, SVM, Multi-Layer Perceptrons, and Naïve Bayes. A series of trials were carried out in Ireland, initially involving N=6 individuals to test the feasibility of the system, before a final trial with N=24 subjects took place in the Netherlands. The protocol used and analysis of 1165min of recorded activities from these trials are described in detail in this paper. Analysis of collected data indicate that accelerometers placed in these locations, are capable of recognizing activities including sitting, standing, lying, walking, running and cycling with accuracies as high as 98%.

  18. Policy approach to nutrition and physical activity education in health care professional training1234

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Lisel; Zatz, Laura Y

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key risk factors for a host of today's most prevalent and costly chronic conditions, such as obesity and diabetes; yet, health care providers are not adequately trained to educate patients on the components of a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this article is to underscore the need for improved nutrition and physical activity training among health care professionals and to explore opportunities for how policy can help support a shift in training. We first identify key barriers to sufficient training in nutrition and physical activity. Then, we provide an overview of how recent changes in the government and institutional policy environment are supporting a shift toward prevention in our health care system and creating an even greater need for improved training of health care professionals in nutrition and physical activity. Last, we outline recommendations for additional policy changes that could drive enhanced training for health care professionals and recommend future directions in research. PMID:24646822

  19. Policy approach to nutrition and physical activity education in health care professional training.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew D; Loy, Lisel; Zatz, Laura Y

    2014-05-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key risk factors for a host of today's most prevalent and costly chronic conditions, such as obesity and diabetes; yet, health care providers are not adequately trained to educate patients on the components of a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this article is to underscore the need for improved nutrition and physical activity training among health care professionals and to explore opportunities for how policy can help support a shift in training. We first identify key barriers to sufficient training in nutrition and physical activity. Then, we provide an overview of how recent changes in the government and institutional policy environment are supporting a shift toward prevention in our health care system and creating an even greater need for improved training of health care professionals in nutrition and physical activity. Last, we outline recommendations for additional policy changes that could drive enhanced training for health care professionals and recommend future directions in research.

  20. The development and assessment of behavioural markers to support counter-IED training.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Jim; Leggatt, Andrew; Campbell, James

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the method used to develop and test a checklist of behavioural markers designed to support UK military forces during Counter-Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) training. IEDs represent a significant threat to UK and allied forces. Effective C-IED procedures and techniques are central to reducing risk to life in this safety critical role. Behavioural markers have been developed to characterise and assess non-technical skills which have been shown to be important in maintaining high performance in other safety critical domains. The aims of this study were two-fold. Firstly to develop a method which could be used to capture and assess operationally relevant behavioural markers for use in C-IED training relating primarily to non-technical skills. Secondly, to test the user acceptance of the behavioural marker checklist during military training activities. Through engagement with military subject matter experts, operationally relevant and observable behaviours seen in C-IED training have been identified and their links to stronger and weaker performance have been established. Using a card-sort technique, the content validity of each of the markers was assessed in addition to their detectability in an operational context. Following this assessment, a selection of the most operationally relevant and detectable behaviours were assimilated into a checklist and this checklist was tested in C-IED training activities. The results of the study show that the method used was effective in generating and assessing the behavioural markers using military subject matter experts. The study also broadly supports the utility and user-acceptance of the use of behavioural markers during training activities. The checklist developed using this methodology will provide those responsible for delivering instruction in C-IED techniques and procedures with a straightforward process for identifying good and poor performance with respect to non-technical skills. In addition

  1. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... remedial education, GED, training in the primary language of persons with limited English-speaking proficiency, or English-as-a-second-language training. (b) On-the-job training. (1) On-the-job training...

  2. Training support staff to embed teaching within natural routines of young children with disabilities in an inclusive preschool.

    PubMed

    Schepis, M M; Reid, D H; Ownbey, J; Parsons, M B

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a program for training 4 support staff to embed instruction within the existing activities of 5 children with disabilities in an inclusive preschool. The program involved classroom-based instruction, role playing, and feedback regarding how to effectively prompt, correct, and reinforce child behavior. Descriptions of naturally occurring teaching opportunities in which to use the teaching skills were also provided. Following classroom training, brief on-the-job training was provided to each staff member, followed by on-the-job feedback. Results indicated that each staff member increased her use of correct teaching procedures when training was implemented. Improvements in child performance accompanied each application of the staff training program. Results are discussed in terms of using effective staff training as one means of increasing the use of recommended intervention procedures in inclusive settings. Areas for future research could focus on training staff to embed other types of recommended practices within typical preschool routines involving children with disabilities.

  3. Enhancing Job-Site Training of Supported Workers with Autism: A Reemphasis on Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattimore, L. Perry; Parsons, Marsha B.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2006-01-01

    Currently recommended practice in supported work emphasizes training job skills to workers with severe disabilities while on the job. Early behavioral research indicated that skills needed in natural environments could also be trained in simulated settings. We compared job-site plus simulation training for teaching job skills to supported workers…

  4. Mentoring, training and support to global health innovators: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-06-28

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated InnovationTM approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed.

  5. Can Massively Multiplayer Online Gaming Environments Support Team Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Debra L.; Menaker, Ellen S.

    2008-01-01

    Instructional games are created when training is deliberately added to a gaming environment or when gaming aspects are deliberately incorporated into training. One type of game that is currently attracting the attention of the education and training field is the massively multiplayer online game (MMOG). Because evidence about learning outcomes…

  6. The right mix to support electronic medical record training: classroom computer-based training and blended learning.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christina L

    2008-01-01

    Staff development plays a crucial role in supporting clinicians to adapt to the ever changing technological advances in the healthcare setting. The quest to support staff in the implementation and ongoing optimization of an electronic medical record (EMR) led these staff development educators to computer based training and a blended learning approach building upon the traditional anchor of classroom learning and the advantages of computer-based training.

  7. One Health research and training and government support for One Health in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Joanna S.; Dahal, Rojan; Kakkar, Manish; Debnath, Nitish; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dorjee, Sithar; Naeem, Khalid; Wijayathilaka, Tikiri; Sharma, Barun Kumar; Maidanwal, Nasir; Halimi, Asmatullah; Kim, Eunmi; Chatterjee, Pranab; Devleesschauwer, Brecht

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Considerable advocacy, funding, training, and technical support have been provided to South Asian countries to strengthen One Health (OH) collaborative approaches for controlling diseases with global human pandemic potential since the early 2000s. It is essential that the OH approach continues to be strengthened given South Asia is a hot spot for emerging and endemic zoonotic diseases. The objectives of this article are to describe OH research and training and capacity building activities and the important developments in government support for OH in these countries to identify current achievements and gaps. Materials and methods A landscape analysis of OH research, training, and government support in South Asia was generated by searching peer-reviewed and grey literature for OH research publications and reports, a questionnaire survey of people potentially engaged in OH research in South Asia and the authors’ professional networks. Results Only a small proportion of zoonotic disease research conducted in South Asia can be described as truly OH, with a significant lack of OH policy-relevant research. A small number of multisectoral OH research and OH capacity building programmes were conducted in the region. The governments of Bangladesh and Bhutan have established operational OH strategies, with variable progress institutionalising OH in other countries. Identified gaps were a lack of useful scientific information and of a collaborative culture for formulating and implementing integrated zoonotic disease control policies and the need for ongoing support for transdisciplinary OH research and policy-relevant capacity building programmes. Discussion Overall we found a very small number of truly OH research and capacity building programmes in South Asia. Even though significant progress has been made in institutionalising OH in some South Asian countries, further behavioural, attitudinal, and institutional changes are required to strengthen OH research

  8. Assessment of Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) Training Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    deploying to theater. Advanced Individual Home station Sickle Sticks Training Support to Developmental Effort TBD TBD TBD Slingshot Training Support... Cell Training (EAC) Exploitation Analysis Center training for 23 Teams (92 Marine Corps personnel) at the National Forensic Science Technology

  9. The Structure and Function of Group Training Companies in Australia. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, N.; Macdonald, Duncan; Toner, Phillip; Turner, Cathy

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Group Training in Australia: A Study of Group Training Organisations and Host Employers", and is an added resource for further information. [Full Report available at ED493992.] Support Document 2, titled " Group Training and Host Employers in…

  10. Supporting Quality in Vocational Training through Networking. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyfried, Erwin; Kohlmeyer, Klaus; Furth-Riedesser, Rafael

    The extent to which network cooperation between the general education system, vocational training institutions, business enterprises, social partners, and political decision makers affects quality development in vocational training was examined through a literature review and synthesis of eight case studies in the following seven European…

  11. Team Training Shell: A Groupware, Multimedia-Supported Application Generator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, D.; And Others

    Since real-life situations of trauma training are practically not available, a proper substitute must take advantage of the most recent advents in multimedia and groupware technologies. Multimedia visualization is of particular importance in trauma training, as the most crucial step of the patient's initial assessment is largely based on a surface…

  12. Training Paraprofessionals to Support Students with Disabilities: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Virginia L.; Smith, Carol G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to describe intervention research studies in which paraprofessionals received training applicable to student with disabilities. Thirty studies were systematically reviewed to identify (a) characteristics of study participants and settings, (b) characteristics of paraprofessional training and…

  13. The Effect of Performance Support and Training as Performance Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Frank; Klein, James D.

    2008-01-01

    For decades, training has been one of the most common interventions used by organizations to improve the performance of their employees and teach them new ideas and skills. But owing to the cost of developing and delivering training, organizations have adopted alternative ways to enable employee performance while reducing the cost and minimizing…

  14. Modelling the Reasons for Training Choices: Technical Paper. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Hill, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This report provides the technical details on the modelling aspects of identifying significant drivers for the reasons for using certain types of training and for the choice of training types. The employed data is from the 2005 Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET system (SEUV). The data has previously been analysed in NCVER (2006). This…

  15. MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS DURING SUSPENSION TRAINING EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sean; Ruffin, Elise; Brewer, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Suspension training (ST) has been utilized over exercises performed on a stable surface to train multiple muscle groups simultaneously to increase muscle activation and joint stability. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether ST augments muscle activation compared to similar exercises performed on a stable surface. Study Design Cross-sectional study Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (male: 16; women: 9; BMI: 23.50 ± 2.48 kg/m2) had 16 pre-amplified wireless surface EMG electrodes placed bilaterally on: the pectoralis major (PM), middle deltoid (MD), serratus anterior (SA), obliques (OB), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), erector spinae (ES), and middle trapezius/rhomboids (MT). Each participant performed reference isometric exercises (Sorensen test, push-up, sit-up, and inverted row) to establish a baseline muscle contraction. Muscle activation was assessed during the following exercises: ST bridge, ST push-up, ST inverted row, ST plank, floor bridge, floor push-up, floor row, and floor plank. The root mean square (RMS) of each side for every muscle was averaged for data analysis. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) for each exercise with post-hoc comparisons were performed to compare muscle activation between each ST exercise and its stable surface counterpart. Results MANOVAs for all exercise comparisons showed statistically significant greater muscle activation in at least one muscle group during the ST condition. Post-hoc analyses revealed a statistically significant increase in muscle activation for the following muscles during the plank: OB (p = 0.021); Push-up: PM (p = 0.002), RA (p<0.0001), OB (p = 0.019), MT (p<0.0001), and ES (p = 0.006); Row: MD (p = 0.016), RA (p = 0.059), and OB (p = 0.027); and Bridge: RA (p = 0.013) and ES (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing ST exercises increases muscle activation of selected muscles when compared to exercises performed on a stable surface. Level of

  16. A Design Architecture for an Integrated Training System Decision Support System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    integration of AETIS within the TRADOC Decision Support System ( TDSS ). Current plans are to replace AETIS with the Training Development Workload Management...implementation by FY 91. This initiative will create a TDWMS database as an integrated system within the Training Module of the TDSS . It will replace the...Systems Approach to Training as a submodule to the TDSS TRAMOD. A fully integrated ASAT, combining collective and individual training development, will

  17. Transition, Training, and Assessment of Multispectral Composite Imagery in Support of the NWS Aviation Forecast Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Leroy, Anita; Schultz, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program works closely with NOAA/NWS weather forecasters to transition unique satellite data and capabilities into operations in order to assist with nowcasting and short-term forecasting issues. Several multispectral composite imagery (i.e. RGB) products were introduced to users in the early 2000s to support hydrometeorology and aviation challenges as well as incident support. These activities lead to SPoRT collaboration with the GOES-R Proving Ground efforts where instruments such as MODIS (Aqua, Terra) and S-NPP/VIIRS imagers began to be used as near-realtime proxies to future capabilities of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). One of the composite imagery products introduced to users was the Night-time Microphysics RGB, originally developed by EUMETSAT. SPoRT worked to transition this imagery to NWS users, provide region-specific training, and assess the impact of the imagery to aviation forecast needs. This presentation discusses the method used to interact with users to address specific aviation forecast challenges, including training activities undertaken to prepare for a product assessment. Users who assessed the multispectral imagery ranged from southern U.S. inland and coastal NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs), to those in the Rocky Mountain Front Range region and West Coast, as well as highlatitude forecasters of Alaska. These user-based assessments were documented and shared with the satellite community to support product developers and the broad users of new generation satellite data.

  18. [Multimedia educational material. A tool of support to the Otolaryngology training].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Marcos, C A; Llorente Pendás, J L; Martínez Nistal, A; Lana Fernández, A; Granda González, E; Sampedro Nuño, A; Suárez Nieto, C

    2005-01-01

    Due to multimedia technologies, the medical information has taken an extraordinary growing. Nevertheless, the education at University will turn out to be a more complex pedagogic process. We present a multimedia educational material (MEM), developed as an online course to "Seminars of Otolaryngology", and available free at the University website. MEM was designed and edited by, ENT teachers, pedagogues, and image and computer experts. It has been structured as a series of modules that integrate texts, images, movie clips, video, audio and animations. The schematic presentation stands out with progressive access to the topics through internal and external links. The pedagogic resources give additional support by learning objectives, glossary, references, index and searcher. Finally, the activities and instrumental simulations complete the training in diagnosis and treatment. The MEM is an interactive useful software program for medical training in Otolaryngology, without avoiding the key figure of the teacher.

  19. Program Activity/Training Plans. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Detailed operational guidelines, training objectives, and learning activities are provided for the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II), which are designed to train students for immediate employment. The first of four reports covers Los Angeles Southwest College's computer programming trainee…

  20. Developing Climate Resilience Toolkit Decision Support Training Sectio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Herring, D.; Keck, J.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) is a Federal government effort to address the U.S. President's Climate Action Plan and Executive Order for Climate Preparedness. The toolkit will provide access to tools and products useful for climate-sensitive decision making. To optimize the user experience, the toolkit will also provide access to training materials. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been building a climate training capability for 15 years. The target audience for the training has historically been mainly NOAA staff with some modified training programs for external users and stakeholders. NOAA is now using this climate training capacity for the CRT. To organize the CRT training section, we collaborated with the Association of Climate Change Officers to determine the best strategy and identified four additional complimentary skills needed for successful decision making: climate literacy, environmental literacy, risk assessment and management, and strategic execution and monitoring. Developing the climate literacy skills requires knowledge of climate variability and change, as well as an introduction to the suite of available products and services. For the development of an environmental literacy category, specific topics needed include knowledge of climate impacts on specific environmental systems. Climate risk assessment and management introduces a process for decision making and provides knowledge on communication of climate information and integration of climate information in planning processes. The strategic execution and monitoring category provides information on use of NOAA climate products, services, and partnership opportunities for decision making. In order to use the existing training modules, it was necessary to assess their level of complexity, catalog them, and develop guidance for users on a curriculum to take advantage of the training resources to enhance their learning experience. With the development of this CRT

  1. [On hi-tech cardiologic care model in medical support of train operation safety].

    PubMed

    Pfaf, V F; Gorokhova, S G; Kotenko, V A

    2015-01-01

    The article covers hi-tech cardiologic care model in system of medical support of train operation safety, with definition of structure blocks in this model. Discussion covers peculiarities of the model functioning in comparison with the governmental system of hi-tech medical care, including its closed cycle principle characteristics, wide patients selection among railway workers, continuous and close cooperation between various medical speicalities, with active involvement of occupational fitness specialists (medical examination committees of various levels, including Central Medical Examination Committee), major extent of interventional rentgenosurgical technologies applied in diseases without significant functional failure.

  2. DoD-Supported Overseas Training Rotations in Tropical Medicine and Global Health, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Hickey, Patrick W; Coldren, Rodney L; Korman, Amy K; Keep, Lisa W; DeFraites, Robert F; Smith, Maria; Mancuso, Luke J; Sanchez, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    In 1999, the Department of Defense developed a tropical medicine training program (TMTP) to train military physicians, medical students, and scientists in performing surveillance activities in an overseas environment. This review describes the competencies, educational approach, program participants, institutional collaborations, and process outcomes of the TMTP from 2000 to 2015. TMTP-sponsored rotations addressed a wide variety of interdisciplinary competencies, many of which have military-unique applications. Rotations consisted of both didactic and experiential (overseas) components. The program provided 282 rotations for 260 trainees between 2006 and 2015, the years for which data were available. The Department of Defense accrues benefits from this training program in three main ways: (1) building a cadre of health care professionals who will go on to work at the overseas research laboratories, (2) supporting force health protection and readiness through experiential tropical medicine training, and (3) engaging in global health collaborations and partnerships. The primary challenges include funding, health and security, trainee and site heterogeneity, supervision, trainee engagement, and burden on the host institution. The program will continue to focus on improvement in these areas, with special attention to trainee preparation, communication with both trainees and host sites, and increasing reciprocity with host sites and their faculty.

  3. Marketing defibrillation training programs and bystander intervention support.

    PubMed

    Sneath, Julie Z; Lacey, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study identifies perceptions of and participation in resuscitation training programs, and bystanders' willingness to resuscitate cardiac arrest victims. While most of the study's participants greatly appreciate the importance of saving someone's life, many indicated that they did not feel comfortable assuming this role. The findings also demonstrate there is a relationship between type of victim and bystanders' willingness to intervene. Yet, bystander intervention discomfort can be overcome with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation training, particularly when the victim is a coworker or stranger. Further implications of these findings are discussed and modifications to public access defibrillation (PAD) training programs' strategy and communications are proposed.

  4. Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT) infrastructure support under USDOE/MEIAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, A.K.; Rojeski, P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    As one of the several institutions of higher education, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University at Greensboro has received support from the office of Minority Education Institution Assistance Program (MEIAP) of the US Department of Energy primarily to provide infrastructure support to promote and enhance interdisciplinary energy-related research. In this effort, the university was authorized to prepare a plan to create a Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT), which was initiated on September 30, 1987. The goals and objectives for CERT are as specified below: (1) To encourage research by the faculty in many academic disciplines and to enhance their success in finding and obtaining funds for interdisciplinary and multi-school research. (2) To enhance students` energy education with increased opportunities for: theoretical and practical contact with energy issues and technologies; new courses and improved course content; internships and graduate funding; and ability and desire to pursue careers in energy field. (3) To establish training and service programs for off-campus constituents in energy issues, use, and management. (4) To develop cooperative relationships with industry, businesses, universities, and other private and professional organizations and with the State Energy Office. (5) To cooperate in establishing communications and collaborative research projects with various national research laboratories and other federal agencies. (6) To develop a permanent university infrastructure for energy research, training, and community service. Summaries of activities from September, 1992 to September, 1993 are presented.

  5. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    PubMed

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging.

  6. Training Analyses Supporting the Land Warrior and Ground Soldier Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    reactions reflected these weaknesses in that Soldier usage and proficiency ratings of many LW tasks and skills were low. Training on LW system...company in a single classroom), the trainers were unable to adapt to the diversity in learning rates and military experience in the target population...impacts within the target population. Training in NET was not sufficient to instill confidence in leaders. Leaders’ ratings of their confidence in the

  7. Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a multi-year, worldwide, indefinite quantity contract by which the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Global Bureau Center for Human Capacity (G/HCD) can work to achieve four objectives: (1) improve the quality, efficiency, access, and equity of education, particularly basic…

  8. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  9. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability.

  10. Development of rehabilitation training support system for occupational therapy of upper limb motor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Hirose, Akinori; Uno, Takashi; Uchid, Masaki; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new rehabilitation training support system for upper limbs. The proposed system enables therapists to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training, to easily change the load of resistance of training and to easily develop a new training program suitable for the subjects. For this purpose we develop control algorithms of training programs in the 3D force display robot. The 3D force display robot has parallel link mechanism with three motors. The control algorithm simulating sanding training is developed for the 3D force display robot. Moreover the teaching/training function algorithm is developed. It enables the therapists to easily make training trajectory suitable for subject's condition. The effectiveness of the developed control algorithms is verified by experiments.

  11. Training with computer-supported motor imagery in post-stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, A; Morganti, F; Walker, R; Meneghini, A; Alcaniz, M; Lozano, J A; Montesa, J; Gil, J A; Riva, G

    2004-06-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that motor imagery (the mental simulation of a motor act within working memory) is associated with subliminal activation of the motor system. This observation has led to the hypothesis that cortical activation during motor imagery may affect the acquisition of specific motor skills and help the recovery of motor function. In this paper, we describe a clinical protocol in which we use interactive tools to stimulate motor imagery in hemiplegic stroke patients, thereby helping them to recover lost motor function. The protocol consists of an inpatient and an outpatient phase, combining physical and mental practice. In the inpatient phase, patients are trained in a laboratory setting, using a custom-made interactive workbench (VR Mirror). After discharge, patients use a portable device to guide mental and physical practice in a home setting. The proposed strategy is based on the hypotheses that: (a) combined physical and mental practice can make a cost-effective contribution to the rehabilitation of stroke patients, (b) effective mental practice is not possible without some form of support, from a therapist (as in our inpatient phase) or from technology (as in the outpatient phase), (c) the inclusion of an outpatient phase will allow the patient to practice more often than would otherwise be possible, therefore increasing the speed and/or effectiveness of learning, and (d) the use of interactive technology will reduce the patient's need for skilled support, therefore improving the cost-effectiveness of training.

  12. Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustina, C.; Fajri, P. N.; Fathoni, F.; Gusti, T. P.; Harifa, A. C.; Hendra, Y.; Hertanti, D. R.; Lusiana, N.; Rohmat, F. I.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Pandjaitan, N.; Santoso, R.; Suharyanto, A.

    2013-12-01

    In hydrologic science and engineering, one challenge is establishing a common framework for discussion among workers from different disciplines. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, nine current or recent graduate students from four Indonesian universities participated in a week of training activities during June 2013. Students had backgrounds in agricultural engineering, civil and environmental engineering, water resources engineering, natural resources management, and soil science. Professors leading the training, which was based at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) in west Java, included an agricultural engineer, civil engineers, and geologists. Activities in surface-water hydrology included geomorphic assessment of streams (measuring slope, cross-section, and bed-clast size) and gauging stream flow (wading with top-setting rods and a current meter for a large stream, and using a bucket and stopwatch for a small stream). Groundwater-hydrology activities included measuring depth to water in wells, conducting a pumping test with an observation well, and performing vertical electrical soundings to infer hydrostratigraphy. Students also performed relatively simple water-quality measurements (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and alkalinity) in streams, wells, and springs. The group analyzed data with commercially-available software such as AQTESOLV for well hydraulics, freeware such as the U.S. Geological Survey alkalinity calculator, and Excel spreadsheets. Results were discussed in the context of landscape position, lithology, and land use.

  13. Supporting Vocational Education and Training in Europe: The Bruges Communique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Union, 2011

    2011-01-01

    On 7 December 2010, European Ministers for vocational education and training (VET), the European Social Partners and the European Commission adopted the Bruges Communique on enhanced European cooperation in VET for 2011-2020. The Communique defines common objectives for 2020 and an action plan for the coming years, combining national measures with…

  14. Organizing for Effective Training Support in an MIS Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Stanford E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a management information system (MIS) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) was adapted to ensure adequate training to accompany the development of computer applications. Highlights include semantic differences; user needs; time and budget constraints; and problems between users and programmers, including examples.…

  15. Australian Small Business Participation in Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Beverley; Walker, Elizabeth; Brown, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of on-line training by small businesses in Australia. It explores the relationship between the owners acceptance and use of the Internet, and their current participation in training opportunities. Design/Methodology/Approach: A sample of small businesses which had participated in an…

  16. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive response to prolonged exercise training.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Tipton, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the individual athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the impact of dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Proper nutritional coaching should be applied throughout both training and competition, each with their specific requirements regarding nutrient provision. Such dietary support will improve exercise training efficiency and, as such, further increase performance capacity. Here, we provide an overview on the properties of various nutritional interventions that may be useful to support the adaptive response to exercise training and competition and, as such, to augment exercise training efficiency.

  17. Higher-Level Vocational Education and Training Qualifications: Their Importance in Today's Training Market. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, S.; Bateman, A.; Delaney, B.; Dyson, C.

    2007-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Higher-Level Vocational Education and Training Qualifications: Their Importance in Today's Training Market" [ED499709], and is an added resource for further information. This document contains information regarding: (1) The Australian Qualifications…

  18. Planning and Development of Lab Training Activities for Powerline Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, A.; Hatziprokopiou, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the planning and development of student training and activities for the Powerline Communications Laboratory at the Technical Education Institute (TEI), Patras, Greece. Powerline communications is currently an active area of research and development that combines three separate specializations from the standard training of…

  19. Supporting Training Strategies for Brigade Combat Teams Using Future Combat Systems (FCS) Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    of Acronyms ix xl Supporting Training Strategies for BCTs Using FCS Technologies SOSCOE System-of-Systems Common Operating Environment SOSO...will remain the keystone to maneuver BCT training in the 2010 to 2016 timeframe. In fact, we see a substantially increased need for live training...operational con- cepts. For example, FM 3-0, Operations, which establishes the Army’s keystone doctrine for full-spectrum operations, allocates a

  20. Design Evolution of a Fighter Training Scheduling Decision Support System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Holloman schedule includes classroom lecture, simulator training, and flying sorties. Second, cyclical scheduling literature does not consider leave...produces - a road map from blank paper to com- pleted schedule. It outlines the scheduling decision pro- cess using words or concepts and linking words or...questionnaire of multiple - choice, short statement, or open-ended questions should be used throughout the DSS implementation and development. Rating and

  1. A Measurement & Analysis Training Solution Supporting CMMI & Six Sigma Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    product” • Designing an integrated training solution • Illustration(s) © 2004 by Carnegie Mellon University Version 1.0 page 5 Carnegie Mellon S...12207 Score- card EIA 632 ISO 9000 ITIL COBIT PSM GQIM © 2004 by Carnegie Mellon University Version 1.0 page 7 Carnegie Mellon S oftware Engineer ing...several Capability Maturity Models, reflects Crosby’s 5 maturity levels • Focuses on infrastructure and process maturity • Intended for software and

  2. A Performance Support Tool for Cisco Training Program Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Angela D.; Bothra, Jashoda; Sharma, Priya

    2004-01-01

    Performance support systems can play an important role in corporations by managing and allowing distribution of information more easily. These systems run the gamut from simple paper job aids to sophisticated computer- and web-based software applications that support the entire corporate supply chain. According to Gery (1991), a performance…

  3. Depression Care Training Participation: Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria; Ong, Michael; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan Dwight; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective Community Engagement and Planning (CEP) could improve dissemination of depression quality improvement in under-resourced communities; but its effects on provider training participation relative to more standard technical assistance or Resources for Services (RS) are unknown. To compare effects of CEP, which trains networks of healthcare and social-community agencies jointly, and RS, which provides technical support to individual programs, on program and staff-level participation in depression quality improvement trainings. Methods Matched programs from healthcare and social-community programs in two communities were randomized to RS or CEP. Data were from 1622 eligible staff members from 95 enrolled programs. Measures: Primary outcomes: for programs, any staff trained; and for staff, total hours of training. Secondary outcomes: training in specific depression collaborative care components. Results CEP programs relative to RS were more likely to participate in any trainings across sectors (p<.001) and from social-community sectors (p<.001), but not from healthcare. Among staff participating in trainings, CEP relative to RS had greater mean training hours (p<.001) overall and for each depression care component (cognitive behavioral therapy, care management, other trainings, p<.001) except medication management. Conclusions Compared with RS, CEP to implement depression quality improvement increased program and staff training participation overall. CEP had a greater effect on any staff training participation within social-community sectors than RS, but not within healthcare. CEP may be an effective strategy to promote staff participation in depression improvement in under-resourced communities. PMID:25930037

  4. Development of medical engagement training toolkits to support special operations military assistance programs in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Boedeker, Ben H; Boedeker, David; Tate, Charmaine

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Seminar (MEDSEM) is a medical operation that shares culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population based upon a "train the trainer" concept. This work describes the development of a hand washing training toolkit designed to support a MEDSEM action in Afghanistan.

  5. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  6. Achieving Outcomes: A Guide to Interagency Training in Transition and Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Jane M., Ed.; And Others

    This manual aids in developing cross-agency and cross-disciplinary inservice training in the areas of transition and supported employment for moderately and severely disabled individuals. Using a "train-the-trainer" approach, the manual outlines goals and objectives and presents strategies for designing inservice workshops and training…

  7. The Mediating Role of Social Support in the Evaluation of Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvelos, Rita; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Bates, Reid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived content validity, transfer design, the motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer, contribute to the effectiveness of training.…

  8. Volunteer Mentor Training and Support: Three Perspectives Regarding the Knowledge and Abilities Needed for Effective Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in mentoring effectiveness and satisfaction is ensuring that mentor preparation training and ongoing support address needed mentor knowledge and abilities (MKAs). Knowing how to mentor is different from knowing what mentoring involves or knowing mentoring policies and procedures. Ideally, mentor training incorporates both the…

  9. Online Training for Paraeducators to Support the Communication of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Sarah N.; McNaughton, David; Light, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Paraeducators are frequent sources of support for young children with disabilities in early childhood settings. However, they typically have limited training in providing communication opportunities for children with complex communication needs (CCN). The impact was investigated of providing training in a communication interaction strategy to…

  10. A New Pedagogical Design for Geo-Informatics Courses Using an E-Training Support System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldin, Ahmed Sharaf; ElNahry, Alaa H.; Elsayed, Adel; Ibrahim, Rania Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    The current study seeks to introduce a new pedagogical design for geo-informatics courses using an e-training support system. Laurillard's conversational approach based on conceptual representation for both instructor and learner was used to form the framework. As the current study specifically interested in training as a special form for…

  11. Inservice Training: Planning the Programs; The Britt Workshop; School Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meers, Gary; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the steps that should be incorporated into planning for inservice efforts with teachers of handicapped students and presents several models for presenting inservice training for teachers and school support personnel. (LRA)

  12. Parent Training and Parent Support: The Efficacy of a Parent-Focused Parent Training Support Group for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattuso, Jonna L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of parents' participation in a supplemental parent-focused parent education/support group following participation in a pre-existing parent training program. For the purpose of this study, the term "parent" will be used for the child's primary caregiver(s). Parents participated in a…

  13. The Impact of Support at the Workplace on Transfer of Training: A Study of an Indian Manufacturing Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Ragini; Ghosh, Piyali; Rai, Alka; Shukla, Divya

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the individual impacts of two components of support at the workplace, namely, support from peers and supervisor, on transfer of training in a post-training environment. Mediation by motivation to transfer in the relationship of supervisor and peer support with transfer of training has also been examined. Data on 149…

  14. How FOSTER supports training Open Science in the GeoSciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    FOSTER (1) is about promoting and facilitating the adoption of Open Science by the European research community, and fostering compliance with the open access policies set out in Horizon 2020 (H2020). FOSTER aims to reach out and provide training to the wide range of disciplines and countries involved in the European Research Area (ERA) by offering and supporting face-to-face as well as distance training. Different stakeholders, mainly young researchers, are trained to integrate Open Science in their daily workflow, supporting researchers to optimise their research visibility and impact. Strengthening the institutional training capacity is achieved through a train-the-trainers approach. The two-and-half-year project started in February 2014 with identifying, enriching and providing training content on all relevant topics in the area of Open Science. One of the main elements was to support two rounds of trainings, which were conducted during 2014 and 2015, organizing more than 100 training events with around 3000 participants. The presentation will explain the project objectives and results and will look into best practice training examples, among them successful training series in the GeoSciences. The FOSTER portal that now holds a collection of training resources (e.g. slides and PDFs, schedules and design of training events dedicated to different audiences, video captures of complete events) is presented. It provides easy ways to identify learning materials and to create own e-learning courses based on the materials and examples. (1) FOSTER is funded through the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. http://fosteropenscience.eu

  15. Implementation of Active Support in Victoria, Australia: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Bigby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Active support is an effective intervention to support engagement of residents with intellectual disability in group homes. This survey explored resident characteristics of the people supported by organisations implementing active support, the provision of active support, its procedures and systems, and resident engagement in…

  16. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chou P.; Cui, Ding; Chen, Yueh-peng; Lin, Chia-pei; Levine, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that “choristers”, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking), carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (“soloists”) in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons) indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons), that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior. PMID:25610392

  17. Theoretically-Driven Infrastructure for Supporting Healthcare Teams Training at a Military Treatment Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Robert T.; Parodi, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team Resource Center (TRC) at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts a tri-service healthcare teams training course three times annually . The course consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for healthcare professionals. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore the use of simulation technologies for enhancing team training and evaluation. The TRC has adopted theoretical frameworks for evaluating training readiness and efficacy, and is using these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting healthcare teams training and research initiatives at NMCP.

  18. Predicting Antitumor Activity of Peptides by Consensus of Regression Models Trained on a Small Data Sample

    PubMed Central

    Radman, Andreja; Gredičak, Matija; Kopriva, Ivica; Jerić, Ivanka

    2011-01-01

    Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met) with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel) support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM) regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample. PMID:22272081

  19. Autogenic training alters cerebral activation patterns in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Schlamann, Marc; Naglatzki, Ryan; de Greiff, Armin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2010-10-01

    Cerebral activation patterns during the first three auto-suggestive phases of autogenic training (AT) were investigated in relation to perceived experiences. Nineteen volunteers trained in AT and 19 controls were studied with fMRI during the first steps of autogenic training. FMRI revealed activation of the left postcentral areas during AT in those with experience in AT, which also correlated with the level of AT experience. Activation of prefrontal and insular cortex was significantly higher in the group with experience in AT while insular activation was correlated with number years of simple relaxation exercises. Specific activation in subjects experienced in AT may represent a training effect. Furthermore, the correlation of insular activation suggests that these subjects are different from untrained subjects in emotional processing or self-awareness.

  20. Hessian-regularized co-training for social activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Li, Yang; Lin, Xu; Tao, Dacheng; Wang, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Co-training is a major multi-view learning paradigm that alternately trains two classifiers on two distinct views and maximizes the mutual agreement on the two-view unlabeled data. Traditional co-training algorithms usually train a learner on each view separately and then force the learners to be consistent across views. Although many co-trainings have been developed, it is quite possible that a learner will receive erroneous labels for unlabeled data when the other learner has only mediocre accuracy. This usually happens in the first rounds of co-training, when there are only a few labeled examples. As a result, co-training algorithms often have unstable performance. In this paper, Hessian-regularized co-training is proposed to overcome these limitations. Specifically, each Hessian is obtained from a particular view of examples; Hessian regularization is then integrated into the learner training process of each view by penalizing the regression function along the potential manifold. Hessian can properly exploit the local structure of the underlying data manifold. Hessian regularization significantly boosts the generalizability of a classifier, especially when there are a small number of labeled examples and a large number of unlabeled examples. To evaluate the proposed method, extensive experiments were conducted on the unstructured social activity attribute (USAA) dataset for social activity recognition. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms baseline methods, including the traditional co-training and LapCo algorithms.

  1. Hessian-Regularized Co-Training for Social Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Li, Yang; Lin, Xu; Tao, Dacheng; Wang, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Co-training is a major multi-view learning paradigm that alternately trains two classifiers on two distinct views and maximizes the mutual agreement on the two-view unlabeled data. Traditional co-training algorithms usually train a learner on each view separately and then force the learners to be consistent across views. Although many co-trainings have been developed, it is quite possible that a learner will receive erroneous labels for unlabeled data when the other learner has only mediocre accuracy. This usually happens in the first rounds of co-training, when there are only a few labeled examples. As a result, co-training algorithms often have unstable performance. In this paper, Hessian-regularized co-training is proposed to overcome these limitations. Specifically, each Hessian is obtained from a particular view of examples; Hessian regularization is then integrated into the learner training process of each view by penalizing the regression function along the potential manifold. Hessian can properly exploit the local structure of the underlying data manifold. Hessian regularization significantly boosts the generalizability of a classifier, especially when there are a small number of labeled examples and a large number of unlabeled examples. To evaluate the proposed method, extensive experiments were conducted on the unstructured social activity attribute (USAA) dataset for social activity recognition. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms baseline methods, including the traditional co-training and LapCo algorithms. PMID:25259945

  2. Changes in muscle activation after reach training with gravity compensation in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Prange, Gerdienke B; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Hermens, Hermie J; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation game. Before and after training, unsupported reach (assessing maximal distance, joint angles and muscle activity of eight shoulder and elbow muscles) and the Fugl-Meyer assessment were compared. After training, the maximal reach distance improved significantly by 3.5% of arm length, together with increased elbow extension (+9.2°) and increased elbow extensor activity (+68%). In some patients, a reduced cocontraction of biceps and anterior deltoid was also involved, although this was not significant on group level. Improvements in unsupported reach after gravity compensation training in chronic stroke patients with mild to severe hemiparesis were mainly accompanied by increased activation of prime movers at the elbow, although in some patients, improved selective joint control may also have been involved. Gravity compensation seems to be a suitable way to provide active, task-specific treatment, without the need for high-tech devices. Further research on a larger scale, including control groups and combinations of arm support with functional hand training, is essential to enhance the potential of arm support to complement poststroke arm rehabilitation.

  3. Effects of elastic support on the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xibin; Zhou, Tianfeng; Xie, Lijing; Jiao, Li; Liu, Zhibing; Liang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Pei

    2017-03-01

    The reliability and service life of wind turbines are influenced by the complex loading applied on the hub, especially amidst a poor external wind environment. A three-point elastic support, which includes the main bearing and two torque arms, was considered in this study. Based on the flexibilities of the planet carrier and the housing, a coupled dynamic model was developed for a wind turbine drive train. Then, the dynamic behaviors of the drive train for different elastic support parameters were computed and analyzed. Frequency response functions were used to examine how different elastic support parameters influence the dynamic behaviors of the drive train. Results showed that the elastic support parameters considerably influenced the dynamic behaviors of the wind turbine drive train. A large support stiffness of the torque arms decreased the dynamic response of the planet carrier and the main bearing, whereas a large support stiffness of the main bearing decreased the dynamic response of planet carrier while increasing that of the main bearing. The findings of this study provide the foundation for optimizing the elastic support stiffness of the wind turbine drive train.

  4. Training the Mind's Eye: "Brain Movies" Support Comprehension and Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Explicit instruction on the skill of creating mental imagery from text supports reading comprehension and recall. This article shares a strategy for teaching students how to process what they read by comparing mental imagery to "brain movies." It emphasizes choosing appropriate fiction and nonfiction texts to encourage readers to build the skill…

  5. Extravehicular Activity training and hardware design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuot, Pierre J.; Harbaugh, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    Designing hardware that can be successfully operated by EVA astronauts for EVA tasks required to assemble and maintain Space Station Freedom requires a thorough understanding of human factors and of the capabilities and limitations of the space-suited astronaut, as well as of the effect of microgravity environment on the crew member's capabilities and on the overhead associated with EVA. This paper describes various training methods and facilities that are being designed for training EVA astronauts for Space Station assembly and maintenance, taking into account the above discussed factors. Particular attention is given to the user-friendly hardware design for EVA and to recent EVA flight experience.

  6. Active Ageing in a Greying Society: Training for All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessel, Roger

    2008-01-01

    With the ageing of society, policy-makers are aware of the need to retain older workers in employment. Across Europe, lifelong learning is increasingly important. Adults who remain active longer need (re-)training to maintain their productivity. However, vocational training tends to decline with age. The article analyses European employment policy…

  7. Working Memory Training: Improving Intelligence--Changing Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were: to investigate whether training on working memory (WM) could improve fluid intelligence, and to investigate the effects WM training had on neuroelectric (electroencephalography--EEG) and hemodynamic (near-infrared spectroscopy--NIRS) patterns of brain activity. In a parallel group experimental design,…

  8. Effect of support group peer facilitator training programmes on peer facilitator and support group member outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Delisle, Vanessa C; Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Kloda, Lorie A; Boruff, Jill; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Körner, Annett; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Thombs, Brett D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Peer facilitators play an important role in determining the success of many support groups for patients with medical illnesses. However, many facilitators do not receive training for their role and report a number of challenges in fulfilling their responsibilities. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of training and support programmes for peer facilitators of support groups for people with medical illnesses on (1) the competency and self-efficacy of group facilitators and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with support groups among group members. Methods Searches included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases from inception through 8 April 2016; reference list reviews; citation tracking of included articles; and trial registry reviews. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language that evaluated the effects of training programmes for peer facilitators compared with no training or alternative training formats on (1) competency or self-efficacy of peer facilitators, and (2) self-efficacy for disease management, health outcomes and satisfaction with groups of group members. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. Results There were 9757 unique titles/abstracts and 2 full-text publications reviewed. 1 RCT met inclusion criteria. The study evaluated the confidence and self-efficacy of cancer support group facilitators randomised to 4 months access to a website and discussion forum (N=23; low resource) versus website, discussion forum and 2-day training workshop (N=29). There were no significant differences in facilitator confidence (Hedges' g=0.16, 95% CI −0.39 to 0.71) or self-efficacy (Hedges' g=0.31, 95% CI −0.24 to 0.86). Risk of bias was unclear or high for 4 of 6 domains. Conclusions Well-designed and well-conducted, adequately powered trials of peer support group facilitator training

  9. Bridging the gap: supporting translational research careers through an integrated research track within residency training.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Melissa R; Gordon, Joshua A; Pincus, Harold A; Oquendo, Maria A

    2013-06-01

    In the setting of traditional residency training programs, physician-scientists are often limited in their ability to pursue research training goals while meeting clinical training requirements. This creates a gap in research training at a critical developmental stage. In response, Columbia University Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry, in partnership with the New York State Psychiatric Institute, has created a formal Research Track Program (RTP) for psychiatry residents so that interested individuals can maintain their attention on research training during formative residency years. Clinical and research training are integrated through core clinical rotations on research units. With protected research time and clear developmental milestones for each year of training, the RTP allows research track residents to meet both clinical and research training goals while maintaining a healthy work-life balance. In coordination with existing postdoctoral research fellowship programs, research track residents can effectively jump-start fellowship training with advanced course work and consistent, continuous mentorship bridging residency and fellowship years. A key element of the program is its provision of core training in research literacy and extensive research opportunities for all residents, stimulating research interest across the whole residency program. Supported by the National Institutes of Health and a private foundation, this RTP capitalizes on a unique academic-private partnership to address many of the challenges facing physician-scientists. By integrating clinical and research exposures and offering protected research time, careful mentoring, and financial resources, the program aims to further the development of those most poised to establish careers in translational research.

  10. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  11. Relationship between education and training activities and tuberculosis case detection in Fiji, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Delai, M Y; Gounder, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2012-12-21

    Due to concerns about under-reporting of the tuberculosis (TB) case burden in Fiji, efforts have been put into national training, education and awareness activities in the formal health sector and among village health workers, health volunteers and the community since 2010. There has been an absolute increase in TB registrations, and TB case notification rates during the period of training activities in 2010 (21.3 per 100 000 population) and 2011 (23.6/100 000) were significantly increased compared with TB case notification rates in 2008 (12.4/100 000) and 2009 (14.6/100 000), when no training activities took place (P < 0.01). These findings support the use of ongoing training efforts.

  12. Social Support among Nursing Home Residents: Evaluation of a Peer Counselor Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.

    Although research has demonstrated the potentially salutary effects of peer support among older persons, salutary peer support and significant interpersonal bonds are often lacking within the confines of a nursing home. A program was designed to train nursing home residents to serve as peer counselors for newly-admitted residents in an effort to…

  13. Effect of memory impairment on training outcomes in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    UNVERZAGT, FREDERICK W.; KASTEN, LINDA; JOHNSON, KATHY E.; REBOK, GEORGE W.; MARSISKE, MICHAEL; KOEPKE, KATHY MANN; ELIAS, JEFFREY W.; MORRIS, JOHN N.; WILLIS, SHERRY L.; BALL, KARLENE; REXROTH, DANIEL F.; SMITH, DAVID M.; WOLINSKY, FREDRIC D.; TENNSTEDT, SHARON L.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive training improves mental abilities in older adults, but the trainability of persons with memory impairment is unclear. We conducted a subgroup analysis of subjects in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) trial to examine this issue. ACTIVE enrolled 2802 non-demented, community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and older and randomly assigned them to one of four groups: Memory training, reasoning training, speed-of-processing training, or no-contact control. For this study, participants were defined as memory-impaired if baseline Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) sum recall score was 1.5 SD or more below predicted AVLT sum recall score from a regression-derived formula using age, education, ethnicity, and vocabulary from all subjects at baseline. Assessments were taken at baseline (BL), post-test, first annual (A1), and second annual (A2) follow-up. One hundred and ninety-three subjects were defined as memory-impaired and 2580 were memory-normal. Training gain as a function memory status (impaired vs. normal) was compared in a mixed effects model. Results indicated that memory-impaired participants failed to benefit from Memory training but did show normal training gains after reasoning and speed training. Memory function appears to mediate response to structured cognitive interventions in older adults. PMID:17942013

  14. Methane activation on supported transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Jason Ned

    At present, there is considerable interest in utilizing methane more efficiently as both a fuel source and as a starting material for the production of other, more valuable products. However, methane is a very stable molecule with strong C-H bonds that are difficult to break. This makes methane combustion or the formation of carbon-carbon bonds quite difficult. The present work focuses on the use of supported transition metal catalysts as a means of activating methane (i.e. breaking C-H bonds) at low temperatures to produce valuable products or energy. The conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A low temperature (<750 K), direct process to effectively convert methane into higher hydrocarbons would be quite desirable. Such a process is thermodynamically feasible if the reaction is broken up into two separate steps. The first step is the adsorption of methane onto a transition metal catalyst at temperatures above about 600 K to produce a surface carbon species. The second step is a low temperature (<373 K) hydrogenation to convert the carbon species into higher hydrocarbons. T. Koerts et al. have pursued this approach by dissociatively absorbing methane onto silica supported transition metal catalysts at temperatures ranging between 573 K and 773 K. The result was a surface carbonaceous species and hydrogen. In the second step, the carbonaceous intermediates produced small alkanes upon hydrogenation around 373 K. A maximum yield to higher hydrocarbons of 13% was obtained on a ruthenium catalyst. The present study was conducted to further investigate the nature of the carbonaceous species reported by Koerts. Methane combustion. This investigation was conducted in an effort to better understand the mechanism of methane combustion on Pd catalysts. In the first part of this study, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) was used to investigate the oxidation and reduction dynamics of a 10 wt% Pd/ZrOsb2 catalyst used for methane combustion. TPR experiments indicate

  15. Association of Parent and Peer Support with Adolescent Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Rodgers, Miki W.; Sallis, James F.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the association between social support and adolescent physical activity when assessing physical activity using different methods and when separating social support into parent and peer support. Self-report and accelerometer data indicated that parent and peer support significantly correlated with physical activity. Perceived social…

  16. Training initiatives within the AFHSC-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System: support for IHR (2005)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Training is a key component of building capacity for public health surveillance and response, but has often been difficult to quantify. During fiscal 2009, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (AFHSC-GEIS) supported 18 partner organizations in conducting 123 training initiatives in 40 countries for 3,130 U.S. military, civilian and host-country personnel. The training assisted with supporting compliance with International Health Regulations, IHR (2005). Training activities in pandemic preparedness, outbreak investigation and response, emerging infectious disease (EID) surveillance and pathogen diagnostic techniques were expanded significantly. By engaging local health and other government officials and civilian institutions, the U.S. military’s role as a key stakeholder in global public health has been strengthened and has contributed to EID-related surveillance, research and capacity-building initiatives specified elsewhere in this issue. Public health and emerging infections surveillance training accomplished by AFHSC-GEIS and its Department of Defense (DoD) partners during fiscal 2009 will be tabulated and described. PMID:21388565

  17. Retention of Advanced Cardiac Life Support Knowledge and Skills Following High-Fidelity Mannequin Simulation Training

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sanchita; Finn, Laura A.; Cawley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess pharmacy students’ ability to retain advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) knowledge and skills within 120 days of previous high-fidelity mannequin simulation training. Design. Students were randomly assigned to rapid response teams of 5-6. Skills in ACLS and mannequin survival were compared between teams some members of which had simulation training 120 days earlier and teams who had not had previous training. Assessment. A checklist was used to record and assess performance in the simulations. Teams with previous simulation training (n=10) demonstrated numerical superiority to teams without previous training (n=12) for 6 out of 8 (75%) ACLS skills observed, including time calculating accurate vasopressor infusion rate (83 sec vs 113 sec; p=0.01). Mannequin survival was 37% higher for teams who had previous simulation training, but this result was not significant (70% vs 33%; p=0.20). Conclusion. Teams with students who had previous simulation training demonstrated numerical superiority in ACLS knowledge and skill retention within 120 days of previous training compared to those who had no previous training. Future studies are needed to add to the current evidence of pharmacy students’ and practicing pharmacists’ ACLS knowledge and skill retention. PMID:25741028

  18. Instructional games and activities for criticality safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, B.; McBride, J. )

    1993-01-01

    During the past several years, the Training and Management Systems Division (TMSD) staff of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has designed and developed nuclear criticality safety (NCS) training programs that focus on high trainee involvement through the use of instructional games and activities. This paper discusses the instructional game, initial considerations for developing games, advantages and limitations of games, and how games may be used in developing and implementing NCS training. It also provides examples of the various instructional games and activities used in separate courses designed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES's) supervisors and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel facility inspectors.

  19. An Examination of Afloat Training Officer Milestones in Support of Training Officer Career Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Subspecialty codes (SSP’s), Additional Qualification Designators (AQD’s), and Naval Officers Billet Classification codes (NOBC’s) ( Jones 2006). Officers...using existing employee KSA’s to identify shortfalls in an organization, and offer solutions through collaborative efforts (O’Connor, Bridget N...organization performance (O’Connor, Bridget N., Bronner, Michael, Delany, Chester, “Training for Organizations” South- Western Thomson Learning, 2002

  20. Maintenance Performance System. Guide for Individual Technical Training in Direct Support Units. Volume 1. Training Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    ELECTE ~W,% 0 119849ff E U. S. Army B... Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences 0D C.1) January 1984 rn-mi Approved for public relemse...new soldiers who have come in. (Indicates system operator has not been maintaining MPS-4-Roster Update accurately.) e "N" opposite soldier’s name on...systematically gathered and analyzed. The procedure for identifying training objectives consists of a sequence of related steps, as follows: e Become

  1. Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training Is No Better Than Overground Training for Individuals with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Addie; Merlo-Rains, Angela; Peters, Denise M.; Greene, Jennifaye V.; Blanck, Erika L.; Moran, Robert; Fritz, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) has produced mixed results compared with other therapeutic techniques. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intensive intervention (intensive mobility training) including BWSTT provides superior gait, balance, and mobility outcomes compared with a similar intervention with overground gait training in place of BWSTT. Methods Forty-three individuals with chronic stroke (mean [SD] age, 61.5 [13.5] years; mean [SD] time since stroke, 3.3 [3.8] years), were randomized to a treatment (BWSTT, n = 23) or control (overground gait training, n = 20) group. Treatment consisted of 1 hour of gait training; 1 hour of balance activities; and 1 hour of strength, range of motion, and coordination for 10 consecutive weekdays (30 hours). Assessments (step length differential, self-selected and fast walking speed, 6-minute walk test, Berg Balance Scale [BBS], Dynamic Gait Index [DGI], Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] scale, single limb stance, Timed Up and Go [TUG], Fugl-Meyer [FM], and perceived recovery [PR]) were conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. Results No significant differences (α = 0.05) were found between groups after training or at follow-up; therefore, groups were combined for remaining analyses. Significant differences (α = 0.05) were found pretest to posttest for fast walking speed, BBS, DGI, ABC, TUG, FM, and PR. DGI, ABC, TUG, and PR results remained significant at follow-up. Effect sizes were small to moderate in the direction of improvement. Conclusions Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of intensive interventions of durations greater than 10 days for improving gait, balance, and mobility in individuals with chronic stroke. PMID:25467394

  2. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  3. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    PubMed

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  4. A Support System for Motion Training Using Motion Capture and Acceleration Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Onai, Rikio

    This paper presents a support system for motion training for dances, sports, gestures, etc. In our previous study, we developed a prototype system for supporting motion training using motion caputure, i.e., marker tracking using a DV camera. The prototype system scores a user's motion by comparing tracking data of the user and a model with DP matching. The prototype system has a limit that it cannot accurately obtain acceleration of each part of the body because marker tracking using a DV camera cannot obtain three dimensional motion. By this limit, two different motions sometimes cannot be distinguished. For more effective motion training, in this study, we propose a system combining motion capture and acceleration sensors. We have examined the effectiveness of using acceleration sensors in motion training by comparing the proposed system with the prototype system. Experimental results have shown that two different motions can be more clearly distinguished by using the acceleration sensors.

  5. Advantage of support vector machine for neural spike train decoding under spike sorting errors.

    PubMed

    Hwan Kim, Kyung; Shin Kim, Sung; June Kim, Sung

    2005-01-01

    Decoding of kinematic variables from neuronal spike trains is important for neuroprosthetic devices. The spike trains from single units must be extracted from extracellular neural signals and thus spike detection and sorting procedure is essential. Since the spike detection and sorting procedure may yield considerable errors, decoding algorithm should be robust against spike train errors. Here we showed that the spike train decoding algorithms employing a nonlinear mapping, especially support vector machine (SVM), may be more advantageous contrary to conventional belief that linear filter is sufficient. The advantage became more conspicuous with erroneous spike trains. Using the SVM, satisfactory performance could be obtained much more easily, compared to the case of using multilayer perceptron, which was employed for previous studies. The results suggests the possibility of neuroprosthetic device with a low-quality spike sorting preprocessor.

  6. 78 FR 67222 - Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and Apprenticeship Training Agreement and Standards and Employer's Application To Provide Job Training AGENCY... information needed to meet statutory requirements for job training program. DATES: Written comments...

  7. [Social support and occupational stress relationship analysis of 1 413 train drivers in a railway bureau].

    PubMed

    Gu, G Z; Yu, S F; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; Kang, L; Chen, R

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To investigate the social support status of train drivers. Methods: Using cluster sampling, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 1 413 male train drivers (including 301 passenger train drivers, 683 freight train drivers, 85 guest scheduling train drivers, 265 cargo adjustable drivers, and 79 high-speed train drivers) from a railway bureau depot. The survey included individual factors, social support, occupational stressors, strains, personalities, and coping strategy using occupational stress instruments and effort-reward imbalance questionnaire. We compared the difference in social support scores between different drivers, who were divided according to job type and age. Additionally, the correlation between social support score and job strain-related factors was analyzed. The influence of depressive symptoms and job satisfaction were analyzed using a non-conditional logistic multivariate model. Results: The overall average age P(50) (P(25),P(75)) of 1 413 train drivers was 33.92 (27.83,43.58) years. The overall average length of service 12.25 (5.25,22.75) years. A significant difference in social support scores was observed according to job type (H=23.23, P<0.001). The specific scores were passenger driver(27 (23,32)), freight train driver (26 (22,30)), guest scheduling driver (27 (24,30)), cargo adjustable driver (26 (22,31)), and high-speed train driver (30 (26,36)) (P(50)(P(25),P(75))). Additionally, social support scores among different age groups were significantly different (H=6.64, P=0.036). The specific scores were ≤30 years (26 (22,31)), 30-40 years (27 (23,33)), and >40 years (27 (22,31)). Correlation analysis revealed that the social support score was negatively associated with job satisfaction (r=-0.43), reward (r=-0.22), working stability (r=-0.23), promotion opportunities (r=-0.12), positive affectivity (r=-0.31), esteem (r=-0.21), and self-esteem (r=-0.20) scores (P<0.001). The social support score was positively associated with

  8. Flywheel resistance training calls for greater eccentric muscle activation than weight training.

    PubMed

    Norrbrand, Lena; Pozzo, Marco; Tesch, Per A

    2010-11-01

    Changes in muscle activation and performance were studied in healthy men in response to 5 weeks of resistance training with or without "eccentric overload". Subjects, assigned to either weight stack (grp WS; n = 8) or iso-inertial "eccentric overload" flywheel (grp FW; n = 9) knee extensor resistance training, completed 12 sessions of four sets of seven concentric-eccentric actions. Pre- and post-measurements comprised maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), rate of force development (RFD) and training mode-specific force. Root mean square electromyographic (EMG(RMS)) activity of mm. vastus lateralis and medialis was assessed during MVC and used to normalize EMG(RMS) for training mode-specific concentric (EMG(CON)) and eccentric (EMG(ECC)) actions at 90°, 120° and 150° knee joint angles. Grp FW showed greater (p < 0.05) overall normalized angle-specific EMG(ECC) of vastii muscles compared with grp WS. Grp FW showed near maximal normalized EMG(CON) both pre- and post-training. EMG(CON) for Grp WS was near maximal only post-training. While RFD was unchanged following training (p > 0.05), MVC and training-specific strength increased (p < 0.05) in both groups. We believe the higher EMG(ECC) activity noted with FW exercise compared to standard weight lifting could be attributed to its unique iso-inertial loading features. Hence, the resulting greater mechanical stress may explain the robust muscle hypertrophy reported earlier in response to flywheel resistance training.

  9. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  10. Vaccine production training to develop the workforce of foreign institutions supported by the BARDA influenza vaccine capacity building program.

    PubMed

    Tarbet, E Bart; Dorward, James T; Day, Craig W; Rashid, Kamal A

    2013-03-15

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, vaccination will be the best method to limit virus spread. However, lack of vaccine biomanufacturing capacity means there will not be enough vaccine for the world's population. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) provides support to the World Health Organization to enhance global vaccine production capacity in developing countries. However, developing a trained workforce in some of those countries is necessary. Biomanufacturing is labor-intensive, requiring unique skills not found in traditional academic programs. Employees must understand the scientific basis of biotechnology, operate specialized equipment, and work in an environment regulated by good manufacturing practices (cGMP). Therefore, BARDA supported development of vaccine biomanufacturing training at Utah State University. The training consisted of a three-week industry-focused course for participants from institutions supported by the BARDA and WHO influenza vaccine production capacity building program. The curriculum was divided into six components: (1) biosafety, (2) cell culture and growth of cells in bioreactors, (3) virus assays and inactivation, (4) scale-up strategies, (5) downstream processing, and (6) egg- and cell-based vaccine production and cGMP. Lectures were combined with laboratory exercises to provide a balance of theory and hands-on training. The initial course included sixteen participants from seven countries including: Egypt, Romania, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The participant's job responsibilities included: Production, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Research; and their education ranged from bachelors to doctoral level. Internal course evaluations utilized descriptive methods including surveys, observation of laboratory activities, and interviews with participants. Generally, participants had appropriate academic backgrounds, but

  11. Connectivity Changes Underlying Neurofeedback Training of Visual Cortex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Scharnowski, Frank; Rosa, Maria Joao; Golestani, Narly; Hutton, Chloe; Josephs, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new approach that allows training of voluntary control over regionally specific brain activity. However, the neural basis of successful neurofeedback learning remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed changes in effective brain connectivity associated with neurofeedback training of visual cortex activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we found that training participants to increase visual cortex activity was associated with increased effective connectivity between the visual cortex and the superior parietal lobe. Specifically, participants who learned to control activity in their visual cortex showed increased top-down control of the superior parietal lobe over the visual cortex, and at the same time reduced bottom-up processing. These results are consistent with efficient employment of top-down visual attention and imagery, which were the cognitive strategies used by participants to increase their visual cortex activity. PMID:24609065

  12. Wireless just-in-time training of mobile skilled support personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandera, Cesar; Marsico, Michael; Rosen, Mitchel; Schlegel, Barry

    2006-05-01

    Skilled Support Personnel (SSP) serve emergency response organizations during an emergency incident, and include laborers, operating engineers, carpenters, ironworkers, sanitation workers and utility workers. SSP called to an emergency incident rarely have recent detailed training on the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosives (CBRNE) agents or the personal protection equipment (PPE) relevant to the incident. This increases personal risk to the SSP and mission risk at the incident site. Training for SSP has been identified as a critical need by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Worker Education and Training Program. We present a system being developed to address this SSP training shortfall by exploiting a new training paradigm called just-in-time training (JITT) made possible by advances in distance learning and cellular telephony. In addition to the current conventional training at regularly scheduled instructional events, SSP called to an emergency incident will have secure access to short (<5 minutes) training modules specific to the incident and derived from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Disaster Site Worker Course. To increase retention, each learning module incorporates audio, video, interactive simulations, graphics, animation, and assessment designed for the user interface of most current cell phones. Engineering challenges include compatibility with current cell phone technologies and wireless service providers, integration with the incident management system, and SCORM compliance.

  13. Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social cognitive training in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Christine I; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 h (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 min/day] plus social cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5-15 min per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. fMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social cognition skills.

  14. Basic life support instructor training: comparison of instructor-led and self-guided training.

    PubMed

    Einspruch, Eric L; Lembach, Jennifer; Lynch, Bonnie; Lee, William; Harper, Richard; Fleischman, Ross J

    2011-01-01

    In this randomized trial, the authors compared the instructional quality of instructor candidates trained in instructional methods through an Internet-based versus a traditional classroom-led version of the American Heart Association Core Instructor Course. The self-guided, Internet-based group had significantly higher posttest scores than did the traditional instructor-led group (although not when adjusted for pretest scores). The Internet-based group scores changed from 54% to 67%, exceeding the a priori definition of 8% as a minimally practically significant improvement (instructor-led group scores changed from 49% to 53%). The Internet-based course appeared to be a suitable alternative to the traditional course.

  15. Should Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training and Robotic-Assistive Steppers for Locomotor Training Trot Back to the Starting Gate?

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Duncan, Pamela W.

    2014-01-01

    Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robotic-assisted step training (RAST) have not, so far, led to better outcomes than a comparable dose of progressive over-ground training (OGT) for disabled persons with stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or cerebral palsy. The conceptual bases for these promising rehabilitation interventions had once seemed quite plausible, but the results of well-designed, randomized clinical trials have been disappointing. The authors reassess the underpinning concepts for BWSTT and RAST, which were derived from mammalian studies of treadmill-induced hind-limb stepping associated with central pattern generation after low thoracic spinal cord transection, as well as human studies of the triple crown icons of task-oriented locomotor training, massed practice, and activity-induced neuroplasticity. The authors retrospectively consider where theory and practice may have fallen short in the pilot studies that aimed to produce thoroughbred interventions. Based on these shortcomings, the authors move forward with recommendations for the future development of workhorse interventions for walking. In the absence of evidence for physical therapists to employ these strategies, however, BWSTT and RAST should not be provided routinely to disabled, vulnerable persons in place of OGT outside of a scientifically conducted efficacy trial. PMID:22412172

  16. Rehabilitation Associate Training for Employed Staff. Instructional Activities Manual (Supplement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ.-Stout, Menomonie. Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Inst.

    This manual provides additional instructional activities for teachers/trainers to use for in-service training of persons who work with mentally retarded, learning disabled, and handicapped clients. The first part of the booklet discusses standard learning activities, such as open discussion, games, modeling, role-playing, and debates. The rest of…

  17. Rehabilitation Associate Training for Employed Staff. Instructional Activities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ.-Stout, Menomonie. Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Inst.

    This manual provides instructional activities for teachers/trainers to use for in-service training of persons who work with mentally retarded, learning disabled, and handicapped clients. The first part of the booklet contains standard learning activities, such as open discussion, games, modeling, role-playing, and debates. The rest of the booklet…

  18. Peer Listening in the Middle School: Training Activities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazouri, Sandra Peyser; Smith, Miriam Frey

    This workbook presents activities for training middle school student peer listeners. The first of the workbook's 10 chapters contains an introduction to peer listening. Activities include a pretest on a series of true-false statements called the "Peer Listening Inventory," defining the meaning of the words that describe the qualities of a peer…

  19. Monopolar intracochlear pulse trains selectively activate the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Schoenecker, Matthew C; Bonham, Ben H; Stakhovskaya, Olga A; Snyder, Russell L; Leake, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Previous cochlear implant studies using isolated electrical stimulus pulses in animal models have reported that intracochlear monopolar stimulus configurations elicit broad extents of neuronal activation within the central auditory system-much broader than the activation patterns produced by bipolar electrode pairs or acoustic tones. However, psychophysical and speech reception studies that use sustained pulse trains do not show clear performance differences for monopolar versus bipolar configurations. To test whether monopolar intracochlear stimulation can produce selective activation of the inferior colliculus, we measured activation widths along the tonotopic axis of the inferior colliculus for acoustic tones and 1,000-pulse/s electrical pulse trains in guinea pigs and cats. Electrical pulse trains were presented using an array of 6-12 stimulating electrodes distributed longitudinally on a space-filling silicone carrier positioned in the scala tympani of the cochlea. We found that for monopolar, bipolar, and acoustic stimuli, activation widths were significantly narrower for sustained responses than for the transient response to the stimulus onset. Furthermore, monopolar and bipolar stimuli elicited similar activation widths when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Surprisingly, we found that in guinea pigs, monopolar and bipolar stimuli produced narrower sustained activation than 60 dB sound pressure level acoustic tones when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Therefore, we conclude that intracochlear electrical stimulation using monopolar pulse trains can produce activation patterns that are at least as selective as bipolar or acoustic stimulation.

  20. CarerSupport - An Innovative Approach to Informal Carers' Training and Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Lene; Moen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    EU and national policies for long-term care acknowledge the role of informal carers. However, there is still little adequate support to prepare or ease informal carers in terms of training to allow them improve their skills, alleviate psychosocial stress and maintain their own health and well-being. In the CarerSupport project, we seek to integrate services, deploy and test an integrated ICT platform enabling participation and collaboration of informal carers, psychologists and health professionals to collaborate, facilitate training and orientation, offer tele-consulting services and psychosocial support to carers. Based on this platform and its content, we will deploy and report on informal carers' experiences with the wide range of offered service. The poster will present the first experiences and suggest potentials for a service like CarerSupport.

  1. Report on Federal Predoctoral Student Support Part II--Students Supported Under Training Grants of the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Interagency Committee on Education, Washington, DC. Student Support Study Group.

    This report presents data concerning predoctoral students supported under training grants of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). The report offers a discussion of the training grant and a comparison of it to other forms of support, a discussion of the students and the fields of study…

  2. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. PMID:28223957

  3. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    PubMed

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state.

  4. Preliminary development of the Active Colonoscopy Training Model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JungHun; Ravindra, Kale; Robert, Randolph; Drozek, David

    2011-01-01

    Formal colonoscopy training requires a significant amount of time and effort. In particular, it requires actual patients for a realistic learning experience. The quality of colonoscopy training varies, and includes didactic courses and procedures proctored by skilled surgeons. A colonoscopy training model is occasionally used as part of the training method, but the effects are minute due to both the simple and tedious training procedures. To enhance the educational effect of the colonoscopy training model, the Active Colonoscopy Training Model (ACTM) has been developed. ACTM is an interactive colonoscopy training device which can create the environment of a real colonoscopy procedure as closely as possible. It comprises a configurable rubber colon, a human torso, sensors, a display, and the control part. The ACTM provides audio and visual interaction to the trainee by monitoring important factors, such as forces caused by the distal tip and the shaft of the colonoscope and the pressure to open up the lumen and the localization of the distal tip. On the computer screen, the trainee can easily monitor the status of the colonoscopy, which includes the localization of the distal tip, maximum forces, pressure inside the colon, and surgery time. The forces between the rubber colon and the constraints inside the ACTM are measured and the real time display shows the results to the trainee. The pressure sensors will check the pressure at different parts of the colon. The real-time localized distal tip gives the colonoscopy trainee easier and more confident operation without introducing an additional device in the colonoscope. With the current need for colonoscopists and physicians, the ACTM can play an essential role resolving the problems of the current colonoscopy training model, and significantly improve the training quality of the colonoscopy. PMID:22915931

  5. Training and capacity development: the foundation of interventions to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda; Louw, Julia; Naicker, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Many programs to support young children and families affected by HIV and AIDS depend substantially on a model of cascaded training from international nongovernmental organizations, through in-country groups and organizations to services on the ground. In this paper, we describe the training and capacity building – as described in proposals, progress reports, and individualized questionnaires – offered by 10 international organizations funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to provide supportive services for young children and their families in five southern and eastern African countries. We related the findings to effective features of training described in the literature. Training and capacity development were found to be the most substantial activities in rendering services to children and families, both in terms of effort and human and financial resources. A total of 67 trainings were conducted over a period of 18 months. Almost all trainings combine lecture-based instruction, group work/discussions, and role play, but only half of the trainings report some form of mentoring, supervision or coaching following the training. Drawing on the literature, it is likely that more purposeful planning is required in terms of the selection of trainees, local adaptation and development of materials, participatory training approaches, and techniques to develop and sustain skills as well as knowledge. Demonstration and mentorship in the field together with quality assurance procedures, pre-and post-assessment to evaluate training, processes to transfer learning into subsequent practice, as well as certification, are all fundamental steps to ensure that training plays a supportive role in the behavior changes necessary to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS and their families. PMID:26430466

  6. Training and capacity development: the foundation of interventions to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Richter, Linda; Louw, Julia; Naicker, Sara

    2015-04-03

    Many programs to support young children and families affected by HIV and AIDS depend substantially on a model of cascaded training from international nongovernmental organizations, through in-country groups and organizations to services on the ground. In this paper, we describe the training and capacity building - as described in proposals, progress reports, and individualized questionnaires - offered by 10 international organizations funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to provide supportive services for young children and their families in five southern and eastern African countries. We related the findings to effective features of training described in the literature. Training and capacity development were found to be the most substantial activities in rendering services to children and families, both in terms of effort and human and financial resources. A total of 67 trainings were conducted over a period of 18 months. Almost all trainings combine lecture-based instruction, group work/discussions, and role play, but only half of the trainings report some form of mentoring, supervision or coaching following the training. Drawing on the literature, it is likely that more purposeful planning is required in terms of the selection of trainees, local adaptation and development of materials, participatory training approaches, and techniques to develop and sustain skills as well as knowledge. Demonstration and mentorship in the field together with quality assurance procedures, pre-and post-assessment to evaluate training, processes to transfer learning into subsequent practice, as well as certification, are all fundamental steps to ensure that training plays a supportive role in the behavior changes necessary to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS and their families.

  7. [Use of supportive autogenic training in multiple morbidity in geriatric psychiatry patients].

    PubMed

    Kircher, T; Stetter, F; Wormstall, H

    1997-01-01

    23 multimorbid, geronto-psychiatric patients, aged 60 years or older, participated in a "supportive" course of autogenic training according to Schultz. Participating in the course an average of 7 +/- 3 weeks, 17 (76%) of the subjects were able to learn the training. In general, subjects reported a better general condition after the training sessions, measured with visual analogue scales (p < 0.001). The psychopathological status improved significantly during the time of the course (BPRS: p < 0.001; GDS: p < 0.001). No significant change was found in the cognitive state (MMSE) and the statements on the "list of complaints" ("Beschwerdenliste"). The global training success was better in the psychopathological less affected than in the more severely ill (BPRS prior r = 0.64, p = 0.001, GDS prior r = 0.46, p < 0.05). No correlation was found between training success and age, number of somatic diseases, number of medication, MMSE and the "Beschwerdenliste". Autogenic training is a useful component in psychotherapeutic and psychiatric therapy for elderly multimorbid in- and outpatients. A half-open group, two therapy sessions per week, reciting the training formulae aloud, a structured, simple setting and co-therapists proved to be worthwhile.

  8. Computerized cognitive training restores neural activity within the reality monitoring network in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Luks, Tracy L; Fisher, Melissa; Simpson, Gregory V; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-02-23

    Schizophrenia patients suffer from severe cognitive deficits, such as impaired reality monitoring. Reality monitoring is the ability to distinguish the source of internal experiences from outside reality. During reality monitoring tasks, schizophrenia patients make errors identifying "I made it up" items, and even during accurate performance, they show abnormally low activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region that supports self-referential cognition. We administered 80 hr of computerized training of cognitive processes to schizophrenia patients and found improvement in reality monitoring that correlated with increased mPFC activity. In contrast, patients in a computer games control condition did not show any behavioral or neural improvements. Notably, recovery in mPFC activity after training was associated with improved social functioning 6 months later. These findings demonstrate that a serious behavioral deficit in schizophrenia, and its underlying neural dysfunction, can be improved by well-designed computerized cognitive training, resulting in better quality of life.

  9. Family nursing hospital training and the outcome on job demands, control and support.

    PubMed

    Sigurdardottir, Anna Olafia; Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Juliusdottir, Sigrun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a family systems nursing hospital training educational program (ETI program) on nurses' and midwives' perception of job demands, control, and/or support. Of the nurses and midwives who were working in the Women's and Children's Services Division at The National University Hospital in Iceland, 479 participated in the study on three time periods from 2009 to 2011. Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorize participants into four job types (Karasek and Theorell, 1990). These four job types are high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control), and active (high demand, high control). However, when the data were evaluated based on the proportion of job characteristics as reported by the nurses and the midwives, no significant difference was found over time (2009 to 2011) (χ(2)=5.203, p=.518). However, based on the results from the independent t-tests at time 1, a significant difference was found amongst the high strain job group regarding perceived support from administrators and colleagues among the nurses and midwives who had taken the ETI program compared to those who had not taken the program (χ(2)=2.218, p=.034). This indicates that the health care professionals who characterized their job to be of high demand but with low control evaluated the support from their administrators and colleagues to be significantly higher if they had taken the ETI program than did the nurses and midwives who did not take the ETI program. These findings are promising because they might, in the long run, increase the nurses' and midwives' autonomy and control over their own work.

  10. Review of the Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum: Supervisory and Direct Support Editions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Don; George, Heather Peshak; Childs, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In the past several years, the values and practices of positive behavior support (PBS) have had a significant impact on services provided to adults and children with disabilities. Evidence of this impact can be seen in federal grants and laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments of 1997 (IDEA, 1997), a professional…

  11. The Training and Support Programme for Parents of Children with Ataxia: Parents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the Training and Support Programme (TSP) among parents of children with ataxia. Twenty-seven parents and their children completed the TSP. Data were collected by home record sheets and observation sheets completed by parents and therapists, respectively, and telephone interviews with 10 parents. Benefits reported…

  12. Effective Communication Training Interventions for Paid Carers Supporting Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Seonaid; Melville, Craig A.; Jones, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Carer communication skills contribute to the well being of individuals with learning disabilities. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of communication training interventions, and there is a lack of robust measures of outcome. A communication self-efficacy measure relevant to carers supporting adults with learning disabilities was…

  13. Occupational Health and Safety. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her written and spoken communication skills needed…

  14. Staff Training in Positive Behaviour Support: Impact on Attitudes and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Kathy; Jones, Edwin; Allen, David; Davies, Dee; James, Wendy; Doyle, Tony; Andrew, Jock; Kaye, Neil; Jones, Sian; Brophy, Sam; Moore, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Background: Positive behavioural support is increasingly viewed as the preferred service approach for people who challenge, but skills are insufficiently widespread. The need for effective staff training has been highlighted as a key factor in high quality service provision, with investigators recommending a multidimensional approach to increase…

  15. Behaviour Support Training for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaad, Eman; Thabet, Rawy A.

    2016-01-01

    Al Jalila Foundation (AJF) is a philanthropic organization based in Dubai. The organization sponsored a training programme in 2013 to support parents of children with various disabilities to cope with the behavioural and emotional challenges that are related to the child's disability. The course lasts for 6 weeks and is delivered across the United…

  16. Returning the Favor: Positive Employee Responses to Supervisor and Peer Support for Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei Tian, Amy; Cordery, John; Gamble, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on social exchange theory and associated notions of reciprocity, we argue that interpersonal support for training transfer in the workplace is associated with increased employee task performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and reduced turnover intention. We test our hypotheses using survey data from 786 Chinese retail…

  17. Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Research Report 1997 Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training...YYYY) April 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2015 to January 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ecological Systems... ecological systems theory takes into account the roles, responsibilities, and influence of individuals inside and outside of the team. In the Army

  18. Learning To Be Partners: An Introductory Training Program for Family Support Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooley, Lynn E., Ed.; Woratschek, Flora, Ed.; Williams, Jeanne, Ed.

    Family support staff need a broad range of knowledge and skills and an understanding of the multiple psychosocial, biological, and cultural factors influencing human behavior, development, and relationships. This training curriculum, based on concepts of adult learning and the assumption that feeling and self-reflection are at the core of…

  19. State Programs Supporting Health Manpower Training: An Inventory. Volume 1. Report and Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    A detailed statistical review of state support for health manpower training during 1973, 1974, and 1975 with an inventory of state expenditures for specific health occupations in 32 states are presented in Volume One of this two-volume study conducted for the Health Resources Administration. Objectives of the study included: investigation of the…

  20. Agricultural Production. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in agricultural production: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with agricultural production. SMAT materials…

  1. Occupational Health and Safety. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with occupational safety and…

  2. Aviation Support Equipment Technician M 3 & 2. Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    One of a series of training manuals prepared for enlisted personnel in the Navy and Naval Reserve, this self-study unit relates directly to the occupational qualifications of the Aviation Support Equipment Technician M rating. Contents include a 15-chapter text followed by a subject index, qualifications for advancement, and the associated…

  3. A Survey of Graduate Training in Empirically Supported and Manualized Treatments: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karekla, Maria; Lundgren, Jennifer D.; Forsyth, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The promotion and dissemination of empirically supported (ESTs) and manualized therapies are important, albeit controversial, developments within clinical science and practice. To date, studies evaluating training opportunities and attitudes about such treatments at the graduate, predoctoral internship, and postdoctoral levels have focused on the…

  4. A Preliminary Evaluation of Reach: Training Early Childhood Teachers to Support Children's Social and Emotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; Patrick, Terese; Kyzer, Angela; McKelvey, Lorraine

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development, implementation and preliminary evaluation of the Reaching Educators and Children (REACH) program, a training and coaching intervention designed to increase the capacity of early childhood teachers to support children's social and emotional development. We evaluated REACH with 139 teachers of toddler and…

  5. UCF's Support for Teaching and Learning Online: CD-ROM Development, Faculty Development, and Statewide Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truman-Davis, Barbara; Futch, Linda; Thompson, Kelvin; Yonekura, Francisca

    The University of Central Florida (UCF) has developed an award winning faculty development program providing experiential, collaborative learning for instructors to build online programs. A project is now underway to extend training throughout the state of Florida. Supporting students is also essential to the success of teaching online. The…

  6. School Counselors' Education and Training, Competency, and Supportive Behaviors Concerning Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William J.; McDougald, Amanda M.; Kresica, Aimee M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined high school counselors' education and training, counseling competency, and supportive behavior regarding gay, lesbian, and bisexual students. Sexual minority students often face a range of school and mental health problems. Results show that participants' counseling competency skills, knowledge, and attitudes predict…

  7. Streaming Videos in Peer Assessment to Support Training Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Kao, Hue-Ching

    2008-01-01

    A web-based peer assessment system using video streaming technology was implemented to support the training of pre-service teachers. The peer assessment process was synchronized with viewing of peer teaching videos so that comments could be linked to the relevant position on the video. When one viewed a comment, the associated video segment could…

  8. Effects of Game Design Patterns on Basic Life Support Training Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelle, Sebastian; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Based on a previous analysis of game design patterns and related effects in an educational scenario, the following paper presents an experimental study. In the study a course for Basic Life Support training has been evaluated and two game design patterns have been applied to the course. The hypotheses evaluated in this paper relate to game design…

  9. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  10. Open and Distance Learning for Health: Supporting Health Workers through Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This case study surveys the growing use of open and distance learning approaches to the provision of support, education and training to health workers over the past few decades. It classifies such uses under four headings, providing brief descriptions from the literature of a few examples of each group. In conclusion, it identifies key lessons…

  11. Balanced VS Imbalanced Training Data: Classifying Rapideye Data with Support Vector Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustuner, M.; Sanli, F. B.; Abdikan, S.

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of supervised image classification is highly dependent upon several factors such as the design of training set (sample selection, composition, purity and size), resolution of input imagery and landscape heterogeneity. The design of training set is still a challenging issue since the sensitivity of classifier algorithm at learning stage is different for the same dataset. In this paper, the classification of RapidEye imagery with balanced and imbalanced training data for mapping the crop types was addressed. Classification with imbalanced training data may result in low accuracy in some scenarios. Support Vector Machines (SVM), Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifications were implemented here to classify the data. For evaluating the influence of the balanced and imbalanced training data on image classification algorithms, three different training datasets were created. Two different balanced datasets which have 70 and 100 pixels for each class of interest and one imbalanced dataset in which each class has different number of pixels were used in classification stage. Results demonstrate that ML and NN classifications are affected by imbalanced training data in resulting a reduction in accuracy (from 90.94% to 85.94% for ML and from 91.56% to 88.44% for NN) while SVM is not affected significantly (from 94.38% to 94.69%) and slightly improved. Our results highlighted that SVM is proven to be a very robust, consistent and effective classifier as it can perform very well under balanced and imbalanced training data situations. Furthermore, the training stage should be precisely and carefully designed for the need of adopted classifier.

  12. Biochemical Lab Activity Supports Evolution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyman, Daniel J.

    1974-01-01

    Described is thin-layer chromatography (TLC), a technique that can be conveniently used in the laboratory to generate evidence supporting the principle that degrees of biochemical similarity reflect degrees of evolutionary relatedness among organisms. (Author/PEB)

  13. Viking mission support. [Deep Space Network activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Statistics listing the Deep Space Network tracking and command support and the discrepancy report status for 1 January through 28 February 1977 are presented in tables. The initial Viking extended mission period of normal DSN support, following the nonstandard operations during the solar conjunction period is included. Operational testing subsequent to the MK III data system installations at DSS 12, 44, and 62 during this period are also discussed.

  14. [Development and Hosting of a Perioperative Advanced Life Support Training Course for Anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Haba, Masanori; Ueshima, Hironobu; Okada, Daisuke; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Participation in the American Heart Association advanced cardiac life support provider course is a prerequisite for taking the anesthesiology specialist examination in Japan. The course teaches fundamental resuscitation methods for different types of cardiac arrest. However, crisis in the perioperative period can result from airway trouble, central venous catheter displacement, or massive hemorrhage. We report our experience of holding a problem- and learning-based perioperative advanced life support training course, Advanced Life Support for Operation (ALS-OP). Main contents of the course included circulation management, airway management central venous catheters, and pain clinic-related complications. ALS-OP simulation training may be beneficial for educating anesthesiologist and promoting perioperative patient safety.

  15. Department of the Navy Justification of Estimates for Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 Submitted to Congress January 1987. Operation & Maintenance, Navy. Book 3. Budget Activity 3. Intelligence & Communications. Budget Activity 8. Training, Medical & OGPA. Budget Activity 9. Administration & Assoc. Acts. Budget Activity 10. Support to Other Nations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    is designed to improve organizational and individual effectiveness and to promote increased personnel management skills that impact on retention...of full-time permanent and temporary employees . 2) Decrease in equipment -2,867 installations in FY 1988. 3) Reduction in WWMCCS contract -358 support...Clock and the Alternate Clock in Florida. 2) One employee will return from 6 New Zealand resulting in Permanent Change of Station expense. B. Other

  16. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  17. Providing Training in Positive Behavioural Support and Physical Interventions for Parents of Children with Autism and Related Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, David

    2014-01-01

    Though professionals working with children on the autism spectrum who display challenging behaviour routinely receive training in the use of both positive behavioural support techniques and physical interventions, such training is rarely provided for the parents of these children. This article reports on the impact of training provided for family…

  18. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Felzen, Marc; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. Objective The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from expert as well as end-user perspective. Methods Two independent medical experts evaluated the medical content of CPR apps from the Google Play store and the Apple App store. The evaluation was based on pre-defined minimum medical content requirements according to current Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines. In a second phase, non-medical end-users tested usability and appeal of the apps that had at least met the minimum requirements. Usability was assessed with the System Usability Scale (SUS); appeal was measured with the self-developed ReactionDeck toolkit. Results Out of 61 apps, 46 were included in the experts’ evaluation. A consolidated list of 13 apps resulted for the following layperson evaluation. The interrater reliability was substantial (kappa=.61). Layperson end-users (n=14) had a high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation 1 [ICC1]=.83, P<.001, 95% CI 0.75-0.882 and ICC2=.79, P<.001, 95% CI 0.695-0.869). Their evaluation resulted in a list of 5 recommendable apps. Conclusions Although several apps for resuscitation training and real incident support are available, very few are designed according to current BLS guidelines and offer an acceptable level of usability and hedonic quality for laypersons. The results of this study are intended to optimize the development of CPR mobile apps. The app ranking supports the informed selection of mobile apps for training situations and CPR campaigns as well as for real incident support. PMID:24647361

  19. A RCT of three training and support strategies to encourage implementation of screening and brief alcohol intervention by general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, E F; Lock, C A; McAvoy, B R; Heather, N; Gilvarry, E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Providing doctors with new research findings or clinical guidelines is rarely sufficient to promote changes in clinical practice. An implementation strategy is required to provide clinicians with the skills and encouragement needed to alter established routines. AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different training and support strategies in promoting implementation of screening and brief alcohol intervention (SBI) by general practitioners (GPs). METHOD: Subjects were 128 GPs, one per practice, from the former Northern and Yorkshire Regional Health Authority, who agreed to use the 'Drink-Less' SBI programme in an earlier dissemination trial. GPs were stratified by previous marketing conditions and randomly allocated to three intensities of training and support: controls (n = 43) received the programme with written guidelines only, trained GPs (n = 43) received the programme plus practice-based training in programme usage, trained and supported GPs (n = 42) received the programme plus practice-based training and a support telephone call every two weeks. GPs were requested to use the programme for three months. Outcome measures included proportions of GPs implementing the programme and numbers of patients screened and intervened with. RESULTS: Seventy-three (57%) GPs implemented the programme and screened 11,007 patients for risk drinking. Trained and supported GPs were significantly more likely to implement the programme (71%) than controls (44%) or trained GPs (56%); they also screened, and intervened with, significantly more patients. Costs per patient screened were: trained and supported GPs, 1.05 Pounds; trained GPs, 1.08 Pounds; and controls, 1.47 Pounds. Costs per patient intervened with were: trained and supported GPs, 5.43 Pounds; trained GPs, 6.02 Pounds; and controls, 8.19 Pounds. CONCLUSION: Practice-based training plus support telephone calls was the most effective and cost-effective strategy to encourage

  20. Supporting command and control training functions in the emergency management domain using cognitive systems engineering.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Celestine A; Balogun, Obafemi; Boyle, Edward; Turner, Amy

    The design and implementation of MERMAIDS, a computer-based training system in the domain of emergency command and control, is described. The research investigates the use of cognitive systems engineering and information management tools for modelling and representing training knowledge of emergency system operators. We propose a decision-centric human-computer interface as a new method of supporting computer-based modelling in the domain of emergency systems. Several interacting themes in information management relevant to emergency response planning are discussed.

  1. Training care teams of children with autism spectrum disorders in positive behaviour support: an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Shawn; Lynch, Shane L; Litman, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    As part of a team, the authors developed a workshop to help parents and teams address the behavioural needs of children with autism using a positive behaviour support (PBS) approach. Teams received comprehensive training in PBS and completed weekly homework assignments. Measures of participant satisfaction, parent satisfaction and efficacy and child behaviour suggested this training as an effective intervention for these teams. Participants reported improvements and the effective implementation of strategies after involvement in the workshops. This innovative model suggests potential for teams struggling with communication challenges in addressing problem behaviours in children with autism.

  2. Education and training activities on personal dosimetry service in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tugrul Zeyrek, C; Akbiyik, Hayri

    2013-10-01

    A personal dosimetry service that evaluates the occupational doses for external and internal radiation of the radiation workers is one of the main components of radiation protection programme. The education and training (E&T) activities in this field are basic aspects of the optimisation of all exposures to radiation. The E&T activities in the field of occupational radiation protection at the national and international level are of main interest and implemented by the Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center. This study describes the Turkish experience in E&T of the staff of dosimetry services, postgraduate students and medical physics experts. In Turkey, the first individual monitoring training course was conducted in 2012. The aim of this study is to provide a structured description of postgraduate courses that are addressed to qualified experts and medical physics experts, and the modules are mainly dedicated to individual monitoring.

  3. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the period 1 Oct. 1995 - 30 Sept. 1996. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics and high lift modeling studies. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the high lift activities.

  4. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  5. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  6. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  7. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  8. 34 CFR 300.119 - Technical assistance and training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.119... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Technical assistance and training activities. 300.119 Section 300.119 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  9. Human-factors engineering for smart transport: design support for car drivers and train traffic controllers.

    PubMed

    Lenior, Dick; Janssen, Wiel; Neerincx, Mark; Schreibers, Kirsten

    2006-07-01

    The theme Smart Transport can be described as adequate human-system symbiosis to realize effective, efficient and human-friendly transport of goods and information. This paper addresses how to attune automation to human (cognitive) capacities (e.g. to take care of information uncertainty, operator trust and mutual man-machine adaptations). An introduction to smart transport is presented, including examples of best practice for engineering human factors in the vehicle ergonomics and train traffic control domain. The examples are representative of an ongoing trend in automation and they show how the human role changes from controller to supervisor. Section 2 focuses on the car driver and systems that support, or sometimes even take over, critical parts of the driving task. Due to the diversity of driver ability, driving context and dependence between driver and context factors, there is a need for personalised, adaptive and integrated support. Systematic research is needed to establish sound systems. Section 3 focuses on the train dispatcher support systems that predict train movements, detect potential conflicts and show the dispatcher the possibilities available to solve the detected problems. Via thorough analysis of both the process to be controlled and the dispatcher's tasks and cognitive needs, support functions were developed as part of an already very complex supervision and control system. The two examples, although from a different field, both show the need for further development in cognitive modelling as well as for the value of sound ergonomics task analysis in design practice.

  10. A web-based training program to support chronic kidney disease screening by community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Gheewala, Pankti A; Peterson, Gregory M; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R; Bereznicki, Luke; Jose, Matthew D; Castelino, Ronald L

    2016-10-01

    findings support further development and widespread implementation of the training program to facilitate health promotion and early identification of chronic kidney disease in a community setting.

  11. The Human Motor System Supports Sequence-Specific Representations over Multiple Training-Dependent Timescales.

    PubMed

    Wymbs, Nicholas F; Grafton, Scott T

    2015-11-01

    Motor sequence learning is associated with increasing and decreasing motor system activity. Here, we ask whether sequence-specific activity is contingent upon the time interval and absolute amount of training over which the skill is acquired. We hypothesize that within each motor region, the strength of any sequence representation is a non-linear function that can be characterized by 3 timescales. We had subjects train for 6 weeks and measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used repetition suppression (RS) to isolate sequence-specific representations while controlling for effects related to kinematics and general task familiarity. Following a baseline training session, primary and secondary motor regions demonstrated rapidly increasing RS. With continued training, there was evidence for skill-specific efficiency, characterized by a dramatic decrease in motor system RS. In contrast, after performance had reached a plateau, further training led to a pattern of slowly increasing RS in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor cortex, and anterior cerebellum consistent with skill-specific specialization. Importantly, many motor areas show changes involving more than 1 of these 3 timescales, underscoring the capacity of the motor system to flexibly represent a sequence based on the amount of prior experience.

  12. Parallel sequential minimal optimization for the training of support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Cao, L J; Keerthi, S S; Ong, Chong-Jin; Zhang, J Q; Periyathamby, Uvaraj; Fu, Xiu Ju; Lee, H P

    2006-07-01

    Sequential minimal optimization (SMO) is one popular algorithm for training support vector machine (SVM), but it still requires a large amount of computation time for solving large size problems. This paper proposes one parallel implementation of SMO for training SVM. The parallel SMO is developed using message passing interface (MPI). Specifically, the parallel SMO first partitions the entire training data set into smaller subsets and then simultaneously runs multiple CPU processors to deal with each of the partitioned data sets. Experiments show that there is great speedup on the adult data set and the Mixing National Institute of Standard and Technology (MNIST) data set when many processors are used. There are also satisfactory results on the Web data set.

  13. Classroom Writing Activities to Support the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Judy

    1990-01-01

    Offers writing activities related to the reading of E. B. White's "Charlotte's Web," including showing the movie, using HyperCard, showing a video about a webspinning spider as a prewriting activity, and using computer graphics and video cameras to create related visual projects. (SR)

  14. Semantic Support Environment for Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maizatul Akmar; Yaacob, Mashkuri; Kareem, Sameem Abdul

    2008-01-01

    Scholarly activities are a collection of academic related activities such as research, teaching and consultation work which result in research outputs such as journals, theses and articles in proceedings. The output will then be disseminated to researchers all over the world by means of the WWW. The four pillars of this scholarship i.e. discovery,…

  15. Effects of Sodium Benzoate Treatment in Combination with An Extinction Training on the Maintenance of Cocaine-Supported Memory.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ni; Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chianfang G; Liao, Tien You; Wu, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Jie-Kuan; Yu, Lung

    2016-02-29

    Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can facilitate the extinction of various maladaptive memories. Sodium benzoate (NaB) has been known to enhance a naturally occurring full agonist on the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor. This study aimed to test whether systemic NaB treatment can affect the extinction of a cocaine-supported memory, the cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Following the establishment of the cocaine (10 mg/kg/conditioning × 3)-induced CPP, an extinction protocol, consisting of two consecutive extinction training bouts at an 8-h interval, was used. NaB (500 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline was given immediately following each extinction training bout to test the modulating effect of NaB on the maintenance of cocaine-induced CPP. Moreover, NaB was bilaterally micro-infused into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to validate the involvement of this brain region in mediating systemic NaB treatment-produced effect on cocaine-induced CPP. Systemic (500 mg/kg) and intra-mPFC (10 μg/side) NaB treatment significantly decreased subsequent cocaine-induced CPP magnitude, although the NaB treatment or the extinction training alone did not affect such CPP magnitude. It was of importance to note that systemic or intra-mPFC NaB delivery did not affect mouse locomotor activity in the retests. These results, taken together, suggest that NaB treatment in combination with the extinction training may facilitate the extinction of the cocaine-supported memory. Moreover, systemic NaB treatment exerts such effects, at least in part, via its effect in the mPFC.

  16. Making child mental health 'everybody's business': a training course for family support workers.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Alex; Van Roosmalen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and delivery of a mental health teaching and training programme offered to Family Support Workers (FSWs) working in a range of schools in an economically deprived part of Bedfordshire. The FSWs had received no prior teaching in the area of child mental health, or in ways of engaging and communicating with children and families. Both topics were considered crucial to their role. The training was delivered in two phases. Phase 1 consisted of 4 full days of teaching. Topics covered included (1) engaging children and families, (2) child development, (3) self-awareness, and (4) systemic thinking. Phase 2 was delivered through 'practice sets', which were held monthly for 4 months, and lasted 2 hours. These were used to develop the FSWs' theoretical understanding of the issues, and link this with their practice. The training was evaluated using a semistructured questionnaire. Results suggested that participants had changed the ways in which they engaged families and children. They were more able to adopt a collaborative, nonexpert, position which focused on empowering families to make decisions for themselves. This represented a significant shift in the way they worked. This process was enhanced by their more sophisticated level of understanding of child development and behaviour problems, which took into account the impact of wider systemic and relational factors and moved away from locating problems within individuals. Participants also demonstrated the ability to reflect on how their personal beliefs and experiences impacted on the work they undertook, and why this was important. Recommendations following the training included the need for regular, ongoing practice support, the need for the training to be more widely disseminated (e.g. to school staff), and the benefits of having clear descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of Family Support Workers.

  17. Training in the laboratory animal science community: strategies to support adult learning.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Jackie; Stevens, James; Medina, Leticia V

    2007-01-01

    The essence of learning is change; learning is the process by which learners customize new information to make it personally meaningful and relevant. Training is the process of helping students make those changes. Research indicates that adults learn differently than children or adolescents and that adults consistently use the following six learning strategies: prior experiences; conversations; metacognition; reflection; authentic experiences; and images, pictures, or other types of visuals. Each of these learning strategies can be combined with the other strategies and often build upon each other. A recent study on how health care professionals learn indicated that the learning strategy they used most often was reflection, which supports learning before, during, and after training. Numerous examples are provided in this article describing how to integrate each of the six adult learning strategies into laboratory animal science training. While lectures and other types of direct instruction are appropriate, they are inadequate and ineffective unless they are integrated with and support adult learning strategies. Both the US Department of Agriculture regulations and the Public Health Service Policy mandate that research institutions must ensure that all personnel involved in animal care, treatment, or use are qualified to perform their duties. Applying adult learning strategies to training for the laboratory animal science community will enhance learning and improve both the science and the humane care of the animals, which is a goal our community must continuously strive to achieve.

  18. Classroom Writing Activities to Support the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Judy

    1993-01-01

    Describes a range of classroom writing activities to go along with three books for children or adolescents: "On My Honor" (Marion Dane Bauer), "Knots on a Counting Rope" (Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault), and "Piggybook" (Anthony Browne). (SR)

  19. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research.

  20. Overground body-weight-supported gait training for children and youth with neuromuscular impairments.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Stuberg, Wayne; Dejong, Stacey; Arpin, David J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine if body-weight-supported (BWS) overground gait training has the potential to improve the walking abilities of children and youth with childhood onset motor impairments and intellectual disabilities. Eight participants (mean age of 16.3 years) completed 12 weeks of BWS overground gait training that was performed two times a week. BWS was provided during the training sessions by an overhead harness system that rolls overground. There was a significant improvement in the preferred walking speed after the training (p < .01; pre = 0.51 ± 0.2 m/s; post = 0.67 ± 0.3 m/s; Cohen's d = 0.80) and cadence (p = .04; pre = 37 ± 7 steps/min; post = 43 ± 8 steps/min; Cohen's d = 0.94). Our results indicate that overground BWS gait training may be an effective treatment strategy for improving the preferred walking speed of children and youth with motor impairments.

  1. Private Training Providers in Australia: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to Australian students in 2003, based on data from a national sample of 330 RTOs. The study also provides estimates of the private sector's overall contribution to the total vocational education and training (VET) effort in Australia…

  2. Competitive employment training for mentally retarded adults: the supported work model.

    PubMed

    Krauss, M W; MacEachron, A E

    1982-05-01

    The supported work model designed to train mentally retarded persons for competitive employment, was initiated as a pilot program in 1979. The placement rate was 50 percent. In order to investigate the predictors of placement, we conducted an empirical analysis using the theory of work adjustment perspective. Results indicated that the participant's work behavior and job skills, ability to meet the requirements of the jobs, and employment reinforcements were predictors of competitive placement.

  3. Supporting Online AP Students: The Rural Facilitator and Considerations for Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Nicole; Degner, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Online courses supplemented by on-site facilitators help many rural students pursue advanced coursework, but research is warranted to better understand facilitator role and training needs. This study examined facilitation experiences, demographic characteristics, and professional development activities of rural on-site facilitators associated with…

  4. Intersex mental health and social support options in pediatric endocrinology training programs.

    PubMed

    Leidolf, Esther Morris; Curran, Megan; Scout; Bradford, Judith

    2008-01-01

    The birth of a child with an intersex condition is often an emotionally stressful event for parents. Preparation and ongoing support systems could be beneficial to both parents and children and would alleviate some of the shame and isolation associated with intersex conditions. To assess the extent to which psychological support is available, a short e-mail survey on this topic was sent to the directors of 50 pediatric endocrinology fellowship training programs (PEFTPs), who are most likely to evaluate and treat intersex children and their parents. Of the 29 PEFTPs that responded, 69% offer psychological support and 58% have a mental health specialist on staff. However, only 19% of patients or families receive emotional support during diagnosis and only 15% receive support after diagnosis. We found two barriers that prevent patients and families from receiving psychological help from their intersex care team. First, there is a lack of training for mental health professionals regarding the needs of intersex patients and families. Second, some families refuse help even though it is offered. This study reveals that further research is needed to overcome these two barriers regarding mental health treatment of intersex patients and families.

  5. Causal interaction following the alteration of target region activation during motor imagery training using real-time fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaojie; Zhang, Hang; Song, Sutao; Ye, Qing; Guo, Jia; Yao, Li

    2013-01-01

    Motor imagery training is an effective approach for motor skill learning and motor function rehabilitation. As a novel method of motor imagery training, real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) enables individuals to acquire self-control of localized brain activation, achieving desired changes in behavior. The regulation of target region activation by rtfMRI often alters the activation of related brain regions. However, the interaction between the target region and these related regions is unclear. The Granger causality model (GCM) is a data-driven method that can explore the causal interaction between brain regions. In this study, we employed rtfMRI to train subjects to regulate the activation of the ipsilateral dorsal premotor area (dPMA) during motor imagery training, and we calculated the causal interaction of the dPMA with other motor-related regions based on the GCM. The results demonstrated that as the activity of the dPMA changed during rtfMRI training, the interaction of the target region with other related regions became significantly altered, and behavioral performance was improved after training. The altered interaction primarily exhibited as an increased unidirectional interaction from the dPMA to the other regions. These findings support the dominant role of the dPMA in motor skill learning via rtfMRI training and may indicate how activation of the target region interacts with the activation of other related regions. PMID:24379775

  6. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  7. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  8. From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Glicksohn, Joseph; Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the cerebellum is increasingly recognized, not only in motor control but also in cognitive learning and function. Nevertheless, the relationship between training-induced cerebellar activation and electrophysiological and structural changes in humans has yet to be established. In the current paper, we suggest a general model tying cerebellar function to cognitive improvement, via neuronal synchronization, as well as biochemical and anatomical changes. We then suggest that sensorimotor training provides an optimal paradigm to test the proposed model and review supporting evidence of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a sensorimotor training aimed at increasing attention and coordination. Subsequently, we discuss the possible mechanisms through which QMT may exert its beneficial effects on cognition (e.g., increased creativity, reflectivity, and reading), focusing on cerebellar alpha activity as a possible mediating mechanism allowing cognitive improvement, molecular and anatomical changes. Using the example of QMT research, this paper emphasizes the importance of investigating whole-body sensorimotor training paradigms utilizing a multidisciplinary approach and its implications to healthy brain development. PMID:26539545

  9. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  10. A model of standardized training in basic life support skills of emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cimrin, Arif H; Topacoglu, Hakan; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Ozsarac, Murat; Ayrik, Cuneyt

    2005-01-01

    This intervention study was designed to determine the current level of basic life support knowledge and skills of residents in a university-based emergency medicine residency program, and to investigate the potential benefit derived by these residents from a standardized theoretical and practical training session. All residents underwent tests before and after the training session. The residents were asked to perform basic life support on a recording cardiopulmonary resuscitation mannequin. Assessments were made using a 10-item checklist, with the highest score being 17. Each step performed by the resident was scored by an emergency physician for accuracy and effectiveness. Twenty-eight residents participated in the study. According to the modified Berden scale, the pretest and posttest scores were 11.2 +/- 2.9 and 15.6 +/- 1.0, respectively, and the mean difference was 4.36 +/- 2.9 (t test, P<.001). Only 11 residents (39.3%) were rated as "good" or "very good" in the pretest, whereas the corresponding figure in the posttest was 27 (96.4%) (P<.001). Skills, such as checking the airway patency (P<.001), checking breathing (P<.001), appropriate compression rate (P<.003), and delivering 2 effective breaths (P<.001), improved significantly. Depth of chest compression (P<.023) was improved significantly only in residents with fewer than 2 years of experience. The training process should comprise standardized courses to facilitate acquisition of the desired skills.

  11. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    PubMed Central

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers’ 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients’ homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants’ strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues’ and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future. PMID

  12. Biomedical Support of U.S. Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Dervay, J. P.; Gillis, D.; McMann, H. J.; Thomas, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    The world's first extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed by A. A. Leonov on March 18, 1965 during the Russian Voskhod-2 mission. The first US EVA was executed by Gemini IV astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965, with an umbilical tether that included communications and an oxygen supply. A hand-held maneuvering unit (HHMU) also was used to test maneuverability during the brief EVA; however the somewhat stiff umbilical limited controlled movement. That constraint, plus difficulty returning through the vehicle hatch, highlighted the need for increased thermal control and improved EVA ergonomics. Clearly, requirements for a useful EVA were interrelated with the vehicle design. The early Gemini EVAs generated requirements for suits providing micro-meteor protection, adequate visual field and eye protection from solar visual and infrared radiation, gloves optimized for dexterity while pressurized, and thermal systems capable of protecting the astronaut while rejecting metabolic heat during high workloads. Subsequent Gemini EVAs built upon this early experience and included development of a portable environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and an astronaut maneuvering unit. The ECLSS provided a pressure vessel and controller with functional control over suit pressure, oxygen flow, carbon dioxide removal, humidity, and temperature control. Gemini EVA experience also identified the usefulness of underwater neutral buoyancy and altitude chamber task training, and the importance of developing reliable task timelines. Improved thermal management and carbon dioxide control also were required for high workload tasks. With the Apollo project, EVA activity was primarily on the lunar surface; and suit durability, integrated liquid cooling garments, and low suit operating pressures (3.75 pounds per square inch absolute [psia] or 25.8 kilopascal [kPa],) were required to facilitate longer EVAs with ambulation and significant physical workloads with average metabolic

  13. Enhancement of children's self-esteem through social support training for youth sport coaches.

    PubMed

    Smoll, F L; Smith, R E; Barnett, N P; Everett, J J

    1993-08-01

    The authors examined the impact of coaching behaviors on players' self-enhancement processes. Eight baseball coaches attended a preseason workshop designed to increase their supportiveness and instructional effectiveness. Behavioral guidelines were presented and modeled. A no-treatment control group had 10 coaches. Boys (N = 152) in both groups were interviewed pre- and postseason. Trained coaches differed from controls in player-perceived behaviors in accordance with the guidelines. They were evaluated more positively by their players, their players had more fun, and their teams exhibited a higher level of attraction among players, despite the fact that their teams did not differ from controls in won-lost records. Consistent with a self-esteem enhancement model, findings showed that boys with low self-esteem who played for the trained coaches exhibited significant increases in general self-esteem; low self-esteem youngsters in the control group did not.

  14. Sports Training Support Method by Self-Coaching with Humanoid Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, S.; Ikeda, F.; Yasaka, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a new training support method called self-coaching with humanoid robots. In the proposed method, two small size inexpensive humanoid robots are used because of their availability. One robot called target robot reproduces motion of a target player and another robot called reference robot reproduces motion of an expert player. The target player can recognize a target technique from the reference robot and his/her inadequate skill from the target robot. Modifying the motion of the target robot as self-coaching, the target player could get advanced cognition. Some experimental results show some possibility as the new training method and some issues of the self-coaching interface program as a future work.

  15. Can shoulder muscle coordination during the support scale at ring height be replicated during training exercises in gymnastics?

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Sylvain M; Tordi, Nicolas R; Parratte, Bernard M; Rouillon, Jean-Denis R

    2009-11-01

    The support scale at ring height, the swallow, is a difficult strength element, usually performed in gymnastics. Coaches try to simulate the swallow position during training to strengthen muscles, specifically in the position used for competition. However, the real effect of this position's simulation on muscle force and coordination and consequently on the muscle activity has not been determined. The purpose of the study was to compare muscle activity and coordination during a swallow performed on the rings, using a counterweight and during 2 training exercises using dumbbells or barbells, respectively. Six top-level gymnasts participated in the study. Electromyograms from the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoideus (clavicular part), pectoralis major, serratus anterior, infraspinatus, trapezius (middle part), and latissimus dorsi in the right shoulder were collected during the 4 exercises and analyzed using root mean square (RMS) and mean power frequency (MPF). The RMS were normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction, and a co-activation index was also determined between biceps and triceps brachii. Our results show specific shoulder muscle coordination for each exercise. As compared with the swallow on the rings, the pectoralis major participates less in shoulder flexion during the counterweight exercise, whereas the deltoideus is more activated during the dumbbells exercise (p < 0.05). The barbell exercise reduces the participation of the serratus anterior in stabilizing the scapula (p < 0.05). Training exercises must therefore be chosen with knowledge of the specific muscle coordination induced by each. The counterweight exercise preserves the pectoralis major. The barbell exercise reduces participation of the serratus anterior. The dumbbells exercise may be useful to prepare the rotator cuff muscles carefully for use.

  16. COMET Program Training Offerings to Support S-NPP and JPSS Utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Dills, P. N.; Weingroff, M.

    2015-12-01

    Are you up to speed on how to exploit new S-NPP capabilities and products? If not, don't worry, because UCAR's COMET program has self-paced online educational materials that highlight the capabilities and applications of current and next-generation operational polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites. The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu) has long received funding from NOAA NESDIS as well as EUMETSAT and the Meteorological Service of Canada to support education and training in satellite meteorology. By partnering with experts from NOAA-NESDIS and its Cooperative Institutes, Meteorological Service of Canada, EUMETSAT, the Naval Research Laboratory and others, COMET's self-paced training stimulates greater use of current and future satellite observations and products. Right now, over 70 satellite-focused, self-paced, online materials are freely available in English via the MetEd Web site at http://meted.ucar.edu/topics/satellite. Additionally, quite a few lessons are also available in Spanish and French making training more easily accessible to an international audience. This presentation will focus on COMET's latest satellite training and education offerings that are directly applicable to data and products from the S-NPP and JPSS satellite series. A recommended set of lessons for users who wish to learn more will be highlighted, including excerpts from the newest materials on the Suomi NPP VIIRS imager and its applications, as well as advances in nighttime visible observation with the VIIRS Day-Night Band. We'll show how the lessons introduce users to the advances these systems bring to forecasting, numerical weather prediction, and environmental monitoring. Finally, new relevant training initiatives will also be presented.

  17. Usalpharma: a cloud-based architecture to support quality assurance training processes in health area using virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J; Cruz-Benito, Juan; Maderuelo, Cristina; Pérez-Blanco, Jonás Samuel; Martín-Suárez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud-based architectures can extend and enhance the functionality of the training environments based on virtual worlds and how, from this cloud perspective, we can provide support to analysis of training processes in the area of health, specifically in the field of training processes in quality assurance for pharmaceutical laboratories, presenting a tool for data retrieval and analysis that allows facing the knowledge discovery in the happenings inside the virtual worlds.

  18. Usalpharma: A Cloud-Based Architecture to Support Quality Assurance Training Processes in Health Area Using Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J.; Pérez-Blanco, Jonás Samuel; Martín-Suárez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud-based architectures can extend and enhance the functionality of the training environments based on virtual worlds and how, from this cloud perspective, we can provide support to analysis of training processes in the area of health, specifically in the field of training processes in quality assurance for pharmaceutical laboratories, presenting a tool for data retrieval and analysis that allows facing the knowledge discovery in the happenings inside the virtual worlds. PMID:24778593

  19. Supporting the joint warfighter by development, training, and fielding of man-portable UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Kenneth A.; Stratton, Benjamin V.

    2005-05-01

    The Robotic Systems Pool (RSP), sponsored by the Joint Robotics Program (JRP), is an inventory of small robotic systems, payloads, and components intended to expedite the development and integration of technology into effective, supportable, fielded robotic assets. The RSP loans systems to multiple users including the military, first-responders, research organizations, and academia. These users provide feedback in their specific domain, accelerating research and development improvements of robotic systems, which in turn allow the joint warfighter to benefit from such changes more quickly than from traditional acquisition cycles. Over the past year, RSP assets have been used extensively for pre-deployment operator and field training of joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) teams, and for the training of Navy Reservist repair technicians. These Reservists are part of the Robotic Systems Combat Support Platoon (RSCSP), attached to Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego. The RSCSP maintains and repairs RSP assets and provides deployable technical support for users of robotic systems. Currently, a small team from the RSCSP is deployed at Camp Victory repairing and maintaining man-portable unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) used by joint EOD teams in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The focus of this paper is to elaborate on the RSP and RSCSP and their role as invaluable resources for spiral development in the robotics community by gaining first-hand technical feedback from the warfighter and other users.

  20. Program Support and Value of Training in Mentors' Satisfaction and Anticipated Continuation of School-Based Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillin, Samuel D.; Straight, Gerald G.; Saeki, Elina

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested a theoretical model of training practices in school-based mentoring by comparing the differences between two mentoring programs on mentor-reported program support, value of training, relationship satisfaction, and plans to continue mentoring. The two mentoring programs that we compared were conducted at the same school and…

  1. Cultivating Faculty Support for Institutional Effectiveness Activities: Benchmarking Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, John F.; Metcalf, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Measured the impact of four predictor variables on faculty perceptions about the importance of institutional effectiveness activities. Found that three variables are critical to faculty support for institutional effectiveness activities: (1) institutional motivation for pursuing these activities; (2) level of involvement or participation in…

  2. Self-injurious behaviour, non-interventionism and practitioners' needs: Implications for training and managerial support.

    PubMed

    Ntinas, Konstantinos M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present article is to critically analyse the literature concerning the factors that lead to non-interventionism towards self-injurious behaviour (SIB) in the field of intellectual disability and to make recommendations for the development of practice. It emerges that the limited behaviour analytic skills of practitioners impede the implementation of behavioural interventions and allow SIB to persist. The implications for the development of in-service training and managerial support that would disseminate the implementation of behavioural interventions are briefly discussed.

  3. Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    require additional content and complexity to support tailored learning for each user and, as a consequence, have a very high development cost—a major...social processes. • Distributed Learning : Concurrent distribution of training and educational content to multiple users at the point of need in...which content is intelligently selected to support learning , increased performance, and long-term competency in selected domains. • Training/ Learning

  4. 75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... termination of such training. Payments are base on the number of hours of flight training completed during... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment... flight training is correct. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection...

  5. 78 FR 13158 - Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... termination of such training. Payments are based on the number of hours of flight training completed during... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment... flight training is correct. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection...

  6. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-02-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  7. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  8. Nutritional strategies to support adaptation to high-intensity interval training in team sports.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Team sports are characterized by intermittent high-intensity activity patterns. Typically, play consists of short periods of very intense or all-out efforts interspersed with longer periods of low-intensity activity. Fatigue is a complex, multi-factorial process, but intense intermittent exercise performance can potentially be limited by reduced availability of substrates stored in skeletal muscle and/or metabolic by-products associated with fuel breakdown. High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been shown to induce adaptations in skeletal muscle that enhance the capacity for both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism. Nutrient availability is a potent modulator of many acute physiological responses to exercise, including various molecular signaling pathways that are believed to regulate cellular adaptation to training. Several nutritional strategies have also been reported to acutely alter metabolism and enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise performance. However, relatively little is known regarding the effect of chronic interventions, and whether supplementation over a period of weeks or months augments HIT-induced physiological remodeling and promotes greater performance adaptations. Theoretically, a nutritional intervention could augment HIT adaptation by improving energy metabolism during exercise, which could facilitate greater total work and an enhanced chronic training stimulus, or promoting some aspect of the adaptive response during recovery, which could lead to enhanced physiological adaptations over time.

  9. The impact of training interventions on organizational readiness to support innovations in juvenile justice offices.

    PubMed

    Taxman, Faye S; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. A clinical trial was conducted examining the impact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a 1 day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive 3-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building approach did not perform any better

  10. Enhancing Recognition of High Quality, Functional IFSP Outcomes: A Training Activity for Infant and Toddler Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Anne; Gillaspy, Kathi; Peters, Mary Louise; Hurth, Joicey

    2014-01-01

    This training activity was created to support participants' understanding of the criteria needed to develop and write high quality, participation-based Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) outcomes. The term "functional" is often used to describe what outcomes ought to be, yet many providers struggle to define what makes an outcome…

  11. Firefighter noise exposure during training activities and general equipment use.

    PubMed

    Root, Kyle S; Schwennker, Catherine; Autenrieth, Daniel; Sandfort, Delvin R; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multiple noise measurements were taken on 6 types of fire station equipment and 15 types of emergency response vehicle-related equipment used by firefighters during routine and emergency operations at 10 fire stations. Five of the six types of fire station equipment, when measured at a distance of one meter and ear level, emitted noise equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including lawn maintenance equipment, snow blowers, compressors, and emergency alarms. Thirteen of 15 types of equipment located on the fire engines emitted noise levels equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including fans, saws, alarms, and extrication equipment. In addition, noise measurements were taken during fire engine operations, including the idling vehicle, vehicle sirens, and water pumps. Results indicated that idling fire-engine noise levels were below 85 dBA; however, during water pump and siren use, noise levels exceeded 85 dBA, in some instances, at different locations around the trucks where firefighters would be stationed during emergency operations. To determine if the duration and use of fire fighting equipment was sufficient to result in overexposures to noise during routine training activities, 93 firefighter personal noise dosimetry samples were taken during 10 firefighter training activities. Two training activities per sampling day were monitored during each sampling event, for a mean exposure time of 70 min per day. The noise dosimetry samples were grouped based on job description to compare noise exposures between the different categories of job tasks commonly associated with fire fighting. The three job categories were interior, exterior, and engineering. Mean personal dosimetry results indicated that the average noise exposure was 78 dBA during the training activities that lasted 70 min on average. There was no significant difference in noise exposure between each of the three job categories. Although firefighters routinely use equipment and emergency response vehicles that

  12. Sink effect in activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, J.; Labady, M.; Severino, F.; Yunes, S.

    1997-03-01

    A synergistic effect has been proposed in previous papers, attempting to explain the higher activity of activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts with respect to conventional alumina-supported catalysts, reported earlier. However, activated carbon characteristics can be strongly affected by the raw material and the method of activation. Thus, previous work using Ni-Mo catalysts supported on two different activated carbons (one prepared by {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} and the other by {open_quotes}chemical{close_quotes} activation) showed different optimal Ni concentrations for higher HDS activity, such difference being attributed to the predominance of Topsoe`s Type I {open_quotes}NiMoS{close_quotes} phase in one carbon and the predominance of Type II in the other. Due to the lack of proper characterization of the activated carbon supported catalysts of the previous work, this paper presents further data suggesting that microporosity provided by the activated carbon may be the responsible for the above referred synergism. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of a combined supported computer education and employment training program for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Dori; Anthony, William; Massaro, Joe; Rogers, E Sally

    2007-01-01

    Meaningful work is described as one of the functional indicators of healing and growth beyond the disability and is seen as critical in recovering a personal sense of worth and value. We describe a supported education-supported employment program which focused on teaching computer, recovery and work skills. A program evaluation was implemented on four consecutive classes of this program. Four classes with a convenience sample of sixty-one students were involved in the evaluation over years. The program utilized a one group pretest, posttest design, with repeated measures over time. Following the 10-month classroom training phase, students entered a 2-month internship to give them computer office work experience. Students were interviewed quarterly using standardized assessments involving work and other subjective outcomes. Results suggest that overall the students experienced a positive change in work status and income and a decrease in mental health services utilization. In addition, non-vocational outcomes, specifically self-esteem and empowerment improved. The program represents a successful integration of supported education and supported employment program models.

  14. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  15. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  16. Designing Real-Life Cases To Support Authentic Design Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sue; Harper, Barry; Hedberg, John

    Teachers in a range of disciplines are interested in engaging their students in authentic activities that reflect the experiences of real-world practitioners. Adopting this approach requires the design and implementation of learning environments that incorporate and support such activities. This paper describes two real-life cases at the…

  17. Support from Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training: The Pathways to Career Aspirations and Further Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Claudia; Stalder, Barbara E.; Tschan, Franziska; Häfeli, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Transition from school to work is a challenging period for young people with learning difficulties. In the dual vocational system of Switzerland, teachers at vocational educational and training (VET)-schools, as well as trainers at VET-companies, provide important support. We were interested in the different pathways from this support to…

  18. Physical activity and social support in adolescents: analysis of different types and sources of social support.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Júnior, José Cazuza de Farias

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of different types and sources of social support on physical activity in adolescents. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between physical activity and different types and sources of social support in adolescents. The sample consisted of 2,859 adolescents between 14-19 years of age in the city of João Pessoa, in Northeastern Brazil. Physical activity was measured with a questionnaire and social support from parents and friends using a 10-item scale five for each group (type of support: encouragement, joint participation, watching, inviting, positive comments and transportation). Multivariable analysis showed that the types of support provided by parents associated with physical activity in adolescents were encouragement for females (P < 0.001) and adolescents between 14-16 years of age (P = 0.003), and transportation (P = 0.014) and comments (P = 0.037) for males. The types of social support provided by friends were: joint participation in male adolescents (P < 0.001) and in these 17-19-year-olds (P < 0.001), and comments in both genders (males: P = 0.009; females: P < 0.001) and 14-16-year-olds (P < 0.001). We conclude that the type of social support associated with physical activity varies according to its source, as well as the gender and age of the adolescents.

  19. Arm weight support training improves functional motor outcome and movement smoothness after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Sebastiano, Fabio; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Nilsson, Jan; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness in acute stroke patients of a rehabilitation program performed with or without an arm weight support device. Twenty-eight acute, first-ever unilateral stroke patients were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Clinical evaluation included Fugl-Mayer Assessment, Functional Independence Measure and kinematic analysis [maximum and mean hand velocity, maximum range of motion (Max RoM), normalized jerk (NJ)]. Patients received 12 daily 30-minute sessions (6/week) of additional upper limb therapy performed using an arm weight support device (study group) or additional traditional physiotherapy (control group). The patients were evaluated on admission and at the end of the rehabilitation intervention. The two groups were clinically comparable on admission (p>0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in clinical scale scores and in Max RoM in flexion-extension, while only the study group showed improvements in NJ and in Max RoM in adduction-abduction. Rehabilitation training using an arm weight support device appears to be a useful method to supplement conventional therapy in acute stroke patients, increasing smoothness of movement and motor function. PMID:25014045

  20. 34 CFR 380.5 - What activities may the Secretary fund under community-based supported employment projects?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-based supported employment projects? 380.5 Section 380.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... following activities are authorized under community-based projects: (1) Job search assistance. (2) Job...) On-the-job training. (4) Job placement. (5) Application of rehabilitation technology in...

  1. Transfer of Training: Does It Truly Happen?: An Examination of Support, Instrumentality, Retention and Learner Readiness on the Transfer Motivation and Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Battour, Mohamed Mohamed; Sundram, Veera Pandiyan Kaliani; Othman, Akmal Aini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the importance of selected environmental, situational and individual factors in the training transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: This study proposes and tests a framework via structural equation modelling by including supervisor and peer support, instrumentality and learner readiness on…

  2. Primary Care Resident Training for Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Counseling: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Antognoli, Elizabeth L; Seeholzer, Eileen L; Gullett, Heidi; Jackson, Brigid; Smith, Samantha; Flocke, Susan A

    2016-07-08

    National guidelines have been established to support the role of primary care physicians in addressing obesity. Preparing primary care residents to recognize and treat overweight/obesity has been identified as an essential component of postgraduate medical training that is currently lacking. This study aims to identify how primary care residency programs are preparing physicians to counsel about obesity, nutrition, and physical activity (ONPA) and to examine program members' perspectives regarding the place of ONPA counseling in the curriculum, and its relevance in primary care training. Using mixed methods, we collected and analyzed data on 25 family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics/gynecology residency programs across Ohio. Programs averaged 2.8 hours of ONPA-related didactics per year. Ten programs (42%) taught techniques for health behavior counseling. Having any ONPA-related didactics was associated with greater counseling knowledge (p = .01) among residents but poorer attitudes (p < .001) and poorer perceived professional norms (p = .004) toward ONPA counseling. Findings from interview data highlighted similar perceived barriers to ONPA counseling across all three specialties but variation in perception of responsibility to provide ONPA counseling. While widespread expectations that primary care physicians counsel their overweight and obese patients prevail, few residency programs provide training to support such counseling.

  3. Motor and functional outcomes of a patient post-stroke following combined activity and impairment level training.

    PubMed

    Combs, Stephanie; Miller, Ellen Winchell; Forsyth, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this single-subject report was to determine the effect of a targeted training regimen aimed at improving motor and functional outcomes for a patient with chronic deficits after stroke. A 51-year-old woman with hemiparesis, 6 months post-stroke, participated in this prospective study. During the baseline, intervention, and immediate retention phases, performance was established by using repeated measures of four dependent variables: Fugl-Meyer assessment, Berg Balance Scale, 10-meter walk, and 6-minute walk. Two standard deviation band analyses were conducted on the four dependent variables with repeated measures. The Frenchay Activities Index and step length/single-limb support time measured at baseline and immediate retention were compared. During intervention, the participant was involved in a combined treatment protocol including body weight supported (BWS) treadmill training and strengthening exercises. Results indicated significant improvements in motor activity, balance, gait speed, and endurance. Progression was found in self-perceived participation. Although an improvement in step length symmetry occurred following training, a decrease in single-limb support time symmetry was found. BWS treadmill training, combined with strength training, significantly improved motor and functional performance in this participant with chronic deficits after stroke.

  4. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Irene H L; Fong, Kenneth N K; Chan, Dora Y L; Wang, Apple Q L; Cheng, Eddy K N; Chau, Pinky H Y; Chow, Kathy K Y; Cheung, Hobby K Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone.

  5. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  6. Supporting the Work Arrangements of Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors to Better Train Preservice Teachers: A New Theoretical Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalié, Guillaume; Chaliès, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal case study examines whether a school-based training scheme that brings together different categories of teacher educators (university supervisors and cooperating teachers) engenders true collective training activity and, if so, whether this collective work contributes to pre-service teacher education. The scheme grew out of a…

  7. Design of a decision support system, trained on GPU, for assisting melanoma diagnosis in dermatoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotsos, Dimitris; Kostopoulos, Spiros; Lalissidou, Stella; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Asvestas, Pantelis; Konstandinou, Christos; Xenogiannopoulos, George; Konstantina Nikolatou, Eirini; Perakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Thanassis; Cavouras, Dionisis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a decision support system for assisting the diagnosis of melanoma in dermatoscopy images. Clinical material comprised images of 44 dysplastic (clark's nevi) and 44 malignant melanoma lesions, obtained from the dermatology database Dermnet. Initially, images were processed for hair removal and background correction using the Dull Razor algorithm. Processed images were segmented to isolate moles from surrounding background, using a combination of level sets and an automated thresholding approach. Morphological (area, size, shape) and textural features (first and second order) were calculated from each one of the segmented moles. Extracted features were fed to a pattern recognition system assembled with the Probabilistic Neural Network Classifier, which was trained to distinguish between benign and malignant cases, using the exhaustive search and the leave one out method. The system was designed on the GPU card (GeForce 580GTX) using CUDA programming framework and C++ programming language. Results showed that the designed system discriminated benign from malignant moles with 88.6% accuracy employing morphological and textural features. The proposed system could be used for analysing moles depicted on smart phone images after appropriate training with smartphone images cases. This could assist towards early detection of melanoma cases, if suspicious moles were to be captured on smartphone by patients and be transferred to the physician together with an assessment of the mole's nature.

  8. Treadmill training with partial body weight support after stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Restoration and improvement of gait after stroke are major aspects of neurorehabilitation. Mobilization out of the bed into the wheelchair and verticalisation with the help of a standing frame are first steps. With the patient cardiovascular stable, gait restoration is put on the agenda. Instead of tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory maneuvers, patients should practice complex gait cycles repetitively. Treadmill training with partial body weight support enables the harness-secured patients to practice numerous steps assisted by two or three therapists. In controlled studies, it proved equally effective as walking on the floor. Gait machines, as the Lokomat or the Gait Trainer GTI, intend to relieve the strenuous effort for the therapists. For the GTI, several controlled trials showed a superior effect in acute stroke patients with respect to walking ability and velocity. For the ambulatory patient, aerobic treadmill training is effective to improve speed and endurance without worsening gait quality. Belt velocity and inclination are gradually increased so that the patients reach a predefined target heart rate. On the belt, patients walk more symmetrically, and higher velocities result in a facilitation of paretic muscles and render gait more efficient. In summary, gait rehabilitation has seen dramatic changes over the last years. More is to be expected.

  9. One Health training and research activities in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Reina; Koopmans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The increase in emerging human infectious diseases that have a zoonotic origin and the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobial drugs have shown the need for collaborations between the human, animal and environmental health sectors. The One Health concept increasingly receives recognition from policy makers and researchers all over the world. This overview compiled research and education activities in the area of One Health in Western Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Scandinavia, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (UK), with a focus on infectious diseases. It can serve as a starting point for future initiatives and collaborations. Material and methods A literature search for ‘One Health’ was performed using National Center for Biotechnology Information and Google. Moreover, information from global and European policy documents was collected and a questionnaire was designed to gather current One Health research and training activities in Western Europe. Results This overview shows that there is considerable recognition for One Health in Europe, although most educational initiatives are recent. In Europe, the One Health approach is currently mainly advocated in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Many countries have incorporated the One Health approach in their policy to fight AMR, and funding possibilities for AMR research increased significantly. The number of national and international multidisciplinary research networks in the area of zoonotic diseases and One Health is increasing. Discussion Although One Health has gained recognition in Europe, often a One Health approach to research and education in the area of zoonotic diseases and AMR is not implemented. In many countries, collaboration between sectors is still lacking, and One Health activities are predominantly initiated by the veterinary sector. To facilitate the

  10. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  11. 45 CFR 1612.8 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training. 1612.8 Section 1612.8 Public Welfare... CERTAIN OTHER ACTIVITIES § 1612.8 Training. (a) A recipient may not support or conduct training programs... activities; or (4) Train participants to engage in activities prohibited by the Act, other applicable law,...

  12. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  13. The roles of 'subjective computer training' and management support in the use of computers in community health centres.

    PubMed

    Yaghmaie, Farideh; Jayasuriya, Rohan

    2004-01-01

    There have been many changes made to information systems in the last decade. Changes in information systems require users constantly to update their computer knowledge and skills. Computer training is a critical issue for any user because it offers them considerable new skills. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of 'subjective computer training' and management support on attitudes to computers, computer anxiety and subjective norms to use computers. The data were collected from community health centre staff. The results of the study showed that health staff trained in computer use had more favourable attitudes to computers, less computer anxiety and more awareness of others' expectations about computer use than untrained users. However, there was no relationship between management support and computer attitude, computer anxiety or subjective norms. Lack of computer training for the majority of healthcare staff confirmed the need for more attention to this issue, particularly in health centres.

  14. Caregiver Training in Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Supports (MBPBS): Effects on Caregivers and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Karazsia, Bryan T.; Myers, Rachel E.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often manage the aggressive behavior of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities that reside in community group homes. Sometimes this results in adverse outcomes for both the caregivers and the care recipients. We provided a 7-day intensive Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) training to caregivers from community group homes and assessed the outcomes in terms of caregiver variables, individuals’ behaviors, and an administrative outcome. When compared to pre-MBPBS training, the MBPBS training resulted in the caregivers using significantly less physical restraints, and staff stress and staff turnover were considerably reduced. The frequency of injury to caregivers and peers caused by the individuals was significantly reduced. A benefit-cost analysis showed substantial financial savings due to staff participation in the MBPBS program. This study provides further proof-of-concept for the effectiveness of MBPBS training for caregivers, and strengthens the call for training staff in mindfulness meditation. PMID:26903906

  15. Caregiver Training in Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Supports (MBPBS): Effects on Caregivers and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay N; Lancioni, Giulio E; Karazsia, Bryan T; Myers, Rachel E

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often manage the aggressive behavior of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities that reside in community group homes. Sometimes this results in adverse outcomes for both the caregivers and the care recipients. We provided a 7-day intensive Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) training to caregivers from community group homes and assessed the outcomes in terms of caregiver variables, individuals' behaviors, and an administrative outcome. When compared to pre-MBPBS training, the MBPBS training resulted in the caregivers using significantly less physical restraints, and staff stress and staff turnover were considerably reduced. The frequency of injury to caregivers and peers caused by the individuals was significantly reduced. A benefit-cost analysis showed substantial financial savings due to staff participation in the MBPBS program. This study provides further proof-of-concept for the effectiveness of MBPBS training for caregivers, and strengthens the call for training staff in mindfulness meditation.

  16. Perceptions of Worksite Support and Employee Obesity, Activity and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Stephenie C.; Zapka, Jane; Li, Wenjun; Estabrook, Barbara; Magner, Robert; Rosal, Milagros C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations of perceptions of organizational commitment to employee health and coworker physical activity and eating behaviors with body mass index (BMI), physical activity and eating behaviors in hospital employees. Methods Baseline data from 899 employees participating in a worksite weight gain prevention trial were analyzed. Results Greater perception of organizational commitment to employee health was associated with lower BMI. Greater perception of coworker healthy eating and physical activity behaviors were associated with fruit and vegetable and saturated fat consumption and physical activity, respectively. Conclusions Improving organizational commitment and facilitating supportive interpersonal environments could improve obesity control among working populations. PMID:19063651

  17. Teacher training programs to support US Department of Energy education initiatives project at NIPER. Final technical progress report, March 23, 1995--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-31

    During the reporting period, the Colorado School of Mines provided teacher training for the U.S. Department of Energy/Bartlesville Project Office to support the DOE Education Initiatives Project at NIPER. Three teacher training workshops were held: (1) Oil and Gas Exploration Teacher Training Workshop, May 30 - June 2, 1995, Tulsa, Oklahoma (30 Oklahoma teachers trained); (2) Earth Science Leadership Institute (training in Oil and Gas Exploration and Ground Water Studies modules), July 9 - 30, 1995, Tulsa, Oklahoma (18 teachers trained representing 15 states and two countries); and (3) Energy: A Closer Look at Oil and Gas Teacher Training Workshop, June 26 - 28, 1996, Tulsa, Oklahoma (9 elementary teachers trained).

  18. ITU e-health training program for pacific island community with the support of the Sasakawa peace foundation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuichi; Juzoji, Hiroshi; Kitano, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Isao

    2011-06-01

    Tokai University School of Medicine provided a short-term e-Health training program for persons from Pacific Island Nations from 2006 until 2008 supported by funds from the Sasakawa Peace Foundation. There were lectures on software, hardware and topics relating to e-Health. We could assess the current medical situation in the Pacific Islands through this training course, and also obtain relevant material to analyze appropriate measures deemed necessary to improve the situation.

  19. Domain Modeling for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    teaching tools, current US Army standards for training and education are group instruction and classroom training, also known as “one-to-many...will be largely responsible for managing their own learning. In support of the US Army Learning Model (ALM) and to provide affordable, tailored SRL...and unit modeling, instructional management principles, domain modeling, authoring tools and methods, and evaluation tools and methods. This report

  20. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  1. Support vector machines classifiers of physical activities in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study is to develop, test, and compare multinomial logistic regression (MLR) and support vector machines (SVM) in classifying preschool-aged children physical activity data acquired from an accelerometer. In this study, 69 children aged 3-5 years old were asked to participate in a s...

  2. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity: Tools and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-sponsored, multi-year initiative designed to further improve the quality of, effectiveness of, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. This catalog is one element of the BEPS information dissemination process. The…

  3. Physical Activity and Social Support in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Mélo, Edilânea Nunes; de Farias, José Cazuza, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically synthesize the results of original studies on the association between physical activity and social support in adolescents, published until April 2011. Searches were carried out in Adolec, ERIC, Lilacs, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, SportsDiscus and Web of Science electronic databases and the reference…

  4. 77 FR 7242 - Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled Veterans, VA Form 28- 1904. OMB Control...-1904 is a written agreement between an on the job training (OJT) establishments and VA. The...

  5. 76 FR 73019 - Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity... comments on information needed to assure that on the job training establishments are providing veterans... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled...

  6. Employer-Employee Relations. A Guide for Industrial Cooperative Training Programs. Learning Activity Package. LAP 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Herbert G.; Chernenko, Walter

    This learning activity package, one of six intended for use in Industrial Cooperative Training Programs, is designed to aid students in developing a good employer-employee relationship by gaining the kinds of worker traits sought by employers. (The industrial cooperative training program provides industrial occupational training experience for…

  7. BOOST H2O - Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science near Lake Iznik, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derin, Y.; Hatipoglu, E.; Sunnetci, M. O.; Tanyas, H.; Unal Ercan, H.; Aktuna, Z.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Schroeder, P.; Ece, O. I.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    Field activities are often the best pedagogy for reinforcing principles learned in the classroom. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, six graduate students from three Turkish universities, four U.S. professors, and two Turkish professors participated in a week of training activities during May-June 2013. Field activities took place in the Lake Iznik region in western Turkey. The lake basin is geologically complex, with fault-controlled hydrogeology, and land use is dominated by agriculture, particularly olive cultivation. Professors trained the students (four females and two males) on concepts and techniques in surface-water and groundwater hydrology, water quality, and related computer software. Activities included stream gauging (using top-setting rods and a current meter), geomorphic assessment of streams (slope, cross-sections, and bed-clast size), measuring depth to water in wells, and collection of water samples from springs, wells, and the lake. Measurements of pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and alkalinity were performed along with sampling for stable isotope (oxygen and hydrogen) analysis. The students visited local villages, farms, surface-water intakes, and recreational springs for a holistic approach towards integrated water resource management. Results were discussed in the context of lithology, tectonics, land use, and other human impacts.

  8. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the Institute include the following: (1) To conduct basic and applied research; (2) to promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community; (3) to provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute; (4) to provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute; and (5) to disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  9. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the institute include the following: To conduct basic and applied research. To promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community To provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute. To provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute. To disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  10. Mesoscopic Patterns of Neural Activity Support Songbird Cortical Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From “time cells” in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia–projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song. PMID:26039895

  11. Mesoscopic patterns of neural activity support songbird cortical sequences.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jeffrey E; Liberti, William A; Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J

    2015-06-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From "time cells" in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia-projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song.

  12. Adherence to physical activity guidelines among cancer support group participants.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Lydon, A; Amir, Z

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity is recommended after cancer diagnosis for physical function, quality of life and survival benefits. This study provided preliminary data on the prevalence of physical activity among adult men and women with cancer in the UK. As part of a national survey of cancer support group participation, questionnaires including items on leisure-time physical activity and demographic information were completed by 748 cancer survivors. Overall, 395 (52.8%) participants reported no weekly moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity, 221 (29.5%) reported some activity but below minimum recommendations and 132 (17.6%) were meeting published guidelines. Gender, health status and socio-economic status were independently associated with meeting guidelines. Among participants in good or fair health who were not meeting guidelines, 59.9% thought that they ought to be more physically active. In conclusion, overall levels of physical activity are low among cancer survivors in the UK. However, the majority of insufficiently active participants showed awareness of the need to increase their activity, and may be receptive to interventions for promoting physical activity in this population.

  13. A peer-training model for instruction of basic cardiac life support.

    PubMed

    Wik, L; Brennan, R T; Braslow, A

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluates a peer-training model for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction for laypersons. Forty-one Norwegian factory employees were trained in CPR and given instructor training. These first trainees then trained 311 co-workers. These employees then trained 873 family members and associates at home. The reference group consists of employees in a Massachusetts commercial hotel trained in seven American Red Cross (ARC): Adult CPR classes. The Norwegian home trainees learned CPR using a cardboard training manikin and were trained by Norwegian factory employees who had learned CPR from co-workers. Trainees were evaluated using skill sheets and a Laerdal Skillmeter manikin. The performance of the Norwegians trained at home by peers did not differ from that of the ARC: Adult CPR trainees in six skills of the initial sequence of CPR. The home trainees outperformed the ARC: Adult CPR trainees in the proportion of compressions delivered correctly (P = 0.032) and ventilations delivered correctly (P = 0.015). Peer training may provide CPR instruction comparable to training in CPR classes at lower cost and with potential to reach new population segments.

  14. Integrating Science Communication Training and Public Outreach Activities into the Juneau Icefield Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, K.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Beedle, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Creating better linkages between scientific research activities and the general public relies on developing the science communication skills of upcoming generations of geoscientists. Despite the valuable role of science outreach, education, and communication activities, few graduate and even fewer undergraduate science departments and programs actively foster the development of these skills. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) was established in 1946 to train and engage primarily undergraduate students in the geosciences, field research skills, and to prepare students for careers in extreme and remote environments. During the course of the 8-week summer program, students make the 125-mile traverse across the Juneau Icefield from Juneau, Alaska to Atlin, British Columbia. Along the way, students receive hands on experience in field research methods, lectures from scientists across several disciplines, and develop and carry out individual research projects. Until the summer of 2012, a coordinated science communication training and field-based outreach campaign has not been a part of the program. During the 2012 Juneau Icefield Research Program, 15 undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States and Canada participated in JIRP. Throughout the 2-month field season, students contributed blog text, photos, and videos to a blog hosted at GlacierChange.org. In addition to internet outreach, students presented their independent research projects to public audiences in Atlin, British Columbia and Juneau, Alaska. To prepare students for completing these activities, several lectures in science communication and outreach related skills were delivered throughout the summer. The lectures covered the reasons to engage in outreach, science writing, photography, and delivering public presentations. There is no internet connection on the Icefield, few computers, and outreach materials were primarily sent out using existing helicopter support. The successes

  15. Training and certification program of the operating staff for a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to beginning a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system, a need was identified for a training and certification program to qualify an operating staff for conducting the test. The staff was responsible for operating and maintaining the test facility, monitoring and ensuring crew safety, and implementing procedures to ensure effective mission performance with good data collection and analysis. The training program was designed to ensure that each operating staff member was capable of performing his assigned function and was sufficiently cross-trained to serve at certain other positions on a contingency basis. Complicating the training program were budget and schedule limitations, and the high level of sophistication of test systems.

  16. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners' Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyuck; Cho, Youngsuk; Kang, Ku Hyun; Cho, Gyu Chong; Song, Keun Jeong; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Basic life support (BLS) training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min), level 2 (80 min), level 3 (120 min), and level 4 (180 min). Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p < 0.001) and average chest compression depth (p = 0.003). All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p < 0.001). Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs.

  17. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners' Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ku Hyun; Song, Keun Jeong; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Basic life support (BLS) training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min), level 2 (80 min), level 3 (120 min), and level 4 (180 min). Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p < 0.001) and average chest compression depth (p = 0.003). All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p < 0.001). Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs. PMID:27529066

  18. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training Program: Summary of program activities, fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-27

    The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training (HBCU NET) Program, funded by DOE, Office of Nuclear Energy and administered by ORAU, began in February 1984. The program provides support for training, study, research participation, and academic enrichment of students and faculty at designated HBCUs in nuclear science, nuclear engineering, and other nuclear-related technologes and disciplines. The program is composed of undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, student and faculty research participation, and an annual student training institute.

  19. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  20. Weight-supported treadmill vs over-ground training for walking after acute incomplete SCI

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, B; Apple, D.; Barbeau, H.; Basso, M.; Behrman, A.; Deforge, D.; Ditunno, J.; Dudley, G.; Elashoff, R.; Fugate, L.; Harkema, S.; Saulino, M.; Scott, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of step training with body weight support on a treadmill (BWSTT) with over-ground practice to the efficacy of a defined over-ground mobility therapy (CONT) in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Methods A total of 146 subjects from six regional centers within 8 weeks of SCI were entered in a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (MRCT). Subjects were graded on the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA) as B, C, or D with levels from C5 to L3 and had a Functional Independence Measure for locomotion (FIM-L) score <4. They received 12 weeks of equal time of BWSTT or CONT. Primary outcomes were FIM-L for ASIA B and C subjects and walking speed for ASIA C and D subjects 6 months after SCI. Results No significant differences were found at entry between treatment groups or at 6 months for FIM-L (n = 108) or walking speed and distance (n = 72). In the upper motor neuron (UMN) subjects, 35% of ASIA B, 92% of ASIA C, and all ASIA D subjects walked independently. Velocities for UMN ASIA C and D subjects were not significantly different for BWSTT (1.1 ± 0.6 m/s, n = 30) and CONT (1.1 ± 0.7, n = 25) groups. Conclusions The physical therapy strategies of body weight support on a treadmill and defined overground mobility therapy did not produce different outcomes. This finding was partly due to the unexpectedly high percentage of American Spinal Injury Association C subjects who achieved functional walking speeds, irrespective of treatment. The results provide new insight into disability after incomplete spinal cord injury and affirm the importance of the multicenter, randomized clinical trial to test rehabilitation strategies. PMID:16505299

  1. Presence and reflection in training: support for learning to improve quality decision-making skills under time limitations.

    PubMed

    Romano, D M; Brna, P

    2001-04-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) has been used for some time for training various skills. The results obtained are generally very reassuring, suggesting that Virtual Environments (VEs) are an effective new kind of educational tool. There are some, however, who argue that there are cases in which a 2D approach would achieve the same training effect. The literature suggests that the key features that distinguish VR from other training approaches is the sense of presence, which provides a first-person experience of the world. Usually, real world learning is multisensory and gives ownership and control over the experience, increases learner motivation, and triggers the construction of knowledge. Despite technical limitations, a VE is the most effective form of information technology for providing multisensory experience including visual, auditory, and to some extend haptic and tactile cues. The sense of presence ensures that the perceived experience is interpreted as being real and makes it likely that skills learned in the VE will be transferred to the real world. We argue that for training time-limited decision-making skills, the learner should also have an opportunity to reflect on actions/strategies to improve performance. Therefore a virtual environment for training should also provide support for students to reflect on their performance. This paper describes a prototype training system that aims to support both construction of knowledge and cognitive learning. It is also intended to trigger a sense of presence as well as provide support mechanisms, not available in the real world, that the students can exercise to reflect on the training experience.

  2. The medical exploration toolkit: an efficient support for visual computing in surgical planning and training.

    PubMed

    Mühler, Konrad; Tietjen, Christian; Ritter, Felix; Preim, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Application development is often guided by the usage of software libraries and toolkits. For medical applications, the toolkits currently available focus on image analysis and volume rendering. Advance interactive visualizations and user interface issues are not adequately supported. Hence, we present a toolkit for application development in the field of medical intervention planning, training, and presentation--the MEDICALEXPLORATIONTOOLKIT (METK). The METK is based on the rapid prototyping platform MeVisLab and offers a large variety of facilities for an easy and efficient application development process. We present dedicated techniques for advanced medical visualizations, exploration, standardized documentation, adn interface widgets for common tasks. These include, e.g., advanced animation facilities, viewpoint selection, several illustrative rendering techniques, and new techniques for object selection in 3D surface models. No extended programming skills are needed for application building, since a graphical programming approach can be used. the toolkit is freely available and well documented to facilitate the use and extension of the toolkit.

  3. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: South Australian Construction Industry Study. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zariah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  4. Examining the Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support, Transfer of Training and Service Quality in the Malaysian Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumrah, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationships among perceived organizational support (POS), transfer of training outcomes to the workplace and service quality in the context of public sector organizations in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The data for this study have been collected from three sources, the employees of public…

  5. Effects of a Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program on Impairment and Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Therese E.; Watson, Kyle E.; Ross, Sandy A.; Gates, Philip E.; Gaughan, John P.; Lauer, Richard T.; Tucker, Carole A.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effects of a supported speed treadmill training exercise program (SSTTEP) with exercise on spasticity, strength, motor control, gait spatiotemporal parameters, gross motor skills, and physical function. Method: Twenty-six children (14 males, 12 females; mean age 9y 6mo, SD 2y 2mo) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP; diplegia, n =…

  6. Design for a Comprehensive Program of Training for Administrative, Teaching, and Support Personnel in a Local School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Marilyn E.; And Others

    This overview paper describes a comprehensive training program for three levels of personnel in Montgomery County, Maryland public schools. The three levels include teachers, administrators and supervisory personnel, and supporting services employees. This staff development program is unique in its comprehensive scope, its career-long professional…

  7. Evaluation of Retention of Knowledge and Skills Imparted to First-Year Medical Students through Basic Life Support Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pande, Sushma; Pande, Santosh; Parate, Vrushali; Pande, Sanket; Sukhsohale, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Poor awareness among medical graduates about basic life support (BLS) is a matter of great concern. The presence of a trained rescuer is the key determinant of ultimate survival from life-threatening emergencies. To achieve this goal, early exposure to such life-saving skills is the right decision to foster these skills for medical students, which…

  8. Micronutrient Action Plan Instructional Tool (MAPit): A Training Tool to Support Public Health Professionals' Efforts to Eliminate Micronutrient Malnutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbon, Suzanne; Nsubuga, Peter; Knowles, Jacky; Bobrow, Emily; Parvanta, Ibrahim; Timmer, Arnold; van der Haar, Frits

    2006-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition (MM) is a global health problem that affects the national socioeconomic stability of an affected country. This article describes a multimedia training tool, the Micronutrient Action Plan instructional tool (MAPit), which has been designed to support public health professionals' efforts to eliminate MM. An overview and…

  9. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: South Australian Aged Care Workers Study. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zariah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  10. An Analysis of Functional Communication Training as an Empirically Supported Treatment for Problem Behavior Displayed by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Patricia F.; Boelter, Eric W.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Chin, Michelle D.; Hagopian, Louis P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the literature on the use of functional communication training (FCT) as a treatment for problem behavior displayed by individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Criteria for empirically supported treatments developed by Divisions 12 and 16 of the American Psychological Association (Kratochwill & Stoiber, 2002; Task Force,…

  11. Social Support Can Buffer against Stress and Shape Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hostinar, Camelia E.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Social support from close relationship partners is an important resource for coping with stress, particularly during childhood. We discuss ethical challenges associated with studying stress and its social buffering in the laboratory, as well as emerging evidence regarding two potential neural substrates for the social buffering of stress: hypothalamic oxytocin activity and activation of areas in the prefrontal cortex associated with effective self-regulation. We also address the role of early-life social experiences in shaping brain development, as well as recommendations for practice and policy that would advance the ethical treatment of children and reduce social inequalities in early-life experiences and opportunities–e.g., investing in programs that prevent child maltreatment and facilitating access to high-quality child care for economically disadvantaged families. We also debate the ethical implications of using oxytocin nasal sprays to simulate the stress-reducing properties of social support and advise waiting for more evidence before recommending their use. PMID:26478822

  12. The Adam language: Ada extended with support for multiway activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlesworth, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    The Adam language is an extension of Ada that supports multiway activities, which are cooperative activities involving two or more processes. This support is provided by three new constructs: diva procedures, meet statements, and multiway accept statements. Diva procedures are recursive generic procedures having a particular restrictive syntax that facilitates translation for parallel computers. Meet statements and multiway accept statements provide two ways to express a multiway rendezvous, which is an n-way rendezvous generalizing Ada's 2-way rendezvous. While meet statements tend to have simpler rules than multiway accept statements, the latter approach is a more straightforward extension of Ada. The only nonnull statements permitted within meet statements and multiway accept statements are calls on instantiated diva procedures. A call on an instantiated diva procedure is also permitted outside a multiway rendezvous; thus sequential Adam programs using diva procedures can be written. Adam programs are translated into Ada programs appropriate for use on parallel computers.

  13. 45 CFR 235.64 - FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., travel and per diem for: (1) Staff development personnel (including support staff) assigned full time to...: (1) Salaries, fringe benefits, travel and per diem for employees in initial in-service training of at least one week; (2) Travel and per diem for employees in agency training sessions away from the...

  14. 45 CFR 235.64 - FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., travel and per diem for: (1) Staff development personnel (including support staff) assigned full time to...: (1) Salaries, fringe benefits, travel and per diem for employees in initial in-service training of at least one week; (2) Travel and per diem for employees in agency training sessions away from the...

  15. 45 CFR 235.64 - FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., travel and per diem for: (1) Staff development personnel (including support staff) assigned full time to...: (1) Salaries, fringe benefits, travel and per diem for employees in initial in-service training of at least one week; (2) Travel and per diem for employees in agency training sessions away from the...

  16. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  17. The Effects of Compensatory Scanning Training on Mobility in Patients with Homonymous Visual Field Defects: Further Support, Predictive Variables and Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; Tucha, Oliver; Heutink, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People with homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) often report difficulty detecting obstacles in the periphery on their blind side in time when moving around. Recently, a randomized controlled trial showed that the InSight-Hemianopia Compensatory Scanning Training (IH-CST) specifically improved detection of peripheral stimuli and avoiding obstacles when moving around, especially in dual task situations. Method The within-group training effects of the previously reported IH-CST are examined in an extended patient group. Performance of patients with HVFD on a pre-assessment, post-assessment and follow-up assessment and performance of a healthy control group are compared. Furthermore, it is examined whether training effects can be predicted by demographic characteristics, variables related to the visual disorder, and neuropsychological test results. Results Performance on both subjective and objective measures of mobility-related scanning was improved after training, while no evidence was found for improvement in visual functions (including visual fields), reading, visual search and dot counting. Self-reported improvement did not correlate with improvement in objective mobility performance. According to the participants, the positive effects were still present six to ten months after training. No demographic characteristics, variables related to the visual disorder, and neuropsychological test results were found to predict the size of training effect, although some inconclusive evidence was found for more improvement in patients with left-sided HVFD than in patients with right-sided HFVD. Conclusion Further support was found for a positive effect of IH-CST on detection of visual stimuli during mobility-related activities specifically. Based on the reports given by patients, these effects appear to be long-term effects. However, no conclusions can be drawn on the objective long-term training effects. PMID:27935973

  18. First responder training: Supporting commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

    DOE PAGES

    Barilo, N. F.; Hamilton, J. J.; Weiner, S. C.

    2016-07-21

    A properly trained first responder community is critical to the successful introduction of hydrogen fuel cell applications and their transformation in how we use energy. Providing resources with accurate information and current knowledge is essential to the delivery of effective hydrogen and fuel cell-related first responder training. Furthermore, the California Fuel Cell Partnership and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have over 15 years of experience in developing and delivering hydrogen safety-related first responder training materials and programs. A National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergency Response Training Resource was recently released (http://h2tools.org/fr/nt/). This training resource serves the delivery of a varietymore » of training regimens. Associated materials are adaptable for different training formats, ranging from high-level overview presentations to more comprehensive classroom training. Our paper presents what has been learned from the development and delivery of hydrogen safety-related first responder training programs (online, classroom, hands-on) by the respective organizations. We discussed the collaborative strategy being developed for enhancing training materials and methods for greater accessibility based on stakeholder input.« less

  19. First responder training: Supporting commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Barilo, N. F.; Hamilton, J. J.; Weiner, S. C.

    2016-07-21

    A properly trained first responder community is critical to the successful introduction of hydrogen fuel cell applications and their transformation in how we use energy. Providing resources with accurate information and current knowledge is essential to the delivery of effective hydrogen and fuel cell-related first responder training. Furthermore, the California Fuel Cell Partnership and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have over 15 years of experience in developing and delivering hydrogen safety-related first responder training materials and programs. A National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergency Response Training Resource was recently released (http://h2tools.org/fr/nt/). This training resource serves the delivery of a variety of training regimens. Associated materials are adaptable for different training formats, ranging from high-level overview presentations to more comprehensive classroom training. Our paper presents what has been learned from the development and delivery of hydrogen safety-related first responder training programs (online, classroom, hands-on) by the respective organizations. We discussed the collaborative strategy being developed for enhancing training materials and methods for greater accessibility based on stakeholder input.

  20. Investigation of training and support needs in rural and remote disability and mainstream service providers: implications for an online training model.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Genevieve; Kerslake, Rachel; Crook, Sarah; Cribb, Corinne

    2016-11-28

    Objectives It is known that there are difficulties in recruiting and retaining practitioners in rural and remote communities and that access to support and professional development can be key in breaking this cycle. Technology provides a possible solution not only for increasing access to these opportunities, but also in building community capacity to support children with autism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the current learning and support needs within rural and remote professionals prior to setting up a model of support.Methods An online survey was used to gather information from service providers in rural and remote communities on their demographics, current skills and confidence in working with clients on the autism spectrum, current supervision and professional development, identified learning and support needs, and the availability and uptake of technology for accessing professional development.Results Respondents reported below average levels of perceived confidence and skills when working with children with autism, most notably children with challenging behaviour. Half the respondents do not currently attend supervision sessions, with only 15% receiving regular supervision (fortnightly or more often), and 66% of respondents had travelled more than 3h to access professional development workshops. The majority of participants had access to technology and over half had already used this for online training.Conclusion Overall, service providers in rural and remote areas are generally not currently meeting their needs in terms of frequency of supervision and professional development. The present needs analysis identifies key areas for learning, the ideal frequency of support and the acceptability of using technology to deliver this support. This information will guide future researchers in the development of an evidence-based model that will be accessible and meaningful to its participants.What is known about the topic? It is known that there

  1. Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training: Years 6 and 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah; Cyr, Rebecca L.; Pato, Michele T.; Thrall, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) has provided a series of full-day conferences of psychiatry residency training directors designed to increase their competence in…

  2. Collecting "Total" Vocational Education and Training Activity. Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In this position paper, NCVER's Managing Director, Dr Tom Karmel, argues that the submission of vocational education and training student data should be mandated as a condition of registration for all registered training organisations, including private providers. This will ensure a comprehensive data collection that gives a realistic view of…

  3. A Guide for Perceptual-Motor Training Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Euclid - Lyndhurst City Schools, Lyndhurst, OH.

    This document has been prepared as part of a kindergarten perceptual-training program of the South Euclid-Lyndhurst City School District near Cleveland, Ohio. The guide contains information on training and procedures related to perceptual-motor learning. This information is structured primarily into 150 lesson plans, devised as 30-minute sessions…

  4. Relaxation training affects success and activation on a teaching test.

    PubMed

    Helin, P; Hänninen, O

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of an audiocassette-relaxation training period (ART) and its timing on success at a teaching test (lecture type), on observed tension and on a number of physiological responses. The electrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (EMG), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), of female and male instructor candidates, were examined before, during and after the teaching test as well as during its critique. The relaxation period (18 min) was presented either on the preceding night (ARTnt) or immediately before the teaching test (ARTimm). The influence of personality (types A-B and extrovert-introvert) was also studied. ART improved success at the teaching test in both sexes. In males (but not in females), ARTimm decreased EMG level during the test, but ARTnt increased EMG at the test period as compared to the control group. In females, both ARTnt and ARTimm lowered HR more than in the control group. ARTimm lowered systolic BP in both sexes. Personality types affected the ART responses; ART was more beneficial for type A than B subjects.

  5. Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Drinking Water Academy provides online training and information to ensure that water professionals, public officials, and involved citizens have the knowledge and skills necessary to protect our drinking water supply.

  6. 77 FR 43238 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver Strand Training Complex, San Diego Bay AGENCY... harassment, incidental to conducting training exercises at the Silver Strand Training Complex (SSTC) in the... taking, by harassment, of marine mammals incidental to conducting training exercises at the Navy's...

  7. Capacity Building as a Tool for Assessing Training and Development Activity: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Sripirabaa, B.

    2008-01-01

    In recognition of its increasing importance, many organizations make periodic assessments of their training and development activity. The objective of the present study was to extend the concept of capacity building to the assessment of training and development activity in an automobile component manufacturing organization, using a developed and…

  8. Engaging Students in Learning Activities: It Is Not Autonomy Support or Structure but Autonomy Support and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hyungshim; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Deci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated 2 engagement-fostering aspects of teachers' instructional styles--autonomy support and structure--and hypothesized that students' engagement would be highest when teachers provided high levels of both. Trained observers rated teachers' instructional styles and students' behavioral engagement in 133 public high school classrooms in…

  9. Pharmacologically active microcarriers for endothelial progenitor cell support and survival.

    PubMed

    Musilli, Claudia; Karam, Jean-Pierre; Paccosi, Sara; Muscari, Claudio; Mugelli, Alessandro; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Parenti, Astrid

    2012-08-01

    The regenerative potential of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-based therapies is limited due to poor cell viability and minimal retention following application. Neovascularization can be improved by means of scaffolds supporting EPCs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether human early EPCs (eEPCs) could be efficiently cultured on pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made with poly(d,l-lactic-coglycolic acid) and coated with adhesion/extracellular matrix molecules. They may serve as a support for stem cells and may be used as cell carriers providing a controlled delivery of active protein such as the angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). eEPC adhesion to fibronectin-coated PAMs (FN-PAMs) was assessed by means of microscopic evaluation and by means of Alamar blue assay. Phospho ERK(1/2) and PARP-1 expression was measured by means of Western blot to assess the survival effects of FN-PAMs releasing VEGF-A (FN-VEGF-PAMs). The Alamar blue assay or a modified Boyden chamber assay was employed to assess proliferative or migratory capacity, respectively. Our data indicate that eEPCs were able to adhere to empty FN-PAMs within a few hours. FN-VEGF-PAMs increased the ability of eEPCs to adhere to them and strongly supported endothelial-like phenotype and cell survival. Moreover, the release of VEGF-A by FN-PAMs stimulated in vitro HUVEC migration and proliferation. These data strongly support the use of PAMs for supporting eEPC growth and survival and for stimulating resident mature human endothelial cells.

  10. Supporting Reflective Activities in Information Seeking on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitomi; Miwa, Kazuhisa

    Recently, many opportunities have emerged to use the Internet in daily life and classrooms. However, with the growth of the World Wide Web (Web), it is becoming increasingly difficult to find target information on the Internet. In this study, we explore a method for developing the ability of users in information seeking on the Web and construct a search process feedback system supporting reflective activities of information seeking on the Web. Reflection is defined as a cognitive activity for monitoring, evaluating, and modifying one's thinking and process. In the field of learning science, many researchers have investigated reflective activities that facilitate learners' problem solving and deep understanding. The characteristics of this system are: (1) to show learners' search processes on the Web as described, based on a cognitive schema, and (2) to prompt learners to reflect on their search processes. We expect that users of this system can reflect on their search processes by receiving information on their own search processes provided by the system, and that these types of reflective activity helps them to deepen their understanding of information seeking activities. We have conducted an experiment to investigate the effects of our system. The experimental results confirmed that (1) the system actually facilitated the learners' reflective activities by providing process visualization and prompts, and (2) the learners who reflected on their search processes more actively understood their own search processes more deeply.

  11. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  12. Predicting pupylation sites in prokaryotic proteins using semi-supervised self-training support vector machine algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zhe; Gu, Hong

    2016-08-15

    As one important post-translational modification of prokaryotic proteins, pupylation plays a key role in regulating various biological processes. The accurate identification of pupylation sites is crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of pupylation. Although several computational methods have been developed for the identification of pupylation sites, the prediction accuracy of them is still unsatisfactory. Here, a novel bioinformatics tool named IMP-PUP is proposed to improve the prediction of pupylation sites. IMP-PUP is constructed on the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs and trained with a modified semi-supervised self-training support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The proposed algorithm iteratively trains a series of support vector machine classifiers on both annotated and non-annotated pupylated proteins. Computational results show that IMP-PUP achieves the area under receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.91, 0.73, and 0.75 on our training set, Tung's testing set, and our testing set, respectively, which are better than those of the different error costs SVM algorithm and the original self-training SVM algorithm. Independent tests also show that IMP-PUP significantly outperforms three other existing pupylation site predictors: GPS-PUP, iPUP, and pbPUP. Therefore, IMP-PUP can be a useful tool for accurate prediction of pupylation sites. A MATLAB software package for IMP-PUP is available at https://juzhe1120.github.io/.

  13. 34 CFR 636.3 - What activities may the Secretary support?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activities: (1) Planning. (2) Applied research. (3) Training. (4) Resource exchanges or technology transfers... in urban settings. (6) Problems faced by families and children. (7) Campus and community...

  14. 34 CFR 636.3 - What activities may the Secretary support?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities: (1) Planning. (2) Applied research. (3) Training. (4) Resource exchanges or technology transfers... in urban settings. (6) Problems faced by families and children. (7) Campus and community...

  15. Job/Work Environment Factors Influencing Training Transfer within a Human Service Agency: Some Indicative Support for Baldwin and Ford's Transfer Climate Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    Interviews 6 months after 14 social services employees participated in inservice training identified job and work environment factors that impede transfer of training: short duration, lack of time and opportunity to practice, minimal supervisor support, and the perception that such training was more for personal development than application to the…

  16. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E

    2013-04-19

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l(-1) CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l(-1) CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8-9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l(-1) extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5',6'-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  17. Twelve months of active musical training in 8- to 10-year-old children enhances the preattentive processing of syllabic duration and voice onset time.

    PubMed

    Chobert, Julie; François, Clément; Velay, Jean-Luc; Besson, Mireille

    2014-04-01

    Musical training has been shown to positively influence linguistic abilities. To follow the developmental dynamics of this transfer effect at the preattentive level, we conducted a longitudinal study over 2 school years with nonmusician children randomly assigned to music or to painting training. We recorded the mismatch negativity (MMN), a cortical correlate of preattentive mismatch detection, to syllables that differed in vowel frequency, vowel duration, and voice onset time (VOT), using a test-training-retest procedure and 3 times of testing: before training, after 6 months and after 12 months of training. While no between-group differences were found before training, enhanced preattentive processing of syllabic duration and VOT, as reflected by greater MMN amplitude, but not of frequency, was found after 12 months of training in the music group only. These results demonstrate neuroplasticity in the child brain and suggest that active musical training rather than innate predispositions for music yielded the improvements in musically trained children. These results also highlight the influence of musical training for duration perception in speech and for the development of phonological representations in normally developing children. They support the importance of music-based training programs for children's education and open new remediation strategies for children with language-based learning impairments.

  18. Impacts of Health and Safety Education: Comparison of Worker Activities Before and After Training

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Paul; Morawetz, John

    2014-01-01

    Background The International Chemical Workers Union Council (ICWUC) Center for Worker Health and Safety Education in Cincinnati, Ohio, trains workers to protect themselves from hazards due to chemical spills and other chemical exposures. We evaluated whether the ICWUC Hazardous Waste Worker Training Program affects the attitudes and post-training activities, of trained union workers. Methods Detailed survey questionnaires were administered to 55 workers prior to and 14–18 months following training. Surveys queried trainees’ interest and involvement in safety and health, use of information resources, training activities at their worksite, and their attempts and successes at making worksite improvements. Results Post-training, the study population showed an increase in training of other workers, use of resources, attempts at improvements, success rates for those attempting change, and overall success at making improvements. Self-reported interest decreased, and self reported involvement in health and safety did not significantly change. Conclusion The study demonstrates that workers are more willing to attempt to change worksite conditions following training, and that their efficacy at making changes is substantially greater than before they were trained. The study confirms earlier work and strengthens these conclusions by using statistically tested comparisons of impact measures pre- and post-training. PMID:15202126

  19. Transfer of Training: The Role of Feedback in Supportive Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Jansen, Niekie

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of training to the workplace often fails to occur. The authors argue that feedback generated within the work environment about the application of newly learned skills in the workplace helps to close the gap between the current performance and the desired goal of full application of what is learned during training. This study takes a…

  20. Supporting Residential Student Organization Advisers: A 21st Century Adviser Training and Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Cory Adam

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for this doctoral action research study was to discover if and how an updated training and development curriculum benefited residential student organization advisers at Arizona State University (ASU). Eleven advisers of residential student organizations completed a pilot training and development program and agreed to participate in a…

  1. Responding to Changes in Building Legislation. Updating Training for the Building Regulations 1985 and Supporting Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert; Phillips, Alan

    A project sought to develop a means of updating and retraining those required to comply with Britain's 1985 Building Regulations, which are substantially different from the previous ones in regard to procedures and technical content. The training needs analysis conducted indicated that the new training should be flexible and use practical and…

  2. Language Assistant Training. A Report of Work Supported by the Nuffield Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Geoff; McAleese, Ray

    The report gives an account of a research and development project on Language Assistant Training. It shows the place of the Year Abroad in Modern Languages Degrees, and the need for training of English Language Assistants. After detailing the preparatory arrangements and timetable of a fieldwork visit to French schools to observe and record…

  3. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  4. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training.

  5. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.302 Training...-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  6. A Centralized, Web-Based Annual Training and Certification Program for a Decentralized Adjutant General Corps Will Improve the Level of Human Resources Proficiency for Human Resources Professionals in the U.S. Active Army, U.S. Army Reserve and U.S. National Guard Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-11

    66  Army eLearning ............................................................................................................ 67  AG... States CPT Captain CSRB Critical Skills Retention Bonus DA Department of the Army DANTES Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support DDE...Development, states the “Army’s training challenge is to optimize, synchronize, and support training in schools, training in units, and self–development

  7. 15 CFR 917.42 - Categories of support available for the conducting of Sea Grant activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... generally for a single item of research, education and training, or advisory service, but may be renewed... may be in research, education, training, or advisory services. Support for a project is made to an... bring into the National Sea Grant Program institutions of higher education that have a strong core...

  8. Effectiveness of Caregiver Training in Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) vs. Training-as-Usual (TAU): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Karazsia, Bryan T.; Chan, Jeffrey; Winton, Alan S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often end up having their medical and psychological well-being compromised due to the stressful nature of caregiving, especially when those in their care engage in aggressive behavior. In this study, we provided caregivers with mindfulness-based training to enable them to better manage their psychological well-being and, through this, to also enhance specific indices of quality of life of the individuals in their care. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) and Training-as-Usual (TAU) for caregivers in a congregate care facility for individuals with severe and profound IDD. The comparative effects of the two training conditions were assessed in terms of caregiver variables care recipient variable (number of aggressive events), and agency variables Results showed that MBPBS was significantly more effective than TAU in enabling the caregivers to manage their perceived psychological stress, and to reduce the use of physical restraints and stat medications for aggressive behavior of the individuals in their care. In addition, there were significant reductions in aggressive events by the individuals in their care, 1:1 staffing of individuals with aggressive behavior, and staff turnover. Furthermore, the MBPBS training was significantly more cost-effective than the TAU training. If replicated in future RCT studies, MBPBS may provide an effective means of enhancing socially acceptable bidirectional engagement of caregivers and care recipients within a person-centered context. PMID:27766088

  9. [The influence of locomotor treatment using robotic body-weight-supported treadmill training on rehabilitation outcome of patients suffering from neurological disorders].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Isabella; Meiner, Zeev

    2013-03-01

    Regaining one's ability to walk is of great importance for neurological patients and is a major goal of all rehabilitation programs. Treating neurological patients in the acute phase after the event is technically difficult because of their motor weakness and balance disturbances. Based on studies in spinalized animals, a novel locomotor training that incorporates high repetitions of task-oriented practice by the use of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) was developed to overcome these obstacles. The use of BWSTT enables early initiation of gait training, integration of weightbearing activities, stepping and balance by the use of a task-specific approach, and a symmetrical gait pattern. However, despite the theoretical potential of BWSTT to become an invaluable therapeutic tool, its effect on walking outcomes was disappointing when compared with conventional training of the same duration. To facilitate the deLivery of BWSTT, a motorized robotic driven gait orthosis (RBWSTT) was recently developed. It has many advantages over the conventional method, including less effort for the physiotherapists, longer session duration, more physiological and reproducible gait patterns, and the possibility of measuring a patient's performances. Several studies have been conducted using RBWSTT in patients after stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases. Although some of the results were encouraging, there is still uncertainty regarding proper patient selection, timing and protocol for RBWTT treatment following neurological diseases. More large randomized controlled studies are needed in order to answer these questions.

  10. Enhanced structural connectivity within a brain sub-network supporting working memory and engagement processes after cognitive training.

    PubMed

    Román, Francisco J; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Martínez, Kenia; Karama, Sherif; Burgaleta, Miguel; Evans, Alan C; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Colom, Roberto

    2017-03-18

    The structural connectome provides relevant information about experience and training-related changes in the brain. Here, we used network-based statistics (NBS) and graph theoretical analyses to study structural changes in the brain as a function of cognitive training. Fifty-six young women were divided in two groups (experimental and control). We assessed their cognitive function before and after completing a working memory intervention using a comprehensive battery that included fluid and crystallized abilities, working memory and attention control, and we also obtained structural MRI images. We acquired and analyzed diffusion-weighted images to reconstruct the anatomical connectome and we computed standardized changes in connectivity as well as group differences across time using NBS. We also compared group differences relying on a variety of graph-theory indices (clustering, characteristic path length, global and local efficiency and strength) for the whole network as well as for the sub-network derived from NBS analyses. Finally, we calculated correlations between these graph indices and training performance as well as the behavioral changes in cognitive function. Our results revealed enhanced connectivity for the training group within one specific network comprised of nodes/regions supporting cognitive processes required by the training (working memory, interference resolution, inhibition, and task engagement). Significant group differences were also observed for strength and global efficiency indices in the sub-network detected by NBS. Therefore, the connectome approach is a valuable method for tracking the effects of cognitive training interventions across specific sub-networks. Moreover, this approach allowsfor the computation of graph theoretical network metricstoquantifythetopological architecture of the brain networkdetected. The observed structural brain changes support the behavioral results reported earlier (see Colom, Román, et al., 2013).

  11. NASA Aerosciences Activities to Support Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been a critical element of the United State's human space flight program for over 50 years. It is the home to NASA s Mission Control Center, the astronaut corps, and many major programs and projects including the Space Shuttle Program, International Space Station Program, and the Orion Project. As part of JSC's Engineering Directorate, the Applied Aeroscience and Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch is charted to provide aerosciences support to all human spacecraft designs and missions for all phases of flight, including ascent, exo-atmospheric, and entry. The presentation will review past and current aeroscience applications and how NASA works to apply a balanced philosophy that leverages ground testing, computational modeling and simulation, and flight testing, to develop and validate related products. The speaker will address associated aspects of aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, rarefied gas dynamics, and decelerator systems, involving both spacecraft vehicle design and analysis, and operational mission support. From these examples some of NASA leading aerosciences challenges will be identified. These challenges will be used to provide foundational motivation for the development of specific advanced modeling and simulation capabilities, and will also be used to highlight how development activities are increasing becoming more aligned with flight projects. NASA s efforts to apply principles of innovation and inclusion towards improving its ability to support the myriad of vehicle design and operational challenges will also be briefly reviewed.

  12. Coordinating complex decision support activities across distributed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge-based technologies have been applied successfully to automate planning and scheduling in many problem domains. Automation of decision support can be increased further by integrating task-specific applications with supporting database systems, and by coordinating interactions between such tools to facilitate collaborative activities. Unfortunately, the technical obstacles that must be overcome to achieve this vision of transparent, cooperative problem-solving are daunting. Intelligent decision support tools are typically developed for standalone use, rely on incompatible, task-specific representational models and application programming interfaces (API's), and run on heterogeneous computing platforms. Getting such applications to interact freely calls for platform independent capabilities for distributed communication, as well as tools for mapping information across disparate representations. Symbiotics is developing a layered set of software tools (called NetWorks! for integrating and coordinating heterogeneous distributed applications. he top layer of tools consists of an extensible set of generic, programmable coordination services. Developers access these services via high-level API's to implement the desired interactions between distributed applications.

  13. Pacemaker deactivation: withdrawal of support or active ending of life?

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S; Amos Bailey, F

    2012-12-01

    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient's "self." The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the pacemaker is misguided. The authors argue that clinicians uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation are nevertheless correct to see it as incompatible with the traditional medical ethics of withdrawal of support. Traditional medical ethics is presently taken by many to sanction pacemaker deactivation when such deactivation honors the patient's right to refuse treatment. The authors suggest that the right to refuse treatment applies to treatments involving ongoing physician agency. This right cannot underwrite patient demands that physicians reverse the effects of treatments previously administered, in which ongoing physician agency is no longer implicated. The permanently indwelling pacemaker is best seen as such a treatment. As such, its deactivation in the pacemaker-dependent patient is best seen not as withdrawal of support but as active ending of life. That being the case, clinicians adhering to the usual ethical analysis of withdrawal of support are correct to be uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life.

  14. Isometric handgrip training reduces arterial pressure at rest without changes in sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carrasco, D. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether isometric handgrip (IHG) training reduces arterial pressure and whether reductions in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate this drop in arterial pressure. Normotensive subjects were assigned to training (n = 9), sham training (n = 7), or control (n = 8) groups. The training protocol consisted of four 3-min bouts of IHG exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) separated by 5-min rest periods. Training was performed four times per week for 5 wk. Subjects' resting arterial pressure and heart rate were measured three times on 3 consecutive days before and after training, with resting MSNA (peroneal nerve) recorded on the third day. Additionally, subjects performed IHG exercise at 30% of MVC to fatigue followed by muscle ischemia. In the trained group, resting diastolic (67 +/- 1 to 62 +/- 1 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (86 +/- 1 to 82 +/- 1 mmHg) significantly decreased, whereas systolic arterial pressure (116 +/- 3 to 113 +/- 2 mmHg), heart rate (67 +/- 4 to 66 +/- 4 beats/min), and MSNA (14 +/- 2 to 15 +/- 2 bursts/min) did not significantly change following training. MSNA and cardiovascular responses to exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia were unchanged by training. There were no significant changes in any variables for the sham training and control groups. The results indicate that IHG training is an effective nonpharmacological intervention in lowering arterial pressure.

  15. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  16. Effects of resistance training on cardiovascular health in non-obese active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Clare Chung-Wah; McManus, Alison Mary; So, Hung-Kwan; Chook, Ping; Au, Chun-Ting; Li, Albert Martin; Kam, Jack Tat-Chi; So, Raymond Chi-Hung; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Sung, Rita Yn-Tz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the benefits of a 10-wk resistance training programme on cardiovascular health in non-obese and active adolescents. METHODS This is a pragmatic randomised controlled intervention. The study was carried out in a Hong Kong Government secondary school. Thirty-eight lean and active boys and girls were randomised to either the resistance training group or the control group. Students in the resistance training group received in-school 10-wk supervised resistance training twice per week, with each session lasting 70 min. Main outcome measures taken before and after training included brachial endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation, body composition, fasting serum lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and aerobic fitness. RESULTS The only training related change was in endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation which increased from 8.5% to 9.8%. A main effect of time and an interaction (P < 0.005) indicated that this improvement was a result of the 10-wk resistance training. Main effects for time (P < 0.05) in a number of anthropometric, metabolic and vascular variables were noted; however, there were no significant interactions indicating the change was more likely an outcome of normal growth and development as opposed to a training effect. CONCLUSION Ten weeks of resistance training in school appears to have some vascular benefit in active, lean children PMID:27610345

  17. Analytical Support, Characterization, and Optimization of a Canine Training Aid Delivery System: Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-29

    Aid Delivery System: Phase 2 January 29, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lauryn E. DEGrEEff SuSan L. roSE-PEhrSSon Navy...Characterization, and Optimization of a Canine Training Aid Delivery System: Phase 2 Lauryn E. DeGreeff, Susan L. Rose-Pehrsson, Michael Malito,* and...Evaluation of homemade explosives (HMEs)........................................ 6 Evaluation of ammonium nitrate and aluminum (AN-Al) training aids

  18. Building Resilience in Families, Communities, and Organizations: A Training Program in Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Support.

    PubMed

    Saul, Jack; Simon, Winnifred

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the Summer Institute in Global Mental Health and Psychosocial Support, a brief immersion training program for mental health, health, and allied professionals who work with populations that have endured severe adversities and trauma, such as domestic and political violence, extreme poverty, armed conflict, epidemics, and natural disasters. The course taught participants to apply collaborative and contextually sensitive approaches to enhance social connectedness and resilience in families, communities, and organizations. This article presents core training principles and vignettes which illustrate how those engaging in such interventions must: (1) work in the context of a strong and supportive organization; (2) appreciate the complexity of the systems with which they are engaging; and (3) be open to the possibilities for healing and transformation. The program utilized a combination of didactic presentations, hands-on interactive exercises, case studies, and experiential approaches to organizational team building and staff stress management.

  19. Experiential Learning Through Participatory Action Research in Public Health Supports Community-Based Training of Future Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Lisa K; Lipus, Adam C; Choate, Laurie; Smith, Jamie; Coppola, Leigh; Cameron, William E; Shannon, Jackilen

    2015-12-01

    Engaging community members in research can help cultivate effective partnerships while providing experiential training and continuing education opportunities. Several studies have involved communities in this way, though many have been small in the scale of community involvement or have included little detail of the institutional review board process by which community members became approved researchers in the study. This article presents findings on an evaluation of the training procedures and experiences of 703 first-time community-based volunteer researchers who were recruited in their communities and trained on-site to enroll research participants, collect data, and provide individualized consultation of results at travelling health education and research fairs. Open-ended registration prompts and postfair surveys assessed volunteers' reasons for participating, comfort with their volunteer experiences, and attitudes toward the biomedical research process. An open-ended survey assessed two key community partners' perspectives about their organizations' involvement with supporting the research throughout the process. Volunteers reported their experience to be a unique training opportunity, citing its ability to help them engage with their community, advance research, and obtain additional experience in their health field of interest, particularly nursing, allied health, and medicine-related careers. Community partners cited that their community's participation as volunteer researchers served as a tool to educate the larger community about research, which enabled other research projects to gain acceptance. Together, these results demonstrate that using volunteer researchers can strengthen community research partnerships while providing valuable training experience in public health research for current and aspiring health personnel.

  20. Adolescents’ Daily Activities and the Restorative Niches that Support Them

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jenny J.; Aspinall, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores wellbeing from the perspective of the psychological dynamics underlying adolescents’ relationship with place. It uses a dynamic model of wellbeing called personal project analysis (PPA) which captures the concept of ‘flourishing’, defined as functioning well in your activities, strivings and interactions with the world [1]. Using PPA methods we identified adolescents’ daily activities and the ‘restorative niches’ that best support them. A series of settings (including home, urban and natural outdoor places) were explored using PPA with 45 young people (aged 11–13) living in Edinburgh, Central Scotland. Participants were asked to think of eight projects of current importance to them, to say where the project took place and to rate each project against a series of core wellbeing dimensions measuring project meaning, manageability, support and affect (how much fun, stress etc.). Latent class analysis was carried out to explore clusters—or sub-groups—in the data and to identify the significant discriminators between clusters. A three-cluster model produced the best fit with project type, project place and wellbeing indicators (fun and stress) significantly discriminating between the three clusters. The three clusters were labeled by their dominant environmental context, ‘faraway’ (e.g., beach, national parks, hills), ‘everyday’ (e.g., home, school, local streets) and ‘citywide’ (e.g., sport settings, urban town context). ‘Faraway’ and ‘citywide’ clusters had a significantly higher wellbeing content, especially for fun and stress; the ‘everyday’ cluster indicated local environs remain a dominant project place for this age group, but are associated with greater stress. We compare findings with adults and suggest that outdoor settings further afield from home have greater significance within adolescent project systems, but that support is needed to facilitate access to these places. PMID:23202680

  1. Education and training to support the use of clinical telehealth: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Edirippulige, S; Armfield, N R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Despite a growing literature base, substantial investment, and policy changes within governments, the integration of telehealth into routine clinical care has been limited. The availability of appropriate systematic education and training for practitioners has been highlighted as necessary for strong adoption. However, the availability and nature of telehealth-related education and training for practitioners is not understood. By reviewing the literature, we aimed to describe the delivery of education and training in telehealth, with particular focus on content, modes of delivery, types of institutions, and target clinician groups. Methods We performed searches using PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC. We included studies that were focused on the delivery of telehealth-related academic or vocational education and training. We extracted information pertaining to country, programs and their participants, and tabulated the results. Results Altogether 388 articles were identified, of which nine studies were selected for final review. Programs from five countries were represented and articles were spread across telemedicine and clinically oriented journals. Education and training in telehealth has been provided as both university level and vocational courses using conventional classroom based delivery methods and e-learning. Reported curriculum items included terminology, clinical applications, the evidence-base, and technological aspects. Conclusions Published evidence in peer-reviewed literature on telehealth education and training is limited. According to this review, a number of topics relating to telehealth have been covered by existing education programs both within tertiary and professional development levels.

  2. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  3. Active Component Responsibility in Reserve Component Pre- and Postmobilization Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    properly documented (Weiss, 2008, and Sanzo, 2008). The USAR established three regional training centers (RTCs), at Fort McCoy , Wisconsin; Fort Hunter...2008. Schuette, Rob, “Regional Training Center-North Standing up at McCoy ,” The Real McCoy , March 14, 2008. As of February 27, 2014: http...Transformation,” Carlisle Barracks, Pa.: U.S. Army War College, April 13, 2010. Witscheber, Loni, “Operation Warrior Trainer Offered at Fort McCoy ,” October

  4. Support for Astronaut's View of Mexican/ Central American Fires and on-Line Earth Observations Training Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, Charles F., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A small project to compile remote sensing and in-site data to review the processes leading to the May 1998 Mexican/Central American fires was undertaken. A web page based on this project was assembled. The second project initiated involved an interactive and on-line program that will replace the paper version of the Earth Observations Preflight Training Manual. Technical support was provided to Prof. Marvin Glasser as needed.

  5. DoD Needs to Improve Oversight of the Afghan National Police Training/Mentoring and Logistics Support Contract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-25

    morale, and public perception of the ANP. Specifically, the contractor was required to support the MoI/ANP training program by delivering classroom...Officer ( PCO ) confirmed with the previous ACC-Rl PCO and neither recall ever making this statement. The previous PCO recalls discussing that a QASP...performance surveillance and have access to all contract documents. Adequate contract oversight is always a concern of the PCO , in part due to the

  6. Instructional Management for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    additional content and complexity to support tailored learning for each user and as a consequence have a very high development cost, a major barrier to...Distributed Learning : Concurrent distribution of training and educational content to multiple users at the point of need in which content is...more positive feelings toward the system (Ritter et al. 2007). Additionally, by aligning examples and information in the content to be learned with

  7. Aerobic and resistance training do not influence plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P; Khandwala, Farah; Yard, Benito; De Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Peersman, Wim; Derave, Wim

    2015-10-01

    A particular allele of the carnosinase gene (CNDP1) is associated with reduced plasma carnosinase activity and reduced risk for nephropathy in diabetic patients. On the one hand, animal and human data suggest that hyperglycemia increases plasma carnosinase activity. On the other hand, we recently reported lower carnosinase activity levels in elite athletes involved in high-intensity exercise compared with untrained controls. Therefore, this study investigates whether exercise training and the consequent reduction in hyperglycemia can suppress carnosinase activity and content in adults with type 2 diabetes. Plasma samples were taken from 243 males and females with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 54.3 yr, SD = 7.1) without major microvascular complications before and after a 6-mo exercise training program [4 groups: sedentary control (n = 61), aerobic exercise (n = 59), resistance exercise (n = 63), and combined exercise training (n = 60)]. Plasma carnosinase content and activity, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, lipid profile, and blood pressure were measured. A 6-mo exercise training intervention, irrespective of training modality, did not decrease plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma carnosinase content and activity showed a high interindividual but very low intraindividual variability over the 6-mo period. Age and sex, but not Hb A1c, were significantly related to the activity or content of this enzyme. It can be concluded that the beneficial effects of exercise training on the incidence of diabetic complications are probably not related to a lowering effect on plasma carnosinase content or activity.

  8. Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited.

  9. An evaluation of postdoctoral research training and trainees supported by the National Institutes of Health in the Division of Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, C H; Scherbenske, M J

    1990-08-01

    The interest of young MDs and PhDs in research careers was assessed by determining the number of former trainees who applied for and (or) received research support from the Public Health Service. Thirty-two percent of trainees supported by Institutional Training Grants between 1977 and 1981 made a subsequent application. Seventy-six percent of all those who submitted applications to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research project support received awards. Examination of the success rate for individual applications submitted by former trainees showed that 56% of all applications submitted by MD scientists were awarded, and 57% of all applications submitted by PhD scientists were awarded. This compares to an NIH-wide average of 33.3% for the same period. The number of appointments made to Institutional Training Grants for a full year remained fairly constant over a 6-year period, as did the number appointed to individual fellowships over an 8-year period. The dollars expended on Institutional Training Grants increased 33% from 1982 to 1986 for a similar number of trainees, and increased 30% from 1981 to 1988 for a similar number of individual fellowships. The number of Research Career Development Award (RCDA) applications declined by 66% for MDs and by 53% for PhDs, accounting for a 32% reduction in the number of active RCDAs held by MDs and a 60% reduction in active RCDAs held by PhDs from 1985 to 1988. MD scientists submitted more applications, had higher award rates, and received more RCDA awards than did PhD scientists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  11. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  12. Music Activity Reports by Music Teachers with Varying Training in Orff Schulwerk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sogin, David W.; Wang, Cecilia Chu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music activities occurring in the music classroom of teachers who received different levels of training in Orff Schulwerk. The subjects (N = 49) were teachers participating in three training levels at a summer Orff Schulwerk certification program in a university in the USA. Teachers were asked to report the…

  13. 32 CFR Appendix C to Subpart M of... - Authorized Activities for Maneuver Training Area Access

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., blackberries, apples and other vegetation Photography Hiking 2. Yakima Training Center: Military Training (FL... activities Observation of wildlife and vegetation Photography Hiking Camping, per Paragraph 6 3. Camp...-commercial picking of ferns, mushrooms, blackberries, apples and other vegetation Photography Hiking...

  14. A National Study of Training Content and Activities for Faculty Development for Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their practices for faculty development for online teaching and particularly the content and training activities used during 2011-2012. This study found that the most frequently offered training content (97% of the…

  15. 76 FR 73020 - Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... written comments on the collection of information through Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request... comments for information needed to ensure contracts between VA and training facilities/vendors...

  16. Treadmill training with partial body-weight support after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    luo, Yuan; Shen, Weizhong; Jiang, Zhong; Sha, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the effects of treadmill training with partial body weight support (TTPBWS) and conventional physical therapy (PT) on subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 subjects were randomly allocated to either a treatment group or a control group. Subjects received either treadmill training with partial body weight support (treatment group) or conventional physical therapy (control group). The circumferences of the lower extremities, Holden classifications, 10-meter walking times and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were compared at 12 and 24 weeks post-operation. The knee joint stability was tested at 24 weeks post-operation using a KT-1000. [Results] Significant differences were found between the two groups at the 12 weeks post-operation. For most of the measures, there was no significant difference between the groups at 24 weeks post-operation. Interestingly, for most of the measures, there was no significant difference between their values in the treatment group at 12 weeks and their values in the control group at 24 weeks post-operation. [Conclusion] The function of a subject’s lower extremities can be improved and the improvement was clearly accelerated by the intervention of treadmill training with partial body weight support, without compromising the stability of the knee joints in a given follow-up period. PMID:28174445

  17. 20 CFR 641.630 - What private sector training activities are allowable under section 502(e)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What private sector training activities are... activities are allowable under section 502(e)? Allowable activities authorized under section 502(e) include... job development; or (9) Combinations of the above-listed activities. (b) Working with employers...

  18. Flexible Learning Activities Fostering Autonomy in Teaching Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupetz, Rita; Ziegenmeyer, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    The flexible use of digital recordings from EFL classrooms as well as online communication with teaching experts are two promising ways of implementing e-learning in the context of initial teacher training. Our research focuses on how to blend these elements efficiently with the different theoretical and practical content layers of an introductory…

  19. Simulation and training of ultrasound supported anaesthesia: a low-cost approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, T.; Lamontain, M.; Hilpert, J.; Schilling, F.; Tolxdorff, T.

    2010-03-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging technology during techniques of peripheral nerve blockade offers several clinical benefits. Here we report on a new method to educate residents in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The daily challenge for the anesthesiologists is the 3D angle-depending handling of the stimulation needle and the ultrasound probe while watching the 2D ultrasound image on the monitor. Purpose: Our approach describes how a computer-aided simulation and training set for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could be built based on wireless low-cost devices and an interactive simulation of a 2D ultrasound image. For training purposes the injection needle and the ultrasound probe are replaced by wireless Bluetooth-connected 3D tracking devices, which are embedded in WII-mote controllers (Nintendo-Brand). In correlation to the tracked 3D positions of the needle and transducer models the visibility and position of the needle should be simulated in the 2D generated ultrasound image. Conclusion: In future, this tracking and visualization software module could be integrated in a more complex training set, where complex injection paths could be trained based on a 3D segmented model and the training results could be part of a curricular e-learning module.

  20. 75 FR 61452 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Military Training Activities at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Activities at the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility Boardman, OR, and To Announce Public Scoping... activities on and increasing usage of the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman, Oregon... training activities to include force structure changes associated with the introduction of new...

  1. Effects of physical activity and training programs on plasma homocysteine levels: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    e Silva, Alexandre de Souza; da Mota, Maria Paula Gonçalves

    2014-08-01

    Homocysteine is an amino acid produced in the liver that, when present in high concentrations, is thought to contribute to plaque formation and, consequently, increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, daily physical activity and training programs may contribute to controlling atherosclerosis. Given that physical exercise induces changes in protein and amino acid metabolism, it is important to understand whether homocysteine levels are also affected by exercise and to determine possible underlying mechanisms. Moreover, regarding the possible characteristics of different training programs (intensity, duration, repetition, volume), it becomes prudent to determine which types of exercise reduce homocysteine levels. To these ends, a systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of daily physical activity and different training programs on homocysteine levels. EndNote(®) was used to locate articles on the PubMed database from 2002 to 2013 with the keyword combinations "physical activity and homocysteine", "training and homocysteine", and/or "exercise and homocysteine". After 34 studies were identified, correlative and comparative studies of homocysteine levels revealed lower levels in patients engaged in greater quantities of daily physical activity. Regarding the acute effects of exercise, all studies reported increased homocysteine levels. Concerning intervention studies with training programs, aerobic training programs used different methods and analyses that complicate making any conclusion, though resistance training programs induced decreased homocysteine levels. In conclusion, this review suggests that greater daily physical activity is associated with lower homocysteine levels and that exercise programs could positively affect homocysteine control.

  2. Effect of altitude training on serum creatine kinase activity and serum cortisol concentration in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, R L; Drake, S D; Hesson, J L; Nelson, J A; Kearney, J T; Dallam, G M; Williams, L L

    2000-01-01

    In this investigation we evaluated the effect of a 5-week training program at 1860 m on serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and serum cortisol concentration in national-caliber triathletes for the purpose of monitoring the response to training in a hypobaric hypoxic environment. Subjects included 16 junior-level female (n = 8) and male (n = 8) triathletes who were training for the International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Championships. After an initial acclimatization period, training intensity and/or volume were increased progressively during the 5-week altitude training camp. Resting venous blood samples were drawn at 0700 hours following a 12-h overnight fast and were analyzed for serum CK activity and serum cortisol concentration. Subjects were evaluated before [7-10 days pre-altitude (SL 1)] and after [7-10 days post-altitude (SL 2)] the 5-week training camp at 1860 m. At altitude, subjects were evaluated within 24-36 h after arrival (ALT 1), 7 days after arrival (ALT 2), 18 days after arrival (ALT 3), and 24-36 h prior to leaving the altitude training camp (ALT 4). A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences over time from SL 1 to SL 2. Compared to SL 1, serum CK activity increased approximately threefold (P < 0.05) within the initial 24-36 h at altitude (ALT 1), and increased by an additional 70% (P < 0.05) after the 1st week of altitude training (ALT 2). Serum CK activity remained significantly elevated over the duration of the experimental period compared to pre-altitude baseline levels. Serum cortisol concentration was increased (P < 0.05) at the end of the 5-week altitude training period (ALT 4) relative to SL 1, ALT 1 and ALT 3. These data suggest that: (1) the initial increase in serum CK activity observed in the first 24-36 h at altitude was due primarily to acute altitude exposure and was independent of increased training intensity and/or training volume, (2) the subsequent increases in serum CK activity observed over

  3. SMART: a system supporting medical activities in real-time.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Consorti, F; Merialdo, P

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the system SMART whose goal is real-time assistance to physicians who execute diagnostic or therapeutic protocols in a clinical context. SMART is able to retrieve a protocol from its knowledge base and to monitor its execution step by step for a single patient. Different protocols for different patients can be followed at the same time in a health care structure. The prototype realized supports the execution of protocols for evaluating surgical risks. It has been implemented according to the specifications given by the 4th Surgical Clinic of "Policlinico Umberto I" and reflects the activities actually performed in that hospital. However, the protocol model defined is general purpose and we envisage an easy application to other contexts and therefore to the informatization of other protocols.

  4. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  5. A Mixed Methods Examination of the Influence of Dimensions of Support on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Laura A.; Burkholder, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to explore how specific dimensions of supervisor support (mentoring, coaching, social support, and task support) influence the transfer of learned knowledge and skills to the job. Quantitative data were collected from employees (N = 48) who develop curriculum at an educational…

  6. Beware: Recruitment of Muscle Activity by the EEG-Neurofeedback Trainings of High Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Katarzyna; Jurewicz, Katarzyna; Rogala, Jacek; Krauz, Rafał; Szczypińska, Marta; Mikicin, Mirosław; Wróbel, Andrzej; Kublik, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    EEG-neurofeedback (NFB) became a very popular method aimed at improving cognitive and behavioral performance. However, the EMG frequency spectrum overlies the higher EEG oscillations and the NFB trainings focusing on these frequencies is hindered by the problem of EMG load in the information fed back to the subjects. In such a complex signal, it is highly probable that the most controllable component will form the basis for operant conditioning. This might cause different effects in the case of various training protocols and therefore needs to be carefully assessed before designing training protocols and algorithms. In the current experiment a group of healthy adults (n = 14) was trained by professional trainers to up-regulate their beta1 (15-22 Hz) band for eight sessions. The control group (n = 18) underwent the same training regime but without rewards for increasing beta. In half of the participants trained to up-regulate beta1 band (n = 7) a systematic increase in tonic EMG activity was identified offline, implying that muscle activity became a foundation for reinforcement in the trainings. The remaining participants did not present any specific increase of the trained beta1 band amplitude. The training was perceived effective by both trainers and the trainees in all groups. These results indicate the necessity of proper control of muscle activity as a requirement for the genuine EEG-NFB training, especially in protocols that do not aim at the participants' relaxation. The specificity of the information fed back to the participants should be of highest interest to all therapists and researchers, as it might irreversibly alter the results of the training.

  7. Beware: Recruitment of Muscle Activity by the EEG-Neurofeedback Trainings of High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Katarzyna; Jurewicz, Katarzyna; Rogala, Jacek; Krauz, Rafał; Szczypińska, Marta; Mikicin, Mirosław; Wróbel, Andrzej; Kublik, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    EEG-neurofeedback (NFB) became a very popular method aimed at improving cognitive and behavioral performance. However, the EMG frequency spectrum overlies the higher EEG oscillations and the NFB trainings focusing on these frequencies is hindered by the problem of EMG load in the information fed back to the subjects. In such a complex signal, it is highly probable that the most controllable component will form the basis for operant conditioning. This might cause different effects in the case of various training protocols and therefore needs to be carefully assessed before designing training protocols and algorithms. In the current experiment a group of healthy adults (n = 14) was trained by professional trainers to up-regulate their beta1 (15–22 Hz) band for eight sessions. The control group (n = 18) underwent the same training regime but without rewards for increasing beta. In half of the participants trained to up-regulate beta1 band (n = 7) a systematic increase in tonic EMG activity was identified offline, implying that muscle activity became a foundation for reinforcement in the trainings. The remaining participants did not present any specific increase of the trained beta1 band amplitude. The training was perceived effective by both trainers and the trainees in all groups. These results indicate the necessity of proper control of muscle activity as a requirement for the genuine EEG-NFB training, especially in protocols that do not aim at the participants’ relaxation. The specificity of the information fed back to the participants should be of highest interest to all therapists and researchers, as it might irreversibly alter the results of the training. PMID:28373836

  8. 77 FR 58567 - Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment Request... of the paperwork requirements in the regulations under Subpart O, ``Well Control and...

  9. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  10. 78 FR 7049 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    .... More advanced, integrated anti-submarine warfare training exercises are conducted in coordinated, at-sea training events involving submarines, ships, and aircraft. This training integrates the full... assess new and emerging technologies. Testing events are often integrated into training activities and...

  11. 78 FR 24161 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver Strand Training Complex, San Diego Bay AGENCY...) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting training exercises at the Silver Strand Training Complex (SSTC) in the vicinity of San Diego Bay, California. Pursuant to the...

  12. 77 FR 19231 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver Strand Training Complex, San Diego Bay AGENCY... Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting training exercises at the Silver Strand Training Complex (SSTC) in the vicinity of San Diego Bay, California....

  13. Education / training in supportive and palliative care in central and eastern Europe. Results of a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Luczak, J; Kluziak, M; Hunter, G Petrie

    2002-05-01

    During the totalitarian era terminal care was excluded from the health care system, and oncology, including education in the field, was rather neglected. The political and economic reforms that started in the 1990s in the countries of eastern and central Europe enhanced the development of palliative care and improvements in cancer treatment standards. This survey was performed to assess the current status of education and training in supportive and palliative care. A questionnaire was prepared and distributed by the authors to national leaders in palliative/supportive care. Data obtained from 16 countries indicate progress in palliative care provision and education, though it is held up by economic difficulties and by the lack of regulations in countries engaged in reforms of their health care systems. Training in supportive care is deficient; the discipline is usually perceived as the management of side-effects of anticancer treatment, so that it is not separated from clinical oncology. Access to professional literature should be improved, and the creation of national literatures should be encouraged. The role of local leaders, NGOs and professional associations must be emphasized. The main goals are: improvement of education, and better quality and availability of palliative and supportive care, not only for patients with cancer but also in other progressive life-threatening diseases.

  14. Effects of Skilled Training on Sleep Slow Wave Activity and Cortical Gene Expression in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Erin C.; Faraguna, Ugo; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: The best characterized marker of sleep homeostasis is the amount of slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5–4 Hz) during NREM sleep. SWA increases as a function of previous waking time and declines during sleep, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have suggested that SWA homeostasis is linked to synaptic potentiation associated with learning during wakefulness. Indeed, studies in rodents and humans found that SWA increases after manipulations that presumably enhance synaptic strength, but the evidence remains indirect. Here we trained rats in skilled reaching, a task known to elicit long-term potentiation in the trained motor cortex, and immediately after learning measured SWA and cortical protein levels of c-fos and Arc, 2 activity-dependent genes involved in motor learning. Design: Intracortical local field potential recordings and training on reaching task. Setting: Basic sleep research laboratory. Patients or Participants: Long Evans adult male rats. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: SWA increased post-training in the trained cortex (the frontal cortex contralateral to the limb used to learn the task), with smaller or no increase in other cortical areas. This increase was reversible within 1 hour, specific to NREM sleep, and positively correlated with changes in performance during the prior training session, suggesting that it reflects plasticity and not just motor activity. Fos and Arc levels were higher in the trained relative to untrained motor cortex immediately after training, but this asymmetry was no longer present after 1 hour of sleep. Conclusion: Learning to reach specifically affects gene expression in the trained motor cortex and, in the same area, increases sleep need as measured by a local change in SWA. Citation: Hanlon EC; Faraguna U; Vyazovskiy VV; Tononi G; Cirelli C. Effects of skilled training on sleep slow wave activity and cortical gene expression in the rat. SLEEP 2009;32(6):719-729. PMID:19544747

  15. How Do You Implement a Digital Environment to Support a Training Group?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronchi, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This case deals with an instructional designer (ID) working at a European university who has been asked to convert an existing on-campus program for working professionals to online delivery. This case took place over a period of several months and led to the development of an online training program. The program was designed to facilitate…

  16. Family Supports in Montana: Region III: Special Training for Exceptional People (STEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam

    Special Training for Exceptional People (STEP) is a private, nonprofit agency serving children with developmental disabilities (0-22 years) and their families in the south-central section of Montana, encompassing Billings and a Crow Indian Reservation. One of the services provided by STEP is specialized family care, to prevent placement out of…

  17. Collaborative Training and Practice among Applied Behavior Analysts Who Support Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Amy; Tincani, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, practicing behavior analysts play an integral role as interdisciplinary team members to develop instructional programs for students with autism spectrum disorder. However, there is a lack of research on collaborative training and practice as it relates to professionals in the field of ABA. In this study, 302 behavioral professionals,…

  18. Creating Place: Design Education as Vocational Education and Training. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Damon; Watson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Design is an increasingly important component of our world-at-work. This project reveals the views of design educators working within vocational education and training (VET). Research participants called for a review of design education teaching methods in the VET context, with a particular focus on promoting innovation and creativity in diploma…

  19. Prototyping a Web-Enabled Decision Support System to Improve Capacity Management of Aviation Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    image of “Cockpit Charts” as displayed from the NAPP Integrated Production Data Repository (NIPDR) website. Comp/fly day: 60 Outs Cumm : 232 Comp...plan day: 46 IPP Cumm : Outs Cumm : 140 Primary SIT: 100 IPP Cumm : 143 Inter. SIT: 65 Prim Preload:14 Figure 2. Cockpit Charts. (From: Training

  20. Supporting Accessible Technology-Enhanced Training: The eAccess2Learn Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    During the last years, the design and development of technology-enhanced training systems for disabled groups of learners has attracted the attention of the technology-enhanced learning community. However, although a number of such systems have been designed to meet accessibility needs and preferences for those groups, most of them anticipate…

  1. Intervention Programmes in Mathematics and Literacy: Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of Their Training and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houssart, Jenny; Croucher, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We approach the recent argument put in this journal that teaching assistants (TAs) should be more strongly trained, monitored and supervised when teaching on intervention programmes. We suggest that the argument sits uneasily with wider management and educational literature. We examine TAs' experience of delivering important intervention…

  2. How To Work with Small Businesses: Advice and Guidance for Providers of Training and Business Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Anne Marie, Ed.

    This publication provides guidance on good practice to help training providers in the United Kingdom improve the quality and relevance of services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Section 1 focuses on key research findings regarding SMEs' needs and SME-college collaboration, including trading conditions for SMEs; services on offer by…

  3. Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training--Supporting Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter; Dalton, Jennifer; Henry, John

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the Australian report, "Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training," and contains three parts. Part 1, Research Methodology and Findings (Peter Smith and Jennifer Dalton), contains: (1) Research Questions; (2)…

  4. Learner Support Requirements for Online Workplace Training in the South African Furniture Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Iain S.; Bullen, Mark; Kozak, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative research project was conducted to evaluate the suitability of e-learning as a means of delivering training to workplace learners in the South African furniture manufacturing sector. Twenty learners participated in a three-month pilot e-learning course and were monitored throughout. While the study was designed primarily to…

  5. A Context-Aware Mobile Learning System for Supporting Cognitive Apprenticeships in Nursing Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Su, Liang-Hao; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The aim of nursing education is to foster in students the competence of applying integrated knowledge with clinical skills to the application domains. In the traditional approach, in-class knowledge learning and clinical skills training are usually conducted separately, such that the students might not be able to integrate the knowledge and the…

  6. Does combined cognitive training and physical activity training enhance cognitive abilities more than either alone? A four-condition randomized controlled trial among healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shatil, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive training and aerobic training are known to improve cognitive functions. To examine the separate and combined effects of such training on cognitive performance, four groups of healthy older adults embarked on a 4 months cognitive and/or mild aerobic training. A first group [n = 33, mean age = 80 (66–90)] engaged in cognitive training, a second [n = 29, mean age = 81 (65–89)] in mild aerobic training, a third [n = 29, mean age = 79 (70–93)] in the combination of both, and a fourth [n = 31, mean age = 79 (71–92)] control group engaged in book-reading activity. The outcome was a well-validated multi-domain computerized cognitive evaluation for older adults. The results indicate that, when compared to older adults who did not engage in cognitive training (the mild aerobic and control groups) older adults who engaged in cognitive training (separate or combined training groups) showed significant improvement in cognitive performance on Hand-Eye Coordination, Global Visual Memory (GVM; working memory and long-term memory), Speed of Information Processing, Visual Scanning, and Naming. Indeed, individuals who did not engage in cognitive training showed no such improvements. Those results suggest that cognitive training is effective in improving cognitive performance and that it (and not mild aerobic training) is driving the improvement in the combined condition. Results are discussed in terms of the special circumstances of aerobic and cognitive training for older adults who are above 80 years of age. PMID:23531885

  7. Pedagogical Synergetics as the Activity Approach Basis in Professional and Pedagogical Training at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serezhnikova, Raisa Kuzminichna; Fishman, Boris Entilyevich; Abramenko, Natalya Yurevna; Zhoglo, Lyubov Yakovlevna; Fishbein, Miron Honevich

    2015-01-01

    The article considers an idea of activity approach realization in professional training assuming not only change of the contents, forms and methods of students' educational activities, but also not less radical transformation of teacher's activities oriented at the students' development of creative self-realization experience. The authors…

  8. A robotic system to train activities of daily living in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Guidali, Marco; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Broggi, Simon; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Nef, Tobias; Riener, Robert

    2011-10-01

    In the past decade, several arm rehabilitation robots have been developed to assist neurological patients during therapy. Early devices were limited in their number of degrees of freedom and range of motion, whereas newer robots such as the ARMin robot can support the entire arm. Often, these devices are combined with virtual environments to integrate motivating game-like scenarios. Several studies have shown a positive effect of game-playing on therapy outcome by increasing motivation. In addition, we assume that practicing highly functional movements can further enhance therapy outcome by facilitating the transfer of motor abilities acquired in therapy to daily life. Therefore, we present a rehabilitation system that enables the training of activities of daily living (ADL) with the support of an assistive robot. Important ADL tasks have been identified and implemented in a virtual environment. A patient-cooperative control strategy with adaptable freedom in timing and space was developed to assist the patient during the task. The technical feasibility and usability of the system was evaluated with seven healthy subjects and three chronic stroke patients.

  9. Exploring the Relationship of Religiosity, Religious Support, and Social Support Among African American Women in a Physical Activity Intervention Program

    PubMed Central

    Story, Chandra R.; Knutson, Douglas; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.

    2016-01-01

    Religious belief has been linked to a variety of positive mental and physical health outcomes. This exploratory study will address the relationship between religious involvement and social connectedness among African American women. Results from a physical activity intervention research project (N = 465) found that total religious support and social support were significantly negatively correlated with total religiosity, while total general social support was significantly positively correlated with total religious support. Overall, the study indicates that more research is needed on ways to encourage interaction between the positive dimensions of both religiosity and social support to bring about healthy behaviors. PMID:25673181

  10. Impact of Inertial Training on Strength and Power Performance in Young Active Men.

    PubMed

    Naczk, Mariusz; Naczk, Alicja; Brzenczek-Owczarzak, Wioletta; Arlet, Jarosław; Adach, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    Naczk, M, Naczk, A, Brzenczek-Owczarzak, W, Arlet, J, and Adach, Z. Impact of inertial training on strength and power performance in young active men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2107-2113, 2016-This study evaluated how 5 weeks of inertial training using 2 different loads influenced strength and power performance. Fifty-eight male physical education students were randomly divided into training and control groups. The 2 training groups (T0 and T10) performed inertial training 3 times per week for 5 weeks using the new Inertial Training and Measurement System (ITMS). Each training session included 3 exercise sets involving the knee extensors muscles. The T0 group used only the mass of the ITMS flywheel (19.4 kg), whereas the T10 group had an additional 10 kg on the flywheel. Before and after training, we evaluated maximum force and power of knee extensors muscles, countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), maximal power output achieved during ergometer test PVT, electromyography of quadriceps, and muscle mass. In T0 and T10, respectively, ITMS training induced significant increases in muscle force (25.2 and 23.3%), muscle power (33.2 and 27%), CMJ (3.8 and 6.7%), SJ (2.2 and 6.1%), PVT (8 and 7.4%), and muscle mass (9.8 and 15%). The changes did not significantly differ between T0 and T10. A 16% significant increase of electromyography amplitude (quadriceps muscle) was noted only in T0. The novel ITMS training method is effective for improving muscular strength and power. Improvements in PVT, CMJ, and SJ indicate that the increased strength and power elicited by ITMS training can translate to improvements in sport performance. The ITMS training can also be useful for building muscle mass.

  11. Mindfulness Meditation Training for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adulthood: Current Empirical Support, Treatment Overview, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John T.; Zylowska, Lidia; Kollins, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining nonpharmacological interventions for adults diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has expanded in recent years and provides patients with more treatment options. Mindfulness-based training is an example of an intervention that is gaining promising preliminary empirical support and is increasingly administered in clinical settings. The aim of this review is to provide a rationale for the application of mindfulness to individuals diagnosed with ADHD, describe the current state of the empirical basis for mindfulness training in ADHD, and summarize a treatment approach specific to adults diagnosed with ADHD: the Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPs) for ADHD Program. Two case study examples are provided to demonstrate relevant clinical issues for practitioners interested in this approach. Directions for future research, including mindfulness meditation as a standalone treatment and as a complementary approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy, are provided. PMID:25908900

  12. Latino Parents Utilizing Home-Based Activities to Support Algebra-Readiness Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinar, Soledad Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation involved a series of training sessions where parents from a Title I middle school participated in the learning and practice of Algebra Readiness skills. The project was based on a series of six weekly trainings for parents to learn home-based activities to increase their child's Algebra Readiness. I administered an initial…

  13. Fall Detection with the Support Vector Machine during Scripted and Continuous Unscripted Activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Chang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the number of proposed fall-detection systems that have been developed has increased dramatically. A threshold-based algorithm utilizing an accelerometer has been used to detect low-complexity falling activities. In this study, we defined activities in which the body's center of gravity quickly declines as falling activities of daily life (ADLs). In the non-falling ADLs, we also focused on the body's center of gravity. A hyperplane of the support vector machine (SVM) was used as the separating plane to replace the traditional threshold method for the detection of falling ADLs. The scripted and continuous unscripted activities were performed by two groups of young volunteers (20 subjects) and one group of elderly volunteers (five subjects). The results showed that the four parameters of the input vector had the best accuracy with 99.1% and 98.4% in the training and testing, respectively. For the continuous unscripted test of one hour, there were two and one false positive events among young volunteers and elderly volunteers, respectively. PMID:23112713

  14. Evaluation of photocatalytic activities of supported catalysts on NaX zeolite or activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    de Brites-Nóbrega, Fernanda F; Polo, Aldino N B; Benedetti, Angélica M; Leão, Mônica M D; Slusarski-Santana, Veronice; Fernandes-Machado, Nádia R C

    2013-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of ZnO and Nb2O5 catalysts, both supported on NaX zeolite and activated charcoal (AC). The synergistic effect between oxide and support and the influence of solution pH (3, 7 and 9) on photocatalytic degradation of reactive blue 5G (C.I. 222) were analyzed. The catalysts Nb2O5/NaX, Nb2O5/AC and ZnO/NaX, ZnO/AC with 5 and 10% (wt%) were prepared by wet impregnation. The results showed that the catalysts exhibit quite different structural and textural properties. The synergic effect between ZnO and NaX support was higher than that with the activated charcoal, showing that these catalysts were more efficient. The most photoactive catalyst was 10% ZnO/NaX which showed 100% discoloration of the dye solution at pH 3, 7 and 9 after 0.5, 5 and 2h of irradiation, respectively. The hydrolytic nature of zeolite favored the formation of surface hydroxyl radicals, which increased the activity of the photocatalyst. Thus, catalysts supported on NaX zeolite are promising for use in photocatalysis.

  15. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  16. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  17. Cultivating Research Skills: An interdisciplinary approach in training and supporting energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, H.; Carbajales-Dale, P.; Alschbach, E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience and energy research has essentially separate and diverse tracks and traditions, making the education process labor-intensive and burdensome. Using a combined forces approach to training, a multidisciplinary workshop on information and data sources and research skills was developed and offered through several departments at Stanford University. The popular workshops taught required skills to scientists - giving training on new technologies, access to restricted energy-related scientific and government databases, search strategies for data-driven resources, and visualization and geospatial analytics. Feedback and data suggest these workshops were fundamental as they set the foundation for subsequent learning opportunities for students and faculty. This session looks at the integration of the information workshops within multiple energy and geoscience programs and the importance of formally cultivating research and information skills.

  18. Psychological First Aid: A Consensus-Derived, Empirically Supported, Competency-Based Training Model

    PubMed Central

    Everly, George S.; Brown, Lisa M.; Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Abd Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Tallchief, Vicki L.; Links, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Surges in demand for professional mental health services occasioned by disasters represent a major public health challenge. To build response capacity, numerous psychological first aid (PFA) training models for professional and lay audiences have been developed that, although often concurring on broad intervention aims, have not systematically addressed pedagogical elements necessary for optimal learning or teaching. We describe a competency-based model of PFA training developed under the auspices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Schools of Public Health. We explain the approach used for developing and refining the competency set and summarize the observable knowledge, skills, and attitudes underlying the 6 core competency domains. We discuss the strategies for model dissemination, validation, and adoption in professional and lay communities. PMID:23865656

  19. Experiential Learning Through Participatory Action Research in Public Health Supports Community-Based Training of Future Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Lisa K.; Lipus, Adam C.; Choate, Laurie; Smith, Jamie; Coppola, Leigh; Cameron, William E.; Shannon, Jackilen

    2016-01-01

    Engaging community members in research can help cultivate effective partnerships while providing experiential training and continuing education opportunities. Several studies have involved communities in this way, though many have been small in the scale of community involvement or have included little detail of the institutional review board process by which community members became approved researchers in the study. This article presents findings on an evaluation of the training procedures and experiences of 703 first-time community-based volunteer researchers who were recruited in their communities and trained on-site to enroll research participants, collect data, and provide individualized consultation of results at travelling health education and research fairs. Open-ended registration prompts and postfair surveys assessed volunteers’ reasons for participating, comfort with their volunteer experiences, and attitudes toward the biomedical research process. An open-ended survey assessed two key community partners’ perspectives about their organizations’ involvement with supporting the research throughout the process. Volunteers reported their experience to be a unique training opportunity, citing its ability to help them engage with their community, advance research, and obtain additional experience in their health field of interest, particularly nursing, allied health, and medicine-related careers. Community partners cited that their community’s participation as volunteer researchers served as a tool to educate the larger community about research, which enabled other research projects to gain acceptance. Together, these results demonstrate that using volunteer researchers can strengthen community research partnerships while providing valuable training experience in public health research for current and aspiring health personnel. PMID:27536722

  20. Proposed Scientific Support to the Land Vehicle Crew Training System (LVCTS) Project Requirements Definition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    effectiveness of motion in training simulators except for very specialized tasks and unique conditions (Bowen, Oakley & Barnett, 2006; Bürki-Cohen, Soja ...Arlington, VA: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral & Social Sciences. [5] Bürki-Cohen, J., Soja , N. N. & Longridge, R. (1998a). Simulator...Switzerland 216-231. [6] Bürki-Cohen, J., Soja , N. N. & Longridge, R. (1998b). Simulator Platform Motion—The Need Revisited. Paper presented at the

  1. A novel electronic assessment strategy to support applied Drosophila genetics training in university courses.

    PubMed

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-02-25

    The advent of "omic" technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353-358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation.

  2. A Novel Electronic Assessment Strategy to Support Applied Drosophila Genetics Training in University Courses

    PubMed Central

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The advent of “omic” technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353−358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation. PMID:25717150

  3. Preparation of Effective Operating Manuals to Support Waste Management Plant Operator Training

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S. R.

    2003-02-25

    Effective plant operating manuals used in a formal training program can make the difference between a successful operation and a failure. Once the plant process design and control strategies have been fixed, equipment has been ordered, and the plant is constructed, the only major variable affecting success is the capability of plant operating personnel. It is essential that the myriad details concerning plant operation are documented in comprehensive operating manuals suitable for training the non-technical personnel that will operate the plant. These manuals must cover the fundamental principles of each unit operation including how each operates, what process variables are important, and the impact of each variable on the overall process. In addition, operators must know the process control strategies, process interlocks, how to respond to alarms, each of the detailed procedures required to start up and optimize the plant, and every control loop-including when it is appropriate to take manual control. More than anything else, operating mistakes during the start-up phase can lead to substantial delays in achieving design processing rates as well as to problems with government authorities if environmental permit limits are exceeded. The only way to assure return on plant investment is to ensure plant operators have the knowledge to properly run the plant from the outset. A comprehensive set of operating manuals specifically targeted toward plant operators and supervisors written by experienced operating personnel is the only effective way to provide the necessary information for formal start-up training.

  4. Training Frontline Staff. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    This four-part workbook will help program leaders teach education specialists the principles, processes, and skills necessary to deliver effective Supported Education services. The workbook includes the following: (1) Basic elements and practice principles of Supported Education; (2) Knowledge and skills to help consumers make informed choices…

  5. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  6. Methods for a Randomized Trial of Weight-Supported Treadmill Training versus Conventional Training for Walking during Inpatient Rehabilitation after Incomplete Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Apple, David; Barbeau, Hugues; Basso, Michele; Behrman, Andrea; Deforge, Dan; Ditunno, John; Dudley, Gary; Elashoff, Robert; Fugate, Lisa; Harkema, Susan; Saulino, Michael; Scott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the rationale and methodology for the first prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a task-oriented walking intervention for subjects during early rehabilitation for an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The experimental strategy, body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT), allows physical therapists to systematically train patients to walk on a treadmill at increasing speeds typical of community ambulation with increasing weight bearing. The therapists provide verbal and tactile cues to facilitate the kinematic, kinetic, and temporal features of walking. Subjects were randomly assigned to a conventional therapy program for mobility versus the same intensity and duration of a combination of BWSTT and over-ground locomotor retraining. Subjects had an incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association grades B, C, and D) from C-4 to T-10 (upper motoneuron group) or from T-11 to L-3 (lower motoneuron group). Within 8 weeks of a SCI, 146 subjects were entered for 12 weeks of intervention. The 2 single-blinded primary outcome measures are the level of independence for ambulation and, for those who are able to walk, the maximal speed for walking 50 feet, tested 6 and 12 months after randomization. The trial’s methodology offers a model for the feasibility of translating neuroscientific experiments into a RCT to develop evidence-based rehabilitation practices. PMID:14503436

  7. Interactive Whiteboard Integration in Classrooms: Active Teachers Understanding about Their Training Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Meritxell Cortada; Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    With the incorporation in education of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), emerges the need for a proper teacher training process due to adequate the integration and the didactic use of this tool in the classroom. This article discusses the teachers' perception on the training process for ICT integration. Its main aim is to contribute to the unification of minimum criteria for effective ICT implementation in any training process for active teachers. This case study begins from the development of a training model called Eduticom which was putted into practice in 4 schools in Catalonia, Spain. Findings indicated different teachers' needs such as an appropriate infrastructure, a proper management and a flexible training model which essentially addresses methodological and didactic aspects of IWB uses in the classroom.

  8. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  9. HandSight: Supporting Everyday Activities through Touch-Vision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    10 training samples per hand region. This could be perceived as overly burdensome by some users. As a comparison, the Apple Fingerprint Recognition...New York, NY, USA, 2005), 106–113. [25] Labati, R.D., Piuri, V. and Scotti, F. 2015. Touchless Fingerprint Biometrics. CRC Press. [26] Li, F.C.Y

  10. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    Progress made in the current year is listed, and the following papers are included in the appendix: Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of an Auxiliary Bearing Supported Rotor System; Dynamic Behavior of a Magnetic Bearing Supported Jet Engine Rotor with Auxiliary Bearings; Dynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of a Magnetic Bearing Rotor System with Auxiliary Bearings; and Synchronous Dynamics of a Coupled Shaft/Bearing/Housing System with Auxiliary Support from a Clearance Bearing: Analysis and Experiment.

  11. Comparison of Support Vector Machine, Neural Network, and CART Algorithms for the Land-Cover Classification Using Limited Training Data Points

    EPA Science Inventory

    Support vector machine (SVM) was applied for land-cover characterization using MODIS time-series data. Classification performance was examined with respect to training sample size, sample variability, and landscape homogeneity (purity). The results were compared to two convention...

  12. Working memory training is associated with lower prefrontal cortex activation in a divergent thinking task.

    PubMed

    Vartanian, O; Jobidon, M-E; Bouak, F; Nakashima, A; Smith, I; Lam, Q; Cheung, B

    2013-04-16

    Working memory (WM) training has been shown to lead to improvements in WM capacity and fluid intelligence. Given that divergent thinking loads on WM and fluid intelligence, we tested the hypothesis that WM training would improve performance and moderate neural function in the Alternate Uses Task (AUT)-a classic test of divergent thinking. We tested this hypothesis by administering the AUT in the functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner following a short regimen of WM training (experimental condition), or engagement in a choice reaction time task not expected to engage WM (active control condition). Participants in the experimental group exhibited significant improvement in performance in the WM task as a function of training, as well as a significant gain in fluid intelligence. Although the two groups did not differ in their performance on the AUT, activation was significantly lower in the experimental group in ventrolateral prefrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices-two brain regions known to play dissociable and critical roles in divergent thinking. Furthermore, gain in fluid intelligence mediated the effect of training on brain activation in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that a short regimen of WM training is associated with lower prefrontal activation-a marker of neural efficiency-in divergent thinking.

  13. Weight training, aerobic physical activities, and long-term waist circumference change in men

    PubMed Central

    Mekary, Rania A.; Grøntved, Anders; Despres, Jean-Pierre; De Moura, Leandro Pereira; Asgarzadeh, Morteza; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Giovannucci, Edward; Hu, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Findings on weight training and waist circumference (WC) change are controversial. This study examined prospectively whether weight training, moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity (MVAA), and replacement of one activity for another were associated with favorable changes in WC and body weight (BW). Methods Physical activity, WC, and BW were reported in 1996 and 2008 in a cohort of 10,500 healthy U.S. men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used multiple linear regression models (partition/substitution) to assess these associations. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, we observed a significant inverse dose-response relationship between weight training and WC change (P-trend<0.001). Less age-associated WC increase was seen with a 20 min/day activity increase; this benefit was significantly stronger for weight training (-0.67cm, 95%CI -0.93, -0.41) than for MVAA (-0.33cm, 95%CI -0.40, -0.27), other activities (-0.16cm, 95%CI -0.28, -0.03), or TV watching (0.08cm, 95%CI 0.05, 0.12). Substituting 20 min/day of weight training for any other discretionary activity had the strongest inverse association with WC change. MVAA had the strongest inverse association with BW change (-0.23kg, 95%CI -0.29, -0.17). Conclusions Among various activities, weight training had the strongest association with less WC increase. Studies on frequency /volume of weight training and WC change are warranted. PMID:25530447

  14. 45 CFR 1612.8 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Training. 1612.8 Section 1612.8 Public Welfare... CERTAIN OTHER ACTIVITIES § 1612.8 Training. (a) A recipient may not support or conduct training programs that: (1) Advocate particular public policies; (2) Encourage or facilitate political activities,...

  15. 45 CFR 1612.8 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Training. 1612.8 Section 1612.8 Public Welfare... CERTAIN OTHER ACTIVITIES § 1612.8 Training. (a) A recipient may not support or conduct training programs that: (1) Advocate particular public policies; (2) Encourage or facilitate political activities,...

  16. Does Spousal Support Can Increase the Women’s Physical Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Hajar; Amidi Mazaheri, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Numerous benefits of physical activity are well-known for the prevention and treatment of various diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and cancers. However, the status of physical activities among women remains noticeably less than the recommended level. Considering the importance of the spouses’ participation in the promotion of women’s health, this study examined the impact of spousal support on women’s physical activity. Methods: This semi--experimental study was done in February 2015 on 100 couples in reproductive age referred to health centers of Falavarjan city. The participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. The information related to women’s physical activity in both groups was collected by aquestionnaire in two steps, before and three months after the intervention. The spouses of women in the intervention group were trained in the field of the importance of physical activity in women’s health in two sessions. The data were analyzed by the software SPSS21 and suitable statistical tests (Independent t, paired t, and Chi-square). Results: The mean and standard deviation of women’s age in the both groups were 28.76±5.51 and 30.38±5.31, respectively. The prevalence of obesity and overweight in the women under the study was generally estimated 44%. Physical activities of women in the intervention group were significantly increased after the intervention (P<0.0001). Also, the Body Mass Index in the intervention group was significantly decreased compared to before the intervention and control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Spouses could encourage women to perform physical activities. It is recommended that the health care system should implement educational sessions for men to encourage women to exercise.

  17. Training Future Teachers from the Standpoint of Implementation of Modular-Activity Programs: International Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desiatov, Tymofiy

    2014-01-01

    The new approach to the higher education modernization based on the realization of competency-building modular programs has been considered. This approach closely supports competency-building approach to professional training of modern specialists within the context of current theoretical and methodological principles. The European dimension of…

  18. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. Objective: To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Methods: Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Results: Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Conclusion: Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field. PMID:27684621

  19. The Role of Social Support in First-Term Sailors’ Attrition from Recruit Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    questionnaires that separate and measure distinct dimensions of social support (Sarason et al., 1983; Henderson, 1981; Vaux & Harrison, 1985; Cutrona & Russell ...2005), as well as directly affecting well-being (Mackie, 1998). Coultrona, Cole, Colangelo, Assouline, and Russell (1994) showed parental support is...and Social Sciences. (AD A258-274). Coultrona, C.E., Cole, V., Colangelo, N., Assouline, S. G., & Russell , D. W. (1994). Perceived parental social

  20. The influence of family-supportive supervisor training on employee job performance and attitudes: An organizational work-family intervention.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Hammer, Leslie B; Crain, Tori L; Bodner, Todd E

    2016-07-01

    Training supervisors to increase their family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) has demonstrated significant benefits for employee physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among employees with high levels of family-to-work conflict in prior research in a grocery store context. We replicate and extend these results in a health care setting with additional important employee outcomes (i.e., employee engagement, organizational commitment, and supervisor ratings of job performance), and consider the role of the 4 dimensions underlying the FSSB. Using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 143 health care employees completed surveys at 2 time periods approximately 10 months apart, along with their supervisors who provided ratings of employees' job performance. Between these surveys, we offered their supervisors FSSB training; 86 (71%) of these supervisors participated. Results demonstrated significant and beneficial indirect effects of FSSB training on changes in employee job performance, organizational commitment, engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions through changes in employee perceptions of their supervisor's overall FSSBs. Further analyses suggest that these indirect effects are due primarily to changes in the creative work-family management dimension of FSSB. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients’ Affected Side Lower Extremity’s Walking Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity’s walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. PMID:25540499

  2. Pupils' Cognitive Activity Stimulation by Means of Physical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekhoroshkov, Anatolij V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the research results of the physical activity influence on the intellectual performance of high school students. The methods of experiments and standardized observation were used. The efficiency of the cognitive activity was assessed by "Proof test" technique of B. Burdon. Within the experimental class, the program…

  3. Lekoteket: A Program for Training Through Systematic Play Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junker, Karin Stensland

    Described are the purposes and activities of the lekotek, a Swedish private, non-profit agency whose name was coined from two Swedish words meaning playthings and library. The lekotek advises families with mentally retarded or other handicapped children at home as to such play activity and educational stimulation as will further the development of…

  4. Four Residents' Narratives on Abortion Training: A Residency Climate of Reflection, Support, and Mutual Respect.

    PubMed

    Singer, Janet; Fiascone, Stephen; Huber, Warren J; Hunter, Tiffany C; Sperling, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The decision on the part of obstetrics and gynecology residents to opt in or out of abortion training is, for many, a complex one. Although the public debate surrounding abortion can be filled with polarizing rhetoric, residents often discover that the boundaries between pro-choice and pro-life beliefs are not so neatly divided. We present narratives from four residents, training at a 32-resident program in the Northeast, who have a range of views surrounding abortion. Their stories reveal how some struggle with the real-life experience of providing abortions, while others feel angst over lacking the skills to terminate a life-threatening pregnancy. These residents have found that close relationships with coworkers from all sides of this issue, along with a residency program that encourages open conversation, have fostered understanding. Their narratives demonstrate that reasonable providers can disagree fundamentally and still work effectively with one another and that the close relationships formed in residency can allow both sides to see beyond the black and white of the public abortion debate. Our objectives in this commentary are to encourage a more nuanced discussion of abortion among obstetrician-gynecologists, to describe the aspects of our residency program that facilitate open dialogue and respect across diverse viewpoints, and to demonstrate that the clear distinction between being pro-life and pro-choice often breaks down when one is immediately responsible for the care of pregnant women.

  5. The private sector: A global pool of technical talent for remote sensing training and program support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. D.

    The growing global pool of highly trained, technical talent in the private sector throughout the world reflects the degree of maturation that remote sensing from air and space vehicles has undergone, especially during the past ten years. This has been further spawned by the US Government move to commercialize the Landsat system. The number of qualified technicians and scientists has grown in proportion to the amount of data that has become available for public and private use. Applications of the data have matured from research investigations to operational use in many disciplines and geographic areas. Private and public industry corporations have established their own image processing and analytical laboratories to ensure their competitive positions. This has been further enhanced by the simultaneous availability of lower cost, analytical computer systems. Training and operational project development remain prominent objectives. While these are all very positive aspects a note of caution must be raised. Concern has recently been expressed by representatives of developing nations that not enough attention is given by remote sensing specialists to spelling out the limitations of the sensing systems or qualifying the degree of accuracy of the results obtained. Such criticisms are probably justified and it is recommended that remote sensing workers be mindful of such concerns.

  6. Associations between family support, family intimacy, and neighborhood violence and physical activity in urban adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Kuo, JoAnn; Voorhees, Carolyn C; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Young, Deborah Rohm

    2007-01-01

    We examined the association between various dimensions of the family environment, including family intimacy and involvement in activities, family support for physical activity, and neighborhood violence (perceived and objective) and physical activity among urban, predominantly African American, ninth-grade girls in Baltimore, Md. Greater family intimacy (P = .05) and support (P = .01), but not neighborhood violence, was associated with physical activity. Family factors, including family intimacy and support, are potential targets in physical activity interventions for urban high-school girls.

  7. Potential role of endurance training in altering renal sympathetic nerve activity in CKD?

    PubMed

    Howden, Erin J; Lawley, Justin S; Esler, Murray; Levine, Benjamin D

    2017-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), is characterized by a progressive loss of renal function and increase in cardiovascular risk. In this review paper, we discuss the pathophysiology of increased sympathetic nerve activity in CKD patients and raise the possibility of endurance exercise being an effective countermeasure to address this problem. We specifically focus on the potential role of endurance training in altering renal sympathetic nerve activity as increased renal sympathetic nerve activity negatively impacts kidney function as well indirectly effects multiple other systems and organs. Recent technological advances in device based therapy have highlighted the detrimental effect of elevated renal sympathetic nerve activity in CKD patients, with kidney function and blood pressure being improved post renal artery nerve denervation in selected patients. These developments provide optimism for the development of alternative and/or complementary strategies to lower renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, appropriately designed studies are required to confirm preliminary observations, as the widespread use of the renal denervation approach to lower sympathetic activity presently has limited feasibility. Endurance training may be one alternative strategy to reduce renal sympathetic nerve activity. Here we review the role of endurance training as a potential alternative or adjunctive to current therapy in CKD patients. We also provide recommendations for future research to assist in establishing an evidence base for the use of endurance training to lower renal sympathetic activity in CKD patients.

  8. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  9. Classroom-Directed Home Training Activities. Preschool Program: A Regional Demonstration Program for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jacquelyn O.

    One of 10 documents developed for preschool programs for handicapped children, the manual presents classroom directed home training activities. The activities are based on such principles as the effectiveness of home instruction by a parent and the need for a parent to feel responsibility for the child's learning. Intended to provide teachers of…

  10. Do Training Programs Work? An Assessment of Pharmacists Activities in the Field of Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Valerie G.; Brock, Tina Penick; Ahn, Jungeun

    2001-01-01

    Seeks to determine if pharmacists who attended a chemical dependency training program were performing more chemical dependency related activities. Results reveal that participants were more likely to perform the following activities: lecture to community groups about chemical dependency; participate in a pharmacists' recovery program; provide…

  11. Resistance training increases total energy expenditure and free-living physical activity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hunter, G R; Wetzstein, C J; Fields, D A; Brown, A; Bamman, M M

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effects 26 wk of resistance training have on resting energy expenditure (REE), total free-living energy expenditure (TEE), activity-related energy expenditure (AEE), engagement in free-living physical activity as measured by the activity-related time equivalent (ARTE) index, and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) in 61- to 77-yr-old men (n = 8) and women (n = 7). Before and after training, body composition (four-compartment model), strength, REE, TEE (doubly labeled water), AEE (TEE - REE + thermic response to meals), and ARTE (AEE adjusted for energy cost of standard activities) were evaluated. Strength (36%) and fat-free mass (2 kg) significantly increased, but body weight did not change. REE increased 6.8%, whereas resting RER decreased from 0.86 to 0.83. TEE (12%) and ARTE (38%) increased significantly, and AEE (30%) approached significance (P = 0.06). The TEE increase remained significant even after adjustment for the energy expenditure of the resistance training. In response to resistance training, TEE increased and RER decreased. The increase in TEE occurred as a result of increases in both REE and physical activity. These results suggest that resistance training may have value in increasing energy expenditure and lipid oxidation rates in older adults, thereby improving their metabolic profiles.

  12. Field support activity aerospace manpower transfer to small business enterprises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    This report reiterates the major findings of the original study on the utilization of unemployed aerospace professionals in small businesses, and also provides a definition of three programs which, as a result of this study and other research into this problem, offer great potential in providing for better utilization of the nation's technically trained personal and technology resources. Details of these three programs are provided along with a recommended plan of action for their implementation.

  13. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  14. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-06-15

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  15. Resistance exercise training influences skeletal muscle immune activation: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Sartor, Maureen A.; IglayReger, Heidi B.; Pistilli, Emidio E.; Gutmann, Laurie; Nader, Gustavo A.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of training on the immune activation in skeletal muscle in response to an acute bout of resistance exercise (RE). Seven young healthy men and women underwent a 12-wk supervised progressive unilateral arm RE training program. One week after the last training session, subjects performed an acute bout of bilateral RE in which the trained and the untrained arm exercised at the same relative intensity. Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 h postexercise from the biceps brachii of both arms and assessed for global transcriptom using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 microarrays. Significantly regulated biological processes and gene groups were analyzed using a logistic regression-based method following differential (trained vs. untrained) gene expression testing via an intensity-based Bayesian moderated t-test. The results from the present study suggest that training blunts the transcriptional upregulation of immune activation by minimizing expression of genes involved in monocyte recruitment and enhancing gene expression involved in macrophage anti-inflammatory polarization. Additionally, our data suggest that training blunts the transcriptional upregulation of the stress response and the downregulation of glucose metabolism, mitochondrial structure, and oxidative phosphorylation, and it enhances the transcriptional upregulation of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton development and organization and the downregulation of gene transcription and muscle contraction. This study provides novel insight into the molecular processes involved in the adaptive response of skeletal muscle following RE training and the cellular and molecular events implicating the protective role of training on muscle stress and damage inflicted by acute mechanical loading. PMID:22052873

  16. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  17. Strength training reduces arterial blood pressure but not sympathetic neural activity in young normotensive subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Downs, Emily M.; Cooke, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of resistance training on arterial blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at rest have not been established. Although endurance training is commonly recommended to lower arterial blood pressure, it is not known whether similar adaptations occur with resistance training. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that whole body resistance training reduces arterial blood pressure at rest, with concomitant reductions in MSNA. Twelve young [21 +/- 0.3 (SE) yr] subjects underwent a program of whole body resistance training 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Resting arterial blood pressure (n = 12; automated sphygmomanometer) and MSNA (n = 8; peroneal nerve microneurography) were measured during a 5-min period of supine rest before and after exercise training. Thirteen additional young (21 +/- 0.8 yr) subjects served as controls. Resistance training significantly increased one-repetition maximum values in all trained muscle groups (P < 0.001), and it significantly decreased systolic (130 +/- 3 to 121 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01), diastolic (69 +/- 3 to 61 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.04), and mean (89 +/- 2 to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01) arterial blood pressures at rest. Resistance training did not affect MSNA or heart rate. Arterial blood pressures and MSNA were unchanged, but heart rate increased after 8 wk of relative inactivity for subjects in the control group (61 +/- 2 to 67 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.01). These results indicate that whole body resistance exercise training might decrease the risk for development of cardiovascular disease by lowering arterial blood pressure but that reductions of pressure are not coupled to resistance exercise-induced decreases of sympathetic tone.

  18. Developing a Corrective Action Simulator to Support Decision Making Research and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    shall produce DIS Entity State PDUs for the ground entities. 2.3 The TGM shall support a Virtual Character Display ( VCD ). 2.3.1 [DELETED] 2.3.2...The TGM VCD shall load a 3-D environment which contains an AWACS-like interior. 2.3.2.1 The TGM VCD AWACS-like interior shall include at least two...Weapons Director (WD) positions/work areas. 2.3.3 The TGM VCD shall support the WD consoles drawn with textures. 2.3.3.1 The TGM VCD WD console

  19. Social activities of older men who require daily support and the purpose of such activities.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michiyo; Saeki, Kazuko; Ueda, Izumi; Honda, Hikaru; Mizuno, Yoshiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to analyze the social activities of older men who require daily support, and to clarify the purpose of such activities, in order to develop effective living support and preventive long-term care service, suitable for this population.Methods Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 older men. Data were analyzed using inductive and qualitative methods.Results Four categories of social activities were identified, and four categories of purposes of these social activities were extracted. The following were the identified social activities: maintenance of "comfortable relationships with others," including family, relatives, friends, and neighbors; "participation and use of services and programs with clear objectives and relationships with others," such as long-term care insurance system services, clubs for the elderly, and hobby groups; maintenance of "relationships with former colleagues, depending on their experience of working with them," where some individuals actively participated in gatherings with former colleagues, while others did not keep in touch at all; and participation in "activities to enrich their feelings and quality of life within their living space," such as reading, watching TV, and doing household chores. The purposes of the observed social activities were to build "relationships with society through communication with other people" and to have a "sense of security by spending time with people of the same age and with those older than them." Hence, participants engaged in clubs for the elderly, as well as in hobby groups. In addition, participants made time for exercising regularly, which maintained their cognitive function and was intended for the "maintenance and activation of their physical functions by continuing to exercise," and "continuing to learn by thinking." Furthermore, participants engaged in the exercise or hobby groups that they were interested in, in order to

  20. Impact of a web based interactive simulation game (PULSE) on nursing students' experience and performance in life support training--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Neal F; McAloon, Toni; O'Neill, Philip; Beggs, Richard

    2012-08-01

    The delivery of effective life support measures is highly associated with the quality, design and implementation of the education that underpins it. Effectively responding to a critical event is a requirement for all nurses illustrating the need for effective educational approaches from pre-registration training through to enhancing and maintaining life support skills after qualification. This paper reports the findings of utilising a web-based multimedia simulation game PULSE (Platform for Undergraduate Life Support Education). The platform was developed to enhance the student experience of life support education, to motivate on-going learning and engagement and to improve psychomotor skills associated with the provision of Intermediate Life Support (ILS) training. Pre training participants played PULSE and during life support training data was collected from an intervention and a control group of final year undergraduate nursing students (N=34). Quantitative analysis of performance took place and qualitative data was generated from a questionnaire assessing the learning experience. A statistically significant difference was found between the competence the groups displayed in the three skills sets of checking equipment, airway assessment and the safe/effective use of defibrillator at ILS level, and PULSE was positively evaluated as an educational tool when used alongside traditional life support training.

  1. Hope and Social Support in Adults Who Are Legally Blind at a Training Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Caitlin; Goodwyn, Mary Ann; Carter, Alice P.

    2009-01-01

    Because initial and unexamined reactions to life-changing events or permanent disabilities are often negative, sometimes even debilitating, factors that help create positive change in the affected individuals' lives need to be examined. In the study presented here, the authors examined the relationship between levels of hope and social support in…

  2. Supporting staff nurses to train as community specialist district nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lorraine

    The removal of district nurses from the Nursing and Midwifery Council's recognised specialist practitioner list has resulted in many employers not commissioning district nurse courses and a lack of clarity about the skills required to be a team leader. This article discusses a practice development initiative to support learning through a practice based competency programme, to develop skills of local staff members.

  3. Learners' Emotional and Psychic Responses to Encounters with Learning Support in Further Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Jocelyn; Bailey, Bill; Mendick, Heather

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the experience of individual learners who have been allocated learning support in the further education system in England. The particular focus is on interviewees' constructions of their emotional and psychic experiences. Through the adoption of a psycho-social perspective, learners' tendency to "idealise" their…

  4. Design and Implement Custom Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS) for Training in Project Based Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Brian R.; Stockman, Mark; Thalmann, Jerry

    Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS) use computers to capture, store, and distribute knowledge in both an interactive and non-linear delivery. Using technology sources such as the Internet, Microsoft's Net Meeting, Connectix's color camera, and business software, it is possible to provide multiple site delivery and bring business…

  5. Improving Support Services for Family Child Care through Relationship-Based Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Bibbs, Tonya

    2011-01-01

    Family child care (FCC) providers often experience isolation from other early childhood and child care professionals. Yet, research suggests that providers who network with other providers, engage with community resources, and belong to support groups tend to offer higher quality child care. For example, the Family Child Care Network Impact Study…

  6. Comparison of Two Modes of Delivery of First Aid Training Including Basic Life Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippmann, John; Livingston, Patricia; Craike, Melinda J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Flexible-learning first aid courses are increasingly common due to reduced classroom contact time. This study compared retention of first aid knowledge and basic life support (BLS) skills three months after a two-day, classroom-based first aid course (STD) to one utilizing on-line theory learning at home followed by one day of classroom…

  7. Empirically Supported Psychotherapy in Social Work Training Programs: Does the Definition of Evidence Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Mullen, Edward J.; Ponniah, Kathryn; Gameroff, Marc J.; Verdeli, Helen; Mufson, Laura; Fitterling, Heidi; Wickramaratne, Priya

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: A national survey finds that 62% of social work programs do not require didactic and clinical supervision in any empirically supported psychotherapy (EST). The authors report the results of analysis of national survey data using two alternative classifications of EST to determine if the results are because of the definition of EST used…

  8. Training activities at FSUE 'RADON' and Lomonosov's Moscow state university under practical arrangements with IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveykin, P.P.; Kalmykov, S.N.; Ojovan, M.I.

    2013-07-01

    The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) 'Radon', in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries - IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) has been signed between FSUE 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. A similar agreement - Practical Arrangements - has been signed between Lomonosov's MSU and the IAEA in 2012. In October 2012 a new IAEA two-weeks training course started at Lomonosov's MSU and FSUE 'Radon' in the framework of the Practical Agreements signed. Pre-disposal management of waste was the main topic of the courses. The paper summarizes the current experience of the FSUE 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

  9. Entrainment of chaotic activities in brain and heart during MBSR mindfulness training.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Fan, Jicong; Wu, Bonnie Wai Yan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chang, Chunqi; Hung, Yeung-Sam; Fung, Peter Chin Wan; Sik, Hin Hung

    2016-03-11

    The activities of the brain and the heart are dynamic, chaotic, and possibly intrinsically coordinated. This study aims to investigate the effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program on the chaoticity of electronic activities of the brain and the heart, and to explore their potential correlation. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded at the beginning of an 8-week standard MBSR training course and after the course. EEG spectrum analysis was carried out, wavelet entropies (WE) of EEG (together with reconstructed cortical sources) and heart rate were calculated, and their correlation was investigated. We found enhancement of EEG power of alpha and beta waves and lowering of delta waves power during MBSR training state as compared to normal resting state. Wavelet entropy analysis indicated that MBSR mindfulness meditation could reduce the chaotic activities of both EEG and heart rate as a change of state. However, longitudinal change of trait may need more long-term training. For the first time, our data demonstrated that the chaotic activities of the brain and the heart became more coordinated during MBSR training, suggesting that mindfulness training may increase the entrainment between mind and body. The 3D brain regions involved in the change in mental states were identified.

  10. [Medical particularities during prolonged demanding activity in a tropical forest. Experience of the tropical forest training center (French Guyana)].

    PubMed

    Guénot, P; Romain, H; Randrianasolo, M; Galant, J; Corcostegui, S-P; Lefort, H

    2015-01-01

    A tropical forest is a hostile environment for humans. The military physician supporting these immersion activities must cope with varied clinical situations with limited resources to reduce operational unavailability. This article reports a prospective cross-sectional epidemiologic study conducted from January to May 2012, observing the daily activity at sick call during the rainy season at the tropical forest training center (CEFE) advanced jungle commando training, located in French Guyana. The aim was to observe the distribution of traumatic injuries and specific diseases in this tropical environment. In all, 9,221 army staff members participated in the training (mean age: 30.8 years) during the 120-day study period. There were 486 medical visits, for a mean daily incidence of 5.3% (trainees: 83.8%, trainers: 16.5%). Skin lesions were most frequent (39%), principally irritative dermatitis and skin maceration (moisture/dressing associated dermatitis). A third (34%) of these conditions were due to trauma, mainly limb contusions and ligament injuries. Tropical diseases accounted for 3% of the reasons for consultation, with rare problems related to equatorial fauna or flora. The remaining conditions (24%) were not specific to the environment or activity. Operational attrition averaged five days. Removal from the training course was necessary in 13.8% of the cases. In an isolated area with a demanding environment , edical practice in a tropical forest requires health prevention actions and close medical follow-up. The permanent presence of a physician provides both care and expertise and is an important asset for both trainees and trainers.

  11. NASA's SMD Cross-Forum Resources for Supporting Scientist Engagement in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Sharma, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Sharing the excitement of ongoing scientific discoveries is an important aspect of scientific activity for researchers. Directly engaging scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities has the benefit of directly connecting the public to those who engage in scientific activities. A shortage of training in education methods, public speaking, and working with various public audiences increases barriers to engaging scientists in these types in E/PO activities. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public forums (astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science) support scientists currently involved in E/PO and who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO through a variety of avenues. Over the past three years, the forums have developed a variety of resources to help engage scientists in education and public outreach. We will showcase the following resources developed through the SMD E/PO cross-forum efforts: Professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), ongoing professional development at scientific conferences to increase scientist engagement in E/PO activities, toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), toolkits to inform scientists of science education resources developed within each scientific thematic community, EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/), thematic resources for teaching about SMD science topics, and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  12. [Medical support of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation: results of activity and tasks for 2016].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ya

    2016-01-01

    The author gives an analysis of activity of the medical service of the Armed Forces in 2015 concerning development of normative legal basis for the military health care, improvement of the level of operational and mobilization readiness of subunits of army group, and military-medical institutions, improvement of effectiveness of treatment and evacuation measures, health resort treatment, medical stuff training optimization, sanitary-and-epidemiologic support, material and technical support improvement, adoption of advanced scientific achievements focusing on medical care delivery to army group, active development and increase in medical information systems, telehealth. system. The author gives data characterizing state and level of development of medical service of the Armed Forces and its dynamics. Main tasks and parameters of development of the service in 2016 and up to 2020 are formulated.

  13. Effects of military training activities on shrub-steppe raptors in southwestern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; Carpenter, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (Pa??a??a??0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (Pa??>a??0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (Pa??activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity.

  14. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-09-23

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played "Fruit Ninja" on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1-2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven's Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers.

  15. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played “Fruit Ninja” on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1–2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven’s Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers. PMID:26395158

  16. Imbalance in SOD/CAT activities in rat skeletal muscles submitted to treadmill training exercise.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo A; Andrades, Michael E; Oliveira, Marcos R; Pirola, Aline C; Zago, Morgana S; Silveira, Paulo C L; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Moreira, José Cláudio F

    2006-10-01

    The association between physical exercise and oxidative damage in the skeletal musculature has been the focus of many studies in literature, but the balance between superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and its relation to oxidative damage is not well established. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between regular treadmill physical exercise, oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in skeletal muscle of rats. Fifteen male Wistar rats (8-12 months) were randomly separated into two groups (trained n=9 and untrained n=6). Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 12 weeks in progressive exercise (velocity, time, and inclination). Training program consisted in a progressive exercise (10 m/min without inclination for 10 min/day). After 1 week the speed, time and inclination were gradually increased until 17 m/min at 10% for 50 min/day. After the training period animals were killed, and gastrocnemius and quadriceps were surgically removed to the determination of biochemical parameters. Lipid peroxidation, protein oxidative damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase and citrate synthase activities, and muscular glycogen content were measured in the isolated muscles. We demonstrated that there is a different modulation of CAT and SOD in skeletal muscle in trained rats when compared to untrained rats (increased SOD/CAT ratio). TBARS levels were significantly decreased and, in contrast, a significant increase in protein carbonylation was observed. These results suggest a non-described adaptation of skeletal muscle against exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Document Skimming Support Environment for Surveying Documents in Creative Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayama, Tessai; Kanai, Takashi; Kunifuji, Susumu

    This paper proposes a document skimming environment for surveying documents in our research. Although there are a lot of on-line documents on our surroundings, people, generally, prefer printing out on-line research papers from computer screen. For this reason, although skimming is used for reading documents in our daily life, it is difficult for us to skim documents from computer screens. Therefore, we developed a document skimming environment. The environment has a skimming support system and a recommendation system. The skimming support system supports skimming documents from computer screens by the interface, which is applied the Fisheye effect and the Overview+detail effect. Focus points of the Fisheye effect are the sentences selected by the original sentence extraction algorithm based on the value of standard distribution, and the Overview interface is displayed automatically the generated table of contents. The recommendation system generates personalized summaries by the collaborate filtering, which use users' log of the skimming support system. Furthermore, evaluation results show as follows; The value of F-measure of our sentence extraction algorithm is higher than it of the sentence extraction algorithm based on TF or Japanese lexical chaining method, the skimming support system is more effective method to skim documents from computer screen than paper, and the skimming support environment is more effective method to product research proposal documents than paper.

  18. Advanced Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.117.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series and considers design and operation…

  19. PERCEPTUAL TRAINING ACTIVITIES HANDBOOK. TEACHERS COLLEGE SERIES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VAN WITSEN, BETTY

    THIS PUBLICATION IS FOR TEACHERS AND SUPERVISORS WORKING WITH CHILDREN WHO HAVE LEARNING DISABILITIES, ESPECIALLY THOSE RELATED TO PERCEPTUAL DISTURBANCES. BEHAVIOR WHICH RESULTS FROM A LACK OF MEANINGFUL ORGANIZATION OF PERCEPTION IS DESCRIBED, AND MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES ARE SUGGESTED. ACTIVITIES ARE PRESENTED UNDER THESE HEADINGS--VISUAL…

  20. Science: Videotapes for Inservice Training for Active Learning. VITAL Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissock, Craig, Ed.

    This handbook, and the VITAL Science Series videotapes, contain 12 lessons that are examples of some of the many ways of organizing elementary school classrooms for science instruction. The videotapes that are available separately demonstrate full class and small group activities, the use of learning centers, cooperative learning, and outdoor…