Science.gov

Sample records for active support training

  1. Outcome Evaluation of Active Support Training in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Harman, Anthony D.; Lin, Chwen-Jen; Lee, Wan-ping; Chang, Shu-chuan; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Active Support was implemented for the first time in Taiwan in March, 2009. This study aims to evaluate whether the supervisors and front line managers of residential services receiving Active Support Training (AST) caused a positive impact on their users with intellectual disabilities (ID) while comparing this with their counterparts with ID…

  2. Supporting Learners in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Ann; Hopkins, Linda

    A project was conducted in Australia to investigate the most effective ways whereby learners receive informal and formal support to assist them to successfully complete vocational education and training (VET), either in school or in business job-training programs. Data were collected through a literature review, a case study of 11 organizations,…

  3. NASA/SPoRt: GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew; Stano, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    SPoRT is using current capabilities of MODIS and VIIRS, combined with current GOES (i.e. Hybrid Imagery) to demonstrate mesoscale capabilities of future ABI instrument. SPoRT is transitioning RGBs from EUMETSAT standard "recipes" to demonstrate a method to more efficiently handle the increase channels/frequency of ABI. Challenges for RGB production exist. Internal vs. external production, Bit depth needed, Adding quantitative information, etc. SPoRT forming group to address these issues. SPoRT is leading efforts on the application of total lightning in operations and to educate users of this new capability. Training in many forms is used to support testbed activities and is a key part to the transition process.

  4. NASA/SPoRT's GOES-R Activities in Support of Product Development, Management, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew L.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports many activities within the GOES-R Proving Grounds (PG). These include the development of imagery from existing instrumentation as a proxy to future Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) capabilities on GOES-R. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instruments are used to provide a glimpse of the multi-spectral capabilities that will become the norm as the number of channels and data rate dramatically increase with GOES-R. The NOAA/NWS has plans to provide operational users with all ABI channels at the highest resolution. Data fusion of individual channels into composite red, green, and blue imagery products will assist the end user with this future wave of information. While increasing the efficiency in the operational use of ABI channels, these composites provide only qualitative information. Within the GOES-R PG, SPoRT and other partners are exploring ways to include quantitative information as part of the composite imagery. However, limitations in local hardware processing and/or data bandwidth for users of the GOES-R data stream are challenges to overcome. This presentation will discuss the creation of these composite images as well as possible solutions to address these processing challenges. In a similar manner the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) to be launched on GOES-R presents several data management challenges. The GLM is a pioneering instrument to quantify total lightning from a geostationary platform. The expected data frequency from the GLM is to be at a sub-minute interval. Users of such a data set may have little experience in handling such a rapid update of information. To assist users, SPoRT is working with the NWS to develop tools within the user fs decision support system to allow tracking and analysis of total lightning from a storm-based perspective. This presentation will discuss the

  5. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  6. Training and Support, Obstacles, and Library Impacts on eLearning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, J. V.; Fisher, S. F.; Wright, D. E.; Anderton, E. K.

    2008-01-01

    Using the Internet for courses, as an enhancement to the traditional class, or for a fully online course in higher education has become routine over the last several years. Less common are empirically-based studies of its implementation. This study concentrated on areas of faculty and student training and support, challenges, and online use of…

  7. Meeting Northern Arizona's Supported Employment Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William E., Jr.; And Others

    In 1989 Northern Arizona University established a Supported Employment Training Center (SETC) to increase the number of trained job coaches in northern Arizona and provide knowledge and skills in supported employment to personnel from cooperating schools and agencies. First-year SETC activities focused on assessment of the training needs of…

  8. Prepubescent Strength Training Gains Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have stimulated greater support for prepubescent weight training. There seems to be general agreement that strength and weight training, when practiced under properly controlled conditions, is safe and efficacious for prepubescents. Weight lifting is not supported. Recommendations for weight training are made, and reservations are…

  9. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American... following: (a) Classroom training. This program activity is any training of the type normally conducted in... classroom training, employment and training services, or supportive services, costs for which the...

  10. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American... following: (a) Classroom training. This program activity is any training of the type normally conducted in... classroom training, employment and training services, or supportive services, costs for which the...

  11. TAP 3, Training Program Support Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should provide well-trained, qualified personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. A need has been identified for guidance regarding analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of consistent and reliable performance-based training programs. Accreditation of training programs at Category A reactors and high-hazard and selected moderate-hazard nonreactor nuclear facilities will assure consistent, appropriate, and cost-effective training of personnel responsible for the operation, maintenance, and technical support of these facilities. Training programs that are designed and based on systematically determined job requirements, instead of subjective estimation of trainee needs, yield training activities that are consistent and develop or improve knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be directly related to the work setting. Because the training is job-related, the content of these programs more efficiently and effectively meets the needs of the employee. Besides a better trained work force, a greater level of operational reactor safety can be realized. This manual is intended to provide an overview of the accreditation process and a brief description of the elements necessary to construct and maintain training programs that are based on the requirements of the job. Two companion manuals provide additional information to assist contractors in their efforts to accredit training programs.

  12. A Review of Combat Support Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Ernest K.; Showel, Morris

    This report presents a review of current training practices and problems as they relate to the broad spread of individual ability among soldiers, and to the increasing need for functionalization of training. Combat support training was observed at four army training centers, with particular reference to training objectives, methods, and student…

  13. Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.

    2007-01-01

    The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities' (AAIDD's) Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum," Second Edition" ("PBSTC"), is a curriculum for training direct support personnel and their supervisors in the values and practices of Positive Behavior Support. The curriculum is designed for direct support persons and…

  14. Theories Supporting Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews theories about factors affecting the transfer of training, including theories on motivation (expectancy, equity, goal setting), training transfer design (identical elements, principle, near and far), and transfer climate (organizational). (Contains 36 references.) (SK)

  15. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = −0.29, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future

  16. Supporting assistant practitioners during their training.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Kenneth; Hoad, Bridget

    2016-07-27

    Assistant practitioners, also known as associate practitioners, provide support to the registered healthcare workforce, practising with advanced knowledge and skills. Assistant practitioners require substantial training to obtain the skills and knowledge required for the role. This article identifies the challenges trainee assistant practitioners may encounter, and makes recommendations for how they can be best supported. The core areas where trainee assistant practitioners require support from their colleagues and mentors are workload, role clarity, mentoring, academic challenge and recognition as learners. PMID:27461328

  17. Training and Support for Successful Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Online education is growing rapidly as colleges seek to increase enrollment without investing in physical infrastructure. To keep up with the increasing demand for courses, some colleges are asking faculty to teach classes online with little training, few resources, and minimal support. The purpose of this study was to determine how the training…

  18. Transforming Staff Practice through Active Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C.; Harman, Anthony D.; Keen, Deb; Pennell, Donna; Harley, Jane H.; Walker, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active support is being introduced in many residential and respite homes in an effort to improve engagement in meaningful activity of people with intellectual disability. Method: A train-the-trainer approach was used in a large government organisation that supports people with intellectual disability in Australia. Five apprentice…

  19. Quantum optimization for training support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Anguita, Davide; Ridella, Sandro; Rivieccio, Fabio; Zunino, Rodolfo

    2003-01-01

    Refined concepts, such as Rademacher estimates of model complexity and nonlinear criteria for weighting empirical classification errors, represent recent and promising approaches to characterize the generalization ability of Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The advantages of those techniques lie in both improving the SVM representation ability and yielding tighter generalization bounds. On the other hand, they often make Quadratic-Programming algorithms no longer applicable, and SVM training cannot benefit from efficient, specialized optimization techniques. The paper considers the application of Quantum Computing to solve the problem of effective SVM training, especially in the case of digital implementations. The presented research compares the behavioral aspects of conventional and enhanced SVMs; experiments in both a synthetic and real-world problems support the theoretical analysis. At the same time, the related differences between Quadratic-Programming and Quantum-based optimization techniques are considered. PMID:12850032

  20. Improving basic life support training for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Lami, Mariam; Nair, Pooja; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Questions have been raised about basic life support (BLS) training in medical education. This article addresses the research evidence behind why BLS training is inadequate and suggests recommendations for improving BLS training for medical students. PMID:27114720

  1. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  2. Support Vector Training of Protein Alignment Models

    PubMed Central

    Joachims, Thorsten; Elber, Ron; Pillardy, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Sequence to structure alignment is an important step in homology modeling of protein structures. Incorporation of features such as secondary structure, solvent accessibility, or evolutionary information improve sequence to structure alignment accuracy, but conventional generative estimation techniques for alignment models impose independence assumptions that make these features difficult to include in a principled way. In this paper, we overcome this problem using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) method that provides a well-founded way of estimating complex alignment models with hundred of thousands of parameters. Furthermore, we show that the method can be trained using a variety of loss functions. In a rigorous empirical evaluation, the SVM algorithm outperforms the generative alignment method SSALN, a highly accurate generative alignment model that incorporates structural information. The alignment model learned by the SVM aligns 50% of the residues correctly and aligns over 70% of the residues within a shift of four positions. PMID:18707536

  3. Pre-Apprenticeship Training Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Paul; Blomberg, Davinia

    2011-01-01

    Pre-apprenticeships are becoming an increasingly important component of the Australian vocational education and training (VET) system. The purpose of this report is to investigate the level of pre-apprenticeship activity occurring in Australia and to examine the characteristics of pre-apprenticeship courses and the students undertaking those…

  4. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. TAP 3: Training Program Support Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Training Accreditation Program (TAP) establishes objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine readiness for accreditation. TAP 3 has been developed to assist the contractor in preparing the initial Self-Evaluation Report, Training Program Accreditation Plan, and the CSER (contractor self-evaluation report).

  6. The Effects of Types of Training Evaluation on Support of Training among Corporate Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusy, Mitchell E., Jr.

    A study was conducted to determine which type of training evaluation method elicited the most management support of the training function among corporate managers. The investigator designed and distributed a case study survey instrument called the Training Evaluation Methods Survey (TEMS) to assess the extent of management support for each type of…

  7. Training Needs of Paraprofessionals Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Kira M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand professional development for paraprofessionals supporting students with ASD in Virginia. This understanding was reached through explanatory, sequential mixed methods design. Surveys and interviews provided insight into training practices, training needs, and training barriers. An interpretation of their…

  8. To Train or Not to Train: The Role of Education and Training in Prison to Work Transitions. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Margaret; Le, Anh Tram; Allan, Maria; Lees, Catherine; Larsen, Ann-Claire; Bennett, Lyn

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the full report, "To Train or Not to Train: The Role of Education and Training in Prison to Work Transition," and is an added resource for further information. This support document presents 21 summary tables and 2 figures. Also presented in this support document are: (1) The…

  9. Activities and Procedures for Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1986-01-01

    Provides an analytical framework for describing various kinds of teacher-training activities and distinguishes between experiential and awareness-raising practices. Presents a taxonomy of awareness-raising practices in terms of activities and procedures. To illustrate the descriptive framework, a sample training activity and training plan for…

  10. ECLSS medical support activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crump, William J.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    During the period from April 10, 1990 to April 9, 1991, the Consortium for the Space Life Sciences provided technical assistance to the NASA/MSFC water recovery efforts. This assistance was in the form of literature reviews, technical recommendations, and presentations. This final report summarizes the activities completed during this period and identifies those areas requiring additional efforts. The tasks which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) water recovery team addressed were either identified by MSFC technical representatives or chosen from those outlined in the subject statement of work.

  11. Emergency medical support system for extravehicular activity training held at weightless environment test building (WETS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) : future prospects and a look back over the past decade.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Isao; Tachibana, Masakazu; Ohashi, Noriyoshi; Imai, Hiroshi; Asari, Yasushi; Matsuyama, Shigenori

    2011-12-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides extravehicular activity (EVA) training to astronauts in a weightless environment test building (WETS) located in Tsukuba City. For EVA training, Tsukuba Medial Center Hospital (TMCH) has established an emergency medical support system, serving as operations coordinator. Taking the perspective of emergency physicians, this paper provides an overview of the medical support system and examines its activities over the past decade as well as future issues. Fortunately, no major accident has occurred during the past 10 years of NBS. Minor complaints (external otitis, acute otitis media, transient dizziness, conjunctival inflammation, upper respiratory inflammation, dermatitis, abraded wounds, etc.) among the support divers have been addressed onsite by attending emergency physicians. Operations related to the medical support system at the WETS have proceeded smoothly for the former NASDA and continue to proceed without event for JAXA, providing safe, high-quality emergency medical services. If an accident occurs at the WETS, transporting the patient by helicopter following initial treatment by emergency physicians can actually exacerbate symptoms, since the procedure exposes a patient who was recently within a hyperbaric environment to the low-pressure environment involved in air transportation. If a helicopter is used, the flight altitude should be kept as low as possible by taking routes over the river. PMID:20703518

  12. Training and Consultation to Promote Implementation of an Empirically Supported Treatment: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Marcus, Steven C.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated the efficacy of three training modalities and the impact of ongoing consultation after training. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety among youths, an empirically supported treatment, was used as the exemplar. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three one-day workshops to examine the efficacy of training modality: routine training (training as usual), computer training (computerized version of training as usual), and augmented training (training that emphasized active learning). After training, all participants received three months of ongoing consultation that included case consultation, didactics, and problem solving. Methods Participants were 115 community therapists (mean age of 35.9 years; 90% were women). Outcome measures included the Adherence and Skill Checklist, used to rate a performance-based role-play; a knowledge test; and the Training Satisfaction Rating Scale. Results All three training modalities resulted in limited gains in therapist adherence, skill, and knowledge. There was no significant effect of modality on adherence, skill, or knowledge from pretraining to posttraining. Participants were more satisfied with augmented and routine training than with computer training. Most important, number of consultation hours after training significantly predicted higher therapist adherence and skill at the three-month follow-up. Conclusions The findings suggest that training alone did not result in therapist behavior change. The inclusion of ongoing consultation was critical to influencing therapist adherence and skill. Implications for implementation science and mental health services research are discussed. PMID:22549401

  13. Training for Change. A Training Pack To Support Adults with Learning Disabilities To Become Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Adult Continuing Education, Leicester (England).

    This training package consists of a print training guide to accompany an audiotape and videotape. It is designed to support adults with learning disabilities in their efforts to become trainers. Adult learners who complete the training package as part of a further education college, adult education center, day center, or self-advocacy group…

  14. Home Health Aide Training: An Appeal for Organizational Support.

    PubMed

    Palesy, Debra

    2016-01-01

    How home healthcare aides (HHAs) adapt their classroom training to their workplaces is central to their own safety and that of their care recipients. A qualitative approach was adopted for this inquiry, where new workers were interviewed in-depth following their classroom training. Findings suggest a perceived lack of supervisor support for classroom training and lack of follow-up in the workplace. Moreover, the need for more peer support was contended, and more comprehensive written materials in clients' homes may also assist workers' learning and enacting safe manual handling techniques in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for supporting HHAs' learning, and includes suggestions for future research. PMID:27348032

  15. Effects of Video-Based Staff Training with Manager-Led Exercises in Residential Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of video-based staff training with manager-led exercises in improving the performance of six staffers in residential support for persons with disabilities was examined. The training procedures improved performance in hand-washing, glove usage, and frequency of positive interaction, but not in the frequency of valued activities.…

  16. Food Service Supervisor. Dietetic Support Personnel Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Ellen; And Others

    This curriculum guide, part of a multi-volume dietetic support personnel training program, consists of materials for use in training future food service supervisors. The first unit provides an overview of the field of dietetics. Addressed next are various aspects of nutrition and diet therapy as well as the functions and sources of nutrients,…

  17. Business Simulations Applied in Support of ERP Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, George

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, quasi-experimental study examined the application of a business simulation against training in support of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Defining more effective training strategies is a critical concern for organizational leaders and stakeholders concerned by today's economic challenges. The scope of this…

  18. Food Production Worker. Dietetic Support Personnel Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Ellen; And Others

    This curriculum guide, part of a multi-volume dietetic support personnel training program, consists of materials (15 units) for use in training future food production workers. Covered in the first part of the guide are nutrition in food production and diet therapy. The second part of the guide deals with sanitation and safety in food production.…

  19. Training in tooth preparation utilizing a support system.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Sohmura, T; Takahashi, J

    2004-02-01

    Tooth preparation is an essential technique for dental treatment, but it is a skill not easily learned by a dental student. To facilitate this leaning process, a new tooth preparation support system with a parallel link mechanism was developed. This study reports the educational efficiency of this system for dental students. Dental students with no experience in clinical practice were selected and divided into two groups; one trained with this support system; and the other, with freehand preparation. They prepared axial walls in right maxillary second premolars and molars mounted in a phantom manikin with an air-turbine handpiece. Convergence angles of the axial walls and parallelisms between axes of prepared teeth were evaluated. Training with the support system led to significantly smaller convergence angles and parallelisms as compared with freehand preparation training. With the freehand preparation after training, the convergence angles and parallelisms became smaller in the group trained with the support system than those trained with freehand. The above findings suggest that training in tooth preparation utilizing the newly developed support system can be one of practical programs that are useful for dental students to achieve greater competency in tooth preparation. PMID:15009599

  20. Interactive Video Training and Development Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy State Univ., AL.

    The Interactive Video Training and Development Activity of Troy State University (Troy, Alabama) is described in this report. The project has trained more than 30 people in the production of interactive video programs since its inception in 1983. Since 1985, training programs have been offered twice a year to individuals within and outside the…

  1. Basic life support training for health care students.

    PubMed

    Perkins, G D; Hulme, J; Shore, H R; Bion, J F

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method for delivering basic life support training to undergraduate healthcare students. A comprehensive 8 h programme is organised and delivered by undergraduate students to their peers. These students have undergone training as basic life support instructors validated by the Royal Life Saving Society UK. The course is delivered to multiprofessional groups of medical, dental, physiotherapy, biomaterial and nursing undergraduates. It has been well received by students and academic staff and provides a solution to reduce the workload of over burdened clinical staff while at the same time enhancing quality. It forms part of an overall strategy for improving resuscitation training for undergraduates from all disciplines. PMID:10459588

  2. Project support of practical training in biophysics.

    PubMed

    Mornstein, V; Vlk, D; Forytkova, L

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Biophysics ensures practical training in biophysics and related subjects for students of medical and health study programmes. Demonstrations of medical technology are an important part of this training. Teaching for Faculty of Sciences in biophysical study programmes becomes also very important. Some lectures and demonstrations of technology are involved, but the practical trainig is missing. About 1 mil. CZK for additional laboratory equipment was obtained from the HEIDF project No. 1866/ 2005 "The demonstration and measuring technology for education in medical biophysics and radiological physics" for measuring system DEWETRON for high frequency signal analysis, Fluke Ti30 IR camera, PM 9000B patient monitor, ARSENAL AF 1 fluorescence microscope, and Nikon Coolpix 4500 digital camera with accessories for microphotography. At the present time, further financial resources are being provided by a development project of Ministry of Education "Inter-university co-operation in biomedical technology and engineering using top technologies" in total amount of almost 5 mil CZK, whereas over 2 mil CZK from this project are reserved for student laboratory equipment. The main goal of this project is to ensure the participation of Medical Faculty in educational co-operation in the biomedical technology and engineering, namely with the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication (FEEC), Brno University of Technology. There will be taught those areas of biophysics which are not covered by FEEC, thus forming a separate subject "General Biophysics". The following instruments will be installed: UV-VIS spectrophotometers, rotation viscometers, tensiometers, microscopes with digital image processing, cooled centrifuge, optical benches, and some smaller instruments for practical measurements. PMID:17125070

  3. Training School Psychologists in Behavior Support Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Brian K.; Ardoin, Scott P.

    2002-01-01

    School psychologists and other prereferral intervention team members have expressed a need to develop skills in two key areas: selecting interventions that are conceptually relevant, and providing teachers with the resources and support needed to ensure successful plan implementation. This paper describes various strategies that have been shown to…

  4. Training and Manpower Development Activities Supported by the Administration on Aging Under Title IV-A of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as Amended. Program Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration on Aging (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This compilation of brief program descriptions is intended to provide information about current projects being supported by the Administration on Aging (AoA) under the Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended. Descriptions were prepared by staff from the Division of Manpower Resources, and generally are edited versions of project summaries…

  5. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... information that occupational demand exists for planned training. The basic types of training activities... the technical skills and information required to perform a specific job or group of jobs. It may be... employer, and which occurs while the participant is engaged in productive work which provides knowledge...

  6. Efficacy of Teachers Training Paraprofessionals to Implement Peer Support Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Matthew E.; Carter, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although peer support arrangements are a promising strategy to promote inclusion in general education classrooms, previous studies have not addressed how paraprofessionals might implement this strategy under typical circumstances without extensive researcher involvement. In this single-case design study, four special education teachers trained and…

  7. Workplace Climate and Peer Support as Determinants of Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    Although billions of dollars are spent annually on training and development, much about the transfer processes is not well understood. This study investigated the interaction of workplace climate and peer support on the transfer of learning in a corporate field setting. Supervisor ratings of performance on several skill dimensions were obtained…

  8. Approaches to Measuring and Understanding Employer Training Expenditure: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Burke, Gerald; Long, Michael; Dumbrell, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This support document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Approaches to Measuring and Understanding Employer Training Expenditure," and is an added resource for further information. As outlined in the report, the research for this study was based on interviews and case studies, analysis of other research and a…

  9. Aviation Support Equipment Technician E 3 & 2. Rate Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The training manual is designed as a self study text for use by Navy and Naval Reserve personnel preparing to meet the professional qualifications for advancement to Petty Officer Third Class and Petty Officer Second Class in the rating of Aviation Support Equipment (ASE) Technician E (Electrical). The first chapter provides information on the…

  10. Declining versus Participating in Employer-Supported Training in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Gordon B.; Chowhan, James; Brown, Travor

    2011-01-01

    Although employer-supported training may be beneficial to all stakeholders, some workers have difficulty accessing it, and a surprising number of workers decline some or all of it when it is offered. We present a conceptual model that uses four categories to define workers according to whether or not they are excluded from, participate in and/or…

  11. Exploring Differential Effects of Supervisor Support on Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijman, Derk-Jan J. M.; Nijhof, Wim J.; Wognum, A. A. M.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of other transfer-influencing factors in a systemic approach of the transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: A review of studies on factors affecting transfer of…

  12. The Effect of Performance Support and Training on Performer Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    While training has been a proven and heavily relied on intervention to impart job-enabling information to performers, its ability to have a positive effect on job performance has been demonstrated to diminish over time. One intervention that has been adopted by performance technologists to provide ongoing support is an electronic performance…

  13. Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Giselle; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Training of Existing Workers: Issues, Incentives and Models," (ED495138) and is an added resource for further information. This support document is divided into the following sections: (1) The Retail Industry--A Snapshot; (2) Case Studies--Hardware, Retail Industry…

  14. Infrared imagery acquisition process supporting simulation and real image training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John

    2012-05-01

    The increasing use of infrared sensors requires development of advanced infrared training and simulation tools to meet current Warfighter needs. In order to prepare the force, a challenge exists for training and simulation images to be both realistic and consistent with each other to be effective and avoid negative training. The US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate has corrected this deficiency by developing and implementing infrared image collection methods that meet the needs of both real image trainers and real-time simulations. The author presents innovative methods for collection of high-fidelity digital infrared images and the associated equipment and environmental standards. The collected images are the foundation for US Army, and USMC Recognition of Combat Vehicles (ROC-V) real image combat ID training and also support simulations including the Night Vision Image Generator and Synthetic Environment Core. The characteristics, consistency, and quality of these images have contributed to the success of these and other programs. To date, this method has been employed to generate signature sets for over 350 vehicles. The needs of future physics-based simulations will also be met by this data. NVESD's ROC-V image database will support the development of training and simulation capabilities as Warfighter needs evolve.

  15. ISS Remote User Payload Operations Training and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Karl

    2012-01-01

    For more than ten years hundreds of payloads have been, and are currently being, successfully operated onboard the ISS. These payloads are operated by a diverse set of users all over the world. Due to the current international economic environment payload operations are being streamlined, in more and more cases, by using the payload investigators and scientists to also fill the role of operators. Taking this into consideration, increasingly, we have payload operators that are new to space operations and practices, therefore ground systems training and support have become a more critical aspect in ensuring a successful payload mission. The ISS ground systems payload interface is the Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC), located at Marshall Space Flight Center. ISS ground systems training for all remote ISS payload operators, as well as the ISS POIC CADRE, are centralized at this facility. The POIC is the starting point for a remote payload operator to learn how to integrate, and operate their payload, successfully onboard the ISS. Additionally, the CADRE that supports the payload user community are trained and operate from this facility. This paper will give an overview of the ISS ground systems at the POIC, as it relates to the payload user/operator and CADRE community. The entire training process from initial contact with the POIC to in-flight operations will be reviewed and improvements to this process will be presented. More importantly we will present current training methods and proposed methodology whereby the user community will be trained more efficiently and thoroughly. Also, we will discuss how we can more effectively support users in their operations concept to programmatically conduct certain aspects of payload operations to reduce costs.

  16. Support Workers within Learning/Intellectual Disability Services Perception of Their Role, Training and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windley, Debbie; Chapman, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of support workers working with adults with learning/intellectual disabilities, training and support needs. Data was collected by focus group (n = 3) and semi-structured interviews (n = 5). Participants saw their key role as maximising quality of life, identified "Trial and error" as the main mode of skill…

  17. The US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards Priority of Training and Human Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Queirolo,A.

    2008-06-13

    The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) priority of training and human resources is aimed at providing the Department of Safeguards with an appropriate mixture of regular staff and extrabudgetary experts who are qualified to meet the IAEA's technical needs and to provide personnel with appropriate instruction to improve the technical basis and specific skills needed to perform their job functions. The equipment and methods used in inspection activities are unique, complex, and evolving. New and experienced safeguards inspectors need timely and effective training to perform required tasks and to learn new skills prescribed by new safeguards policies or agreements. The role of the inspector has changed from that of strictly an accountant to include that of a detective. New safeguards procedures are being instituted, and therefore, experienced inspectors must be educated on these new procedures. The USSP also recognizes the need for training safeguards support staff, particularly those who maintain and service safeguards equipment (SGTS), and those who perform information collection and analysis (SGIM). The USSP is committed to supporting the IAEA with training to ensure the effectiveness of all staff members and will continue to offer its assistance in the development and delivery of basic, refresher, and advanced training courses. This paper will discuss the USSP ongoing support in the area of training and IAEA staffing.

  18. Social Support at the Workplace, Motivation to Transfer and Training Transfer: A Multilevel Indirect Effects Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massenberg, Ann-Christine; Spurk, Daniel; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Supervisor support, peer support and transfer motivation have been identified as important predictors of training transfer. Transfer motivation is thought to mediate the support-training transfer relationship. Especially after team training interventions that include all team members (i.e. whole-team training), individual perception of these…

  19. Pedagogical Support for Responsible Conduct of Research Training.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Misti Ault

    2016-01-01

    The number of training programs for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) has increased substantially over the past few decades as the importance of research ethics has received greater attention. It is unclear, however, whether the proliferation of RCR training programs has improved researcher integrity or the public's trust in science. Rather than training researchers simply to comply with regulations, we could use the opportunity to develop researchers' ability to understand and appreciate the ethical ideals that inform the regulations in order to help them integrate ethical decision-making into their work on a regular basis. Incorporating ethical principles into research training requires a new way of teaching RCR and the development of support materials to facilitate its adoption. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, a panel established to advise the President on bioethical issues arising from advances in biomedicine and related areas of science and technology, developed and provides pedagogical materials based on its published reports to facilitate the integration of ethics education across the curriculum and in support of RCR and general bioethics education. PMID:26786037

  20. The Temporal Effect of Training Utility Perceptions on Adopting a Trained Method: The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madera, Juan M.; Steele, Stacey T.; Beier, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the temporal effect of perceived training utility on adoption of a trained method and how perceived organizational support influences the relationship between perceived training utility perceptions and adoption of a trained method. With the use of a correlational-survey-based design, this longitudinal study required…

  1. Harmonizing and supporting infection control training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Brusaferro, S; Arnoldo, L; Cattani, G; Fabbro, E; Cookson, B; Gallagher, R; Hartemann, P; Holt, J; Kalenic, S; Popp, W; Privitera, G; Prikazsky, V; Velasco, C; Suetens, C; Varela Santos, C

    2015-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), patient safety, and the harmonization of related policies and programmes are the focus of increasing attention and activity in Europe. Infection control training for healthcare workers (HCWs) is a cornerstone of all patient safety and HCAI prevention and control programmes. In 2009 the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) commissioned an assessment of needs for training in infection control in Europe (TRICE), which showed a substantial increase in commitment to HCAI prevention. On the other hand, it also identified obstacles to the harmonization and promotion of training in infection control and hospital hygiene (IC/HH), mostly due to differences between countries in: (i) the required qualifications of HCWs, particularly nurses; (ii) the available resources; and (iii) the sustainability of IC/HH programmes. In 2013, ECDC published core competencies for infection control and hospital hygiene professionals in the European Union and a new project was launched ['Implementation of a training strategy for infection control in the European Union' (TRICE-IS)] that aimed to: define an agreed methodology and standards for the evaluation of IC/HH courses and training programmes; develop a flexible IC/HH taxonomy; and implement an easily accessible web tool in 'Wiki' format for IC/HH professionals. This paper reviews several aspects of the TRICE and the TRICE-IS projects. PMID:25777079

  2. The Effect of Counselling-Based Training on Online Peer Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekka, Foteini; Efstathiou, Giorgos; Kalantzi-Azizi, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the impact of counselling-based training on online peer support by comparing the interventions of trained peer supporters as opposed to non-trained peer supporters. Two independent raters analysed 746 support posts published during a period of one year at the "Student to Student" online peer…

  3. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-01-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  4. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-02-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  5. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    climate-sensitive decisions. Course evaluation survey collected 20 responses and indicated a high level of satisfaction. Valuable written comments offered an input for further improvement of the training services. The course offers a prototype for the conduct of training activities developed in partnership with climate information providers and the intended user group(s), in this case the California DWR.

  6. Rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of brief training and implementation of skills to support patient self-management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-management of arthritis requires informed, activated patients to manage its physical and psychosocial consequences. Patient activation and self-management can be enhanced through the use of cognitive-behavioural approaches, which have a strong evidence base and provide insight into the variation in outcome of patients with ostensibly the same degree of disease activity. However, training for rheumatology health professionals in theory and skills underpinning the facilitation of self-management is not widely available. To develop such training, this study explored rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of a variety of brief skills training courses to understand which aspects were helpful or unhelpful, and to identify the barriers and facilitators of applying the skills in clinical practice. Methods 16 clinicians who had previously attended communication and self-management skills training participated in semi-structured interviews: 3 physicians, 3 physiotherapists, 4 nurses, 6 occupational therapists. Transcripts were analysed (ED) using a hybrid inductive and deductive thematic approach, with a subset independently analysed (SH, RG-H, RJ). Results 3 overarching themes captured views about training undertaken and subsequent use of approaches to facilitate self-management. In ‘putting theory into practice’, clinicians felt that generic training was not as relevant as rheumatology-specific training. They wanted a balance between theory and skills practice, and identified the importance of access to ongoing support. In ‘challenging professional identity’, models of care and working cultures influenced learning and implementation. Training often challenged a tendency to problem-solve on behalf of patients and broadened clinicians’ remit from a primary focus on physical symptoms to the mind and body interaction. In ‘enhanced practice’, clinicians viewed consultations as enhanced after training. Focus had shifted from clinicians’ agendas to

  7. Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    This document serves as a support paper to the "Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training" report. This support document contains tables that show: (1) participation in education and training; (2) participation in education and training and work-life interaction; (3) future participation in education or training; (4) perceptions…

  8. Guide to good practices for line and training manager activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide direction for line and training managers in carrying out their responsibilities for training and qualifying personnel and to verify that existing training activities are effective.

  9. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  10. Mental Health Clinicians' Participation in Web-Based Training for an Evidence Supported Intervention: Signs of Encouragement and Trouble Ahead.

    PubMed

    McMillen, J Curtis; Hawley, Kristin M; Proctor, Enola K

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive scalable clinician training is needed to increase the impact of evidence-supported psychotherapies. This study was designed to ascertain clinician participation in different low-cost training activities, what predicts their training participation, and how participation can be increased. The study enrolled 163 clinicians. Of these, 105 completed a follow-up survey and 20 completed a more in-depth qualitative interview. Some activities (web training) attracted greater participation than others (e.g., discussion boards, role playing). Key findings include the desirability of self-paced learning and the flexibility it afforded practicing clinicians. However, some found the lack of accountability insurmountable. Many desired in-person training as a way to introduce accountability and motivation. While low-cost, relevant, self-paced learning appeals to practicing clinicians, it may need to be combined with opportunities for in-person training and accountability mechanisms in order to encourage large numbers of clinicians to complete training. PMID:25822326

  11. Understanding the Initial Impact of Early Support and Key Working Training through the Voices of Trainers, Training Participants, and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brito, Ana Teresa; Lindsay, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    An exploratory study is reported of the delivery of the Early Support and Key Working (ES&KW) training program in England for multiagency professionals and parents. This qualitative study examined how ES&KW training principles and content relate to contemporary pillars in early childhood intervention; how this training is structured to…

  12. Evaluation of a newly developed media-supported 4-step approach for basic life support training

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective The quality of external chest compressions (ECC) is of primary importance within basic life support (BLS). Recent guidelines delineate the so-called 4“-step approach” for teaching practical skills within resuscitation training guided by a certified instructor. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a “media-supported 4-step approach” for BLS training leads to equal practical performance compared to the standard 4-step approach. Materials and methods After baseline testing, 220 laypersons were either trained using the widely accepted method for resuscitation training (4-step approach) or using a newly created “media-supported 4-step approach”, both of equal duration. In this approach, steps 1 and 2 were ensured via a standardised self-produced podcast, which included all of the information regarding the BLS algorithm and resuscitation skills. Participants were tested on manikins in the same mock cardiac arrest single-rescuer scenario prior to intervention, after one week and after six months with respect to ECC-performance, and participants were surveyed about the approach. Results Participants (age 23 ± 11, 69% female) reached comparable practical ECC performances in both groups, with no statistical difference. Even after six months, there was no difference detected in the quality of the initial assessment algorithm or delay concerning initiation of CPR. Overall, at least 99% of the intervention group (n = 99; mean 1.5 ± 0.8; 6-point Likert scale: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree) agreed that the video provided an adequate introduction to BLS skills. Conclusions The “media-supported 4-step approach” leads to comparable practical ECC-performance compared to standard teaching, even with respect to retention of skills. Therefore, this approach could be useful in special educational settings where, for example, instructors’ resources are sparse or large-group sessions have to be prepared. PMID

  13. A Comparison of Workshop Training versus Intensive, Experiential Training for Improving Behavior Support Skills in Early Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Vujnovic, Rebecca K.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Yu, Jihnhee; Mashtare, Terry; Pariseau, Meaghan E.; Pelham, William E.; Parham, Brittany R.; Smalls, Kalima J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective behavior support is an important component of high-quality and nurturing early childhood classroom settings. At present, there are few studies that investigate the best way to train and support teachers in these strategies. The present study compared two different training approaches: (1) a workshop that included a one-day…

  14. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outs...

  15. The development and assessment of behavioural markers to support counter-IED training.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Jim; Leggatt, Andrew; Campbell, James

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the method used to develop and test a checklist of behavioural markers designed to support UK military forces during Counter-Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) training. IEDs represent a significant threat to UK and allied forces. Effective C-IED procedures and techniques are central to reducing risk to life in this safety critical role. Behavioural markers have been developed to characterise and assess non-technical skills which have been shown to be important in maintaining high performance in other safety critical domains. The aims of this study were two-fold. Firstly to develop a method which could be used to capture and assess operationally relevant behavioural markers for use in C-IED training relating primarily to non-technical skills. Secondly, to test the user acceptance of the behavioural marker checklist during military training activities. Through engagement with military subject matter experts, operationally relevant and observable behaviours seen in C-IED training have been identified and their links to stronger and weaker performance have been established. Using a card-sort technique, the content validity of each of the markers was assessed in addition to their detectability in an operational context. Following this assessment, a selection of the most operationally relevant and detectable behaviours were assimilated into a checklist and this checklist was tested in C-IED training activities. The results of the study show that the method used was effective in generating and assessing the behavioural markers using military subject matter experts. The study also broadly supports the utility and user-acceptance of the use of behavioural markers during training activities. The checklist developed using this methodology will provide those responsible for delivering instruction in C-IED techniques and procedures with a straightforward process for identifying good and poor performance with respect to non-technical skills. In addition

  16. Active relearning for robust supervised training of emphysema patterns.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A; Bartholmai, Brian J; Robb, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Radiologists are adept at recognizing the character and extent of lung parenchymal abnormalities in computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the inconsistent differential diagnosis due to subjective aggregation necessitates the exploration of automated classification based on supervised or unsupervised learning. The robustness of supervised learning depends on the training samples. Towards optimizing emphysema classification, we introduce a physician-in-the-loop feedback approach to minimize ambiguity in the selected training samples. An experienced thoracic radiologist selected 412 regions of interest (ROIs) across 15 datasets to represent 124, 129, 139 and 20 training samples of mild, moderate, severe emphysema and normal appearance, respectively. Using multi-view (multiple metrics to capture complementary features) inductive learning, an ensemble of seven un-optimized support vector models (SVM) each based on a specific metric was constructed in less than 6 s. The training samples were classified using seven SVM models and consensus labels were created using majority voting. In the active relearning phase, the ensemble-expert label conflicts were resolved by the expert. The efficacy and generality of active relearning feedback was assessed in the optimized parameter space of six general purpose classifiers across the seven dissimilarity metrics. The proposed just-in-time active relearning feedback with un-optimized SVMs yielded 15 % increase in classification accuracy and 25 % reduction in the number of support vectors. The average improvement in accuracy of six classifiers in their optimized parameter space was 21 %. The proposed cooperative feedback method enhances the quality of training samples used to construct automated classification of emphysematous CT scans. Such an approach could lead to substantial improvement in quantification of emphysema. PMID:24771303

  17. High-Fidelity Simulation for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Training

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lindsay E.; Storjohann, Tara D.; Spiegel, Jacqueline J.; Beiber, Kellie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a high-fidelity simulation technique compared with lecture would produce greater improvement in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) knowledge, confidence, and overall satisfaction with the training method. Design. This sequential, parallel-group, crossover trial randomized students into 2 groups distinguished by the sequence of teaching technique delivered for ACLS instruction (ie, classroom lecture vs high-fidelity simulation exercise). Assessment. Test scores on a written examination administered at baseline and after each teaching technique improved significantly from baseline in all groups but were highest when lecture was followed by simulation. Simulation was associated with a greater degree of overall student satisfaction compared with lecture. Participation in a simulation exercise did not improve pharmacy students’ knowledge of ACLS more than attending a lecture, but it was associated with improved student confidence in skills and satisfaction with learning and application. Conclusions. College curricula should incorporate simulation to complement but not replace lecture for ACLS education. PMID:23610477

  18. Enhancing Job-Site Training of Supported Workers with Autism: A Reemphasis on Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattimore, L. Perry; Parsons, Marsha B.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2006-01-01

    Currently recommended practice in supported work emphasizes training job skills to workers with severe disabilities while on the job. Early behavioral research indicated that skills needed in natural environments could also be trained in simulated settings. We compared job-site plus simulation training for teaching job skills to supported workers…

  19. The Effects of Types of Training Evaluation on Support of Training among Corporation Managers. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusy, Mitchell Edward, Jr.

    A study compared various types of training evaluation methods to determine which method elicited the greatest management support of the training function among corporate managers. A case study approach was used to compare four training evaluation methods: reaction, learning, behavior, and results. The study population consisted of 90 part-time…

  20. Implementation and Evaluation of Active Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Jill; McGill, Peter; Stretton, Rachel; Kelly-Pike, Amanda; Moore, Jane; Macdonald, Susan; Eastop, Zoe; Marks, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Active support was implemented in three community houses (active support houses), with 11 service users with severe learning disabilities. Methods: This was evaluated with reference to changes in levels of engagement, challenging behaviour (major and minor) and staff contact, measured against three comparison services (non-active…

  1. Can Massively Multiplayer Online Gaming Environments Support Team Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Debra L.; Menaker, Ellen S.

    2008-01-01

    Instructional games are created when training is deliberately added to a gaming environment or when gaming aspects are deliberately incorporated into training. One type of game that is currently attracting the attention of the education and training field is the massively multiplayer online game (MMOG). Because evidence about learning outcomes…

  2. The Virtual Library Foundation: Staff Training and Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1995-01-01

    Considers the need for staff training in virtual libraries. Highlights include instruction and training, including in-house training, vendor contracts, and self-paced instruction; documentation; current awareness via professional literature, electronic discussions, bibliographies, and conferences; information filtering through selective…

  3. Mentoring, training and support to global health innovators: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-09-01

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated InnovationTM approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed. PMID:23985118

  4. Mentoring, Training and Support to Global Health Innovators: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dan-Bi; Cole, Donald; Simiyu, Ken; Luong, Winnie; Neufeld, Vic

    2013-01-01

    Global health innovators must navigate substantial complexities to successfully develop, implement and sustain global health innovations with impact through application of an Integrated Innovation™ approach. We sought to examine the nature of the literature and evidence around mentoring, training and support of global health innovators. We conducted a scoping review searching eight databases with terms capturing different kinds of innovation and support. Assessment of relevance and mapping was completed by two reviewers, with interpretation by the review team. Twenty-eight relevant papers provided perspectives on fostering global health innovators and innovation. Fifteen included empirical data on supports to global health innovators involving a wide range of innovators. Eight included documentation of outcomes but without designs to determine effectiveness. The diverse mentoring, training and support activities included: business incubators, support organizations and centres for entrepreneurship, technology transfer and intellectual property management, internship programs for business skill development, initiatives to bridge industry and researchers, and platforms for South-led innovation for global health. We propose the cultivation of a pipeline of global health innovators to increase the number of appropriate, sustainable innovations with impact in global health. Further empirical work on how to effectively support global health innovators is needed. PMID:23985118

  5. Annual Summary. Training and Technology Experimentation, Demonstration, and Utilization Program Activities (January 1-December 31, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Directed primarily toward increasing utilization of industrial resources for training and development of disadvantaged persons, Training and Technology (TAT) activities for 1971 included: (1) development and implementation of experimental approaches to program development and operation, (2) technical support for university-conducted related…

  6. Weather support activities for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, Gerald G.

    The work of the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at the Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is discussed. The primary function of the SMG is to provide operational meteorological support to the MCC. SMG meteorologists have the final responsibility for all weather forecasts and meteorological advice used by the MCC. This responsibility includes mission planning, launch-abort-site decisions (which could delay a launch), emergency landing prior to the normal end of mission, and the normal end-of-mission forecast. Another SMG function is computer system management, which involves the node management of the JSC Meteorological Interactive Data Display system. Weather flight rules, mission planning and training support, on-orbit and end-of-mission support, and equipment and data sources are also discussed.

  7. A novel self-guided approach to alpha activity training.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Geert J M; Denissen, Ad J M; Jäger, Mark; Vernon, David; Dekker, Marian K J; Mihajlović, Vojkan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2012-03-01

    Fifty healthy participants took part in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in which they were either given auditory alpha activity (8-12Hz) training (N=18), random beta training (N=12), or no training at all (N=20). A novel wireless electrode system was used for training without instructions, involving water-based electrodes mounted in an audio headset. Training was applied approximately at central electrodes. Post-training measurement using a conventional full-cap EEG system revealed a 10% increase in alpha activity at posterior sites compared to pre-training levels, when using the conventional index of alpha activity and a non-linear regression fit intended to model individual alpha frequency. This statistically significant increase was present only in the group that received the alpha training, and remained evident at a 3 month follow-up session, especially under eyes open conditions where an additional 10% increase was found. In an exit interview, approximately twice as many participants in the alpha training group (53%) mentioned that the training was relaxing, compared to those in either the beta (20%) or no training (21%) control groups. Behavioural measures of stress and relaxation were indicative of effects of alpha activity training but failed to reach statistical significance. These results are discussed in terms of a lack of statistical power. Overall, results suggest that self-guided alpha activity training using this novel system is feasible and represents a step forward in the ease of instrumental conditioning of brain rhythms. PMID:22119661

  8. Program Activity/Training Plans. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Detailed operational guidelines, training objectives, and learning activities are provided for the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II), which are designed to train students for immediate employment. The first of four reports covers Los Angeles Southwest College's computer programming trainee…

  9. Achieving Outcomes: A Guide to Interagency Training in Transition and Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Jane M., Ed.; And Others

    This manual aids in developing cross-agency and cross-disciplinary inservice training in the areas of transition and supported employment for moderately and severely disabled individuals. Using a "train-the-trainer" approach, the manual outlines goals and objectives and presents strategies for designing inservice workshops and training materials.…

  10. The Structure and Function of Group Training Companies in Australia. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, N.; Macdonald, Duncan; Toner, Phillip; Turner, Cathy

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Group Training in Australia: A Study of Group Training Organisations and Host Employers", and is an added resource for further information. [Full Report available at ED493992.] Support Document 2, titled " Group Training and Host Employers in Australia", is also…

  11. Training, Consultation, and Mentoring: Supporting Effective Responses to Challenging Behavior in Early Care and Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschland, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Administrators in early care and education programs often turn to training initiatives to bolster staff competence in supporting children with emotional and behavioral challenges. However, training alone rarely results in the wide-ranging changes these administrators seek. This article presents a flexible approach to training, consultation and…

  12. Supporting Quality in Vocational Training through Networking. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyfried, Erwin; Kohlmeyer, Klaus; Furth-Riedesser, Rafael

    The extent to which network cooperation between the general education system, vocational training institutions, business enterprises, social partners, and political decision makers affects quality development in vocational training was examined through a literature review and synthesis of eight case studies in the following seven European…

  13. Team Training Shell: A Groupware, Multimedia-Supported Application Generator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, D.; And Others

    Since real-life situations of trauma training are practically not available, a proper substitute must take advantage of the most recent advents in multimedia and groupware technologies. Multimedia visualization is of particular importance in trauma training, as the most crucial step of the patient's initial assessment is largely based on a surface…

  14. Modelling the Reasons for Training Choices: Technical Paper. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Hill, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This report provides the technical details on the modelling aspects of identifying significant drivers for the reasons for using certain types of training and for the choice of training types. The employed data is from the 2005 Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET system (SEUV). The data has previously been analysed in NCVER (2006). This…

  15. Cross-Cultural Training and Workplace Performance. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the report "Cross- Cultural Training and Workplace Performance" (ED503402). It contains the following materials related to the report: (1) Primary approach letters; (2) Tests for statistical significance; (3) Survey of current cross-cultural training practice; (4) Survey of…

  16. Training Paraprofessionals to Support Students with Disabilities: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Virginia L.; Smith, Carol G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to describe intervention research studies in which paraprofessionals received training applicable to student with disabilities. Thirty studies were systematically reviewed to identify (a) characteristics of study participants and settings, (b) characteristics of paraprofessional training and…

  17. The Effect of Performance Support and Training as Performance Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Frank; Klein, James D.

    2008-01-01

    For decades, training has been one of the most common interventions used by organizations to improve the performance of their employees and teach them new ideas and skills. But owing to the cost of developing and delivering training, organizations have adopted alternative ways to enable employee performance while reducing the cost and minimizing…

  18. Developing Climate Resilience Toolkit Decision Support Training Sectio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Herring, D.; Keck, J.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) is a Federal government effort to address the U.S. President's Climate Action Plan and Executive Order for Climate Preparedness. The toolkit will provide access to tools and products useful for climate-sensitive decision making. To optimize the user experience, the toolkit will also provide access to training materials. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been building a climate training capability for 15 years. The target audience for the training has historically been mainly NOAA staff with some modified training programs for external users and stakeholders. NOAA is now using this climate training capacity for the CRT. To organize the CRT training section, we collaborated with the Association of Climate Change Officers to determine the best strategy and identified four additional complimentary skills needed for successful decision making: climate literacy, environmental literacy, risk assessment and management, and strategic execution and monitoring. Developing the climate literacy skills requires knowledge of climate variability and change, as well as an introduction to the suite of available products and services. For the development of an environmental literacy category, specific topics needed include knowledge of climate impacts on specific environmental systems. Climate risk assessment and management introduces a process for decision making and provides knowledge on communication of climate information and integration of climate information in planning processes. The strategic execution and monitoring category provides information on use of NOAA climate products, services, and partnership opportunities for decision making. In order to use the existing training modules, it was necessary to assess their level of complexity, catalog them, and develop guidance for users on a curriculum to take advantage of the training resources to enhance their learning experience. With the development of this CRT

  19. Transition, Training, and Assessment of Multispectral Composite Imagery in Support of the NWS Aviation Forecast Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Jedlovec, Gary; Leroy, Anita; Schultz, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program works closely with NOAA/NWS weather forecasters to transition unique satellite data and capabilities into operations in order to assist with nowcasting and short-term forecasting issues. Several multispectral composite imagery (i.e. RGB) products were introduced to users in the early 2000s to support hydrometeorology and aviation challenges as well as incident support. These activities lead to SPoRT collaboration with the GOES-R Proving Ground efforts where instruments such as MODIS (Aqua, Terra) and S-NPP/VIIRS imagers began to be used as near-realtime proxies to future capabilities of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). One of the composite imagery products introduced to users was the Night-time Microphysics RGB, originally developed by EUMETSAT. SPoRT worked to transition this imagery to NWS users, provide region-specific training, and assess the impact of the imagery to aviation forecast needs. This presentation discusses the method used to interact with users to address specific aviation forecast challenges, including training activities undertaken to prepare for a product assessment. Users who assessed the multispectral imagery ranged from southern U.S. inland and coastal NWS weather forecast offices (WFOs), to those in the Rocky Mountain Front Range region and West Coast, as well as highlatitude forecasters of Alaska. These user-based assessments were documented and shared with the satellite community to support product developers and the broad users of new generation satellite data.

  20. Person Focused Training: A Model for Delivering Positive Behavioural Supports to People with Challenging Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, B.; Dench, C.; Grey, I.; Shanahan, S.; Fitzsimons, E.; Hendler, J.; Corrigan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Person Focused Training is introduced as a model of service delivery for people with severe challenging behaviours. It is defined as training and supporting staff to conduct functional assessments and to design and implement positive behavioural support for specific individuals with challenging behaviours. Longitudinal outcome data are presented…

  1. Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT) infrastructure support under USDOE/MEIAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, A.K.; Rojeski, P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    As one of the several institutions of higher education, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University at Greensboro has received support from the office of Minority Education Institution Assistance Program (MEIAP) of the US Department of Energy primarily to provide infrastructure support to promote and enhance interdisciplinary energy-related research. In this effort, the university was authorized to prepare a plan to create a Center for Energy Research and Training (CERT), which was initiated on September 30, 1987. The goals and objectives for CERT are as specified below: (1) To encourage research by the faculty in many academic disciplines and to enhance their success in finding and obtaining funds for interdisciplinary and multi-school research. (2) To enhance students` energy education with increased opportunities for: theoretical and practical contact with energy issues and technologies; new courses and improved course content; internships and graduate funding; and ability and desire to pursue careers in energy field. (3) To establish training and service programs for off-campus constituents in energy issues, use, and management. (4) To develop cooperative relationships with industry, businesses, universities, and other private and professional organizations and with the State Energy Office. (5) To cooperate in establishing communications and collaborative research projects with various national research laboratories and other federal agencies. (6) To develop a permanent university infrastructure for energy research, training, and community service. Summaries of activities from September, 1992 to September, 1993 are presented.

  2. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability. PMID:26114456

  3. Accelerometry Measuring the Outcome of Robot-Supported Upper Limb Training in Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Ryanne J. M.; Timmermans, Annick A. A.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J. M.; Pulles, Sanne A. N. T. D.; Geers, Richard P. J.; Bakx, Wilbert G. M.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Seelen, Henk A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to assess the extent to which accelerometers can be used to determine the effect of robot-supported task-oriented arm-hand training, relative to task-oriented arm-hand training alone, on the actual amount of arm-hand use of chronic stroke patients in their home situation. Methods This single-blind randomized controlled trial included 16 chronic stroke patients, randomly allocated using blocked randomization (n = 2) to receive task-oriented robot-supported arm-hand training or task-oriented (unsupported) arm-hand training. Training lasted 8 weeks, 4 times/week, 2×30 min/day using the (T-)TOAT ((Technology-supported)-Task-Oriented-Arm-Training) method. The actual amount of arm-hand use, was assessed at baseline, after 8 weeks training and 6 months after training cessation. Duration of use and intensity of use of the affected arm-hand during unimanual and bimanual activities were calculated. Results Duration and intensity of use of the affected arm-hand did not change significantly during and after training, with or without robot-support (i.e. duration of use of unimanual use of the affected arm-hand: median difference of −0.17% in the robot-group and −0.08% in the control group between baseline and after training cessation; intensity of the affected arm-hand: median difference of 3.95% in the robot-group and 3.32% in the control group between baseline and after training cessation). No significant between-group differences were found. Conclusions Accelerometer data did not show significant changes in actual amount of arm-hand use after task-oriented training, with or without robot-support. Next to the amount of use, discrimination between activities performed and information about quality of use of the affected arm-hand are essential to determine actual arm-hand performance. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.com ISRCTN82787126 PMID:24823925

  4. Women and Training for Rural Gainful Activities (TRUGA). Training Discussion Paper No. 72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baidya, Bhuchandra P. R.; Chaudhari, Gayatri

    An evaluative study was conducted of the Training for Rural Gainful Activities (TRUGA) project and methodology in Nepal regarding women's participation and benefits. The study analyzed TRUGA as a project and as a training methodology, assessed the effects of TRUGA activities on women, and evaluated project investment in and benefits to women.…

  5. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    PubMed

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging. PMID:25355192

  6. Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustina, C.; Fajri, P. N.; Fathoni, F.; Gusti, T. P.; Harifa, A. C.; Hendra, Y.; Hertanti, D. R.; Lusiana, N.; Rohmat, F. I.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Pandjaitan, N.; Santoso, R.; Suharyanto, A.

    2013-12-01

    In hydrologic science and engineering, one challenge is establishing a common framework for discussion among workers from different disciplines. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, nine current or recent graduate students from four Indonesian universities participated in a week of training activities during June 2013. Students had backgrounds in agricultural engineering, civil and environmental engineering, water resources engineering, natural resources management, and soil science. Professors leading the training, which was based at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) in west Java, included an agricultural engineer, civil engineers, and geologists. Activities in surface-water hydrology included geomorphic assessment of streams (measuring slope, cross-section, and bed-clast size) and gauging stream flow (wading with top-setting rods and a current meter for a large stream, and using a bucket and stopwatch for a small stream). Groundwater-hydrology activities included measuring depth to water in wells, conducting a pumping test with an observation well, and performing vertical electrical soundings to infer hydrostratigraphy. Students also performed relatively simple water-quality measurements (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and alkalinity) in streams, wells, and springs. The group analyzed data with commercially-available software such as AQTESOLV for well hydraulics, freeware such as the U.S. Geological Survey alkalinity calculator, and Excel spreadsheets. Results were discussed in the context of landscape position, lithology, and land use.

  7. SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: JUNE 2004 - SEPT. 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, SESD provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the areas of Air Quality Monitoring, Hazardous Wast...

  8. Australian Small Business Participation in Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Beverley; Walker, Elizabeth; Brown, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of on-line training by small businesses in Australia. It explores the relationship between the owners acceptance and use of the Internet, and their current participation in training opportunities. Design/Methodology/Approach: A sample of small businesses which had participated in an…

  9. Development of rehabilitation training support system for occupational therapy of upper limb motor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Hirose, Akinori; Uno, Takashi; Uchid, Masaki; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new rehabilitation training support system for upper limbs. The proposed system enables therapists to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training, to easily change the load of resistance of training and to easily develop a new training program suitable for the subjects. For this purpose we develop control algorithms of training programs in the 3D force display robot. The 3D force display robot has parallel link mechanism with three motors. The control algorithm simulating sanding training is developed for the 3D force display robot. Moreover the teaching/training function algorithm is developed. It enables the therapists to easily make training trajectory suitable for subject's condition. The effectiveness of the developed control algorithms is verified by experiments.

  10. Comparison of Online and Traditional Basic Life Support Renewal Training Methods for Registered Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Serwetnyk, Tara M; Filmore, Kristi; VonBacho, Stephanie; Cole, Robert; Miterko, Cindy; Smith, Caitlin; Smith, Charlene M

    2015-01-01

    Basic Life Support certification for nursing staff is achieved through various training methods. This study compared three American Heart Association training methods for nurses seeking Basic Life Support renewal: a traditional classroom approach and two online options. Findings indicate that online methods for Basic Life Support renewal deliver cost and time savings, while maintaining positive learning outcomes, satisfaction, and confidence level of participants. PMID:26580468

  11. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Science and Ecosytem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the are...

  12. Enzyme Specific Activity in Functionalized Nanoporous Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2008-03-26

    Enzyme specific activity can be increased or decreased to a large extent by changing protein loading density in functionalized nanoporous support, where organophosphorus hydrolase can display a constructive orientation and thus leave a completely open entrance for substrate even at higher protein loading density, but glucose oxidase can not.

  13. CCMC Support of Active Missions: STEREO, THEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabeo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Coordinated Community Modeling Center has been providing custom support for current active missions, such as STEREO and THEMIS. Global heliospheric and magnetospheric MHD model results and their presentation along the actual spacecraft trajectories are invaluable for the rapid contextualization of the observations. User feedback will be provided from the point of view of a mission scientist with suggestions for future improvements.

  14. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  15. Planning and Development of Lab Training Activities for Powerline Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, A.; Hatziprokopiou, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the planning and development of student training and activities for the Powerline Communications Laboratory at the Technical Education Institute (TEI), Patras, Greece. Powerline communications is currently an active area of research and development that combines three separate specializations from the standard training of…

  16. Supporting Vocational Education and Training in Europe: The Bruges Communique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Union, 2011

    2011-01-01

    On 7 December 2010, European Ministers for vocational education and training (VET), the European Social Partners and the European Commission adopted the Bruges Communique on enhanced European cooperation in VET for 2011-2020. The Communique defines common objectives for 2020 and an action plan for the coming years, combining national measures with…

  17. Race, Identity and Support in Initial Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhopal, Kalwant

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of 22 Black and minority ethnic (BME) trainee teachers who were enrolled on a secondary teacher training course at one university over a two-year period. It argues that BME trainee teachers experience different forms of exclusionary practices in the classroom, but use their identities in a positive way to…

  18. AIDS Bereavement Support Group: A Qualitative Analysis of Training Transcripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Arlene Marchese; Moore, Penelope J.

    African American pastors are increasingly becoming involved in the care and understanding of those infected with HIV and AIDS. In this pilot project, lay leaders of a Methodist Church in Queens, New York participated in a facilitator training program for AIDS bereavement. A variety of theoretical perspectives that included bereavement theory;…

  19. Organizing for Effective Training Support in an MIS Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Stanford E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a management information system (MIS) at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) was adapted to ensure adequate training to accompany the development of computer applications. Highlights include semantic differences; user needs; time and budget constraints; and problems between users and programmers, including examples.…

  20. A Performance Support Tool for Cisco Training Program Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Angela D.; Bothra, Jashoda; Sharma, Priya

    2004-01-01

    Performance support systems can play an important role in corporations by managing and allowing distribution of information more easily. These systems run the gamut from simple paper job aids to sophisticated computer- and web-based software applications that support the entire corporate supply chain. According to Gery (1991), a performance…

  1. Online Training for Paraeducators to Support the Communication of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Sarah N.; McNaughton, David; Light, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Paraeducators are frequent sources of support for young children with disabilities in early childhood settings. However, they typically have limited training in providing communication opportunities for children with complex communication needs (CCN). The impact was investigated of providing training in a communication interaction strategy to…

  2. 75 FR 17133 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Training Range and Garrison Support Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Modified Record Fire Ranges, a Qualification Training Range, an Infantry Squad Battle Course, a Fire and Movement Range, a Digital Multipurpose Training Range, a 25 Meter Zero Range, a Combat Pistol Range, and a Convoy Live-Fire Course and associated engagement boxes. The Garrison Support Facilities are a...

  3. Training Teachers to Support Pupils' Listening in Class: An Evaluation Using Pupil Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosskey, Liz; Vance, Maggie

    2011-01-01

    Many children with speech, language and communication needs are educated in mainstream schools. Current policy and practice includes training for school staff in facilitating the development of speaking and listening skills. This study evaluates one such training package that focuses on supporting pupils' listening skills, delivered in a…

  4. Video Feedback in Key Word Signing Training for Preservice Direct Support Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rombouts, Ellen; Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research has demonstrated that formal training is essential for professionals to learn key word signing. Yet, the particular didactic strategies have not been studied. Therefore, this study compared the effectiveness of verbal and video feedback in a key word signing training for future direct support staff. Method: Forty-nine future…

  5. Volunteer Mentor Training and Support: Three Perspectives Regarding the Knowledge and Abilities Needed for Effective Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in mentoring effectiveness and satisfaction is ensuring that mentor preparation training and ongoing support address needed mentor knowledge and abilities (MKAs). Knowing how to mentor is different from knowing what mentoring involves or knowing mentoring policies and procedures. Ideally, mentor training incorporates both the…

  6. A New Pedagogical Design for Geo-Informatics Courses Using an E-Training Support System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldin, Ahmed Sharaf; ElNahry, Alaa H.; Elsayed, Adel; Ibrahim, Rania Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    The current study seeks to introduce a new pedagogical design for geo-informatics courses using an e-training support system. Laurillard's conversational approach based on conceptual representation for both instructor and learner was used to form the framework. As the current study specifically interested in training as a special form for…

  7. The Mediating Role of Social Support in the Evaluation of Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvelos, Rita; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Bates, Reid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of factors that affect training effectiveness. According to the literature, social support, perceived content validity, transfer design, the motivation to improve work through learning and positive transfer, contribute to the effectiveness of training.…

  8. An Evaluation of the Team-Teach Behaviour Support Training Programme in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, James; Walker, Lawrence; Hornby, Garry

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of teachers and other professionals of Team-Teach behaviour support training in New Zealand. Analysis of course evaluations, questionnaires, interviews and documents provide the findings. Comparisons are made with Team-Teach training in the UK and similarities and differences between New Zealand training…

  9. Autogenic training alters cerebral activation patterns in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Schlamann, Marc; Naglatzki, Ryan; de Greiff, Armin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2010-10-01

    Cerebral activation patterns during the first three auto-suggestive phases of autogenic training (AT) were investigated in relation to perceived experiences. Nineteen volunteers trained in AT and 19 controls were studied with fMRI during the first steps of autogenic training. FMRI revealed activation of the left postcentral areas during AT in those with experience in AT, which also correlated with the level of AT experience. Activation of prefrontal and insular cortex was significantly higher in the group with experience in AT while insular activation was correlated with number years of simple relaxation exercises. Specific activation in subjects experienced in AT may represent a training effect. Furthermore, the correlation of insular activation suggests that these subjects are different from untrained subjects in emotional processing or self-awareness. PMID:20799123

  10. Active robotic training improves locomotor function in a stroke survivor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. One key factor responsible for this is the use of control strategies that provide substantial guidance. This strategy not only leads to a reduction in volitional physical effort, but also interferes with motor relearning. Methods We tested the feasibility of a novel training approach (active robotic training) using a powered gait orthosis (Lokomat) in mitigating post-stroke gait impairments of a 52-year-old male stroke survivor. This gait training paradigm combined patient-cooperative robot-aided walking with a target-tracking task. The training lasted for 4-weeks (12 visits, 3 × per week). The subject’s neuromotor performance and recovery were evaluated using biomechanical, neuromuscular and clinical measures recorded at various time-points (pre-training, post-training, and 6-weeks after training). Results Active robotic training resulted in considerable increase in target-tracking accuracy and reduction in the kinematic variability of ankle trajectory during robot-aided treadmill walking. These improvements also transferred to overground walking as characterized by larger propulsive forces and more symmetric ground reaction forces (GRFs). Training also resulted in improvements in muscle coordination, which resembled patterns observed in healthy controls. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in motor cortical excitability (MCE) of the vastus medialis, medial hamstrings, and gluteus medius muscles during treadmill walking. Importantly, active robotic training resulted in substantial improvements in several standard clinical and functional parameters. These improvements persisted during the follow-up evaluation at 6 weeks. Conclusions The results indicate that active robotic training appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function in moderately impaired stroke survivors. PMID:22906099

  11. Hessian-Regularized Co-Training for Social Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Li, Yang; Lin, Xu; Tao, Dacheng; Wang, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Co-training is a major multi-view learning paradigm that alternately trains two classifiers on two distinct views and maximizes the mutual agreement on the two-view unlabeled data. Traditional co-training algorithms usually train a learner on each view separately and then force the learners to be consistent across views. Although many co-trainings have been developed, it is quite possible that a learner will receive erroneous labels for unlabeled data when the other learner has only mediocre accuracy. This usually happens in the first rounds of co-training, when there are only a few labeled examples. As a result, co-training algorithms often have unstable performance. In this paper, Hessian-regularized co-training is proposed to overcome these limitations. Specifically, each Hessian is obtained from a particular view of examples; Hessian regularization is then integrated into the learner training process of each view by penalizing the regression function along the potential manifold. Hessian can properly exploit the local structure of the underlying data manifold. Hessian regularization significantly boosts the generalizability of a classifier, especially when there are a small number of labeled examples and a large number of unlabeled examples. To evaluate the proposed method, extensive experiments were conducted on the unstructured social activity attribute (USAA) dataset for social activity recognition. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms baseline methods, including the traditional co-training and LapCo algorithms. PMID:25259945

  12. Service User Outcomes of Staff Training in Positive Behaviour Support Using Person-Focused Training: A Control Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Ian M.; McClean, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Effectively supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities who display challenging behaviours continues to be a priority for service providers. Person-focused training (PFT) is a model of service delivery which provides staff with skills in functional assessment and intervention development. Existing longitudinal data from a…

  13. Remote symptom support training programs for oncology nurses in Canada: an environmental scan.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Dawn; Carley, Meg; Kohli, Jagbir; Skrutkowski, Myriam; Avery, Jonathan; Bazile, Astride M; Court, Arlene; Nagel, Daniel A; Budz, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to explore current remote symptom support training programs provided to nurses in ambulatory oncology programs across Canada, using a survey-methods environmental scan. Of 36 delivered invitations, 28 programs responded (77.8%) representing 10 provinces. Of 25 programs that offer telephone symptom support, 17 provide symptom support training, seven do not, and one did not say. Seven programs shared training materials with the investigators and elements of training included: symptom management guidelines (n = 6), telephone triage process/principles (n = 5), competent telephone practices (n = 4), documentation (n = 4), professional standards (n = 3), role-play (n = 3), communication skills/etiquette (n = 3), and monitoring quality (n = 1). Formats included: presentations (n = 3), paper-based resources (n = 3), or e-learning modules (n = 1). No training programs were rigorously evaluated. Training in telephone nursing symptom support across oncology programs is variable. Opportunities exist to identify core competencies and evaluate if training programs enhance delivery of remote cancer symptom support. PMID:24902425

  14. Predicting Antitumor Activity of Peptides by Consensus of Regression Models Trained on a Small Data Sample

    PubMed Central

    Radman, Andreja; Gredičak, Matija; Kopriva, Ivica; Jerić, Ivanka

    2011-01-01

    Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met) with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel) support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM) regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample. PMID:22272081

  15. Predicting antitumor activity of peptides by consensus of regression models trained on a small data sample.

    PubMed

    Radman, Andreja; Gredičak, Matija; Kopriva, Ivica; Jerić, Ivanka

    2011-01-01

    Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met) with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel) support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM) regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample. PMID:22272081

  16. The Importance of TA Training in an Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, W. H.

    2000-05-01

    We are now in our fourth year of teaching a 1000+ student per year introductory physics course in an active-learning format. Students meet for five hours per week in what we call discussion/lab sections. They work in groups of five, with twenty five students in each section. The discussion/lab is truly the heart of the course, rather than the once-a-week lecture section. During a typical two and one-half hour discussion/lab, students typically complete three activity cycles. Each cycle consists of individual and small group work in response to written prompts, sometimes involving the carrying out of a measurement or lab-type activity. Then each small group arrives at their own consensus, presents and/or defends their work to the entire class, which often leads to animated whole-class discussion. The majority of these sections are taught by first and second year graduate student teaching assistants. The role of the instructor in these sections is much more as facilitator than presenter of information and/or lab procedures, the role a typical beginning graduate student is familiar with. However, we have found that the vast majority of our TAs quickly become effective instructors in their new role, if they participate in our first-quarter instructor professional development and training program. Our program begins with an intense three day workshop just prior to the start of classes and then continues with an approximately five/hour per week component during the first quarter. In this talk I will emphasize the interrelated and connected nature of the training program with the active-learning teaching experience of the TAs, and why we believe it achieves the success it does. Data on how the beliefs and practices of the new graduate students change and evolve will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of a FIPSE grant #P116B70958

  17. How FOSTER supports training Open Science in the GeoSciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    FOSTER (1) is about promoting and facilitating the adoption of Open Science by the European research community, and fostering compliance with the open access policies set out in Horizon 2020 (H2020). FOSTER aims to reach out and provide training to the wide range of disciplines and countries involved in the European Research Area (ERA) by offering and supporting face-to-face as well as distance training. Different stakeholders, mainly young researchers, are trained to integrate Open Science in their daily workflow, supporting researchers to optimise their research visibility and impact. Strengthening the institutional training capacity is achieved through a train-the-trainers approach. The two-and-half-year project started in February 2014 with identifying, enriching and providing training content on all relevant topics in the area of Open Science. One of the main elements was to support two rounds of trainings, which were conducted during 2014 and 2015, organizing more than 100 training events with around 3000 participants. The presentation will explain the project objectives and results and will look into best practice training examples, among them successful training series in the GeoSciences. The FOSTER portal that now holds a collection of training resources (e.g. slides and PDFs, schedules and design of training events dedicated to different audiences, video captures of complete events) is presented. It provides easy ways to identify learning materials and to create own e-learning courses based on the materials and examples. (1) FOSTER is funded through the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. http://fosteropenscience.eu

  18. Nutritional support to maintain proper immune status during intense training.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune function which can increase the risk of picking up minor infections. To maintain robust immunity, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy, carbohydrate, protein, and micronutrient requirements. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction and an adequate intake of iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important in the maintenance of immune function. Consuming carbohydrate during prolonged strenuous exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Similar effects can be seen with daily ingestion of high-dose antioxidant vitamin supplements, though concerns have been expressed that excessive antioxidant intake may impair exercise training adaptations. It is safe to say with reasonable confidence that individual amino acids, colostrum, Echinacea, and zinc are unlikely to boost immunity or reduce infection risk in athletes. The ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise and daily consumption of probiotic and plant polyphenol (e.g. quercetin)-containing supplements or foodstuffs (e.g. non-alcoholic beer) currently offer the best chance of success. This approach is likely to be most effective for individuals who are particularly prone to illness. PMID:23765353

  19. Differential effects of low versus high amounts of weight supported treadmill training in spinally transected rats.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Ray D; See, Pamela A; Chow, Cheryl H T

    2011-06-01

    Intensive weight-supported treadmill training (WSTT) improves locomotor function following spinal cord injury. Because of a number of factors, undergoing intensive sessions of training may not be feasible. Whether reduced amounts of training are sufficient to enhance spinal plasticity to a level that is necessary for improving function is not known. The focus of the present study was to assess differences in recovery of locomotor function and spinal plasticity as a function of the amount of steps taken during WSTT in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Rats were spinally transected at 5 days of age. When they reached 28 days of age, a robotic system was used to implement a weight-supported treadmill training program of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session daily for 4 weeks. Antibodies for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, and the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, were used to examine the expression of these proteins in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Rats that received weight-supported treadmill training performed better stepping relative to untrained rats, but only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered locomotor function that resembled normal patterns. Only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered normal levels of synaptophysin immunoreactivity around motor neurons. Weight-supported treadmill training consisting of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session increased BDNF immunoreactivity in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. TrkB expression in the ventral horn was not affected by spinal cord transection or weight-supported treadmill training. Synaptophysin expression, but not BDNF or TrkB expression was correlated with the recovery of stepping function. These findings suggested that a large amount of weight-supported treadmill training was necessary for restoring synaptic connections to motor neurons within the locomotor generating circuitry. Although a large amount of training

  20. Theoretically-Driven Infrastructure for Supporting Healthcare Teams Training at a Military Treatment Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Robert T.; Parodi, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team Resource Center (TRC) at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts a tri-service healthcare teams training course three times annually . The course consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for healthcare professionals. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore the use of simulation technologies for enhancing team training and evaluation. The TRC has adopted theoretical frameworks for evaluating training readiness and efficacy, and is using these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting healthcare teams training and research initiatives at NMCP.

  1. Active Ageing in a Greying Society: Training for All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessel, Roger

    2008-01-01

    With the ageing of society, policy-makers are aware of the need to retain older workers in employment. Across Europe, lifelong learning is increasingly important. Adults who remain active longer need (re-)training to maintain their productivity. However, vocational training tends to decline with age. The article analyses European employment policy…

  2. Working Memory Training: Improving Intelligence--Changing Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were: to investigate whether training on working memory (WM) could improve fluid intelligence, and to investigate the effects WM training had on neuroelectric (electroencephalography--EEG) and hemodynamic (near-infrared spectroscopy--NIRS) patterns of brain activity. In a parallel group experimental design,…

  3. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  4. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer counselor training program for volunteer veterans, the “Buddies” program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Results Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. Conclusions MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion. PMID:24199738

  5. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Tzvetan G.; Carolus, Almut; Schubring, David; Popova, Petia; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ). Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19), similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19), or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19). Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b). Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects. PMID:26082889

  6. Training the Mind's Eye: "Brain Movies" Support Comprehension and Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Explicit instruction on the skill of creating mental imagery from text supports reading comprehension and recall. This article shares a strategy for teaching students how to process what they read by comparing mental imagery to "brain movies." It emphasizes choosing appropriate fiction and nonfiction texts to encourage readers to build the skill…

  7. Implementation of Active Support in Victoria, Australia: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Bigby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Active support is an effective intervention to support engagement of residents with intellectual disability in group homes. This survey explored resident characteristics of the people supported by organisations implementing active support, the provision of active support, its procedures and systems, and resident engagement in…

  8. Instructional games and activities for criticality safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, B.; McBride, J. )

    1993-01-01

    During the past several years, the Training and Management Systems Division (TMSD) staff of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has designed and developed nuclear criticality safety (NCS) training programs that focus on high trainee involvement through the use of instructional games and activities. This paper discusses the instructional game, initial considerations for developing games, advantages and limitations of games, and how games may be used in developing and implementing NCS training. It also provides examples of the various instructional games and activities used in separate courses designed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES's) supervisors and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel facility inspectors.

  9. Enhanced training using the life support for trauma and transport (LSTAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Matthew E.; Toth, Louis S.; White, William H.

    1999-07-01

    The Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT) is an intensive care unit (ICU) in a 'stretcher' only 5 inches thick. LSTAT is a portable intensive care system which integrates state-of-the-art, commercial-off-the-shelf, hospital grade ICU devices into a single patient resuscitation, stabilization, evacuation, and surgical platform. LSTAT's current and evolving attributes include compact volume, low weight, integrated devices and subsystems, ergonomic patient-caregiver interface, patient and system information system, near-universal power interface, patient- caregiver hazardous environment isolation, and extensive evacuation vehicle interface compatibility. Although the LSTAT system architecture was established primarily to support diagnosis, monitoring and telemedicine consulting, the information architecture and communications suite can also support hosting training experiences and scenarios. The training scenario capabilities and features include: (1) moving training out to the field, (2) facilitating distributed training, (3) off-setting training with remote experts (or potentially embedded expert systems), and (4) facilitating training-by-simulation. Equipping the caregiver via such enhanced equipment and training should ultimately translate into better care for the patient.

  10. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Laharnar, Naima; Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Kent Anger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective policy implementation is essential for a healthy workplace. The Ryan-Kossek 2008 model for work-life policy adoption suggests that supervisors as gatekeepers between employer and employee need to know how to support and communicate benefit regulations. This article describes a workplace intervention on a national employee benefit, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention on supervisor knowledge, awareness, and experience with FMLA. Methods The intervention consisted of computer-based training (CBT) and a survey measuring awareness and experience with FMLA. The training was administered to 793 county government supervisors in the state of Oregon, USA. Results More than 35% of supervisors reported no previous training on FMLA and the training pre-test revealed a lack of knowledge regarding benefit coverage and employer responsibilities. The CBT achieved: (1) a significant learning effect and large effect size of d = 2.0, (2) a positive reaction to the training and its design, and (3) evidence of increased knowledge and awareness regarding FMLA. Conclusion CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA. PMID:24106648

  11. 78 FR 67222 - Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and Apprenticeship Training Agreement and Standards and Employer's Application To Provide Job Training AGENCY... information needed to meet statutory requirements for job training program. DATES: Written comments...

  12. High resolution combat simulations to support training for close combat light applications

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, R.M.; Dobbs, L.A.; Pimper, J.E.

    1990-06-14

    Superior tactical planning and maneuver synchronization are essential to fight and win on the CCL battlefield. This superiority can be achieved by the use of a combination of field exercises and high-resolution, computerized, combat simulation systems designed to support training. Computerized simulation systems provide a cost effective capability to promote learning through repetition and permit the exploration of scenarios that are impractical or dangerous to apply to live exercises. Man-in-the-loop, real-time, and force-on-force simulation systems with interactive color graphics interfaces are now available to support CCL training. Combat simulations have been developed specifically for this environment within the Conflict Simulation Laboratory (CSL) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Research and development efforts are underway that will greatly improve these capabilities. Applications are envisioned in training support, mission planning, analysis of new tactics and weapons, real-time display, and real-time operational support. 32 refs.

  13. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  14. Retention of Advanced Cardiac Life Support Knowledge and Skills Following High-Fidelity Mannequin Simulation Training

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sanchita; Finn, Laura A.; Cawley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess pharmacy students’ ability to retain advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) knowledge and skills within 120 days of previous high-fidelity mannequin simulation training. Design. Students were randomly assigned to rapid response teams of 5-6. Skills in ACLS and mannequin survival were compared between teams some members of which had simulation training 120 days earlier and teams who had not had previous training. Assessment. A checklist was used to record and assess performance in the simulations. Teams with previous simulation training (n=10) demonstrated numerical superiority to teams without previous training (n=12) for 6 out of 8 (75%) ACLS skills observed, including time calculating accurate vasopressor infusion rate (83 sec vs 113 sec; p=0.01). Mannequin survival was 37% higher for teams who had previous simulation training, but this result was not significant (70% vs 33%; p=0.20). Conclusion. Teams with students who had previous simulation training demonstrated numerical superiority in ACLS knowledge and skill retention within 120 days of previous training compared to those who had no previous training. Future studies are needed to add to the current evidence of pharmacy students’ and practicing pharmacists’ ACLS knowledge and skill retention. PMID:25741028

  15. Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training Is No Better Than Overground Training for Individuals with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Addie; Merlo-Rains, Angela; Peters, Denise M.; Greene, Jennifaye V.; Blanck, Erika L.; Moran, Robert; Fritz, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) has produced mixed results compared with other therapeutic techniques. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intensive intervention (intensive mobility training) including BWSTT provides superior gait, balance, and mobility outcomes compared with a similar intervention with overground gait training in place of BWSTT. Methods Forty-three individuals with chronic stroke (mean [SD] age, 61.5 [13.5] years; mean [SD] time since stroke, 3.3 [3.8] years), were randomized to a treatment (BWSTT, n = 23) or control (overground gait training, n = 20) group. Treatment consisted of 1 hour of gait training; 1 hour of balance activities; and 1 hour of strength, range of motion, and coordination for 10 consecutive weekdays (30 hours). Assessments (step length differential, self-selected and fast walking speed, 6-minute walk test, Berg Balance Scale [BBS], Dynamic Gait Index [DGI], Activities-specific Balance Confidence [ABC] scale, single limb stance, Timed Up and Go [TUG], Fugl-Meyer [FM], and perceived recovery [PR]) were conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. Results No significant differences (α = 0.05) were found between groups after training or at follow-up; therefore, groups were combined for remaining analyses. Significant differences (α = 0.05) were found pretest to posttest for fast walking speed, BBS, DGI, ABC, TUG, FM, and PR. DGI, ABC, TUG, and PR results remained significant at follow-up. Effect sizes were small to moderate in the direction of improvement. Conclusions Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of intensive interventions of durations greater than 10 days for improving gait, balance, and mobility in individuals with chronic stroke. PMID:25467394

  16. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  17. Knowledge of the Portuguese population on Basic Life Support and availability to attend training.

    PubMed

    Dixe, Maria Dos Anjos Coelho Rodrigues; Gomes, José Carlos Rodrigues

    2015-08-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the level of knowledge and the availability of the Portuguese population to attend training in Basic Life Support (BLS) and identify factors related to their level of knowledge about BLS.METHODObservational study including 1,700 people who responded to a questionnaire containing data on demography, profession, training, interest in training and knowledge about BLS.RESULTSAmong 754 men and 943 women, only 17.8% (303) attended a course on BLS, but 95.6% expressed willingness to carry out the training. On average, they did not show good levels of knowledge on basic life support (correct answers in 25.9 ± 11.5 of the 64 indicators). Male, older respondents who had the training and those who performed BLS gave more correct answers, on average (p<0.01).CONCLUSIONThe skill levels of the Portuguese population are low, but people are available for training, hence it is important to develop training courses and practice to improve their knowledge. PMID:26353102

  18. Bariatric support line: a prospective study of support line activity.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Kirsten; Segaran, Ella; Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal I

    2010-03-01

    In this prospective study, we examine the workload of the North London Obesity Surgery Service Bariatric telephone support line (BTSL) and its effects on service provision. Over a 3-month period (June to August 2008), a prospective record was kept of all calls, who they were from, whether the patient was presurgery or postsurgery, the type of procedure planned or undertaken, the nature of the enquiry, and the time taken to answer the query. Seventy-five (72%) calls were related to patients who were postsurgery and 29 (28%) presurgery. Patients scheduled for or having undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass accounted for 46 (44%) calls; 24 (23%) were preprocedure and 22 (21%) postprocedure. Patients scheduled for or having undergone gastric banding accounted for 56 (54%) calls; five (0.5%) were preprocedure and 51 (49%) postprocedure. Patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy accounted for two (<1%) calls. Both calls were postprocedure. The reason for the support line enquiry was psychological support in 15 (14%) patients, questions postsurgery in 26 (25%), general enquiries in 27 (26%), and clinical enquiries in 36 (36%). This study of the BTSL has allowed us to identify areas of need within our bariatric population and improve the service we deliver. The changes we have made should lead to a better use of the team's time, greater patient compliance, and satisfaction as well as reduced complaints and litigation. PMID:19711140

  19. Wireless just-in-time training of mobile skilled support personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandera, Cesar; Marsico, Michael; Rosen, Mitchel; Schlegel, Barry

    2006-05-01

    Skilled Support Personnel (SSP) serve emergency response organizations during an emergency incident, and include laborers, operating engineers, carpenters, ironworkers, sanitation workers and utility workers. SSP called to an emergency incident rarely have recent detailed training on the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosives (CBRNE) agents or the personal protection equipment (PPE) relevant to the incident. This increases personal risk to the SSP and mission risk at the incident site. Training for SSP has been identified as a critical need by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Worker Education and Training Program. We present a system being developed to address this SSP training shortfall by exploiting a new training paradigm called just-in-time training (JITT) made possible by advances in distance learning and cellular telephony. In addition to the current conventional training at regularly scheduled instructional events, SSP called to an emergency incident will have secure access to short (<5 minutes) training modules specific to the incident and derived from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Disaster Site Worker Course. To increase retention, each learning module incorporates audio, video, interactive simulations, graphics, animation, and assessment designed for the user interface of most current cell phones. Engineering challenges include compatibility with current cell phone technologies and wireless service providers, integration with the incident management system, and SCORM compliance.

  20. Decision Support for Active Water Management (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.; Salas, F.; Minsker, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Active water management refers to real-time adjustment of water management decisions based on observation and modeling of current water conditions. A case study is presented of a decision-support system for active water management in the San Antonio and Guadalupe basins using web services and cloud computing to create at the University of Texas a repository of observations, forecasts and model simulations from federal, state and regional water agencies and academia. Each day, National Weather Service river flow forecasts at 47 points in the basin are densified to create corresponding flows in 5500 river reaches using the RAPID river flow model operated in "Model as a Service" mode at the University of Illinois. These flows are adjusted by using the "Declarations of Intent" to pump water compiled by the Texas Commission for Environmental Quality which is the WaterMaster for all surface water withdrawals in the basin. The results are viewed through web maps that convey both maps of the spatial pattern of flow at a particular point in time, and charts of time series of flows at particular points in space.

  1. Vaccine production training to develop the workforce of foreign institutions supported by the BARDA influenza vaccine capacity building program.

    PubMed

    Tarbet, E Bart; Dorward, James T; Day, Craig W; Rashid, Kamal A

    2013-03-15

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, vaccination will be the best method to limit virus spread. However, lack of vaccine biomanufacturing capacity means there will not be enough vaccine for the world's population. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) provides support to the World Health Organization to enhance global vaccine production capacity in developing countries. However, developing a trained workforce in some of those countries is necessary. Biomanufacturing is labor-intensive, requiring unique skills not found in traditional academic programs. Employees must understand the scientific basis of biotechnology, operate specialized equipment, and work in an environment regulated by good manufacturing practices (cGMP). Therefore, BARDA supported development of vaccine biomanufacturing training at Utah State University. The training consisted of a three-week industry-focused course for participants from institutions supported by the BARDA and WHO influenza vaccine production capacity building program. The curriculum was divided into six components: (1) biosafety, (2) cell culture and growth of cells in bioreactors, (3) virus assays and inactivation, (4) scale-up strategies, (5) downstream processing, and (6) egg- and cell-based vaccine production and cGMP. Lectures were combined with laboratory exercises to provide a balance of theory and hands-on training. The initial course included sixteen participants from seven countries including: Egypt, Romania, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The participant's job responsibilities included: Production, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Research; and their education ranged from bachelors to doctoral level. Internal course evaluations utilized descriptive methods including surveys, observation of laboratory activities, and interviews with participants. Generally, participants had appropriate academic backgrounds, but

  2. Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social cognitive training in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Christine I; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 h (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 min/day] plus social cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5-15 min per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. fMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social cognition skills. PMID:22695257

  3. Peer Listening in the Middle School: Training Activities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazouri, Sandra Peyser; Smith, Miriam Frey

    This workbook presents activities for training middle school student peer listeners. The first of the workbook's 10 chapters contains an introduction to peer listening. Activities include a pretest on a series of true-false statements called the "Peer Listening Inventory," defining the meaning of the words that describe the qualities of a peer…

  4. Land cover classification by support vector machine: training set size and selection issues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, A.; Foody, G.

    The accuracy of land cover maps derived via supervised classification is often insufficient for operational applications. One of the important reasons for this is associated with the inputs to supervised classification analyses, especially the training data. The aim of this poster paper is to highlight the effect of variation in training set size on classification accuracy with respect to a series of supervised classifiers with particular regard to identifying an approach to allow accurate classification from small training sets. The classifiers investigated are the widely used maximum-likelihood classifier (MLC), feedforward artificial neural networks (ANN), decision trees (DT) and support vector machines (SVM). An advanced pattern recognition technique that has recently attracted the attention of the remote sensing community is support vector machines (SVM). A key attraction of the SVM based approach to classification is that it seeks to fit an optimal hyperplane between the classes and since it uses only the training samples that lie at the edge of the class distributions in feature space it may require only a small training sample. The potential of SVM classification was demonstrated from a series of analyses that classified land cover from imagery of Feltwell, Norfolk, U.K. All four classifiers were able to classify land cover accurately, each > 90% correct. However, for training sets ranging in size from 15 to 100 samples per-class, the highest accuracy was derived from the SVM. Moreover, inspection of the number of support vectors used in each SVM classification indicated a potential to reduce training set size without any negative impact on classification accuracy. This requires a means to intelligently identify training samples and the second part of this poster focuses on one such approach, based on the use of ancillary data on soil type to direct training site acquisition. It is shown that with information on soil type, training sample acquisition can be

  5. Towards better counselling. Keeping confidences. Training activities.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Presented are two training exercises for health personnel who counsel individuals about the results of blood tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The first exercise is preceded by remarks on the importance of trust and confidentiality in the clinical encounter. Then, participants are divided into pairs and instructed to think of a person they trust and to list 10 characteristics of that person. These attributes are compiled for the entire group. Next, small groups of 3-4 participants discuss the following questions: What do you need to say and do when you are counseling someone to help them have confidence in you? What do you need to do to enable them to keep trusting you? What might happen when confidentiality is broken? What are the benefits of maintaining confidentiality? Finally, the small groups are given case scenarios of breaches of client confidentiality and asked to imagine both how they would feel in such a situation and how it could have been prevented. The second exercise seeks to increase counselors' understanding of clients' risk-taking behaviors and their ability to suspend personal judgment by having them describe incidents from their own lives when they took a risk related to sex, relationships, or money. PMID:12291931

  6. Should Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training and Robotic-Assistive Steppers for Locomotor Training Trot Back to the Starting Gate?

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Duncan, Pamela W.

    2014-01-01

    Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robotic-assisted step training (RAST) have not, so far, led to better outcomes than a comparable dose of progressive over-ground training (OGT) for disabled persons with stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or cerebral palsy. The conceptual bases for these promising rehabilitation interventions had once seemed quite plausible, but the results of well-designed, randomized clinical trials have been disappointing. The authors reassess the underpinning concepts for BWSTT and RAST, which were derived from mammalian studies of treadmill-induced hind-limb stepping associated with central pattern generation after low thoracic spinal cord transection, as well as human studies of the triple crown icons of task-oriented locomotor training, massed practice, and activity-induced neuroplasticity. The authors retrospectively consider where theory and practice may have fallen short in the pilot studies that aimed to produce thoroughbred interventions. Based on these shortcomings, the authors move forward with recommendations for the future development of workhorse interventions for walking. In the absence of evidence for physical therapists to employ these strategies, however, BWSTT and RAST should not be provided routinely to disabled, vulnerable persons in place of OGT outside of a scientifically conducted efficacy trial. PMID:22412172

  7. Bridging the Gap: Supporting Translational Research Careers Through an Integrated Research Track Within Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Pincus, Harold A.; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    In the setting of traditional residency training programs, physician–scientists are often limited in their ability to pursue research training goals while meeting clinical training requirements. This creates a gap in research training at a critical developmental stage. In response, Columbia University Medical Center’s Department of Psychiatry, in partnership with the New York State Psychiatric Institute, has created a formal Research Track Program (RTP) for psychiatry residents so that interested individuals can maintain their attention on research training during formative residency years. Clinical and research training are integrated through core clinical rotations on research units. With protected research time and clear developmental milestones for each year of training, the RTP allows research track residents to meet both clinical and research training goals while maintaining a healthy work–life balance. In coordination with existing postdoctoral research fellowship programs, research track residents can effectively jump-start fellowship training with advanced course work and consistent, continuous mentorship bridging residency and fellowship years. A key element of the program is its provision of core training in research literacy and extensive research opportunities for all residents, stimulating research interest across the whole residency program. Supported by the National Institutes of Health and a private foundation, this RTP capitalizes on a unique academic–private partnership to address many of the challenges facing physician–scientists. By integrating clinical and research exposures and offering protected research time, careful mentoring, and financial resources, the program aims to further the development of those most poised to establish careers in translational research. PMID:23619070

  8. The effects of a bridge exercise with vibration training and an unstable base of support on lumbar stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinsik; Lee, Sangyong; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a bridge exercise with vibration training and an unstable base of support on lumbar stabilization. [Subjects] This study assigned healthy adults in their 20s to a bridge exercise with a sling and vibration group (BESV, n=20) and a bridge exercise with a sling group (BESG, n=20). [Methods] Electromyography was used to comparatively analyze the activity of the internal obliques (IO), external obliques (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) when local vibration was applied during a bridge exercise that used a sling as an unstable base of support. [Results] There were statistically significant increases in the activity of the IO and EO within each group after the intervention. The activity of the IO and the EO was significantly higher in the BESV group than in the BES group after the intervention. [Conclusion] The bridge exercise performed using vibration training on an unstable base of support increased the activity of the IO and the EO, which improved lumbar stabilization. PMID:25642039

  9. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  10. CarerSupport - An Innovative Approach to Informal Carers' Training and Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Lene; Moen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    EU and national policies for long-term care acknowledge the role of informal carers. However, there is still little adequate support to prepare or ease informal carers in terms of training to allow them improve their skills, alleviate psychosocial stress and maintain their own health and well-being. In the CarerSupport project, we seek to integrate services, deploy and test an integrated ICT platform enabling participation and collaboration of informal carers, psychologists and health professionals to collaborate, facilitate training and orientation, offer tele-consulting services and psychosocial support to carers. Based on this platform and its content, we will deploy and report on informal carers' experiences with the wide range of offered service. The poster will present the first experiences and suggest potentials for a service like CarerSupport. PMID:27332409

  11. The supportive effect of supplementation with α-keto acids on physical training in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Spreng, T; Lehr, M; Yang, B; Karau, A; Gebhardt, H; Steinacker, J M

    2015-07-01

    The maintenance of physical activity is crucial for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and exercise induced changes including production of metabolites like ammonia can result in fatigue and exercise intolerance. Nutritional supplements may serve as an effective measure in supporting patients undergoing physical training by acting on their metabolism. This study investigates the effects of supplementation with α-keto acids (KAS) on exercise tolerance and glucose control in T2D patients. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study 28 T2D patients underwent 6 weeks training on a cycle ergometer while they were supplemented with either a placebo or KAS (0.2 g kg(-1) body weight each day). The weekly training volume, power output at maximum and lactic threshold, leg muscle torque, the plasma concentration and 8 h urinary discharge of glucose, ammonia and urea were determined before and after the training as well as after one week of recovery. With KAS the patients did significantly more voluntary exercise (213 vs. 62 min, P < 0.01), reached a higher VO2max (27.3 vs. 24.8 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), higher power output (224 vs. 193 watts, P < 0.05) and greater endurance capacity (108 vs. 96 watts at lactic threshold, P < 0.05). Although the patients without KAS improved their glucose control after the training (P < 0.05), this effect could not be maintained after recovery as it was in the KAS group, where there was a prolonged benefit in glucose control. KAS also affected the ammonia and urea metabolism. KAS delivered supportive effects on the physical training along with a prolonged benefit in glucose control in T2D patients. PMID:26068548

  12. Active vibration control for high speed train bogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Alexander; Storm, Stefan; Röder, Arno; Maier, Rudolf; Frank, Paul-Gerhard

    2005-02-01

    This report deals with the design of an active vibration control (AVC) system integrated into the primary suspension of the bogie of a German high-speed train (ICE). As a design case a prototype bogie (WU92) for the ICE2 was taken. This paper comprises all parts and stages of the development of an AVC system. First, a transfer path analysis was performed in order to identify the main paths of propagation and to determine the boundary conditions at the actuator contact points. A detailed FE-analysis performed on the basis of an already existing FE-model serves as a support to investigate the actuator performance and evaluate several actuator concepts. However, the evaluation of a multifold of varying configurations of actuator, error sensor and monitor sensor positions is obviously not possible in the experiment, but is in the simulation. Based on the simulations and the experiments the control system is implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP) system. The structure borne noise level was determined during running tests at the ICE3 and measurements at the WU92 installed in the test rig. The design of the actuator system includes the layout of the specific system as well as the selection of the piezoelectric elements. A specifically developed amplifier drives the actuators. Finally the system is integrated into one axle of the WU92 and tested during roller-rig measurements.

  13. [How can the mentally ill achieve sustained employment? Supported employment versus pre-vocational training].

    PubMed

    Brieger, P; Hoffmann, H

    2012-07-01

    People with severe mental disorders are often without work, although work may have a positive effect on their health. The paper presents some results in this field from the German S3 guidelines on psychosocial therapies. In terms of evidence-based medicine supported employment (SE - first place then train) has proven to be most effective. Nevertheless, SE is still rare in Germany. Pre-vocational training, however, follows the concept first train then place and is offered in rehabilitation of the mentally ill (RPK) centres in Germany. There is some evidence that the programs are beneficial for users. The UN Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities outlines an obligation for work on an equal basis with others and for vocational training. So far, the German mental health system only partly meets these requirements. PMID:22729512

  14. [Use of supportive autogenic training in multiple morbidity in geriatric psychiatry patients].

    PubMed

    Kircher, T; Stetter, F; Wormstall, H

    1997-01-01

    23 multimorbid, geronto-psychiatric patients, aged 60 years or older, participated in a "supportive" course of autogenic training according to Schultz. Participating in the course an average of 7 +/- 3 weeks, 17 (76%) of the subjects were able to learn the training. In general, subjects reported a better general condition after the training sessions, measured with visual analogue scales (p < 0.001). The psychopathological status improved significantly during the time of the course (BPRS: p < 0.001; GDS: p < 0.001). No significant change was found in the cognitive state (MMSE) and the statements on the "list of complaints" ("Beschwerdenliste"). The global training success was better in the psychopathological less affected than in the more severely ill (BPRS prior r = 0.64, p = 0.001, GDS prior r = 0.46, p < 0.05). No correlation was found between training success and age, number of somatic diseases, number of medication, MMSE and the "Beschwerdenliste". Autogenic training is a useful component in psychotherapeutic and psychiatric therapy for elderly multimorbid in- and outpatients. A half-open group, two therapy sessions per week, reciting the training formulae aloud, a structured, simple setting and co-therapists proved to be worthwhile. PMID:9453848

  15. Training and capacity development: the foundation of interventions to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda; Louw, Julia; Naicker, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Many programs to support young children and families affected by HIV and AIDS depend substantially on a model of cascaded training from international nongovernmental organizations, through in-country groups and organizations to services on the ground. In this paper, we describe the training and capacity building – as described in proposals, progress reports, and individualized questionnaires – offered by 10 international organizations funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to provide supportive services for young children and their families in five southern and eastern African countries. We related the findings to effective features of training described in the literature. Training and capacity development were found to be the most substantial activities in rendering services to children and families, both in terms of effort and human and financial resources. A total of 67 trainings were conducted over a period of 18 months. Almost all trainings combine lecture-based instruction, group work/discussions, and role play, but only half of the trainings report some form of mentoring, supervision or coaching following the training. Drawing on the literature, it is likely that more purposeful planning is required in terms of the selection of trainees, local adaptation and development of materials, participatory training approaches, and techniques to develop and sustain skills as well as knowledge. Demonstration and mentorship in the field together with quality assurance procedures, pre-and post-assessment to evaluate training, processes to transfer learning into subsequent practice, as well as certification, are all fundamental steps to ensure that training plays a supportive role in the behavior changes necessary to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS and their families. PMID:26430466

  16. Skylab 2 prime crew suit up during prelaunch training activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, prime crew pilot of the first manned Skylab mission, is suited up in bldg 5 at JSC during prelaunch training activity. He is assisted by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., prime crew commander. The man in the left background is wearing a face mask to insure that Conrad, Joseph Kerwin, and Weitz are not exposed to disease prior to launch (25399); Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin (on left), and Weitz assist each other in suiting up in bldg 5 at JSC during pre-launch training activity (25400).

  17. Family nursing hospital training and the outcome on job demands, control and support.

    PubMed

    Sigurdardottir, Anna Olafia; Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Juliusdottir, Sigrun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a family systems nursing hospital training educational program (ETI program) on nurses' and midwives' perception of job demands, control, and/or support. Of the nurses and midwives who were working in the Women's and Children's Services Division at The National University Hospital in Iceland, 479 participated in the study on three time periods from 2009 to 2011. Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorize participants into four job types (Karasek and Theorell, 1990). These four job types are high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control), and active (high demand, high control). However, when the data were evaluated based on the proportion of job characteristics as reported by the nurses and the midwives, no significant difference was found over time (2009 to 2011) (χ(2)=5.203, p=.518). However, based on the results from the independent t-tests at time 1, a significant difference was found amongst the high strain job group regarding perceived support from administrators and colleagues among the nurses and midwives who had taken the ETI program compared to those who had not taken the program (χ(2)=2.218, p=.034). This indicates that the health care professionals who characterized their job to be of high demand but with low control evaluated the support from their administrators and colleagues to be significantly higher if they had taken the ETI program than did the nurses and midwives who did not take the ETI program. These findings are promising because they might, in the long run, increase the nurses' and midwives' autonomy and control over their own work. PMID:25825355

  18. Staff Training in Positive Behaviour Support: Impact on Attitudes and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Kathy; Jones, Edwin; Allen, David; Davies, Dee; James, Wendy; Doyle, Tony; Andrew, Jock; Kaye, Neil; Jones, Sian; Brophy, Sam; Moore, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Background: Positive behavioural support is increasingly viewed as the preferred service approach for people who challenge, but skills are insufficiently widespread. The need for effective staff training has been highlighted as a key factor in high quality service provision, with investigators recommending a multidimensional approach to increase…

  19. Farm Management and Leadership. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in farm management and leadership: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with farm management. SMAT materials can…

  20. Occupational Health and Safety. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with occupational safety and…

  1. State Programs Supporting Health Manpower Training: An Inventory. Volume 1. Report and Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    A detailed statistical review of state support for health manpower training during 1973, 1974, and 1975 with an inventory of state expenditures for specific health occupations in 32 states are presented in Volume One of this two-volume study conducted for the Health Resources Administration. Objectives of the study included: investigation of the…

  2. UCF's Support for Teaching and Learning Online: CD-ROM Development, Faculty Development, and Statewide Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truman-Davis, Barbara; Futch, Linda; Thompson, Kelvin; Yonekura, Francisca

    The University of Central Florida (UCF) has developed an award winning faculty development program providing experiential, collaborative learning for instructors to build online programs. A project is now underway to extend training throughout the state of Florida. Supporting students is also essential to the success of teaching online. The…

  3. Farmers as Employers. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of farmers as employers: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her written and spoken communication and numeracy skills…

  4. A Survey of Graduate Training in Empirically Supported and Manualized Treatments: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karekla, Maria; Lundgren, Jennifer D.; Forsyth, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The promotion and dissemination of empirically supported (ESTs) and manualized therapies are important, albeit controversial, developments within clinical science and practice. To date, studies evaluating training opportunities and attitudes about such treatments at the graduate, predoctoral internship, and postdoctoral levels have focused on the…

  5. Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104): Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Meyers, Dave; Bateman, Andrea; Bluer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This document supports the report "Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104)". The first section outlines the methodology used to undertake the research and covers the design of the research, sample details, data collection processes and the strategy for data analysis and reporting. The…

  6. Occupational Health and Safety. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her written and spoken communication skills needed…

  7. A Survey of Supported Employment Agencies' Quality Improvement Practices and Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley-Maxwell, Cheryl; Whitney-Thomas, Jean

    1995-01-01

    Examines knowledge level, relevance, and current use level of quality improvement practices in Wisconsin-supported employment agencies among administrators and service providers. Respondents expressed low-to-moderate level of need for training in areas of critical ingredients of quality improvement, evaluation and team performance, and defining…

  8. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: National Finance Sector Survey. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zaniah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  9. Agricultural Production. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in agricultural production: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her written and spoken communication skills needed to deal with…

  10. The Training and Support Programme for Parents of Children with Ataxia: Parents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the Training and Support Programme (TSP) among parents of children with ataxia. Twenty-seven parents and their children completed the TSP. Data were collected by home record sheets and observation sheets completed by parents and therapists, respectively, and telephone interviews with 10 parents. Benefits reported…

  11. Open and Distance Learning for Health: Supporting Health Workers through Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This case study surveys the growing use of open and distance learning approaches to the provision of support, education and training to health workers over the past few decades. It classifies such uses under four headings, providing brief descriptions from the literature of a few examples of each group. In conclusion, it identifies key lessons…

  12. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  13. Contingency Mapping: Use of a Novel Visual Support Strategy as an Adjunct to Functional Equivalence Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kenneth E.; Mirenda, Pat

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of contingency mapping, a new visual support strategy designed to enhance clients' understanding of the contingencies associated with functional equivalence training (FET). The study was conducted in a general education classroom with an adolescent boy with autism who engaged in prompt dependent behavior. A…

  14. Effects of Game Design Patterns on Basic Life Support Training Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelle, Sebastian; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Based on a previous analysis of game design patterns and related effects in an educational scenario, the following paper presents an experimental study. In the study a course for Basic Life Support training has been evaluated and two game design patterns have been applied to the course. The hypotheses evaluated in this paper relate to game design…

  15. A Training and Support Group for Elderly Diabetics: Description and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Floyd F.

    1993-01-01

    Conducted 12-week diabetes support-training group for older adults having difficulty managing their diabetes because of poor dietary compliance. Results revealed that group participants (n=12 women) successfully improved their compliance to diet plans and lowered their peak blood glucose levels. (Author/NB)

  16. Farm Management and Leadership. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in farm management and leadership: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner with the reading, writing, and spoken communication skills needed to deal with…

  17. Supporting School System Leaders: The State of Effective Training Programs for School Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teitel, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The current report explores what is available to superintendents after they assume their positions: what the landscape of sustained executive training and support options available for sitting school system leaders looks like. It describes about two dozen programs offered around the country-who offers them, how they are organized and funded, what…

  18. Behaviour Support Training for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaad, Eman; Thabet, Rawy A.

    2016-01-01

    Al Jalila Foundation (AJF) is a philanthropic organization based in Dubai. The organization sponsored a training programme in 2013 to support parents of children with various disabilities to cope with the behavioural and emotional challenges that are related to the child's disability. The course lasts for 6 weeks and is delivered across the United…

  19. Aviation Support Equipment Technician M 3 & 2. Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    One of a series of training manuals prepared for enlisted personnel in the Navy and Naval Reserve, this self-study unit relates directly to the occupational qualifications of the Aviation Support Equipment Technician M rating. Contents include a 15-chapter text followed by a subject index, qualifications for advancement, and the associated…

  20. Farmers as Employers. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of farmers as employers: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with employment of agriculture…

  1. Returning the Favor: Positive Employee Responses to Supervisor and Peer Support for Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei Tian, Amy; Cordery, John; Gamble, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on social exchange theory and associated notions of reciprocity, we argue that interpersonal support for training transfer in the workplace is associated with increased employee task performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and reduced turnover intention. We test our hypotheses using survey data from 786 Chinese retail…

  2. Training and Supporting the "Volunteers": Revisiting Total Literacy Campaigns in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagi, Rie

    2006-01-01

    Teacher effectiveness is one of the most important determinants of the success of adult literacy programmes. From the outset of the campaign movement, the National Literacy Mission (NLM) of the Government of India has emphasised the need for a training and support system for campaign personnel, who often have limited education and lack of…

  3. Review of the Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum: Supervisory and Direct Support Editions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Don; George, Heather Peshak; Childs, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In the past several years, the values and practices of positive behavior support (PBS) have had a significant impact on services provided to adults and children with disabilities. Evidence of this impact can be seen in federal grants and laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments of 1997 (IDEA, 1997), a professional…

  4. Understanding support mediated activity by investigating highly active, thermally stable, silica supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Rashkeev, Sergey; Pennycook, Stephen J; Schwartz, Viviane; Mullins, David R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    2.5 nm gold nanoparticles were grown on a fumed silica support using the physical vapor deposition technique magnetron sputtering. Combining electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and catalytic studies revealed that the silica supported gold catalysts are thermally stable when annealed in an oxygen containing environment up to at least 500oC. This surprising stability is attributed to the absence of residual halide impurities and a strong bond between gold and defects at the silica surface (2.7 - 3.8 eV), as estimated from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Au/SiO2 catalysts are slightly less active for CO oxidation than the prototypical Au/TiO2 catalysts, however they can be regenerated far more easily, fully recovering the activity of a freshly prepared catalyst after deactivation.

  5. Balanced VS Imbalanced Training Data: Classifying Rapideye Data with Support Vector Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustuner, M.; Sanli, F. B.; Abdikan, S.

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of supervised image classification is highly dependent upon several factors such as the design of training set (sample selection, composition, purity and size), resolution of input imagery and landscape heterogeneity. The design of training set is still a challenging issue since the sensitivity of classifier algorithm at learning stage is different for the same dataset. In this paper, the classification of RapidEye imagery with balanced and imbalanced training data for mapping the crop types was addressed. Classification with imbalanced training data may result in low accuracy in some scenarios. Support Vector Machines (SVM), Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifications were implemented here to classify the data. For evaluating the influence of the balanced and imbalanced training data on image classification algorithms, three different training datasets were created. Two different balanced datasets which have 70 and 100 pixels for each class of interest and one imbalanced dataset in which each class has different number of pixels were used in classification stage. Results demonstrate that ML and NN classifications are affected by imbalanced training data in resulting a reduction in accuracy (from 90.94% to 85.94% for ML and from 91.56% to 88.44% for NN) while SVM is not affected significantly (from 94.38% to 94.69%) and slightly improved. Our results highlighted that SVM is proven to be a very robust, consistent and effective classifier as it can perform very well under balanced and imbalanced training data situations. Furthermore, the training stage should be precisely and carefully designed for the need of adopted classifier.

  6. Effects of a competency-based professional development training on children's physical activity and staff physical activity promotion in summer day camps.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards for summer camp programs. This chapter presents findings from a multiyear evaluation of a competency-based training approach using a single group design with preassessments and multiple postassessments. Training consisted of participatory exercises and video demonstrations. Data on staff physical activity promotion behaviors were collected using SOSPAN, an instrument that utilizes momentary time sampling to record instances of staff physical activity promotion behaviors consistent with physical activity standards. This chapter describes how a competency-based professional development training may be effective at increasing physical activity promoting and decreasing physical activity discouraging staff behaviors and related child activity levels. PMID:25530241

  7. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Characteristics of Trained Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centeio, Erin E.; Erwin, Heather; Castelli, Darla M.

    2014-01-01

    As public health concerns about physical inactivity and childhood obesity continue to rise, researchers are calling for interventions that comprehensively lead to more opportunities to participate in physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics and attitudes of trained physical education teachers during the…

  8. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  9. Providing Training in Positive Behavioural Support and Physical Interventions for Parents of Children with Autism and Related Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, David

    2014-01-01

    Though professionals working with children on the autism spectrum who display challenging behaviour routinely receive training in the use of both positive behavioural support techniques and physical interventions, such training is rarely provided for the parents of these children. This article reports on the impact of training provided for family…

  10. A training needs survey of doctors' breastfeeding support skills in England.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Louise M; Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna

    2006-10-01

    The study examined the training needs of paediatricians and general practitioners (GPs). Respondents rated their competence on 23 breastfeeding support skills, importance of update in the next 2 years, actual and potential helpfulness of different forms of professional updates, and accessibility in the next 2 years. The perception of organizational barriers to breastfeeding support and practitioners' knowledge of policies and guidance on breastfeeding were also examined. The sample comprised 120 paediatricians and 57 GPs. Response rates were estimated as between 4% and 29%, depending upon the method of recruitment. Although both groups rated themselves as fairly competent in most of the skill areas, they welcomed training in key areas of practice. Paediatricians identified more areas for update than GPs (t = 3.44; d.f. = 178; P < 0.00001). Those who believed that they were less competent in clinical skills were least likely to seek update (r = 0.35; P < 0.00001). Practical forms of training were most often welcomed. Only 47% of GPs and 62.5% of paediatricians had access to a local breastfeeding policy. There were evident gaps in knowledge on key aspects of public health policy, which could influence local practice; for example, 50.8% of GPs and 47.5% of paediatricians identified a younger age for introducing solids than the minimum according to current government guidance. Organizational barriers to breastfeeding support were experienced by all respondents. Recommendations include purposively targeting training to those least likely to seek training, and developing effective self-study and observational methods of learning. All training should be evaluated and implemented alongside breastfeeding policies and clinical leadership to improve the practice of all healthcare practitioners. PMID:16999767

  11. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the period 1 Oct. 1995 - 30 Sept. 1996. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics and high lift modeling studies. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the high lift activities.

  12. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Felzen, Marc; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the perspective of medical experts and end-users. Objective The study aims to assess the quality of current mobile apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training and real incident support from expert as well as end-user perspective. Methods Two independent medical experts evaluated the medical content of CPR apps from the Google Play store and the Apple App store. The evaluation was based on pre-defined minimum medical content requirements according to current Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines. In a second phase, non-medical end-users tested usability and appeal of the apps that had at least met the minimum requirements. Usability was assessed with the System Usability Scale (SUS); appeal was measured with the self-developed ReactionDeck toolkit. Results Out of 61 apps, 46 were included in the experts’ evaluation. A consolidated list of 13 apps resulted for the following layperson evaluation. The interrater reliability was substantial (kappa=.61). Layperson end-users (n=14) had a high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation 1 [ICC1]=.83, P<.001, 95% CI 0.75-0.882 and ICC2=.79, P<.001, 95% CI 0.695-0.869). Their evaluation resulted in a list of 5 recommendable apps. Conclusions Although several apps for resuscitation training and real incident support are available, very few are designed according to current BLS guidelines and offer an acceptable level of usability and hedonic quality for laypersons. The results of this study are intended to optimize the development of CPR mobile apps. The app ranking supports the informed selection of mobile apps for training situations and CPR campaigns as well as for real incident support. PMID:24647361

  13. Supporting command and control training functions in the emergency management domain using cognitive systems engineering.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Celestine A; Balogun, Obafemi; Boyle, Edward; Turner, Amy

    The design and implementation of MERMAIDS, a computer-based training system in the domain of emergency command and control, is described. The research investigates the use of cognitive systems engineering and information management tools for modelling and representing training knowledge of emergency system operators. We propose a decision-centric human-computer interface as a new method of supporting computer-based modelling in the domain of emergency systems. Several interacting themes in information management relevant to emergency response planning are discussed. PMID:17008263

  14. Multilevel Predictors of Clinic Adoption of State-Supported Trainings in Children’s Services

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Su-chin Serene; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Weaver, James; Duan, Naihua; Kerker, Bonnie D.; Clark, Lisa J.; Cleek, Andrew F.; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective Characteristics associated with participation in training in evidence-informed business and clinical practices by 346 outpatient mental health clinics licensed to treat youths in New York State were examined. Methods Clinic characteristics extracted from state administrative data were used as proxies for variables that have been linked with adoption of innovation (extraorganizational factors, agency factors, clinic provider-level profiles, and clinic client-level profiles). Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess the independent effects of theoretical variables on the clinics’ participation in state-supported business and clinical trainings between September 2011 and August 2013 and on the intensity of participation (low or high). Interaction effects between clinic characteristics and outcomes were explored. Results Clinic characteristics were predictive of any participation in trainings but were less useful in predicting intensity of participation. Clinics affiliated with larger (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=.65, p<.01), more efficient agencies (AOR=.62, p<.05) and clinics that outsourced more clinical services (AOR=.60, p<.001) had lower odds of participating in any business-practice trainings. Participation in business trainings was associated with interaction effects between agency affiliation (hospital or community) and clinical staff capacity. Clinics with more full-time-equivalent clinical staff (AOR=1.52, p<.01) and a higher proportion of clients under age 18 (AOR=1.90, p<.001) had higher odds of participating in any clinical trainings. Participating clinics with larger proportions of youth clients had greater odds of being high adopters of clinical trainings (odds ratio=1.54, p<.01). Conclusions Clinic characteristics associated with uptake of business and clinical training could be used to target state technical assistance efforts. PMID:25686815

  15. The Human Motor System Supports Sequence-Specific Representations over Multiple Training-Dependent Timescales.

    PubMed

    Wymbs, Nicholas F; Grafton, Scott T

    2015-11-01

    Motor sequence learning is associated with increasing and decreasing motor system activity. Here, we ask whether sequence-specific activity is contingent upon the time interval and absolute amount of training over which the skill is acquired. We hypothesize that within each motor region, the strength of any sequence representation is a non-linear function that can be characterized by 3 timescales. We had subjects train for 6 weeks and measured brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used repetition suppression (RS) to isolate sequence-specific representations while controlling for effects related to kinematics and general task familiarity. Following a baseline training session, primary and secondary motor regions demonstrated rapidly increasing RS. With continued training, there was evidence for skill-specific efficiency, characterized by a dramatic decrease in motor system RS. In contrast, after performance had reached a plateau, further training led to a pattern of slowly increasing RS in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor cortex, and anterior cerebellum consistent with skill-specific specialization. Importantly, many motor areas show changes involving more than 1 of these 3 timescales, underscoring the capacity of the motor system to flexibly represent a sequence based on the amount of prior experience. PMID:24969473

  16. 20 CFR 1001.121 - Performance standard on facilities and support for Veterans' Employment and Training Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... support for Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) staff. 1001.121 Section 1001.121 Employees... Training Service (VETS) staff. Each State agency shall provide adequate and appropriate facilities and administrative support such as office space, furniture, telephone, equipment, and supplies to VETS staff....

  17. [The metrological support of medical laboratory activity].

    PubMed

    Émanuél', A V; Suvorov, V I; Evseenko, O V

    2013-02-01

    The article discusses the methodological approaches in implementing of regulations of the Federal law FZ-102 "On the support of unity of measurements in the area of laboratory medicine "from the positions of GOSTK ISO 9001-2008 "The systems of quality management. Requirements" and GOST K ISO 15189-2009 "medical laboratories. The particular requirements to quality and competence". The application of GOSTK ISO 18113.1-5 "The medicine items for diagnostic in vitro. Information provided by manufacturer (marking)" neatly assigns the responsibility for support of metrological correctness of laboratory measurements. PMID:23808011

  18. Improvements to executive function during exercise training predict maintenance of physical activity over the following year

    PubMed Central

    Best, John R.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise training benefits cognitive, neural, and physical health markers in older adults. It is likely that these positive effects will diminish if participants return to sedentary lifestyles following training cessation. Theory posits that that the neurocognitive processes underlying self-regulation, namely executive function (EF), are important to maintaining positive health behaviors. Therefore, we examined whether better EF performance in older women would predict greater adherence to routine physical activity (PA) over 1 year following a 12-month resistance exercise training randomized controlled trial. The study sample consisted of 125 community-dwelling women aged 65–75 years old. Our primary outcome measure was self-reported PA, as measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), assessed on a monthly basis from month 13 to month 25. Executive function was assessed using the Stroop Test at baseline (month 0) and post-training (month 12). Latent growth curve analyses showed that, on average, PA decreased during the follow-up period but at a decelerating rate. Women who made greater improvements to EF during the training period showed better adherence to PA during the 1-year follow-up period (β = −0.36, p < 0.05); this association was unmitigated by the addition of covariates (β = −0.44, p < 0.05). As expected, EF did not predict changes in PA during the training period (p > 0.10). Overall, these findings suggest that improving EF plays an important role in whether older women maintain higher levels of PA following exercise training and that this association is only apparent after training when environmental support for PA is low. PMID:24904387

  19. Making child mental health 'everybody's business': a training course for family support workers.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Alex; Van Roosmalen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and delivery of a mental health teaching and training programme offered to Family Support Workers (FSWs) working in a range of schools in an economically deprived part of Bedfordshire. The FSWs had received no prior teaching in the area of child mental health, or in ways of engaging and communicating with children and families. Both topics were considered crucial to their role. The training was delivered in two phases. Phase 1 consisted of 4 full days of teaching. Topics covered included (1) engaging children and families, (2) child development, (3) self-awareness, and (4) systemic thinking. Phase 2 was delivered through 'practice sets', which were held monthly for 4 months, and lasted 2 hours. These were used to develop the FSWs' theoretical understanding of the issues, and link this with their practice. The training was evaluated using a semistructured questionnaire. Results suggested that participants had changed the ways in which they engaged families and children. They were more able to adopt a collaborative, nonexpert, position which focused on empowering families to make decisions for themselves. This represented a significant shift in the way they worked. This process was enhanced by their more sophisticated level of understanding of child development and behaviour problems, which took into account the impact of wider systemic and relational factors and moved away from locating problems within individuals. Participants also demonstrated the ability to reflect on how their personal beliefs and experiences impacted on the work they undertook, and why this was important. Recommendations following the training included the need for regular, ongoing practice support, the need for the training to be more widely disseminated (e.g. to school staff), and the benefits of having clear descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of Family Support Workers. PMID:18411866

  20. Classroom Writing Activities to Support the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Judy

    1990-01-01

    Offers writing activities related to the reading of E. B. White's "Charlotte's Web," including showing the movie, using HyperCard, showing a video about a webspinning spider as a prewriting activity, and using computer graphics and video cameras to create related visual projects. (SR)

  1. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:25682553

  2. Effects of Social Support and Relapse Prevention Training as Adjuncts to a Televised Smoking-Cessation Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruder, Charles L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Smokers were assigned to either no-contact control, discussion, or social support group. All subjects received self-help manual and were encouraged to watch daily televised cessation program. Social support group and their nonsmoking buddies were trained in support and relapse prevention. Found abstinence rates highest in social support group,…

  3. Selective control of gait subtasks in robotic gait training: foot clearance support in stroke survivors with a powered exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-aided gait training is an emerging clinical tool for gait rehabilitation of neurological patients. This paper deals with a novel method of offering gait assistance, using an impedance controlled exoskeleton (LOPES). The provided assistance is based on a recent finding that, in the control of walking, different modules can be discerned that are associated with different subtasks. In this study, a Virtual Model Controller (VMC) for supporting one of these subtasks, namely the foot clearance, is presented and evaluated. Methods The developed VMC provides virtual support at the ankle, to increase foot clearance. Therefore, we first developed a new method to derive reference trajectories of the ankle position. These trajectories consist of splines between key events, which are dependent on walking speed and body height. Subsequently, the VMC was evaluated in twelve healthy subjects and six chronic stroke survivors. The impedance levels, of the support, were altered between trials to investigate whether the controller allowed gradual and selective support. Additionally, an adaptive algorithm was tested, that automatically shaped the amount of support to the subjects’ needs. Catch trials were introduced to determine whether the subjects tended to rely on the support. We also assessed the additional value of providing visual feedback. Results With the VMC, the step height could be selectively and gradually influenced. The adaptive algorithm clearly shaped the support level to the specific needs of every stroke survivor. The provided support did not result in reliance on the support for both groups. All healthy subjects and most patients were able to utilize the visual feedback to increase their active participation. Conclusion The presented approach can provide selective control on one of the essential subtasks of walking. This module is the first in a set of modules to control all subtasks. This enables the therapist to focus the support on the subtasks

  4. From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Glicksohn, Joseph; Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the cerebellum is increasingly recognized, not only in motor control but also in cognitive learning and function. Nevertheless, the relationship between training-induced cerebellar activation and electrophysiological and structural changes in humans has yet to be established. In the current paper, we suggest a general model tying cerebellar function to cognitive improvement, via neuronal synchronization, as well as biochemical and anatomical changes. We then suggest that sensorimotor training provides an optimal paradigm to test the proposed model and review supporting evidence of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a sensorimotor training aimed at increasing attention and coordination. Subsequently, we discuss the possible mechanisms through which QMT may exert its beneficial effects on cognition (e.g., increased creativity, reflectivity, and reading), focusing on cerebellar alpha activity as a possible mediating mechanism allowing cognitive improvement, molecular and anatomical changes. Using the example of QMT research, this paper emphasizes the importance of investigating whole-body sensorimotor training paradigms utilizing a multidisciplinary approach and its implications to healthy brain development. PMID:26539545

  5. From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Glicksohn, Joseph; Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the cerebellum is increasingly recognized, not only in motor control but also in cognitive learning and function. Nevertheless, the relationship between training-induced cerebellar activation and electrophysiological and structural changes in humans has yet to be established. In the current paper, we suggest a general model tying cerebellar function to cognitive improvement, via neuronal synchronization, as well as biochemical and anatomical changes. We then suggest that sensorimotor training provides an optimal paradigm to test the proposed model and review supporting evidence of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a sensorimotor training aimed at increasing attention and coordination. Subsequently, we discuss the possible mechanisms through which QMT may exert its beneficial effects on cognition (e.g., increased creativity, reflectivity, and reading), focusing on cerebellar alpha activity as a possible mediating mechanism allowing cognitive improvement, molecular and anatomical changes. Using the example of QMT research, this paper emphasizes the importance of investigating whole-body sensorimotor training paradigms utilizing a multidisciplinary approach and its implications to healthy brain development. PMID:26539545

  6. Educational and training activities in personal dosimetry in Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, P; Kalef-Ezra, J; Pafilis, C; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    An individual monitoring programme is one of the main components of any radiation protection programme since it constitutes the mean for assessing and thus optimising the doses of occupationally exposed workers. The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the competent authority for radiation protection and nuclear safety in Greece. GAEC's educational and training activities in the field of occupational radiation protection at the national and regional (Eastern Europe) level are presented, along with the relevant activities of the University of Ioannina in the region of North-West Greece, as an example of a local education and training programme. The curricula of two postgraduate courses addressed to qualified experts and medical physics experts and mainly the modules dedicated to individual monitoring are discussed as well. PMID:21115448

  7. Locomotor step training with body weight support improves respiratory motor function in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    de Paleville, Daniela Terson; McKay, William; Aslan, Sevda; Folz, Rodney; Sayenko, Dimitry; Ovechkin, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective case-controlled clinical study was undertaken to investigate to what extent the manually assisted treadmill stepping Locomotor Training with body weight support (LT) can change respiratory function in individuals with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Pulmonary function outcomes (Forced Vital Capacity /FVC/, Forced Expiratory Volume one second /FEV1/, Maximum Inspiratory Pressure /PImax/, Maximum Expiratory Pressure /PEmax/) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) measures of respiratory muscles activity during respiratory taskswere obtained from eight individuals with chronic C3-T12 SCI before and after 62±10 (Mean ± SD) sessions of the LT. FVC, FEV1, PImax, PEmax, amount of overall sEMG activity and rate of motor unit recruitment were significantly increased after LT (p<0.05) These results suggest that these improvements induced by the LT are likely the result of neuroplastic changes in spinal neural circuitry responsible for the activation of respiratory muscles preserved after injury. PMID:23999001

  8. CDDIS Support of IGS LEO Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has served as a global data center for the International GPS Service (IGS) since its start in June 1992, providing on-line access to data from over 175 sites on a daily and hourly basis. This paper will present an overview about the current status of the CDDIS GPS data and products archive with a look to the future support of LEO (Low Earth Orbiting missions), including the archive of high-rate data and on-board GPS receiver data.

  9. Support Effects on the Catalytic Activity of Graphene-Supported Pt13 Nanoclusters for CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fampiou, Ioanna; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    Sub-nanometer Pt nanoparticles supported on graphene are shown to exhibit increased stability, uniform dispersion and increased tolerance to CO poisoning, making them attractive candidates as electrocatalysts for fuel-cell electrodes. A fundamental understanding of support effects on the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles is important for effective catalyst design. In this study, we use density functional theory to investigate support effects on the catalytic activity for CO oxidation on Pt13 nanoclusters supported at point defects (vacancies, divacancies) in graphene in the high CO-coverage regime. Our results suggest that support defects are crucial in stabilizing the clusters on the support at high CO cluster coverage, preventing sintering and catalyst loss. By sampling the CO oxidation reaction at various surface sites on graphene-supported and free Pt13 nanoclusters, we show that strong cluster-support interactions can substantially reduce the barrier for CO oxidation on supported versus free nanoclusters, by more than 0.5 eV. Our results suggest that defect engineering of graphene supports could serve to enhance the catalytic activity of sub-nanometer Pt nanoclusters, allowing for tuning of catalytic properties through cluster-support interactions. We acknowledge support by U.S. DOE under Award Number DE-SC0010610 and computational resources by NERSC, supported by the Office of Science, U.S DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. Parasuicidal behavior on an active duty army training post.

    PubMed

    Koshes, R J; Rothberg, J M

    1992-07-01

    The incidence of suicidal behavior among active duty Army personnel at a training post has not been the subject of analysis since the advent of the all-volunteer military. A review of admissions over 16 consecutive months showed most of the behaviors to be parasuicidal, with low levels of lethality and high rescuability. Compared to previously published studies, the characteristics of these soldiers are little changed over the past 25 years. This report suggests a standard method for handling suicidal behavior which includes an active role for psychiatric consultation to units and commanders. PMID:1528469

  11. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  12. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  13. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    PubMed Central

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers’ 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients’ homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants’ strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues’ and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future. PMID

  14. The Development and Evaluation of a Multimedia Resource To Support ICT Training: Design Issues, Training Processes and User Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tearle, Penni; Dillon, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Addresses issues surrounding the process of information and communications technology training (ICT), and the application of training outcomes in the workplace. Provides an overview of content and design features of the multimedia resource "Ensuring Effectiveness of ICT Training" and reports on its evaluation. Discusses design issues, training…

  15. Enhancement of children's self-esteem through social support training for youth sport coaches.

    PubMed

    Smoll, F L; Smith, R E; Barnett, N P; Everett, J J

    1993-08-01

    The authors examined the impact of coaching behaviors on players' self-enhancement processes. Eight baseball coaches attended a preseason workshop designed to increase their supportiveness and instructional effectiveness. Behavioral guidelines were presented and modeled. A no-treatment control group had 10 coaches. Boys (N = 152) in both groups were interviewed pre- and postseason. Trained coaches differed from controls in player-perceived behaviors in accordance with the guidelines. They were evaluated more positively by their players, their players had more fun, and their teams exhibited a higher level of attraction among players, despite the fact that their teams did not differ from controls in won-lost records. Consistent with a self-esteem enhancement model, findings showed that boys with low self-esteem who played for the trained coaches exhibited significant increases in general self-esteem; low self-esteem youngsters in the control group did not. PMID:8407704

  16. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  17. Design of a software framework to support live/virtual training on distributed terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Guy A.; Tracy, Judd; Woodruff, Eric; Dere, Troy

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we describe research and development on the concept and application of distributed terrain and distributed terrain servers to support live/virtual training operations. This includes design of a distributed, cluster-capable "Combat Server" for the virtual representation and simulation of live training exercises, and current work to support virtual representation and visualization of live indoor operations involving firefighters, SWAT teams and/or special operations forces. The Combat Server concept under development is for an object-oriented, efficient and flexible distributed platform designed for simulation and training. It can operate on any compatible, high performance computer for which the software is compliant; however, it is explicitly designed for distribution and cooperation of relatively inexpensive clustered computers, together playing the role of a large independent system. The design of the Combat Server aims to be generic and encompass any situation that involves monitoring, tracking, assessment, visualization and, eventually, simulated interactivity to compliment real-world training exercises. To accomplish such genericity, the design must incorporate techniques such as layering or abstraction to remove any dependencies on specific hardware, such as weapons, that are to eventually be employed by the system; this also includes entity tracking hardware interfaces, whether by GPS or Ultra-Wide Band technologies. The Combat Server is a framework. Its design is a foothold for building a specialized distributed system for modeling a particular style of exercise. The combat server can also be a software development framework, providing a platform for building specialized exercises while abstracting the developer from the minutia of building a real-time distributed system. In this paper we review preliminary experiments regarding basic line-of-sight (LOS) functions of the combat server functionality and scalability in a cluster computing

  18. COMET Program Training Offerings to Support S-NPP and JPSS Utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Dills, P. N.; Weingroff, M.

    2015-12-01

    Are you up to speed on how to exploit new S-NPP capabilities and products? If not, don't worry, because UCAR's COMET program has self-paced online educational materials that highlight the capabilities and applications of current and next-generation operational polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites. The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu) has long received funding from NOAA NESDIS as well as EUMETSAT and the Meteorological Service of Canada to support education and training in satellite meteorology. By partnering with experts from NOAA-NESDIS and its Cooperative Institutes, Meteorological Service of Canada, EUMETSAT, the Naval Research Laboratory and others, COMET's self-paced training stimulates greater use of current and future satellite observations and products. Right now, over 70 satellite-focused, self-paced, online materials are freely available in English via the MetEd Web site at http://meted.ucar.edu/topics/satellite. Additionally, quite a few lessons are also available in Spanish and French making training more easily accessible to an international audience. This presentation will focus on COMET's latest satellite training and education offerings that are directly applicable to data and products from the S-NPP and JPSS satellite series. A recommended set of lessons for users who wish to learn more will be highlighted, including excerpts from the newest materials on the Suomi NPP VIIRS imager and its applications, as well as advances in nighttime visible observation with the VIIRS Day-Night Band. We'll show how the lessons introduce users to the advances these systems bring to forecasting, numerical weather prediction, and environmental monitoring. Finally, new relevant training initiatives will also be presented.

  19. Usalpharma: A Cloud-Based Architecture to Support Quality Assurance Training Processes in Health Area Using Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J.; Pérez-Blanco, Jonás Samuel; Martín-Suárez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses how cloud-based architectures can extend and enhance the functionality of the training environments based on virtual worlds and how, from this cloud perspective, we can provide support to analysis of training processes in the area of health, specifically in the field of training processes in quality assurance for pharmaceutical laboratories, presenting a tool for data retrieval and analysis that allows facing the knowledge discovery in the happenings inside the virtual worlds. PMID:24778593

  20. Biomedical Support of U.S. Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Dervay, J. P.; Gillis, D.; McMann, H. J.; Thomas, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    The world's first extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed by A. A. Leonov on March 18, 1965 during the Russian Voskhod-2 mission. The first US EVA was executed by Gemini IV astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965, with an umbilical tether that included communications and an oxygen supply. A hand-held maneuvering unit (HHMU) also was used to test maneuverability during the brief EVA; however the somewhat stiff umbilical limited controlled movement. That constraint, plus difficulty returning through the vehicle hatch, highlighted the need for increased thermal control and improved EVA ergonomics. Clearly, requirements for a useful EVA were interrelated with the vehicle design. The early Gemini EVAs generated requirements for suits providing micro-meteor protection, adequate visual field and eye protection from solar visual and infrared radiation, gloves optimized for dexterity while pressurized, and thermal systems capable of protecting the astronaut while rejecting metabolic heat during high workloads. Subsequent Gemini EVAs built upon this early experience and included development of a portable environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and an astronaut maneuvering unit. The ECLSS provided a pressure vessel and controller with functional control over suit pressure, oxygen flow, carbon dioxide removal, humidity, and temperature control. Gemini EVA experience also identified the usefulness of underwater neutral buoyancy and altitude chamber task training, and the importance of developing reliable task timelines. Improved thermal management and carbon dioxide control also were required for high workload tasks. With the Apollo project, EVA activity was primarily on the lunar surface; and suit durability, integrated liquid cooling garments, and low suit operating pressures (3.75 pounds per square inch absolute [psia] or 25.8 kilopascal [kPa],) were required to facilitate longer EVAs with ambulation and significant physical workloads with average metabolic

  1. 78 FR 40551 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review...: Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training, VA Form 22-6553c. OMB Control Number: 2900-0162. Type... vocational flight training. VA Form 22-6553c serves as a report of flight training pursued and termination...

  2. Supporting the joint warfighter by development, training, and fielding of man-portable UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Kenneth A.; Stratton, Benjamin V.

    2005-05-01

    The Robotic Systems Pool (RSP), sponsored by the Joint Robotics Program (JRP), is an inventory of small robotic systems, payloads, and components intended to expedite the development and integration of technology into effective, supportable, fielded robotic assets. The RSP loans systems to multiple users including the military, first-responders, research organizations, and academia. These users provide feedback in their specific domain, accelerating research and development improvements of robotic systems, which in turn allow the joint warfighter to benefit from such changes more quickly than from traditional acquisition cycles. Over the past year, RSP assets have been used extensively for pre-deployment operator and field training of joint Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) teams, and for the training of Navy Reservist repair technicians. These Reservists are part of the Robotic Systems Combat Support Platoon (RSCSP), attached to Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego. The RSCSP maintains and repairs RSP assets and provides deployable technical support for users of robotic systems. Currently, a small team from the RSCSP is deployed at Camp Victory repairing and maintaining man-portable unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) used by joint EOD teams in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The focus of this paper is to elaborate on the RSP and RSCSP and their role as invaluable resources for spiral development in the robotics community by gaining first-hand technical feedback from the warfighter and other users.

  3. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    PubMed

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners. PMID:27305794

  4. Firefighter noise exposure during training activities and general equipment use.

    PubMed

    Root, Kyle S; Schwennker, Catherine; Autenrieth, Daniel; Sandfort, Delvin R; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multiple noise measurements were taken on 6 types of fire station equipment and 15 types of emergency response vehicle-related equipment used by firefighters during routine and emergency operations at 10 fire stations. Five of the six types of fire station equipment, when measured at a distance of one meter and ear level, emitted noise equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including lawn maintenance equipment, snow blowers, compressors, and emergency alarms. Thirteen of 15 types of equipment located on the fire engines emitted noise levels equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including fans, saws, alarms, and extrication equipment. In addition, noise measurements were taken during fire engine operations, including the idling vehicle, vehicle sirens, and water pumps. Results indicated that idling fire-engine noise levels were below 85 dBA; however, during water pump and siren use, noise levels exceeded 85 dBA, in some instances, at different locations around the trucks where firefighters would be stationed during emergency operations. To determine if the duration and use of fire fighting equipment was sufficient to result in overexposures to noise during routine training activities, 93 firefighter personal noise dosimetry samples were taken during 10 firefighter training activities. Two training activities per sampling day were monitored during each sampling event, for a mean exposure time of 70 min per day. The noise dosimetry samples were grouped based on job description to compare noise exposures between the different categories of job tasks commonly associated with fire fighting. The three job categories were interior, exterior, and engineering. Mean personal dosimetry results indicated that the average noise exposure was 78 dBA during the training activities that lasted 70 min on average. There was no significant difference in noise exposure between each of the three job categories. Although firefighters routinely use equipment and emergency response vehicles that

  5. Design and development of a virtual reality simulator for advanced cardiac life support training.

    PubMed

    Vankipuram, Akshay; Khanal, Prabal; Ashby, Aaron; Vankipuram, Mithra; Gupta, Ashish; DrummGurnee, Denise; Josey, Karen; Smith, Marshall

    2014-07-01

    The use of virtual reality (VR) training tools for medical education could lead to improvements in the skills of clinicians while providing economic incentives for healthcare institutions. The use of VR tools can also mitigate some of the drawbacks currently associated with providing medical training in a traditional clinical environment such as scheduling conflicts and the need for specialized equipment (e.g., high-fidelity manikins). This paper presents the details of the framework and the development methodology associated with a VR-based training simulator for advanced cardiac life support, a time critical, team-based medical scenario. In addition, we also report the key findings of a usability study conducted to assess the efficacy of various features of this VR simulator through a postuse questionnaire administered to various care providers. The usability questionnaires were completed by two groups that used two different versions of the VR simulator. One version consisted of the VR trainer with it all its features and a minified version with certain immersive features disabled. We found an increase in usability scores from the minified group to the full VR group. PMID:24122608

  6. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  7. Enhancing Recognition of High Quality, Functional IEP Goals: A Training Activity for Early Childhood Special Education Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Anne; Gillaspy, Kathi; Peters, Mary Louise; Hurth, Joicey

    2014-01-01

    This training activity was created to support participants' understanding of the criteria needed to develop and write high quality, participation-based Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals. The term "functional" is often used to describe what goals ought to be, yet many Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) staff (e.g.,…

  8. The Impact of Training Interventions on Organizational Readiness to Support Innovations in Juvenile Justice Offices

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. METHODS A clinical trial was conducted examining the mpact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a one day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive three-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. RESULTS External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building

  9. The impact of training interventions on organizational readiness to support innovations in juvenile justice offices.

    PubMed

    Taxman, Faye S; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. A clinical trial was conducted examining the impact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a 1 day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive 3-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building approach did not perform any better

  10. Automatic Generation Of Training Data For Hyperspectral Image Classification Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, B.; Arefi, H.; Bigdeli, B.; Roessner, S.

    2015-04-01

    An image classification method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed on hyperspectral and 3K DSM data. To obtain training data we applied an automatic method relating to four classes namely; building, grass, tree, and ground pixels. First, some initial segments regarding to building, tree, grass, and ground pixels are produced using different feature descriptors. The feature descriptors are generated using optical (hyperspectral) as well as range (3K DSM) images. The initial building regions are created using DSM segmentation. Fusion of NDVI and elevation information assist us to provide initial segments regarding to the grass and tree areas. Also, we created initial segment regarding to ground pixel after geodesic based filtering of DSM and elimination of the non-ground pixels. To improve classification accuracy, the hyperspectral image and 3K DSM were utilized simultaneously to perform image classification. For obtaining testing data, labelled pixels was divide into two parts: test and training. Experimental result shows a final classification accuracy of about 90% using Support Vector Machine. In the process of satellite image classification; provided by 3K camera. Both datasets correspond to Munich area in Germany.

  11. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  12. Support vector machine based training of multilayer feedforward neural networks as optimized by particle swarm algorithm: application in QSAR studies of bioactivity of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Qi; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Wu, Hai-Long; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2007-01-30

    Multilayer feedforward neural networks (MLFNNs) are important modeling techniques widely used in QSAR studies for their ability to represent nonlinear relationships between descriptors and activity. However, the problems of overfitting and premature convergence to local optima still pose great challenges in the practice of MLFNNs. To circumvent these problems, a support vector machine (SVM) based training algorithm for MLFNNs has been developed with the incorporation of particle swarm optimization (PSO). The introduction of the SVM based training mechanism imparts the developed algorithm with inherent capacity for combating the overfitting problem. Moreover, with the implementation of PSO for searching the optimal network weights, the SVM based learning algorithm shows relatively high efficiency in converging to the optima. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated using the Hansch data set. Application to QSAR studies of the activity of COX-2 inhibitors is also demonstrated. The results reveal that this technique provides superior performance to backpropagation (BP) and PSO training neural networks. PMID:17186488

  13. Child Support Enforcement and Sexual Activity of Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Han, Wen-Jui

    2007-01-01

    Strong child support enforcement requires fathers to take financial responsibility for their children and may also encourage more responsible sexual behavior. Using the 1997-2001 waves of the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 4,272), this article examines the association between child support enforcement and the sexual activity of…

  14. Perceptions of Child Support and Sexual Activity of Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Han, Wen-Jui

    2004-01-01

    Using the 1995 new cohort of the National Survey of Adolescent Males, this paper examines the association between perceptions of child support and adolescent males' sexual activity. The results indicate that adolescent males who expect the chance of being required to pay child support is high if one becomes a non-resident father or who has a…

  15. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  16. 77 FR 22602 - Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... paperwork requirements in the regulations under Subpart O, ``Well Control and Production Safety Training... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment...

  17. PATTERNS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN CHILDREN: AN ASSESSMENT OF BARRIERS AND SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janice L.; Davis, Sally M.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Going, Scott; Becenti, Alberta; Metcalfe, Lauve; Stone, Elaine; Harnack, Lisa; Ring, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Estimates indicate that 10% to 50% of American Indian and non-Indian children in the U.S. are obese, defined as a body mass index ≥ 95th percentile of the NHANES II reference data. Pathways is a two-phase, multi-site study to develop and test a school-based obesity prevention program in American Indian schoolchildren in grades three through five. During Phase I feasibility prior to initiation of the Pathways trial, data were collected related to physical activity patterns, and the supports of, and barriers to, physical activity. Nine schools from communities representing six different tribal groups participated in this study. Multiple measures were used for data collection including direct observation, paired child interviews, and in-depth interviews and focus groups with adults. Students completed the self-administered Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors (KAB) survey, and a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Barriers to physical activity at schools included a lack of facilities, equipment, and trained staff persons for PE. Adults were not consistently active with their children, but they were highly supportive of their children’s activity level. Children reported a strong enjoyment of physical activity and strong peer support to be physically active. Weather conditions, safety concerns, and homework/chores were common barriers to physical activity reported by children and adult caregivers. The information was used to design culturally and age-appropriate, practical interventions including the five physical activity programs for schoolchildren in the Pathways study. PMID:11759094

  18. Patterns of physical activity among American Indian children: an assessment of barriers and support.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J L; Davis, S M; Gittelsohn, J; Going, S; Becenti, A; Metcalfe, L; Stone, E; Harnack, L; Ring, K

    2001-12-01

    Estimates indicate that 10% to 50% of American Indian and non-Indian children in the U.S. are obese, defined as a body mass index > or = 95th percentile of the NHANES II reference data. Pathways is a two-phase, multi-site study to develop and test a school-based obesity prevention program in American Indian schoolchildren in grades three through five. During Phase I feasibility prior to initiation of the Pathways trial, data were collected related to physical activity patterns, and the supports of, and barriers to, physical activity. Nine schools from communities representing six different tribal groups participated in this study. Multiple measures were used for data collection including direct observation, paired child interviews, and in-depth interviews and focus groups with adults. Students completed the self-administered Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors (KAB) survey, and a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Barriers to physical activity at schools included a lack of facilities, equipment, and trained staff persons for PE. Adults were not consistently active with their children, but they were highly supportive of their children's activity level. Children reported a strong enjoyment of physical activity and strong peer support to be physically active. Weather conditions, safety concerns, and homework/chores were common barriers to physical activity reported by children and adult caregivers. The information was used to design culturally and age-appropriate, practical interventions including the five physical activity programs for schoolchildren in the Pathways study. PMID:11759094

  19. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  20. An interactive videodisk training program in basic cardiac life support: implications for staff development.

    PubMed

    Hekelman, F P; Phillips, J A; Bierer, L A

    1990-01-01

    Interactive videodisk training programs offer a new instructional approach to demands for technical skills training. This article highlights the demands for staff development providers to address technical skills training through interactive videodisk modalities. PMID:2122986

  1. Body weight support by virtual model control of an impedance controlled exoskeleton (LOPES) for gait training.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Herman; Koopman, Bram; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of an alternative method to support body weight in a powered exoskeleton is demonstrated. Instead of using an overhead suspension system, body weight is supported by augmenting the joint moments through virtual model control. The advantages of this novel method is that it allows for independent support of the left and right leg, and does not interfere with the excitation of cutanous afferents and balance of the body or trunk. Results show that after a short familiarization period the activity of muscles during initial stance reduces and kinematics become close to normal. PMID:19163077

  2. 78 FR 4135 - Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Training Mission and Mission Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... for the training of Army aviation units and unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and modern training... facilities and ranges. As technology changes, new weapons, weapons systems, and unmanned systems...

  3. Wearable Sensors in Medical Education: Supporting Hand Hygiene Training with a Forearm EMG.

    PubMed

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Jonas, Stephan M

    2015-01-01

    Lack of proper hand hygiene is a common source of hospital acquired infections. Training and evaluating efficiency in hand washing is therefore an important part of medical education. Here, we propose to use the Myo wearable armband to measure correctness of hand washing for mobile learning. Myo's sensors are designed in order to recognize the activity of the forearm, palm and fingers. Using signal processing and machine learning, the quality of the hand washing process can be estimated and used as evaluation in medical teaching. The project is in its initial phase, thus we present preliminary results and a vision of future development. PMID:25980884

  4. Intensive training induces longitudinal changes in meditation state-related EEG oscillatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Saggar, Manish; King, Brandon G.; Zanesco, Anthony P.; MacLean, Katherine A.; Aichele, Stephen R.; Jacobs, Tonya L.; Bridwell, David A.; Shaver, Phillip R.; Rosenberg, Erika L.; Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ferrer, Emilio; Tang, Akaysha C.; Mangun, George R.; Wallace, B. Alan; Miikkulainen, Risto; Saron, Clifford D.

    2012-01-01

    The capacity to focus one's attention for an extended period of time can be increased through training in contemplative practices. However, the cognitive processes engaged during meditation that support trait changes in cognition are not well characterized. We conducted a longitudinal wait-list controlled study of intensive meditation training. Retreat participants practiced focused attention (FA) meditation techniques for three months during an initial retreat. Wait-list participants later undertook formally identical training during a second retreat. Dense-array scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) data were collected during 6 min of mindfulness of breathing meditation at three assessment points during each retreat. Second-order blind source separation, along with a novel semi-automatic artifact removal tool (SMART), was used for data preprocessing. We observed replicable reductions in meditative state-related beta-band power bilaterally over anteriocentral and posterior scalp regions. In addition, individual alpha frequency (IAF) decreased across both retreats and in direct relation to the amount of meditative practice. These findings provide evidence for replicable longitudinal changes in brain oscillatory activity during meditation and increase our understanding of the cortical processes engaged during meditation that may support long-term improvements in cognition. PMID:22973218

  5. 20 CFR 1001.121 - Performance standard on facilities and support for Veterans' Employment and Training Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Performance standard on facilities and support for Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) staff. 1001.121 Section 1001.121 Employees... Eligible Persons § 1001.121 Performance standard on facilities and support for Veterans' Employment...

  6. Support from Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training: The Pathways to Career Aspirations and Further Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Claudia; Stalder, Barbara E.; Tschan, Franziska; Häfeli, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Transition from school to work is a challenging period for young people with learning difficulties. In the dual vocational system of Switzerland, teachers at vocational educational and training (VET)-schools, as well as trainers at VET-companies, provide important support. We were interested in the different pathways from this support to…

  7. The Deployment, Training and Teacher Relationships of Teaching Assistants Supporting Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in Mainstream Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symes, Wendy; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Growing numbers of pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are attending mainstream schools, and increasing numbers of additional staff are being deployed to support them. Recent research has cast doubt on the effectiveness of this support, by highlighting issues relating to deployment and training, and to relationships with class teachers.…

  8. Supporting Mobile Collaborative Activities through Scaffolded Flexible Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boticki, Ivica; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wong, Lung-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    Within the field of Mobile Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (mCSCL), we are interested in exploring the space of collaborative activities that enable students to practice communication, negotiation and decision-making skills. Collaboration is via learning activities that circumvent the constraints of fixed seating or locations of…

  9. Supporting Emergent Literacy in Play-based Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanline, Mary Frances

    2001-01-01

    This article presents ideas for using play activities to support the development of emergent literacy skills in young children, including those with disabilities. Four principles of promoting early literacy skills are explained and applied to activities in block and microsymbolic play, macrosymbolic play, and fluid construction play. The…

  10. A new life with aphasia: everyday activities and social support.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist Nätterlund, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    People who develop aphasia must adjust their lifestyles and learn to cope with the activity limitations that may follow from their disability. The purpose of this study was to describe aphasic individuals' experiences of everyday activities and social support in daily life. Interviews were conducted with 20 people with aphasia, and analysed with qualitative content analysis. The results show that everyday activities changed considerably with the onset of aphasia, and the participants were hindered from participating in activities by communication problems or physical disabilities. Aphasia led to the loss of friends and colleagues, and the interviewees often felt lonely. They generally received a lot of social support from close relatives, but support from the healthcare system was lacking. They need different kinds of social support to help them manage their aphasia and everyday activities and to improve their participation in society. Further studies are needed to improve our knowledge of everyday activity and social support for people with aphasia, and what it means to live with aphasia. PMID:20370533

  11. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  12. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Debra M; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C; Wirth, Christopher K; Kraus, Caroline; Venezia, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  13. Eyes Wide Open--Vocational Education & Training in the Information Age. A Supporting Paper to Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training, 1998-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    This paper has been written as a supporting paper to "A Bridge to the Future: Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training 1998-2003" (ED 420 764). Technology has an impact on industry in terms of the work done, how it is done, and how individuals live and do business. Globalization means that business--and the business of…

  14. The Impact of Workplace Support and Identity on Training Transfer: A Case Study of Drug and Alcohol Safety Training in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidd, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that the transfer climate of work organisations is an important factor in determining the degree to which knowledge, skills and abilities gained in training transfer to the workplace. In particular, workplace social support from supervisors and coworkers is consistently cited as an important factor that can…

  15. Transfer of Training: Does It Truly Happen?: An Examination of Support, Instrumentality, Retention and Learner Readiness on the Transfer Motivation and Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Battour, Mohamed Mohamed; Sundram, Veera Pandiyan Kaliani; Othman, Akmal Aini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the importance of selected environmental, situational and individual factors in the training transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: This study proposes and tests a framework via structural equation modelling by including supervisor and peer support, instrumentality and learner readiness on…

  16. Arm weight support training improves functional motor outcome and movement smoothness after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Sebastiano, Fabio; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Nilsson, Jan; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness in acute stroke patients of a rehabilitation program performed with or without an arm weight support device. Twenty-eight acute, first-ever unilateral stroke patients were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Clinical evaluation included Fugl-Mayer Assessment, Functional Independence Measure and kinematic analysis [maximum and mean hand velocity, maximum range of motion (Max RoM), normalized jerk (NJ)]. Patients received 12 daily 30-minute sessions (6/week) of additional upper limb therapy performed using an arm weight support device (study group) or additional traditional physiotherapy (control group). The patients were evaluated on admission and at the end of the rehabilitation intervention. The two groups were clinically comparable on admission (p>0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in clinical scale scores and in Max RoM in flexion-extension, while only the study group showed improvements in NJ and in Max RoM in adduction-abduction. Rehabilitation training using an arm weight support device appears to be a useful method to supplement conventional therapy in acute stroke patients, increasing smoothness of movement and motor function. PMID:25014045

  17. 45 CFR 1612.8 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training. 1612.8 Section 1612.8 Public Welfare... CERTAIN OTHER ACTIVITIES § 1612.8 Training. (a) A recipient may not support or conduct training programs... activities; or (4) Train participants to engage in activities prohibited by the Act, other applicable law,...

  18. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  19. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Irene H L; Fong, Kenneth N K; Chan, Dora Y L; Wang, Apple Q L; Cheng, Eddy K N; Chau, Pinky H Y; Chow, Kathy K Y; Cheung, Hobby K Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  20. "On Track"--an educational resource to support dental SHO training.

    PubMed

    Clark, J D; Robertson, L J; Harden, R M; Laidlaw, J M; McManus, N K

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational resource, "On Track", designed to support dental SHOs throughout their time in post, thereby helping them gain optimum benefit from this important stage in their early postgraduate training. The need for such a resource was highlighted by a previous study undertaken by the paper's key authors with SHOs and their trainers in a UK dental school. Among several areas of change identified by both trainers and trainees were the needs to develop the SHO experience into more than an apprenticeship by improving the trainer/trainee relationship, and to encourage trainee-centred learning and self-appraisal. The key aims of "On Track" were therefore to define the outcomes of SHO training, to facilitate the relationship between SHO and educational supervisor (trainer), and to encourage the SHO in reflective learning and self-appraisal."On Track" was subject to developmental testing with both trainers and trainees to ensure that it could achieve these aims and the resultant resource is described, along with its implementation and evaluation. "On Track" met with mixed success and the reasons behind this and conclusions drawn for the introduction of any future similar resources are outlined. PMID:15359297

  1. Design of a decision support system, trained on GPU, for assisting melanoma diagnosis in dermatoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotsos, Dimitris; Kostopoulos, Spiros; Lalissidou, Stella; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Asvestas, Pantelis; Konstandinou, Christos; Xenogiannopoulos, George; Konstantina Nikolatou, Eirini; Perakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Thanassis; Cavouras, Dionisis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a decision support system for assisting the diagnosis of melanoma in dermatoscopy images. Clinical material comprised images of 44 dysplastic (clark's nevi) and 44 malignant melanoma lesions, obtained from the dermatology database Dermnet. Initially, images were processed for hair removal and background correction using the Dull Razor algorithm. Processed images were segmented to isolate moles from surrounding background, using a combination of level sets and an automated thresholding approach. Morphological (area, size, shape) and textural features (first and second order) were calculated from each one of the segmented moles. Extracted features were fed to a pattern recognition system assembled with the Probabilistic Neural Network Classifier, which was trained to distinguish between benign and malignant cases, using the exhaustive search and the leave one out method. The system was designed on the GPU card (GeForce 580GTX) using CUDA programming framework and C++ programming language. Results showed that the designed system discriminated benign from malignant moles with 88.6% accuracy employing morphological and textural features. The proposed system could be used for analysing moles depicted on smart phone images after appropriate training with smartphone images cases. This could assist towards early detection of melanoma cases, if suspicious moles were to be captured on smartphone by patients and be transferred to the physician together with an assessment of the mole's nature.

  2. Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of a Training to Support an Inquiry-Based General Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Whitworth, Brooke A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to better understand teaching assistants' (TAs') perceptions of training in a guided inquiry undergraduate general chemistry laboratory context. The training was developed using existing TA training literature and informed by situated learning theory. TAs engaged in training prior to teaching (~25…

  3. Body Weight Support Treadmill Training for Children With Developmental Delay Who Are Ambulatory

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Leah; McMillan, Amy Gross; Yates, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on gait and gross motor skill development in children (2–5 years old) with developmental delay who are ambulatory. Methods Twenty-four subjects (12 control, 12 BWSTT) were enrolled in this randomized control trial. All subjects continued to receive physical therapy. Subjects were tested at baseline, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 6 weeks following completion of BWSTT. Outcomes were assessed using the 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and Gross Motor Function Measure- D and E. Results Significant improvements were seen in gait velocity and gross motor skill attainment. With positive interactions in both the 10MWT and GMFM-E, the BWSTT group as compared to the control group demonstrated functional gains in gait velocity and gross motor skills, P = .033 and.017, respectively. Conclusions A 6-week high intensity BWSTT program can improve gait velocity and influence functional gains. PMID:26397083

  4. Engineering analysis activities in support of susquehanna unit 1 startup testing and cycle 1 operations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.D.; Kukielka, C.A.; Olson, L.M.; Refling, J.G.; Roscioli, A.J.; Somma, S.A.

    1985-07-01

    The engineering analysis group is responsible for all nuclear plant systems analysis and reactor analysis activities, excluding fuel management analysis, at Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. These activities include making pretest and posttest predictions of startup tests; analyzing unplanned or unexpected transient events; providing technical training to plant personnel; assisting in the development of emergency drill scenarios; providing engineering evaluations to support design and technical specification changes, and evaluating, assessing, and resolving a number of license conditions. Many of these activities have required the direct use of RETRAN models. Two RETRAN analyses that were completed to support plant operations - a pretest analysis of the turbine trip startup test, and a posttest analysis of the loss of startup transformer event - are investigated. For each case, RETRAN results are compared with available plant data and comparisons are drawn on the acceptability of the performance of the plant systems.

  5. Curve Squeal of Train Wheels, Part 3: Active Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HECKL, MARIA A.; HUANG, X. Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to annul the squeal noise that is produced by trains traversing a curve. The method is a special form of active control, applied to suppress the bending oscillations of a squealing wheel. It is essentially a feedback system with the following components: sensor, narrowband filter, phase-shifter, amplifier and actuator. The control signal driving the actuator has only a single frequency (set at the filter), and that frequency typically corresponds to one of the bending modes of the wheel. Two versions of the feedback system are considered. In the first version, the actuator exerts a control force on the wheel, and in the second version, the actuator imposes a velocity on the rail. A mathematical model is presented and predictions are made for the performance of both versions. The coupling of the different wheel modes by the control system is discussed. A model rig is described which was used for a practical demonstration of this form of active control. Differences from more conventional forms of active control are pointed out.

  6. Caregiver Training in Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Supports (MBPBS): Effects on Caregivers and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Karazsia, Bryan T.; Myers, Rachel E.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often manage the aggressive behavior of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities that reside in community group homes. Sometimes this results in adverse outcomes for both the caregivers and the care recipients. We provided a 7-day intensive Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) training to caregivers from community group homes and assessed the outcomes in terms of caregiver variables, individuals’ behaviors, and an administrative outcome. When compared to pre-MBPBS training, the MBPBS training resulted in the caregivers using significantly less physical restraints, and staff stress and staff turnover were considerably reduced. The frequency of injury to caregivers and peers caused by the individuals was significantly reduced. A benefit-cost analysis showed substantial financial savings due to staff participation in the MBPBS program. This study provides further proof-of-concept for the effectiveness of MBPBS training for caregivers, and strengthens the call for training staff in mindfulness meditation. PMID:26903906

  7. Caregiver Training in Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Supports (MBPBS): Effects on Caregivers and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay N; Lancioni, Giulio E; Karazsia, Bryan T; Myers, Rachel E

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often manage the aggressive behavior of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities that reside in community group homes. Sometimes this results in adverse outcomes for both the caregivers and the care recipients. We provided a 7-day intensive Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS) training to caregivers from community group homes and assessed the outcomes in terms of caregiver variables, individuals' behaviors, and an administrative outcome. When compared to pre-MBPBS training, the MBPBS training resulted in the caregivers using significantly less physical restraints, and staff stress and staff turnover were considerably reduced. The frequency of injury to caregivers and peers caused by the individuals was significantly reduced. A benefit-cost analysis showed substantial financial savings due to staff participation in the MBPBS program. This study provides further proof-of-concept for the effectiveness of MBPBS training for caregivers, and strengthens the call for training staff in mindfulness meditation. PMID:26903906

  8. Effects of Slackline Training on Postural Control, Jump Performance, and Myoelectrical Activity in Female Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luis; Fernández-Río, Javier; Fernández-García, Benjamín; Jakobsen, Markus D; González-Gómez, Lucía; Suman, Oscar E

    2016-03-01

    Santos, L, Fernández-Río, J, Fernández-García, B, Jakobsen, MD, González-Gómez, L, and Suman, OE. Effects of slackline training on postural control, jump performance, and myoelectrical activity in female basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 30(3): 653-664, 2016-The main goal of the study was to assess the effects of slackline training on the postural control system and jump performance of athletes. Twenty-five female basketball players were randomized into 2 groups: control (N = 12) and experimental (N = 13). The latter experienced a 6-week supervised slackline training (3 sessions per week, 5-9 minutes per session). Participants underwent center of pressure (CoP) testing through three 10-second tasks (bipedal, left leg, and right leg support) over firm and compliant surfaces with eyes open. Several CoP parameters were assessed: length, area, length/area, speed, Ymean, Xmean, deltaY, deltaX, RMS (root-mean-squared amplitude of the CoP), RMSY, and RMSX. Surface electromyography recordings were obtained too. Participants were also tested on jump performance, provided perceived exertion (6-20 Borg scale) and local muscle perceived exertion. Center of pressure parameters significantly differed before and after training only in the experimental group and only on the compliant surface (left leg: length, area, speed, deltaY, and deltaX; right leg: length, speed, Ymean, deltaY, and RMSY). Surface electromyography recordings were comparable before and after training in both groups. Performance on a countermovement jump test significantly improved only in the experimental group (effect side was 3.21 and 1.36 [flight time and jump height, respectively], which is described as a large effect). Mechanical power of the legs, as measured through the 30-second maximal performance jump test, did not improve in either group. The slackline training was rated as "somewhat hard" with the quadriceps, soleus, and gastrocnemius being rated as the most engaged muscles. Data

  9. 76 FR 73019 - Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity... comments on information needed to assure that on the job training establishments are providing veterans... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled...

  10. 77 FR 7242 - Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled Veterans, VA Form 28- 1904. OMB Control...-1904 is a written agreement between an on the job training (OJT) establishments and VA. The...

  11. 75 FR 33898 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training (under Chapters 30 and 32, Title 38 U... enrolling in or pursuing approved vocational flight training. VA Form 22-6553c serves as a report of...

  12. 75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment... flight training is correct. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... information technology. Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training, VA Form 22-6553c. OMB Control...

  13. A Support Method with Changeable Training Strategies Based on Mutual Adaptation between a Ubiquitous Pet and a Learner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianzhi; Jing, Lei; Kansen, Mizuo; Wang, Junbo; Ota, Kaoru; Cheng, Zixue

    With the progress of ubiquitous technology, ubiquitous learning presents new opportunities to learners. Situations of a learner can be grasped through analyzing the learner's actions collected by sensors, RF-IDs, or cameras in order to provide support at proper time, proper place, and proper situation. Training for acquiring skills and enhancing physical abilities through exercise and experience in the real world is an important domain in u-learning. A training program may last for several days and has one or more training units (exercises) for a day. A learner's performance in a unit is considered as short term state. The performance in a series of units may change with patterns: progress, plateau, and decline. Long term state in a series of units is accumulatively computed based on short term states. In a learning/training program, it is necessary to apply different support strategies to adapt to different states of the learner. Adaptation in learning support is significant, because a learner loses his/her interests easily without adaptation. Systems with the adaptive support usually provide stimulators to a learner, and a learner can have a great motivation in learning at beginning. However, when the stimulators reach some levels, the learner may lose his/her motivation, because the long term state of the learner changes dynamically, which means a progress state may change to a plateau state or a decline state. In different long term learning states, different types of stimulators are needed. However, the stimulators and advice provided by the existing systems are monotonic without changeable support strategies. We propose a mutual adaptive support. The mutual adaptation means each of the system and the learner has their own states. On one hand, the system tries to change its state to adapt to the learner's state for providing adaptive support. On the other hand, the learner can change its performance following the advice given based on the state of the system

  14. Control of resonance phenomenon in flexible structures via active support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolpour Saleh, A. R.; Mailah, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of active support to cope with the resonance phenomenon in the flexible structures. A valid computational platform for the flexible structure was first presented via a finite difference (FD) approach. Then, the active support mechanism was applied to the simulation algorithm through which the performance of the proposed methodology in suppressing the resonance phenomenon was evaluated. The flexible structure was thus excited with the external disturbance and the system response with and without the effect of the active support was investigated through a simulation study. The simulation outcomes clearly demonstrated effective resonance suppression in the flexible structure. Finally, an experimental rig was developed to investigate the validity of the proposed technique. The experimental results revealed an acceptable agreement with the simulation outcomes through which the validity of the proposed control method was affirmed.

  15. Training and Technical Assistance for Compliance With Beverage and Physical Activity Components of New York City’s Regulations for Early Child Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Lillian; O’Dell, Sarah Abood; Jernigan, Jan; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2006, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) passed regulations for child care centers that established standards for beverages provided to children and set a minimum amount of time for daily physical activity. DOHMH offered several types of training and technical assistance to support compliance with the regulations. This article analyzes the association between training and technical assistance provided and compliance with the regulations in a sample of 174 group child care centers. Methods Compliance was measured by using a site inventory of beverages stored on premises and a survey of centers’ teachers regarding the amount of physical activity provided. Training and technical assistance measures were based on the DOHMH records of training and technical assistance provided to the centers in the sample and on a survey of center directors. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess the association between training and technical assistance measures and compliance with the regulations. Results Measures of training related to physical activity the center received: the number of staff members who participated in Sport, Play and Active Recreation for Kids (SPARK) and other training programs in which a center participated were associated with better compliance with the physical activity regulations. Neither training nor technical assistance were associated with compliance with the regulations related to beverages. Conclusion Increased compliance with regulations pertaining to physical activity was not related to compliance with beverage regulations. Future trainings should be targeted to the specific regulation requirements to increase compliance. PMID:25321628

  16. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  17. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the institute include the following: To conduct basic and applied research. To promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community To provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute. To provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute. To disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  18. BOOST H2O - Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science near Lake Iznik, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derin, Y.; Hatipoglu, E.; Sunnetci, M. O.; Tanyas, H.; Unal Ercan, H.; Aktuna, Z.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Schroeder, P.; Ece, O. I.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    Field activities are often the best pedagogy for reinforcing principles learned in the classroom. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, six graduate students from three Turkish universities, four U.S. professors, and two Turkish professors participated in a week of training activities during May-June 2013. Field activities took place in the Lake Iznik region in western Turkey. The lake basin is geologically complex, with fault-controlled hydrogeology, and land use is dominated by agriculture, particularly olive cultivation. Professors trained the students (four females and two males) on concepts and techniques in surface-water and groundwater hydrology, water quality, and related computer software. Activities included stream gauging (using top-setting rods and a current meter), geomorphic assessment of streams (slope, cross-sections, and bed-clast size), measuring depth to water in wells, and collection of water samples from springs, wells, and the lake. Measurements of pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and alkalinity were performed along with sampling for stable isotope (oxygen and hydrogen) analysis. The students visited local villages, farms, surface-water intakes, and recreational springs for a holistic approach towards integrated water resource management. Results were discussed in the context of lithology, tectonics, land use, and other human impacts.

  19. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the Institute include the following: (1) To conduct basic and applied research; (2) to promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community; (3) to provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute; (4) to provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute; and (5) to disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  20. Predictors and Effects of Training on an Online Health Education and Support System for Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Helene; Kim, Eunkyung; Shaw, Bret R; Han, Jeong Yeob; Gumieny, Lauren

    2010-04-01

    Many breast cancer patients currently turn to Internet-based education and support to help them cope with their illness. This study explores the role of training in influencing how patients use a particular Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS) over time and also examines what pre-test characteristics predict which people are most likely to opt in or out of training in the first place. With use of pre-test survey and unobtrusive individual records of ICCS system use data (N = 216), nonparametric tests revealed that only having a later stage of cancer predicted whether or not patients participated in training. Results indicated that participating in training was a significant predictor of higher levels of using the CHESS system. In particular, the repeated measures analysis of covariance found the significant interaction as well as main effect of group (i.e., training vs. no training) and time (i.e., individual's CHESS usages at different times) in interactive and information CHESS services, suggesting that 1) the training group has a higher level of usage than the no training group, 2) both of the groups' usage decreased over time, and 3) these joint patterns hold over time. Practical guidelines for future ICCS campaign implementation are discussed. PMID:21949474

  1. How funding agencies can support research use in healthcare: an online province-wide survey to determine knowledge translation training needs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health research funding agencies are increasingly promoting evidence use in health practice and policy. Building on work suggesting how agencies can support such knowledge translation (KT), this paper discusses an online survey to assess KT training needs of researchers and research users as part of a Canadian provincial capacity-building effort. Methods The survey comprised 24 multiple choice and open-ended questions including demographics, interest in learning KT skills, likelihood of participating in training, and barriers and facilitators to doing KT at work. More than 1,200 people completed the survey. The high number of responses is attributed to an engagement strategy involving partner organizations (health authorities, research institutes, universities) in survey development and distribution. SPSS was used to analyze quantitative results according to respondents’ primary role, geographic region, and work setting. Qualitative results were analyzed in NVivo. Results Over 85 percent of respondents are interested in learning more about the top KT skills identified. Research producers have higher interest in disseminating research results; research users are more interested in the application of research results. About one-half of respondents require beginner-level training in KT skills; one-quarter need advanced training. Time and cost constraints are the biggest barriers to participating in KT training. More than one-half of respondents have no financial support for travel and almost one-half lack support for registration fees. Time is the biggest challenge to integrating KT into work. Conclusions Online surveys are useful for determining knowledge translation training needs of researchers, research users and ultimately organizations. In this case, findings suggest the importance of considering all aspects of KT in training opportunities, while taking into account different stakeholder interests. Funders can play a role in developing new training

  2. Supporting young mothers into education, employment and training: assessing progress towards the target.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Mary; Woolhead, Gillian

    2006-03-01

    The government has set a target of increasing the participation of teenage mothers in education, employment and training (EET) to 60% by 2010 to reduce their risk of long-term social exclusion. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative research project conducted in the South West region of England to establish the tracking practices employed by practitioners working with young parents to ascertain whether and to what extent teenage parents are engaged in EET. The range of support that is currently needed by and provided to teenage parents when returning to or continuing their EET was also investigated. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 24 participants from a unitary authority, county and city within the region; participants were working in a variety of professional roles with responsibilities for teenage parents. The results show that in the South West there are currently no standard procedures or practices in place for effectively tracking the participation of teenage parents in EET. There was evidence of a good understanding of the needs of young parents amongst practitioners and that a variety of support was being provided to them. However, it needs to be understood, and addressed, that having contact with young parents and providing them with support does not necessarily lead to the standardised information that is needed in order to assess progress towards the target. We conclude that in order to assess in a meaningful way progress towards the target of 60% participation by 2010, a clear protocol for the collection and collation of information--and responsibility for this--needs to be developed and implemented. PMID:16460367

  3. Responding to Changing Skill Demands: Training Packages and Accredited Courses. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    2010-01-01

    This document was produced by the author based on her research for the report "Responding to Changing Skill Demands: Training Packages and Accredited Courses", and is an added resource for further information. "Responding to Changing Skill Demands: Training Packages and Accredited Courses" looks at whether vocational education and training (VET)…

  4. Support vector machines classifiers of physical activities in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study is to develop, test, and compare multinomial logistic regression (MLR) and support vector machines (SVM) in classifying preschool-aged children physical activity data acquired from an accelerometer. In this study, 69 children aged 3-5 years old were asked to participate in a s...

  5. European user support activities for ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Ferrigno, C.; Guainazzi, M.; Kretschmar, P.; Lumb, D.; Paltani, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Japanese mission ASTRO-H will be the next major X-ray satellite to operate after its launch in 2015. ASTRO-H will carry several instruments observing simultaneously that will provide broad-band coverage from 0.3 to 600 keV, while the Soft X-ray Spectrometer will offer high spectral resolution in the soft X-ray domain. Europe actively participates in the ASTRO-H mission, and European astronomers will have access to observing time. The European user support activities will be spread across two centers: The Science Operations Center (SOC), located at ESAC (Spain), and the European Science Support Center (ESSC), located at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). The tasks of the SOC will be focussed on supporting the European user community in the use of the allocated time for ASTRO-H, through handling annual calls for observing proposals and related activities. The tasks of the ESSC will be focussed on supporting the European scientific community with respect to the analysis of ASTRO-H data. The activities of the European ASTRO-H SOC and ESSC, together with a summary of ASTRO-H and its capabilities, will be presented at a booth at the X-ray Universe 2014 conference.

  6. Physical Activity and Social Support in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Mélo, Edilânea Nunes; de Farias, José Cazuza, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically synthesize the results of original studies on the association between physical activity and social support in adolescents, published until April 2011. Searches were carried out in Adolec, ERIC, Lilacs, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, SportsDiscus and Web of Science electronic databases and the reference…

  7. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity: Tools and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-sponsored, multi-year initiative designed to further improve the quality of, effectiveness of, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. This catalog is one element of the BEPS information dissemination process. The…

  8. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general. PMID:21423188

  9. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssilov, Georgi N.; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P.; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C.; MatolíN, VladimíR.; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  10. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training Program: Summary of program activities, fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-27

    The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training (HBCU NET) Program, funded by DOE, Office of Nuclear Energy and administered by ORAU, began in February 1984. The program provides support for training, study, research participation, and academic enrichment of students and faculty at designated HBCUs in nuclear science, nuclear engineering, and other nuclear-related technologes and disciplines. The program is composed of undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, student and faculty research participation, and an annual student training institute.

  11. SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: AUGUST 2007 – SEPTEMBER 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, SESD provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outside of Region 4, as requested, in the areas of Hazardo...

  12. A Guide for Perceptual-Motor Training Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Euclid - Lyndhurst City Schools, Lyndhurst, OH.

    This document has been prepared as part of a kindergarten perceptual-training program of the South Euclid-Lyndhurst City School District near Cleveland, Ohio. The guide contains information on training and procedures related to perceptual-motor learning. This information is structured primarily into 150 lesson plans, devised as 30-minute sessions…

  13. Collecting "Total" Vocational Education and Training Activity. Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In this position paper, NCVER's Managing Director, Dr Tom Karmel, argues that the submission of vocational education and training student data should be mandated as a condition of registration for all registered training organisations, including private providers. This will ensure a comprehensive data collection that gives a realistic view of…

  14. Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training: Years 6 and 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah; Cyr, Rebecca L.; Pato, Michele T.; Thrall, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) has provided a series of full-day conferences of psychiatry residency training directors designed to increase their competence in…

  15. Relaxation training affects success and activation on a teaching test.

    PubMed

    Helin, P; Hänninen, O

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of an audiocassette-relaxation training period (ART) and its timing on success at a teaching test (lecture type), on observed tension and on a number of physiological responses. The electrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (EMG), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), of female and male instructor candidates, were examined before, during and after the teaching test as well as during its critique. The relaxation period (18 min) was presented either on the preceding night (ARTnt) or immediately before the teaching test (ARTimm). The influence of personality (types A-B and extrovert-introvert) was also studied. ART improved success at the teaching test in both sexes. In males (but not in females), ARTimm decreased EMG level during the test, but ARTnt increased EMG at the test period as compared to the control group. In females, both ARTnt and ARTimm lowered HR more than in the control group. ARTimm lowered systolic BP in both sexes. Personality types affected the ART responses; ART was more beneficial for type A than B subjects. PMID:3325481

  16. Iaea Activities Supporting the Applications of Research Reactors in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peld, Nathan D.; Ridikas, Danas

    2014-02-01

    As the underutilization of research reactors around the world persists as a primary topic of concern among facility owners and operators, the IAEA responded in 2013 with a broad range of activities to address the planning, execution and improvement of many experimental techniques. The revision of two critical documents for planning and diversifying a facility's portfolio of applications, TECDOC 1234 “The Applications of Research Reactors” and TECDOC 1212 “Strategic Planning for Research Reactors”, is in progress in order to keep this information relevant, corresponding to the dynamism of experimental techniques and research capabilities. Related to the latter TECDOC, the IAEA convened a meeting in 2013 for the expert review of a number of strategic plans submitted by research reactor operators in developing countries. A number of activities focusing on specific applications are either continuing or beginning as well. In neutron activation analysis, a joint round of inter-comparison proficiency testing sponsored by the IAEA Technical Cooperation Department will be completed, and facility progress in measurement accuracy is described. Also, a training workshop in neutron imaging and Coordinated Research Projects in reactor benchmarks, automation of neutron activation analysis and neutron beam techniques for material testing intend to advance these activities as more beneficial services to researchers and other users.

  17. Training and certification program of the operating staff for a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Prior to beginning a 90-day test of a regenerative life support system, a need was identified for a training and certification program to qualify an operating staff for conducting the test. The staff was responsible for operating and maintaining the test facility, monitoring and ensuring crew safety, and implementing procedures to ensure effective mission performance with good data collection and analysis. The training program was designed to ensure that each operating staff member was capable of performing his assigned function and was sufficiently cross-trained to serve at certain other positions on a contingency basis. Complicating the training program were budget and schedule limitations, and the high level of sophistication of test systems.

  18. Impact of training program on school nurses' confidence levels in managing and supporting students with epilepsy and seizures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Joan K; Kakacek, Jody R M; Carr, Deborah

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of an epilepsy-focused training program on school nurses. The Epilepsy Foundation and the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) created a training program titled "Managing Students with Seizures" to educate school nurses on strategies and resources that they can use to handle emergency situations effectively and to create a safe and supportive school environment for children with epilepsy and seizures. Before and after the training sessions, nurses answered questionnaires that measured their confidence levels in providing care for students with epilepsy and seizures; these questionnaires showed an improvement in nurses' confidence levels across all measures. Analysis was also carried out to identify program components and nurse subgroups associated with statistically significant improvements. An evaluation of satisfaction indicated overall satisfaction with the program. This article presents results from 1,080 complete surveys associated with the training in 2007. PMID:20861414

  19. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners' Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyuck; Cho, Youngsuk; Kang, Ku Hyun; Cho, Gyu Chong; Song, Keun Jeong; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Basic life support (BLS) training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min), level 2 (80 min), level 3 (120 min), and level 4 (180 min). Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p < 0.001) and average chest compression depth (p = 0.003). All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p < 0.001). Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs. PMID:27529066

  20. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners' Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ku Hyun; Song, Keun Jeong; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Basic life support (BLS) training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min), level 2 (80 min), level 3 (120 min), and level 4 (180 min). Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p < 0.001) and average chest compression depth (p = 0.003). All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p < 0.001). Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs. PMID:27529066

  1. Effects of task-oriented robot training on arm function, activity, and quality of life in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over fifty percent of stroke patients experience chronic arm hand performance problems, compromising independence in daily life activities and quality of life. Task-oriented training may improve arm hand performance after stroke, whereby augmented therapy may lead to a better treatment outcome. Technology-supported training holds opportunities for increasing training intensity. However, the effects of robot-supported task-oriented training with real life objects in stroke patients are not known to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and added value of the Haptic Master robot combined with task-oriented arm hand training in chronic stroke patients. Methods In a single-blind randomized controlled trial, 22 chronic stroke patients were randomly allocated to receive either task-oriented robot-assisted arm-hand training (experimental group) or task-oriented non-robotic arm-hand training (control group). For training, the T-TOAT (Technology-supported Task-Oriented Arm Training) method was applied. Training was provided during 8 weeks, 4 times/week, 2× 30 min/day. Results A significant improvement after training on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) was demonstrated in the experimental group (p = 0.008). Results were maintained until 6 months after cessation of the training. On the perceived performance measure (Motor Activity Log (MAL)), both, the experimental and control group improved significantly after training (control group p = 0.008; experimental group p = 0.013). The improvements on MAL in both groups were maintained until 6 months after cessation of the training. With regard to quality of life, only in the control group a significant improvement after training was found (EuroQol-5D p = 0.015, SF-36 physical p = 0.01). However, the improvement on SF-36 in the control group was not maintained (p = 0.012). No between-group differences could be demonstrated on any of the outcome measures

  2. Adherence to physical activity guidelines among cancer support group participants.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Lydon, A; Amir, Z

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity is recommended after cancer diagnosis for physical function, quality of life and survival benefits. This study provided preliminary data on the prevalence of physical activity among adult men and women with cancer in the UK. As part of a national survey of cancer support group participation, questionnaires including items on leisure-time physical activity and demographic information were completed by 748 cancer survivors. Overall, 395 (52.8%) participants reported no weekly moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity, 221 (29.5%) reported some activity but below minimum recommendations and 132 (17.6%) were meeting published guidelines. Gender, health status and socio-economic status were independently associated with meeting guidelines. Among participants in good or fair health who were not meeting guidelines, 59.9% thought that they ought to be more physically active. In conclusion, overall levels of physical activity are low among cancer survivors in the UK. However, the majority of insufficiently active participants showed awareness of the need to increase their activity, and may be receptive to interventions for promoting physical activity in this population. PMID:24127843

  3. Mesoscopic Patterns of Neural Activity Support Songbird Cortical Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From “time cells” in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia–projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song. PMID:26039895

  4. Mesoscopic patterns of neural activity support songbird cortical sequences.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Jeffrey E; Liberti, William A; Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J

    2015-06-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From "time cells" in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia-projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song. PMID:26039895

  5. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  6. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  7. 34 CFR 350.14 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Projects Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.14 What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity? In carrying out a training activity under this... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must a grantee do in carrying out a...

  8. 34 CFR 350.14 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Projects Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.14 What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity? In carrying out a training activity under this... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must a grantee do in carrying out a...

  9. Capacity Building as a Tool for Assessing Training and Development Activity: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Sripirabaa, B.

    2008-01-01

    In recognition of its increasing importance, many organizations make periodic assessments of their training and development activity. The objective of the present study was to extend the concept of capacity building to the assessment of training and development activity in an automobile component manufacturing organization, using a developed and…

  10. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    PubMed Central

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  11. Application of arm support training in sub-acute stroke rehabilitation: first results on effectiveness and user experiences.

    PubMed

    Prange, G B Gerdienke; Kottink, Air Anke; Buurke, J H Jaap; Rietman, J S Hans

    2013-06-01

    A multi-center randomized clinical trial was performed in 7 Dutch rehabilitation centers, in the context of an implementation project (ROBAR), to compare the effect of an arm support (AS) training device to equally intensive conventional reach training (CON) on recovery of arm-hand function in sub-acute stroke. The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FM) and user experiences of therapists and patients were examined in both groups. An improvement of 10 and 8 points on the FM was found for respectively the CON and AS group. Both therapists and patients reported positive experiences on several aspects of user acceptance. These findings indicate that a low-tech system for arm support results in similar gains in arm function as conventional reach training in equal intensity, and is suitable for application in clinical practice. PMID:24187287

  12. Impact of Extended Education/Training in Positive Behaviour Support on Staff Knowledge, Causal Attributions and Emotional Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Peter; Bradshaw, Jill; Hughes, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study sought to gather information about the impact of extended training in positive behaviour support on staff knowledge, causal attributions and emotional responses. Methods: Students completed questionnaires at the beginning, middle and end of a University Diploma course to measure changes in their knowledge of challenging…

  13. Evaluation of Retention of Knowledge and Skills Imparted to First-Year Medical Students through Basic Life Support Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pande, Sushma; Pande, Santosh; Parate, Vrushali; Pande, Sanket; Sukhsohale, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Poor awareness among medical graduates about basic life support (BLS) is a matter of great concern. The presence of a trained rescuer is the key determinant of ultimate survival from life-threatening emergencies. To achieve this goal, early exposure to such life-saving skills is the right decision to foster these skills for medical students, which…

  14. Achieving Equitable Outcomes. A Supporting Paper to Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training, 1998-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    This paper is one of five supporting papers to "A Bridge to the Future: Australia's National Strategy for VET 1998-2003" (ED 420 764). Although some equity client groups in Australia are now relatively well represented in vocational education and training (VET), patterns of enrollment and achievement are not uniform. To respond to this situation…

  15. Standards-Based Assessment, Grading, and Reporting in Classrooms: Can District Training and Support Change Teacher Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMunn, Nancy; Schenck, Patricia; McColskey, Wendy

    Whether school district support and training in standards-based assessment, grading, and reporting in classrooms can change teacher practice in these areas was studied in a Florida school district. This district, Bay District Schools of Panama City, has been working with the SERVE Regional Educational Laboratory on a project that involves teachers…

  16. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: Victorian Aged Care Workers Survey. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zariah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  17. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: South Australian Aged Care Workers Study. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zariah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  18. Micronutrient Action Plan Instructional Tool (MAPit): A Training Tool to Support Public Health Professionals' Efforts to Eliminate Micronutrient Malnutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbon, Suzanne; Nsubuga, Peter; Knowles, Jacky; Bobrow, Emily; Parvanta, Ibrahim; Timmer, Arnold; van der Haar, Frits

    2006-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition (MM) is a global health problem that affects the national socioeconomic stability of an affected country. This article describes a multimedia training tool, the Micronutrient Action Plan instructional tool (MAPit), which has been designed to support public health professionals' efforts to eliminate MM. An overview and…

  19. Examining the Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support, Transfer of Training and Service Quality in the Malaysian Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumrah, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationships among perceived organizational support (POS), transfer of training outcomes to the workplace and service quality in the context of public sector organizations in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The data for this study have been collected from three sources, the employees of public…

  20. Effects of a Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program on Impairment and Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Therese E.; Watson, Kyle E.; Ross, Sandy A.; Gates, Philip E.; Gaughan, John P.; Lauer, Richard T.; Tucker, Carole A.; Engsberg, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effects of a supported speed treadmill training exercise program (SSTTEP) with exercise on spasticity, strength, motor control, gait spatiotemporal parameters, gross motor skills, and physical function. Method: Twenty-six children (14 males, 12 females; mean age 9y 6mo, SD 2y 2mo) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP; diplegia, n =…

  1. School Counselors' Education and Training, Competency, and Supportive Behaviors Concerning Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William J.; McDougald, Amanda M.; Kresica, Aimee M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined high school counselors' education and training, counseling competency, and supportive behavior regarding gay, lesbian, and bisexual students. Sexual minority students often face a range of school and mental health problems. Results show that participants' counseling competency skills, knowledge, and attitudes predict…

  2. DISOSS--Distributed Office Support System. An Electronic Messaging System Training Program for American Express TRS Company Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Mary Emily

    An instructional system design model was developed for training new employees of the American Express TRS (Travel Related Services) Company, Inc. on the Distributed Office Support System (DISOSS), an electronic mail system. The project used the Interservice Procedures for Instructional Systems Development, which consists of five phases: analysis,…

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Training on Need-Supportive Teaching in Physical Education: Qualitative and Quantitative Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelterman, N.; Vansteenkiste, M.; Van Keer, H.; De Meyer, J.; Van den Berghe, L.; Haerens, L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated 35 physical education teachers' appreciation of a continuous professional development (CPD) training on need-supportive teaching, embedded in Self-Determination Theory, using qualitative (i.e. focus groups) and quantitative methods (i.e. questionnaire). The findings suggest that teachers highly valued opportunities for…

  4. An Analysis of Functional Communication Training as an Empirically Supported Treatment for Problem Behavior Displayed by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Patricia F.; Boelter, Eric W.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Chin, Michelle D.; Hagopian, Louis P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the literature on the use of functional communication training (FCT) as a treatment for problem behavior displayed by individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Criteria for empirically supported treatments developed by Divisions 12 and 16 of the American Psychological Association (Kratochwill & Stoiber, 2002; Task Force,…

  5. Older Workers' Perspectives on Training and Retention of Older Workers: South Australian Construction Industry Study. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Marshallsay, Zariah

    2007-01-01

    Older workers' perspectives are examined in a national survey of the finance sector and case studies of aged care and construction workers. The majority of older workers intend to work beyond retirement age, to achieve a better lifestyle. With training, older workers could mentor younger workers. This support document includes a national survey of…

  6. Changes in cerebellar activity and inter-hemispheric coherence accompany improved reading performance following Quadrato Motor Training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Avirame, Keren; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham; Harpaz, Yuval; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia is a multifactorial reading deficit that involves multiple brain systems. Among other theories, it has been suggested that cerebellar dysfunction may be involved in dyslexia. This theory has been supported by findings from anatomical and functional imaging. A possible rationale for cerebellar involvement in dyslexia could lie in the cerebellum's role as an oscillator, producing synchronized activity within neuronal networks including sensorimotor networks critical for reading. If these findings are causally related to dyslexia, a training regimen that enhances cerebellar oscillatory activity should improve reading performance. We examined the cognitive and neural effects of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a structured sensorimotor training program that involves sequencing of motor responses based on verbal commands. Twenty-two adult Hebrew readers (12 dyslexics and 10 controls) were recruited for the study. Using Magnetoencephalography (MEG), we measured changes in alpha power and coherence following QMT in a within-subject design. Reading performance was assessed pre- and post-training using a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. Our results demonstrate improved performance on a speeded reading task following one month of intensive QMT in both the dyslexic and control groups. Dyslexic participants, but not controls, showed significant increase in cerebellar oscillatory alpha power following training. In addition, across both time points, inter-hemispheric alpha coherence was higher in the dyslexic group compared to the control group. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the combination of motor and language training embedded in QMT increases cerebellar oscillatory activity in dyslexics and improves reading performance. These results support the hypothesis that the cerebellum plays a role in skilled reading, and begin to unravel the underlying mechanisms that mediate cerebellar contribution in cognitive and neuronal augmentation. PMID

  7. Changes in cerebellar activity and inter-hemispheric coherence accompany improved reading performance following Quadrato Motor Training

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Avirame, Keren; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham; Harpaz, Yuval; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia is a multifactorial reading deficit that involves multiple brain systems. Among other theories, it has been suggested that cerebellar dysfunction may be involved in dyslexia. This theory has been supported by findings from anatomical and functional imaging. A possible rationale for cerebellar involvement in dyslexia could lie in the cerebellum’s role as an oscillator, producing synchronized activity within neuronal networks including sensorimotor networks critical for reading. If these findings are causally related to dyslexia, a training regimen that enhances cerebellar oscillatory activity should improve reading performance. We examined the cognitive and neural effects of Quadrato Motor Training (QMT), a structured sensorimotor training program that involves sequencing of motor responses based on verbal commands. Twenty-two adult Hebrew readers (12 dyslexics and 10 controls) were recruited for the study. Using Magnetoencephalography (MEG), we measured changes in alpha power and coherence following QMT in a within-subject design. Reading performance was assessed pre- and post-training using a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. Our results demonstrate improved performance on a speeded reading task following one month of intensive QMT in both the dyslexic and control groups. Dyslexic participants, but not controls, showed significant increase in cerebellar oscillatory alpha power following training. In addition, across both time points, inter-hemispheric alpha coherence was higher in the dyslexic group compared to the control group. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the combination of motor and language training embedded in QMT increases cerebellar oscillatory activity in dyslexics and improves reading performance. These results support the hypothesis that the cerebellum plays a role in skilled reading, and begin to unravel the underlying mechanisms that mediate cerebellar contribution in cognitive and neuronal augmentation. PMID

  8. Reduced posterior parietal cortex activation after training on a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Bueichekú, Elisenda; Miró-Padilla, Anna; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Parcet, María-Antonia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ávila, César

    2016-07-15

    Gaining experience on a cognitive task improves behavioral performance and is thought to enhance brain efficiency. Despite the body of literature already published on the effects of training on brain activation, less research has been carried out on visual search attention processes under well controlled conditions. Thirty-six healthy adults divided into trained and control groups completed a pre-post letter-based visual search task fMRI study in one day. Twelve letters were used as targets and ten as distractors. The trained group completed a training session (840 trials) with half the targets between scans. The effects of training were studied at the behavioral and brain levels by controlling for repetition effects using both between-subjects (trained vs. control groups) and within-subject (trained vs. untrained targets) controls. The trained participants reduced their response speed by 31% as a result of training, maintaining their accuracy scores, whereas the control group hardly changed. Neural results revealed that brain changes associated with visual search training were circumscribed to reduced activation in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) when controlling for group, and they included inferior occipital areas when controlling for targets. The observed behavioral and brain changes are discussed in relation to automatic behavior development. The observed training-related decreases could be associated with increased neural efficiency in specific key regions for task performance. PMID:27132048

  9. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  10. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  11. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  12. Social Support Can Buffer against Stress and Shape Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hostinar, Camelia E.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Social support from close relationship partners is an important resource for coping with stress, particularly during childhood. We discuss ethical challenges associated with studying stress and its social buffering in the laboratory, as well as emerging evidence regarding two potential neural substrates for the social buffering of stress: hypothalamic oxytocin activity and activation of areas in the prefrontal cortex associated with effective self-regulation. We also address the role of early-life social experiences in shaping brain development, as well as recommendations for practice and policy that would advance the ethical treatment of children and reduce social inequalities in early-life experiences and opportunities–e.g., investing in programs that prevent child maltreatment and facilitating access to high-quality child care for economically disadvantaged families. We also debate the ethical implications of using oxytocin nasal sprays to simulate the stress-reducing properties of social support and advise waiting for more evidence before recommending their use. PMID:26478822

  13. The Adam language: Ada extended with support for multiway activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlesworth, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    The Adam language is an extension of Ada that supports multiway activities, which are cooperative activities involving two or more processes. This support is provided by three new constructs: diva procedures, meet statements, and multiway accept statements. Diva procedures are recursive generic procedures having a particular restrictive syntax that facilitates translation for parallel computers. Meet statements and multiway accept statements provide two ways to express a multiway rendezvous, which is an n-way rendezvous generalizing Ada's 2-way rendezvous. While meet statements tend to have simpler rules than multiway accept statements, the latter approach is a more straightforward extension of Ada. The only nonnull statements permitted within meet statements and multiway accept statements are calls on instantiated diva procedures. A call on an instantiated diva procedure is also permitted outside a multiway rendezvous; thus sequential Adam programs using diva procedures can be written. Adam programs are translated into Ada programs appropriate for use on parallel computers.

  14. STS-60 cosmonauts participate in mission training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-60 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Russian Mission Specialist Sergei Krikalev and Russian backup Mission Specialist Vladimir Titov work with Training Instructor Richard M. Davis (holding space shuttle model) prior to entering the Building 16 Systems Engineering Simulator (SES).

  15. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  16. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  17. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  18. Professional and educational initiatives, supports, and opportunities for advanced training in public health.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoai-An; Patterson, Brooke Y

    2010-09-10

    The United States is facing a public health workforce shortage and pharmacists have the opportunity and obligation to address this challenge in health care. There have been initiatives and supports from within and beyond the profession for the pharmacist's role in public health. This article identifies existing professional and educational initiatives for the pharmacist's expanded role in public health, as well as postgraduate and other advanced educational opportunities in public health. Recommendations also are provided on how to further engage pharmacists in public health activities to alleviate the public health workforce challenge. PMID:21088727

  19. Twelve months of active musical training in 8- to 10-year-old children enhances the preattentive processing of syllabic duration and voice onset time.

    PubMed

    Chobert, Julie; François, Clément; Velay, Jean-Luc; Besson, Mireille

    2014-04-01

    Musical training has been shown to positively influence linguistic abilities. To follow the developmental dynamics of this transfer effect at the preattentive level, we conducted a longitudinal study over 2 school years with nonmusician children randomly assigned to music or to painting training. We recorded the mismatch negativity (MMN), a cortical correlate of preattentive mismatch detection, to syllables that differed in vowel frequency, vowel duration, and voice onset time (VOT), using a test-training-retest procedure and 3 times of testing: before training, after 6 months and after 12 months of training. While no between-group differences were found before training, enhanced preattentive processing of syllabic duration and VOT, as reflected by greater MMN amplitude, but not of frequency, was found after 12 months of training in the music group only. These results demonstrate neuroplasticity in the child brain and suggest that active musical training rather than innate predispositions for music yielded the improvements in musically trained children. These results also highlight the influence of musical training for duration perception in speech and for the development of phonological representations in normally developing children. They support the importance of music-based training programs for children's education and open new remediation strategies for children with language-based learning impairments. PMID:23236208

  20. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  1. Predicting pupylation sites in prokaryotic proteins using semi-supervised self-training support vector machine algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zhe; Gu, Hong

    2016-08-15

    As one important post-translational modification of prokaryotic proteins, pupylation plays a key role in regulating various biological processes. The accurate identification of pupylation sites is crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of pupylation. Although several computational methods have been developed for the identification of pupylation sites, the prediction accuracy of them is still unsatisfactory. Here, a novel bioinformatics tool named IMP-PUP is proposed to improve the prediction of pupylation sites. IMP-PUP is constructed on the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs and trained with a modified semi-supervised self-training support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The proposed algorithm iteratively trains a series of support vector machine classifiers on both annotated and non-annotated pupylated proteins. Computational results show that IMP-PUP achieves the area under receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.91, 0.73, and 0.75 on our training set, Tung's testing set, and our testing set, respectively, which are better than those of the different error costs SVM algorithm and the original self-training SVM algorithm. Independent tests also show that IMP-PUP significantly outperforms three other existing pupylation site predictors: GPS-PUP, iPUP, and pbPUP. Therefore, IMP-PUP can be a useful tool for accurate prediction of pupylation sites. A MATLAB software package for IMP-PUP is available at https://juzhe1120.github.io/. PMID:27197054

  2. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants' Object Exploration.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Sarah E; Watkins, Rachel M; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants' behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant's experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  3. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants’ Object Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Sarah E.; Watkins, Rachel M.; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants’ behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant’s experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  4. Commercial Contract Training, Marine Corps Area VOTEC Support Center (AVSC) Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, D. R.; And Others

    The report provides a description of the Phase II findings of a two-phase study to determine if certain Marine Corps skill training requirements could be satisfied through contract with qualified commercial sources. It demonstrates the utility of the commercial contract training concept and contains information useful to Area VOTEC…

  5. Supporting Residential Student Organization Advisers: A 21st Century Adviser Training and Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Cory Adam

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for this doctoral action research study was to discover if and how an updated training and development curriculum benefited residential student organization advisers at Arizona State University (ASU). Eleven advisers of residential student organizations completed a pilot training and development program and agreed to participate in a…

  6. From the Sidelines to the Centre: Indigenous Support Units in Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helme, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous Australians are significantly disadvantaged in comparison with non-Indigenous Australians on all socioeconomic indicators. Education and training are seen as a means of reducing inequality, and high levels of Indigenous participation in vocational education and training (VET) indicate that this sector has a central role in this process.…

  7. Transfer of Training: The Role of Feedback in Supportive Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Jansen, Niekie

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of training to the workplace often fails to occur. The authors argue that feedback generated within the work environment about the application of newly learned skills in the workplace helps to close the gap between the current performance and the desired goal of full application of what is learned during training. This study takes a…

  8. Instructional Methodology and Experimental Design for Evaluating Audio-Video Support to Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purifoy, George R., Jr.

    This report presents a detailed description of the methods by which airborne video recording will be utilized in training Air Force pilots, and presents the format for an experiment testing the effectiveness of such training. Portable airborne recording with ground playback permits more economical and efficient teaching of the critical visual and…

  9. Responding to Changes in Building Legislation. Updating Training for the Building Regulations 1985 and Supporting Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert; Phillips, Alan

    A project sought to develop a means of updating and retraining those required to comply with Britain's 1985 Building Regulations, which are substantially different from the previous ones in regard to procedures and technical content. The training needs analysis conducted indicated that the new training should be flexible and use practical and…

  10. Functional Specifications for Computer Aided Training Systems Development and Management (CATSDM) Support Functions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, John; And Others

    This report provides a description of a Computer Aided Training System Development and Management (CATSDM) environment based on state-of-the-art hardware and software technology, and including recommendations for off the shelf systems to be utilized as a starting point in addressing the particular systematic training and instruction design and…

  11. What Works Where You Are? The Implementation of Training Packages in Rural Australia: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Blom, Kaaren; Bateman, Andrea; Carden, Pam

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "What Works Where You Are? The Implementation of Training Packages in Rural Australia" [ED495190] and is an added resource for further information. The original report investigates the implementation of training packages in five rural communities, and the strategies…

  12. The Effect of Instructional Method on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skill Performance: A Comparison Between Instructor-Led Basic Life Support and Computer-Based Basic Life Support With Voice-Activated Manikin.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Sands, Cathy; Brahn, Pamela; Graves, Kristal

    2015-01-01

    Validating participants' ability to correctly perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills during basic life support courses can be a challenge for nursing professional development specialists. This study compares two methods of basic life support training, instructor-led and computer-based learning with voice-activated manikins, to identify if one method is more effective for performance of CPR skills. The findings suggest that a computer-based learning course with voice-activated manikins is a more effective method of training for improved CPR performance. PMID:26381346

  13. A multi-channel biomimetic neuroprosthesis to support treadmill gait training in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chia, Noelia; Ambrosini, Emilia; Baccinelli, Walter; Nardone, Antonio; Monticone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrante, Simona

    2015-08-01

    This study presents an innovative multi-channel neuroprosthesis that induces a biomimetic activation of the main lower-limb muscles during treadmill gait training to be used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The electrostimulation strategy replicates the physiological muscle synergies used by healthy subjects to walk on a treadmill at their self-selected speed. This strategy is mapped to the current gait sub-phases, which are identified in real time by a custom algorithm. This algorithm divides the gait cycle into six sub-phases, based on two inertial sensors placed laterally on the shanks. Therefore, the pre-defined stimulation profiles are expanded or stretched based on the actual gait pattern of each single subject. A preliminary experimental protocol, involving 10 healthy volunteers, was carried out to extract the muscle synergies and validate the gait-detection algorithm, which were afterwards used in the development of the neuroprosthesis. The feasibility of the neuroprosthesis was tested on one healthy subject who simulated different gait patterns, and a chronic stroke patient. The results showed the correct functioning of the system. A pilot study of the neurorehabilitation treatment for stroke patients is currently being carried out. PMID:26737943

  14. Engaging Students in Learning Activities: It Is Not Autonomy Support or Structure but Autonomy Support and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hyungshim; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Deci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated 2 engagement-fostering aspects of teachers' instructional styles--autonomy support and structure--and hypothesized that students' engagement would be highest when teachers provided high levels of both. Trained observers rated teachers' instructional styles and students' behavioral engagement in 133 public high school classrooms in…

  15. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  16. Isometric handgrip training reduces arterial pressure at rest without changes in sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carrasco, D. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether isometric handgrip (IHG) training reduces arterial pressure and whether reductions in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate this drop in arterial pressure. Normotensive subjects were assigned to training (n = 9), sham training (n = 7), or control (n = 8) groups. The training protocol consisted of four 3-min bouts of IHG exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) separated by 5-min rest periods. Training was performed four times per week for 5 wk. Subjects' resting arterial pressure and heart rate were measured three times on 3 consecutive days before and after training, with resting MSNA (peroneal nerve) recorded on the third day. Additionally, subjects performed IHG exercise at 30% of MVC to fatigue followed by muscle ischemia. In the trained group, resting diastolic (67 +/- 1 to 62 +/- 1 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (86 +/- 1 to 82 +/- 1 mmHg) significantly decreased, whereas systolic arterial pressure (116 +/- 3 to 113 +/- 2 mmHg), heart rate (67 +/- 4 to 66 +/- 4 beats/min), and MSNA (14 +/- 2 to 15 +/- 2 bursts/min) did not significantly change following training. MSNA and cardiovascular responses to exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia were unchanged by training. There were no significant changes in any variables for the sham training and control groups. The results indicate that IHG training is an effective nonpharmacological intervention in lowering arterial pressure.

  17. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  18. Resident Research and Scholarly Activity in Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Rachel B; Hebert, Randy S; Wright, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES 1) To describe how internal medicine residency programs fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) scholarly activity training requirement including the current context of resident scholarly work, and 2) to compare findings between university and nonuniversity programs. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING ACGME-accredited internal medicine residency programs. PARTICIPANTS Internal medicine residency program directors. MEASUREMENTS Data were collected on 1) interpretation of the scholarly activity requirement, 2) support for resident scholarship, 3) scholarly activities of residents, 4) attitudes toward resident research, and 5) program characteristics. University and nonuniversity programs were compared. MAIN RESULTS The response rate was 78%. Most residents completed a topic review with presentation (median, 100%) to fulfill the requirement. Residents at nonuniversity programs were more likely to complete case reports (median, 40% vs 25%; P =.04) and present at local or regional meetings (median, 25% vs 20%; P =.01), and were just as likely to conduct hypothesis-driven research (median, 20% vs 20%; P =.75) and present nationally (median, 10% vs 5%; P =.10) as residents at university programs. Nonuniversity programs were more likely to report lack of faculty mentors (61% vs 31%; P <.001) and resident interest (55% vs 40%; P =.01) as major barriers to resident scholarship. Programs support resident scholarship through research curricula (47%), funding (46%), and protected time (32%). CONCLUSIONS Internal medicine residents complete a variety of projects to fulfill the scholarly activity requirement. Nonuniversity programs are doing as much as university programs in meeting the requirement and supporting resident scholarship despite reporting significant barriers. PMID:15836549

  19. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l−1 CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l−1 CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8–9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l−1 extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5′,6′-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  20. Effects of resistance training on cardiovascular health in non-obese active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Clare Chung-Wah; McManus, Alison Mary; So, Hung-Kwan; Chook, Ping; Au, Chun-Ting; Li, Albert Martin; Kam, Jack Tat-Chi; So, Raymond Chi-Hung; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Sung, Rita Yn-Tz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the benefits of a 10-wk resistance training programme on cardiovascular health in non-obese and active adolescents. METHODS This is a pragmatic randomised controlled intervention. The study was carried out in a Hong Kong Government secondary school. Thirty-eight lean and active boys and girls were randomised to either the resistance training group or the control group. Students in the resistance training group received in-school 10-wk supervised resistance training twice per week, with each session lasting 70 min. Main outcome measures taken before and after training included brachial endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation, body composition, fasting serum lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and aerobic fitness. RESULTS The only training related change was in endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation which increased from 8.5% to 9.8%. A main effect of time and an interaction (P < 0.005) indicated that this improvement was a result of the 10-wk resistance training. Main effects for time (P < 0.05) in a number of anthropometric, metabolic and vascular variables were noted; however, there were no significant interactions indicating the change was more likely an outcome of normal growth and development as opposed to a training effect. CONCLUSION Ten weeks of resistance training in school appears to have some vascular benefit in active, lean children PMID:27610345

  1. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  2. Self-training in significance space of support vectors for imbalanced biomedical event data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pairwise relationships extracted from biomedical literature are insufficient in formulating biomolecular interactions. Extraction of complex relations (namely, biomedical events) has become the main focus of the text-mining community. However, there are two critical issues that are seldom dealt with by existing systems. First, an annotated corpus for training a prediction model is highly imbalanced. Second, supervised models trained on only a single annotated corpus can limit system performance. Fortunately, there is a large pool of unlabeled data containing much of the domain background that one can exploit. Results In this study, we develop a new semi-supervised learning method to address the issues outlined above. The proposed algorithm efficiently exploits the unlabeled data to leverage system performance. We furthermore extend our algorithm to a two-phase learning framework. The first phase balances the training data for initial model induction. The second phase incorporates domain knowledge into the event extraction model. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated on the Genia event extraction corpus and a PubMed document pool. Our method can identify a small subset of the majority class, which is sufficient for building a well-generalized prediction model. It outperforms the traditional self-training algorithm in terms of f-measure. Our model, based on the training data and the unlabeled data pool, achieves comparable performance to the state-of-the-art systems that are trained on a larger annotated set consisting of training and evaluation data. PMID:25952719

  3. Use of a training program to enhance NICU nurses' cognitive abilities for assessing preterm infant behaviors and offering supportive interventions.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Jen-Jiuan

    2003-06-01

    This study tested the use of a developmentally supportive care (DSC) training program in the form of videotaped and personalized instruction to increase nurses' cognitive abilities for assessing preterm infant behavioral signals and offering supportive care. The study used a two-group pre-test post-test quasi-experimental repeated measures design. The participants were 25 NICU nurses, 13 in the intervention group, and 12 in the control group. An instrument developed for the purpose of the study was a video test that measured the effectiveness of the DSC training. The video test questionnaires were administered to the participants twice with an interval of four weeks. ANCOVA controlling the baseline scores was used for data analysis. In general, the results support the hypothesis that nurses' cognitive abilities were enhanced after the DSC training. The increase in nurses' cognitive abilities is the prerequisite for behavioral change, based on the assumptions of Bandura's Social Cognitive Learning Theory (Bandura, 1986). As nurses' cognitive abilities increased, it would be possible that nurse behaviors in taking care of these preterm infants might change. Therefore, the author recommends that in order to improve NICU care quality and the outcomes of preterm infants, the concepts of developmentally supportive care be incorporated into NICU caregiving practice by educating nurses. PMID:12820071

  4. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  5. Training Services Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.13. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The mission of Hanford Reservation`s Training Services is to procure, promote, and provide ``Tomorrow`s Training Today`` by innovatively adapting services to meet the needs of current programs. The program objectives are: provide the workforce with the knowledge and skills to safely and effectively achieve the Hanford Mission; Provide customer-driven training services in a quality, cost efficient manner; provide the Hanford community retraining opportunities consistent with the Hanford Mission and Columbia Basin economic viability; and provide workforce with knowledge and expertise with new and more effective technology.

  6. Aerobic and resistance training do not influence plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P; Khandwala, Farah; Yard, Benito; De Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Peersman, Wim; Derave, Wim

    2015-10-01

    A particular allele of the carnosinase gene (CNDP1) is associated with reduced plasma carnosinase activity and reduced risk for nephropathy in diabetic patients. On the one hand, animal and human data suggest that hyperglycemia increases plasma carnosinase activity. On the other hand, we recently reported lower carnosinase activity levels in elite athletes involved in high-intensity exercise compared with untrained controls. Therefore, this study investigates whether exercise training and the consequent reduction in hyperglycemia can suppress carnosinase activity and content in adults with type 2 diabetes. Plasma samples were taken from 243 males and females with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 54.3 yr, SD = 7.1) without major microvascular complications before and after a 6-mo exercise training program [4 groups: sedentary control (n = 61), aerobic exercise (n = 59), resistance exercise (n = 63), and combined exercise training (n = 60)]. Plasma carnosinase content and activity, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, lipid profile, and blood pressure were measured. A 6-mo exercise training intervention, irrespective of training modality, did not decrease plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma carnosinase content and activity showed a high interindividual but very low intraindividual variability over the 6-mo period. Age and sex, but not Hb A1c, were significantly related to the activity or content of this enzyme. It can be concluded that the beneficial effects of exercise training on the incidence of diabetic complications are probably not related to a lowering effect on plasma carnosinase content or activity. PMID:26389600

  7. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  8. Structured Activities in Perceptual Training to Aid Retention of Visual and Auditory Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, James W.; And Others

    The experimental program in structured activities in perceptual training was said to have two main objectives: to train children in retention of visual and auditory images and to increase the children's motivation to learn. Eight boys and girls participated in the program for two hours daily for a 10-week period. The age range was 7.0 to 12.10…

  9. 77 FR 2350 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ....Regulations.gov or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity Under... INFORMATION: Title: Request for Change of Program or Place of Training, VA Form 22-1995. OMB Control...

  10. 75 FR 3541 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ....Regulations.gov ; or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Monthly Record of Training and Wages, VA Form 28-1905c. OMB Control...

  11. 78 FR 6850 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activities Under OMB

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activities Under OMB AGENCY... Record of Training and Wages, VA Form 28-1905c. OMB Control Number: 2900-0176. Type of Review:...

  12. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  13. A National Study of Training Content and Activities for Faculty Development for Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their practices for faculty development for online teaching and particularly the content and training activities used during 2011-2012. This study found that the most frequently offered training content (97% of the…

  14. 76 FR 73020 - Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request... Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Contract for Training and Employment (Chapter...

  15. 77 FR 7242 - Agency Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment): Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment): Activity Under OMB Review...-0487 or email denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0677.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Contract for Training and Employment (Chapter 31, Title 38 U.S. Code), VA Form...

  16. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  17. 34 CFR 642.10 - Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program. 642.10 Section 642.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FEDERAL...

  18. Evaluation of an Outreach Activity of Pediatric Clerkship Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parcel, Guy S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An opportunity for medical students to observe and interact with children in a setting outside the clinical environment was introduced as part of ambulatory pediatric clerkship training. Evaluation of the program indicated its overall effectiveness as well as areas for which changes are suggested. (LBH)

  19. Flexible Learning Activities Fostering Autonomy in Teaching Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupetz, Rita; Ziegenmeyer, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    The flexible use of digital recordings from EFL classrooms as well as online communication with teaching experts are two promising ways of implementing e-learning in the context of initial teacher training. Our research focuses on how to blend these elements efficiently with the different theoretical and practical content layers of an introductory…

  20. 15 CFR 917.42 - Categories of support available for the conducting of Sea Grant activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... generally for a single item of research, education and training, or advisory service, but may be renewed... may be in research, education, training, or advisory services. Support for a project is made to an... bring into the National Sea Grant Program institutions of higher education that have a strong core...

  1. Cooks Training for Faith, Activity, and Nutrition project with AME churches in SC

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara; Carter, Chad; Jordan, Jeannette F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study describes the development and evaluation of a participatory training for cooks in African American churches. The 8-hour training focused on providing healthy meals within the church food program. It enlisted cooks in hands-on “cooking with the chef” training and menu building exercises, and demonstrated development of flavor in foods through healthy ingredients. Cook ratings from pre- to post-training (possible range: 1 to 10) were evaluated with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results 114 cooks from 57 churches over the period from 7/21/07 to 3/21/11 participated in trainings. Self-rated cooking skill increased from pre- (6.5 ± SD) to post- training (7.9 ± SD), p = .0001. Self-rated confidence in preparing meals also increased significantly (pre: 7.3 ± SD; post: 8.3 ± SD), p =.0001. Qualitative feedback from the cooks’ training has been positive. Two of the more frequently stated changes cooks report are using less salt and using more vegetables and fruits in menus. Lessons learned include: choosing the right church to host the training, teamwork as a key component, need for support system for church cooks, allocation of time for planning as well as shopping for healthy ingredients, and incorporation of flexibility into the training plan. PMID:23352927

  2. 75 FR 61452 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Military Training Activities at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Activities at the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility Boardman, OR, and To Announce Public Scoping... activities on and increasing usage of the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman, Oregon... training activities to include force structure changes associated with the introduction of new...

  3. Support for Astronaut's View of Mexican/ Central American Fires and on-Line Earth Observations Training Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, Charles F., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A small project to compile remote sensing and in-site data to review the processes leading to the May 1998 Mexican/Central American fires was undertaken. A web page based on this project was assembled. The second project initiated involved an interactive and on-line program that will replace the paper version of the Earth Observations Preflight Training Manual. Technical support was provided to Prof. Marvin Glasser as needed.

  4. NASA Aerosciences Activities to Support Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been a critical element of the United State's human space flight program for over 50 years. It is the home to NASA s Mission Control Center, the astronaut corps, and many major programs and projects including the Space Shuttle Program, International Space Station Program, and the Orion Project. As part of JSC's Engineering Directorate, the Applied Aeroscience and Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch is charted to provide aerosciences support to all human spacecraft designs and missions for all phases of flight, including ascent, exo-atmospheric, and entry. The presentation will review past and current aeroscience applications and how NASA works to apply a balanced philosophy that leverages ground testing, computational modeling and simulation, and flight testing, to develop and validate related products. The speaker will address associated aspects of aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, rarefied gas dynamics, and decelerator systems, involving both spacecraft vehicle design and analysis, and operational mission support. From these examples some of NASA leading aerosciences challenges will be identified. These challenges will be used to provide foundational motivation for the development of specific advanced modeling and simulation capabilities, and will also be used to highlight how development activities are increasing becoming more aligned with flight projects. NASA s efforts to apply principles of innovation and inclusion towards improving its ability to support the myriad of vehicle design and operational challenges will also be briefly reviewed.

  5. Coordinating complex decision support activities across distributed applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge-based technologies have been applied successfully to automate planning and scheduling in many problem domains. Automation of decision support can be increased further by integrating task-specific applications with supporting database systems, and by coordinating interactions between such tools to facilitate collaborative activities. Unfortunately, the technical obstacles that must be overcome to achieve this vision of transparent, cooperative problem-solving are daunting. Intelligent decision support tools are typically developed for standalone use, rely on incompatible, task-specific representational models and application programming interfaces (API's), and run on heterogeneous computing platforms. Getting such applications to interact freely calls for platform independent capabilities for distributed communication, as well as tools for mapping information across disparate representations. Symbiotics is developing a layered set of software tools (called NetWorks! for integrating and coordinating heterogeneous distributed applications. he top layer of tools consists of an extensible set of generic, programmable coordination services. Developers access these services via high-level API's to implement the desired interactions between distributed applications.

  6. Effects of a cognitive training on spatial learning and associated functional brain activations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both cognitive and physical exercise have been discussed as promising interventions for healthy cognitive aging. The present study assessed the effects of cognitive training (spatial vs. perceptual training) and physical training (endurance training vs. non-endurance training) on spatial learning and associated brain activation in 33 adults (40–55 years). Spatial learning was assessed with a virtual maze task, and at the same time neural correlates were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results Only the spatial training improved performance in the maze task. These behavioral gains were accompanied by a decrease in frontal and temporal lobe activity. At posttest, participants of the spatial training group showed lower activity than participants of the perceptual training group in a network of brain regions associated with spatial learning, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. No significant differences were observed between the two physical intervention groups. Conclusions Functional changes in neural systems associated with spatial navigation can be induced by cognitive interventions and seem to be stronger than effects of physical exercise in middle-aged adults. PMID:23870447

  7. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  8. Ultrafine Nanoparticle-Supported Ru Nanoclusters with Ultrahigh Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihua; Jiang, Yingying; Zheng, Jinbao; Zhang, Nuowei; Yu, Changlin; Li, Yunhua; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Jin, Chuanhong; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Chen, Bing H

    2015-09-01

    The design of an ideal heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation reaction is to impart the catalyst with synergetic surface sites active cooperatively toward different reaction species. Herein a new strategy is presented for the creation of such a catalyst with dual active sites by decorating metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with ultrafine nanoclusters at atomic level. This strategy is exemplified by the design and synthesis of Ru nanoclusters supported on Ni/NiO nanoparticles. This Ru-nanocluster/Ni/NiO-nanoparticle catalyst is shown to exhibit ultrahigh catalytic activity for benzene hydrogenation reaction, which is 55 times higher than Ru-Ni alloy or Ru on Ni catalysts. The nanoclusters-on-nanoparticles are characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Cs-corrected high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy, elemental mapping, high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering, and X-ray absorption spectra. The atomic-scale nanocluster-nanoparticle structural characteristics constitute the basis for creating the catalytic synergy of the surface sites, where Ru provides hydrogen adsorption and dissociation site, Ni acts as a "bridge" for transferring H species to benzene adsorbed and activated at NiO site, which has significant implications to multifunctional nanocatalysts design for wide ranges of catalytic reactions. PMID:26081741

  9. Adolescents’ Daily Activities and the Restorative Niches that Support Them

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jenny J.; Aspinall, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores wellbeing from the perspective of the psychological dynamics underlying adolescents’ relationship with place. It uses a dynamic model of wellbeing called personal project analysis (PPA) which captures the concept of ‘flourishing’, defined as functioning well in your activities, strivings and interactions with the world [1]. Using PPA methods we identified adolescents’ daily activities and the ‘restorative niches’ that best support them. A series of settings (including home, urban and natural outdoor places) were explored using PPA with 45 young people (aged 11–13) living in Edinburgh, Central Scotland. Participants were asked to think of eight projects of current importance to them, to say where the project took place and to rate each project against a series of core wellbeing dimensions measuring project meaning, manageability, support and affect (how much fun, stress etc.). Latent class analysis was carried out to explore clusters—or sub-groups—in the data and to identify the significant discriminators between clusters. A three-cluster model produced the best fit with project type, project place and wellbeing indicators (fun and stress) significantly discriminating between the three clusters. The three clusters were labeled by their dominant environmental context, ‘faraway’ (e.g., beach, national parks, hills), ‘everyday’ (e.g., home, school, local streets) and ‘citywide’ (e.g., sport settings, urban town context). ‘Faraway’ and ‘citywide’ clusters had a significantly higher wellbeing content, especially for fun and stress; the ‘everyday’ cluster indicated local environs remain a dominant project place for this age group, but are associated with greater stress. We compare findings with adults and suggest that outdoor settings further afield from home have greater significance within adolescent project systems, but that support is needed to facilitate access to these places. PMID:23202680

  10. Simulation and training of ultrasound supported anaesthesia: a low-cost approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, T.; Lamontain, M.; Hilpert, J.; Schilling, F.; Tolxdorff, T.

    2010-03-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging technology during techniques of peripheral nerve blockade offers several clinical benefits. Here we report on a new method to educate residents in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The daily challenge for the anesthesiologists is the 3D angle-depending handling of the stimulation needle and the ultrasound probe while watching the 2D ultrasound image on the monitor. Purpose: Our approach describes how a computer-aided simulation and training set for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could be built based on wireless low-cost devices and an interactive simulation of a 2D ultrasound image. For training purposes the injection needle and the ultrasound probe are replaced by wireless Bluetooth-connected 3D tracking devices, which are embedded in WII-mote controllers (Nintendo-Brand). In correlation to the tracked 3D positions of the needle and transducer models the visibility and position of the needle should be simulated in the 2D generated ultrasound image. Conclusion: In future, this tracking and visualization software module could be integrated in a more complex training set, where complex injection paths could be trained based on a 3D segmented model and the training results could be part of a curricular e-learning module.

  11. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  12. Does combined cognitive training and physical activity training enhance cognitive abilities more than either alone? A four-condition randomized controlled trial among healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shatil, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive training and aerobic training are known to improve cognitive functions. To examine the separate and combined effects of such training on cognitive performance, four groups of healthy older adults embarked on a 4 months cognitive and/or mild aerobic training. A first group [n = 33, mean age = 80 (66–90)] engaged in cognitive training, a second [n = 29, mean age = 81 (65–89)] in mild aerobic training, a third [n = 29, mean age = 79 (70–93)] in the combination of both, and a fourth [n = 31, mean age = 79 (71–92)] control group engaged in book-reading activity. The outcome was a well-validated multi-domain computerized cognitive evaluation for older adults. The results indicate that, when compared to older adults who did not engage in cognitive training (the mild aerobic and control groups) older adults who engaged in cognitive training (separate or combined training groups) showed significant improvement in cognitive performance on Hand-Eye Coordination, Global Visual Memory (GVM; working memory and long-term memory), Speed of Information Processing, Visual Scanning, and Naming. Indeed, individuals who did not engage in cognitive training showed no such improvements. Those results suggest that cognitive training is effective in improving cognitive performance and that it (and not mild aerobic training) is driving the improvement in the combined condition. Results are discussed in terms of the special circumstances of aerobic and cognitive training for older adults who are above 80 years of age. PMID:23531885

  13. Support vector machines classifiers of physical activities in preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Adolph, Anne L; Puyau, Maurice R; Vohra, Firoz A; Butte, Nancy F; Zakeri, Issa F

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop, test, and compare multinomial logistic regression (MLR) and support vector machines (SVM) in classifying preschool-aged children physical activity data acquired from an accelerometer. In this study, 69 children aged 3–5 years old were asked to participate in a supervised protocol of physical activities while wearing a triaxial accelerometer. Accelerometer counts, steps, and position were obtained from the device. We applied K-means clustering to determine the number of natural groupings presented by the data. We used MLR and SVM to classify the six activity types. Using direct observation as the criterion method, the 10-fold cross-validation (CV) error rate was used to compare MLR and SVM classifiers, with and without sleep. Altogether, 58 classification models based on combinations of the accelerometer output variables were developed. In general, the SVM classifiers have a smaller 10-fold CV error rate than their MLR counterparts. Including sleep, a SVM classifier provided the best performance with a 10-fold CV error rate of 24.70%. Without sleep, a SVM classifier-based triaxial accelerometer counts, vector magnitude, steps, position, and 1- and 2-min lag and lead values achieved a 10-fold CV error rate of 20.16% and an overall classification error rate of 15.56%. SVM supersedes the classical classifier MLR in categorizing physical activities in preschool-aged children. Using accelerometer data, SVM can be used to correctly classify physical activities typical of preschool-aged children with an acceptable classification error rate. PMID:24303099

  14. Methodological issues in the design and evaluation of supported communication for aphasia training: a cluster-controlled feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Simon; Clark, Allan; Barton, Garry; Lane, Kathleen; Pomeroy, Valerie M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and acceptability of training stroke service staff to provide supported communication for people with moderate–severe aphasia in the acute phase; assess the suitability of outcome measures; collect data to inform sample size and Health Economic evaluation in a definitive trial. Design Phase II cluster-controlled, observer-blinded feasibility study. Settings In-patient stroke rehabilitation units in the UK matched for bed numbers and staffing were assigned to control and intervention conditions. Participants 70 stroke rehabilitation staff from all professional groups, excluding doctors, were recruited. 20 patients with moderate-severe aphasia were recruited. Intervention Supported communication for aphasia training, adapted to the stroke unit context versus usual care. Training was supplemented by a staff learning log, refresher sessions and provision of communication resources. Main outcome measures Feasibility of recruitment and acceptability of the intervention and of measures required to assess outcomes and Health Economic evaluation in a definitive trial. Staff outcomes: Measure of Support in Conversation; patient outcomes: Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale; Communicative Access Measure for Stroke; Therapy Outcome Measures for aphasia; EQ-5D-3L was used to assess health outcomes. Results Feasibility of staff recruitment was demonstrated. Training in the intervention was carried out with 28 staff and was found to be acceptable in qualitative reports. 20 patients consented to take part, 6 withdrew. 18 underwent all measures at baseline; 16 at discharge; and 14 at 6-month follow-up. Of 175 patients screened 71% were deemed to be ineligible, either lacking capacity or too unwell to participate. Poor completion rates impacted on assessment of patient outcomes. We were able to collect sufficient data at baseline, discharge and follow-up for economic evaluation. Conclusions The feasibility study informed components of the

  15. Pedagogical Synergetics as the Activity Approach Basis in Professional and Pedagogical Training at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serezhnikova, Raisa Kuzminichna; Fishman, Boris Entilyevich; Abramenko, Natalya Yurevna; Zhoglo, Lyubov Yakovlevna; Fishbein, Miron Honevich

    2015-01-01

    The article considers an idea of activity approach realization in professional training assuming not only change of the contents, forms and methods of students' educational activities, but also not less radical transformation of teacher's activities oriented at the students' development of creative self-realization experience. The authors…

  16. Antibacterial activity of graphene supported FeAg bimetallic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Li, Li; Bao, Jie; Jia, Xin; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2016-07-01

    We report the simple one pot synthesis of iron-silver (FeAg) bimetallic nanoparticles with different compositions on graphene support. The nanoparticles are well dispersed on the graphene sheet as revealed by the TEM, XRD, and Raman spectra. The antibacterial activity of graphene-FeAg nanocomposite (NC) towards Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated by colony counting method. Graphene-FeAg NC demonstrates excellent antibacterial activity as compared to FeAg bimetallic without graphene. To understand the antibacterial mechanism of the NC, oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the glutathione (GSH) oxidation were investigated in the system. It has been observed that ROS production and GSH oxidation are concentration dependent while the increase in silver content up to 50% generally enhances the ROS production while ROS decreases on further increase in silver content. Graphene loaded FeAg NC demonstrates higher GSH oxidation capacity than bare FeAg bimetallic nanocomposite. The mechanism study suggests that the antibacterial activity is probably due to membrane and oxidative stress produced by the nanocomposites. The possible antibacterial pathway mainly includes the non-ROS oxidative stress (GSH oxidation) while ROS play minor role. PMID:27038914

  17. Developing Adaptive Collaboration Support: The Example of an Effective Training for Collaborative Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiglmayr, Anne; Spada, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive support for computer-mediated collaboration aims at supporting learners' collaboration in a way that is tailored to their actual needs and by fostering their self-regulation, leading to the acquisition of new collaboration skills. This review gives an example of developing support for a specific collaboration skill: the co-construction of…

  18. A Mixed Methods Examination of the Influence of Dimensions of Support on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Laura A.; Burkholder, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods sequential explanatory study was to explore how specific dimensions of supervisor support (mentoring, coaching, social support, and task support) influence the transfer of learned knowledge and skills to the job. Quantitative data were collected from employees (N = 48) who develop curriculum at an educational…

  19. Impact of Inertial Training on Strength and Power Performance in Young Active Men.

    PubMed

    Naczk, Mariusz; Naczk, Alicja; Brzenczek-Owczarzak, Wioletta; Arlet, Jarosław; Adach, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    Naczk, M, Naczk, A, Brzenczek-Owczarzak, W, Arlet, J, and Adach, Z. Impact of inertial training on strength and power performance in young active men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2107-2113, 2016-This study evaluated how 5 weeks of inertial training using 2 different loads influenced strength and power performance. Fifty-eight male physical education students were randomly divided into training and control groups. The 2 training groups (T0 and T10) performed inertial training 3 times per week for 5 weeks using the new Inertial Training and Measurement System (ITMS). Each training session included 3 exercise sets involving the knee extensors muscles. The T0 group used only the mass of the ITMS flywheel (19.4 kg), whereas the T10 group had an additional 10 kg on the flywheel. Before and after training, we evaluated maximum force and power of knee extensors muscles, countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), maximal power output achieved during ergometer test PVT, electromyography of quadriceps, and muscle mass. In T0 and T10, respectively, ITMS training induced significant increases in muscle force (25.2 and 23.3%), muscle power (33.2 and 27%), CMJ (3.8 and 6.7%), SJ (2.2 and 6.1%), PVT (8 and 7.4%), and muscle mass (9.8 and 15%). The changes did not significantly differ between T0 and T10. A 16% significant increase of electromyography amplitude (quadriceps muscle) was noted only in T0. The novel ITMS training method is effective for improving muscular strength and power. Improvements in PVT, CMJ, and SJ indicate that the increased strength and power elicited by ITMS training can translate to improvements in sport performance. The ITMS training can also be useful for building muscle mass. PMID:27457914

  20. Analysis of Private Returns to Vocational Education and Training: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wang-Sheng; Coelli, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This document is an appendix that is meant to accompany the main report, "Analysis of Private Returns to Vocational Education and Training". Included here are the detailed regression results that correspond to Tables 4 to 59 of the main report. This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the main report, and is an added…

  1. Creating Place: Design Education as Vocational Education and Training. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Damon; Watson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Design is an increasingly important component of our world-at-work. This project reveals the views of design educators working within vocational education and training (VET). Research participants called for a review of design education teaching methods in the VET context, with a particular focus on promoting innovation and creativity in diploma…

  2. Learner Support Requirements for Online Workplace Training in the South African Furniture Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Iain S.; Bullen, Mark; Kozak, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A qualitative research project was conducted to evaluate the suitability of e-learning as a means of delivering training to workplace learners in the South African furniture manufacturing sector. Twenty learners participated in a three-month pilot e-learning course and were monitored throughout. While the study was designed primarily to…

  3. How To Work with Small Businesses: Advice and Guidance for Providers of Training and Business Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Anne Marie, Ed.

    This publication provides guidance on good practice to help training providers in the United Kingdom improve the quality and relevance of services to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Section 1 focuses on key research findings regarding SMEs' needs and SME-college collaboration, including trading conditions for SMEs; services on offer by…

  4. Who Administers Wraparound? An Examination of the Training, Beliefs, and Implementation Supports for Wraparound Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Eric J.; Walrath, Christine M.; Sheehan, Angela K.

    2007-01-01

    The wraparound care management process has been cited as a promising means for making evidence-based treatments relevant and accessible to youth with mental health needs and their families. However, there has been little research on the background and training of providers who participate on wraparound teams. In the current study, the authors…

  5. Fully On-the-Job Training: Experiences and Steps Ahead: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    This document was produced by DBM Consultants, who provided the research on Susanne Wood's report "Fully On-the-Job Training: Experiences and Steps Ahead." It contains the appendix: Stage 3--CATI Questionnaire for Fully On-the-Job trainees/apprentices and is provided as an added resource for further information. [Full Report available at ED493985.

  6. Supporting Accessible Technology-Enhanced Training: The eAccess2Learn Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    During the last years, the design and development of technology-enhanced training systems for disabled groups of learners has attracted the attention of the technology-enhanced learning community. However, although a number of such systems have been designed to meet accessibility needs and preferences for those groups, most of them anticipate…

  7. Intervention Programmes in Mathematics and Literacy: Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of Their Training and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houssart, Jenny; Croucher, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We approach the recent argument put in this journal that teaching assistants (TAs) should be more strongly trained, monitored and supervised when teaching on intervention programmes. We suggest that the argument sits uneasily with wider management and educational literature. We examine TAs' experience of delivering important intervention…

  8. Tribal Management Support Center: Training Services. Continuing Education System Catalog F. Y.-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    A continuing education program in health systems management and administration, conducted for tribal and Indian Health Service (IHS) personnel, is described in this catalog. The first section states the goals of the program, which provides, on a national level, training to help tribes and tribal organizations administer health programs and to…

  9. How Do You Implement a Digital Environment to Support a Training Group?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronchi, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This case deals with an instructional designer (ID) working at a European university who has been asked to convert an existing on-campus program for working professionals to online delivery. This case took place over a period of several months and led to the development of an online training program. The program was designed to facilitate…

  10. Evaluation of Orr's Discretionary Grant Support for Enhanced Skills Training and Multiple Wage Earners. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; And Others

    An evaluation of the Multiple Wage Earner (MWE) discretionary grant program and Enhanced Skills Training (EST) program developed by the Department of Health and Human Services is reported. The EST program was intended to reach hard-to-employ refugees through improvement of the quality of jobs available to refugees experiencing difficulties…

  11. Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training--Supporting Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter; Dalton, Jennifer; Henry, John

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the Australian report, "Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training," and contains three parts. Part 1, Research Methodology and Findings (Peter Smith and Jennifer Dalton), contains: (1) Research Questions; (2) Research…

  12. A Context-Aware Mobile Learning System for Supporting Cognitive Apprenticeships in Nursing Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Su, Liang-Hao; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The aim of nursing education is to foster in students the competence of applying integrated knowledge with clinical skills to the application domains. In the traditional approach, in-class knowledge learning and clinical skills training are usually conducted separately, such that the students might not be able to integrate the knowledge and the…

  13. Update on Activities of CEOS Disaster Management Support Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) has supported natural and technological disaster management on a worldwide basis by fostering improved utilization of existing and planned Earth Observation (EO) satellite data. The DMSG has focused on developing and refining recommendations for the application of satellite data to selected hazard areas--drought, earthquake, fire, flood, ice, landslide, oil spill, and volcanic hazards. Particular emphasis was placed on working closely with space agencies, international and regional organizations, and commercial organizations on the implementation of these recommendations. The DMSG is in its last year with its primary focus on documenting its work and migrating on going activities to other fora. With over 300 participants from more than 140 organizations, the DMSG has found strong support among CEOS space agencies and the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), as well as an enthusiastic reception from numerous international, regional, and national emergency managers, and distinct interest from the commercial sector. In addition, the group has worked to give full support to the work of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in pursuit of decisions taken at UNISPACE III and the United Nations International Strategy on Disaster Reduction (ISDR). In conjunction with the IGOS, several of the DMSG hazards teams (earthquake, landslide, and solid Earth dimensions of volcanoes) are joining in the effort to develop an IGOS Geohazards theme team. Cooperation efforts with organizations such as IGOS, COPUOS, and ISDR will hopefully lead to the pick up of much of the on going DMSG activities. Since the inception of this ad hoc working group and its predecessor project, the DMSG has developed and refined recommendations for the application of satellite data by bringing together experts from eight hazard areas to identify user needs, as well as

  14. A robotic system to train activities of daily living in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Guidali, Marco; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Broggi, Simon; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Nef, Tobias; Riener, Robert

    2011-10-01

    In the past decade, several arm rehabilitation robots have been developed to assist neurological patients during therapy. Early devices were limited in their number of degrees of freedom and range of motion, whereas newer robots such as the ARMin robot can support the entire arm. Often, these devices are combined with virtual environments to integrate motivating game-like scenarios. Several studies have shown a positive effect of game-playing on therapy outcome by increasing motivation. In addition, we assume that practicing highly functional movements can further enhance therapy outcome by facilitating the transfer of motor abilities acquired in therapy to daily life. Therefore, we present a rehabilitation system that enables the training of activities of daily living (ADL) with the support of an assistive robot. Important ADL tasks have been identified and implemented in a virtual environment. A patient-cooperative control strategy with adaptable freedom in timing and space was developed to assist the patient during the task. The technical feasibility and usability of the system was evaluated with seven healthy subjects and three chronic stroke patients. PMID:21796422

  15. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  16. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  17. MHEALTH INTERVENTION DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Sarah J.; Beck, Susan L.; Pearce, Patricia F.; Chirico, Cristina; Etchevarria, Mirta; Rubinstein, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile Health (mHealth) based interventions have been increasingly used to improve a broad range of health outcomes. However, few researchers have reported on the process or the application of theory to guide the development of mHealth based interventions, or specifically for tuberculosis (TB) treatment management. Aims To describe the steps, process, and considerations in developing a text messaging-based intervention to promote treatment adherence and provide support to patients with active TB. Methods Traditional qualitative techniques, including semi-structured interviews, field notes, content analysis, iterative coding, and thematic analysis, were used to design and document the intervention development with a multidisciplinary team of researchers, clinicians, administrators, and patients who were in active TB treatment. The Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model was used to guide the coding scheme for content analysis of patient-directed TB educational material and intervention development. Results The development steps included: a) establishing intervention components, including justifications, considerations, timing and frequency of components; b) developing educational messages, including cultural adaption, text or short message service (SMS) formatting, and prioritizing message delivery order; and c) determining implementation protocol. A set of 16 IMB-based messages were developed for the educational component. Final intervention development was achieved in 3 months. Conclusion A collaborative approach and application of a theory to guide the intervention design and development is supported. Although a collaborative approach was more time consuming, it resulted in a more responsive, culturally appropriate, and comprehensive intervention. Considerations for developing a text messaging based intervention are provided and may serve as a guide for similar interventions. Further empirical evidence is needed for applying the IMB model

  18. Effects of a Body-Weight Supporting Kite on Sprint Running Kinematics in Well-Trained Sprinters.

    PubMed

    Kratky, Sascha; Buchecker, Michael; Pfusterschmied, Jürgen; Szekely, Csaba; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Data of elite sprinters indicate that faster athletes realize shorter ground contact times compared with slower individuals. Furthermore, the importance of the so-called "front side mechanics" for elite sprint performance is frequently emphasized by researchers and coaches. Recently, it was demonstrated that using a body-weight supporting kite during full-effort sprints in highly trained sprinters leads to a reduction in ground contact time. The aim of this study was to investigate possible negative effects of this body-weight supporting device on sprint running kinematics, which was not clarified in previous studies. Eleven well-trained Austrian sprinters performed flying 20-m sprints under 2 conditions: (a) free sprint (FS); and (b) body-weight supported sprint (BWS). Sprint cycle characteristics were recorded during the high-speed phase by a 16 camera 3D-system (Vicon), an optical acquisition system (Optojump-next), and a high-speed camera. Paired sample t-tests and Cohen's d effect size were used to determine differences between sprinting conditions. Compared with FS, BWS caused a decrease in ground contact time by 5.6% and an increase in air time by 5.5% (both p < 0.001), whereas stride length and rate remained unchanged. Furthermore, a reduced hip joint extension at and after take-off, an increased maximal hip joint flexion (i.e., high knee position), and a smaller horizontal distance of the touchdown to the center of gravity could be observed (all p < 0.01). These results indicate no negative effects on front side mechanics during BWS and that sprinting with a body-weight supporting kite seems to be a highly specific method to reduce ground contact time in well-trained sprinters. PMID:26270692

  19. 77 FR 60679 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for AFTT was made available to the public on May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27742... Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing Activities in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing... Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) study area from January 2014 through January 2019. Pursuant to...

  20. 20 CFR 641.660 - Who is eligible to participate in section 502(e) private sector training activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... community service portion of the program apply for participation in the private sector training activities...(e) private sector training activities? 641.660 Section 641.660 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  1. Interactive Whiteboard Integration in Classrooms: Active Teachers Understanding about Their Training Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Meritxell Cortada; Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    With the incorporation in education of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), emerges the need for a proper teacher training process due to adequate the integration and the didactic use of this tool in the classroom. This article discusses the teachers' perception on the training process for ICT integration. Its main aim is to contribute to the unification of minimum criteria for effective ICT implementation in any training process for active teachers. This case study begins from the development of a training model called Eduticom which was putted into practice in 4 schools in Catalonia, Spain. Findings indicated different teachers' needs such as an appropriate infrastructure, a proper management and a flexible training model which essentially addresses methodological and didactic aspects of IWB uses in the classroom.

  2. Mindfulness Meditation Training for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adulthood: Current Empirical Support, Treatment Overview, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John T.; Zylowska, Lidia; Kollins, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining nonpharmacological interventions for adults diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has expanded in recent years and provides patients with more treatment options. Mindfulness-based training is an example of an intervention that is gaining promising preliminary empirical support and is increasingly administered in clinical settings. The aim of this review is to provide a rationale for the application of mindfulness to individuals diagnosed with ADHD, describe the current state of the empirical basis for mindfulness training in ADHD, and summarize a treatment approach specific to adults diagnosed with ADHD: the Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPs) for ADHD Program. Two case study examples are provided to demonstrate relevant clinical issues for practitioners interested in this approach. Directions for future research, including mindfulness meditation as a standalone treatment and as a complementary approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy, are provided. PMID:25908900

  3. Mouse Visual Neocortex Supports Multiple Stereotyped Patterns of Microcircuit Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sadovsky, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Spiking correlations between neocortical neurons provide insight into the underlying synaptic connectivity that defines cortical microcircuitry. Here, using two-photon calcium fluorescence imaging, we observed the simultaneous dynamics of hundreds of neurons in slices of mouse primary visual cortex (V1). Consistent with a balance of excitation and inhibition, V1 dynamics were characterized by a linear scaling between firing rate and circuit size. Using lagged firing correlations between neurons, we generated functional wiring diagrams to evaluate the topological features of V1 microcircuitry. We found that circuit connectivity exhibited both cyclic graph motifs, indicating recurrent wiring, and acyclic graph motifs, indicating feedforward wiring. After overlaying the functional wiring diagrams onto the imaged field of view, we found properties consistent with Rentian scaling: wiring diagrams were topologically efficient because they minimized wiring with a modular architecture. Within single imaged fields of view, V1 contained multiple discrete circuits that were overlapping and highly interdigitated but were still distinct from one another. The majority of neurons that were shared between circuits displayed peri-event spiking activity whose timing was specific to the active circuit, whereas spike times for a smaller percentage of neurons were invariant to circuit identity. These data provide evidence that V1 microcircuitry exhibits balanced dynamics, is efficiently arranged in anatomical space, and is capable of supporting a diversity of multineuron spike firing patterns from overlapping sets of neurons. PMID:24899701

  4. Organizational factors and mental health in community volunteers. The role of exposure, preparation, training, tasks assigned, and support.

    PubMed

    Thormar, Sigridur Bjork; Gersons, Berthold P R; Juen, Barbara; Djakababa, Maria Nelden; Karlsson, Thorlakur; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    During disasters, aid organizations often respond using the resources of local volunteer members from the affected population who are not only inexperienced, but who additionally take on some of the more psychologically and physically difficult tasks in order to provide support for their community. Although not much empirical evidence exists to justify the claim, it is thought that preparation, training, and organizational support limit (or reduce) a volunteer's risk of developing later psychopathology. In this study, we examined the effects of preparation, training, and organizational support and assigned tasks on the mental health of 506 Indonesian Red Cross volunteers who participated in the response to a massive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2006. Controlling for exposure level, the volunteers were assessed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and subjective health complaints (SHCs) 6, 12, and 18 months post-disaster. Results showed high levels of PTSD and SHCs up to 18 months post-disaster, while anxiety and depression levels remained in the normal range. Higher levels of exposure as well as certain tasks (e.g., provision of psychosocial support to beneficiaries, handling administration, or handing out food aid) made the volunteers more vulnerable. Sense of safety, expressed general need for support at 6 months, and a lack of perceived support from team leaders and the organization were also related to greater psychopathology at 18 months. The results highlight the importance of studying organizational factors. By incorporating these results into future volunteer management programs the negative effects of disaster work on volunteers can be ameliorated. PMID:23205850

  5. Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Southam, Anna C; Kuo, Yi-Ling; Lee, Ya-Yun; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-04-13

    It has been proposed that strengthening and skill training of gluteus maximus (GM) may be beneficial in treating various knee injuries. Given the redundancy of the hip musculature and the small representational area of GM in the primary motor cortex (M1), learning to activate this muscle before prescribing strength exercises and modifying movement strategy would appear to be important. This study aimed to determine whether a short-term activation training program targeting the GM results in neuroplastic changes in M1. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were obtained in 12 healthy individuals at different stimulation intensities while they performed a double-leg bridge. Participants then completed a home exercise program for ∼1 h/day for 6 days that consisted of a single exercise designed to selectively target the GM. Baseline and post-training input-output curves (IOCs) were generated by graphing average MEP amplitudes and cortical silent period durations against corresponding stimulation intensities. Following the GM activation training, the linear slope of both the MEP IOC and cortical silent period IOC increased significantly. Short-term GM activation training resulted in a significant increase in corticomotor excitability as well as changes in inhibitory processes of the GM. We propose that the observed corticomotor plasticity will enable better utilization of the GM in the more advanced stages of a rehabilitation/training program. PMID:26981714

  6. Cultivating Research Skills: An interdisciplinary approach in training and supporting energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, H.; Carbajales-Dale, P.; Alschbach, E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience and energy research has essentially separate and diverse tracks and traditions, making the education process labor-intensive and burdensome. Using a combined forces approach to training, a multidisciplinary workshop on information and data sources and research skills was developed and offered through several departments at Stanford University. The popular workshops taught required skills to scientists - giving training on new technologies, access to restricted energy-related scientific and government databases, search strategies for data-driven resources, and visualization and geospatial analytics. Feedback and data suggest these workshops were fundamental as they set the foundation for subsequent learning opportunities for students and faculty. This session looks at the integration of the information workshops within multiple energy and geoscience programs and the importance of formally cultivating research and information skills.

  7. Psychological First Aid: A Consensus-Derived, Empirically Supported, Competency-Based Training Model

    PubMed Central

    Everly, George S.; Brown, Lisa M.; Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Abd Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Tallchief, Vicki L.; Links, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Surges in demand for professional mental health services occasioned by disasters represent a major public health challenge. To build response capacity, numerous psychological first aid (PFA) training models for professional and lay audiences have been developed that, although often concurring on broad intervention aims, have not systematically addressed pedagogical elements necessary for optimal learning or teaching. We describe a competency-based model of PFA training developed under the auspices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Schools of Public Health. We explain the approach used for developing and refining the competency set and summarize the observable knowledge, skills, and attitudes underlying the 6 core competency domains. We discuss the strategies for model dissemination, validation, and adoption in professional and lay communities. PMID:23865656

  8. A novel electronic assessment strategy to support applied Drosophila genetics training in university courses.

    PubMed

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The advent of "omic" technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353-358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation. PMID:25717150

  9. A Novel Electronic Assessment Strategy to Support Applied Drosophila Genetics Training in University Courses

    PubMed Central

    Fostier, Maggy; Patel, Sanjai; Clarke, Samantha; Prokop, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The advent of “omic” technologies has revolutionized genetics and created a demand to focus classical genetics on its present-day applications (Redfield, 2012, PLoS Biol 10: e1001356). This demand can be met by training students in Drosophila mating scheme design, which is an important problem-solving skill routinely applied in many modern research laboratories. It promotes a thorough understanding and application of classical genetics rules and introduces to transgenic technologies and the use of model organisms. As we show here, such training can be implemented as a flexible and concise module (~1-day home study, ~8-hour course time) on university courses by using our previously published training package designed for fly researchers (Roote and Prokop, 2013, G3 (Bethesda) 3: 353−358). However, assessing this training to make it an accredited course element is difficult, especially in large courses. Here, we present a powerful assessment strategy based on a novel hybrid concept in which students solve crossing tasks initially on paper and then answer automatically marked questions on the computer (1.5 hours total). This procedure can be used to examine student performance on more complex tasks than conventional e-assessments and is more versatile, time-saving, and fairer than standard paper-based assignments. Our evaluation shows that the hybrid assessment is effective and reliably detects varying degrees of understanding among students. It also may be applicable in other disciplines requiring complex problem solving, such as mathematics, chemistry, physics, or informatics. Here, we describe our strategies in detail and provide all resources needed for their implementation. PMID:25717150

  10. Experiential Learning Through Participatory Action Research in Public Health Supports Community-Based Training of Future Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Lisa K.; Lipus, Adam C.; Choate, Laurie; Smith, Jamie; Coppola, Leigh; Cameron, William E.; Shannon, Jackilen

    2016-01-01

    Engaging community members in research can help cultivate effective partnerships while providing experiential training and continuing education opportunities. Several studies have involved communities in this way, though many have been small in the scale of community involvement or have included little detail of the institutional review board process by which community members became approved researchers in the study. This article presents findings on an evaluation of the training procedures and experiences of 703 first-time community-based volunteer researchers who were recruited in their communities and trained on-site to enroll research participants, collect data, and provide individualized consultation of results at travelling health education and research fairs. Open-ended registration prompts and postfair surveys assessed volunteers’ reasons for participating, comfort with their volunteer experiences, and attitudes toward the biomedical research process. An open-ended survey assessed two key community partners’ perspectives about their organizations’ involvement with supporting the research throughout the process. Volunteers reported their experience to be a unique training opportunity, citing its ability to help them engage with their community, advance research, and obtain additional experience in their health field of interest, particularly nursing, allied health, and medicine-related careers. Community partners cited that their community’s participation as volunteer researchers served as a tool to educate the larger community about research, which enabled other research projects to gain acceptance. Together, these results demonstrate that using volunteer researchers can strengthen community research partnerships while providing valuable training experience in public health research for current and aspiring health personnel. PMID:27536722

  11. [Proposal of a conceptual method of supportive care for co-active patients].

    PubMed

    Abidli, Yamine; Piette, Danielle; Casini, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus on the importance for health professionals to support co-active patients. However, in practice, very few "patient care partnership" approaches have been developed. We hypothesized that the lack of investment in supporting patient care partnerships is due to the lack of interest in the skills needed by caregivers to provide such support. This paper intends to address thisgap. The patient care partnership method is studied, adapted and developed from existing models. It complements, harmonizes and integrates various schools of thought arising from the need to place the patient at the center of care and life in general. The patient care partnership method includes 7 stages during which the professional accompanies the patient through the process of care. The methodological approach for training professionals is designed to ensure that professionals experience the change as well as its difficulties of the change they expect from the patient in the care relationship. This method now needs to be validated by the experience of other professionals in order define the limits of application and to allow further development. PMID:26168615

  12. Methods for a Randomized Trial of Weight-Supported Treadmill Training versus Conventional Training for Walking during Inpatient Rehabilitation after Incomplete Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Apple, David; Barbeau, Hugues; Basso, Michele; Behrman, Andrea; Deforge, Dan; Ditunno, John; Dudley, Gary; Elashoff, Robert; Fugate, Lisa; Harkema, Susan; Saulino, Michael; Scott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the rationale and methodology for the first prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a task-oriented walking intervention for subjects during early rehabilitation for an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The experimental strategy, body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT), allows physical therapists to systematically train patients to walk on a treadmill at increasing speeds typical of community ambulation with increasing weight bearing. The therapists provide verbal and tactile cues to facilitate the kinematic, kinetic, and temporal features of walking. Subjects were randomly assigned to a conventional therapy program for mobility versus the same intensity and duration of a combination of BWSTT and over-ground locomotor retraining. Subjects had an incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association grades B, C, and D) from C-4 to T-10 (upper motoneuron group) or from T-11 to L-3 (lower motoneuron group). Within 8 weeks of a SCI, 146 subjects were entered for 12 weeks of intervention. The 2 single-blinded primary outcome measures are the level of independence for ambulation and, for those who are able to walk, the maximal speed for walking 50 feet, tested 6 and 12 months after randomization. The trial’s methodology offers a model for the feasibility of translating neuroscientific experiments into a RCT to develop evidence-based rehabilitation practices. PMID:14503436

  13. Cellular immune activity in response to increased training of elite oarsmen prior to Olympic competition.

    PubMed

    Jakeman, P M; Weller, A; Warrington, G

    1995-06-01

    This study investigated the changes in urinary neopterin, a biochemical marker of cellular immune activity, in elite male rowers undertaking a progressive increase in training prior to Olympic competition. Twenty-seven male rowers of the 1992 Great Britain team provided daily urine samples for a 4-week period of training that included 17 days of altitude training and 10 days of heat acclimatization. The mean (+/- S.D.) ratio of neopterin/creatinine in urine increased from pre-training values of 135 +/- 32 to a peak of 219 +/- 121 mumol neopterin per mol creatinine on day 19 of training (P < 0.05). Changes in the ratio of neopterin/creatinine with training were found to be transient and highly variable between subjects, ranging from no change to peak values five-fold greater than baseline. On the basis of the in vivo measurement of cell-mediated immunity employed in this study, we conclude that elite athletes engaged in high-intensity training prior to competition show either no change or a moderate increase in cellular immune activation. PMID:7563287

  14. Changes in the exercise activation of diencephalic and brainstem cardiorespiratory areas after training.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Gilbert, Andrea B; Waldrop, Tony G; Iwamoto, Gary A

    2002-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise training changes the extent or pattern of activation of areas in the central nervous system (CNS) involved in cardiorespiratory control. Rats that spontaneously trained on running wheels for 80-100 days were compared to rats that were not provided an opportunity to exercise. Selected brain regions including the hypothalamic and mesencephalic locomotor regions, and ventrolateral medulla were studied using c-Fos-like immunocytochemistry. A single test bout of exercise evoked significantly less activation as indicated by Fos labeling in the posterior (caudal) hypothalamic area, periaqueductal gray, nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the trained rats when compared to sedentary rats. These results are consistent with the concept that the nervous system changes its responses to a given level of exercise after training. These changes may also be related to perceived exertion. PMID:12176165

  15. Strength Training Improves Body Image and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Midlife and Older Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Eldridge, Galen; Lynch, Wesley; Paul, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of strength training on body image is understudied. The Strong Women Program, a 10-week, twice weekly strength-training program, was provided by Extension agents to 341 older rural women (62±12 years); changes in body image and other psychosocial variables were evaluated. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to assess mean differences pre- to post-program. Strength training was associated with significant improvements in several dimensions of body image, health-related quality of life, and physical activity behaviors, satisfaction, and comfort among rural aging women—an often underserved population that stands to benefit considerably from similar programs. PMID:25767297

  16. Training Frontline Staff. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    This four-part workbook will help program leaders teach education specialists the principles, processes, and skills necessary to deliver effective Supported Education services. The workbook includes the following: (1) Basic elements and practice principles of Supported Education; (2) Knowledge and skills to help consumers make informed choices…

  17. How Technology for Comprehension Training Can Support Conversation towards the Joint Construction of Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Nicola; Pearce, Darren; Kerawalla, Lucinda; Harris, Amanda; Luckin, Rosemary

    2009-01-01

    Two studies assessed the role of Separate Control of Shared Space (SCoSS) technology in supporting peer collaborative discussion and comprehension. We hypothesised that providing equitable shared input to two literacy tasks (both good predictors of comprehension skill) would support discussion to promote the joint construction of meaning, and…

  18. Walking the Talk: A Study of Training in Five National Family Support Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Rice, Rena

    Although family support programs vary in program goals and service delivery, their common features constitute an approach for working with families. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to gather basic information about how programs prepare their staff to use the family support approach and to identify commonalities and differences in their…

  19. Coordinator's Training Guide. Research & Development Series No. 119-A. Career Planning Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaltry, Paul; Kester, Ralph J.

    One of a set of twelve documents describing the Career Planning Support System (CPSS) and its use, this guide is designed to help the CPSS coordinator become familiar with CPSS and his or her role. (The Career Planning Support System is a comprehensive guidance program management system which (1) provides techniques to improve a high school's…

  20. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  1. Utilization and Training of Speech-Language Pathology Support Personnel To Enhance Services for Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillow, Gary L.

    This practicum involved the development and delivery of a three semester hour community college course for five speech-language pathology (SLP) support personnel assisting in a preschool setting. The practicum addressed the specific problem that support personnel did not demonstrate independent and effective instructional strategies when…

  2. Fall Detection with the Support Vector Machine during Scripted and Continuous Unscripted Activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Chang

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the number of proposed fall-detection systems that have been developed has increased dramatically. A threshold-based algorithm utilizing an accelerometer has been used to detect low-complexity falling activities. In this study, we defined activities in which the body's center of gravity quickly declines as falling activities of daily life (ADLs). In the non-falling ADLs, we also focused on the body's center of gravity. A hyperplane of the support vector machine (SVM) was used as the separating plane to replace the traditional threshold method for the detection of falling ADLs. The scripted and continuous unscripted activities were performed by two groups of young volunteers (20 subjects) and one group of elderly volunteers (five subjects). The results showed that the four parameters of the input vector had the best accuracy with 99.1% and 98.4% in the training and testing, respectively. For the continuous unscripted test of one hour, there were two and one false positive events among young volunteers and elderly volunteers, respectively. PMID:23112713

  3. Comparison of Activity Profiles and Physiological Demands Between International Rugby Sevens Matches and Training.

    PubMed

    Higham, Dean G; Pyne, David B; Anson, Judith M; Hopkins, Will G; Eddy, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The specificity of contemporary training practices of international rugby sevens players is unknown. We quantified the positional group-specific activity profiles and physiological demands of on-field training activities and compared these with match demands. Twenty-two international matches and 63 rugby-specific training drills were monitored in 25 backs and 17 forwards from a national squad of male rugby sevens players over a 21-month period. Drills were classified into 3 categories: low-intensity skill refining (n = 23 drills, 560 observations), moderate- to high-intensity skill refining (n = 28 drills, 600 observations), and game simulation (n = 12 drills, 365 observations). Movement patterns (via Global Positioning System devices) and physiological load (via heart rate monitors) were recorded for all activities, and the differences between training and matches were quantified using magnitude-based inferential statistics. Distance covered in total and at ≥3.5 m·s, maximal velocity, and frequency of accelerations and decelerations were lower for forwards during competition compared with those for backs by a small but practically important magnitude. No clear positional group differences were observed for physiological load during matches. Training demands exceeded match demands only for frequency of decelerations of forwards during moderate- to high-intensity skill-refining drills and only by a small amount. Accelerations and distance covered at ≥6 m·s were closer to match values for forwards than for backs during all training activities, but training drills consistently fell below the demands of international competition. Coaches could therefore improve physical and physiological specificity by increasing the movement demands and intensity of training drills. PMID:27100167

  4. Exploring the Relationship of Religiosity, Religious Support, and Social Support Among African American Women in a Physical Activity Intervention Program

    PubMed Central

    Story, Chandra R.; Knutson, Douglas; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.

    2016-01-01

    Religious belief has been linked to a variety of positive mental and physical health outcomes. This exploratory study will address the relationship between religious involvement and social connectedness among African American women. Results from a physical activity intervention research project (N = 465) found that total religious support and social support were significantly negatively correlated with total religiosity, while total general social support was significantly positively correlated with total religious support. Overall, the study indicates that more research is needed on ways to encourage interaction between the positive dimensions of both religiosity and social support to bring about healthy behaviors. PMID:25673181

  5. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  6. Education and Training that Meets the Needs of Small Business: List of 198 Studies with Abstracts and Reasons for Exclusion. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawe, Susan; Naidu, Radhika; Harris, Lee-Ann

    2007-01-01

    This document lists 198 studies with abstracts and reasons for exclusion in support of the main report, "Education and Training that Meets the Needs of Small Business: A Systematic Review of Research" (ED499699). [This work has been produced with funding provided through the Australian Department of Education, Science and Training. For a related…

  7. Lags in Training Response to Changes in Economic Activity: An Exploratory Inquiry for Five Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Ross E.; Park, Jin S.; Akdere, Mesut

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the length of time it takes training budgets in five industries to respond to changes in the demand for their services/activity and for their speed of response to changes in productive activity. The results indicate that for the industries studied, the length of lag between change in demand and median adjustment to that…

  8. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  9. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  10. Professional Activities, Needed Competencies and Training Needs of Medical Librarians in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal; Bakhtar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to explore the professional activities, needed competencies and education/training needs of medical librarians in Pakistan. The following questions guided the study: what are the current professional activities of medical librarians in Pakistan? What is their perception of the competencies needed of medical librarians? And what are…

  11. Classroom-Directed Home Training Activities. Preschool Program: A Regional Demonstration Program for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jacquelyn O.

    One of 10 documents developed for preschool programs for handicapped children, the manual presents classroom directed home training activities. The activities are based on such principles as the effectiveness of home instruction by a parent and the need for a parent to feel responsibility for the child's learning. Intended to provide teachers of…

  12. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section C--Drive Train.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Five learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of drive train in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these five units: (1) clutch assembly, (2) standard transmission, (3) drive lines, (4) rear axle,…

  13. Community College Involvement in Contract Training and Other Economic Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert; And Others

    In 1989-90, a national survey was conducted to assess the scope and nature of contract training and other economic development activities at community colleges and technical institutes. The survey was sent to a random sample of 246 community colleges, requesting information on the colleges' workforce and economic development activities in 1988-89.…

  14. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (Ramp): Training Persons with Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Cameron J.; Skrajner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders'…

  15. Change in performance in response to training load adjustment based on autonomic activity.

    PubMed

    Botek, M; McKune, A J; Krejci, J; Stejskal, P; Gaba, A

    2014-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess performance (Perf) changes in response to a new training strategy. Specifically, based on spectral analysis of heart rate variability (SA HRV) to determine autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, training doses were adjusted to maintain vagal activity at a high and relatively stable level during training preparation. Trained athletes (5 male and 5 female) aged 23.2±4.2 years voluntarily participated in the study. ANS activity was assessed during an orthoclinostatic test, and was represented by calculating HRV variables and a total score index. Over 17 weeks, improvement (1.4-8.5%) and deterioration (0.1-8.8%) in Perf were detected in 7 and 3 athletes, respectively. A relationship (rs=0.684; P<0.05) between the change in Perf (ΔPerf) and supine PHF during season was found. Supine HRV indices (PHF, PT, and MSSD) for the last 3 weeks of the HRV-adjusting period correlated (rs=0.636; 0.648; 0.648, P<0.05) with ΔPerf. Based on the results, a high and relative stable vagal activity during preparation may indicate a readiness to train or appropriate recovery that positively affects Perf. In conclusion, daily quantification of ANS activity by SA HRV seems to be a promising tool for the enhancement of Perf. PMID:24129989

  16. Comparison of Support Vector Machine, Neural Network, and CART Algorithms for the Land-Cover Classification Using Limited Training Data Points

    EPA Science Inventory

    Support vector machine (SVM) was applied for land-cover characterization using MODIS time-series data. Classification performance was examined with respect to training sample size, sample variability, and landscape homogeneity (purity). The results were compared to two convention...

  17. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  18. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  19. Strength training reduces arterial blood pressure but not sympathetic neural activity in young normotensive subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Downs, Emily M.; Cooke, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of resistance training on arterial blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at rest have not been established. Although endurance training is commonly recommended to lower arterial blood pressure, it is not known whether similar adaptations occur with resistance training. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that whole body resistance training reduces arterial blood pressure at rest, with concomitant reductions in MSNA. Twelve young [21 +/- 0.3 (SE) yr] subjects underwent a program of whole body resistance training 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Resting arterial blood pressure (n = 12; automated sphygmomanometer) and MSNA (n = 8; peroneal nerve microneurography) were measured during a 5-min period of supine rest before and after exercise training. Thirteen additional young (21 +/- 0.8 yr) subjects served as controls. Resistance training significantly increased one-repetition maximum values in all trained muscle groups (P < 0.001), and it significantly decreased systolic (130 +/- 3 to 121 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01), diastolic (69 +/- 3 to 61 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.04), and mean (89 +/- 2 to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01) arterial blood pressures at rest. Resistance training did not affect MSNA or heart rate. Arterial blood pressures and MSNA were unchanged, but heart rate increased after 8 wk of relative inactivity for subjects in the control group (61 +/- 2 to 67 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.01). These results indicate that whole body resistance exercise training might decrease the risk for development of cardiovascular disease by lowering arterial blood pressure but that reductions of pressure are not coupled to resistance exercise-induced decreases of sympathetic tone.

  20. Active control of train bogies with MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotoohi, Abbas; Yousefi-Koma, Aghil; Yasrebi, Naser

    2006-03-01

    This research is conducted to demonstrate the advantages of skyhook semi-active dampers in railway vehicle suspension systems. This semi- active suspension system consists of four actuators on each bogie that locate in the secondary suspension position instead of passive dampers. Employing equations of skyhook control scheme, the semi- active damping force (actuator force) is determined by absolute velocity of car body instead of relative velocity. An integration of a control design tool, i.e. MATLAB, together with a tool for railway vehicle simulation, i.e. ADAMS/Rail is utilized for modeling and control analysis simultaneously. Analysis has been performed on a traditional bogie model with passive secondary suspension and on a new bogie model with semi-active suspension. The effects of suspension system on displacement and acceleration in passenger seats have been investigated in various points of car body. Results show that the semi-active suspension improves the ride comfort by reducing accelerations, in comparison with passive model. Finally, according to the damper force obtained from Sky-hook controller, a Magnetorheological (MR) damper has been designed for the semi-active suspension system.

  1. Radiation-pressure-supported obscuring tori around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pier, Edward A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation pressure acting on dust grains can support the vertical thickness of the obscuring tori believed to exist in active galactic nuclei. Using the results of 2D radiation transfer calculations, we evaluate the radiation force acting on these tori. We find that on the inner edge of the torus the radiation force is about 350 l(E) times the gravitational force of the nucleus, where l(E) is the Eddington ratio. Beyond a few torus heights from the inner edge, the radiation force is negligible with respect to gravity. However, between these two extremes lies a region of considerable size where the ratio of radiation force to gravity is nearly constant and can be of order unity for l(E) about 0.1. If the distribution of material within the torus is sufficiently lumpy, there is a significant time-varying component to the radiation force. This drives the random motions of the constituent clouds, thickening the torus at lower values of l(E).

  2. Theoretical study of carbon dioxide activation by metals (Co, Cu, Ni) supported on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Van Khu, Le; Cam, Le Minh

    2015-12-01

    The activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by catalytic systems comprising a transition metal (Co, Cu,Ni) on an activated carbon (AC) support was investigated using a combination of different theoretical calculation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, DFT and DFT-D, molecular dynamics (MD), and a climbing image nudged elastic band (CI-NEB) method. The results obtained indicate that CO2 is easily adsorbed by AC or MAC (M: Cu, Co, Ni). The results also showed that the process of adsorbing CO2 does not involve a transition state, and that NiAC and CoAC are the most effective of the MAC catalysts at adsorbing CO2. Adsorption on NiAC led to the strongest activation of the C-O bond, while adsorption on CuAC led to the weakest activation. Graphical Abstract Models of CO2 activation on: a)- activated carbon; b)- metal supported activated carbon (M-AC), where M: Co, Cu, Ni. PMID:26637187

  3. The influence of family-supportive supervisor training on employee job performance and attitudes: An organizational work-family intervention.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Hammer, Leslie B; Crain, Tori L; Bodner, Todd E

    2016-07-01

    Training supervisors to increase their family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) has demonstrated significant benefits for employee physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among employees with high levels of family-to-work conflict in prior research in a grocery store context. We replicate and extend these results in a health care setting with additional important employee outcomes (i.e., employee engagement, organizational commitment, and supervisor ratings of job performance), and consider the role of the 4 dimensions underlying the FSSB. Using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 143 health care employees completed surveys at 2 time periods approximately 10 months apart, along with their supervisors who provided ratings of employees' job performance. Between these surveys, we offered their supervisors FSSB training; 86 (71%) of these supervisors participated. Results demonstrated significant and beneficial indirect effects of FSSB training on changes in employee job performance, organizational commitment, engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions through changes in employee perceptions of their supervisor's overall FSSBs. Further analyses suggest that these indirect effects are due primarily to changes in the creative work-family management dimension of FSSB. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26652264

  4. Predicting Child Physical Activity and Screen Time: Parental Support for Physical Activity and General Parenting Styles

    PubMed Central

    Crain, A. Lauren; Senso, Meghan M.; Levy, Rona L.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between parenting styles and practices and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time. Methods: Participants were children (6.9 ± 1.8 years) with a body mass index in the 70–95th percentile and their parents (421 dyads). Parent-completed questionnaires assessed parental support for child physical activity (PA), parenting styles and child screen time. Children wore accelerometers to assess MVPA. Results: Parenting style did not predict MVPA, but support for PA did (positive association). The association between support and MVPA, moreover, varied as a function of permissive parenting. For parents high in permissiveness, the association was positive (greater support was related to greater MVPA and therefore protective). For parents low in permissiveness, the association was neutral; support did not matter. Authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were both associated with greater screen time. Conclusions: Parenting practices and styles should be considered jointly, offering implications for tailored interventions. PMID:24812256

  5. Four Residents' Narratives on Abortion Training: A Residency Climate of Reflection, Support, and Mutual Respect.

    PubMed

    Singer, Janet; Fiascone, Stephen; Huber, Warren J; Hunter, Tiffany C; Sperling, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The decision on the part of obstetrics and gynecology residents to opt in or out of abortion training is, for many, a complex one. Although the public debate surrounding abortion can be filled with polarizing rhetoric, residents often discover that the boundaries between pro-choice and pro-life beliefs are not so neatly divided. We present narratives from four residents, training at a 32-resident program in the Northeast, who have a range of views surrounding abortion. Their stories reveal how some struggle with the real-life experience of providing abortions, while others feel angst over lacking the skills to terminate a life-threatening pregnancy. These residents have found that close relationships with coworkers from all sides of this issue, along with a residency program that encourages open conversation, have fostered understanding. Their narratives demonstrate that reasonable providers can disagree fundamentally and still work effectively with one another and that the close relationships formed in residency can allow both sides to see beyond the black and white of the public abortion debate. Our objectives in this commentary are to encourage a more nuanced discussion of abortion among obstetrician-gynecologists, to describe the aspects of our residency program that facilitate open dialogue and respect across diverse viewpoints, and to demonstrate that the clear distinction between being pro-life and pro-choice often breaks down when one is immediately responsible for the care of pregnant women. PMID:26241256

  6. The private sector: A global pool of technical talent for remote sensing training and program support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. D.

    The growing global pool of highly trained, technical talent in the private sector throughout the world reflects the degree of maturation that remote sensing from air and space vehicles has undergone, especially during the past ten years. This has been further spawned by the US Government move to commercialize the Landsat system. The number of qualified technicians and scientists has grown in proportion to the amount of data that has become available for public and private use. Applications of the data have matured from research investigations to operational use in many disciplines and geographic areas. Private and public industry corporations have established their own image processing and analytical laboratories to ensure their competitive positions. This has been further enhanced by the simultaneous availability of lower cost, analytical computer systems. Training and operational project development remain prominent objectives. While these are all very positive aspects a note of caution must be raised. Concern has recently been expressed by representatives of developing nations that not enough attention is given by remote sensing specialists to spelling out the limitations of the sensing systems or qualifying the degree of accuracy of the results obtained. Such criticisms are probably justified and it is recommended that remote sensing workers be mindful of such concerns.

  7. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    Progress made in the current year is listed, and the following papers are included in the appendix: Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of an Auxiliary Bearing Supported Rotor System; Dynamic Behavior of a Magnetic Bearing Supported Jet Engine Rotor with Auxiliary Bearings; Dynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of a Magnetic Bearing Rotor System with Auxiliary Bearings; and Synchronous Dynamics of a Coupled Shaft/Bearing/Housing System with Auxiliary Support from a Clearance Bearing: Analysis and Experiment.

  8. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients’ Affected Side Lower Extremity’s Walking Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity’s walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. PMID:25540499

  9. Entrainment of chaotic activities in brain and heart during MBSR mindfulness training.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Fan, Jicong; Wu, Bonnie Wai Yan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chang, Chunqi; Hung, Yeung-Sam; Fung, Peter Chin Wan; Sik, Hin Hung

    2016-03-11

    The activities of the brain and the heart are dynamic, chaotic, and possibly intrinsically coordinated. This study aims to investigate the effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program on the chaoticity of electronic activities of the brain and the heart, and to explore their potential correlation. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded at the beginning of an 8-week standard MBSR training course and after the course. EEG spectrum analysis was carried out, wavelet entropies (WE) of EEG (together with reconstructed cortical sources) and heart rate were calculated, and their correlation was investigated. We found enhancement of EEG power of alpha and beta waves and lowering of delta waves power during MBSR training state as compared to normal resting state. Wavelet entropy analysis indicated that MBSR mindfulness meditation could reduce the chaotic activities of both EEG and heart rate as a change of state. However, longitudinal change of trait may need more long-term training. For the first time, our data demonstrated that the chaotic activities of the brain and the heart became more coordinated during MBSR training, suggesting that mindfulness training may increase the entrainment between mind and body. The 3D brain regions involved in the change in mental states were identified. PMID:26784361

  10. Person-Centred Active Support--Increasing Choice, Promoting Independence and Reducing Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Whelton, Beckie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has found that active support is effective at increasing levels of participation in activities and supporting a good quality of life for people with intellectual disabilities. However, there has been little research on the effect of active support on other outcome measures. Methods: This study uses observational…

  11. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  12. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  13. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama....763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area is... enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama City Florida, and such agencies as...

  14. Comparison of the quality of basic life support provided by rescuers trained using the 2005 or 2010 ERC guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Effective delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and prompt defibrillation following sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is vital. Updated guidelines for adult basic life support (BLS) were published in 2010 by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in an effort to improve survival following SCA. There has been little assessment of the ability of rescuers to meet the standards outlined within these new guidelines. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the performance of first year healthcare students trained and assessed using either the new 2010 ERC guidelines or their 2005 predecessor, within the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. All students were trained as lay rescuers during a standardised eight hour ERC-accredited adult BLS course. Results We analysed the examination records of 1091 students. Of these, 561 were trained and assessed using the old 2005 ERC guidelines and 530 using the new 2010 guidelines. A significantly greater proportion of candidates failed in the new guideline group (16.04% vs. 11.05%; p < 0.05), reflecting a significantly greater proportion of lay-rescuers performing chest compressions at too fast a rate when trained and assessed with the 2010 rather than 2005 guidelines (6.04% vs. 2.67%; p < 0.05). Error rates for other skills did not differ between guideline groups. Conclusions The new ERC guidelines lead to a greater proportion of lay rescuers performing chest compressions at an erroneously fast rate and may therefore worsen BLS efficacy. Additional study is required in order to define the clinical impact of compressions performed to a greater depth and at too fast a rate. PMID:22876933

  15. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played “Fruit Ninja” on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1–2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven’s Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers. PMID:26395158

  16. Effects of military training activities on shrub-steppe raptors in southwestern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; Carpenter, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (Pa??a??a??0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (Pa??>a??0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (Pa??activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity.

  17. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played "Fruit Ninja" on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1-2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven's Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers. PMID:26395158

  18. Effects of Military Training Activities on Shrub-steppe Raptors in Southwestern Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    LEHMAN; STEENHOF; KOCHERT; CARPENTER

    1999-04-01

    / Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (P &le 0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (P > 0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (P < 0.001). In 1993, distances from occupied burrowing owl nests to firing ranges used early in the year were similar to those from random points to the same firing ranges (P = 0.16). Military activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity. KEY WORDS: Distribution; Military impacts; Nesting success; Raptors; Relative abundance; Shrub-steppe PMID:9950702

  19. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  20. Basic Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.115.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. This is the first of a three module series and considers definition of terms, design…