Science.gov

Sample records for active supportive care

  1. [Nutrition, lifestyle, physical activity, and supportive care during chemotherapeutic treatment].

    PubMed

    Lümmen, G; Jäger, T; Sommer, F; Ebert, T; Schmitz-Draeger, B

    2006-05-01

    With improvements in cancer survival rates, more patients with cancer are living longer and the influence of nutrition, lifestyle, physical activity as well as supportive care during and after chemotherapy is of increasing interest. In several malignancies smoking cessation increases cancer survival. Similar effects are expected by healthy nutrition. Regular physical activity of cancer patients reduces drug interactions of chemotherapy, decreases the number of comorbid conditions, and helps patients maintain independence as long as possible. For supportive care during chemotherapy the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are more effective for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. There are several colony-stimulating factors (e.g. GCSF, erythropoietin) for hematopoietic recovery post-chemotherapy. Altogether supportive care of chemotherapy reduces toxicity and increases efficacy.

  2. Supportive Care.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Pia Riis; Lorenzo, Rosalía

    2016-01-01

    This chapter takes its point of departure in psychosocial aspects of supportive care in adolescent and young adult cancer care. The purpose is to describe some of the challenges that these young people face following a cancer diagnosis and guide healthcare professionals in how to provide care that improves the quality of life. In most hospitals and healthcare systems, adolescents and young adults are cared for and treated in settings for children or adults. Accordingly, healthcare professionals may lack attention to and knowledge about what characterize young peoples' life situation, their special needs and how to meet them. The topics we include in the chapter are the following: the youth friendly environment, social support and social network, parents, information during a psychosocial crisis event, the use of HEADSS, peer support, fertility, body image and self-esteem, after treatment and future challenges and palliative and end of life care. PMID:27595353

  3. [Proposal of a conceptual method of supportive care for co-active patients].

    PubMed

    Abidli, Yamine; Piette, Danielle; Casini, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus on the importance for health professionals to support co-active patients. However, in practice, very few "patient care partnership" approaches have been developed. We hypothesized that the lack of investment in supporting patient care partnerships is due to the lack of interest in the skills needed by caregivers to provide such support. This paper intends to address thisgap. The patient care partnership method is studied, adapted and developed from existing models. It complements, harmonizes and integrates various schools of thought arising from the need to place the patient at the center of care and life in general. The patient care partnership method includes 7 stages during which the professional accompanies the patient through the process of care. The methodological approach for training professionals is designed to ensure that professionals experience the change as well as its difficulties of the change they expect from the patient in the care relationship. This method now needs to be validated by the experience of other professionals in order define the limits of application and to allow further development. PMID:26168615

  4. Empowering Parents: Developing Support, Leadership, Advocacy, and Activism. Child Care Action Campaign Issue Brief #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurie; Anderson, Candice

    This report from a 1995 Child Care Action Campaign national audioconference examines approaches to empowering parents through developing support, leadership, advocacy, and activism to better enable low-income parents to become effective change agents. The report describes the experiences of three parent programs, which found that parents typically…

  5. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P < .001). The risk ratio of achieving and maintaining the goal blood pressure in patients of active care management group was 5.44, CI (3.2-9.9; P = .005). Implementation of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  6. [Yearly change of the relationship between the place of death and activity of home care supporting clinics in Tokyo, Japan].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    We examined a yearly change of the relationship between the place of death and the activity of home care supporting clinics(HCSC)in Tokyo, Japan. The number of HCSCs by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare has edged up slightly from 1, 166 in 2008 to 1, 246 in 2010. The number of total patients provided the care by HCSC has increased by 24. 4% from 2009 to 2010. There was a 9. 3% increase in the patients provided the care by HCSC, and died at home from 2009 to 2010. These results suggested that the home care support system has proceeded gradually in Tokyo, Japan.

  7. [Relationship between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Akiko; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Mikami, Hiroshi

    2010-12-01

    We examined the relation between the activity of home care supporting clinics and the place of death in Tokyo, Japan. Of 1,209 clinics certified home care supporting clinics by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, 9.1% were not functioning for a year and 34.7% of them did not deal with patient's home death. Of patients who died at home, 64.3% utilized home care supporting clinics which dealt with 11 or more patient's death at home per year.

  8. [Analyses of the activities of home care supporting clinics in Tokyo from the standpoint of place of death].

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Chihiro; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Akiyama, Akiko

    2013-12-01

    We examined the activities of home care supporting clinics (HCSC) in Tokyo, Japan, from the standpoint of the place of death. The number of HCSCs in Tokyo was 1,246 in 2010. Fifteen HCSCs cared for > or = 50 patients who died at home in a year. In contrast, the 19 HCSCs in the top 10 percentile for the number of patients (> or = 176) did not have any patients who died at home. Their patients died at hospitals or facilities. These results suggest that the activities of HCSCs in Tokyo are diverse.

  9. Physical activity levels and supportive care needs for physical activity among breast cancer survivors with different psychosocial profiles: a cluster-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, C; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Spittaels, H; Bourgois, J; DE Bourdeaudhuij, I; VAN Hoof, E

    2012-11-01

    The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is associated with many treatment-related and psychosocial factors, which can influence health behaviour and associated needs. First, this study aimed to identify clusters of treatment-related and psychosocial factors among breast cancer survivors. Second, clusters' physical activity levels and care needs for physical activity were evaluated. Breast cancer survivors (n= 440; 52 ± 8 years) (3 weeks to 6 months post treatment) completed self-reports on physical and psychological symptoms; illness representations; social support and coping; physical activity and care needs for physical activity. Analyses identified four clusters: (1) a low distress-active approach group; (2) a low distress-resigned approach group; (3) a high distress-active approach group; and (4) a high distress-emotional approach group. Physical activity levels were higher in the low distress groups than in the high distress-emotional approach group. However, women with low distress and an active approach reported equal care needs for physical activity than women with high distress and an emotional approach. These findings suggest that care needs for physical activity are unrelated to distress and actual physical activity levels. The results emphasise the importance of screening for needs and provide a framework supporting the referral of breast cancer survivors to tailored interventions.

  10. Supportive care in oncology.

    PubMed

    Levy, M H; Rosen, S M; Ottery, F D; Hermann, J

    1992-01-01

    Pain management, nutritional support, and psychosocial support are fundamental services that enhance patients' ability to cope with their cancer and its therapy. The common goal of symptom prevention mandates that each of these supportive services be provided to all patients throughout their cancer experience. Comprehensive cancer pain management begins with identifying the origin of all of the patient's pains and treating each one specifically. Pain prevention can be achieved through around-the-clock opioid administration with as-needed supplements for breakthrough pain and dose titration. Common narcotic side effects such as constipation and nausea also must be prevented. Successful opioid analgesia requires that patient and family concerns regarding addiction and tolerance be dispelled at the outset. Cancer pain prevention can be further optimized with the use of appropriate coanalgesics in response to the pathophysiology of the patient's pains. Cognitive and behavioral therapies may also be useful adjuncts to reduce both pain and suffering. Procedure-oriented pain control should be considered when systemic pharmacologic therapy does not provide adequate pain relief or is associated with intolerable side effects. The only absolute contraindications for pain-relieving procedures are untreatable coagulopathy and a decrease in mental status not related to medical pain management. Useful neurodestructive techniques include radiofrequency lesioning, cryoanalgesia, and chemical neurolysis with agents such as phenol, alcohol, and hypertonic saline. The most beneficial pain-relieving procedures and percutaneous cordotomy, spinal narcotics, celiac and hypogastric plexus ablation, spinal neurolysis, and epidural injection of steroids and hypertonic saline. Procedure selection depends on the cause of the pain and the patient's prognosis. Common indications for pain-relieving procedures include unilateral pain below the shoulder, upper abdominal visceral pains, pelvic

  11. Active Supportive and Palliative Care Research Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Care staff intentions to support adults with an intellectual disability to engage in physical activity: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emma; McKenzie, Karen; Newman, Emily; Bowden, Keith; Morris, Paul Graham

    2011-01-01

    Researchers suggest that people with an intellectual disability (ID) undertake less physical activity than the general population and many rely, to some extent, on others to help them to access activities. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) model was previously found to significantly predict the intention of care staff to facilitate a healthy diet in those they supported. The present study examined whether the TPB was useful in predicting the intentions of 78 Scottish care staff to support people with ID to engage in physical activity. Regression analyses indicated that perceived behavioural control was the most significant predictor of both care staff intention to facilitate physical activity and reported physical activity levels of the people they supported. Attitudes significantly predicted care staff intention to support physical activity, but this intention was not itself significantly predictive of reported activity levels. Increasing carers' sense of control over their ability to support clients' physical activity may be more effective in increasing physical activity than changing their attitudes towards promoting activity.

  13. Care staff intentions to support adults with an intellectual disability to engage in physical activity: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emma; McKenzie, Karen; Newman, Emily; Bowden, Keith; Morris, Paul Graham

    2011-01-01

    Researchers suggest that people with an intellectual disability (ID) undertake less physical activity than the general population and many rely, to some extent, on others to help them to access activities. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) model was previously found to significantly predict the intention of care staff to facilitate a healthy diet in those they supported. The present study examined whether the TPB was useful in predicting the intentions of 78 Scottish care staff to support people with ID to engage in physical activity. Regression analyses indicated that perceived behavioural control was the most significant predictor of both care staff intention to facilitate physical activity and reported physical activity levels of the people they supported. Attitudes significantly predicted care staff intention to support physical activity, but this intention was not itself significantly predictive of reported activity levels. Increasing carers' sense of control over their ability to support clients' physical activity may be more effective in increasing physical activity than changing their attitudes towards promoting activity. PMID:21803540

  14. Child care and other support programs.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network with nearly 23,000 workers that directly serves or subsidizes care for 200,000 children every day. Child-care options available to civilians typically pale in comparison, and the military's system, embedded in a broader web of family support services, is widely considered to be a model for the nation. The military's child-care success rests on four pillars, write Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The first is certification by the military itself, including unannounced inspections to check on safety, sanitation, and general compliance with DoD rules. The second is accreditation by nationally recognized agencies, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The third is a hiring policy that sets educational and other requirements for child-care workers, and the fourth is a pay scale that not only sets wages high enough to discourage the rapid turnover common in civilian child care but also rewards workers for completing additional training. Floyd and Phillips sound a few cautionary notes. For one, demand for military child care continues to outstrip the supply In particular, as National Guard and Reserve members have been activated during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the DoD has sometimes struggled to provide child care for their children. And force reductions and budget cuts are likely to force the military to make difficult choices as it seeks to streamline its child-care services in the years ahead. PMID:25518693

  15. Child care and other support programs.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network with nearly 23,000 workers that directly serves or subsidizes care for 200,000 children every day. Child-care options available to civilians typically pale in comparison, and the military's system, embedded in a broader web of family support services, is widely considered to be a model for the nation. The military's child-care success rests on four pillars, write Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The first is certification by the military itself, including unannounced inspections to check on safety, sanitation, and general compliance with DoD rules. The second is accreditation by nationally recognized agencies, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The third is a hiring policy that sets educational and other requirements for child-care workers, and the fourth is a pay scale that not only sets wages high enough to discourage the rapid turnover common in civilian child care but also rewards workers for completing additional training. Floyd and Phillips sound a few cautionary notes. For one, demand for military child care continues to outstrip the supply In particular, as National Guard and Reserve members have been activated during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the DoD has sometimes struggled to provide child care for their children. And force reductions and budget cuts are likely to force the military to make difficult choices as it seeks to streamline its child-care services in the years ahead.

  16. EMPLOYEE SPIRITUAL CARE: Supporting Those Who Care for Others.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide whole-person care for patients and families, Loma Linda University Health recognizes the importance of supporting employee wholeness. The Employee Spiritual Care department helps create and support an environment that nurtures the spiritual health and wholeness of employees, and provides employees tools and knowledge about providing whole-person care to patients and colleagues.

  17. EMPLOYEE SPIRITUAL CARE: Supporting Those Who Care for Others.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide whole-person care for patients and families, Loma Linda University Health recognizes the importance of supporting employee wholeness. The Employee Spiritual Care department helps create and support an environment that nurtures the spiritual health and wholeness of employees, and provides employees tools and knowledge about providing whole-person care to patients and colleagues. PMID:27119805

  18. Employer-Supported Child Care in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services, Toronto.

    Six case studies describing current employer-supported child care services in Ontario are presented. The studies describe the PLADEC Day Care Center of the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital, the day care center at the Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals in Hamilton, the Early Learning Centre at Durham College in Oshawa, the Hydrokids day care center at the…

  19. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  20. [Mental health care systems and provisions in the immediate and acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake: situational and support activities in Miyagi Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, which measured 9.0 on the Richter scale, was followed by a huge tsunami that caused catastrophic damage to the area extending from the Tohoku to Kanto regions. It was also accompanied by the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Mental health service provisions were hit equally hard by the disaster, with a wide range of support and relief activities being implemented. This article reviews damage that was inflicted and support activities that were carried out in the mental health field in Miyagi Prefecture in the immediate aftermath and acute phase of the disaster, and also examines future challenges. Almost all mental health institutions in Miyagi Prefecture were affected by the disaster, and experienced difficulties such as feeding inpatients and securing necessary medication. Mental health institutions in the coastal area, in particular, were severely hit. Three hospitals-were seriously damaged by the tsunami, which forced them to make arrangements for the transfer of 300 inpatients. In the aftermath of the earthquake, it became difficult to access medical institutions, and confusion ensued regarding the provision of mental health services. Many municipalities in Miyagi Prefecture were seriously affected by the disaster, and information-gathering was crippled due to the disruption of communication and transport networks. Consequently, the administrative function regarding mental health service provisions was significantly impaired. Through official, private, and academic channels, volunteers in the field of mental health were sent to the affected areas in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. It was very difficult to coordinate these volunteers because of the confusion in gathering-information and in the chain of command for support activities. The number of support teams working in the affected areas peaked one to two months after the earthquake, but it became clear that continuous and long

  1. [Mental health care systems and provisions in the immediate and acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake: situational and support activities in Miyagi Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, which measured 9.0 on the Richter scale, was followed by a huge tsunami that caused catastrophic damage to the area extending from the Tohoku to Kanto regions. It was also accompanied by the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Mental health service provisions were hit equally hard by the disaster, with a wide range of support and relief activities being implemented. This article reviews damage that was inflicted and support activities that were carried out in the mental health field in Miyagi Prefecture in the immediate aftermath and acute phase of the disaster, and also examines future challenges. Almost all mental health institutions in Miyagi Prefecture were affected by the disaster, and experienced difficulties such as feeding inpatients and securing necessary medication. Mental health institutions in the coastal area, in particular, were severely hit. Three hospitals-were seriously damaged by the tsunami, which forced them to make arrangements for the transfer of 300 inpatients. In the aftermath of the earthquake, it became difficult to access medical institutions, and confusion ensued regarding the provision of mental health services. Many municipalities in Miyagi Prefecture were seriously affected by the disaster, and information-gathering was crippled due to the disruption of communication and transport networks. Consequently, the administrative function regarding mental health service provisions was significantly impaired. Through official, private, and academic channels, volunteers in the field of mental health were sent to the affected areas in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. It was very difficult to coordinate these volunteers because of the confusion in gathering-information and in the chain of command for support activities. The number of support teams working in the affected areas peaked one to two months after the earthquake, but it became clear that continuous and long

  2. Legal Mechanisms Supporting Accountable Care Principles

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Public health and private providers and facilities may shape the future of the US health system by engaging in new ways to deliver care to patients. “Accountable care” contracts allow private health care and public health providers and facilities to collaboratively serve defined populations. Accountable care frameworks emphasize health care quality and cost savings, among other goals. In this article, I explore the legal context for accountable care, including the mechanisms by which providers, facilities, and public health coordinate activities, avoid inefficiencies, and improve health outcomes. I highlight ongoing evaluations of the impact of accountable care on public health outcomes. PMID:25211740

  3. Importance of social support in diabetes care

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Ghalmreza Sharfi; Bakht, Leila Azad; Feizi, Avat; Mohebi, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Diabetes is one of the major concerns in the third millennium, affecting more people every day. The prevalence of this disease in Iran is reported to be high (about 7.7%). The most important method to control this disease and prevent its complications is self-care. According to various studies, this method has not found its proper place among patients with diabetes due to several reasons. The present study was aimed at determining the relationship between social support, especially family support, and self-care behavior of diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: This study was a narrative review in which the relevant papers of cross-sectional, cohort, clinical trial, and systematic review designs were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed, ProQuest, SCOPUS, and Elsevier, with the keywords diabetes, social support, and self-care. Moreover, Persian papers were selected from MEDLAB and IRANMEDEX databases and through searching the websites of original research papers published in Iran. All the papers published from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Results: The results of the study indicated that the status of self-care and social support in patients with diabetes was not favorable. All the studied papers showed that there was a positive relationship between social support and self-care behavior. Also, some studies pointed to the positive effect of social support, especially family support and more specifically support from the spouse, on controlling blood sugar level and HbA1c. Conclusion: As social support can predict the health promoting behavior, this concept is also capable of predicting self-care behavior of patients with diabetes. Therefore, getting the family members, especially the spouse, involved in self-care behavior can be of significant importance in providing health care to patients with diabetes. PMID:24520558

  4. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  5. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care. PMID:10181605

  6. Perioperative Care Coordination Measurement: A Tool to Support Care Integration of Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Lynne R; Ziniel, Sonja I; Antonelli, Richard C

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of care coordination activities and outcomes to resource utilization and personnel costs has been evaluated for a number of pediatric medical home practices. One of the first tools designed to evaluate the activities and outcomes for pediatric care coordination is the Care Coordination Measurement Tool (CCMT). It has become widely used as an instrument for health care providers in both primary and subspecialty care settings. This tool enables the user to stratify patients based on acuity and complexity while documenting the activities and outcomes of care coordination. We tested the feasibility of adapting the CCMT to a pediatric surgical population at Boston Children's Hospital. The tool was used to assess the preoperative care coordination activities. Care coordination activities were tracked during the interval from the date the patient was scheduled for a surgical or interventional procedure through the day of the procedure. A care coordination encounter was defined as any task, whether face to face or not, supporting the development or implementation of a plan of care. Data were collected to enable analysis of 5675 care coordination encounters supporting the care provided to 3406 individual surgical cases (patients). The outcomes of care coordination, as documented by the preoperative nursing staff, included the elaboration of the care plan through patient-focused communication among specialist, facilities, perioperative team, and primary care physicians in 80.5% of cases. The average time spent on care coordination activities increased incrementally by 30 minutes with each additional care coordination encounter for a surgical case. Surgical cases with 1 care coordination encounter took an average of 35.7 minutes of preoperative care coordination, whereas those with ≥4 care coordination encounters reported an average of 121.6 minutes. We successfully adapted and implemented the CCMT for a pediatric surgical population and measured nonface

  7. Decision support for patient care: implementing cybernetics.

    PubMed

    Ozbolt, Judy; Ozdas, Asli; Waitman, Lemuel R; Smith, Janis B; Brennan, Grace V; Miller, Randolph A

    2004-01-01

    The application of principles and methods of cybernetics permits clinicians and managers to use feedback about care effectiveness and resource expenditure to improve quality and to control costs. Keys to the process are the specification of therapeutic goals and the creation of an organizational culture that supports the use of feedback to improve care. Daily feedback on the achievement of each patient's therapeutic goals provides tactical decision support, enabling clinicians to adjust care as needed. Monthly or quarterly feedback on aggregated goal achievement for all patients on a clinical pathway provides strategic decision support, enabling clinicians and managers to identify problems with supposed "best practices" and to test hypotheses about solutions. Work is underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to implement feedback loops in care and management processes and to evaluate the effects.

  8. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  9. Information Persistence Services Designed to Support Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs of citizens, and to allow the reallocation of resources to alternatives to hospitalization or institutionalization. Objective Home care services require cooperation between different actors, including health and social caregivers, care receivers, and their informal caregivers (eg, relatives or friends), across time, space, and organizational boundaries. Therefore, it is foreseeable that eHealth services can contribute to their improvement. The aim of this study is to evaluate information persistence services based on the Reference Information Model (RIM) of the Health Level Seven (HL7) version 3 to support formal caregivers, both health and social care providers, and informal caregivers in the context of home care services. Methods A pilot study was set up involving two Portuguese institutions that provide home care services for the elderly. Defining of information requirements was performed according to a comprehensive process. This included a review of the literature, observations of work activities, interviews with caregivers, care receivers and their relatives, analysis of paper documentation related to care receivers’ histories, health conditions and care plans, and brainstorming groups involving specialized professionals. Following this, information objects were implemented and validated. Results The methodological approach, as well as the information persistence services, proved to be robust and adequate to specify, implement, and validate different types of information objects related to home care services for the elderly. This study also reinforces the application of the RIM of the HL7 version 3 beyond the strict scope of health care, allowing the persistence of not only health care information, but also information related to social assistance

  10. Family caregivers and care manager support under long-term care insurance in rural Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miho; Hagihara, Akihito; Nobutomo, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Care managers are expected to coordinate care services for the elderly and to function as a source of social support under the Long-term Care Insurance programme in Japan. Thus far, however, little attention has been paid to the social support function of the care manager. To clarify the role of care manager support, we evaluated how care manager support ('social talk,' 'information giving' and 'reassurance') affects the burden of family caregivers categorised by caregiver gender and living arrangement. The interaction between 'information giving' and 'memory and behaviour problems' had a negative effect on 'social activity' among females living with elderly relatives (p < 0.05). 'Information giving' had a direct negative effect on caregiver burden among males living with elderly relatives (p < 0.05). Although 'social talk' had a moderating effect on caregiver burden (p < 0.05), the interaction between 'social talk' and 'memory and behaviour problems' had a negative impact on caregiver burden among females living with elderly relatives (p < 0.05). These results indicate that care manager support is only effective for female caregivers living with elderly relatives, and is ineffective or works poorly for female caregivers living separately and male caregivers living with elderly relatives. We concluded that the social support function of care managers would be improved by ensuring that they have adequate time for each case, and the skills to assess psychosocial needs. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to improve the work environment and introduce systematic training for psychosocial needs assessment.

  11. Care Staff Intentions to Support Adults with an Intellectual Disability to Engage in Physical Activity: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Emma; McKenzie, Karen; Newman, Emily; Bowden, Keith; Morris, Paul Graham

    2011-01-01

    Researchers suggest that people with an intellectual disability (ID) undertake less physical activity than the general population and many rely, to some extent, on others to help them to access activities. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) model was previously found to significantly predict the intention of care staff to facilitate a healthy…

  12. Using the Internet to support self-care.

    PubMed

    LaPerrière, B; Edwards, P; Romeder, J M; Maxwell-Young, L

    1998-05-01

    Nurses have long recognized the importance of self-care. In the current Information Age, nurses can use the Internet to locate computer- and non-computer-based programs and tools that encourage people to become active consumers who control decisions and actions related to their health. The Internet can support self-care in two main ways: by supplying information and by providing a medium for interactive social support. But there are pros and cons to such use of the Internet. PMID:9923213

  13. Providing Safe Health Care: The Role of Educational Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Julie

    This handbook is written for the educational support person (ESP) who may or may not be a trained or licensed health care provider, but whose job has come to include caring for students with disabilities with special health care needs. Section 1, "The Laws Governing the ESP and the Care of the Student with Special Health Care Needs," discusses the…

  14. Applying activity-based costing in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Wodchis, W P

    1998-01-01

    As greater numbers of the elderly use health services, and as health care costs climb, effective financial tracking is essential. Cost management in health care can benefit if costs are linked to the care activities where they are incurred. Activity-based costing (ABC) provides a useful approach. The framework aligns costs (inputs), through activities (process), to outputs and outcomes. It allocates costs based on client care needs rather than management structure. The ABC framework was tested in a residential care facility and in supportive housing apartments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of ABC for long term care agencies, including community-based care. PMID:10339203

  15. Applying activity-based costing in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Wodchis, W P

    1998-01-01

    As greater numbers of the elderly use health services, and as health care costs climb, effective financial tracking is essential. Cost management in health care can benefit if costs are linked to the care activities where they are incurred. Activity-based costing (ABC) provides a useful approach. The framework aligns costs (inputs), through activities (process), to outputs and outcomes. It allocates costs based on client care needs rather than management structure. The ABC framework was tested in a residential care facility and in supportive housing apartments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of ABC for long term care agencies, including community-based care.

  16. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  17. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  18. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  19. Psychosocially supportive design--Scandinavian health care design.

    PubMed

    Dilani, A

    2001-01-01

    consideration of care philosophies and in the creation of new health care facilities. In this new paradigm, the focus is on the patients: along with their physical health needs the patients' psychological and social health needs are given major emphasis in the delivery of care activities and in the design of health care environments. Future research needs to develop care philosophies that focus on a broader concept of health, thus creating an awareness of the importance of psychosocially supportive design. PMID:11372255

  20. ECLSS medical support activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crump, William J.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    During the period from April 10, 1990 to April 9, 1991, the Consortium for the Space Life Sciences provided technical assistance to the NASA/MSFC water recovery efforts. This assistance was in the form of literature reviews, technical recommendations, and presentations. This final report summarizes the activities completed during this period and identifies those areas requiring additional efforts. The tasks which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) water recovery team addressed were either identified by MSFC technical representatives or chosen from those outlined in the subject statement of work.

  1. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction.  | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  2. Support for Contextual Control in Primary Care: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Charlene; Drews, Frank A; Butler, Jorie; Barrus, Robyn J; Jones, Mokoto L.; Nebeker, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Providing support for high-level cognitive performance is largely missing in many decision support designs. Most development in this area is structured to minimize attention, decrease the need for deeper processing and limit intense goal-directed cognitive processing. However, from a dual process perspective, both automatic and deliberative processes need to be supported. The purpose of this qualitative analysis is to explore complex cognitive processing. We used the Contextual Control Model to guide the analysis. Transcripts from 33 taped primary care visits across 4 locations in the VA were analyzed using iterative process of construct and thematic development. Five themes related to high-level cognitive processes were identified: 1) Joint Exchange and Patient Activation; 2) Planning and Proactive Problem Solving; 3) Script and heuristic processing; 4) Time perspectives and 5) Uncertainty management. Results are discussed in terms of the need to support integrated views for complex situation mental models. PMID:24551420

  3. Employer-Supported Child Care: Who Participates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Taryn W.; Warner, Mildred E.

    2009-01-01

    Child-care vouchers are becoming more common and can provide child-care assistance to a wide spectrum of the population. There is little empirical research, however, on which workers participate in their employer's child-care programs. In this exploratory study, employees with children at 1 large university completed questionnaires to gather…

  4. Staff perceptions of caring: the importance of a supportive environment.

    PubMed

    Sikma, Suzanne K

    2006-06-01

    Five themes of caring interventions emerged from the perspective of staff caregivers-valuing personhood and the work, belonging, knowing, acting together, and promoting quality. Three themes of caring organizational conditions identified by participants included communicating, providing resources, and trusting. The research-based Model of Caring in the Organizational Environment can be used to assess and improve the caring environment of nursing homes as well as to develop caring managers and staff. Organizational well-being for nursing homes is everyone's responsibility and requires formal and informal leaders who can create supportive caring organizational conditions, engage in caring interventions with staff, and inspire the synergy of caring. PMID:16773860

  5. Staff perceptions of caring: the importance of a supportive environment.

    PubMed

    Sikma, Suzanne K

    2006-06-01

    Five themes of caring interventions emerged from the perspective of staff caregivers-valuing personhood and the work, belonging, knowing, acting together, and promoting quality. Three themes of caring organizational conditions identified by participants included communicating, providing resources, and trusting. The research-based Model of Caring in the Organizational Environment can be used to assess and improve the caring environment of nursing homes as well as to develop caring managers and staff. Organizational well-being for nursing homes is everyone's responsibility and requires formal and informal leaders who can create supportive caring organizational conditions, engage in caring interventions with staff, and inspire the synergy of caring.

  6. Help, care and support during a mental health crisis.

    PubMed

    Glasper, Alan

    Emeritus professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses the recently published Care Quality Commission (CQC) report Right here, right now, which documents people's experiences of help, care and support during a mental health crisis. PMID:26450676

  7. 77 FR 42185 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... responding to the Bridge Public Notice, 77 FR 14364, March 9, 2012, supports the provision of ``bridge... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... support on a limited, interim, fiscally responsible basis for specific Rural Health Care Pilot...

  8. An active Grid infrastructure for elderly care.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Doan; Lawrence, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    We propose a technique in which elderly people can be monitored non-intrusively. The information is kept in an 'active' health record which becomes alive when attention or action is necessary concerning the condition of the elderly person. The proposed system consists of three main components: a sensor/actor loop, sensor records and associated active services, and a Grid middleware platform. Information is captured in realtime within a collaborative health-care Grid. The Grid connects elderly people, caregivers and medical service providers in ways that reduce unnecessary calls on expensive medical services through an intermediate local service centre (which can be virtual) assisted with Internet communications and monitoring technologies. The proposal should support preventive health-care programmes for reducing the cost of caring for the elderly.

  9. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  10. Quality care as ethical care: a poststructural analysis of palliative and supportive district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Walshe, Catherine; Luker, Karen A

    2016-03-01

    Quality of care is a prominent discourse in modern health-care and has previously been conceptualised in terms of ethics. In addition, the role of knowledge has been suggested as being particularly influential with regard to the nurse-patient-carer relationship. However, to date, no analyses have examined how knowledge (as an ethical concept) impinges on quality of care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care and thirteen of their lay carers. Poststructural discourse analysis techniques were utilised to take an ethical perspective on the current way in which quality of care is assessed and produced in health-care. It is argued that if quality of care is to be achieved, patients and carers need to be able to redistribute and redevelop the knowledge of their services in a collaborative way that goes beyond the current ways of working. Theoretical works and extant research are then used to produce tentative suggestions about how this may be achieved.

  11. Child Care and Other Support Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a…

  12. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-05-23

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers' 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients' homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants' strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues' and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future.

  13. Healthy cities as catalysts for caring and supportive environments.

    PubMed

    Green, Geoff; Jackisch, Josephine; Zamaro, Gianna

    2015-06-01

    'Caring and Supportive Environments' are fundamental to a social model of health and were a core theme of Phase V (2009-13) of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network. Deploying the methodology of realist evaluation, this article synthesizes qualitative evidence from 112 highly structured case studies from 68 Network cities and 71 responses to a General Evaluation Questionnaire, which asked cities to analyze city attributes and trends. A schematic model was developed to describe the interaction between action targeted toward children, migrants, older people and action on social and health services, health literacy and active citizenship-the six subtopics clustered within the theme Caring and Supportive Environments. Four hypotheses were tested: (i) there are prerequisites and processes of local governance that increase city capacity for creating supportive environments; (ii) investing in health and social services, active citizenship and health literacy enhance the social inclusion of vulnerable population groups; (iii) there are synergies between social investment and healthy urban planning; and (iv) these investments promote greater equity in health. The evaluation revealed many innovative practices. Providers of health and social services have developed partnerships with agencies influencing wider determinants of health. Health literacy campaigns address the wider context of people's lives. In a period of economic austerity, cities have utilized the social assets of their citizens. Realist evaluation can help illuminate the pathways from case study interventions to health outcomes, and the prerequisites and processes required to initiate and sustain such investments.

  14. Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Taking Care of ...

  15. Big data and ambulatory care: breaking down legal barriers to support effective use.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an overview of the legal framework governing health information, dispels misconceptions about privacy regulations, and highlights how ambulatory care providers in particular can maximize the utility of big data to improve care. PMID:25401945

  16. Best supportive care: a euphemism for no care or a standard of good care?

    PubMed

    Cherny, Nathan

    2011-06-01

    This article seeks to address the question: Is best supportive care (BSC) in research a euphemism for no care or a standard of good care? The data regarding the ethical and methodological validity of BSC studies are reviewed. Most of the BSC studies published over the past 25 years are really treatment versus no treatment studies represented as BSC studies. By ignoring the best contemporaneous standards of BSC, standardizing practices in multicenter studies, validating participating centers, or documenting treatment delivery, researchers belie the stated intention of studying BSC. Most studies sought to evaluate if there was any benefit of a new anti-tumor treatment versus discontinuation of anti-tumor therapies. Overwhelmingly, and with few exceptions, the impact of BSC practices was not really part of the key research question. To be ethical and methodologically valid, BSC studies must incorporate standards consistent with contemporaneous, proven BSC practice standards. Work is underway to develop widely validated standards of practice for the control arm of best supportive care studies. These can be readily incorporated in to study development and evaluation.

  17. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  18. Cultural Support Workers and Long Day Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melinda G.; Knowles, Meg; Grieshaber, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, eligible long day care services may apply for support at the state level to assist with the transition of children from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds into childcare settings. For staff in childcare services, this support comes in the form of a cultural support worker (CSW). The primary role of a CSW is to build…

  19. [Setting up supportive care in oncology: reflexions and suggestions.].

    PubMed

    Colombat, P; Antoun, S; Aubry, R; Banterla-Dadon, I; Barruel, F; Bonel, J-M; Bonnin, J-C; Chassignol, L; Chollet, A; Chvetzoff, G; D'Hérouville, D; Drouart, M; Gaillet, H; Ganem, G; Krakowski, I; Morigault, M-O; Nallet, G; Rolland, J; Suc, A

    2009-09-01

    A group of 19 health professionals implicated in supportive care wanted to suggest some reflexions for organization, setting and evaluation of the supportive care in institutions and health territories. The suggested organization must be applicable to any cancer patient and the place of the care whatever the age, the stage of the disease; in the future, must be applicable to any patient with serious chronic illness. This organization must allow to optimize the accompaniment and the care of the patients and their close relations by 1) precise and regular analysis of their needs; 2) the respect of the continuity of the health care; 3) the setting of collaborative practice and transversality in the care. It is not a new medical speciality but a coordination of competences for patients and their families. PMID:19903599

  20. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action.

  1. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action. PMID:26306523

  2. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  3. Support for caring and resiliency among successful nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan Mac Leod; Prestia, Angela S; Smith, Marlaine C

    2015-01-01

    Health care practice settings are replete with competing priorities for nurse leaders who are responsible to the staff, the organization, and the patients and their families. In the midst of the competing priorities, there is a mandate for successful nursing leadership that is patient centered. To support the continuance of nurse leader success and avoid discouragement and attrition, a caring and resilient model for leadership may be necessary. This article considers the practices of nurse leaders that support caring, resiliency, and, ultimately, their success. Successful navigation toward patient-centered solutions through the intentional and inextricably linked living caring and resiliency was enhanced with practices of self-care, accountability, and reflection. Within each of the 3 intentional practices, a primary process emerged that revealed how nurse leaders actualize their caring and resiliency. The practices and mutually supportive processes are discussed. Useful questions are provided to guide any nurse leader who is contemplating practices of self-care, accountability, and reflection for supporting caring and resiliency. PMID:25714947

  4. Support for caring and resiliency among successful nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan Mac Leod; Prestia, Angela S; Smith, Marlaine C

    2015-01-01

    Health care practice settings are replete with competing priorities for nurse leaders who are responsible to the staff, the organization, and the patients and their families. In the midst of the competing priorities, there is a mandate for successful nursing leadership that is patient centered. To support the continuance of nurse leader success and avoid discouragement and attrition, a caring and resilient model for leadership may be necessary. This article considers the practices of nurse leaders that support caring, resiliency, and, ultimately, their success. Successful navigation toward patient-centered solutions through the intentional and inextricably linked living caring and resiliency was enhanced with practices of self-care, accountability, and reflection. Within each of the 3 intentional practices, a primary process emerged that revealed how nurse leaders actualize their caring and resiliency. The practices and mutually supportive processes are discussed. Useful questions are provided to guide any nurse leader who is contemplating practices of self-care, accountability, and reflection for supporting caring and resiliency.

  5. From Institutional to Community Support: Consequences for Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Loon, Jos; Knibbe, Jeroen; Van Hove, Geert

    2005-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the quality of medical care available for people with intellectual disabilities in community-based services. The aims of this study were to evaluate a model of medical care developed during a programme of deinstitutionalization, based on a specialist physician supporting general practitioners (GPs).…

  6. 76 FR 37280 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... the Second Report and Order, 70 FR 6365, February 7, 2005. The Commission sought written public... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...) adopts an interim rule permitting health care providers that are located in a ``rural area'' under...

  7. Doula support compared with standard care

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Jacqueline H.; Godwin, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the effect of support provided by doulas on the rate of medical interventions during labour for low-risk women intending to deliver vaginally at term. Data sources Comprehensive searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were undertaken using the search terms labour support and doula. Study selection Randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of trained doulas for medical interventions during labour were selected and evaluated for methodologic quality. Articles of adequate quality were included in the synthesis. The outcomes of interest were rates of cesarean section, instrumental vaginal delivery, the use of oxytocin, and epidural anesthesia. Synthesis Outcomes were synthesized to determine overall odds ratios for relevant outcomes. Sensitivity analysis using only studies with high methodologic quality was completed, and publication bias was assessed. The presence and support of a trained doula reduced the odds of delivery by cesarean section and instrumental vaginal delivery. No significant effect was seen for the use of epidural anesthesia or the rates of oxytocin use. There was considerable heterogeneity among the studies. Conclusion Trained doulas help to reduce the odds of certain medical interventions during labour for low-risk women delivering at term.

  8. An innovative model of diabetes care and delivery: the St. Joseph's Primary Care Diabetes Support Program (SJHC PCDSP).

    PubMed

    Reichert, Sonja M; Harris, Stewart; Harvey, Betty

    2014-06-01

    The majority of diabetes care in Canada is provided within the primary healthcare setting. It is delivered in a variety of models ranging from the physician working in a solo fee-for-service practice to an interprofessional team setting with specialist collaboration. To augment diabetes-related health services, the Ontario government has provided substantial funding to support community diabetes education programs. These models and initiatives are improving diabetes outcomes, and continued evolution of these programs can provide even greater outcomes. The St. Joseph's Primary Care Diabetes Support Program (SJHC PCDSP) is an innovative model that incorporates multidisciplinary allied health professionals together with physician support to provide care for more than 3000 patients in London, Ontario, Canada. It embodies the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA)'s Organizations of Care recommendations to combine patient education and self-management with active medical support at each clinic encounter, all while embodying the tenets of primary care. A brief review of primary healthcare reform is provided to explain how the SJHC PCDSP combines features of current models in a unique format so as to deliver exceptional patient care. By providing a detailed description of the services delivered at the SJHC PCDSP, it is hoped that both specialists and primary care providers consider using and adapting approaches to diabetes management based on this innovative model to optimize their practices. PMID:24909092

  9. An innovative model of diabetes care and delivery: the St. Joseph's Primary Care Diabetes Support Program (SJHC PCDSP).

    PubMed

    Reichert, Sonja M; Harris, Stewart; Harvey, Betty

    2014-06-01

    The majority of diabetes care in Canada is provided within the primary healthcare setting. It is delivered in a variety of models ranging from the physician working in a solo fee-for-service practice to an interprofessional team setting with specialist collaboration. To augment diabetes-related health services, the Ontario government has provided substantial funding to support community diabetes education programs. These models and initiatives are improving diabetes outcomes, and continued evolution of these programs can provide even greater outcomes. The St. Joseph's Primary Care Diabetes Support Program (SJHC PCDSP) is an innovative model that incorporates multidisciplinary allied health professionals together with physician support to provide care for more than 3000 patients in London, Ontario, Canada. It embodies the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA)'s Organizations of Care recommendations to combine patient education and self-management with active medical support at each clinic encounter, all while embodying the tenets of primary care. A brief review of primary healthcare reform is provided to explain how the SJHC PCDSP combines features of current models in a unique format so as to deliver exceptional patient care. By providing a detailed description of the services delivered at the SJHC PCDSP, it is hoped that both specialists and primary care providers consider using and adapting approaches to diabetes management based on this innovative model to optimize their practices.

  10. Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

  11. Health Care Coverage among Child Support-Eligible Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, Laudan Y.

    Using data from the National Survey of America's Families (a nationally representative survey of the economic, social, and health characteristics of children, adults, and their families), this paper discusses health care coverage among child support eligible children. It begins with a detailed profile of child support eligible children living with…

  12. Systematic review: unmet supportive care needs in people diagnosed with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Valery, Patricia C; Powell, Elizabeth; Moses, Neta; Volk, Michael L; McPhail, Steven M; Clark, Paul J; Martin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective People with chronic liver disease, particularly those with decompensated cirrhosis, experience several potentially debilitating complications that can have a significant impact on activities of daily living and quality of life. These impairments combined with the associated complex treatment mean that they are faced with specific and high levels of supportive care needs. We aimed to review reported perspectives, experiences and concerns of people with chronic liver disease worldwide. This information is necessary to guide development of policies around supportive needs screening tools and to enable prioritisation of support services for these patients. Design Systematic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO from the earliest records until 19 September 2014. Data were extracted using standardised forms. A qualitative, descriptive approach was utilised to analyse and synthesise data. Results The initial search yielded 2598 reports: 26 studies reporting supportive care needs among patients with chronic liver disease were included, but few of them were patient-reported needs, none used a validated liver disease-specific supportive care need assessment instrument, and only three included patients with cirrhosis. Five key domains of supportive care needs were identified: informational or educational (eg, educational material, educational sessions), practical (eg, daily living), physical (eg, controlling pruritus and fatigue), patient care and support (eg, support groups), and psychological (eg, anxiety, sadness). Conclusions While several key domains of supportive care needs were identified, most studies included hepatitis patients. There is a paucity of literature describing the supportive care needs of the chronic liver disease population likely to have the most needs—namely those with cirrhosis. Assessing the supportive care needs of people with chronic liver disease have potential utility in clinical practice for facilitating timely referrals

  13. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The maximum support distance is the distance from the health...

  14. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The maximum support distance is the distance from the health...

  15. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The maximum support distance is the distance from the health...

  16. Developmentally supportive care in the neonatal intensive care unit: an occupational therapist's role.

    PubMed

    Nightlinger, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The role of a pediatric occupational therapist (OT) in the NICU is to provide comprehensive services, including evaluation, treatment, education, decision making, family support, and discharge planning. It may also include early intervention services or outpatient pediatric rehabilitation services. This article will address the need for developmentally supportive care in the NICU, and specifically addresses the role of an OT in this setting. It will explain how crucial collaboration between team members can be in providing quality, comprehensive care for these neonates. In addition, it will address the important role of the parent in this setting for developmentally supportive care while in the NICU and follow-up intervention upon discharge.

  17. Community Health Workers as Support for Sickle Cell Care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lewis L; Green, Nancy S; Donnell Ivy, E; Neunert, Cindy E; Smaldone, Arlene; Johnson, Shirley; Castillo, Sheila; Castillo, Amparo; Thompson, Trevor; Hampton, Kisha; Strouse, John J; Stewart, Rosalyn; Hughes, TaLana; Banks, Sonja; Smith-Whitley, Kim; King, Allison; Brown, Mary; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith, Wally R; Martin, Molly

    2016-07-01

    Community health workers are increasingly recognized as useful for improving health care and health outcomes for a variety of chronic conditions. Community health workers can provide social support, navigation of health systems and resources, and lay counseling. Social and cultural alignment of community health workers with the population they serve is an important aspect of community health worker intervention. Although community health worker interventions have been shown to improve patient-centered outcomes in underserved communities, these interventions have not been evaluated with sickle cell disease. Evidence from other disease areas suggests that community health worker intervention also would be effective for these patients. Sickle cell disease is complex, with a range of barriers to multifaceted care needs at the individual, family/friend, clinical organization, and community levels. Care delivery is complicated by disparities in health care: access, delivery, services, and cultural mismatches between providers and families. Current practices inadequately address or provide incomplete control of symptoms, especially pain, resulting in decreased quality of life and high medical expense. The authors propose that care and care outcomes for people with sickle cell disease could be improved through community health worker case management, social support, and health system navigation. This paper outlines implementation strategies in current use to test community health workers for sickle cell disease management in a variety of settings. National medical and advocacy efforts to develop the community health workforce for sickle cell disease management may enhance the progress and development of "best practices" for this area of community-based care.

  18. Spirituality in Renal Supportive Care: A Thematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Richard; Wood, Sarah; MacLeod, Rod; Walker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is marked by a reduced life expectancy and a high symptom burden. For those who reach end-stage renal disease, the prognosis is poor, and this combined with the growing prevalence of the disease necessitates supportive and palliative care programmes that will address people’s psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs. While there is variation between countries, research reveals that many renal specialist nurses and doctors are reluctant to address spirituality, initiate end-of-life conversations or implement conservative treatment plans early. Yet, other studies indicate that the provision of palliative care services, which includes the spiritual dimension, can reduce symptom burden, assist patients in making advanced directives/plans and improve health-related quality of life. This review brings together the current literature related to renal supportive care and spirituality under the following sections and themes. The introduction and background sections situate spirituality in both healthcare generally and chronic kidney disease. Gaps in the provision of chronic kidney disease spiritual care are then considered, followed by a discussion of the palliative care model related to chronic kidney disease and spirituality. Chronic kidney disease spiritual needs and care approaches are discussed with reference to advanced care planning, hope, grief and relationships. A particular focus on quality of life is developed, with spirituality named as a key dimension. Finally, further challenges, such as culture, training and limitations, are explicated. PMID:27417819

  19. Spirituality in Renal Supportive Care: A Thematic Review.

    PubMed

    Egan, Richard; Wood, Sarah; MacLeod, Rod; Walker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is marked by a reduced life expectancy and a high symptom burden. For those who reach end-stage renal disease, the prognosis is poor, and this combined with the growing prevalence of the disease necessitates supportive and palliative care programmes that will address people's psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs. While there is variation between countries, research reveals that many renal specialist nurses and doctors are reluctant to address spirituality, initiate end-of-life conversations or implement conservative treatment plans early. Yet, other studies indicate that the provision of palliative care services, which includes the spiritual dimension, can reduce symptom burden, assist patients in making advanced directives/plans and improve health-related quality of life. This review brings together the current literature related to renal supportive care and spirituality under the following sections and themes. The introduction and background sections situate spirituality in both healthcare generally and chronic kidney disease. Gaps in the provision of chronic kidney disease spiritual care are then considered, followed by a discussion of the palliative care model related to chronic kidney disease and spirituality. Chronic kidney disease spiritual needs and care approaches are discussed with reference to advanced care planning, hope, grief and relationships. A particular focus on quality of life is developed, with spirituality named as a key dimension. Finally, further challenges, such as culture, training and limitations, are explicated.

  20. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. Results A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. Conclusion The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means. PMID:27626949

  1. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  2. 76 FR 37307 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the... providers. In the Second Report and Order, 70 FR 6365, February 7, 2005, the Commission grandfathered these... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications...

  3. 78 FR 38606 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... published at 78 FR 13936, March 1, 2013, are effective June 27, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark... Contact Form, 77 FR 42728, July 20, 2012. The OMB Control Number is 3060-0824. The Commission publishes... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications...

  4. 78 FR 13935 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... broadband services and, where necessary, HCP-constructed and owned facilities as part of networks, will best... Communications Commission reforms its universal service support program for health care, transitioning its... also be purchased from the Commission's duplicating contractor, Best Copy and Printing, Inc., 445...

  5. Child Support, Child Care and Head Start Collaboration: Innovations & Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Bureau, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This monograph highlights and compares approaches of six demonstration grant projects designed to promote collaboration between state Child Support Enforcement, Child Care, and Head Start programs. These demonstration grant projects were awarded to Alaska, Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, and Missouri. These three-year projects were…

  6. [The informational analytical support of management of regional health care on the basis of expertise].

    PubMed

    Finchenko, E A; Tsytsorina, I A; Shalygina, L S; Ivaninskii, O I; Sharapov, I V

    2014-01-01

    principles of elaboration of system of informational analytical support of management of regional health care. The unified expertise questionnaire was developed to be used as a document basis of expertise system. The study results can be implemented in practical activities of regional health administration and medical organizations. The results of study made it possible to substantiate the development of the system of informational analytical support of regional health care and to determine priority directions of its formation. PMID:25799752

  7. [The informational analytical support of management of regional health care on the basis of expertise].

    PubMed

    Finchenko, E A; Tsytsorina, I A; Shalygina, L S; Ivaninskii, O I; Sharapov, I V

    2014-01-01

    principles of elaboration of system of informational analytical support of management of regional health care. The unified expertise questionnaire was developed to be used as a document basis of expertise system. The study results can be implemented in practical activities of regional health administration and medical organizations. The results of study made it possible to substantiate the development of the system of informational analytical support of regional health care and to determine priority directions of its formation.

  8. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  9. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study.

  10. Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Joel; Lindsay, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The principle barriers preventing health care professionals from promoting physical activity include an incomplete understanding of the evidence linking physical activity and health, difficulty in translating research findings into a feasible and efficacious clinical intervention, resistance to adopting a preventive orientation, and concerns about the risks of physical activity. Low level activities likely provide benefit with little risk. PMID:21229089

  11. Implementation of an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Complex Care Support Health Care Model at an Academic Medical Center: Impact on Health Care Utilization and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Christine; Andersen, Robin; Eng, Jessica; Garrigues, Sarah K.; Intinarelli, Gina; Kao, Helen; Kawahara, Suzanne; Patel, Kanan; Sapiro, Lisa; Thibault, Anne; Tunick, Erika; Barnes, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE) program has been shown to decrease acute care utilization and increase patient self-rated health in low-income seniors at community-based health centers. Aims To describe adaptation of the GRACE model to include adults of all ages (named Care Support) and to evaluate the process and impact of Care Support implementation at an urban academic medical center. Setting 152 high-risk patients (≥5 ED visits or ≥2 hospitalizations in the past 12 months) enrolled from four medical clinics from 4/29/2013 to 5/31/2014. Program Description Patients received a comprehensive in-home assessment by a nurse practitioner/social worker (NP/SW) team, who then met with a larger interdisciplinary team to develop an individualized care plan. In consultation with the primary care team, standardized care protocols were activated to address relevant key issues as needed. Program Evaluation A process evaluation based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research identified key adaptations of the original model, which included streamlining of standardized protocols, augmenting mental health interventions and performing some assessments in the clinic. A summative evaluation found a significant decline in the median number of ED visits (5.5 to 0, p = 0.015) and hospitalizations (5.5 to 0, p<0.001) 6 months before enrollment in Care Support compared to 6 months after enrollment. In addition, the percent of patients reporting better self-rated health increased from 31% at enrollment to 64% at 9 months (p = 0.002). Semi-structured interviews with Care Support team members identified patients with multiple, complex conditions; little community support; and mild anxiety as those who appeared to benefit the most from the program. Discussion It was feasible to implement GRACE/Care Support at an academic medical center by making adaptations based on local needs. Care Support patients experienced

  12. [For a coordination of the supportive care for people affected by severe illnesses: proposition of organization in the public and private health care centres].

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Ivan; Boureau, François; Bugat, Roland; Chassignol, Laurent; Colombat, Philippe; Copel, Laure; d'Hérouville, Daniel; Filbet, Marylène; Laurent, Bernard; Memran, Nadine; Meynadier, Jacques; Parmentier, Gérard; Poulain, Philippe; Saltel, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Wagner, Jean-Philippe

    2004-05-01

    The concept of continuous and global care is acknowledged today by all as inherent to modern medicine. A working group gathered to propose models for the coordination of supportive care for all severe illnesses in the various private and public health care centres. The supportive care are defined as: "all care and supports necessary for ill people, at the same time as specific treatments, along all severe illnesses". This definition is inspired by that of "supportive care" given in 1990 by the MASCC (Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer): "The total medical, nursing and psychosocial help which the patients need besides the specific treatment". It integrates as much the field of cure with possible after-effects as that of palliative care, the definition of which is clarified (initial and terminal palliative phases). Such a coordination is justified by the pluridisciplinarity and hyperspecialisation of the professionals, by a poor communication between the teams, by the administrative difficulties encountered by the teams participating in the supportive care. The working group insists on the fact that the supportive care is not a new speciality. He proposes the creation of units. departments or pole of responsibility of supportive care with a "basic coordination" involving the activities of chronic pain, palliative care, psycho-oncology, and social care. This coordination can be extended, according to the "history" and missions of health care centres. Service done with the implementation of a "unique counter" for the patients and the teams is an important point. The structure has to comply with the terms and conditions of contract (Consultation, Unit or Centre of chronic pain, structures of palliative care, of psycho-oncology, of nutrition, of social care). A common technical organization is one of the interests. The structure has to set up strong links with the private practitioners, the networks, the home medical care (HAD) and the nurses

  13. [For a coordination of the supportive care for people affected by severe illnesses: proposition of organization in the public and private health care centres].

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Ivan; Boureau, François; Bugat, Roland; Chassignol, Laurent; Colombat, Philippe; Copel, Laure; d'Hérouville, Daniel; Filbet, Marylène; Laurent, Bernard; Memran, Nadine; Meynadier, Jacques; Parmentier, Gérard; Poulain, Philippe; Saltel, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Wagner, Jean-Philippe

    2004-05-01

    The concept of continuous and global care is acknowledged today by all as inherent to modern medicine. A working group gathered to propose models for the coordination of supportive care for all severe illnesses in the various private and public health care centres. The supportive care are defined as: "all care and supports necessary for ill people, at the same time as specific treatments, along all severe illnesses". This definition is inspired by that of "supportive care" given in 1990 by the MASCC (Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer): "The total medical, nursing and psychosocial help which the patients need besides the specific treatment". It integrates as much the field of cure with possible after-effects as that of palliative care, the definition of which is clarified (initial and terminal palliative phases). Such a coordination is justified by the pluridisciplinarity and hyperspecialisation of the professionals, by a poor communication between the teams, by the administrative difficulties encountered by the teams participating in the supportive care. The working group insists on the fact that the supportive care is not a new speciality. He proposes the creation of units. departments or pole of responsibility of supportive care with a "basic coordination" involving the activities of chronic pain, palliative care, psycho-oncology, and social care. This coordination can be extended, according to the "history" and missions of health care centres. Service done with the implementation of a "unique counter" for the patients and the teams is an important point. The structure has to comply with the terms and conditions of contract (Consultation, Unit or Centre of chronic pain, structures of palliative care, of psycho-oncology, of nutrition, of social care). A common technical organization is one of the interests. The structure has to set up strong links with the private practitioners, the networks, the home medical care (HAD) and the nurses

  14. Community Health Workers as Support for Sickle Cell Care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lewis L; Green, Nancy S; Donnell Ivy, E; Neunert, Cindy E; Smaldone, Arlene; Johnson, Shirley; Castillo, Sheila; Castillo, Amparo; Thompson, Trevor; Hampton, Kisha; Strouse, John J; Stewart, Rosalyn; Hughes, TaLana; Banks, Sonja; Smith-Whitley, Kim; King, Allison; Brown, Mary; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith, Wally R; Martin, Molly

    2016-07-01

    Community health workers are increasingly recognized as useful for improving health care and health outcomes for a variety of chronic conditions. Community health workers can provide social support, navigation of health systems and resources, and lay counseling. Social and cultural alignment of community health workers with the population they serve is an important aspect of community health worker intervention. Although community health worker interventions have been shown to improve patient-centered outcomes in underserved communities, these interventions have not been evaluated with sickle cell disease. Evidence from other disease areas suggests that community health worker intervention also would be effective for these patients. Sickle cell disease is complex, with a range of barriers to multifaceted care needs at the individual, family/friend, clinical organization, and community levels. Care delivery is complicated by disparities in health care: access, delivery, services, and cultural mismatches between providers and families. Current practices inadequately address or provide incomplete control of symptoms, especially pain, resulting in decreased quality of life and high medical expense. The authors propose that care and care outcomes for people with sickle cell disease could be improved through community health worker case management, social support, and health system navigation. This paper outlines implementation strategies in current use to test community health workers for sickle cell disease management in a variety of settings. National medical and advocacy efforts to develop the community health workforce for sickle cell disease management may enhance the progress and development of "best practices" for this area of community-based care. PMID:27320471

  15. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  16. An Activities Handbook for Child Care: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Georgia Blair, Comp.

    Designed for both the home economics teacher as a reference in planning a science unit in the child care curriculum, and for the student of child care as a resource for planning science activities, this handbook contains six units for teaching science to preschool children. Five of the units teach through imaginative finger plays and songs, and…

  17. [Information system for supporting the Nursing Care Systematization].

    PubMed

    Malucelli, Andreia; Otemaier, Kelly Rafaela; Bonnet, Marcel; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Garcia, Telma Ribeiro

    2010-01-01

    It is an unquestionable fact, the importance, relevance and necessity of implementing the Nursing Care Systematization in the different environments of professional practice. Considering it as a principle, emerged the motivation for the development of an information system to support the Nursing Care Systematization, based on Nursing Process steps and Human Needs, using the diagnoses language, nursing interventions and outcomes for professional practice documentation. This paper describes the methodological steps and results of the information system development - requirements elicitation, modeling, object-relational mapping, implementation and system validation.

  18. Protocol care for hypertension supported by an expert system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, E; Yoshida, K; Izuno, T; Miyakawa, M; Sugimori, H

    1995-01-01

    1. PURPOSE. Hypertension if one of the major prevalent diseases that influences the prognosis of chronic diseases. Primary care should attract much attention in the management of hypertension. The management of hypertension includes not only the use of antihypertensiove drugs, but also the modification of unhealthy lifestyles. Multi-dimensional approaches are required for the management of hypertensive patients. This system supports the standard protocol care for hypertensive patients and the database for clinical epidemiology. 2. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS. This system has several functions that support the appropriate management of hypertensive patients. The first one is clinical database management. The second is the evaluation of the clinical conditions in hypertension. The third is the decision support system for the selection of treatments for hypertension. 3. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION. This system administers the clinical database, which includes symptoms and signs, laboratory data, and prescriptions. The database deals with the temporal course of the patient's status. The system that evaluates the patient's condition and the decision support system have some knowledge bases. The knowledge bases consist of the evaluation of the patient's condition, the appropriate selection of laboratory examinations, and suggestions for treatments, which involve a life-style modification and the proper prescription of medication. 4. STATUS REPORTS. The relational database was developed for handling the patient's records. These records were displayed on the terminal according to the temporal sequence. The graphical representations of the medical data were displayed in order to understand the patient's status. 5. LESSON LEARNED. This kind of protocol care system is expected to support the proper medical care of patients. Excess medications and laboratory examinations will be excluded under the protocol care, thus reducing unnecessary medical expense. The system will enhance the

  19. Public support for social financing of health care in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Perneger, Thomas V; Hudelson, Patricia M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the public's preference for financing health care according to people's ability to pay. The authors compared voters' support in 26 Swiss cantons for a legislative proposal to replace regionally rated health insurance premiums (current system) with premiums proportional to income and wealth, and co-financed through the value added tax. The vote took place in May 2003, and the initiative was rejected, with only 27 percent of support nationwide. However, support varied more than threefold, from 13 to 44 percent, among cantons. In multivariate analysis, support was most strongly correlated with the approval rate of the 1994 law on health insurance, which strengthened solidarity between the sick and the healthy. More modest associations were seen between support for the initiative and the health insurance premium of 2003, and proportions of elderly and urban residents in the population. Hence support for more social financing of health care was best explained by past preference for a social health insurance system in the local community. PMID:15759558

  20. Support workers in social care in England: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Manthorpe, Jill; Martineau, Stephen; Moriarty, Jo; Hussein, Shereen; Stevens, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports the findings of a scoping study designed to describe the evidence base with regard to support workers in social care in the United Kingdom and to identify gaps in knowledge. Multiple bibliographic databases were searched for studies published since 2003. The results revealed that the support worker role, though not well-defined, could be characterised as one aimed at fostering independence among service users, undertaking tasks across social and health-care, and not being trained in, or a member of, a specific profession. The studies identified were predominantly small-scale qualitative projects which considered issues such as role clarity, training and pay, worker satisfaction, service user views and the amount of time support workers are able to spend with service users compared to other staff. The review concluded that the research base lacks longitudinal studies, there is definitional confusion and imprecision, and there is limited evidence about employment terms and conditions for support workers or about their accountability and performance. The desirability and value of training and how it is resourced need further analysis. It is concluded that moves to self-directed support or personalisation and the increased reliance on and use of support workers, in the form of personal assistants, call for closer scrutiny of the role. PMID:20345887

  1. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  2. Renal supportive care and palliative care: revision and proposal in kidney replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Santos, Juan P; Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa; García-Llana, Helena; Fernández-Reyes, M José; Heras-Benito, Manuel; Molina-Ordas, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Astrid; Álvarez-Ude, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease may receive sustained renal supportive care and renal palliative care (RPC) starting with the diagnosis of the disease, throughout the various stages of renal replacement therapy (RRT), the cessation of the RRT, and in the decision of whether to provide conservative treatment or non-initiation of RRT. This article reviews the literature on the development of renal palliative care and proposed RPC models. We describe the progression of disease in organ failure, which is very different from other areas of palliative care (PC). We describe important components of resident nephrology training in PC. We discuss the management of pain and symptom control, as well as communication skills and other psychological and ethical aspects in the renal patient. We conclude that in chronic renal patients, a palliative care approach can provide a positive impact on the quality of life of patients and their families, as well as optimizing the complex treatment of the renal patient.

  3. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Method Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. Setting UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Participants Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Main outcomes Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers’ professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. Results A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16–19 years in 23 services and 23–35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. Conclusions This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers’ contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers’ roles. PMID:24644170

  4. Decision support system based semantic web for personalized patient care.

    PubMed

    Douali, Nassim; De Roo, Jos; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine may be considered an extension of traditional approaches to understanding and treating diseases, but with greater precision. A profile of a patient's genetic variation can guide the selection of drugs or treatment protocols that minimize harmful side effects or ensure a more successful outcome. In this paper we describe a decision support system designed to assist physicians for personalized care, and methodology for integration in the clinical workflow. A reasoning method for interacting heterogeneous knowledge and data is a necessity in the context of personalized medicine. Development of clinical decision support based semantic web for personalized patient care is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare.

  5. Supporting Siblings as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Lehmann, Vicky; Long, Kristin A; Alderfer, Melissa A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for supporting siblings as a standard of care in pediatric oncology. Using Medline, PsycInfo, and CINAHL, a systematic search of articles published over the past two decades about siblings of children with cancer was conducted. A total of 125 articles, which were primarily descriptive studies, were evaluated by the four investigators using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is moderate-quality evidence, as well as support from community stakeholders, to justify a strong recommendation that siblings of children with cancer should be provided with psychosocial services and that parents and professionals are advised about how to meet siblings' needs.

  6. A network to improve emergency patient care by facilitating practitioners to effectively support practitioners.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Networks that integrate academic and clinical activities are developing across Canada. The University of British Columbia, Department of Emergency Medicine, is leading the planning and implementation of a network that integrates clinician researchers and clinical experts with all practitioners in emergency medicine across the province. The intention is to facilitate emergency practitioners supporting emergency practitioners in remote to tertiary care settings to deliver best practices to patients in all BC emergency departments. The structure and objectives of the network demonstrate how focusing directly on patient-centred care across a large dispersed group of caregivers with common needs can effectively improve care delivery.

  7. Effectively marketing prepaid medical care with decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Forgionne, G A

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports a decision support system (DSS) that enables health plan administrators to quickly and easily: (1) manage relevant medical care market (consumer preference and competitors' program) information and (2) convert the information into appropriate medical care delivery and/or payment policies. As the paper demonstrates, the DSS enables providers to design cost efficient and market effective medical care programs. The DSS provides knowledge about subscriber preferences, customer desires, and the program offerings of the competition. It then helps administrators structure a medical care plan in a way that best meets consumer needs in view of the competition. This market effective plan has the potential to generate substantial amounts of additional revenue for the program. Since the system's data base consists mainly of the provider's records, routine transactions, and other readily available documents, the DSS can be implemented at a nominal incremental cost. The paper also evaluates the impact of the information system on the general financial performance of existing dental and mental health plans. In addition, the paper examines how the system can help contain the cost of providing medical care while providing better services to more potential beneficiaries than current approaches.

  8. Social Support and the Receipt of Home Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.

    1985-01-01

    Compares differences between elderly who use formal home care services and those who do not. Data revealed users as less healthy and less active and as receiving more assistance from both formal and informal sources. Suggests that formal and informal services complement rather than substitute for one another. (NRB)

  9. Emotional Support for Health Care Professionals: A Therapeutic Role for the Hospital Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    Chooljian, David M; Hallenbeck, James; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Sebesta, Robert; Iqbal, Hasan; Kuschner, Ware G

    2016-01-01

    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) are typically charged with addressing ethical disputes, conflicts, and dilemmas that arise in the course of patient care. HECs are not widely viewed as having a therapeutic role for health care professionals who experience psychological distress or anticipatory grief in the course of discharging professional duties. A case is presented in which an ethics consultation was requested, chiefly, to secure emotional support for health care professionals who had been asked by a patient to discontinue life-sustaining treatments. As the case demonstrates, HECs may be called upon to provide emotional support and reassurance to health care professionals who willingly carry out psychologically difficult actions, even though these actions may be ethically uncontroversial. In providing this service, the HEC may not necessarily engage in its customary activity of deliberating an ethics issue and resolving a conflict but may still provide valuable assistance, as in the case presented.

  10. Emotional Support for Health Care Professionals: A Therapeutic Role for the Hospital Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    Chooljian, David M; Hallenbeck, James; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Sebesta, Robert; Iqbal, Hasan; Kuschner, Ware G

    2016-01-01

    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) are typically charged with addressing ethical disputes, conflicts, and dilemmas that arise in the course of patient care. HECs are not widely viewed as having a therapeutic role for health care professionals who experience psychological distress or anticipatory grief in the course of discharging professional duties. A case is presented in which an ethics consultation was requested, chiefly, to secure emotional support for health care professionals who had been asked by a patient to discontinue life-sustaining treatments. As the case demonstrates, HECs may be called upon to provide emotional support and reassurance to health care professionals who willingly carry out psychologically difficult actions, even though these actions may be ethically uncontroversial. In providing this service, the HEC may not necessarily engage in its customary activity of deliberating an ethics issue and resolving a conflict but may still provide valuable assistance, as in the case presented. PMID:27462956

  11. 'We're in the sandwich': Aged care staff members' negotiation of constraints and the role of the organisation in enacting and supporting an ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-12-01

    Aged care staff are often seen as holding power in care relationships, particularly in client engagement. Such a perception, however, may limit our understanding and analysis of the dynamics and politics within care spaces. This paper uses interview and focus group data from both staff and clients of an Australian aged care provider to identify the positions given to, and taken up by, staff in client engagement. Focusing on one of these positions, in which staff are seen as managing and negotiating constraints, the paper uses an ethic of care lens to examine the context in which engagement - and this position taking - occurs. Findings reflect the importance of the organisational and systemic context to the practice of care ethics and the potential vulnerability and disempowerment of care giving staff. Implications for the support of staff in client engagement and the role of care organisations beyond structures and processes to an active participant in an ethic of care are discussed. PMID:26568218

  12. An information retrieval service to support clinical decision-making at the point of care.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F; Gardner, M; van Rijsbergen, K

    1999-01-01

    The information retrieval systems currently available in general practice, such as Medline, and web search engines are passive and relatively difficult to access during consultations. Emergent technologies, including the National Electronic Library for Health, offer opportunities for more active decision support. We examine the extent to which information retrieval could support primary care consultations by examining the impact of the new technology at different stages of the consultation. We advocate a system whereby professional organisations concerned with quality of care, such as the Royal College of General Practitioners, might contribute the the process. PMID:10824349

  13. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  14. Exploring primary care activities in ACT teams.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Williams, Nancy A; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Katon, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    People with serious mental illness often receive inadequate primary and preventive care services. Federal healthcare reform endorses team-based care that provides high quality primary and preventive care to at risk populations. Assertive community treatment (ACT) teams offer a proven, standardized treatment approach effective in improving mental health outcomes for the seriously mentally ill. Much is known about the effectiveness of ACT teams in improving mental health outcomes, but the degree to which medical care needs are addressed is not established. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which ACT teams address the physical health of the population they serve. ACT team leaders were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey to explore attitudes and activities involving the primary care needs of their clients. Information was collected regarding the use of health screening tools, physical health assessments, provision of medical care and collaboration with primary care systems. Data was analyzed from 127 team leaders across the country, of which 55 completed the entire survey. Nearly every ACT team leader believed ACT teams have a role in identifying and managing the medical co-morbidities of their clientele. ACT teams report participation in many primary care activities. ACT teams are providing a substantial amount of primary and preventive services to their population. The survey suggests standardization of physical health identification, management or referral processes within ACT teams may result in improved quality of medical care. ACT teams are in a unique position to improve physical health care by virtue of having medically trained staff and frequent, close contact with their clients.

  15. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  16. Using social media in supportive and palliative care research.

    PubMed

    Casañas i Comabella, Carolina; Wanat, Marta

    2015-06-01

    Difficulties relating to supportive and palliative care research are often reported. However, studies have highlighted that people near the end of life are happy to participate in research and want their voices heard. Thus, one may raise a twofold question: are we limiting the free will of people who are seriously ill? And are we missing important data, which probably cannot be obtained from other sources? In light of this landscape, a new opportunity has emerged: the use of social media (SM). This paper provides a comprehensive summary of SM, including its theoretical underpinnings, and recent examples of successful uses of SM in healthcare research. It also outlines the opportunities (wider reach, direct access, the potential of Big Data, readiness of research data, empowered participants) and challenges (anonymity of participants, digital divide, sample bias, screening and 'saying no' to participants, data analysis) of using SM in end-of-life care research. Finally, it describes the practical steps that a researcher could follow to recruit patients using SM. Implications for palliative care clinicians, researchers and policymakers are also discussed, with a focus on the need to facilitate patient-centred care through the use of SM. The need for relevant and updated guidelines in this new, emerging field is highlighted. PMID:25311211

  17. Role of Supportive Care for Terminal Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Panda, Dipanjan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with end stage or terminal HCC are those presenting with tumors leading to a very poor Performance Status (ECOG 3–4) or Child–Pugh C patients with tumors beyond the transplantation threshold. Among HCC patients, 15–20% present with end stage or terminal stage HCC. Their median survival is less than 3–4 months. The management of end stage or terminal HCC is only symptomatic and no definitive tumor directed treatment is indicated. Patients with end stage or terminal HCC should receive palliative support including management of pain, nutrition and psychological support. In general, they should not be considered for participating in clinical trials. This review focuses on palliative care of terminal stage HCC. PMID:25755605

  18. Multi-centred mixed-methods PEPFAR HIV care & support public health evaluation: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A public health response is essential to meet the multidimensional needs of patients and families affected by HIV disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In order to appraise curret provision of HIV care and support in East Africa, and to provide evidence-based direction to future care programming, and Public Health Evaluation was commissioned by the PEPFAR programme of the US Government. Methods/Design This paper described the 2-Phase international mixed methods study protocol utilising longitudinal outcome measurement, surveys, patient and family qualitative interviews and focus groups, staff qualitative interviews, health economics and document analysis. Aim 1) To describe the nature and scope of HIV care and support in two African countries, including the types of facilities available, clients seen, and availability of specific components of care [Study Phase 1]. Aim 2) To determine patient health outcomes over time and principle cost drivers [Study Phase 2]. The study objectives are as follows. 1) To undertake a cross-sectional survey of service configuration and activity by sampling 10% of the facilities being funded by PEPFAR to provide HIV care and support in Kenya and Uganda (Phase 1) in order to describe care currently provided, including pharmacy drug reviews to determine availability and supply of essential drugs in HIV management. 2) To conduct patient focus group discussions at each of these (Phase 1) to determine care received. 3) To undertake a longitudinal prospective study of 1200 patients who are newly diagnosed with HIV or patients with HIV who present with a new problem attending PEPFAR care and support services. Data collection includes self-reported quality of life, core palliative outcomes and components of care received (Phase 2). 4) To conduct qualitative interviews with staff, patients and carers in order to explore and understand service issues and care provision in more depth (Phase 2). 5) To undertake document analysis to appraise

  19. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper.

  20. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Emmanuel Joseph; Cheah, Whye Lian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32–2.64). Top 10 items with “moderate to high” level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old), had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups. PMID:27239346

  1. Long-term care counselor: an electronic decision-support tool.

    PubMed

    Polniaszek, Susan; Klinger, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    With the American population aging at a steady pace, the need to help individuals, families, and aging/health care professionals in making often-difficult long-term care decisions is increasing. Finding accurate, impartial information is also critically important, especially information that is personalized to the individual rather than for the general public. The Long-Term Care Counselor (LTCC) is a free and confidential, web-based, decision-support tool developed by The National Council on the Aging (NCOA) to meet this particular need. It is part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's (CMS) long-term care information initiative and is found via the official Medicare website at http://www.medicare.gov/ longtermcare/static/ltccounselor.asp. The LTCC helps individuals, caregivers, and professionals to find information relevant to particular circumstances based on the age, health, level of activity, finances, or personal preferences of the person.

  2. [Physical activities, psychiatric care and mental health].

    PubMed

    Davanture, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    At Ville-Evrard psychiatric hospital, sports activities are used as one of several therapeutic tools. The day-long multi-sport sessions, led notably by a nurse, form part of the care programme. Sport not only enables the patients to exert themselves, it is above all a form of therapeutic mediation which encourages verbal and non-verbal communication.

  3. Primary Care Provider Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Two Self-Management Support Programs for Vulnerable Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Bhandari, Vijay K; Handley, Margaret; Rundall, Thomas; Hammer, Hali; Schillinger, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care providers (PCPs) in safety net settings face barriers to optimizing care for patients with diabetes. We conducted this study to assess PCPs' perspectives on the effectiveness of two language-concordant diabetes self-management support programs. Methods One year postintervention, we surveyed PCPs whose patients with diabetes participated in a three-arm multiclinic randomized controlled trial comparing usual care (UC), weekly automated telephone self-management (ATSM) support with nurse care management, and monthly group medical visits (GMVs). We compared PCP perspectives on patient activation to create and achieve goals, quality of care, and barriers to care using regression models accounting for within-PCP clustering. Results Of 113 eligible PCPs caring for 330 enrolled patients, 87 PCPs (77%) responded to surveys about 245 (74%) enrolled patients. Intervention patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as activated to create and achieve goals for chronic care when compared with UC patients (standardized effect size, ATSM vs UC, +0.41, p = 0.01; GMV vs UC, +0.31, p = 0.05). Primary care providers rated quality of care as higher for patients exposed to ATSM compared to UC (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.01). Compared with GMV patients, ATSM patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as overcoming barriers related to limited English proficiency (82% ATSM vs 44% GMV, p = 0.01) and managing medications (80% ATSM vs 53% GMV, p = 0.01). Conclusions Primary care providers perceived that patients receiving ATSM support had overcome barriers, participated more actively, and received higher quality diabetes care. These views of clinician stakeholders lend additional evidence for the potential to upscale ATSM more broadly to support PCPs in their care of diverse, multilinguistic populations. PMID:22401329

  4. [On hi-tech cardiologic care model in medical support of train operation safety].

    PubMed

    Pfaf, V F; Gorokhova, S G; Kotenko, V A

    2015-01-01

    The article covers hi-tech cardiologic care model in system of medical support of train operation safety, with definition of structure blocks in this model. Discussion covers peculiarities of the model functioning in comparison with the governmental system of hi-tech medical care, including its closed cycle principle characteristics, wide patients selection among railway workers, continuous and close cooperation between various medical speicalities, with active involvement of occupational fitness specialists (medical examination committees of various levels, including Central Medical Examination Committee), major extent of interventional rentgenosurgical technologies applied in diseases without significant functional failure.

  5. Personal resources supporting living at home as described by older home care clients.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sini; Routasalo, Pirkko; Arve, Seija

    2008-08-01

    This study describes the personal resources of older (> or = 75 years) home care clients in Finland and their perceptions of factors that enhance and constrain their ability to live independently at home. The data were collected by unstructured interviews with 21 older home care clients. Inductive content analysis were used to analyse the data. The resources of older people consisted of a sense of control over one's life and a determination to remain active. Factors enhancing older people's resources were their involvement in leisure activities and social networks, factors undermining their resources were conditions on living imposed by outsiders, declining health and loneliness. The results show that home care professionals do not yet have sufficient skills and abilities to identify and support older people's existing resources. As well as having access to necessary resources, it is also crucial that older people know how to use them.

  6. Supportive care considerations for older adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Naeim, Arash; Aapro, Matti; Subbarao, Rashmi; Balducci, Lodovico

    2014-08-20

    The treatment of cancer presents specific concerns that are unique to the growing demographic of elderly patients. Because the incidence of cancer is strongly correlated with aging, the expansion of supportive care and other age-appropriate therapies will be of great importance as the population of elderly patients with cancer increases in the coming years. Elderly patients are especially likely to experience febrile neutropenia, complications from chemotherapy-induced nausea, anemia, osteoporosis (especially in patients diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer), depression, insomnia, and fatigue. These issues are often complicated by other chronic conditions related to age, such as diabetes and cardiac disease. For many patients, symptoms may be addressed both through lifestyle management and pharmaceutical approaches. Therefore, the key to improving quality of life for the elderly patient with cancer is an awareness of their specific needs and a familiarity with emergent treatment options. PMID:25071112

  7. New trends in high-technology health care support services.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, D F

    1998-01-01

    To understand clearly the economic dynamics of high-technology service and support in hospitals, the author used results of recent studies carried out by D. F. Blumberg & Associates, utilizing a variety of sources, to identify existing cost components of the typical 300- to 400-bed general hospital located in a major metropolitan area in the United States. The largest single functional component of cost is direct labor and benefits. Other major cost items include direct overhead administration and infrastructure costs and outside material equipment and supply purchases. This evaluation, based on extensive benchmarking comparison and market estimates, suggests that the issues of make, buy, or outsource are neither trivial nor easy to resolve in the health care field.

  8. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  9. Active Play Opportunities at Child Care

    PubMed Central

    Saelens, Brian E.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Physical activity (PA) is important for children’s health and development, yet preschoolers are not meeting PA recommendations. The objective of this study was to examine different PA opportunities at child care and how variation in indoor versus outdoor and free versus teacher-led opportunities relate to children’s PA. METHODS: An observational study of 98 children (mean age 4.5 years, 49% girls) from 10 child care centers. Classrooms were observed for at least 4 full days per center (total 50 days) to categorize time into (1) not an active play opportunity (APO); (2) naptime; (3) APO, outdoor free play; (4) APO, outdoor teacher-led; (5) APO, indoor free play; and (6) APO, indoor teacher-led. Children wore accelerometers during observations. Linear regression models examined the influence of APO categories on moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. RESULTS: Children’s activity was 73% sedentary, 13% light, and 14% MVPA. For 88% of time children did not have APOs, including 26% time as naptime. On average, 48 minutes per day were APOs (41% sedentary, 18% light, and 41% MVPA), 33 minutes per day were outdoors. The most frequent APO was outdoor free play (8% of time); outdoor teacher-led time was <1%. Children were more active and less sedentary outdoors versus indoors and during the child-initiated APOs (indoors and outdoors) versus teacher-led APOs. CONCLUSIONS: Preschoolers were presented with significantly fewer than recommended opportunities for PA at child care. More APOs are needed for children to meet recommendations, particularly those that encourage more outdoor time, more teacher-led and child-initiated active play, and flexibility in naptime for preschoolers. PMID:25986016

  10. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  11. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  12. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  13. Improving Support Services for Family Child Care through Relationship-Based Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Bibbs, Tonya

    2011-01-01

    Family child care (FCC) providers often experience isolation from other early childhood and child care professionals. Yet, research suggests that providers who network with other providers, engage with community resources, and belong to support groups tend to offer higher quality child care. For example, the Family Child Care Network Impact Study…

  14. The Effect of Telephone Support Groups on Costs of Care for Veterans with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Laura O.; Shulan, Mollie D.; Toseland, Ronald W.; Freeman, Kurt E.; Vasquez, Bob Edward; Gao, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have addressed the effects of caregiver interventions on the costs of care for the care recipient. This study evaluated the effects of a caregiver education and support group delivered via the telephone on care recipient health care utilization and cost. Design and Methods: The Telehealth Education Program (TEP) is a…

  15. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  16. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  17. Oncologist Support for Consolidated Payments for Cancer Care Management in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Siva; Hautamaki, Emily

    2016-01-01

    /good, who have a contract with a commercial payer that reimburses for dispensed oral cancer drugs, or who practice in a hospital setting. The use of at least 1 quality-of-care metric was more common among respondents participating in an accountable care organization (ACO) than among those not participating in an ACO (92.6% vs 83.2%, respectively; P = .0380). The most common metric used by the physicians in their practice setting was patient satisfaction scores (60.1%). Accountability for delivering high-quality care was supported by 74.9% of respondents; those who practice in a hospital setting were twice as likely as those in private practice to support accountability for quality of care (81.3% vs 67.6%; odds ratio, 2.1; P = .0176). Conclusion Support for ASCO's payment reform proposal is mixed among oncology physicians and medical directors, underscoring the importance of continuous and broader engagement of practicing physicians around the country via outreach and dialogue on topics that impact their clinical practices, as well as providing education or awareness activities by ASCO to its membership. PMID:27625745

  18. Perceived social support among adults seeking care for acute respiratory tract infections in US EDs.

    PubMed

    Levin, Sara K; Metlay, Joshua P; Maselli, Judith H; Kersey, Ayanna S; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2009-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) provide a disproportionate amount of care to disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. We examined social support levels among a diverse population of adults seeking ED care for acute respiratory tract infections. A convenience sample of adults seeking care in 1 of 15 US EDs was telephone interviewed 1 to 6 weeks postvisit. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (7-point Likert) assessed social support across 3 domains: friends, family, and significant others. Higher scores indicate higher support. Of 1104 subjects enrolled, 704 (64%) completed the follow-up interview. Factor analysis yielded 3 factors. Mean social support score was 5.54 (SD 1.04). Female sex, greater household income, and better health status were independently associated with higher levels of social support. Social support levels among adults seeking care in the ED for acute respiratory tract infections are similar to general population cohorts, suggesting that social support is not a strong determinant of health care seeking in EDs.

  19. The Canadian experience: Using telemedicine for the support of medical care at remote sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, Maxwell

    1991-01-01

    While the majority of Canadians live in a narrow strip about 200 miles wide just north of the 45th parallel, a significant proportion of the population lives in non-urban, remote and sometimes isolated areas. Given this widely dispersed population, the provision of health services has always been a challenge. A list of non-urban health needs include the following: consulting services; clinical laboratory resources; investigative techniques (e.g., EEG, radiology, ultrasound, nuclear medicine); continuing education for physicians, nurses and other health professionals; teaching and training programs for administrative and support staff (dietary, housekeeping, maintenance); community health education and improved general education for health workers and families. For nearly three decades physicians and other health care professionals in the United States and Canada have been exploring the application of telecommunications to health care in rural and remote areas. The terms telemedicine and telehealth are used interchangeably to describe this activity. The prefix 'tele' refers to distance and now includes all types of communication over distance that support health care and health educational programs. Actually, telemedicine is as old as the telephone, which is still the most widely used communications technology in health care.

  20. Social Support Can Buffer against Stress and Shape Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hostinar, Camelia E.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Social support from close relationship partners is an important resource for coping with stress, particularly during childhood. We discuss ethical challenges associated with studying stress and its social buffering in the laboratory, as well as emerging evidence regarding two potential neural substrates for the social buffering of stress: hypothalamic oxytocin activity and activation of areas in the prefrontal cortex associated with effective self-regulation. We also address the role of early-life social experiences in shaping brain development, as well as recommendations for practice and policy that would advance the ethical treatment of children and reduce social inequalities in early-life experiences and opportunities–e.g., investing in programs that prevent child maltreatment and facilitating access to high-quality child care for economically disadvantaged families. We also debate the ethical implications of using oxytocin nasal sprays to simulate the stress-reducing properties of social support and advise waiting for more evidence before recommending their use. PMID:26478822

  1. Supporting positive dimensions of health, challenges in mental health care

    PubMed Central

    Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will explore two contrasting paradigms in mental health care and their relationship to evidence-based practice. The biomedical perspective of pathogenesis and the health perspective of salotogenesis are two major diverse views in mental health care. Positive dimensions of health are traditionally viewed as software not suitable for statistical analysis, while absence of symptoms of disease are regarded as measurable and suitable for statistical analysis and appropriate as a foundation of evidence-based practice. If the main goal of mental health care is to enhance subjectively experienced health among patients, it will not be sufficient to evaluate absence of symptoms of disease as a measure of quality of care. The discussion focuses on the paradox of evidence-based absence of illness and disease versus subjectively experienced health and well-being as criterions of quality of care in mental health care. PMID:21637739

  2. Housestaff activism: the emergence of patient-care demands.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, L M

    1982-01-01

    There have been two trends within the physician housestaff movement: increased acceptance of collective bargaining and unions, and a shift from narrower economic to broader political demands, including some involving patient care. Case studies of politically active housestaff associations in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles are used to examine the emergence of "patient-care" demands and their compatibility with collective bargaining frameworks. As house-staff have become principal providers of care to indigent populations in public hospitals, and economic cutbacks have endangered service as well as the positions of physicians, patient-care demands arise and become infused with demands for participation and control in decision-making. Common factors in the politicization of housestaff have been the contribution of activists of the sixties as leaders, and the impact of fiscal crisis and economic retrenchment in the seventies. However, the emergence and resolution of these issues has differed depending upon legal, political, historical, and organizational variations. In general, patient-care issues are supported by housestaff when they dovetail with housestaff interests. However, physician interests can diverge from those of patients, as in the case of manpower redistribution. On the whole, wages and benefits have done better than educational or patient-care demands. Educational demands have met with counterattack, and patient care, limited by the traditional scope of collective bargaining, has had to evolve indirectly, and has been hurt by long-term economic trends. Finally, national housestaff organization is limited by the wide-ranging politics and ideas of diverse regional organizations which represent different types of training institutions and career orientations.

  3. Using an internet intervention to support self-management of low back pain in primary care: protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial (SupportBack)

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Stanford, Rosie; Little, Paul; Roberts, Lisa; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Hay, Elaine; Stuart, Beth; Turner, David; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. The majority of patients experiencing LBP are managed in primary care, where first-line care recommendations consist of advice to self-manage and remain active. Internet interventions present a potential means of providing patients with tailored self-management advice and evidence-based support for increasing physical activity. Methods/analysis This protocol describes a single-blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial of an internet intervention developed to support the self-management of LBP in primary care. Patients are being randomised to 1 of 3 groups receiving either usual primary care, usual primary care with the addition of an internet intervention or an internet intervention with physiotherapist telephone support. Patients are followed up at 3 months. Primary outcomes are the feasibility of (1) the trial design/methods, (2) the delivery of the internet intervention and (3) the provision of telephone support by physiotherapists. Secondary outcomes will include exploratory analysis of estimates and variation in clinical outcomes of pain and disability, in order to inform a future main trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference 13/SC/0202. The feasibility findings will be disseminated to the research community through presentations at conferences and publication in peer review journals. Broader dissemination will come following a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 31034004. PMID:26399575

  4. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment

  5. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  6. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care

    PubMed Central

    Duker, Leah I. Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care. PMID:27295001

  7. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Sleight, Alix G; Duker, Leah I Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care. PMID:27295001

  8. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Sleight, Alix G; Duker, Leah I Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care.

  9. CARE activities on superconducting RF cavities at INFN Milano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosotti, A.; Pierini, P.; Michelato, P.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Panzeri, N.; Monaco, L.; Paulon, R.; Novati, M.

    2005-09-01

    The SC RF group at INFN Milano-LASA is involved both in the TESLA/TTF collaboration and in the research and design activity on superconducting cavities for proton accelerators. Among these activities, some are supported by the European community within the CARE project. In the framework of the JRASRF collaboration we are developing a coaxial blade tuner for ILC (International Linear Collider) cavities, integrated with piezoelectric actuators for the compensation of the Lorenz force detuning and microphonics perturbation. Another activity, regarding the improved component design on SC technology, based on the information retrieving about the status of art on ancillaries and experience of various laboratories involved in SCRF, has started in our laboratory. Finally, in the framework of the HIPPI collaboration, we are testing two low beta superconducting cavities, built for the Italian TRASCO project, to verify the possibility to use them for pulsed operation. All these activities will be described here, together with the main results and the future perspectives.

  10. The VST active primary mirror support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, Pietro; Capaccioli, Massimo; D'Orsi, Sergio; Ferragina, Luigi; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco; De Paris, Giacinto; Fierro, Davide; Tomelleri, Raffaele; Rossettini, Pierfrancesco; Perina, Francesco; Recchia, Stefano; Magrin, Demetrio

    2010-07-01

    The 2.6-m primary mirror of the VST telescope is equipped with an active optics system in order to correct low-order aberrations, constantly monitoring the optical quality of the image and controlling the relative position and the shape of the optical elements. Periodically an image analyser calculates the deviation of the image from the best quality. VST is equipped with both a Shack-Hartmann in the probe system and a curvature sensor embedded in the OmegaCAM instrument. The telescope control software decomposes the deviation into single optical contributions and calculates the force correction that each active element has to perform to achieve the optimal quality. The set of correction forces, one for each axial actuator, is computed by the telescope central computer and transmitted to the local control unit of the primary mirror system for execution. The most important element of the VST active optics is the primary mirror, with its active support system located within the primary mirror cell structure. The primary mirror support system is composed by an axial and a lateral independent systems and includes an earthquake safety system. The system is described and the results of the qualification test campaign are discussed.

  11. Peer Collaboration: A Model to Support Counsellor Self-Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Constance A.; Phelan, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a larger case study on how continuous learning in the workplace could be achieved through the implementation of peer collaboration, the process of how counsellors engaged in self-care within a large health care organization became clearer. This article is based on data derived from a qualitative analysis of nine transcribed…

  12. Supporting Infant Teachers in Their Care of Fussy Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurie, Cindy; Baker, Marsha

    2008-01-01

    Child care teachers cope with juggling multiple competing demands: (1) managing relationships with parents; (2) coping with individual infant temperaments; and (3) meeting the group needs of the other infants in their care. Infant teachers often play a unique role in that they may be the first adults to listen and understand what the experience of…

  13. Enhancing the Empowerment of Youth in Foster Care: Supportive Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra J.; Skolnik, Louise; Turnbull, Ayme

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on youth empowerment in seven child welfare programmatic areas. A lack of studies specifically focused on the empowerment of youth in foster care was found. Conceptual perspectives and existing data, however, suggest that the empowerment of youth in and transitioning out of care is essential and should be overtly…

  14. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  15. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chou P.; Cui, Ding; Chen, Yueh-peng; Lin, Chia-pei; Levine, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that “choristers”, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking), carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (“soloists”) in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons) indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons), that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior. PMID:25610392

  16. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland. PMID:27610908

  17. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  18. Implementation of Active Support in Victoria, Australia: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Bigby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Active support is an effective intervention to support engagement of residents with intellectual disability in group homes. This survey explored resident characteristics of the people supported by organisations implementing active support, the provision of active support, its procedures and systems, and resident engagement in…

  19. The Community Perinatal Care Study: Home Visiting and Nursing Support for Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, David; Tough, Suzanne; Siever, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    This article describes The Community Perinatal Care Study, a community-based study of pregnancy support that was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between 2001 and 2004. The study was conducted to learn how to improve community-based pregnancy care and to improve prenatal care and healthy births, particularly for women with increased…

  20. Supporting Care Leavers to Fulfil Their Educational Aspirations: Resilience, Relationships and Resistance to Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Most children in state care do not do as well in school as their peers, but the period of leaving care and transition to adulthood may offer a "turning point" for positive change. Based on a small study of care leavers in England, this article employs the concept of resilience to explore the significance of supportive relationships in enabling…

  1. Non-Licensed Forms of Child Care in Homes: Issues and Recommendations for State Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen; Elliott, Kim; Beaudette, Christine; Azer, Sheri

    Noting the increased interest of states in exploring how they can provide supports to informal child-care providers to improve the quality of care and education that children receive, this report discusses quality initiatives, licensing issues, training, and monitoring of various forms of non-licensed family child care. The types of care…

  2. The Ethic of Care in Teaching: An Overview of Supportive Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Lynn M.; Ennis, Catherine D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of three theoretical frameworks that appear related to teachers who manifest an ethic of care. An in-depth review of related literature develops Noddings' theory of the ethic of care, focusing on defining care in teaching. It is further supported with theories of moral development, the theory…

  3. Transitional Child Care: State Experiences and Emerging Policies under the Family Support Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebb, Nancy; And Others

    This guide is designed to provide information about transitional child care (TCC) program policies and operations and to offer recommendations to policymakers and advocates. Transitional child care is a new federal child care program that every state must implement by April 1, 1990. Established by the Family Support Act (FSA) of 1988, TCC is…

  4. The use of flange extenders to support patient care.

    PubMed

    Black, Pat

    Pat Black, Senior Lecturer, St Mark's Institute of GI Nursing, St Mark's Hospital, explores one option for stoma care nurses to consider that could help improve patient confidence and comfort. PMID:26973006

  5. [Ethical challenge in palliative support of intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Salomon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Intensive care medicine and palliative care medicine were considered for a long time to be contrasting concepts in therapy. While intensive care medicine is directed towards prolonging life and tries to stabilize disordered body functions, palliative care medicine is focused upon the relief of disturbances to help patients in the face of death. Today both views have become congruent. Palliative aspects are equally important in curative therapy. In the course of illness or in respect of the patient's will, the aim of therapy may change from curative to palliative. Two examples are presented to illustrate the ethical challenges in this process. They follow from the medical indication, attention to the patient's will, different opinions in the team, truth at the bedside and from what must be done in the process of withdrawing therapy.

  6. Eva Between Anxiety and Hope: Integrating Anthroposophic Music Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Ben-Arye, Yotam; Barak, Yael

    2015-11-30

    Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM) aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music therapy goals are discussed in regard to two modes of treatment: receptive listening and clinical composition. Next, these two treatment modes are discussed in a broader context by reviewing conventional music therapy interventions during chemotherapy on two axes: a. standardized vs. individualized treatment; b. patient's involvement on a passive to active continuum. In conclusion, psycho-oncology care can be enriched by adding anthroposophic medicine-oriented music therapy integrated within patients' supportive care. PMID:26973967

  7. Eva Between Anxiety and Hope: Integrating Anthroposophic Music Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Ben-Arye, Yotam; Barak, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM) aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music therapy goals are discussed in regard to two modes of treatment: receptive listening and clinical composition. Next, these two treatment modes are discussed in a broader context by reviewing conventional music therapy interventions during chemotherapy on two axes: a. standardized vs. individualized treatment; b. patient’s involvement on a passive to active continuum. In conclusion, psycho-oncology care can be enriched by adding anthroposophic medicine-oriented music therapy integrated within patients’ supportive care. PMID:26973967

  8. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    PubMed

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

  9. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    PubMed

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system. PMID:25370088

  10. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel L.; Smerek, Michelle M.; Blake Cameron, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Method: Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. Framework: An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. Next Steps: We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use. PMID:27563686

  11. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health...

  12. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health...

  13. How to Support Toddlers' Autonomy: A Qualitative Study with Child Care Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Côté-Lecaldare, Marilena; Joussemet, Mireille; Dufour, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study explored the concrete manifestations of autonomy support (AS) toward toddlers. Eight child care educators were interviewed. Based on our assessment, these educators all valued AS. A qualitative content analysis revealed 18 practices that this group of child care educators considered supportive of toddlers'…

  14. Increasing Family Support Capacity in Child Care Centers through Regional Networking and Information Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, Karen L.

    Society as a whole has become more transient, creating a weakened network for families in need of assistance. The child care center has the ability to create a support system for families via referrals to outside agencies, support groups, and organizations. This practicum project assessed a strategy to address the difficulty a child care agency…

  15. The Impact of Stress and Support on Direct Care Workers' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ejaz, Farida K.; Noelker, Linda S.; Menne, Heather L.; Bagaka's, Joshua G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research applies a stress and support conceptual model to investigate the effects of background characteristics, personal and job-related stressors, and workplace support on direct care workers' (DCW) job satisfaction. Design and Methods: Researchers collected survey data from 644 DCWs in 49 long-term care (LTC) organizations. The…

  16. Relational Communications Strategies to Support Family-Centered Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Benzies, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units is intended to facilitate parental involvement, shared decision-making, and improved outcomes for infants and families. To support family-centered care, there are multiple interventions with different components and associated outcomes that have been described in the research literature. This evidence leaves many unanswered questions about how best to implement and evaluate strategies to enhance family-centered care. This article provides a brief overview of interventions designed to support family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units and offers an evidence-informed staff education strategy to enhance family-centered care. The evidence-informed relational communications strategies of circular pattern diagrams, questioning, and commendations are described, along with specific examples of how nurses can use them in in their day-to-day practice in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27465456

  17. Supportive care in pediatric oncology: oncologic emergencies and management of fever and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Henry, Meret; Sung, Lillian

    2015-02-01

    Advancements in the care of children with cancer have, in part, been achieved through improvements in supportive care. Situations that require prompt care can occur at the time of presentation as well as during treatment. This article discusses the approach to children with fever and neutropenia, a complication encountered daily by care providers, as well as oncologic emergencies that can be seen at the time of a child's initial diagnosis: hyperleukocytosis, tumor lysis syndrome, superior vena cava syndrome, and spinal cord compression.

  18. Carers' quality of life and experiences of adult social care support in England

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Stacey; Malley, Juliette

    2014-01-01

    Informal carers make a vital contribution to the well-being of the people they care for or look after. Against the policy background in England, the purpose of this study was to explore the views of carers who are in contact with adult social care support services. A qualitative study with 31 carers, who were recruited via local authorities and carers' organisations, was conducted between April and July 2012 to collect data on carers' experiences and perceptions of their quality of life (QoL) with and without adult social care and support for themselves or the person they look after. Through framework analysis, three key themes were identified: (i) definitions of social care services ‘for’ the carer or ‘for’ care recipient and social care outcomes; (ii) carers' access to social care services; and (iii) the meaning and value of informal care. We find that carers' QoL is affected by social care support directed at carers and support directed at those they care for, as well as access to services, the experience of stigma in communities, and in how individual needs and preferences are considered when making decisions about care. While there is much to welcome in the direction of policy in England, this study has shown that there are some gaps in thinking around these areas that will need to be addressed if the lives of carers are to be improved. PMID:24330095

  19. Carers' quality of life and experiences of adult social care support in England.

    PubMed

    Rand, Stacey; Malley, Juliette

    2014-07-01

    Informal carers make a vital contribution to the well-being of the people they care for or look after. Against the policy background in England, the purpose of this study was to explore the views of carers who are in contact with adult social care support services. A qualitative study with 31 carers, who were recruited via local authorities and carers' organisations, was conducted between April and July 2012 to collect data on carers' experiences and perceptions of their quality of life (QoL) with and without adult social care and support for themselves or the person they look after. Through framework analysis, three key themes were identified: (i) definitions of social care services 'for' the carer or 'for' care recipient and social care outcomes; (ii) carers' access to social care services; and (iii) the meaning and value of informal care. We find that carers' QoL is affected by social care support directed at carers and support directed at those they care for, as well as access to services, the experience of stigma in communities, and in how individual needs and preferences are considered when making decisions about care. While there is much to welcome in the direction of policy in England, this study has shown that there are some gaps in thinking around these areas that will need to be addressed if the lives of carers are to be improved.

  20. Being Active at Child Care. Facilitator's Guide [and Videotape]. Active Me, Healthy Me.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenhagen, Kathryn A.

    Noting that childhood obesity is a growing concern for parents, educators, and health care providers, this guide and videotape, "Being Active at Child Care," is from a three-part series, "Active Me, Healthy Me," exploring ways to keep children active while in child care settings. The 13-minute videotape demonstrates in both a child care center and…

  1. Supportive care and the use of relaxation therapy in a district cancer service.

    PubMed Central

    McIllmurray, M. B.; Holdcroft, P. E.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a cancer support organisation, CancerCare, for North Lancashire and South Lakeland is described. The use of relaxation therapy is described to illustrate the demand for supportive care. Between January 1990 and 1991, 513 patients, 243 relatives and 143 bereaved were referred to five cancer support nurses. One hundred and sixty-two (32%), 29 (12%) and 49 (34%) respectively, used relaxation therapy. The high demand for supportive care suggests that services should be made available in any district health provider unit. Measures of benefit and better definition of services are required before clear recommendations can be made. PMID:8471447

  2. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support.

  3. 75 FR 48235 - Rural Health Care Universal Service Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ...) by filing paper copies. See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121... broadband infrastructure for health care purposes, incorporating lessons learned from the Pilot Program. 6... be selected for funding each year. One of the lessons learned from the Pilot Program is that...

  4. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  5. Concepts and definitions for “supportive care,” “best supportive care,” “palliative care,” and “hospice care” in the published literature, dictionaries, and textbooks

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; De La Cruz, Maxine; Mori, Masanori; Parsons, Henrique A.; Kwon, Jung Hye; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Kim, Sun Hyun; Dev, Rony; Hutchins, Ronald; Liem, Christiana; Kang, Duck-Hee; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Commonly used terms such as “supportive care,” “best supportive care,” “palliative care,” and “hospice care” were rarely and inconsistently defined in the palliative oncology literature. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to further identify concepts and definitions for these terms. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL for published peer-reviewed articles from 1948 to 2011 that conceptualized, defined, or examined these terms. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and then extracted the concepts/definitions when available. Dictionaries/textbooks were also searched. Results Nine of 32 “SC/BSC,” 25 of 182 “PC,” and 12 of 42 “HC” articles focused on providing a conceptual framework/definition. Common concepts for all three terms were symptom control and quality-of-life for patients with life-limiting illness. “SC” focused more on patients on active treatment compared to other categories (9/9 vs. 8/37) and less often involved interdisciplinary care (4/9 vs. 31/37). In contrast, “HC” focused more on volunteers (6/12 vs. 6/34), bereavement care (9/12 vs. 7/34), and community care (9/12 vs. 6/34). Both “PC” and “SC/BSC” were applicable earlier in the disease trajectory (16/34 vs. 0/9). We found 13, 24, and 17 different definitions for “SC/BSC,” “PC,” and “HC,” respectively. “SC/BSC” was the most variably defined, ranging from symptom management during cancer therapy to survivorship care. Dictionaries/textbooks showed similar findings. Conclusion We identified defining concepts for “SC/BSC,” “PC,” and “HC” and developed a preliminary conceptual framework unifying these terms along the continuum of care to help build consensus toward standardized definitions. PMID:22936493

  6. Using function-focused care to increase physical activity among older adults.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of physical activity for older adults, adherence to regular physical activity recommendations is poor. Less than half of adults in this country meet physical activity recommendations with reasons for lack of adherence including such things as access, motivation, pain, fear, comorbidities, among others. To overcome these challenges, function-focused care was developed. Function-focused care is a philosophy of care that focuses on evaluating the older adult's underlying capability with regard to function and physical activity and helping him or her optimize and maintain physical function and ability and continually increase time spent in physical activity. Examples of function-focused care include such things as using verbal cues during bathing, so the older individual performs the tasks rather than the caregiver bathing the individual; walking a resident or patient to the bathroom rather than using a urinal, or taking a resident to an exercise class. There are now over 20 studies supporting the benefits of function-focused care approaches across all settings and different types of patient groups (i.e, those with mild versus moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment). The approaches for implementation of function-focused care have also been well supported and have moved beyond establishing effectiveness to considering dissemination and implementation of this approach into real world clinical settings. The process of dissemination and implementation has likewise been articulated and supported, and ongoing work needs to continue in this venue across all care settings. PMID:24894140

  7. Social support in type II diabetes care: a case of too little, too late

    PubMed Central

    Kadirvelu, Amudha; Sadasivan, Sivalal; Ng, Shu Hui

    2012-01-01

    Coping with type II diabetic patients is increasingly posing large financial burdens, sorely felt especially by growing economies. Self-management has been found to be an effective approach towards maintaining good control in diabetics. However, although efforts at implementing self-management have had initial success, there has been a lack of sustainability. This review examines the different components impinging on self-care among type II diabetic patients. These include the critical role of social support, the need for support from health care providers, the value of support from family and friends, the influence of sex and cultural factors in self-care behavior, the benefits of peer support, and the role of literacy in diabetes self-care. Despite the mounting evidence for the effectiveness of social support in diabetes care, and the various stakeholders including this in their clinical guidelines, there has only been a lukewarm response from policy-makers towards ensuring its implementation. Hence, more effort is required from health care providers in moving away from just understanding the effects of new drugs and subsequently putting their patients on these drugs, and going back to the basics of communicating with the patients, understanding their woes, and helping to motivate/empower their patients. This paper analyzes the various components of social support, their influence on diabetes self-care, and how health care providers can help in this process. PMID:23226028

  8. “The More Support You Have the Better”: Partner Support and Dyadic HIV Care Across the Continuum for Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Tamar; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men account for a disproportionate burden of HIV incidence in the United States, with one-third to two-thirds of these new HIV infections occurring within main partnerships. Early initiation and adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment is a key factor in treating and preventing the transmission of HIV; however, the average rate of adherence in the United States is low. Social support has been examined as a source of improving health for people experiencing a variety of chronic health conditions. This study aims to understand perceptions of how dyadic HIV care could influence partner-specific support for same-sex male couples with a goal of improving adherence. Methods Data were collected from 5 focus group (n = 35) discussions with gay and bisexual men in same-sex male relationships in Atlanta, GA. Participants discussed perceptions of how dyadic HIV care would impact partner support among serodiscordant and seroconcordant HIV-positive same-sex male couples. Verbatim transcripts were segmented thematically and systematically analyzed to examine patterns. Results Participants described how dyadic HIV care can facilitate emotional, informational, and instrumental support at various stages across the continuum of care, depending on partner dynamics. Participants stated that dyadic HIV care can provide an additional “sense of togetherness” and “solidarity” that helps to “alleviate stress.” Conclusions Results suggest that dyadic approaches for HIV care across the continuum may be useful in promoting partner support and improving adherence. Future research should further examine dyadic interventions for HIV treatment among same-sex male couples. PMID:25867781

  9. Supporting employees' work-family needs improves health care quality: Longitudinal evidence from long-term care.

    PubMed

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Kelly, Erin L; Bacic, Janine; DePasquale, Nicole; Hurtado, David; Kossek, Ellen; Sembajwe, Grace

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed qualitative and quantitative data from U.S.-based employees in 30 long-term care facilities. Analysis of semi-structured interviews from 154 managers informed quantitative analyses. Quantitative data include 1214 employees' scoring of their supervisors and their organizations on family supportiveness (individual scores and aggregated to facility level), and three outcomes: (1), care quality indicators assessed at facility level (n = 30) and collected monthly for six months after employees' data collection; (2), employees' dichotomous survey response on having additional off-site jobs; and (3), proportion of employees with additional jobs at each facility. Thematic analyses revealed that managers operate within the constraints of an industry that simultaneously: (a) employs low-wage employees with multiple work-family challenges, and (b) has firmly institutionalized goals of prioritizing quality of care and minimizing labor costs. Managers universally described providing work-family support and prioritizing care quality as antithetical to each other. Concerns surfaced that family-supportiveness encouraged employees to work additional jobs off-site, compromising care quality. Multivariable linear regression analysis of facility-level data revealed that higher family-supportive supervision was associated with significant decreases in residents' incidence of all pressure ulcers (-2.62%) and other injuries (-9.79%). Higher family-supportive organizational climate was associated with significant decreases in all falls (-17.94%) and falls with injuries (-7.57%). Managers' concerns about additional jobs were not entirely unwarranted: multivariable logistic regression of employee-level data revealed that among employees with children, having family-supportive supervision was associated with significantly higher likelihood of additional off-site jobs (RR 1.46, 95%CI 1.08-1.99), but family-supportive organizational climate was associated with lower likelihood

  10. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system.

  11. Supporting patient autonomy: decision making in home care.

    PubMed

    Davitt, J K; Kaye, L W

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the policies and procedures that home health care agencies have developed to handle the incapacitated patient and life-sustaining treatment decisions. Data collected from a survey of 154 home health care agency directors and interviews with 92 local agency staff (including nurses and social workers) and 67 patients confirmed that directors, staff, and patients agree that patients are informed about their legal rights. When asked about specific rights, fewer patients were aware of their right to execute an advance directive, and even fewer patients had actually executed one. Only 67 percent of agencies reported having existing policies on advance directives and life-sustaining treatment decisions, whereas 41.5 percent had policies on how to handle the patient with questionable decision-making capacity. Consistent policies are needed for social workers, nurses, and other staff to handle such difficult ethical dilemmas. A review of specific agency policies is presented with recommendations for future policy changes and development.

  12. Neonatal Informatics: Information Technology to Support Handoffs in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jonathan P; Van Eaton, Erik G; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Communication failures during physician handoffs represent a significant source of preventable adverse events. Computerized sign-out tools linked to hospital electronic medical record systems and customized for neonatal care can facilitate standardization of the handoff process and access to clinical information, thereby improving communication and reducing adverse events. It is important to note, however, that adoption of technological tools alone is not sufficient to remedy flawed communication processes. OBJECTIVES: After completing this article, readers should be able to: Identify key elements of a computerized sign-out tool.Describe how an electronic tool might be customized for neonatal care.Appreciate that technological tools are only one component of the handoff process they are designed to facilitate.

  13. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC), but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63%) RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34%) trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29%) reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15%) and two (5%) trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions Evidence supports the

  14. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    PubMed

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  15. Ethical challenges and how to develop ethics support in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lillemoen, Lillian; Pedersen, Reidar

    2013-02-01

    Ethics support in primary health care has been sparser than in hospitals, the need for ethics support is probably no less. We have, however, limited knowledge about how to develop ethics support that responds to primary health-care workers' needs. In this article, we present a survey with a mixture of closed- and open-ended questions concerning: How frequent and how distressed various types of ethical challenges make the primary health-care workers feel, how important they think it is to deal with these challenges better and what kind of ethics support they want. Five primary health-care institutions participated. Ethical challenges seem to be prominent and common. Most frequently, the participants experienced ethical challenges related to scarce resources and lack of knowledge and skills. Furthermore, ethical challenges related to communication and decision making were common. The participants welcomed ethics support responding to their challenges and being integrated in their daily practices.

  16. Supporting home care aides: what employers can do to assist their workers.

    PubMed

    Butler, Sandra S; Rowan, Noell

    2013-01-01

    The demand for personal care workers in home-based care is expected to double with the aging of the baby boomer population at the same time that home care agencies struggle with high rates of turnover. This article examines the job experience of 171 home care aides who remained on the job over 18 months of data collection in the longitudinal home care worker retention study. The three groups of themes that emerged from the analysis of telephone interviews with study participants-challenges of the job, compensating strategies, and potential employer interventions-provide insight on how to offer support to these valuable workers. PMID:24189019

  17. Care of Black Children with Sickle Cell Disease: Fathers, Maternal Support, and Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Diana T.; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye

    1988-01-01

    Compared primary caregivers' perceptions of social support received in father-present (N=15) and father-absent (N=19) Black families caring for a child with sickle cell anemia. Found most support to caregivers came from extended kin network, despite father presence or absence. Caregivers reported decrease in network support between diagnosis in…

  18. Activity-based funding model provides foundation for province-wide best practices in renal care.

    PubMed

    Levin, Adeera; Lo, Clifford; Noel, Kevin; Djurdjev, Ogjnenka; Amano, Erlyn C

    2013-01-01

    British Columbia has a unique funding model for renal care in Canada. Patient care is delivered through six health authorities, while funding is administered by the Provincial Renal Agency using an activity-based funding model. The model allocates funding based on a schedule of costs for every element of renal care, excluding physician fees. Accountability, transparency of allocation and tracking of outcomes are key features that ensure successful implementation. The model supports province-wide best practices and equitable care and fosters innovation. Since its introduction, the outpatient renal services budget has grown less than the population, while maintaining or improving clinical outcomes. PMID:24485244

  19. [Quality of life and supportive care in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Grandazzi, Guillaume; Prévost, Virginie; Robard, Laetitia

    2014-05-01

    The quality of life of patients treated for head and neck cancers and their carers is part of the current concerns of health care teams. Assessment tools were created and helped to highlight the severe physical effects (pain, mucositis…) and chronic (mutilation, post-radiation complications…) related to the disease or to different treatments but also to consider the psychosocial impact of this disease. Improving the quality of life through a thoughtful and comprehensive support that must be associated with somatic care, mental health care, rehabilitation and inclusion of social difficulties and suffering relatives. Supportive care shall ensure a good quality of life for patients treated and their families but also reduce the physical effects associated with the disease and treatment. They rely on coordination of care including the cancer networks established in the cancer plan to ensure comprehensive and continuous care for these patients. PMID:24886902

  20. Integration of Tactical Emergency Casualty Care Into the National Tactical Emergency Medical Support Competency Domains.

    PubMed

    Pennardt, Andre; Kamin, Rich; Llewellyn, Craig; Shapiro, Geoff; Carmona, Philip A; Schwartz, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Tactical emergency medical support (TEMS) is a critical component of the out-of-hospital response to domestic high-threat incidents such as hostage scenarios, warrant service, active shooter or violent incidents, terrorist attacks, and other intentional mass casualty-producing acts. From its grass-roots inception in the form of medical support of select law enforcement special weapons and tactics (SWAT) units in the 1980s, the TEMS subspecialty of prehospital care has rapidly grown and evolved over the past 40 years. The National TEMS Initiative and Council (NTIC) competencies and training objectives are the only published recommendations of their kind and offer the opportunity for national standardization of TEMS training programs and a future accreditation process. Building on the previous work of the NTIC and the creation of acknowledged competency domains for TEMS and the acknowledged civilian translation of TCCC by the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC), the Joint Review Committee (JRC) has created an opportunity to bring forward the work in a form that could be operationally useful in an all-hazards and whole of community format. PMID:27450605

  1. Nutritional care and support among adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tafese, Zelalem; Birhan, Yifru; Abebe, Hiwot

    2013-11-01

    Background Improving nutritional care and support for people living with HIV (PLHIV) is an integral part of comprehensive HIV treatment according to the National Nutritional Strategy of Ethiopia. However, there is no adequate published study that assesses the nutritional care and support services for adult people living with HIV/ AIDS (PLHIV) in this setting. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the existing nutritional care and support services and determine the challenges facing adults living with HIV at Hawassa Referral Hospital in southern Ethiopia. Methods A qualitative study was carried out using focus group discussions (FGDs), in-depth interviews and participant observation. Four FDGs were held and five in-depth interviews were conducted. A two-week participant observation was also conducted by trained nurses. All interviews and FDGs were tape-recorded and transcribed; those conducted in Amharic were translated back to English. Finally thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. Results Most of the FDG participants were unsatisfied with their nutritional care and support services and expressed difficulty with disclosing their HIV status for fear of stigma and discrimination. The in-depth interviews and participant observation showed results similar to those of the FDG. Some key informants expressed a fear that such poor nutritional care and support may threaten the quality of life of people living with HIV and suggested that all stakeholders work on improving the services. Conclusion Current nutritional care and support services for people living with HIV are not well coordinated. They focus mainly on monthly supplementation of antiretroviral drugs and occasional handouts of food. The need to provide health education on antiretroviral drugs and nutrition, and to emphasise strategies aimed at improving the nutritional status of peoples living with HIV is critical. Furthermore, the study recommended strengthening the initiatives of some

  2. Supporting the Student's Graduated Independence in Diabetes Care.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Crystal C; Albanese-O'Neill, Anastasia

    2016-07-01

    The gradual progression to self-management is a critical milestone for children/adolescents with diabetes. This article provides recommendations to facilitate collaboration between the student's family, diabetes healthcare provider, and school nurse to support and implement a plan that enables the child/adolescent to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully transition to independent management of diabetes. PMID:27260800

  3. Family Education and Support Services in Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyamfi, Phyllis; Walrath, Christine; Burns, Barbara J.; Stephens, Robert L.; Geng, Yisong; Stambaugh, Leyla

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the use of family education and support (FES) services within community-based mental health systems. Using data from the national evaluation of the Children's Mental Health Initiative (CMHI), 2,853 caregivers and their children ages 6 to 18 years from 39 communities participated in this study. The findings indicated that during…

  4. About Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The program supports research in three areas: prevention or treatment of acute or chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment and caregiving (symptom management research); effects on quality of life from cancer, its treatment and caregiving (quality of life research); and end-of-life psychosocial issues, caregiving and treatment strategies (end-of-life research). |

  5. SMART: a system supporting medical activities in real-time.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Consorti, F; Merialdo, P

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the system SMART whose goal is real-time assistance to physicians who execute diagnostic or therapeutic protocols in a clinical context. SMART is able to retrieve a protocol from its knowledge base and to monitor its execution step by step for a single patient. Different protocols for different patients can be followed at the same time in a health care structure. The prototype realized supports the execution of protocols for evaluating surgical risks. It has been implemented according to the specifications given by the 4th Surgical Clinic of "Policlinico Umberto I" and reflects the activities actually performed in that hospital. However, the protocol model defined is general purpose and we envisage an easy application to other contexts and therefore to the informatization of other protocols.

  6. Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptom management with spiritual support, counseling, and social services. It can help prevent or manage the symptoms ... healthcare provider can help you include palliative care services. Who ... workers, pharmacists, chaplains, counselors, and nutritionists. They manage ...

  7. The Integrated Medical Model: A Decision Support Tool for In-flight Crew Health Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Doug

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of an Integrated Medical Model (IMM) decision support tool for in-flight crew health care safety. Clinical methods, resources, and case scenarios are also addressed.

  8. Postsecondary Strengths, Challenges, and Supports Experienced by Foster Care Alumni College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Amy M.; Jones, Kevin R.; Emerson, John C.; Mucha, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Young people transitioning from foster care to college experience unique identities and circumstances that make being successful in college especially challenging. We used qualitative survey data from 248 college graduates who were formerly in foster care to explore the strengths, challenges, and supports they experienced while in college that…

  9. Care, Empowerment and Self-Determination in the Practice of Peer Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Anne; Doughty, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The concept of "care" has been fraught with negative connotations within the disability movement; the concepts of empowerment, choice and control have been developed as alternatives. The peer-support movement in the mental health sector draws from this tradition, and is uncomfortable with the provision of care. Drawing on the feminist ethic of…

  10. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  11. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  12. Community-Based Learning to Support South African Early Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Virginia; Lamb-Parker, Faith

    2012-01-01

    The Developing Families Project-South Africa (DFP-SA) is a community-based model of education and training for the care, support and education of vulnerable children birth-to-three and their caregivers, guardians and families in rural and peri-urban townships. The approach fosters interactive learning among community members about early care and…

  13. [Palliative Care for Neurological Intractable Diseases and Home Medical Support].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ogino, Mieko; Ishigaki, Yasunori; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Many medical doctors regard the end stage and palliative care of neurological intractable diseases as the point at which aggressive treatment should be interrupted and death is imminent. However, the definition of health by the World Health Organization as the physical, psychological, and social goal to achieve a fully favorable health condition should be revisited. In the real clinical setting, the health condition, as the ability to adapt and self-manage in the face of social, physical, and emotional challenges with the aim to overcome stress (resilience), is dynamic and involves a healthy condition and satisfaction with one's own living. The most important step in palliative therapy that is shared by neurologists is the maintenance of the health status with the help of multi-disciplinary team with the view to improving the quality of life. PMID:26241362

  14. Ethics support in institutional elderly care: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van der Dam, Sandra; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Abma, Tineke A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical ethics support mechanisms in healthcare are increasing but little is known about the specific developments in elderly care. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic literature review on the characteristics of existing ethics support mechanisms in institutional elderly care. A review was performed in three electronic databases (Pubmed, CINAHL/PsycINFO, Ethxweb). Sixty papers were included in the review. The ethics support mechanisms are classified in four categories: 'institutional bodies' (ethics committee and consultation team); 'frameworks' (analytical tools to assist care professionals); 'educational programmes and moral case deliberation'; and 'written documents and policies'. For each category the goals, methods and ways of organising are described. Ethics support often serves several goals and can be targeted at various levels: case, professional or organisation. Over the past decades a number of changes have taken place in the development of ethics support in elderly care. Considering the goals, ethics support has become more outreaching and proactive, aiming to qualify professionals to integrate ethics in daily care processes. The approaches in clinical ethics support have become more diverse, more focused on everyday ethical issues and better adapted to the concrete learning style of the nursing staff. Ethics support has become less centrally organised and more connected to local contexts and primary process within the organisation.

  15. Periodontal self-care: evidence-based support.

    PubMed

    Drisko, Connie L

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this review on periodontal self-care will be based primarily on the results of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Based on the evidence gleaned from systematic reviews, it is notable that most authors of these reviews commented on the relatively small number of trials that could pass the quality-assessment inclusion in the systematic review. Interproximal devices, namely interproximal brushes, are more effective for reducing interproximal plaque and gingivitis than are flossing or brushing alone. Some added benefit may be attributed to the use of rotational oscillation powered toothbrushes over manual toothbrushes. Recommendations by the dentist and dental hygienist to add one or more chemotherapeutic agents to the typical oral hygiene regimen has been shown, in systematic reviews and meta-analyses, to reduce the level of plaque and gingival inflammation in patients. Oral irrigation does not seem to reduce visible plaque but does tend to reduce inflammation, determined by the presence of bleeding on probing, the gingival index score and probing depth measurements. To date, high-quality evidence is either lacking or weak in some areas regarding the efficacy of self-care and periodontal disease. Low educational attainment, smoking and socio-economic status are related to adverse periodontal health outcomes. Variation in self-esteem, self-confidence and perfectionism are associated with oral health status and oral health behaviors. Better understanding of the psychological factors associated with oral hygiene would be of benefit in further developing strategies to help patients improve their oral hygiene in addition to helping professionals design better programs on prevention and education.

  16. Volunteers supporting older people in formal care settings in England: personal and local factors influencing prevalence and type of participation.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2014-12-01

    In the UK context of financial austerity and the promotion of the social responsibility through the concept of the "Big Society," volunteers are becoming a more important part of the labor workforce. This is particularly so in the long-term care (LTC) sector, where both shortages of staff and demands for support are particularly high. This article investigate the levels and profile of contribution of volunteers in the LTC sector using a large national data set, National Minimum Data Set for Social Care, linked to local area levels of rurality and socio-economic status. The analysis shows that volunteer activity in formal care services varies between sectors and service types, with no strong relationship between local area deprivation, unemployment levels, and levels of volunteering. However, some significant association was found with level of rurality. The contribution of volunteers is most evident in provision of counseling, support, advocacy, and advice.

  17. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Laura Johanson; Leite, Josete Luzia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; da Silva, Leila Rangel; da Silva, Thiago Privado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management. METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed. RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (de)motivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method. CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (dis)continuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model. PMID:26155013

  18. A comprehensive information technology system to support physician learning at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Sorensen, Kristi J; Nishimura, Rick A; Ommen, Steve R; Lloyd, Farrell J

    2015-01-01

    MayoExpert is a multifaceted information system integrated with the electronic medical record (EMR) across Mayo Clinic's multisite health system. It was developed as a technology-based solution to manage information, standardize clinical practice, and promote and document learning in clinical contexts. Features include urgent test result notifications; models illustrating expert-approved care processes; concise, expert-approved answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs); a directory of topic-specific experts; and a portfolio for provider licensure and credentialing. The authors evaluate MayoExpert's reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. Evaluation data sources included usage statistics, user surveys, and pilot studies.As of October 2013, MayoExpert was available at 94 clinical sites in 12 states and contained 1,368 clinical topics, answers to 7,640 FAQs, and 92 care process models. In 2012, MayoExpert was accessed at least once by 2,578/3,643 (71%) staff physicians, 900/1,374 (66%) midlevel providers, and 1,728/2,291 (75%) residents and fellows. In a 2013 survey of MayoExpert users with 536 respondents, all features were highly rated (≥67% favorable). More providers reported using MayoExpert to answer questions before/after than during patient visits (68% versus 36%). During November 2012 to April 2013, MayoExpert sent 1,660 notifications of new-onset atrial fibrillation and 1,590 notifications of prolonged QT. MayoExpert has become part of routine clinical and educational operations, and its care process models now define Mayo Clinic best practices. MayoExpert's infrastructure and content will continue to expand with improved templates and content organization, new care process models, additional notifications, better EMR integration, and improved support for credentialing activities. PMID:25374037

  19. Access to HIV Care and Support Services for African American Transwomen Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Erin C.; Arayasirikul, Sean; Johnson, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Low access to HIV care and support has led to survival rates for transwomen that are half that of other populations at risk for HIV. Within the population, HIV disproportionately impacts African American transwomen. Interventions to increase access to HIV care and support are needed to better serve those most affected and vulnerable within the population. We conducted a study of barriers and facilitators to care and support services for African American transwomen to fill a gap in the literature to improve access for this particularly impacted population. A total of 10 in-depth interviews were conducted with African American transwomen living with HIV who lived outside the metro area of San Francisco. Three overarching thematic topics emerged-gender stigma, peer, and institutional distrust - giving insight into African American transwomen's barriers to HIV care and support services. A number of factors within these themes impacted access, such as whether organizations offered gender-related care, the geography of organizations as it relates to safe transportation and location, confidentiality and trust of peers and organizations, and trauma. Specific instrumental, institutional and emotional supports are provided that that may increase access to care and support services for African American transwomen living with HIV. PMID:24817835

  20. Bayesian Networks for Clinical Decision Support in Lung Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Nicholson, Ann E.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Kadir, Timor; Brady, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Survival prediction and treatment selection in lung cancer care are characterised by high levels of uncertainty. Bayesian Networks (BNs), which naturally reason with uncertain domain knowledge, can be applied to aid lung cancer experts by providing personalised survival estimates and treatment selection recommendations. Based on the English Lung Cancer Database (LUCADA), we evaluate the feasibility of BNs for these two tasks, while comparing the performances of various causal discovery approaches to uncover the most feasible network structure from expert knowledge and data. We show first that the BN structure elicited from clinicians achieves a disappointing area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (± 0.03), whereas a structure learned by the CAMML hybrid causal discovery algorithm, which adheres with the temporal restrictions, achieves 0.81 (± 0.03). Second, our causal intervention results reveal that BN treatment recommendations, based on prescribing the treatment plan that maximises survival, can only predict the recorded treatment plan 29% of the time. However, this percentage rises to 76% when partial matches are included. PMID:24324773

  1. A.S.P.E.N. Standards for Nutrition Support: Home and Alternate Site Care.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Sharon M; Adams, Stephen C; Arthur, Elaine; Corrigan, Mandy L; Hammond, Kathleen; Kovacevich, Debra S; McNamara, Kevn; Pasquale, Jack A

    2014-06-25

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) is a professional society of physicians, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, other allied health professionals, and researchers. A.S.P.E.N. envisions an environment in which every patient receives safe, efficacious, and high-quality nutrition care. A.S.P.E.N.'s mission is to improve patient care by advancing the science and practice of clinical nutrition and metabolism. These combined Standards for Nutrition Support: Home Care and Alternate Site Care are an update of the 2005 and 2006 standards. PMID:24964788

  2. Peer Support for Diabetes Management in Primary Care and Community Settings in Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhimin; Fisher, Edwin B.; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We evaluated a peer leader–support program (PLSP) for diabetes self-management in China in terms of acceptability and feasibility; implementation; perceived advantages; disadvantages and barriers; reach and recruitment; effectiveness in terms of diabetes knowledge and clinical impacts; adoption; and sustainability. METHODS Within each of 3 cities in Anhui Province, 2 subcommunities were randomly assigned to usual care or PLSP. Peer leaders and staff of Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) co-led biweekly educational meetings. Peer leaders also led biweekly discussion meetings, promoted regular care through the CHSCs, organized informal health promotion activities (eg, walking and tai chi groups), and provided informal individual support to participants through casual contact. RESULTS Qualitative evaluations indicated acceptance of and positive responses to the program among patients, peer leaders, and CHSC staff. Implementation was successful in 2 of 3 subcommunities, the third failing for lack of staff resources. Reported advantages included peer support as a bridge between CHSCs and their patients. In 2 sites where the PLSP was implemented, analyses controlling for baseline differences and site showed significant benefits for PLSP relative to controls (P <0.05) for knowledge, self-efficacy, BMI, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and both fasting and 2-hour post-prandial blood glucose. The Anhui Provincial Health Bureau has extended the PLSP model to other communities and to cardiovascular disease prevention and management. CONCLUSION The PLSP was well accepted, feasible given sufficient administrative and staff resources, effective for those who participated, and generalizable to other sites and health problems. PMID:26304972

  3. Transitions in care among older adults receiving long-term services and supports.

    PubMed

    Toles, Mark P; Abbott, Katherine M; Hirschman, Karen B; Naylor, Mary D

    2012-11-01

    Recipients of long-term services and supports (LTSS) frequently transition between LTSS settings (e.g., assisted living facilities, nursing homes) and hospitals for acute changes in health. In this qualitative study, we analyzed findings from interviews with 57 recently hospitalized LTSS recipients and their family caregivers and described barriers and facilitators to high-quality care to support older adults through these care transitions. The themes that emerged strongly suggest that LTSS recipients and family caregivers do not receive needed information about the reasons for their transfers to hospitals, medical diagnoses, and planned treatments to address acute changes in health. Our findings indicate an urgent need for nurses and other health care team members to talk with LTSS recipients (and family caregivers) and ensure they are engaged and informed participants in care. We also found the need for research to test evidence-based transitional care for high-risk LTSS recipients and their family caregivers.

  4. Peer Support as a Novel Strategy to Mitigate Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mark E; Jackson, James C; Hopkins, Ramona O; Thompson, Carol; Andrews, Adair; Netzer, Giora; Bates, Dina M; Bunnell, Aaron E; Christie, LeeAnn M; Greenberg, Steven B; Lamas, Daniela J; Sevin, Carla M; Weinhouse, Gerald; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2016-01-01

    Post-intensive care syndrome, a condition defined by new or worsening impairment in cognition, mental health, and physical function after critical illness, has emerged in the past decade as a common and life-altering consequence of critical illness. New strategies are urgently needed to mitigate the risk of neuropsychological and functional impairment common after critical illness and to prepare and support survivors on their road toward recovery. The present state of critical care survivorship is described, and postdischarge care delivery in the United States and the potential impact of the present-day fragmented model of care delivery are detailed. A novel strategy that uses peer support groups could more effectively meet the needs of survivors of critical illness and mitigate post-intensive care syndrome. PMID:27153311

  5. The future of mental health care: peer-to-peer support and social media

    PubMed Central

    Naslund, J. A.; Aschbrenner, K. A.; Marsch, L. A.; Bartels, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims People with serious mental illness are increasingly turning to popular social media, including Facebook, Twitter or YouTube, to share their illness experiences or seek advice from others with similar health conditions. This emerging form of unsolicited communication among self-forming online communities of patients and individuals with diverse health concerns is referred to as peer-to-peer support. We offer a perspective on how online peer-to-peer connections among people with serious mental illness could advance efforts to promote mental and physical wellbeing in this group. Methods In this commentary, we take the perspective that when an individual with serious mental illness decides to connect with similar others online it represents a critical point in their illness experience. We propose a conceptual model to illustrate how online peer-to-peer connections may afford opportunities for individuals with serious mental illness to challenge stigma, increase consumer activation and access online interventions for mental and physical well-being. Results People with serious mental illness report benefits from interacting with peers online from greater social connectedness, feelings of group belonging and by sharing personal stories and strategies for coping with day-to-day challenges of living with a mental illness. Within online communities, individuals with serious mental illness could challenge stigma through personal empowerment and providing hope. By learning from peers online, these individuals may gain insight about important health care decisions, which could promote mental health care seeking behaviours. These individuals could also access interventions for mental and physical wellbeing delivered through social media that could incorporate mutual support between peers, help promote treatment engagement and reach a wider demographic. Unforeseen risks may include exposure to misleading information, facing hostile or derogatory comments from others, or

  6. The POIS (Parkland On-Line Information System) Implementation of the IBM Health Care Support/Patient Care System

    PubMed Central

    Mishelevich, David J.; Hudson, Betty G.; Van Slyke, Donald; Mize, Elaine I.; Robinson, Anna L.; Brieden, Helen C.; Atkinson, Jack; Robertson, James

    1980-01-01

    The installation of major components of a comprehensive Hospital Information System (HIS) called POIS, the Parkland On-line Information System, including identified success factors is described for the Dallas County Hospital District (DCHD) known also as the Parkland Memorial Hospital. Installation of the on-line IBM Health Care Support (HCS) Registration and Admissions Packages occurred in 1976 and implementation of the HCS Patient Care System (PCS) began in 1977 which includes on-line support of health care areas such as nursing stations and ancillary areas. The Duke Hospital Information System (DHIS) is marketed as the IBM HCS/Patient Care System (PCS). DCHD was the validation site. POIS has order entry, result reporting and work management components. While most of the patient care components are currently installed for the inpatient service, the Laboratories are being installed for the outpatient and Emergency areas as well. The Clinic Appointment System developed at the University of Michigan is also installed. The HCS family of programs use DL/1 and CICS and were installed in the OS versions, currently running under MVS on an IBM 370/168 Model 3 with 8 megabytes of main memory. ImagesFigure 1-AFigure 1-B

  7. Supportive medical care for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Antillon, Federico; Pacheco, Carlos; Sullivan, Courtney E; Lam, Catherine G; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable progress in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been achieved in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), but survival rates remain significantly lower than those in high-income countries. Inadequate supportive care and consequent excess mortality from toxicity are important causes of treatment failure for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in LMIC. This article summarizes practical supportive care recommendations for healthcare providers practicing in LMIC, starting with core approaches in oncology nursing care, management of tumor lysis syndrome and mediastinal masses, nutritional support, use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, and palliative care. Prevention and treatment of infectious diseases are described in a parallel paper. PMID:26013005

  8. WORKING AND CARING: THE SIMULTANEOUS DECISION OF LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION AND INFORMAL ELDERLY AND CHILD SUPPORT ACT IVITIES IN MEXICO*

    PubMed Central

    van Gameren, Edwin; Velandia Naranjo, Durfari

    2016-01-01

    We analyze factors determining women’s decisions to participate in the labor market and provide elderly care and nonfinancial support to their (grand)children. We use data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study, a survey of people aged 50 and over, applying a three-equation, reduced-form SUR model. Results suggest that care needs are the driving force behind caregiving activities. Traditional roles also appear to be relevant in the labor force participation decision: women with a closer labor market connection when they were young are more likely to work. Simulations of demographic changes illustrate potential effects for future caregiving and participation rates. PMID:26924883

  9. Health care development: integrating transaction cost theory with social support theory.

    PubMed

    Hajli, M Nick; Shanmugam, Mohana; Hajli, Ali; Khani, Amir Hossein; Wang, Yichuan

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies has already been influential in many industries, and Web 2.0 applications are now beginning to have an impact on health care. These new technologies offer a promising approach for shaping the future of modern health care, with the potential for opening up new opportunities for the health care industry as it struggles to deal with challenges including the need to cut costs, the increasing demand for health services and the increasing cost of medical technology. Social media such as social networking sites are attracting more individuals to online health communities, contributing to an increase in the productivity of modern health care and reducing transaction costs. This study therefore examines the potential effect of social technologies, particularly social media, on health care development by adopting a social support/transaction cost perspective. Viewed through the lens of Information Systems, social support and transaction cost theories indicate that social media, particularly online health communities, positively support health care development. The results show that individuals join online health communities to share and receive social support, and these social interactions provide both informational and emotional support. PMID:25068990

  10. [Travel and cultural activities in care homes for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Andriot, Hervé; Roumilhac, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Travel and cultural activities are still accessible for elderly people, in particular those living in care homes. With some precautions and adequate professional supervision, it is possible to carry out such activities, elderly people's limits being psychological rather than physical. Elderly people can thereby open up to the adventure of travelling whether it is an actual, physical trip or a virtual journey, through cultural activities. A report on the Residence Orpea des Noues care home's experience of such initiatives.

  11. Withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care unit: guidance for practice

    PubMed Central

    Laddie, Joanna; Craig, Finella; Brierley, Joe; Kelly, Paula; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the work of one tertiary paediatric palliative care service in facilitating planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting, with the purpose of developing local guidance for practice. Methods Retrospective 10-year (2003–2012) case note review of intensive care patients whose parents elected to withdraw ventilation in another setting. Demographic and clinical data revealed common themes and specific incidents relevant to local guideline development. Results 18 children (aged 2 weeks to 16 years) were considered. Three died prior to transfer. Transfer locations included home (5), hospice (8) and other (2). Primary pathologies included malignant, neurological, renal and respiratory diseases. Collaborative working was evidenced in the review including multidisciplinary team meetings with the palliative care team prior to discharge. Planning included development of symptom management plans and emergency care plans in the event of longer than anticipated survival. Transfer of children and management of extubations demonstrated the benefits of planning and recognition that unexpected events occur despite detailed planning. We identified the need for local written guidance supporting healthcare professionals planning and undertaking extubation outside the intensive care setting, addressing the following phases: (i) introduction of withdrawal, (ii) preparation pretransfer, (iii) extubation, (iv) care postextubation and (v) care postdeath. Conclusions Planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting is challenging and resource intensive. The development of local collaborations and guidance can enable parents of children dependent on intensive care to consider a preferred place of death for their child, which may be outside the intensive care unit. PMID:24951460

  12. Biochemical Lab Activity Supports Evolution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyman, Daniel J.

    1974-01-01

    Described is thin-layer chromatography (TLC), a technique that can be conveniently used in the laboratory to generate evidence supporting the principle that degrees of biochemical similarity reflect degrees of evolutionary relatedness among organisms. (Author/PEB)

  13. "We Only Own the Hours": Discontinuity of Care in the British Columbia Home Support System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Zena; McLaren, Arlene Tigar; Cohen, Marcy; Ostry, Aleck

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of continuity of care to examine the implications of health-system restructuring for workers and staff in the BC home support system. Home support primarily serves frail seniors living in poverty and has the potential to provide assistance with tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as offer social…

  14. The Effects of Health Care and Father Support for Mother on the Children's Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestari, Tri Riana; Suwandi, Tjipto; Nursalam; Narendra, Moersintowarti B.

    2015-01-01

    Toddler stage is referred to as the golden era (golden age period), especially at the age of 0-2 years, the brain development reach 80%. This study examines the effects of health care support and father support for mother on the emotions of children aged less than 2 years. This study was observational, with cross-sectional design. The sampling…

  15. Surveying Community Nursing Support for Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Palliative Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Maria; Doody, Owen; Lyons, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care services have developed over the years to support all persons with life-limiting conditions. Moreover, services for people with an intellectual disability have moved from the traditional institutional setting to supporting people with an intellectual disability to live in their own community and family home. The expansion of…

  16. Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The "Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices" report describes the outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village program in Sacramento, California. Serna Village is a supportive housing program serving homeless families. Outcomes from the program illustrate that it is possible to end…

  17. Child Care under the Family Support Act: Early Lessons from the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC.

    A Children's Defense Fund (CDF) survey indicates that many AFDC families are being forced to place their children in low-quality and potentially dangerous child care. Family Support Act (FSA) childcare typically lacks basic health and safety and precautions, fails to provide sufficient assistance to support quality childcare and preschool…

  18. Tender Care and Early Learning: Supporting Infants and Toddlers in Child Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Jacalyn; Hohmann, Mary

    High/Scope has a long history of curriculum development, training, and research in the area of infant and toddler development. This book explores how the approach can be implemented with infants and toddlers in group care settings. Following an introduction outlining the history of and principles guiding the High/Scope Infant and Toddler Approach,…

  19. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient.

  20. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient. PMID:27439249

  1. Improving supportive care for women with breast cancer in Australia: the challenge of modifying health systems.

    PubMed

    Redman, Sally; Turner, Jane; Davis, Cindy

    2003-09-01

    Although the benefits of many psychosocial support strategies in improving well being in women with breast cancer have been demonstrated, few women receive these programs as part of routine care. This paper provides some recommendations, based on experience in Australia, about how access to evidence-based supportive care strategies might be improved through modification of health systems. It demonstrates the paucity of research about the costs and health service implications of psychosocial support strategies, which is vital to health planning and service delivery change. It outlines the systematic approach taken in Australia to improving psychosocial support nationally by: the development of research reviews; preparation of guidelines about supportive care; implementation of programs to foster the adoption of guidelines through modification of policy, health service delivery and clinician training; and monitoring programs. Coalitions of government, health care professionals and consumers are key to effective lobbying for change. If all women with breast cancer are to receive better supportive care, there is a need for approaches which: refocus the research effort in psycho-oncology; develop more strategic approaches to generating change in health systems and health policy and foster partnerships to advocate for improved resources.

  2. Active support system for 1-m SONG primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dongsheng; Wang, Guomin; Gu, Bozhong

    2012-05-01

    Chinese-node telescope of Stellar Observations Network Group (SONG) has a primary mirror 1m in diameter with flat back, which will be supported actively. The performance evaluation of the telescope's active optics system is conducted. Finite element analysis (FEA) is employed to analyze the optical surface figures of the primary mirror, and two optimizations are carried out by using ANSYS: (1) the locations and forces of axial supports are optimized with the telescope pointing to zenith; (2) the lateral support forces are calculated with the telescope pointing to horizon. Axial support force sensitivities are calculated in a case that a single axial support has a force error of 0.5N. The correction ability of the active support system is analyzed when an arbitrary axial support is failure. Several low order Zernike modes are modeled with MATLAB procedure, and active optics corrections are applied to these modes. Thermal deformation of the mirror is also corrected using active support system.

  3. Step 1: Offers All Birthing Mothers Unrestricted Access to Birth Companions, Labor Support, Professional Midwifery Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Storton, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The first step of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care insures that women have access to a wide variety of support in labor and during the pregnancy and postpartum periods: unrestricted access to birth companions of their choice, including family and friends; unrestricted access to continuous emotional and physical support from a skilled woman such as a doula; and access to midwifery care. The rationales for the importance of each factor and the evidence to support those rationales are presented. PMID:18523678

  4. Caring for carers: how community nurses can support carers of people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Argyle, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    There are more than 1 million people in the UK looking after a family member or friend with cancer, but half the number of these carers do not receive support to care. Providing this care significantly affects cancer carers emotionally, physically, and financially. Community and district nurses have a vital role to play in reaching out to these hidden carers and signposting them to the correct support. This article provides tips on identifying carers, including who they are, the challenges they face, and how health professionals can approach and speak to them. It also provides guidance on signposting carers to national and local sources of support in the UK. PMID:27282503

  5. Stress, Social Support, and Burnout Among Long-Term Care Nursing Staff.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, Erin L; Northrop, Lynn; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care nursing staff are subject to considerable occupational stress and report high levels of burnout, yet little is known about how stress and social support are associated with burnout in this population. The present study utilized the job demands-resources model of burnout to examine relations between job demands (occupational and personal stress), job resources (sources and functions of social support), and burnout in a sample of nursing staff at a long-term care facility (N = 250). Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that job demands (greater occupational stress) were associated with more emotional exhaustion, more depersonalization, and less personal accomplishment. Job resources (support from supervisors and friends or family members, reassurance of worth, opportunity for nurturing) were associated with less emotional exhaustion and higher levels of personal accomplishment. Interventions to reduce burnout that include a focus on stress and social support outside of work may be particularly beneficial for long-term care staff.

  6. Physical activity promotion in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Ilkka M; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) have great potential in the prevention, management, and rehabilitation of a variety of diseases, but this potential has not been fully realized in clinical practice. The health care system (HCS) could do much more to support patients in increasing their PA and ET. However, counseling on ET is not used widely by the HCS owing partly to attitudes but mainly to practical obstacles. Extensive searches of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and ScienceDirect for literature published between January 1, 2000, and January 31, 2013, provided data to assess the critical characteristics of ET counseling. The evidence reveals that especially brief ET counseling is an efficient, effective, and cost-effective means to increase PA and ET and to bring considerable clinical benefits to various patient groups. Furthermore, it can be practiced as part of the routine work of the HCS. However, there is a need and feasible means to increase the use and improve the quality of ET counseling. To include PA and ET promotion as important means of comprehensive health care and disease management, a fundamental change is needed. Because exercise is medicine, it should be seen and dealt with in the same ways as pharmaceuticals and other medical interventions regarding the basic and continuing education and training of health care personnel and processes to assess its needs and to prescribe and deliver it, to reimburse the services related to it, and to fund research on its efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, and interactions and comparability with other preventive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative modalities. This change requires credible, strong, and skillful advocacy inside the medical community and the HCS.

  7. Is Europe putting theory into practice? A qualitative study of the level of self-management support in chronic care management approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-management support is a key component of effective chronic care management, yet in practice appears to be the least implemented and most challenging. This study explores whether and how self-management support is integrated into chronic care approaches in 13 European countries. In addition, it investigates the level of and barriers to implementation of support strategies in health care practice. Methods We conducted a review among the 13 participating countries, based on a common data template informed by the Chronic Care Model. Key informants presented a sample of representative chronic care approaches and related self-management support strategies. The cross-country review was complemented by a Dutch case study of health professionals’ views on the implementation of self-management support in practice. Results Self-management support for chronically ill patients remains relatively underdeveloped in Europe. Similarities between countries exist mostly in involved providers (nurses) and settings (primary care). Differences prevail in mode and format of support, and materials used. Support activities focus primarily on patients’ medical and behavioral management, and less on emotional management. According to Dutch providers, self-management support is not (yet) an integral part of daily practice; implementation is hampered by barriers related to, among others, funding, IT and medical culture. Conclusions Although collaborative care for chronic conditions is becoming more important in European health systems, adequate self-management support for patients with chronic disease is far from accomplished in most countries. There is a need for better understanding of how we can encourage both patients and health care providers to engage in productive interactions in daily chronic care practice, which can improve health and social outcomes. PMID:23530744

  8. M-Support: keeping in touch on placement in primary health care settings.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Bev; Harding, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Lecturer support for nursing students in clinical placements is essential to assist students in consolidating their clinical experience and making links between theory and practice. The primary health care context poses challenges different from those of secondary or tertiary clinical settings. To deal with these challenges in primary health care settings a project using eTXT and SMS (Short Message Service) was introduced. This provides M-Support for students via a lecturer's computer and students' mobile phones. M-Support was provided to motivate, support and communicate with these student nurses. To evaluate the project a mixed methodology using data from surveys, eTXT and mobile phone message history, and a lecturer's field notes were used. Findings demonstrated that the introduction of this innovation reduced barriers to timely and effective support that arise from the mobile nature of some primary health care nursing roles and the geographical dispersion of placements across the region. These findings suggest that M-Support is an acceptable, cost-effective form of support to motivate, encourage and communicate with nursing students in primary health care clinical placements.

  9. Social support and adjustment to caring for elder family members: A multi-study analysis.

    PubMed

    Smerglia, Virginia L; Miller, Nancy B; Sotnak, Diane L; Geiss, Carrie A

    2007-03-01

    This multi-study analysis systematically examines research findings on relationships between social support and caregiver adjustment to discover whether informal support helps family caregivers. Caring for older relatives is an ongoing stressful life course event and role. Informal social support is often used as a predictor of caregiver adjustment outcomes. It is widely believed to enhance adjustment. Yet the varied research results do not necessarily support this belief. A computer-generated literature search of social sciences and medical databases produced thirty-five caregiving articles, published in refereed journals, which meet study parameters. A coding form was developed to categorize social support and adjustment variables for cross-tabular analyses. The findings show most relationships (61%) between social support and caregiver adjustment are not positively significant. Of the minority of positively significant relationships, neither perceived (available) nor received support is more important and neither instrumental nor socioemotional support is more likely to aid adjustment. Researchers and health care professionals need to explore the negative impact of social support and attributes of caregiver-care recipient relationships.

  10. Information in Support of Population Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    As part of UNESCO's World Population Year, information services in support of population programs are explained and listed. The information system of the International Planned Parenthood Federation is described and the management of population literature discussed. Information needs of population workers and special aspects of the training and…

  11. Optimizing psychosocial support during office-based buprenorphine treatment in primary care: patients’ experiences and preferences

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Masyukova, Mariya; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine maintenance treatment is effective and has been successfully integrated into HIV and primary care settings. However, one key barrier to providers prescribing buprenorphine is their perception that they are unable to provide adequate counseling or psychosocial support to patients with opioid addiction. This qualitative study investigated supportive elements of office-based buprenorphine treatment that patients perceived to be most valuable. Methods We conducted five focus groups with 33 buprenorphine treatment-experienced participants. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Iterative readings of transcripts and grounded theory analysis revealed common themes. Results Overall, participants perceived that buprenorphine treatment helped them to achieve their treatment goals and valued the flexibility, accessibility, and privacy of treatment. Participants identified interpersonal and structural elements of buprenorphine treatment that provided psychosocial support. Participants desired good physician-patient relationships, but also valued care delivery models that were patient-centered, created a safe place for self-disclosure, and utilized coordinated team-based care. Conclusions Participants derived psychosocial support from their prescribing physician, but were also open to collaborative or team-based models of care, as long as they were voluntary and confidential. Buprenorphine prescribing physicians without access to referral options for psychosocial counseling could focus on maintaining non-judgmental attitudes and shared decision making during patient encounters. Adding structure and psychosocial support to buprenorphine treatment through coordinated team-based care also seems to have great promise. PMID:26566712

  12. Marshalling Social Support: A Care-Getting Model for Persons Living with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahana, Eva; Kahana, Boaz; Wykle, May; Kulle, Diana

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a stress theory-based conceptual framework for understanding proactive options for care-getting for patients living with cancer that is also relevant to patients living with other chronic or life-threatening illnesses. Barriers and facilitators to active efforts for obtaining responsive care from both informal and formal…

  13. Semantic Support Environment for Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maizatul Akmar; Yaacob, Mashkuri; Kareem, Sameem Abdul

    2008-01-01

    Scholarly activities are a collection of academic related activities such as research, teaching and consultation work which result in research outputs such as journals, theses and articles in proceedings. The output will then be disseminated to researchers all over the world by means of the WWW. The four pillars of this scholarship i.e. discovery,…

  14. Classroom Writing Activities to Support the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Judy

    1990-01-01

    Offers writing activities related to the reading of E. B. White's "Charlotte's Web," including showing the movie, using HyperCard, showing a video about a webspinning spider as a prewriting activity, and using computer graphics and video cameras to create related visual projects. (SR)

  15. Evaluation of a mentorship program to support chronic kidney disease care

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jocelyn; Grill, Allan; Bhatt, Monisha; Woodward, Graham L.; Brimble, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Primary care providers (PCPs) are ideally situated to detect and manage patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but they could use more support from nephrologists to accomplish this. Objective of program To improve early detection and management of CKD in primary care, and improve referrals to nephrologists through education and greater partnership between nephrologists and PCPs. Program description Nephrologists provided mentorship to PCPs in Ontario through a collaborative relationship. Nephrologists provided PCPs with educational orientation sessions and need-based advice on patient cases. Conclusion Primary care providers with more than 5 years of experience were more likely to use the program. Primary care providers expressed high satisfaction with the program and reported that it was effective in supporting routine CKD screening efforts, management of early CKD, appropriate referrals, and building a collaborative relationship with nephrologists. PMID:27521409

  16. Epidemiology of Pediatric Prehospital Basic Life Support Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diggs, Leigh Ann; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; De Leo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Children have unique medical needs compared to adults. Emergency medical services personnel need proper equipment and training to care for children. The purpose of this study is to characterize emergency medical services pediatric basic life support to help better understand the needs of children transported by ambulance. Pediatric basic life support patients were identified in this retrospective descriptive study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine incident location, possible injury, cardiac arrest, resuscitation attempted, chief complaint, primary symptom, provider's primary impression, cause of injury, and procedures performed during pediatric basic life support calls using the largest aggregate of emergency medical services data available, the 2013 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public Release Research Data Set. Pediatric calls represented 7.4% of emergency medical services activations. Most pediatric patients were male (49.8%), White (40.0%), and of non-Hispanic origin (56.5%). Most incidents occurred in the home. Injury, cardiac arrest, and resuscitation attempts were highest in the 15 to 19 year old age group. Global complaints (37.1%) predominated by anatomic location and musculoskeletal complaints (26.9%) by organ system. The most common primary symptom was pain (30.3%) followed by mental/psychiatric (13.4%). Provider's top primary impression was traumatic injury (35.7%). The most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accident (32.3%). The most common procedure performed was patient assessment (27.4%). Median EMS system response time was 7 minutes (IQR: 5-12). Median EMS scene time was 12 minutes (IQR: 8-19). Median transport time was 14 minutes (IQR: 8-24). Median EMS total call time was 51 minutes (IQR: 33-77). The epidemiology of pediatric basic life support can help to guide efforts in both emergency medical services operations and training.

  17. Classroom Writing Activities to Support the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Judy

    1993-01-01

    Describes a range of classroom writing activities to go along with three books for children or adolescents: "On My Honor" (Marion Dane Bauer), "Knots on a Counting Rope" (Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault), and "Piggybook" (Anthony Browne). (SR)

  18. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence W; Camfield, Peter; Capers, Melissa; Cascino, Greg; Ciccarelli, Mary; de Gusmao, Claudio M; Downs, Stephen M; Majnemer, Annette; Miller, Amy Brin; SanInocencio, Christina; Schultz, Rebecca; Tilton, Anne; Winokur, Annick; Zupanc, Mary

    2016-08-23

    The child neurologist has a critical role in planning and coordinating the successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Leadership in appropriately planning a youth's transition and in care coordination among health care, educational, vocational, and community services providers may assist in preventing gaps in care, delayed entry into the adult care system, and/or health crises for their adolescent patients. Youth whose neurologic conditions result in cognitive or physical disability and their families may need additional support during this transition, given the legal and financial considerations that may be required. Eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process have been outlined by a multidisciplinary panel convened by the Child Neurology Foundation are introduced and described. The authors of this consensus statement recognize the current paucity of evidence for successful transition models and outline areas for future consideration. PMID:27466477

  19. WikiBuild: a new application to support patient and health care professional involvement in the development of patient support tools.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2011-01-01

    Active patient and public involvement as partners in their own health care and in the development of health services is key to achieving a health care system that is responsive to patients' needs and values. It promotes better use of the health care system, and improves health outcomes, quality of life and patient satisfaction. By involving patients and health care professionals as partners in the creation and updating of patient health support tools, wikis--highly accessible, interactive vehicles of communication--have the potential to empower users to implement these support tools in daily life. Acknowledging the potential of wikis, and recognizing that they capitalize on the free and open access to information, scientists, opinion leaders and patient advocates have suggested that wikis could help decision-making constituencies improve the delivery of health care. They might also decrease its cost and improve access to knowledge within developing countries. However, little is known about the efficacy of wikis in helping to attain these goals. There is also a need to know more about the intention of patients and health care workers to use wikis, in what circumstances and what factors will influence their use of wikis. In this issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, Gupta et al describe how they developed and tested a new wiki-inspired application to improve asthma care. The researchers involved patients with asthma, primary care physicians, pulmonologists and certified asthma educators in the construction of an asthma action plan. Their paper--entitled "WikiBuild: a new online collaboration process for multistakeholder tool development and consensus building"--is the first description of a wiki-inspired technology built to involve patients and health care professionals in the development of a patient support tool. This innovative study has made important contributions toward how wikis could be generalized to involve multiple stakeholders in the

  20. Tablet-based patient monitoring and decision support systems in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Linden, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Remote patient monitoring with evidence-based decision support is revolutionizing healthcare. This novel approach could enable both patients and healthcare providers to improve quality of care and reduce costs. Clinicians can also view patients' data within the hospital network on tablet computers as well as other ubiquitous devices. Today, a wide range of applications are available on tablet computers which are increasingly integrating into the healthcare mainstream as clinical decision support systems. Despite the benefits of tablet-based healthcare applications, there are concerns around the accuracy, security and stability of such applications. In this study, we developed five tablet-based application screens for remote patient monitoring at hospital care settings and identified related issues and challenges. The ultimate aim of this research is to integrate decision support algorithms into the monitoring system in order to improve inpatient care and the effectiveness of such applications. PMID:26736485

  1. The Importance of Supportive Care in Optimizing Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimal oncologic care of older men with prostate cancer, including effective prevention and management of the disease and treatment side effects (so-called best supportive care measures) can prolong survival, improve quality of life, and reduce depressive symptoms. In addition, the proportion of treatment discontinuations can be reduced through early reporting and management of side effects. Pharmacologic care may be offered to manage the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy and chemotherapy, which may include hot flashes, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, and diarrhea. Nonpharmacologic care (e.g., physical exercise, acupuncture, relaxation) has also been shown to benefit patients. At the Georges Pompidou European Hospital, the Program of Optimization of Chemotherapy Administration has demonstrated that improved outpatient follow-up by supportive care measures can reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-related side effects, reduce cancellations and modifications of treatment, reduce chemotherapy wastage, and reduce the length of stay in the outpatient unit. The importance of supportive care measures to optimize management and outcomes of older men with advanced prostate cancer should not be overlooked. PMID:23015682

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Possible Memory Biases Affecting Support for Racial Health Care Policy

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to test the theory that estimates of racial disparities may be based on small recalled samples of specific individuals (Black vs White), a strategy likely to lead to underestimates of true racial disparities and a corresponding opposition to race-focused health care policies. Methods. We asked a sample of White adults to list the first 5 Black and White individuals who came to mind, and then measured support for various race-focused health care policies. Results. Analyses indicated that the Black individuals recalled by participants tended to be more famous and wealthy than their White counterparts. Furthermore, the tendency to list wealthier Black individuals predicted opposition to progressive racial health care programs. A follow-up study demonstrated that support for certain race-focused health care policies could be increased by informing Whites of potential memory biases. Conclusions. The survival and success of minority health care policies depend partially on public acceptance. Education regarding continuing racial disparities may help to increase support for race-focused health care policies. PMID:22420789

  3. Supporting parental bonding in the NICU: a care plan for nurses.

    PubMed

    Haut, C; Peddicord, K; O'Brien, E

    1994-12-01

    New and improved technology in the NICU has assisted in supporting critically ill neonates, especially those born at very low birth weights. These small patients require the dedicated hand of the NICU staff, but also the love and support of their parents. Family bonding in the NICU is often a very difficult process, which is interrupted by separation of parent and child at birth and continued by the physical constraints of this highly complex critical care environment. Neonatal nurses are most often the front line managers and coordinators of family care in the NICU. They are charged with the challenge of understanding and providing "state of the art" technological care in an environment that must also adapt to the ever changing needs of parents and families who cannot be considered visitors, but an integral part of their infants' care and survival. Each infant and family in the NICU requires individualized assessment and nursing care. This article reviews the process of parental bonding as it relates to the premature or ill infant and provides for nurses a plan of care written to foster and support family bonding in the NICU. Stages of bonding with a sick or premature infant are explored in the context of a theoretical framework of adaptation provided by Sister Callista Roy.

  4. Participant-Driven Managed Supports: Breaking New Ground. A Handbook on Applying Managed Care Strategies to Developmental Disabilities Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melda, Kerri, Ed.

    This guide discusses participant-driven managed support in which people with disabilities and their families steer their own futures by having more control over the money used to provide long-term supports. After an introductory chapter, chapter 2, "What Is Managed Care," describes managed care, traditional managed care players, and the 10 tools…

  5. The Basis for Using the Internet to Support the Information Needs of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Westberg, Edward E.; Miller, Randolph A.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesizing the state of the art from the published literature, this review assesses the basis for employing the Internet to support the information needs of primary care. The authors survey what has been published about the information needs of clinical practice, including primary care, and discuss currently available information resources potentially relevant to primary care. Potential methods of linking information needs with appropriate information resources are described in the context of previous classifications of clinical information needs. Also described is the role that existing terminology mapping systems, such as the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System, may play in representing and linking information needs to answers. PMID:9925225

  6. Patient Segmentation Analysis Offers Significant Benefits For Integrated Care And Support.

    PubMed

    Vuik, Sabine I; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Integrated care aims to organize care around the patient instead of the provider. It is therefore crucial to understand differences across patients and their needs. Segmentation analysis that uses big data can help divide a patient population into distinct groups, which can then be targeted with care models and intervention programs tailored to their needs. In this article we explore the potential applications of patient segmentation in integrated care. We propose a framework for population strategies in integrated care-whole populations, subpopulations, and high-risk populations-and show how patient segmentation can support these strategies. Through international case examples, we illustrate practical considerations such as choosing a segmentation logic, accessing data, and tailoring care models. Important issues for policy makers to consider are trade-offs between simplicity and precision, trade-offs between customized and off-the-shelf solutions, and the availability of linked data sets. We conclude that segmentation can provide many benefits to integrated care, and we encourage policy makers to support its use. PMID:27140981

  7. Translational Cognition for Decision Support in Critical Care Environments: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vimla L.; Zhang, Jiajie; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Green, Robert; Sayan, Osman R.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic and distributed work environment in critical care requires a high level of collaboration among clinical team members and a sophisticated task coordination system to deliver safe, timely and effective care. A complex cognitive system underlies the decision-making process in such cooperative workplaces. This methodological review paper addresses the issues of translating cognitive research to clinical practice with a specific focus on decision-making in critical care, and the role of information and communication technology to aid in such decisions. Examples are drawn from studies of critical care in our own research laboratories. Critical care, in this paper, includes both intensive (inpatient) and emergency (outpatient) care. We define translational cognition as the research on basic and applied cognitive issues that contribute to our understanding of how information is stored, retrieved and used for problem-solving and decision-making. The methods and findings are discussed in the context of constraints on decision-making in real world complex environments and implications for supporting the design and evaluation of decision support tools for critical care health providers. PMID:18343731

  8. Role and Success of Finnish Early Childhood Education and Care in Supporting Child Welfare Clients: Perspectives from Parents and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pölkki, Pirjo L.; Vornanen, Riitta H.

    2016-01-01

    Day care in Finland comprising care, education and teaching--called Educare or the ECEC model--can be used as an open care (community care) support measure for children whose development is at risk. The general aim of the study was to investigate whether the needs of child welfare client children and their parents are fulfilled in day care…

  9. CDDIS Support of IGS LEO Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) has served as a global data center for the International GPS Service (IGS) since its start in June 1992, providing on-line access to data from over 175 sites on a daily and hourly basis. This paper will present an overview about the current status of the CDDIS GPS data and products archive with a look to the future support of LEO (Low Earth Orbiting missions), including the archive of high-rate data and on-board GPS receiver data.

  10. Making Personalized Health Care Even More Personalized: Insights From Activities of the IOM Genomics Roundtable

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P.; Johnson, Samuel G.; Berger, Adam C.; Feero, W. Gregory; Terry, Sharon F.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has generated much new knowledge into mechanisms of human disease, with the potential to catalyze novel drug discovery and development, prenatal and neonatal screening, clinical pharmacogenomics, more sensitive risk prediction, and enhanced diagnostics. Genomic medicine, however, has been limited by critical evidence gaps, especially those related to clinical utility and applicability to diverse populations. Genomic medicine may have the greatest impact on health care if it is integrated into primary care, where most health care is received and where evidence supports the value of personalized medicine grounded in continuous healing relationships. Redesigned primary care is the most relevant setting for clinically useful genomic medicine research. Taking insights gained from the activities of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health, we apply lessons learned from the patient-centered medical home national experience to implement genomic medicine in a patient-centered, learning health care system. PMID:26195686

  11. A Wireless, Handheld Decision Support System To Promote Smoking Cessation in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Michel, George; Marcy, Theodore; Shiffman, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    Tobacco use remains a relatively unaddressed cause of disease and death in the daily care of patients by physicians. To overcome the barriers that physicians face in addressing tobacco use and its treatment in the primary care setting, we have developed a clinical decision support system that is readily accessible through the use of familiar wireless handheld devices and supportive of treatment through the implementation of the Tobacco Use and Dependence Treatment Guideline recommendations. We adopted the Information Management Services model to ensure that the application would effectively implement the guideline. The techniques used here are readily adaptable to implementing a broad range of clinical guidelines. PMID:16779096

  12. Developing quality indicators for family support services in community team-based mental health care.

    PubMed

    Serene Olin, S; Kutash, Krista; Pollock, Michele; Burns, Barbara J; Kuppinger, Anne; Craig, Nancy; Purdy, Frances; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Wisdom, Jennifer; Hoagwood, Kimberly E

    2014-01-01

    Quality indicators for programs integrating parent-delivered family support services for children's mental health have not been systematically developed. Increasing emphasis on accountability under the Affordable Care Act highlights the importance of quality-benchmarking efforts. Using a modified Delphi approach, quality indicators were developed for both program level and family support specialist level practices. These indicators were pilot tested with 21 community-based mental health programs. Psychometric properties of these indicators are reported; variations in program and family support specialist performance suggest the utility of these indicators as tools to guide policies and practices in organizations that integrate parent-delivered family support service components. PMID:23709287

  13. Developing quality indicators for family support services in community team-based mental health care.

    PubMed

    Serene Olin, S; Kutash, Krista; Pollock, Michele; Burns, Barbara J; Kuppinger, Anne; Craig, Nancy; Purdy, Frances; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Wisdom, Jennifer; Hoagwood, Kimberly E

    2014-01-01

    Quality indicators for programs integrating parent-delivered family support services for children's mental health have not been systematically developed. Increasing emphasis on accountability under the Affordable Care Act highlights the importance of quality-benchmarking efforts. Using a modified Delphi approach, quality indicators were developed for both program level and family support specialist level practices. These indicators were pilot tested with 21 community-based mental health programs. Psychometric properties of these indicators are reported; variations in program and family support specialist performance suggest the utility of these indicators as tools to guide policies and practices in organizations that integrate parent-delivered family support service components.

  14. Health Information Technology Coordination to Support Patient-centered Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To select papers published in 2014, illustrating how information technology can contribute to and improve patient-centered care coordination. Method The two section editors performed a literature review from Medline and Web of Science to select a list of candidate best papers on the use of information technology for patient-centered care coordination. These papers were peer-reviewed by external reviewers and three of them were selected as “best papers”. Results The first selected paper reports a qualitative study exploring the gap between current practices of care coordination in various settings and idealized longitudinal care plans. The second selected paper illustrates several unintended consequences of HIT designed to improve care coordination. The third selected paper shows that advanced analytic techniques in medical informatics can be instrumental in studying patient-centered care coordination. Conclusions The realization of true patient-centered care coordination is dependent upon a number of factors. Standardization of clinical documentation and HIT interoperability across organization and settings is a critical prerequisite for HIT to support patient-centered care coordination. Enabling patient involvement is an efficient means for goal setting and health information sharing. Additionally, unintended consequences of HIT tools (both positive and negative) must be measured and taken into account for quality improvement. PMID:26293848

  15. Health care worker perspectives inform optimization of patient panel-support tools: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Adrianne C; Schneider, Jennifer L; Unitan, Robert; Perrin, Nancy A; Smith, David H; Nichols, Gregory A; Lee, Nancy L

    2013-04-01

    Electronic decision-support systems appear to enhance care, but improving both tools and work practices may optimize outcomes. Using qualitative methods, the authors' aim was to evaluate perspectives about using the Patient Panel-Support Tool (PST) to better understand health care workers' attitudes toward, and adoption and use of, a decision-support tool. In-depth interviews were conducted to elicit participant perspectives about the PST-an electronic tool implemented in 2006 at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. The PST identifies "care gaps" and recommendations in screening, medication use, risk-factor control, and immunizations for primary care panel patients. Primary care physician (PCP) teams were already grouped (based on performance pre- and post-PST introduction) into lower, improving, and higher percent-of-care-needs met. Participants were PCPs (n=21), medical assistants (n=11), and quality and other health care managers (n=20); total n=52. Results revealed that the most commonly cited benefit of the PST was increased in-depth knowledge of patient panels, and empowerment of staff to do quality improvement. Barriers to PST use included insufficient time, competing demands, suboptimal staffing, tool navigation, documentation, and data issues. Facilitators were strong team staff roles, leadership/training for tool implementation, and dedicated time for tool use. Higher performing PCPs and their assistants more often described a detailed team approach to using the PST. In conclusion, PCP teams and managers provided important perspectives that could help optimize use of panel-support tools to improve future outcomes. Improvements are needed in tool function and navigation; training; staff accountability and role clarification; and panel management time.

  16. Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care - A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning.

    PubMed

    Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Karlsson, Karin; Lindell, Lisbeth; Fors, Uno

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students' opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students' independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care.

  17. Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care - A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning.

    PubMed

    Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Karlsson, Karin; Lindell, Lisbeth; Fors, Uno

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students' opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students' independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care. PMID:27038085

  18. The Performance of mHealth in Cancer Supportive Care: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the advent of smartphones, mHealth has risen to the attention of the health care system as something that could radically change the way health care has been viewed, managed, and delivered to date. This is particularly relevant for cancer, as one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and for cancer supportive care, since patients and caregivers have key roles in managing side effects. Given adequate knowledge, they are able to expect appropriate assessments and interventions. In this scenario, mHealth has great potential for linking patients, caregivers, and health care professionals; for enabling early detection and intervention; for lowering costs; and achieving better quality of life. Given its great potential, it is important to evaluate the performance of mHealth. This can be considered from several perspectives, of which organizational performance is particularly relevant, since mHealth may increase the productivity of health care providers and as a result even the productivity of health care systems. Objective This paper aims to review studies on the evaluation of the performance of mHealth, with particular focus on cancer care and cancer supportive care processes, concentrating on its contribution to organizational performance, as well as identifying some indications for a further research agenda. Methods We carried out a review of literature, aimed at identifying studies related to the performance of mHealth in general or focusing on cancer care and cancer supportive care. Results Our analysis revealed that studies are almost always based on a single dimension of performance. Any evaluations of the performance of mHealth are based on very different methods and measures, with a prevailing focus on issues linked to efficiency. This fails to consider the real contribution that mHealth can offer for improving the performance of health care providers, health care systems, and the quality of life in general. Conclusions Further research

  19. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  20. Supporting South Asian carers and those they care for: the role of the primary health care team.

    PubMed Central

    Katbamna, Savita; Bhakta, Padma; Ahmad, Waqar; Baker, Richard; Parker, Gillian

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Demographic and socioeconomic changes have increased policy interest in informal carers. However, despite the multicultural nature of British society, most research in this field has been in majority communities. AIM: To explore the role of the primary health care team (PHCT) in supporting carers from British South Asian communities. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative study. SETTING: Four South Asian communities in Leicestershire and West Yorkshire. METHODS: Focus groups and in-depth interviews were used to assess male and female carers, supported by a literature review. RESULTS: Failure to recognise carers' needs, gaps in service provision, and communication and language issues compromised carers' ability to care. While some carers were positive about the PHCT role, the main weaknesses concerned poor consultation, PHCT attitudes towards carers, and access to appropriate services. CONCLUSION: South Asian carers' experiences largely parallel those of others, but there are some issues that are distinct, namely, language and communication barriers, culturally inappropriate services, and implicit or explicit racism. The multi-ethnic nature of Great Britain requires that professional practice enhances the ability of minority ethnic communities to provide informal care. The findings underline the important role of the PHCT in ensuring that carers' needs are taken seriously and that appropriate services reach them. PMID:11942447

  1. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  2. Outcome Evaluation of Active Support Training in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Harman, Anthony D.; Lin, Chwen-Jen; Lee, Wan-ping; Chang, Shu-chuan; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Active Support was implemented for the first time in Taiwan in March, 2009. This study aims to evaluate whether the supervisors and front line managers of residential services receiving Active Support Training (AST) caused a positive impact on their users with intellectual disabilities (ID) while comparing this with their counterparts with ID…

  3. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery: an evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Thijs-Boer, F M; de Kruif, A T; van de Wiel, H B

    1999-04-01

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals that provide surgical treatment for these patients. Nursing care was defined to be optimal if it met the following criteria: (a) Specialized nursing support is provided to all patients during admission and in the outpatient departments both before and after surgery. (b) A protocol is in place outlining standard nursing procedures for breast cancer patients. (c) Formal communication about each breast cancer patient exists between the nurses involved. On the basis of this definition, it was found that optimal nursing care was provided in only 6% of the hospitals. Nursing care fell short mainly in the outpatient setting. This shortcoming also was recognized by most respondents, and many were already planning improvements. Nurses had varying opinions about their responsibility to provide the patient with information about the disease and its treatment, and consensus was lacking. In summary, nursing care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Dutch hospitals needs improvement, especially in the outpatient setting. PMID:10217034

  4. Activating people to address their health care needs: learning from people with lived experience of chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Victoria; Henwood, Benjamin F

    2014-08-01

    One of the primary goals of health care reform is improving the quality and reducing the costs of care for people with co-morbid mental health and physical health conditions. One strategy is to integrate primary and behavioral health care through care coordination and patient activation. This qualitative study using community based participatory research methods informs the development of integrated care by presenting the perspectives of those with lived experience of chronic illnesses and homelessness. Themes presented include the internal and external barriers to addressing health needs and the key role of peer support in overcoming these barriers.

  5. Incentives for telehealthcare deployment that support integrated care: a comparative analysis across eight European countries

    PubMed Central

    Lluch, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Health care systems are struggling to deal with the increasing demands of an older population. In an attempt to find a solution to these demands, there has been a shift towards integrated care supported by information and communication technologies. However, little is understood about the role played by incentives and reimbursement schemes in the development of integrated care and information and communication technologies uptake. The objective of this paper is to investigate this question, specifically as regards telehealthcare. Methods In order to identify the deployment of telehealthcare applications and their role in supporting integrated care, a case study approach was used. A clustering exercise was carried out and eight European countries were selected for in-depth study: Denmark, Estonia, Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK. In total, 31 telehealthcare initiatives across eight countries involving over 20,000 patients were investigated. Results Reflecting on specific examples in each initiative, drivers promoting integrated care delivery supported by telehealthcare mainstreaming and associated incentive mechanisms were identified. Attention was also paid to other factors which acted as barriers for widespread deployment. Discussion and conclusions Trends towards telehealthcare mainstreaming were found in Denmark, the UK, and in some regions of Spain, Italy and France. Mainstreaming often went hand-in-hand with progress towards integrated care delivery and payment reforms. A general trend was found towards outcomes-based payments and bundled payment schemes, which aimed to promote integrated care supported by telehealthcare deployment. Their effectiveness in achieving these goals remains to be seen. In addition, a form of outpatient diagnostic-related group reimbursement for telehealthcare services was found to have emerged in a few countries. However, it is questionable how this incentive could promote integrated care

  6. Aircraft: United States Air Force Child Care Program Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggs, Juanita; Brant, Linda

    General information about United States' aircraft is provided in this program activity guide for teachers and caregivers in Air Force preschools and day care centers. The guide includes basic information for teachers and caregivers, basic understandings, suggested teaching methods and group activities, vocabulary, ideas for interest centers, and…

  7. Active Learning in a Family Day Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Susan

    Practical tips for improving the quality of child care are offered in this guide. It presents early childhood research findings in everyday language and suggests ways to apply these findings with active learning experiences for children. Developmentally appropriate, holistic activities are presented for key areas. The first five parts of the book…

  8. Supporting Self-Care for Families of Children With Eczema With a Web-Based Intervention Plus Health Care Professional Support: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. Methods We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. Results A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ≥2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that

  9. [Assessing and evaluating physical activity during counseling in health care].

    PubMed

    Hagströmer, Maria; Wisén, Anita; Hassmén, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To make individualized counseling possible, valid and reliable measures of physical activity are necessary. In health care, quality must be continuously secured and developed. Follow-up of life-style habits such as physical activity does not differ from monitoring of other treatment in the health care setting.  After counseling and appropriate period of time, evaluation should be done to assess if there has been any change in the physical activity level. For assessment and evaluation of physical activity in routine clinical practice the National Board for Health and Social Welfare indicator questions regarding physical activity are recommended. For a more detailed assessment and evaluation of physical activity and sedentary behavior comprehensive validated instruments/diaries should be used. For precise and objective assessment and evaluation of both physical activity and sedentary behavior, movement sensors are recommended.

  10. Marshalling Social Support: A “Care-Getting” Model for Persons Living with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Eva; Kahana, Boaz; Wykle, May; Kulle, Diana

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a stress theory based conceptual framework for understanding proactive options for care-getting for patients living with cancer that is also relevant to patients living with other chronic or life threatening illnesses. Barriers and facilitators to active efforts for obtaining responsive care from both informal and formal sources are discussed. This “Care-Getting” model explores benefits of proactive care-getting for diminishing physical discomfort/suffering, burden of illness and disability, and psychological distress. We highlight unique issues in care-getting that patients face at different stages of the life course. Implications of prior research related to the model for practice and intervention are discussed. PMID:20107524

  11. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  12. Enhancing the Safety of Children in Foster Care and Family Support Programs: Automated Critical Incident Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Eliot; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 has made child safety an explicit focus in child welfare. The authors describe an automated critical incident reporting program designed for use in foster care and family-support programs. The program, which is based in Lotus Notes and uses e-mail to route incident reports from direct service staff to…

  13. Fair Shares? Supporting Families Caring for Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConkey, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although the majority of adult persons with intellectual disabilities are cared for by their families, remarkably little is known of the characteristics of their carers, the support services they receive and their unmet needs. A particular concern is whether or not carers have equitable access to services. Method: Information was…

  14. The provision of primary care interventions by community health support workers in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sara; Kelly, Amber; Randhawa, Gurch

    2007-04-01

    Skill mix and role redesign have changed the face of the primary care workforce in the UK in recent years. In areas with minority ethnic communities, support workers with language skills and cultural knowledge have been employed to provide health care. Although this role is relatively new to the UK, countries like Pakistan have a long history of employing community support workers. This study seeks to learn from Pakistan's experience and apply the learning to the UK context. The findings from this study suggest that the support worker role in Pakistan is highly effective when training and adequate supervision is given and when the support worker is entrusted with a considerable degree of freedom to act. It was also observed that the same role might be highly effective in one context, but less so in another, which indicates the importance of exploring a range of factors that may affect outcomes. The study provided an invaluable opportunity to gain a better understanding of the health care system in Pakistan. This may assist in the development of services in the UK to improve primary health care, particularly for those who experience barriers in accessing services. PMID:17455572

  15. Animating Community Supported Agriculture in North East England: Striving for a "Caring Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Liz

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a case study of a new Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) scheme in the north of England to draw attention to some of the ethical issues encountered when using a participatory action research approach to animating CSA. Both CSA and participatory action research have been associated with the concept of "caring practice" and an…

  16. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  17. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  18. Support and Self-Care: Professional Reflections of Six New Zealand High School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Yvonne A.; Payne, Monica A.

    2008-01-01

    In many Western societies there is increasing demand for counselling; in turn, heightened levels of support needs have been identified for counsellors themselves. Despite calls for practitioners to adopt a more proactive approach to self-care, research suggests many still pay insufficient attention to alleviating on-the-job stress or achieving…

  19. Day Care Room Transitions for Toddlers: Recommendations for a Supportive Physical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Nanci

    1996-01-01

    Discusses ways physical setting facilitates room transitions for toddlers in day care centers. Recommends specific physical features that support the transition process, including visual access to the next room, flexible access to one's former room, shared space, familiar materials and structures, and enriched cozy areas. Toddlers need to take in…

  20. Mediating Effects of Social Support on Firefighters' Sense of Community and Perceptions of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowman, Shaun E.; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Liao-Troth, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between psychological sense of community, social-support networks, and care-giver stress and satisfaction among firefighters. No significant gender differences were obtained, but zero-order correlates demonstrated significant relationships among all four variables. In examining the mediating effects of…

  1. Cash Assistance as a Support for In-Home Care: Caregivers' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamek, Margaret E.

    Recognition of the importance of families in providing care to older persons has led to advocacy for a variety of supports to assist them. This study was conducted to describe caregivers' perceptions of the helpfulness of cash assistance and to identify factors associated with perceived helpfulness. Subjects were co-resident caregivers (N=155)…

  2. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  3. Personalisation of Adult Social Care: Self-Directed Support and the Choice and Control Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Sophie; Cameron, Ailsa

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, "self-directed support" was introduced in adult social care in England to establish choice and control--in the assessment process itself and over service provision--for "all" service users. The personalisation agenda is underpinned by a range of ideologies, particularly a civil rights empowerment approach and…

  4. How to develop a second victim support program: a toolkit for health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Stephen; Kenney, Linda; Scott, Susan D; Wu, Albert W

    2012-05-01

    A toolkit was developed to help health care organizations implement support programs for clinicians suffering from the emotional impact of errors and adverse events. Based on the best available evidence related to the second victim experience, the toolkit consists of 10 modules, each with a series of specific action steps, references, and exemplars.

  5. Review of State Policies and Programs to Support Young People Transitioning Out of Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworsky, Amy; Havlicek, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This comprehensive review of policies and programs designed to support youth transitioning out of foster care spans all 50 states and the District of Columbia. As part of the review, Chapin Hall administered a web-based survey of state independent living services coordinators to collect up-to-date information about their state's policies and…

  6. Training, Consultation, and Mentoring: Supporting Effective Responses to Challenging Behavior in Early Care and Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschland, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Administrators in early care and education programs often turn to training initiatives to bolster staff competence in supporting children with emotional and behavioral challenges. However, training alone rarely results in the wide-ranging changes these administrators seek. This article presents a flexible approach to training, consultation and…

  7. Educational Supports for Middle School Youths Involved in the Foster Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyre, Ashli D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite our knowledge of poor educational outcomes for youths in foster care, the literature on methods or models for addressing the needs of this vulnerable group of students remains extremely limited. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to describe a school-based educational support model that provides advocacy, tutoring, and…

  8. Development of a system supporting patient supervision and treatment in contemporary home-care: status report.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Basile; Botsivaly, Maria; Tzavaras, Aris; Koutsourakis, Konstantinos; Koulouris, Eleutherios; Liargovas, Dimitrios; Mertika, Konstantina

    2006-01-01

    The emerging amalgamation of informatics, communication technologies, and entertainment electronics in the field of Biomedical Technology combined to, first, the increase in length of the mean life expectancy, and, second, the hospitalization cost avalanche, will facilitate gradually the development of a new Hi-Tec home-care environment. We have developed a home-computer based system, addressing crucial aspects of the development of contemporary home-care that comprises of: First, the employment of low-cost commercially available components, supporting home-care patient's well-being observation, including eventually vital-signs monitoring. Second, software means for the processing, the evaluation, and the targeted transmission of the acquired health-data. Third, software tools for the planning, the documentation, and the management of the corresponding home-care case. The present paper constitutes a progress report of the ongoing development efforts.

  9. Concerns about end-of-life care and support for euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Givens, Jane L; Mitchell, Susan L

    2009-08-01

    Popular support for euthanasia is known to vary according to sociodemographic characteristics. However, little is known about whether support is associated with concerns regarding the emotional, physical, and economic burdens of end-of-life care. This study used data from the 1998 General Social Survey, a national survey of community-dwelling adults. The outcome variable assessed the respondents' support for a doctor's right to end life in the setting of terminal illness. Independent variables assessed the following concerns: 1) concern about the emotional burden of end-of-life decision making for family members; 2) worry about the economic burden of terminal illness; 3) concern about pain at the end of life; 4) worry that lack of money or insurance will result in second-class end-of-life care; and 5) belief that their religious community will be helpful at the end of life. Multivariable logistic regression estimated the independent effect of these concerns on support for euthanasia, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Of 786 respondents, 70.6% approved of euthanasia in the setting of terminal illness. In adjusted analyses, respondents with concerns about the emotional toll of decision making on family members, economic burden, and poor health care because of lack of insurance were significantly more likely to support euthanasia. Respondents with faith in the helpfulness of their religious community were less likely to support euthanasia. In conclusion, emotional and economic concerns about end-of-life care were associated with support for the right to euthanasia. Future work can evaluate whether alleviating these concerns may reduce the perceived desire for euthanasia by patients near the end of life.

  10. PEPFAR support for the scaling up of collaborative TB/HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrea A; Gasana, Michel; Getahun, Haileyesus; Harries, Anthony; Lawn, Stephen D; Miller, Bess; Nelson, Lisa; Sitienei, Joseph; Coggin, William L

    2012-08-15

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported a comprehensive package of care in which interventions to address HIV-related tuberculosis (TB) have received increased funding and support in recent years. PEPFAR's TB/HIV programming is based on the World Health Organization's 12-point policy for collaborative TB/HIV activities, which are integrated into PEPFAR annual guidance. PEPFAR implementing partners have provided crucial support to TB/HIV collaboration, and as a result, PEPFAR-supported countries in sub-Saharan Africa have made significant gains in HIV testing and counseling of TB patients and linkages to HIV care and treatment, intensified TB case finding, and TB infection control. PEPFAR's support of TB/HIV integration has also included significant investment in health systems, including improved laboratory services and educating and enlarging the workforce. The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy along with support of programs to increase HIV counseling and testing and improve linkage and retention in HIV care may have considerable impact on TB morbidity and mortality, if used synergistically with isoniazid preventive therapy, intensified case finding, and infection control. Issues to be addressed by future programming include accelerating implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy, increasing access and ensuring appropriate use of new TB diagnostics, supporting early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected TB patients, and strengthening systems to monitor and evaluate program implementation.

  11. Prostate cancer and supportive care: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis of men's experiences and unmet needs

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M.; Moore, T.H.M.; Paterson, C.; Sharp, D.; Persad, R.; Huntley, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide, accounting for an estimated 1.1 million new cases diagnosed in 2012 (www.globocan.iarc.fr). Currently, there is a lack of specific guidance on supportive care for men with prostate cancer. This article describes a qualitative systematic review and synthesis examining men's experience of and need for supportive care. Seven databases were searched; 20 journal articles were identified and critically appraised. A thematic synthesis was conducted in which descriptive themes were drawn out of the data. These were peer support, support from partner, online support, cancer specialist nurse support, self‐care, communication with health professionals, unmet needs (emotional support, information needs, support for treatment‐induced side effects of incontinence and erectile dysfunction) and men's suggestions for improved delivery of supportive care. This was followed by the development of overarching analytic themes which were: uncertainty, reframing, and the timing of receiving treatment, information and support. Our results show that the most valued form of support men experienced following diagnosis was one‐to‐one peer support and support from partners. This review highlights the need for improved access to cancer specialist nurses throughout the care pathway, individually tailored supportive care and psychosexual support for treatment side effects. PMID:25630851

  12. Relationship between parent–infant attachment and parental satisfaction with supportive nursing care

    PubMed Central

    Ghadery-Sefat, Akram; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Badiee, Zohreh; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parent–infant attachment is an important factor in accepting parenting role, accelerating infant survival, and adjusting to the environment outside the uterus. Since family supportive interventions can strengthen the parent–infant caring relationship, this study sought to investigate the relationship between mother–infant attachment and satisfaction of the mothers with the supportive nursing care received in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive–correlational study, 210 mothers with premature infants who were hospitalized in the NICUs affiliated to Isfahan Medical University hospitals took part. The data were collected via Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale and researcher's self-tailored questionnaire based on Nurse Parent Support Tool. Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple linear regressions were used to analyze the collected data. Results: The results showed that the overall score of mother–infant attachment and the overall score of maternal satisfaction correlated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.195. Also, the overall score of mother–infant attachment and mothers’ satisfaction scores in the emotional, communicative-informative, and self-confidence domains correlated with correlation coefficients of r = 0.182, r = 0.0.189, and r = 0.0.304, respectively. The results of multiple regression analysis revealed that about 15% of changes in the dependent variable (mother–infant attachment) could be explained by different dimensions of mothers’ satisfaction. Conclusions: The results of the study showed that mother–infant attachment improved by increasing mothers’ satisfaction of supportive nursing care. Therefore, it seems necessary to increase maternal satisfaction through given nursing care support, in order to promote mother–infant attachment. PMID:26985225

  13. A care improvement program acting as a powerful learning environment to support nursing students learning facilitation competencies.

    PubMed

    Jukema, Jan S; Harps-Timmerman, Annelies; Stoopendaal, Annemiek; Smits, Carolien H M

    2015-11-01

    Change management is an important area of training in undergraduate nursing education. Successful change management in healthcare aimed at improving practices requires facilitation skills that support teams in attaining the desired change. Developing facilitation skills in nursing students requires formal educational support. A Dutch Regional Care Improvement Program based on a nationwide format of change management in healthcare was designed to act as a Powerful Learning Environment for nursing students developing competencies in facilitating change. This article has two aims: to provide comprehensive insight into the program components and to describe students' learning experiences in developing their facilitation skills. This Dutch Regional Care Improvement Program considers three aspects of a Powerful Learning Environment: self-regulated learning; problem-based learning; and complex, realistic and challenging learning tasks. These three aspects were operationalised in five distinct areas of facilitation: increasing awareness of the need for change; leadership and project management; relationship building and communication; importance of the local context; and ongoing monitoring and evaluation. Over a period of 18 months, 42 nursing students, supported by trained lecturer-coaches, took part in nine improvement teams in our Regional Care Improvement Program, executing activities in all five areas of facilitation. Based on the students' experiences, we propose refinements to various components of this program, aimed at strengthenin the learning environment. There is a need for further detailed empirical research to study the impact this kind of learning environment has on students developing facilitation competencies in healthcare improvement.

  14. Hiring a pediatric health care advocate for advisory and support services.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Jennalee S; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina A; Cronan, Terry A; Sadler, Melody S

    2013-01-01

    In this study, factors that influence a person's likelihood of hiring a pediatric health care advocate (HCA) for support and/or advisory services were examined. Participants were asked to read vignettes in which a child's symptom severity, probability of mortality, and age were manipulated. A significantly higher likelihood of hiring an HCA for advisory services than for support services was found. A significant interaction between level of mortality and type of service indicated that when mortality was depicted as high, participants reported a greater likelihood of hiring an HCA for support services than for advisory services.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support System in Improving Maternal Health Care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Akweongo, Patricia; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Saronga, Happiness Pius; Williams, John; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Sauerborn, Rainer; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider’s perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out. Results Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC) in the intervention health centres (before-intervention= 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention= 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value=0.010). In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention= 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value=0.305). Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost –effectiveness ratio) decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention) to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention). Incremental cost –effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS), cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285. Conclusions Computer –assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether

  16. Perceived social support among HIV patients newly enrolled in care in rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Lifson, Alan R; Workneh, Sale; Hailemichael, Abera; Demissie, Workneh; Slater, Lucy; Shenie, Tibebe

    2015-01-01

    Social support significantly enhances physical and mental health for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We surveyed 142 rural Ethiopian HIV patients newly enrolled in care for perceived social support and factors associated with low support levels. Using the Social Provisions Scale (SPS), the mean summary score was 19.1 (possible scores = 0-48). On six SPS subscales, mean scores (possible scores = 0-8), were: Reliable Alliance (others can be counted on for tangible assistance) = 2.8, Attachment (emotional closeness providing sense of security) = 2.9, Reassurance of Worth (recognition of competence and value by others) = 3.2, Guidance (provision of advice or information by others) = 3.2, Social Integration (belonging to a group with similar interests and concerns) = 3.5, and Nurturance (belief that others rely on one for their well-being) = 3.6. In multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with lower social support scores were: lower education level (did not complete primary school) (p = .019), lower total score on knowledge items about HIV care/treatment (p = .038), and greater number of external stigma experiences in past three months (p < .001); greater number of chronic disease symptoms was of borderline significance (p = .098). Among rural Ethiopian patients newly entering HIV care, we found moderate and varying levels of perceived social support, with lowest scores for subscales reflecting emotional closeness and reliance on others for tangible assistance. Given that patients who have recently learned their diagnosis and entered care may be an especially vulnerable group, programs to help identify and address social support needs can provide multiple benefits in facilitating the best possible physical, emotional and functional quality of life for people living with HIV.

  17. Introducing pharmacogenetic testing with clinical decision support into primary care: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Martin; Aloise, Martin N.; Ang, J. Sidney; Cullis, Pieter; Dawes, Diana; Fraser, Robert; Liknaitzky, Gideon; Paterson, Andrea; Stanley, Paul; Suarez-Gonzalez, Adriana; Katzov-Eckert, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate prescribing increases patient illness and death owing to adverse drug events. The inclusion of genetic information into primary care medication practices is one solution. Our aim was to assess the ability to obtain and genotype saliva samples and to determine the levels of use of a decision support tool that creates medication options adjusted for patient characteristics, drug-drug interactions and pharmacogenetics. Methods: We conducted a cohort study in 6 primary care settings (5 family practices and 1 pharmacy), enrolling 191 adults with at least 1 of 10 common diseases. Saliva samples were obtained in the physician's office or pharmacy and sent to our laboratory, where DNA was extracted and genotyped and reports were generated. The reports were sent directly to the family physician/pharmacist and linked to an evidence-based prescribing decision support system. The primary outcome was ability to obtain and genotype samples. The secondary outcomes were yield and purity of DNA samples, ability to link results to decision support software and use of the decision support software. Results: Genotyping resulted in linking of 189 patients (99%) with pharmacogenetic reports to the decision support program. A total of 96.8% of samples had at least 1 actionable genotype for medications included in the decision support system. The medication support system was used by the physicians and pharmacists 236 times over 3 months. Interpretation: Physicians and pharmacists can collect saliva samples of sufficient quantity and quality for DNA extraction, purification and genotyping. A clinical decision support system with integrated data from pharmacogenetic tests may enable personalized prescribing within primary care. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02383290. PMID:27730116

  18. Commercial filming of patient care activities in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Geiderman, Joel M; Larkin, Gregory L

    2002-07-17

    Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

  19. Development of guidelines to facilitate improved support of South Asian carers by primary health care teams

    PubMed Central

    Katbamna, S; Baker, R; Ahmad, W; Bhakta, P; Parker, G

    2001-01-01

    Background—Evidence based guidelines are regarded as an appropriate basis for providing effective health care, but few guidelines incorporate the views of users such as carers. Aim—To develop guidelines to assist primary health care teams (PHCTs) in their work with carers within South Asian communities. Methods—The guidelines were drawn up by a development group consisting of members of teams in areas with South Asian communities (Leicester and Bradford). The teams were invited to make their recommendations based on a systematic review of literature on minority ethnic carers and the findings of a study of the needs and experiences of local South Asian carers. A grading system was devised to enable the teams and a group of expert peer reviewers to assess the quality of evidence in support of each recommendation. Results—The teams agreed seven recommendations, graded according to available evidence and strength of opinion. External peer review supported the PHCTs' interpretation of evidence and their recommendations. The recommendations included consideration of communication and information for carers, coordination of care within teams, and recognition by team members of the roles of carers and their cultural and religious beliefs. Conclusion—There are particular steps that PHCTs can take to improve their support of South Asian carers. It is possible to develop guidelines that take users' views into account and incorporate evidence from qualitative studies. Key Words: primary health care; South Asian carers; guidelines PMID:11533424

  20. Support for information management in critical care: a new approach to identify needs.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenal, T. W.; Forsythe, D. E.; Musen, M. A.; Seiver, A.

    1995-01-01

    Managing information is necessary to support clinical decision making and action in critical care. By understanding the nature of information management and its relationship to sound clinical practice, we should come to use technology more wisely. We demonstrated that a new approach inspired by ethnographic research methods could identify useful and unexpected findings about clinical information management. In this approach, a clinician experienced in a specific domain (critical care), with advice from a medical anthropologist, made short-term observations of information management in that domain. We identified 8 areas in a critical care Unit in which information management was seriously in need of better support. We also found interesting differences in how these needs were viewed by nurses and physicians. Our interest in this approach was at two levels: 1. Identify and describe representative instances of sub-optimal information management in a critical care Unit. 2. Investigate the effectiveness of such short-term observations by clinicians. Our long-range goal is to explore the use of this approach and the information it reveals to optimize the process of developing and selecting new information support tools, preparing for their introduction, and optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:8563267

  1. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  2. Community-based home support agencies: comparing the quality of care of cooperative and non-profit organizations.

    PubMed

    Leviten-Reid, Catherine; Hoyt, Ann

    2009-06-01

    In the province of Québec, services focusing on the instrumental activities of daily living are delivered to seniors by a combination of non-profit organizations and cooperatives. But do these organizations perform differently? This study asks whether home support cooperatives deliver higher-quality care than non-profit home support agencies. The specific effects of consumer and worker participation on the board of directors are also tested. Data were collected in 2006 and 2007 from 831 individuals receiving home support services from nine cooperatives and nine non-profits. Two consumer-centered measures of quality were used: a summated, 39-point satisfaction score and a 4-point overall quality score. Data were analyzed using ordered logistic regression. Results show that although organizational type was not a predictor of the two quality outcomes, worker involvement in governance was positively associated with the satisfaction score, while consumer involvement was positively associated with the overall quality score.

  3. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  4. System safety activities supporting an aero-space plane ground support technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the specific system safety activities required to support the ground support technology program associated with the design of an aerospace plane. Safe zones must be assessed to ensure that explosive safety requirements are attained to protect the vehicle, personnel, and support and operational facilities. Attention is given to the specific and unique design requirements connected with the utilization of cryogenic fuels as they apply to the design and development of an aerospace plane.

  5. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs. PMID:24912832

  6. Ethics meetings in support of good nursing care: some practice-based thoughts.

    PubMed

    Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Meulenbergs, Tom; van de Vijver, Lut; Tanghe, Anne; Gastmans, Chris

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to clarify both the role of nurses in ethics meetings and the way in which ethics meetings can function as a catalyst for good nursing care. The thoughts presented are practice based; they arose from our practical experiences as nurses and ethicists with ethics meetings in health care organizations in Belgium. Our reflections are written from the perspective of the nurse in the field who is participating in (inter)professional ethical dialogue. First, the difficulties that nurses experience while participating in ethics meetings are described. Then the possibilities for support of nurses in their ethical responsibility are explored. PMID:12449998

  7. Nutritional support and quality of life in cancer patients undergoing palliative care.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Grach, M-C

    2012-09-01

    In palliative care, the nutrition provided has to be tailored to the patient's needs, enhancing patient comfort and quality of life (QoL). We conducted a literature search to review methods of measuring QoL, and modalities of nutritional intervention and their influence on QoL of cancer patients in palliative care. Original papers published in English were selected from PubMed database by using the search terms, palliative medicine, cancer, nutrition and quality of life. Specific tools that are particularly recommended to assess QoL in a palliative care setting are reviewed. The main goal in palliative care is to maintain oral nutrition by providing nutritional counselling. Enteral nutritional support showed inconsistent effects on survival and QoL. An evidence-base for parenteral nutrition is still lacking. Ethical considerations concerning provision of food and hydration in end-of-life care are discussed. Nutritional status should be assessed early and regularly during treatment using appropriate tools. In the particularly acute context of palliative care, optimal patient management requires adequate education and counselling to patients and families. Meaningful interactions between the patient, caregivers and medical team would also increase the chance of resolving nutrition-related issues and help to fulfil each patient's specific nutritional needs and thus improve the QoL.

  8. The Effect of Active Support Training on Engagement, Opportunities for Choice, Challenging Behaviour and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa; Hamilton, David; Leighton, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate active support (AS) training and to investigate changes to perceived engagement in domestic tasks, opportunities for choice, frequency of challenging behaviour, and level of support needs. Method: Participants were 12 adults with ID aged 27-57 years (M = 37 years) residing in three group homes, and…

  9. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  10. The impact of the carer support needs assessment tool (CSNAT) in community palliative care using a stepped wedge cluster trial.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Grande, Gunn; Howting, Denise; Deas, Kathleen; Toye, Chris; Troeung, Lakkhina; Stajduhar, Kelli; Ewing, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Family caregiving towards the end-of-life entails considerable emotional, social, financial and physical costs for caregivers. Evidence suggests that good support can improve caregiver psychological outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the impact of using the carer support needs assessment tool (CSNAT), as an intervention to identify and address support needs in end of life home care, on family caregiver outcomes. A stepped wedge design was used to trial the CSNAT intervention in three bases of Silver Chain Hospice Care in Western Australia, 2012-14. The intervention consisted of at least two visits from nurses (2-3 weeks apart) to identify, review and address caregivers' needs. The outcome measures for the intervention and control groups were caregiver strain and distress as measured by the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire (FACQ-PC), caregiver mental and physical health as measured by SF-12v2, and caregiver workload as measured by extent of caregiver assistance with activities of daily living, at baseline and follow up. Total recruitment was 620. There was 45% attrition for each group between baseline and follow-up mainly due to patient deaths resulting in 322 caregivers completing the study (233 in the intervention group and 89 in the control group). At follow-up, the intervention group showed significant reduction in caregiver strain relative to controls, p=0.018, d=0.348 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.41). Priority support needs identified by caregivers included knowing what to expect in the future, having time for yourself in the day and dealing with your feelings and worries. Despite the challenges at the clinician, organisational and trial levels, the CSNAT intervention led to an improvement in caregiver strain. Effective implementation of an evidence-informed and caregiver-led tool represents a necessary step towards helping palliative care providers better assess and address caregiver needs, ensuring adequate family caregiver support

  11. A web-based intensive care clinical decision support system: from design to evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Deniz; Bilge, Ugur; Zayim, Nese; Cengiz, Melike

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) containing clinical guidelines and protocols that will support intensive care unit (ICU) providers in making decisions more effectively and quickly. First, a survey was carried out with 38 physicians in order to determine their preferences, needs and concerns regarding decision support tools. After the survey, guidelines were prepared by a group of specialists in ICU, and a medical informatician converted the guidelines into algorithm forms. Ten CDSS were developed using the algorithms, and placed onto the Intensive Care Decision Support Website (ICDSW). In order to evaluation of the website, 15 physicians were asked to answer 10 questions in 10 different scenarios first using a paper-based approach, then with ICDSW. When the answers were analyzed, it was found that the answers given by using ICDSW were significantly better than the paper-based approach (p <  0.001). However, there was no significant difference in terms of the time needed to answer the questions (p =  0.138). The usability score of the website was 85.6 ±  8.89. The study demonstrated the successful implementation of an ICDSW within intensive care units.

  12. Is physical activity associated with appetite? A survey of long-term care residents.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Megann; McDaniel, Jennifer L; Weiss, Edward P; Tomazic, Terry J; Mattfeldt-Beman, Mildred

    2009-01-01

    The intent of this research was to explore the influence of physical activity on the appetite of older adults in long-term care. Given the impact of the anorexia of aging and the increasing numbers of older adults, this could have significant health implications. Residents (N = 93) of a long-term care, assisted living, and rehabilitation facility were surveyed using the "Appetite & Activity Questionnaire." There was no relationship found between physical activity and appetite regardless of the participants' sex or age. BMI appeared to correlate well with the amount of activity that was performed. The most salient finding was the near absence of physical activity, even in the presence of facilities, support personnel, and available time. PMID:19234996

  13. Doula care supports near-universal breastfeeding initiation among diverse, low-income women

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy Backes; Attanasio, Laura B.; Hardeman, Rachel R.; O’Brien, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the United States breastfeeding initiation rates have risen in recent years. However, there are notable disparities by socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity. Previous research has suggested that care from a doula (a trained professional who provides non-medical support during the perinatal period) may increase breastfeeding initiation. The goal of this study was to study whether doula support may be associated with breastfeeding initiation among low-income, diverse women. Methods We compared breastfeeding initiation rates (mean values and 95% confidence intervals) for 1,069 women who received doula care from Everyday Miracles, a Minnesota-based organization that employs a diverse group of certified doulas, to a state-based sample of Medicaid-covered women who gave birth in 2009 or 2010 and participated in the Minnesota Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey (weighted n=51,721). Results Women who had doula-supported births had near-universal breastfeeding initiation (97.9%), compared with 80.8% of the general Medicaid population. Among African-American women, 92.7% of those with doula support initiated breastfeeding, compared with 70.3% of the general Medicaid population. Discussion These results suggest that access to culturally-appropriate doula care may facilitate higher rates of breastfeeding initiation. When supported in their non-medical needs by birth doulas, the diverse, low-income patients of midwives and other maternity care providers may have a greater likelihood of initiating breastfeeding and experiencing the maternal and infant health benefits associated with breastfeeding. PMID:23837663

  14. Responsive partisanship: public support for the clinton and obama health care plans.

    PubMed

    Kriner, Douglas L; Reeves, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    We examine the contours of support for the Clinton and Obama health care plans during the 1990s and 2000s based on our own compilation of 120,000 individual-level survey responses from throughout the debates. Despite the rise of the Tea Party, and the racialization of health care politics, opinion dynamics are remarkably similar in both periods. Party ID is the single most powerful predictor of support for reform and the president's handling of it. Contrary to prominent claims, after controlling for partisanship, demographic characteristics are at best weak predictors of support for reform. We also show that Clinton and Obama did not "lose" blacks, seniors, or wealthy voters over the course of the debate. The small and often nonexistent relationship between these characteristics and support for the plan are constant over time. Instead, the modest fluctuations in support for reform appear to follow the ebb and flow of elite rhetoric. Both mean levels of support and its volatility over time covary with elite partisan discourse. These findings suggest that presidents courting public opinion should seek consensus among their own party's elites before appealing to other narrower interests.

  15. Lived experiences of self-care among older physically active urban-living individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sundsli, Kari; Espnes, Geir Arild; Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Background Promoting physical activity is a public health priority in most industrial countries, and physical function is an important factor when taking into consideration older people’s self-care and health. Despite the increasing challenges associated with urbanization and the aging population, urban life appears to be positive in many ways for urban dwellers. However, the manner in which older people live in urban settings and how this influences their ability to take care of themselves should be considered important knowledge for health professionals and politicians to acquire. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that may influence health and self-care among older urban home-dwelling individuals who are physically active. Methods Ten subjects, three women and seven men, who were aged 65–82 years and identified to be physically active, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to the descriptive phenomenological method devised by Giorgi. Results Our findings showed beneficial self-care. The participants lived active everyday lives and were frequently physically active. They were part of a supportive, inclusive, and promoting fellowship, and they had the opportunity to travel. They utilized their competence and experienced making themselves useful. It was a privilege to be part of a family life as a husband, wife, parent, and/or a grandparent. They acknowledged physical and mental limitations, yet they felt they were in good health. Conclusion Health professionals and politicians should identify places where fellowship and relationships can be built, as well as encourage older people to use their competence by engagement in volunteering. These interventions are important to support older people’s self-care and health. This may also be a way to reduce ageism in Western societies. PMID:23390363

  16. 45 CFR 302.52 - Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... foster care maintenance cases. 302.52 Section 302.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases. Effective October 1, 1984, the... collected in foster care maintenance cases shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of §...

  17. 45 CFR 302.52 - Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... foster care maintenance cases. 302.52 Section 302.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases. Effective October 1, 1984, the... collected in foster care maintenance cases shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of §...

  18. 45 CFR 302.52 - Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... foster care maintenance cases. 302.52 Section 302.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases. Effective October 1, 1984, the... collected in foster care maintenance cases shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of §...

  19. 45 CFR 302.52 - Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... foster care maintenance cases. 302.52 Section 302.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases. Effective October 1, 1984, the... collected in foster care maintenance cases shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of §...

  20. 45 CFR 302.52 - Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... foster care maintenance cases. 302.52 Section 302.52 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... Distribution of support collected in Title IV-E foster care maintenance cases. Effective October 1, 1984, the... collected in foster care maintenance cases shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of §...

  1. Perceptions of Child Support and Sexual Activity of Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Han, Wen-Jui

    2004-01-01

    Using the 1995 new cohort of the National Survey of Adolescent Males, this paper examines the association between perceptions of child support and adolescent males' sexual activity. The results indicate that adolescent males who expect the chance of being required to pay child support is high if one becomes a non-resident father or who has a…

  2. Child Support Enforcement and Sexual Activity of Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Chung; Han, Wen-Jui

    2007-01-01

    Strong child support enforcement requires fathers to take financial responsibility for their children and may also encourage more responsible sexual behavior. Using the 1997-2001 waves of the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 4,272), this article examines the association between child support enforcement and the sexual activity of…

  3. A Web-based GIS for health care decision-support.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Richard; Toubiana, Laurent; Le Mignot, Loïc; Ben Said, Mohamed; Mugnier, Claude; Le Bihan-Benjamin, Christine; Jaïs, Jean Philippe; Landais, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This Web-based application allows to access views of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) concerning the epidemiology of the demand and the supply of care. It is a Web-based Geographic Information System (Web-GIS), the SIGNe (Système d'Information Géographique pour la Néphrologie), designed for the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) dedicated to ESRD. It is a visualisation and decision-support tool. This Web-GIS was coupled to a data warehouse and embedded in an n-tier architecture designed as the Multi-Source Information System (MSIS). It provides maps matching the offer of care to the demand. It is presented with insights on the design and underlying technologies. It is dedicated to professionals and to public health care decision-makers.

  4. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  5. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuum of Care planning activities. 578.39 Section 578.39 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT...

  6. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Continuum of Care planning activities. 578.39 Section 578.39 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT...

  7. Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE): Supporting Teachers and Researchers Beyond the Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, J.; Warnick, W. K.; Breen, K.; Fischer, K.; Wiggins, H.

    2007-12-01

    Teacher research experiences (TREs) require long-term sustained support for successful transfer of research experiences into the classroom. Specifically, a support mechanism that facilitates focused discussion and collaboration among teachers and researchers is critical to improve science content and pedagogical approaches in science education. Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE) is a professional development network that utilizes online web meetings to support the integration of science research experiences into classroom curriculum. CARE brings together teachers and researchers to discuss field experiences, current science issues, content, technology resources, and pedagogy. CARE is a component of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) education program PolarTREC--Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating. PolarTREC is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program celebrating the International Polar Year (IPY) that advances polar science education by bringing K-12 educators and polar researchers together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic. Currently in its second year, the program fosters the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. The CARE network was established to develop a sustainable learning community through which teachers and researchers will further their work to bring polar research into classrooms. Through CARE, small groups of educators are formed on the basis of grade-level and geographic region; each group also contains a teacher facilitator. Although CARE targets educators with previous polar research experiences, it is also open to those who have not participated in a TRE but who are interested in bringing real-world polar science to the classroom

  8. Diagnoses Treated in Ambulatory Care Among Homeless-Experienced Veterans: Does Supported Housing Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielian, Sonya; Yuan, Anita H.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Gelberg, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about how permanent supported housing influences ambulatory care received by homeless persons. To fill this gap, we compared diagnoses treated in VA Greater Los Angeles (VAGLA) ambulatory care between Veterans who are formerly homeless—now housed/case managed through VA Supported Housing (“VASH Veterans”)—and currently homeless. Methods We performed secondary database analyses of homeless-experienced Veterans (n = 3631) with VAGLA ambulatory care use from October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2011. We compared diagnoses treated—adjusting for demographics and need characteristics in regression analyses—between VASH Veterans (n = 1904) and currently homeless Veterans (n = 1727). Results On average, considering 26 studied diagnoses, VASH (vs currently homeless) Veterans received care for more (P < .05) diagnoses (mean = 2.9/1.7). Adjusting for demographics and need characteristics, VASH Veterans were more likely (P < .05) than currently homeless Veterans to receive treatment for diagnoses across categories: chronic physical illness, acute physical illness, mental illness, and substance use disorders. Specifically, VASH Veterans had 2.5, 1.7, 2.1, and 1.8 times greater odds of receiving treatment for at least 2 condition in these categories, respectively. Among participants treated for chronic illnesses, adjusting for predisposing and need characteristics, VASH (vs currently homeless) Veterans were 9%, 8%, and 11% more likely to have 2 or more visits for chronic physical illnesses, mental illnesses, and substance use disorder, respectively. Conclusion Among homeless-experienced Veterans, permanent supported housing may reduce disparities in the treatment of diagnoses commonly seen in ambulatory care. PMID:27343544

  9. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients’ condition. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. Results: The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the means of satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the means of satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Conclusions: Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method. PMID:26473077

  10. A Bimonthly Interdisciplinary State-wide Palliative Care Case Conference Promotes Education, Networking, and Emotional Support

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Elizabeth; Fischberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Meeting emotional, educational, and professional development needs for palliative care practitioners is a priority of clinical practice guidelines for quality palliative care. Here, we introduce and evaluate Palliative Pupus, a novel, state-wide, interdisciplinary, case conference designed to meet these needs. Methods: Palliative Pupus is a free, interdisciplinary case conference open to all hospice and palliative care clinicians in Hawai‘i. The conference has convened every other month since 2010 and is jointly sponsored by Hawai‘i's largest hospital-based palliative care program and Kokua Mau, Hawai‘i's hospice and palliative care organization. Twenty to forty participants typically meet on the island of O‘ahu and are joined by participants from other islands who attend remotely via audio or video conferencing technology. Attendees at the Palliative Pupus on May 15th, 2013 were asked to complete an anonymous evaluation tool designed for this purpose. Demographic data were analyzed using SPSS software (IBM, 1911) and inductive content analysis was carried out on open-ended questions. Results: Twenty-four attendees participated in the study. The majority of participants were women (75%). The leading disciplines of attendees were nursing (46%), medicine (25%), and chaplaincy (12.5%). The primary work settings were hospice (67%) and hospital (25%). Participants cited education (96%), networking (87%), and emotional support (37%) as reasons for attending. Inductive content analysis revealed the most valued benefits of attending were educational (71%), an enhanced sense of being part of a community of providers (24%), and emotional/psychological support (24%). Respondents agreed that the format of the conference would work in other communities (100%) and that they would recommend attending the conference to others (100%). Conclusions: Palliative Pupus is an innovative and sustainable state-wide approach to meeting diverse educational, emotional, and

  11. Defining "necessary" services and supports: why systems of care must take direction from service-level processes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Janet S; Koroloff, Nancy M; Bruns, Eric J

    2010-02-01

    A crucial element of the system of care definition is the specification of its purpose, namely, "to ensure access to and availability of necessary services and supports." This article discusses the structures and processes that must be in place so that systems of care can acquire and respond to high-quality information about what services and supports are truly necessary.

  12. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 1: Education Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-66

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworsky, Amy; Smithgall, Cheryl; Courtney, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need many supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee…

  13. Supportive care needs of rural individuals living with cancer: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Loughery, Joanne; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of geographic location, the cancer journey is an extremely difficult experience for both patients and their families. The aim of this literature review is to explore the impact of rural or remote residence on the supportive care needs of individuals living with cancer. This review included ten qualitative, seven quantitative, and six mixed design studies. Data collection, analysis, and evaluation were guided using a multi-domain supportive care framework based on seven domains: physical, emotional, informational, psychological, spiritual, social, and practical (Fitch, 2009). This review will suggest that there are distinct experiences that present both challenges and benefits to individuals living with cancer in rural areas. These findings will be detailed with recommendations, and grounding for future research outlined. PMID:26638285

  14. Establishment of a renal supportive care program: Experience from a rural community hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Hung, Yu-Chien; Lai, Chun-Fu; Ueng, Ruey-Hsiuang; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2016-07-01

    Renal supportive care (RSC) denotes a care program dedicated for patients with acute, chronic renal failure, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), aiming to offer maximal symptom relief and optimize patients' quality of life. The uncertainty of prognosis for patients with chronic kidney disease and ESRD, the sociocultural issues inherent to the Taiwanese society, and the void of structured and practical RSC pathway, contributes to the underrecognition and poor utilization of RSC. Taiwanese patients rarely receive information regarding RSC as part of a standardized care and are not commonly offered this option. In National Taiwan University Hospital Jinshan branch, we started a RSC subprogram, supported by the community-based palliative/hospice care main program. We focused on understanding the need and providing the choice of RSC to suitable candidates. A three-step and four-phase protocol was designed and implemented to identify appropriate patients and to enhance the applicability of the RSC. We harnessed family visit and home-based family meeting as a vehicle to understand the patients' preferences, to discover what ESRD patients and their family value most, and to introduce the option of RSC. In the current review, we described our pilot experience of establishing a RSC program in Taiwan, and discuss its potential advantage.

  15. Psychosocial Interventions and Therapeutic Support as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Amii C; Mullins, Larry L; Mullins, Alexandria J; Muriel, Anna C

    2015-12-01

    Research indicates that a subset of youths with childhood cancer and their parents will experience significant psychological distress throughout the course of their illness. Importantly, the existing literature indicates that psychosocial support is beneficial in decreasing symptoms of distress in these families. The aim of the current review is to determine the extent of the evidence to support a standard of psychosocial care for children and their families throughout the cancer trajectory; thus, we examined the research related to psychosocial outcomes in youth with cancer and their parents.

  16. Level of empowerment and health knowledge of home support workers providing care for frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C Shanthi; Noel, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the profile of home support workers (HSWs) caring for the frail elderly and to determine the perceived empowerment levels and general health knowledge of these support workers. Background, work-profile, empowerment level and health knowledge related to seniors of 64 HSWs were assessed using questionnaires. Findings revealed the majority of workers to be middleaged women, and their health knowledge scores were low. Empowerment levels were moderate as was formal power. Findings demonstrate the need to revise the curriculum of HSWs to include health topics, as well as the need for continued education and strategies to enhance empowerment levels.

  17. The role of health care technology in support of perinatal nurse staffing.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Catherine H

    2015-01-01

    Health care technology can generate massive amounts of data. However, when data are generated from disparate, uncoordinated systems, using them to make decisions related to staffing can be a challenge. In this article, I describe the importance of data standardization, system interoperability, standard terminologies that support nursing practice, and nursing informatics expertise as tools for improving the usefulness of electronic systems for informing staffing decisions.

  18. Bridging knowledge: reflections on crossing the boundaries between long-term care and support

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, David; Cieza, Alarcos; Gomez, Ana Rico

    2009-01-01

    In March 2009 members of the research, policy and practice communities in the fields of ageing and disability came together in Barcelona for the first international conference on bridging knowledge in long-term care and support. This paper presents a brief snapshot of some of the key themes and ideas that emerged during three days of presentation and debate on methods, policy and practice. PMID:19590760

  19. Helmsley trust support for telehealth improves access to care in rural and frontier areas.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Shelley; Schultz, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Rural residents in need of health care face many challenges. In 2009 the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust created the Rural Healthcare Program to improve access to and quality of care in areas of the upper Midwest challenged by health care workforce shortages and low population density. The program has focused its efforts on telehealth in seven upper Midwestern states. Since 2009 the Rural Healthcare Program has approved $22 million in grants to eighty-five rural hospitals to implement eEmergency services. The service's videoconferencing technology connects rural emergency department staff with emergency physicians and nurses located at the service's "hub." Initial analyses indicate that eEmergency has helped participating rural hospitals increase patients' access to specialists, increase the use of evidence-based treatment, decrease time to transfer a patient to a facility able to provide a higher level of care, and reduce unnecessary patient transfers. This article describes the health care challenges rural communities face and the telehealth projects supported by the Helmsley Trust's Rural Healthcare Program. PMID:24493777

  20. Helmsley trust support for telehealth improves access to care in rural and frontier areas.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Shelley; Schultz, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Rural residents in need of health care face many challenges. In 2009 the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust created the Rural Healthcare Program to improve access to and quality of care in areas of the upper Midwest challenged by health care workforce shortages and low population density. The program has focused its efforts on telehealth in seven upper Midwestern states. Since 2009 the Rural Healthcare Program has approved $22 million in grants to eighty-five rural hospitals to implement eEmergency services. The service's videoconferencing technology connects rural emergency department staff with emergency physicians and nurses located at the service's "hub." Initial analyses indicate that eEmergency has helped participating rural hospitals increase patients' access to specialists, increase the use of evidence-based treatment, decrease time to transfer a patient to a facility able to provide a higher level of care, and reduce unnecessary patient transfers. This article describes the health care challenges rural communities face and the telehealth projects supported by the Helmsley Trust's Rural Healthcare Program.

  1. How older black women perceive the effects of stigma and social support on engagement in HIV care.

    PubMed

    McDoom, M Maya; Bokhour, Barbara; Sullivan, Meg; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-02-01

    As black women over age 50 represent a growing share of women living with HIV, understanding what helps them persist and engage in ongoing HIV care will become increasingly important. Delineating the specific roles of social support and stigma on HIV care experiences among this population remains unclear. We qualitatively examined how experiences with stigma and social support either facilitated or inhibited engagement in HIV care, from the perspective of older black women. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older black women currently receiving HIV care at primary care clinics in the Metropolitan Boston area. Women expressed that experiences with stigma and seeking support played an important role in evaluating the risks and benefits of engaging in care. Social support facilitated their ability to engage in care, while stigma interfered with their ability to engage in care throughout the course of their illness. Providers in particular, can facilitate engagement by understanding the changes in these women's lives as they struggle with stigma and disclosure while engaging in HIV care. The patient's experiences with social support and stigma and their perceptions about engagement are important considerations for medical teams to tailor efforts to engage older black women in regular HIV care.

  2. African American women's preventative care usage: the role of social support and racial experiences and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Erin; Perry, Brea; Oser, Carrie

    2014-09-01

    Research suggests that African Americans are less likely to utilise preventative care services than Americans of European descent, and that these patterns may contribute to racial health disparities in the United States. Despite the persistence of inequalities in preventative care utilisation, culturally relevant factors influencing the use of these gateway health services have been understudied among marginalised groups. Using a stratified sample of 205 low-income African American women, this research examines the predictors of receiving a physical exam, with a particular emphasis on how differing levels of social support from friend and family networks and experiences of racial discrimination and cultural mistrust shape utilisation. The findings underscore the importance of traditional predictors of utilisation, including insurance status and having a usual physician. However, they also indicate that supportive ties to friendship networks are associated with higher predicted rates of having an annual physical exam, while social support from family and sentiments of cultural mistrust are associated with lower rates of utilisation. Broadly, the findings indicate that even as traditional predictors of help-seeking become less relevant, it will be critical to explore how variations in discrimination experiences and social relationships across marginalised groups drive patterns of preventative care utilisation.

  3. The impact of Multimedia Software Support on the Knowledge and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farmahini Farahani, Moloud; Purfarzad, Zahra; Ghorbani, Mojtaba; Ghamari Zare, Zohre; Ghorbani, Fateme

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Education is the most effective and economical part of diabetes treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a training program with multimedia software on the knowledge and self-care behaviors of patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients referred to diabetes clinic at Arak city were divided randomly into experimental (n=30) and control (n=30) groups. The instruments for collecting data were "Summary of Diabetes self-care activities questionnaire" and "knowledge of self-care in patients with diabetes". Data were collected before and 2 months after the intervention in the both groups. Educational program with equal content was applied for both experimental group (self-care program with multimedia software support) & control group (lecture and presentation with PowerPoint). Data analysis was done using SPSS Ver.13. Results: Implementation of the self-care program with multimedia software support resulted in improvements in patients’ self-care behaviors in the experimental group, whereas these behaviors had not significant changes in the control group after eight weeks. There was a significant difference in the mean score of knowledge in both the experiment and control groups before and after the intervention. Conclusion: Considering beneficial effects of training program with multimedia software support on the knowledge and self-care behaviors and the importance of this issue, suggested that the patients preferably provide terms of use of educational software for themselves. PMID:27354975

  4. Active supports and force optimization for the MMT primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hubert M.; Callahan, Shawn P.; Cuerden, Brian; Davison, Warren B.; Derigne, S. T.; Dettmann, Lee R.; Parodi, G.; Trebisky, T. J.; West, Steve C.; Williams, Joseph T.

    1998-08-01

    We describe the active support system and optimization of support forces for the 6.5 m primary mirror for the Multiple Mirror Telescope Conversion. The mirror was figured to an accuracy of 26 nm rms surface error, excluding certain flexible bending modes that will be controlled by support forces in the telescope. On installation of the mirror into its telescope support cell, an initial optimization of support forces is needed because of minor differences between the support used during fabrication and that in the telescope cell. The optimization is based on figure measurements made interferometrically in the vibration- isolated test tower of the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. Actuator influence functions were determined by finite- element analysis and verified by measurement. The optimization is performed by singular value decomposition of the influence functions into normal modes. Preliminary results give a wavefront accuracy better than that of the atmosphere in 0.11 arcsecond seeing.

  5. Supporting Emergent Literacy in Play-based Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanline, Mary Frances

    2001-01-01

    This article presents ideas for using play activities to support the development of emergent literacy skills in young children, including those with disabilities. Four principles of promoting early literacy skills are explained and applied to activities in block and microsymbolic play, macrosymbolic play, and fluid construction play. The…

  6. Supporting Mobile Collaborative Activities through Scaffolded Flexible Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boticki, Ivica; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wong, Lung-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    Within the field of Mobile Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (mCSCL), we are interested in exploring the space of collaborative activities that enable students to practice communication, negotiation and decision-making skills. Collaboration is via learning activities that circumvent the constraints of fixed seating or locations of…

  7. Leadership for Transitions of Care: An Active Learning Innovation.

    PubMed

    Huber, Diane L; Joseph, M Lindell; Halbmaier, Katie Anne; Carlson, Molly; Crill, Stacy; Krieger, Kimberly; Matthys, Nicole; Mundisev, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Active learning assignments can be achieved in online discussions, resulting in creative linkages for innovation. This article describes how the teaching strategy of active learning assignment evolved into a group of student learners engaging in the development of a creative advanced clinical care scenario in an online graduate core course on leadership and management. The advanced clinical scenario that resulted from the students envisioning the assignment through the continuum of care was innovative and creative. Most importantly, the scenario stimulated vigorous conversation and excitement over the assignment, which promoted learning, pride in accomplishment, and on-the-job impact. This article serves as a model of ways to engage students in active learning for synthesis and evaluation to enable creativity and innovation. PMID:26840240

  8. Correlates of perceived self-care activities and diabetes control among Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke G M; Martens, Marloes K; Bagchus, Charlotte; de Weerdt, Inge; de Vries, Nanne K; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-06-01

    This study examined how Dutch type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients' perceived autonomy support, as well as their perceived competence and treatment self-regulation, are associated with their diabetes self-care activities (healthy diet, physical activity, monitoring blood glucose, medication use) and general diabetes control. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 143 type 1 diabetics and 384 type 2 diabetics. Overall, participants felt competent, supported in their autonomy, and perceived to autonomously self-regulate their diabetes. Our results underline the importance of perceived competence in type 1 and 2 diabetics, as this was strongly associated with adhering to a healthy diet and general diabetes control. Our findings also emphasize the need for autonomy supportive health care professionals in diabetes care. Interestingly, perceived competence partially mediated the influence of autonomy support on general diabetes control. PMID:25627667

  9. Are Nurses and Auxiliary Healthcare Workers Equally Effective in Delivering Smoking Cessation Support in Primary Care?

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Kathryn; Sutton, Stephen; Jamison, James; Sloan, Melanie; Boase, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Smoking cessation support is increasingly delivered in primary care by auxiliary healthcare workers in place of healthcare professionals. However, it is unknown whether this shift might affect the quality and impact of the support delivered. Methods: Data from the iQuit in Practice randomized control trial of cessation support in General Practice was used (N = 602). Analyses assessed whether cessation advisor type (nurse or healthcare assistant [HCA]) was associated with abstinence (primary outcome: self-reported 2-week point prevalence abstinence at 8 weeks follow-up), the advice delivered during the initial consultation, pharmacotherapies prescribed, patient satisfaction, initial consultation length, and the number and type of interim contacts. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in abstinence for support delivered by HCAs versus nurses at 8 weeks (HCAs 42.8%, nurses 42.6%; unadjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73 to 1.40), or at 4 weeks or 6 months follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences in advice delivered, the types of pharmacotherapies prescribed or patient satisfaction. Compared with nurses, HCA consultations were longer on average (HCAs 23.6 minutes, nurses 20.8 minutes; P = .002) and they undertook more interim contacts (HCAs median 2, nurses median 1; P < .001), with contact more likely to be face-to-face than phone call (HCAs 91.2%, nurses 70.9%; OR = 4.23, 95% CI = 2.86 to 6.26). Conclusions: HCAs appear equally effective as nurses in supporting smoking cessation, although they do this with greater patient contact. Using auxiliary practitioners to deliver cessation support could free up nurse time and reduce costs. Implications: This study found that primary care patients receiving smoking cessation support from auxiliary healthcare workers were just as likely to be abstinent up to 6 months later as those patients seen by nurses. While the auxiliary healthcare

  10. Recovering activity and illusion: the nephrology day care unit.

    PubMed

    Remón Rodríguez, C; Quirós Ganga, P L; González-Outón, J; del Castillo Gámez, R; García Herrera, A L; Sánchez Márquez, M G

    2011-01-01

    Day Care Units are an alternative to hospital care that improves more efficiency. The Nephrology, by its technical characteristics, would be benefit greatly from further development of this care modality. The objectives of this study are to present the process we have developed the Nephrology Day Care Unit in the Puerto Real University Hospital (Cádiz, Spain). For this project we followed the Deming Management Method of Quality improvement, selecting opportunities, analyzing causes, select interventions, implement and monitor results. The intervention plan includes the following points: 1) Define the place of the Day Care Unit in the organization of our Clinical Department of Nephrology, 2) Define the Manual of organization, 3) Define the structural and equipment resources, 4) Define the Catalogue of services and procedures, 5) Standards of Care Processes. Protocols and Clinical Pathways; and 6) Information and Registration System. In the first 8 months we have been performed nearly 2000 procedures, which corresponds to an average of about 10 procedures per day, and essentially related to Hemodialysis in critical or acute patients, the Interventional Nephrology, the Clinical Nephrology and Peritoneal Dialysis. The development of the Nephrology Day Care Units can help to increase our autonomy, our presence in Hospitals, recover the progressive loss of clinical activity (diagnostic and therapeutic skills) in the past to the benefit of other Specialties. It also contributes to: Promote and develop the Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology; improve the clinical management of patients with Primary Health Level, promote the Health Education and Investigation, collaborate in the Resources Management, and finally, to make more attractive and exciting our Specialty, both for nephrologists to training specialists. PMID:21959721

  11. Participatory design with children in the development of a support system for patient-centered care in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Ruland, Cornelia M; Starren, Justin; Vatne, Torun M

    2008-08-01

    Developing software for children with severe illness poses a number of design challenges. In this paper we describe participatory design methods used in the development of SISOM, a support system for children with cancer age 7-12 to help children elicit and report their symptoms/problems in a child-friendly, age-adjusted manner, and to assist clinicians at the point of care in addressing and integrating children's reported symptoms and problems in patient care. The particular design challenges in the development of a clinical support tool for seriously ill children are described, followed by the participatory design techniques we used to meet these challenges. Healthy children and children with cancer participated actively in different stages of the design process. We describe how children contributed to the graphical design of the system's interface; selection of understandable, child-friendly terms used in the system; iconic and graphical representations; and its usability. The methods applied helped us to significantly improve and adapt SISOM to children's cognitive and emotional developmental stage. Working with children as partners in the design also provided important insights into the role children can play in participatory design that may be helpful for other system developers who wish to design support applications for ill children. Children had very creative design ideas that considerably improved the software. However, system development for seriously ill children also requires psychological and pedagogical insights and design and usability expertise. This limits the role children can play as full design partners.

  12. Elderly demand for family-based care and support: evidence from a social intervention strategy.

    PubMed

    Aboagye, Emmanuel; Agyemang, Otuo Serebour; Tjerbo, Trond

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines the influence of the national health insurance scheme on elderly demand for family-based care and support. It contributes to the growing concern on the rapid increase in the elderly population globally using micro-level social theory to examine the influence the health insurance has on elderly demand for family support. A qualitative case study approach is applied to construct a comprehensive and thick description of how the national health insurance scheme influences the elderly in their demand for family support.Through focused interviews and direct observation of six selected cases, in-depth information on primary carers, living arrangement and the interaction between the health insurance as structure and elders as agents are analyzed. The study highlights that the interaction between the elderly and the national health insurance scheme has produced a new stratum of relationship between the elderly and their primary carers. Consequently, this has created equilibrium between the elderly demand for support and support made available by their primary carers. As the demand of the elderly for support is declining, supply of support by family members for the elderly is also on the decline. PMID:24576369

  13. Elderly demand for family-based care and support: evidence from a social intervention strategy.

    PubMed

    Aboagye, Emmanuel; Agyemang, Otuo Serebour; Tjerbo, Trond

    2013-12-06

    This paper examines the influence of the national health insurance scheme on elderly demand for family-based care and support. It contributes to the growing concern on the rapid increase in the elderly population globally using micro-level social theory to examine the influence the health insurance has on elderly demand for family support. A qualitative case study approach is applied to construct a comprehensive and thick description of how the national health insurance scheme influences the elderly in their demand for family support.Through focused interviews and direct observation of six selected cases, in-depth information on primary carers, living arrangement and the interaction between the health insurance as structure and elders as agents are analyzed. The study highlights that the interaction between the elderly and the national health insurance scheme has produced a new stratum of relationship between the elderly and their primary carers. Consequently, this has created equilibrium between the elderly demand for support and support made available by their primary carers. As the demand of the elderly for support is declining, supply of support by family members for the elderly is also on the decline.

  14. The prevalence and nature of supportive care needs in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, M.E.; Milne, R.A.; Puts, M.; Sampson, L.R.; Kwan, J.Y.Y.; Le, L.W.; Alibhai, S.M.H.; Howell, D.; Abdelmutti, N.; Liu, G.; Papadakos, J.; Catton, P.; Jones, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present work, we set out to comprehensively describe the unmet supportive care and information needs of lung cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional study used the Supportive Care Needs Survey Short Form 34 (34 items) and an informational needs survey (8 items). Patients with primary lung cancer in any phase of survivorship were included. Demographic data and treatment details were collected from the medical charts of participants. The unmet needs were determined overall and by domain. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with greater unmet needs. Results From August 2013 to February 2014, 89 patients [44 (49%) men; median age: 71 years (range: 44–89 years)] were recruited. The mean number of unmet needs was 8 (range: 0–34), and 69 patients (78%) reported at least 1 unmet need. The need proportions by domain were 52% health system and information, 66% psychological, 58% physical, 24% patient care, and 20% sexuality. The top 2 unmet needs were “fears of the cancer spreading” [n = 44 of 84 (52%)] and “lack of energy/tiredness” [n = 42 of 88 (48%)]. On multivariable analysis, more advanced disease and higher MD Anderson Symptom Inventory scores were associated with increased unmet needs. Patients reported that the most desired information needs were those for information on managing symptoms such as fatigue (78%), shortness of breath (77%), and cough (63%). Conclusions Unmet supportive care needs are common in lung cancer patients, with some patients experiencing a very high number of unmet needs. Further work is needed to develop resources to address those needs. PMID:27536176

  15. Cold Season Ground Validation Activities in support of GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, D. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental component of the next-generation global precipitation data products that will be addressed by the GPM mission is the hydrologic cycle at higher latitudes. In this respect, falling snow represents a primary contribution to regional atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets. The current study provides provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation and precipitating cloud systems across multiple scales. It also addresses the ability of in-situ ground-based sensors as well as multi-frequency active and passive microwave sensors to detect and estimate falling snow, and more generally to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the complete global water cycle. The work supports the incorporation of appropriate physics into GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms and the development of improved ground validation techniques for GPM product evaluation. Important information for developing GPM falling snow retrieval algorithms will be provided by a field campaign that took place in the winter of 2011/12 in the Great Lakes area of North America, termed the GPM Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx). GCPEx represented a collaboration among the NASA, Environment Canada (EC), the Canadian Space Agency and several US, Canadian and European universities. The data collection strategy for GCPEx was coordinated, stacked high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions sampling within a broader network of ground-based volumetric observations and measurements. The NASA DSC-8 research aircraft provided a platform for the downward-viewing dual-frequency radar and multi-frequency radiometer observations. The University of North Dakota Citation and the Canadian NRC Convair-580 aircraft provided in-situ profiles of cloud and precipitation microphysics using a suite of optical array probes and bulk measurement instrumentation. Ground sampling was focused about a densely-instrumented central location that is

  16. Peer support in health care and prevention: cultural, organizational, and dissemination issues.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Coufal, Muchieh Maggy; Parada, Humberto; Robinette, Jennifer B; Tang, Patrick Y; Urlaub, Diana M; Castillo, Claudia; Guzman-Corrales, Laura M; Hino, Sayaka; Hunter, Jaimie; Katz, Ariana W; Symes, Yael R; Worley, Heidi P; Xu, Cuirong

    2014-01-01

    As reviewed in the article by Perry and colleagues (2014) in this volume, ample evidence has documented the contributions of peer support (PS) to health, health care, and prevention. Building on that foundation, this article discusses characteristics, contexts, and dissemination of PS, including (a) fundamental aspects of the social support that is often central to it; (b) cultural influences and ways PS can be tailored to specific groups; (c) key features of PS and the importance of ongoing support and backup of peer supporters and other factors related to its success; (d) directions in which PS can be expanded beyond prevention and chronic disease management, such as in mental health or interventions to prevent rehospitalization; (e) other opportunities through the US Affordable Care Act, such as through patient-centered medical homes and chronic health homes; and (f) organizational and policy issues that will govern its dissemination. All these demonstrate the extent to which PS needs to reflect its contexts--intended audience, health problems, organizational and cultural settings--and, thus, the importance of dissemination policies that lead to flexible response to contexts rather than constraint by overly prescriptive guidelines.

  17. Recent developments in the use of online resources and mobile technologies to support mental health care.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Carolyn L; Roberts, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    This review describes recent developments in online and mobile mental health applications, including a discussion of patient portals to support mental health care. These technologies are rapidly evolving, often before there is systematic investigation of their effectiveness. Though there are some reviews of the effectiveness of mental health mobile apps, perhaps the more significant development is innovation in technology evaluation as well as new models of interprofessional collaboration in developing behavioural health technologies. Online mental health programs have a strong evidence base. Their role in population health strategies needs further exploration, including the most effective use of limited clinical staff resources. Patient portals and personal health records serve to enhance mental health treatment also, though concerns specific to mental health must be addressed to support broader adoption of portals. Provider concerns about sharing psychiatric notes with patients hinder support for portals. Health information exchange for mental health information requires thoughtful consent management strategies so mental health patients can benefit. Finally, the broad array of health information technologies may overwhelm patients. User-friendly, well-designed, patient-centred health information technology homes may integrate these functions to promote a holistic approach to care plans and overall wellness. Such technology homes have special security needs and require providers and patients to be well informed about how best to use these technologies to support behavioural health interventions. PMID:26523397

  18. Development of an excretion care support robot with human cooperative characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yina Wang; Shuoyu Wang

    2015-08-01

    To support care giving in an aging society with a shrinking population, various life support robots are being developed. In the authors' laboratory, an excretion care support robot (ECSR) with human cooperative characteristic has been developed to relieve the burden of caregivers and improve the quality of life for bedridden persons. This robot consists of a portable toilet with storage tank and a mobile robot which can run autonomously to conduct the cooperative work with others. Our research is focused on how to improve the motion accuracy and how the robot can cooperate with users. In this paper, to enable the ECSR could precisely move in the indoor environment, a proper controller is proposed considering the center of gravity shift and load changes. Then, to perform the cooperative task, two acceleration sensors are used to recognize the users' intended posture and position when moving from bed to toilet. The robot's target angle and position are determined by the user's posture. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by a pseudo excretion support experiment. PMID:26737871

  19. Development of an excretion care support robot with human cooperative characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yina Wang; Shuoyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    To support care giving in an aging society with a shrinking population, various life support robots are being developed. In the authors' laboratory, an excretion care support robot (ECSR) with human cooperative characteristic has been developed to relieve the burden of caregivers and improve the quality of life for bedridden persons. This robot consists of a portable toilet with storage tank and a mobile robot which can run autonomously to conduct the cooperative work with others. Our research is focused on how to improve the motion accuracy and how the robot can cooperate with users. In this paper, to enable the ECSR could precisely move in the indoor environment, a proper controller is proposed considering the center of gravity shift and load changes. Then, to perform the cooperative task, two acceleration sensors are used to recognize the users' intended posture and position when moving from bed to toilet. The robot's target angle and position are determined by the user's posture. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by a pseudo excretion support experiment.

  20. Peer support in health care and prevention: cultural, organizational, and dissemination issues.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Coufal, Muchieh Maggy; Parada, Humberto; Robinette, Jennifer B; Tang, Patrick Y; Urlaub, Diana M; Castillo, Claudia; Guzman-Corrales, Laura M; Hino, Sayaka; Hunter, Jaimie; Katz, Ariana W; Symes, Yael R; Worley, Heidi P; Xu, Cuirong

    2014-01-01

    As reviewed in the article by Perry and colleagues (2014) in this volume, ample evidence has documented the contributions of peer support (PS) to health, health care, and prevention. Building on that foundation, this article discusses characteristics, contexts, and dissemination of PS, including (a) fundamental aspects of the social support that is often central to it; (b) cultural influences and ways PS can be tailored to specific groups; (c) key features of PS and the importance of ongoing support and backup of peer supporters and other factors related to its success; (d) directions in which PS can be expanded beyond prevention and chronic disease management, such as in mental health or interventions to prevent rehospitalization; (e) other opportunities through the US Affordable Care Act, such as through patient-centered medical homes and chronic health homes; and (f) organizational and policy issues that will govern its dissemination. All these demonstrate the extent to which PS needs to reflect its contexts--intended audience, health problems, organizational and cultural settings--and, thus, the importance of dissemination policies that lead to flexible response to contexts rather than constraint by overly prescriptive guidelines. PMID:24387085

  1. Recent developments in the use of online resources and mobile technologies to support mental health care.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Carolyn L; Roberts, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    This review describes recent developments in online and mobile mental health applications, including a discussion of patient portals to support mental health care. These technologies are rapidly evolving, often before there is systematic investigation of their effectiveness. Though there are some reviews of the effectiveness of mental health mobile apps, perhaps the more significant development is innovation in technology evaluation as well as new models of interprofessional collaboration in developing behavioural health technologies. Online mental health programs have a strong evidence base. Their role in population health strategies needs further exploration, including the most effective use of limited clinical staff resources. Patient portals and personal health records serve to enhance mental health treatment also, though concerns specific to mental health must be addressed to support broader adoption of portals. Provider concerns about sharing psychiatric notes with patients hinder support for portals. Health information exchange for mental health information requires thoughtful consent management strategies so mental health patients can benefit. Finally, the broad array of health information technologies may overwhelm patients. User-friendly, well-designed, patient-centred health information technology homes may integrate these functions to promote a holistic approach to care plans and overall wellness. Such technology homes have special security needs and require providers and patients to be well informed about how best to use these technologies to support behavioural health interventions.

  2. Physical activity and social support in adolescents: analysis of different types and sources of social support.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Júnior, José Cazuza de Farias

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of different types and sources of social support on physical activity in adolescents. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between physical activity and different types and sources of social support in adolescents. The sample consisted of 2,859 adolescents between 14-19 years of age in the city of João Pessoa, in Northeastern Brazil. Physical activity was measured with a questionnaire and social support from parents and friends using a 10-item scale five for each group (type of support: encouragement, joint participation, watching, inviting, positive comments and transportation). Multivariable analysis showed that the types of support provided by parents associated with physical activity in adolescents were encouragement for females (P < 0.001) and adolescents between 14-16 years of age (P = 0.003), and transportation (P = 0.014) and comments (P = 0.037) for males. The types of social support provided by friends were: joint participation in male adolescents (P < 0.001) and in these 17-19-year-olds (P < 0.001), and comments in both genders (males: P = 0.009; females: P < 0.001) and 14-16-year-olds (P < 0.001). We conclude that the type of social support associated with physical activity varies according to its source, as well as the gender and age of the adolescents.

  3. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  4. The Cancer Experience Map: An Approach to Including the Patient Voice in Supportive Care Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The perspective of the patient, also called the “patient voice”, is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the “cancer experience map”. This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps. PMID:26022846

  5. The cancer experience map: an approach to including the patient voice in supportive care solutions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Leslie Kelly; Kunz, Breanne F; Davis, Elizabeth V; Dawson, Rose I; Powers, Ryan S

    2015-05-28

    The perspective of the patient, also called the "patient voice", is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the "cancer experience map". This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps.

  6. [Musical meetings as a resource in oncologic palliative care for users of a support home].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Vladimir Araujo; Sales, Catarina Aparecida

    2013-06-01

    This was a phenomenological investigation into musical meetings, structured according to the existential analytics of Martin Heidegger, that aimed at scrutinizing the perception of patients with cancer living in a support home. Seven users of the support home of the Rede Feminina de Combate ao Cancer in Maringá, Paraná, took part in the study, during which eight musical meetings took place during the months of January and February 2011. For the purposes of data collection individual interviews were used, starting with the following question: What do these musical meetings represent to you at this time of your life? During the process of understanding the investigated phenomenon, two ontological themes emerged: a feeling of being taken care of in the musical meetings; and transcending their existential facticity. It was observed that a meeting mediated by music represents a resource in oncologic palliative care nursing; and that it brings inspiration to the patients' daily life, instilling a feeling of being cared for and giving a new meaning to their being-in-the-world. PMID:24601139

  7. Conceptual framework of knowledge management for ethical decision-making support in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Frize, Monique; Yang, Lan; Walker, Robin C; O'Connor, Annette M

    2005-06-01

    This research is built on the belief that artificial intelligence estimations need to be integrated into clinical social context to create value for health-care decisions. In sophisticated neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), decisions to continue or discontinue aggressive treatment are an integral part of clinical practice. High-quality evidence supports clinical decision-making, and a decision-aid tool based on specific outcome information for individual NICU patients will provide significant support for parents and caregivers in making difficult "ethical" treatment decisions. In our approach, information on a newborn patient's likely outcomes is integrated with the physician's interpretation and parents' perspectives into codified knowledge. Context-sensitive content adaptation delivers personalized and customized information to a variety of users, from physicians to parents. The system provides structuralized knowledge translation and exchange between all participants in the decision, facilitating collaborative decision-making that involves parents at every stage on whether to initiate, continue, limit, or terminate intensive care for their infant.

  8. Rediscovering Recovery: Reconceptualizing Underlying Assumptions of Citizenship and Interrelated Notions of Care and Support

    PubMed Central

    Vandekinderen, Caroline; Roets, Griet; Roose, Rudi; Van Hove, Geert

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, research, policy, and practice in the field of mental health care and a complementary variety of social work and social service delivery have internationally concentrated on recovery as a promising concept. In this paper, a conceptual distinction is made between an individual approach and a social approach to recovery, and underlying assumptions of citizenship and interrelated notions and features of care and support are identified. It is argued that the conditionality of the individual approach to recovery refers to a conceptualization of citizenship as normative, based on the existence of a norm that operates in every domain of our society. We argue that these assumptions place a burden of self-governance on citizens with mental health problems and risk producing people with mental health problems as nonrecyclable citizens. The social approach to recovery embraces a different conceptualization of citizenship as relational and inclusive and embodies the myriad ways in which the belonging of people with mental health problems can be constructed in practice. As such, we hope to enable social services and professionals in the field to balance their role in the provision of care and support to service users with mental health problems. PMID:23326216

  9. [Barriers and need for support in the primary care of depressive patients].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Isaac; Lohmann, Antonia; Berger, Mathias; Härter, Martin

    2002-10-01

    The aim of the study was to record the difficulties and barriers in the management of depressive patients faced by primary care physicians, their self-reported competence and need for support. In this study a questionnaire was sent out to 960 physicians, of whom 180 replied (response rate: 19%). This sample matches the total sample in essential dimensions such as age, sex and special field. From the results retrieved it can be concluded that apart from organisational structural factors the greatest barriers in the treatment of depressive patients are created by the patients' behaviour, i.e. mainly scepticism and reluctance towards treatment. The physicians rated their own competence in treating depression highly, especially concerning diagnostics and primary care. Accordingly, physicians reported they required support in more specific areas (mainly in the management of suicidality). The results are discussed with respect to their implications for professional development programs. Two central aspects were identified: a) the development of practice-oriented measures that can be used to improve guideline-based health care and b) the explicit involvement of patients into treatment processes.

  10. [Musical meetings as a resource in oncologic palliative care for users of a support home].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Vladimir Araujo; Sales, Catarina Aparecida

    2013-06-01

    This was a phenomenological investigation into musical meetings, structured according to the existential analytics of Martin Heidegger, that aimed at scrutinizing the perception of patients with cancer living in a support home. Seven users of the support home of the Rede Feminina de Combate ao Cancer in Maringá, Paraná, took part in the study, during which eight musical meetings took place during the months of January and February 2011. For the purposes of data collection individual interviews were used, starting with the following question: What do these musical meetings represent to you at this time of your life? During the process of understanding the investigated phenomenon, two ontological themes emerged: a feeling of being taken care of in the musical meetings; and transcending their existential facticity. It was observed that a meeting mediated by music represents a resource in oncologic palliative care nursing; and that it brings inspiration to the patients' daily life, instilling a feeling of being cared for and giving a new meaning to their being-in-the-world.

  11. European Long-Term Care Programs: Lessons for Community Living Assistance Services and Supports?

    PubMed Central

    Nadash, Pamela; Doty, Pamela; Mahoney, Kevin J; von Schwanenflugel, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To uncover lessons from abroad for Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS), a federally run voluntary public long-term care (LTC) insurance program created under the Accountable Care Act of 2010. Data Sources Program administrators and policy researchers from Austria, England, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. Study Design Qualitative methods focused on key parameters of cash for care: how programs set benefit levels; project expenditures; control administrative costs; regulate the use of benefits; and protect workers. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Structured discussions were conducted during an international conference of LTC experts, followed by personal meetings and individual correspondence. Principal Findings Germany's self-financing mandate and tight targeting of benefits have resulted in a solvent program with low premiums. Black markets for care are likely in the absence of regulation; France addresses this via a unique system ensuing legal payment of workers. Conclusions Programs in the five countries studied have lessons, both positive and negative, relevant to CLASS design. PMID:22091672

  12. Educational support group in changing caregivers' psychological elder abuse behavior toward caring for institutionalized elders.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Wang, Jing-Jy; Yen, Maiofen; Liu, Tzu-Ti

    2009-08-01

    Institutionalized elderly who are frail and dependent are vulnerable to be abused by overwhelmed caregivers especially caregiver psychological abusive behavior is a growing but hidden problem with few evidence-based interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an educational support group in alleviating caregiver's psychological abusive behavior, reducing work stress and promoting knowledge of geriatric care-giving among a group of caregivers. A quasi-experimental design using a case control pre-post test approach was conducted. A total of 100 participants completed the study with 50 caregivers in each group. The research instruments included the Caregiver Psychological Elder Abuse Behavior Scale (CPEAB), the Work Stressors Inventory (WSI), and the Knowledge of Gerontology Nursing Scale (KGNS). The results showed that the intervention had significant effects in alleviating caregiver psychological abuse behavior and increasing care-giving knowledge in the experimental group (p = .048; .018). However, the intervention had no measurable effect on work stress (p = .66). Findings have important implications for education and programming for facility administers and long-term care policy makers when planning quality improvement for elderly care.

  13. The approaches to learning of support workers employed in the care home sector: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David T; Roberts, Julia D; Fitzpatrick, Joanne M; While, Alison E; Baldwin, Julie

    2004-02-01

    This study examined the approaches to learning of a cohort (n=76) of National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Care Award candidates using the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students. The NVQ candidates were support workers (SWs) (sometimes called care assistants) employed in United Kingdom (UK) care homes for older people. The aim was to identify SWs' approaches to learning and to determine whether or not a preparatory six-week College-based course had any impact on these approaches. The findings were encouraging. The course had a positive impact with a statistically significant increase in orientation towards a deep learning approach, which is associated with desirable learning outcomes as well as self-directed and lifelong learning skills. The UK government recognises that lifelong learning enables people to continually develop their talents, thereby enhancing local communities and contributing to a civilised, cohesive society. In a health care environment, adopting a deep approach is likely to be beneficial. Those who use evidence to inform practice, who are able to relate elements of what they are taught to their working experiences and who are able to adapt to meet new challenges, are more likely to enhance their practice and become more effective carers. PMID:14769453

  14. The approaches to learning of support workers employed in the care home sector: an evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David T; Roberts, Julia D; Fitzpatrick, Joanne M; While, Alison E; Baldwin, Julie

    2004-02-01

    This study examined the approaches to learning of a cohort (n=76) of National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Care Award candidates using the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students. The NVQ candidates were support workers (SWs) (sometimes called care assistants) employed in United Kingdom (UK) care homes for older people. The aim was to identify SWs' approaches to learning and to determine whether or not a preparatory six-week College-based course had any impact on these approaches. The findings were encouraging. The course had a positive impact with a statistically significant increase in orientation towards a deep learning approach, which is associated with desirable learning outcomes as well as self-directed and lifelong learning skills. The UK government recognises that lifelong learning enables people to continually develop their talents, thereby enhancing local communities and contributing to a civilised, cohesive society. In a health care environment, adopting a deep approach is likely to be beneficial. Those who use evidence to inform practice, who are able to relate elements of what they are taught to their working experiences and who are able to adapt to meet new challenges, are more likely to enhance their practice and become more effective carers.

  15. Collaborative agency to support integrated care for children, young people and families: an action research study

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Kaz

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Collaboration was legislated in the delivery of integrated care in the early 2000s in the UK. This research explored how the reality of practice met the rhetoric of collaboration. Theory The paper is situated against a theoretical framework of structure, agency, identity and empowerment. Collectively and contextually these concepts inform the proposed model of ‘collaborative agency’ to sustain integrated care. The paper brings sociological theory on structure and agency to the dilemma of collaboration. Methods Participative action research was carried out in collaborative teams that aspired to achieve integrated care for children, young people and families between 2009 and 2013. It was a part time, PhD study in collaborative practice. Results The research established that people needed to be able to be jointly aware of their context, to make joint decisions, and jointly act in order to deliver integrated services, and proposes a model of collaborative agency derived from practitioner’s experiences and integrated action research and literature on agency. The model reflects the effects of a range of structures in shaping professional identity, empowerment, and agency in a dynamic. The author proposes that the collaborative agency model will support integrated care, although this is, as yet, an untested hypothesis. PMID:24868192

  16. Control of resonance phenomenon in flexible structures via active support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolpour Saleh, A. R.; Mailah, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of active support to cope with the resonance phenomenon in the flexible structures. A valid computational platform for the flexible structure was first presented via a finite difference (FD) approach. Then, the active support mechanism was applied to the simulation algorithm through which the performance of the proposed methodology in suppressing the resonance phenomenon was evaluated. The flexible structure was thus excited with the external disturbance and the system response with and without the effect of the active support was investigated through a simulation study. The simulation outcomes clearly demonstrated effective resonance suppression in the flexible structure. Finally, an experimental rig was developed to investigate the validity of the proposed technique. The experimental results revealed an acceptable agreement with the simulation outcomes through which the validity of the proposed control method was affirmed.

  17. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  18. Developing supplemental activities for primary health care maternity services.

    PubMed

    Panitz, E

    1990-12-01

    Supplemental health care activities are described in the context of the augmented product. The potential benefits of supplemental services to recipients and provider are discussed. The author describes a study that was the basis for (re)developing a supplemental maternity service. The implementation of the results in terms of changes in the marketing mix of this supplemental program is discussed. The effects of the marketing mix changes on program participation are presented.

  19. Nurses' perceptions of factors influencing patient decision support for place of care at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mary Ann; Wilson, Keith; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Stacey, Dawn; O'Connor, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Although patients have more choices about where to receive care as death approaches, they often need help with decision making. This study identified factors that influence nurses' provision of decision support. A total of 22 nurses, from 3 health networks, participated in semistructured interviews. Overall, nurses held favorable attitudes toward providing decision support for place of care at end of life. Overlap between other professionals' roles and nurses' clinical experience affected nurses' decision support behaviors. Although nurses considered decision support to be part of patient-centered care, they report a lack of skills, confidence, and tools to help them provide it. These findings confirm the need to develop practical postlicensure education strategies and ways to embed patient decision support tools into systems of care.

  20. Patient Insights Into the Design of Technology to Support a Strengths-Based Approach to Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Olöf Birna; Stenberg, Una; Krogseth, Tonje; Stange, Kurt C; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of research studies in the psychological and biobehavioral sciences support incorporating patients’ personal strengths into illness management as a way to empower and activate the patients, thus improving their health and well-being. However, lack of attention to patients’ personal strengths is still reported in patient–provider communication. Information technology (IT) has great potential to support strengths-based patient–provider communication and collaboration, but knowledge about the users’ requirements and preferences is inadequate. Objective This study explored the aspirations and requirements of patients with chronic conditions concerning IT tools that could help increase their awareness of their own personal strengths and resources, and support discussion of these assets in consultations with health care providers. Methods We included patients with different chronic conditions (chronic pain, morbid obesity, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and used various participatory research methods to gain insight into the participants’ needs, values, and opinions, and the contexts in which they felt strengths-based IT tools could be used. Results Participants were positive toward using technology to support them in identifying and discussing their personal strengths in clinical consultation, but also underlined the importance of fitting it to their specific requirements and the right contexts of use. Participants recommended that technology be designed for use in preconsultation settings (eg, at home) and felt that it should support them in both identifying strengths and in finding out new ways how strengths can be used to attain personal health-related goals. Participants advocated use of technology to support advance preparation for consultations and empower them to take a more active role. IT tools were suggested to be potentially useful in specific contexts, including individual or group consultations with

  1. A decision class analysis of critical care life-support decision-making.

    PubMed

    Seiver, A

    1993-02-01

    Decision analysis is a powerful methodology that can help clinicians make good decisions. Because it is not practical to place a decision analyst at the bedside in critical care units, the application of this methodology will require leveraging the analyst through computer-based systems. A decision class analysis is a collective analysis of a group of decisions that provides the high-level specification for such a computer system. This paper presents a decision class analysis of critical care life-support decisions. Key elements of this analysis are: the simplification of an otherwise extremely complex multistage sequential decision problem by using a sequence of two-stage models, and the use of six generic knowledge maps that capture the extremely complex relevant medical knowledge. PMID:8326214

  2. Measuring critical care air support teams' performance during extended periods of duty.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Di

    2010-01-01

    The Royal Air Force (RAF) Critical Care Air Support Teams (CCASTs) aeromedically evacuate seriously injured service personnel. Long casualty evacuation chains create logistical constraints that must be considered when aeromedically evacuating patients. One constraint is the length of a CCAST mission and its potential effect on team member performance. Despite no evidence of patient care compromise, the RAF has commissioned a study to investigate whether CCAST mission length influences performance. Describing and understanding the role of a CCAST enabled fatigue to be defined. Factors essential to studying fatigue were then identified that were used to develop a theoretical model for designing a study to measure the effects of fatigue on CCAST performance. Relevant factors include the patient's clinical condition, team members' cognition and vigilance levels, and the occupational aviation environment. Further factors influencing overall performance include the duration and complexity of patient interventions, mission length, circadian influences, and fatigue countermeasures. PMID:20683231

  3. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    PubMed

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients.

  4. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    PubMed

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients. PMID:27349847

  5. Needs assessment for home-based care and the strengthening of social support networks: the role of community care workers in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Moshabela, Mosa; Sips, Ilona; Barten, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Background Community care workers (CCWs) in rural South Africa provide medical, personal, household, educational, and social care services to their clients. However, little understanding exists on how provision of services is approached within a household, taking into account available social support networks. Objective The aim of this study was to generate an understanding of the processes that underpin the provision of care by CCWs in rural households and their engagement with clients, primary caregivers (PCGs), and other members of the social support network. Design We analysed in-depth interviews conducted in a triad of participants involved in a home-based care (HBC) encounter – 32 clients, 32 PCGs, and 17 CCWs. For each triad, a purposefully selected CCW was linked with a purposefully selected client and the corresponding PCG using maximum variation sampling. Three coders used an inductive content analysis method to describe participants’ references to the nuances of processes followed by CCWs in servicing HBC clients. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Findings The results suggest that, by intuition and prior knowledge, CCWs treated each household uniquely, depending on the clients’ care needs, cooperation, availability of a social network, and the reliability and resilience of the social support system for the client. Four distinct processes took place in rural households: needs assessment for care, rationing of care, appraisal of care, and reinforcement of a social support system. However, there was no particular order or sequence established for these processes, and caregivers followed no prescribed or shared standards. Conclusions CCWs bring a basket of services to a household, but engage in a constant, dynamic, and cyclical process of weighing needs against services provided. The service package is uniquely crafted and tailored for each household, depending on the absorptive capacity of the social support network

  6. Visually storying living with HIV: bridging stressors and supports in accessing care.

    PubMed

    Schrader, S M; Deering, E N; Zahl, D A; Wallace, M

    2011-08-01

    This paper examines how visual narratives may bridge relational understandings between people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) and future oral health care providers. Borrowing from literature in participatory visual methods such as photo elicitation and photovoice, we explored how PLWH/A visually choose to represent their daily lives. This study uses a grounded theory action-oriented approach in examining the thematic analysis of 257 photos and 12 related reflective participant journals. Ten collaborative themes emerged from the participants' analysis of their photos. These themes of social support, places, family, staff, group, recovery tools, transportation, friends, medications and food exhibited the indivisible characteristics of stressors and supports commonly found in accessing care. Further researcher reflections also found three meta-themes of stigmatization, maintenance of positive mental health and the development of pride in managing one's health. PLWH/A need to share these visual themes of supports and stressors with future dental providers so that they may hopefully acquire an understanding of chronic illness that is more personalized and relationship centered rather than merely numeric and detached.

  7. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  8. Developing a free supportive care program for cancer patients within an integrative medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, E; Gautier, H; Fobair, P; Andrews, A; Hawn, M; Kurshner, R; Festa, B; Kramer, P; Manuel, F; Hirschberger, N; Selim, S; Spiegel, D

    2003-05-01

    The cancer patient's journey not only includes a threat to one's life, but the need to face many medical and emotional challenges. The free Cancer Supportive Care Program (CSCP) within the Center for Integrative Medicine Clinic at Stanford University Hospital and Clinics has been identified as a successful model for helping patients to deal with these challenges. Its programs include informational lectures, support groups, chair massages, exercise, alternative modality classes, a Life Tapes Project, an informational website, and a bimonthly newsletter available free to anybody touched by cancer. Now in its third year, this program benefits from a blending of leadership resources, availability of space, institutional agreement on patient need and funds from private and corporate donations. By presenting the basic premises of the Cancer Supportive Care program and outlining specifics about the program, institutions in various national and international demographic regions may implement similar programs according to their resources and the needs of patients. It is our hope that the CSCP can become a model for the development of similar programs in various parts of the United States and abroad.

  9. Support for learning in the perspective of patient safety in primary health care 1

    PubMed Central

    Paranaguá, Thatianny Tanferri de Brito; Bezerra, Ana Lúcia Queiroz; Tobias, Gabriela Camargo; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the support for learning, in the perspective of patient safety, offered in the work environment, according to health professionals working in primary care. Method: a transversal study, held with 86 health professionals working in primary care. A validated instrument was used, applied via the Internet. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken with a presentation of median, mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation. Results: points which are favorable to supporting learning were evidenced, such as mutual respect, autonomy for organizing the work and valorization of new ideas, which obtained means above 7.0. The variables which hinder the process of learning in the work environment, perceived by the professionals, were: resistance to changes, and excess of work impeding reflection on how to improve the work, with means above 6.0. Conclusion: the study found evidence of indicators related to the process of staff development in the area of health and indicates the influence of support for learning for the improvement of the work processes and of patient safety. It is necessary that a culture involving the systematic assessment of educational interventions in health should be established, the aim being to diagnose actions which are more incisive for changing health professionals' attitude and, therefore, clinical practice. PMID:27556877

  10. [Volunteers as family supporters in the home care setting: profile and motives].

    PubMed

    Fringer, André; Mayer, Herbert; Schnepp, Wilfried

    2010-06-01

    Family caregivers are increasingly receiving support in home care at low threshold from so called "social support services", since they are often overburdened with caring. Over the necessity for voluntary workers in and beyond this area, literature identifies different aspects that describe the profile of voluntary workers. The central idea of a "new culture of aid" manifests itself in various pilot projects. Such a project was implemented in North Rhine-Westfalia, Germany, during the years 2005 to 2008. It offered social support services to family caregivers and was scientifically assessed by means of case study research. The aim of this study was to depict the profile of voluntary workers, to understand their motives, and to identify their reasons for leaving the project. A total of 52 voluntary workers were surveyed by means of a standardised questionnaire, before and six months after their enrollment in the study. The motives for their commitment to participate in the study differed significantly from the first to the second interview, particularly with regard to participation allowance and the need to strengthen their sense of self-worth. The participation allowance in itself played no primary role in the motivation to become a voluntary worker, it is, however, a not to be underestimated aspect of acknowledgement for provided help. PMID:20509113

  11. Real-time support of pediatric diabetes self-care by a transport team.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Brandi E; Crisler, S Crile; Shappley, Rebekah; Armour, Meri M; McCommon, Dana T; Ferry, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study seeks to improve access for underserved patients via novel integration of Pedi-Flite (a critical care transport team) and to validate whether this safely enhances diabetes care and effectively expands the endocrine workforce. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study retrospectively analyzed pager service use in a cohort of established diabetic patients (n = 979) after inception of Pedi-Flite support. Outcomes included incidence and severity of recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and cost savings generated from reduced referrals to the emergency department (ED) and on-call endocrinologist. We generated descriptive statistics to characterize the study population and ED visits for DKA and constructed logistic regression models to examine associations of pager use and likelihood of ED visitation and nonelective inpatient admission from an ED for DKA. RESULTS Pager users comprised 30% of the patient population. They were younger but had more established diabetes than nonusers. While pager users were 2.75 times more likely than nonusers to visit the ED for DKA (P < 0.0001), their visits were less likely to lead to inpatient admissions (odds ratio 0.58; P < 0.02). More than half (n = 587) of all calls to the pager were resolved without need for further referral. Estimates suggest that 439 ED visits and 115 admissions were avoided at a potential cost savings exceeding 760,000 USD. CONCLUSIONS Integration of a transport service provides a novel, cost-effective approach to reduce disparities in diabetes care. Advantages include scalability, applicability to other disease areas and settings, and low added costs. These findings enrich an emerging evidence base for telephonic care-management models supported by allied health personnel. PMID:23959568

  12. Impact of supervised drug consumption services on access to and engagement with care at a palliative and supportive care facility for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Dilley, Laura B; Guirguis-Younger, Manal; Hwang, Stephen W; Small, Will

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Improvements in the availability and effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have prolonged the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, mortality rates have remained high among populations that encounter barriers to accessing and adhering to HAART, notably people who use drugs. This population consequently has a high burden of illness and complex palliative and supportive care needs, but is often unable to access these services due to anti-drug policies and discrimination. In Vancouver, Canada, the Dr. Peter Centre (DPC), which operates a 24-bed residential HIV/AIDS care facility, has sought to improve access to palliative and supportive care services by adopting a comprehensive harm reduction strategy, including supervised injection services. We undertook this study to explore how the integration of comprehensive harm reduction services into this setting shapes access to and engagement with care. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 DPC residents between November 2010 and August 2011. Interviews made use of a semistructured interview guide which facilitated discussion regarding how the DPC Residence's model of care (a) shaped healthcare access, (b) influenced healthcare interactions and (c) impacted drug use practices and overall health. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results Participant accounts highlight how the harm reduction policy altered the structural-environmental context of healthcare services and thus mediated access to palliative and supportive care services. Furthermore, this approach fostered an atmosphere in which drug use could be discussed without the risk of punitive action, and thus increased openness between residents and staff. Finally, participants reported that the environmental supports provided by the DPC Residence decreased drug-related risks and improved health outcomes, including HAART adherence and survival. Conclusions This study highlights how adopting

  13. The impact of supportive nursing care on the needs of men with prostate cancer: a study across seven European countries

    PubMed Central

    Cockle-Hearne, J; Charnay-Sonnek, F; Denis, L; Fairbanks, H E; Kelly, D; Kav, S; Leonard, K; van Muilekom, E; Fernandez-Ortega, P; Jensen, B T; Faithfull, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is for many men a chronic disease with a long life expectancy after treatment. The impact of prostate cancer therapy on men has been well defined, however, explanation of the consequences of cancer treatment has not been modelled against the wider variables of long-term health-care provision. The aim of this study was to explore the parameters of unmet supportive care needs in men with prostate cancer in relation to the experience of nursing care. Methods: A survey was conducted among a volunteer sample of 1001 men with prostate cancer living in seven European countries. Results: At the time of the survey, 81% of the men had some unmet supportive care needs including psychological, sexual and health system and information needs. Logistic regression indicated that lack of post-treatment nursing care significantly predicted unmet need. Critically, men's contact with nurses and/or receipt of advice and support from nurses, for several different aspects of nursing care significantly had an impact on men's outcomes. Conclusion: Unmet need is related not only to disease and treatment factors but is also associated with the supportive care men received. Imperative to improving men's treatment outcomes is to also consider the access to nursing and the components of supportive care provided, especially after therapy. PMID:24064968

  14. Predictors of caregiver supportive behaviors towards reproductive health care for women with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chu, Cordia M; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Although many previous studies have begun to address the reproductive health needs of women with intellectual disabilities; however, the supportive behaviors of caregivers to assist their reproductive health is not well understood. Data from a cross-sectional survey of "2009 National Survey on Reproductive Health Care Needs and Health Education Strategies for Women with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan" were analyzed. Study sample consisted of 1152 caregivers who working in 32 disability institutions have been analyzed in the study. The results showed that the caregiver did not have adequate supportive behaviors towards reproductive health care for women with ID (mean score was 29.84 out of 60), particularly in the arrangement of preventive reproductive health services. We analyzed the potential significant variables in a multiple linear regression model to examine the factors which affect the caregiver's supportive behaviors of reproductive health for women with ID. The model revealed that the factor of respondent's gender, job category, working years in disability setting, helping experience of reproductive health for women with ID, perception of reproductive health knowledge, in-job training of reproductive health, perceived adequacy of public reproductive health service for the client, scores of reproductive health knowledge and reproductive health attitude were significantly correlated to their supportive behavioral score of reproductive health for women with ID. These factors can explain 23.6% of the variation of supportive behavioral score. The present study suggests the reproductive health interventions need to take into account the perspectives of health workers, caregivers and women, as well as the constraints they face in providing and receiving services, respectively. PMID:21167677

  15. Cost analysis of prenatal care using the activity-based costing model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gesse, T; Golembeski, S; Potter, J

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  16. The cost of changing physical activity behaviour: evidence from a "physical activity pathway" in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 'Physical Activity Care Pathway' (a Pilot for the 'Let's Get Moving' policy) is a systematic approach to integrating physical activity promotion into the primary care setting. It combines several methods reported to support behavioural change, including brief interventions, motivational interviewing, goal setting, providing written resources, and follow-up support. This paper compares costs falling on the UK National Health Service (NHS) of implementing the care pathway using two different recruitment strategies and provides initial insights into the cost of changing physical activity behaviour. Methods A combination of a time driven variant of activity based costing, audit data through EMIS and a survey of practice managers provided patient-level cost data for 411 screened individuals. Self reported physical activity data of 70 people completing the care pathway at three month was compared with baseline using a regression based 'difference in differences' approach. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses in combination with hypothesis testing were used to judge how robust findings are to key assumptions and to assess the uncertainty around estimates of the cost of changing physical activity behaviour. Results It cost £53 (SD 7.8) per patient completing the PACP in opportunistic centres and £191 (SD 39) at disease register sites. The completer rate was higher in disease register centres (27.3% vs. 16.2%) and the difference in differences in time spent on physical activity was 81.32 (SE 17.16) minutes/week in patients completing the PACP; so that the incremental cost of converting one sedentary adult to an 'active state' of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week amounts to £ 886.50 in disease register practices, compared to opportunistic screening. Conclusions Disease register screening is more costly than opportunistic patient recruitment. However, additional costs come with a higher completion rate and better

  17. PalliPA: How can general practices support caregivers of patients at their end of life in a home-care setting? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The care of patients with a life-threatening, progressive and far advanced illness in a home-care setting requires appropriate individual care and requires the active support of family caregivers. General practice teams are usually the primary care givers and first contact and are best placed to offer support to family caregivers and to recognise and respond to the burden of care giving on family members. The aim of this project is to develop a best practice model for engaging with and supporting family caregivers. Findings The project is framed as an exploratory trial for a subsequent implementation study, covering phases 0, I and II of the MRC (Medical Research Council) framework for development, design and evaluation of complex interventions. The project is a multi-method procedure and has two phases. In the first phase, which has already been completed, we used a reflective practice procedure where general practice teams were asked about how they currently deal with family caregivers. In the second phase, a participatory action research approach aims to improve identification and response to when support is necessary for family caregivers. Ten participating general practice teams each enrol 40 eligible patients and their family caregiver, to identify structures and tools feasible for use in their practice. Standardised self-reported questionnaires (Burden Scale for Family Caregivers and Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative) are being applied at study inclusion (prior to or during the implementation period) and after 6 and 12 months to explore implementation effects. Qualitative assessment of general practice teams’ experiences will be triangulated with the quantitative evaluation of the implementation. Discussion This two-step approach, which is appropriate to primary palliative care in the German health care context, will enable general practice teams to develop feasible, acceptable and successful strategies for the implementation of

  18. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J S; Quijada, M A

    2004-12-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to support change. We offer examples of organisations that drew upon cultural strengths to create new ways of working and gradually shifted the culture. PMID:15576686

  19. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J; Quijada, M

    2004-01-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to support change. We offer examples of organisations that drew upon cultural strengths to create new ways of working and gradually shifted the culture. PMID:15576686

  20. Web 2.0 support for residents' and fellows' patient care and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Sherry; Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses librarian support of medical education programs and patient care with blogs and wikis. Pedagogical background for using Web 2.0 tools in educational settings is explored and example applications given. A survey of health sciences libraries usage of blogs and wikis was conducted in 2009-2010. Using the results from the survey plus five years of experience using blogs and wikis at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, best practices were compiled and are presented for guidance in establishing new blogs and wikis. PMID:21534109

  1. A critical review of Singapore's policies aimed at supporting families caring for older members.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kalyani K

    2006-01-01

    This article critically examines the family-oriented social policies of the Singapore government aimed at supporting families caring for older members. The sectors focused on are financial security, health, and housing. Singaporeans have been reminded that the family should be the first line of defense for aging families, followed by the community - the state would step in as the last resort. Drawing from recent research and examination of the state policies, the author argues that more should be done to help family caregivers looking after elder relatives. Recommendations for innovative ways to recognize and reward family carers conclude the paper.

  2. Web 2.0 support for residents' and fellows' patient care and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Sherry; Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses librarian support of medical education programs and patient care with blogs and wikis. Pedagogical background for using Web 2.0 tools in educational settings is explored and example applications given. A survey of health sciences libraries usage of blogs and wikis was conducted in 2009-2010. Using the results from the survey plus five years of experience using blogs and wikis at the University of Washington Health Sciences Library, best practices were compiled and are presented for guidance in establishing new blogs and wikis.

  3. Social networks of experientially similar others: Formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child’s care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents’ perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child’s care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences. PMID:22999229

  4. Social networks of experientially similar others: formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience.

    PubMed

    Gage, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child's care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents' perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child's care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences.

  5. A Web-based home welfare and care services support system using a pen type image sensor.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Sato, Haruhiko; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2003-01-01

    A long-term care insurance law for elderly persons was put in force two years ago in Japan. The Home Helpers, who are employed by hospitals, care companies or the welfare office, provide home welfare and care services for the elderly, such as cooking, bathing, washing, cleaning, shopping, etc. We developed a web-based home welfare and care services support system using wireless Internet mobile phones and Internet client computers, which employs a pen type image sensor. The pen type image sensor is used by the elderly people as the entry device for their care requests. The client computer sends the requests to the server computer in the Home Helper central office, and then the server computer automatically transfers them to the Home Helper's mobile phone. This newly-developed home welfare and care services support system is easily operated by elderly persons and enables Homes Helpers to save a significant amount of time and extra travel.

  6. Support vector machines classifiers of physical activities in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study is to develop, test, and compare multinomial logistic regression (MLR) and support vector machines (SVM) in classifying preschool-aged children physical activity data acquired from an accelerometer. In this study, 69 children aged 3-5 years old were asked to participate in a s...

  7. Physical Activity and Social Support in Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonça, Gerfeson; Cheng, Luanna Alexandra; Mélo, Edilânea Nunes; de Farias, José Cazuza, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically synthesize the results of original studies on the association between physical activity and social support in adolescents, published until April 2011. Searches were carried out in Adolec, ERIC, Lilacs, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, SportsDiscus and Web of Science electronic databases and the reference…

  8. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity: Tools and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creative Associates International, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Basic Education and Policy Support (BEPS) Activity is a United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-sponsored, multi-year initiative designed to further improve the quality of, effectiveness of, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. This catalog is one element of the BEPS information dissemination process. The…

  9. [Early childhood intervention - access to risk families and support through actors from the health-care sector].

    PubMed

    Clauß, D; Deutsch, J; Krol, I; Haase, R; Willard, P; Müller-Bahlke, T; Mauz-Körholz, C; Körholz, D

    2014-07-01

    Interdisciplinary cooperation and networking determine the success of activities for supporting families at risk for early childhood abuse. The integration of the healthcare sector might be important.The medical standard of perinatal care at the University hospital includes information exchange about family risk factors which may contribute to an increased risk of child abuse within the first year of life. As a result, the -pediatrician offered supporting services for the families at the time of the second examination during the official childhood health screening program (U2). A team of family-sponsorship was established and evaluated.In 281 of 1238 risk-factor questionnaires at least one stress factor was detected and 97 families had high-impact family stress. Families under the supervision of a family midwife or youth services had a significantly higher number of risk factors. The family-sponsorship program was institutionalized and positively evaluated by the families.The time of a hospital delivery is an excellent opportunity for the evaluation of familial risk factors and for the provision of supporting services. To increase the acceptance of such services by the families at risk repeated assessment of risk factors and support offers are required. PMID:25010130

  10. Improving health workers' access to HIV and TB prevention, treatment, care and support services.

    PubMed

    Kisting, Sophia; Wilburn, Susan; Protsiv, Myroslava; Hsu, Lee-Nah

    2010-01-01

    The International Labour Organization (ILO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) jointly developed policy guidelines for improving health workers' access to HIV and TB prevention, treatment, care and support services. These 14-point policy guidelines support the key principles of the International Labour Standard concerning HIV and AIDS in the world of work adopted in 2010. The joint guidelines cover issues on workers' rights, national legislation and social protection of health workers. In addition, the guidelines provide framework for workplace policies, programmes, and training. To ensure proper implementation, the guidelines also addressed issues of budget, monitoring and evaluation. Turning these policy guidelines into effective practice would require advocacy to both the health and labour sectors, as well as the recognition of the important roles of health workers, employers of health services, and that of the Ministries of Health and Ministries of Labour. PMID:21391451

  11. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  12. Moving beyond supportive care--current status of specific therapies in pediatric acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Symons, Jordan M

    2014-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a significant challenge, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Therapy for AKI to this point has largely been supportive; specific interventions to treat established AKI have had minimal effect. Review of the pathogenesis of AKI reveals complex, interacting mechanisms, including changes in microcirculation, the immune system, and inflammation, and cell death from both necrosis and apoptosis. Past definitions of AKI have been imprecise; newer methods for AKI identification and classification, including novel biomarkers and improved criteria for defining AKI, may permit earlier intervention with greater potential for success. With improved understanding of pathophysiology and the opportunity for intervention before AKI is fully established, clinicians may be able to move beyond supportive care and improve outcomes.

  13. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. PMID:26262065

  14. Promise and challenges with the use of mobile applications to support and improve patient care: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Bucklen, K W; Abbott, B M

    2014-05-01

    Mobile applications represent an immense opportunity to support and improve patient health care, as the scope and functionality of medical apps are enabling physicians and patients to manage care in new, fast, and personalized ways. Several challenges exist in medical-app development, including careful attention to quality systems, medical-device regulation, and app life span. Despite these complexities, we find that development of mobile medical apps is a worthwhile undertaking given their potential to improve outcomes for patients.

  15. Enabling health care decisionmaking through clinical decision support and knowledge management.

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David; Sanders, Gillian D; Bright, Tiffani J; Wong, Anthony; Dhurjati, Ravi; Bristow, Erin; Bastian, Lori; Coeytaux, Remy; Samsa, Gregory; Hasselblad, Vic; Williams, John W; Wing, Liz; Musty, Michael; Kendrick, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of CDSSs and KMSs, to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), PsycINFO(®), and Web of Science(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included. RESULTS We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: Integration with charting or order entry system. Promotion of action rather than inaction. No need for additional clinician data entry. Justification of decision support via research evidence. Local user involvement. Provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: Automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow. Provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking. Provision of a

  16. Blended Learning Networks Supported by Information and Communication Technology: An Intervention for Knowledge Transformation within Family Care of Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Magnusson, Lennart; Sennemark, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes an innovative practice called Blended Learning Networks (BLNs) whose aim is to enable older people, their families, and care providers to exchange knowledge, learn together, and support each other in local development work so that care is improved for older people. BLNs were established in 31 municipalities, headed…

  17. Testing Self-Efficacy as a Pathway that Supports Self-Care among Family Caregivers in a Psychoeducational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Brintnall-Peterson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a psychoeducational intervention supports family-centered care by influencing health risk and self-care behaviors of caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (N = 325). Moreover, this study investigated the extent to which changes in self-efficacy explained changes in health risk and self-care…

  18. Trained or professional doulas in the support and care of pregnant and birthing women: a critical integrative review.

    PubMed

    Steel, Amie; Frawley, Jane; Adams, Jon; Diezel, Helene

    2015-05-01

    The professionalisation of doula care and research interest in this area of maternity care/support have both grown internationally in recent years highlighting important broader issues around the access, continuity and delivery of maternity care services. However, no work to date has provided a critical appraisal of the international literature on this topic. In response, this paper presents the first critical review of international empirical literature examining professional doula care for pregnant and birthing women. A database search of AMED, CINAHL, Maternity and Infant Care, and MEDLINE using the search term, "doula" was undertaken. A total of 48 papers published between 1980 and March 2013 involving trained or professional doulas were extracted. Four descriptive categories were identified from the review: 'workforce and professional issues in doula care'; 'trained or professional doula's role and skill'; 'physical outcomes of trained or professional doula care'; and 'social outcomes of trained or professional doula care'. Of the studies evaluating outcomes of doula care, there were a number with design and methodology weaknesses. The review highlights a number of gaps in the research literature including a lack of research examining doula workforce issues; focus upon the experience and perspective of significant stakeholders such as expectant fathers with regard to trained or professional doula care; clinical trials measuring both subjective experiences and physical outcomes of trained or professional doula support; synergy between the design of clinical trials research examining trained or professional doula care and the clinical reality of professional doula practice. It is imperative that key aspects of trained doula care be subject to further rigorous, empirical investigation to help establish an evidence base to guide policy and practice relating to this area of support and care for pregnant and birthing women.

  19. Health Care Decision Support System for the Pediatric Emeregency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, Sarah; Hammadi, Slim; Quilliot, Alain; Martinot, Alain; Renard, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Health organization management is facing a high amount of complexity due to the inherent dynamics of the processes and the distributed organization of hospitals. It is therefore necessary for health care institutions to focus on this issue in order to deal with patients' requirements and satisfy their needs. The main objective of this study is to develop and implement a Decision Support System which can help physicians to better manage their organization, to anticipate the overcrowding feature, and to establish avoidance proposals for it. This work is a part of HOST project (Hospital: Optimization, Simulation, and Crowding Avoidance) of the French National Research Agency (ANR). It aims to optimize the functioning of the Pediatric Emergency Department characterized by stochastic arrivals of patients which leads to its overcrowding and services overload. Our study is a set of tools to smooth out patient flows, enhance care quality and minimize long waiting times and costs due to resources allocation. So we defined a decision aided tool based on Multi-agent Systems where actors negotiate and cooperate under some constraints in a dynamic environment. These entities which can be either physical agents representing real actors in the health care institution or software agents allowing the implementation of optimizing tools, cooperate to satisfy the demands of patients while respecting emergency degrees. This paper is concerned with agents' negotiation. It proposes a new approach for multi-skill tasks scheduling based on interactions between agents. PMID:26262060

  20. Depression Care Training Participation: Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria; Ong, Michael; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan Dwight; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective Community Engagement and Planning (CEP) could improve dissemination of depression quality improvement in under-resourced communities; but its effects on provider training participation relative to more standard technical assistance or Resources for Services (RS) are unknown. To compare effects of CEP, which trains networks of healthcare and social-community agencies jointly, and RS, which provides technical support to individual programs, on program and staff-level participation in depression quality improvement trainings. Methods Matched programs from healthcare and social-community programs in two communities were randomized to RS or CEP. Data were from 1622 eligible staff members from 95 enrolled programs. Measures: Primary outcomes: for programs, any staff trained; and for staff, total hours of training. Secondary outcomes: training in specific depression collaborative care components. Results CEP programs relative to RS were more likely to participate in any trainings across sectors (p<.001) and from social-community sectors (p<.001), but not from healthcare. Among staff participating in trainings, CEP relative to RS had greater mean training hours (p<.001) overall and for each depression care component (cognitive behavioral therapy, care management, other trainings, p<.001) except medication management. Conclusions Compared with RS, CEP to implement depression quality improvement increased program and staff training participation overall. CEP had a greater effect on any staff training participation within social-community sectors than RS, but not within healthcare. CEP may be an effective strategy to promote staff participation in depression improvement in under-resourced communities. PMID:25930037

  1. Features of Effective Medical Knowledge Resources to Support Point of Care Learning: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, David A.; Sorensen, Kristi J.; Hersh, William; Berger, Richard A.; Wilkinson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Health care professionals access various information sources to quickly answer questions that arise in clinical practice. The features that favorably influence the selection and use of knowledge resources remain unclear. We sought to better understand how clinicians select among the various knowledge resources available to them, and from this to derive a model for an effective knowledge resource. Methods We conducted 11 focus groups at an academic medical center and outlying community sites. We included a purposive sample of 50 primary care and subspecialist internal medicine and family medicine physicians. We transcribed focus group discussions and analyzed these using a constant comparative approach to inductively identify features that influence the selection of knowledge resources. Results We identified nine features that influence users' selection of knowledge resources, namely efficiency (with sub-features of comprehensiveness, searchability, and brevity), integration with clinical workflow, credibility, user familiarity, capacity to identify a human expert, reflection of local care processes, optimization for the clinical question (e.g., diagnosis, treatment options, drug side effect), currency, and ability to support patient education. No single existing resource exemplifies all of these features. Conclusion The influential features identified in this study will inform the development of knowledge resources, and could serve as a framework for future research in this field. PMID:24282535

  2. Overview and Categorization of Robots Supporting Independent Living of Elderly People: What Activities Do They Support and How Far Have They Developed.

    PubMed

    Bedaf, Sandra; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; De Witte, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, many robots for the elderly have been developed, supporting different activities of elderly people. A systematic review in four scientific literature databases and a search in article references and European projects was performed in order to create an overview of robots supporting independent living of elderly people. The robots found were categorized based on their development stage, the activity domains they claim to support, and the type of support provided (i.e., physical, non-physical, and/or non-specified). In total, 107 robots for the elderly were identified. Six robots were still in a concept phase, 95 in a development phase, and six of these robots were commercially available. These robots claimed to provide support related to four activity domains: mobility, self-care, interpersonal interaction & relationships, and other activities. Of the many robots developed, only a small percentage is commercially available. Technical ambitions seem to be guiding robot development. To prolong independent living, the step towards physical support is inevitable and needs to be taken. However, it will be a long time before a robot will be capable of supporting multiple activities in a physical manner in the home of an elderly person in order to enhance their independent living. PMID:26132353

  3. Overview and Categorization of Robots Supporting Independent Living of Elderly People: What Activities Do They Support and How Far Have They Developed.

    PubMed

    Bedaf, Sandra; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; De Witte, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, many robots for the elderly have been developed, supporting different activities of elderly people. A systematic review in four scientific literature databases and a search in article references and European projects was performed in order to create an overview of robots supporting independent living of elderly people. The robots found were categorized based on their development stage, the activity domains they claim to support, and the type of support provided (i.e., physical, non-physical, and/or non-specified). In total, 107 robots for the elderly were identified. Six robots were still in a concept phase, 95 in a development phase, and six of these robots were commercially available. These robots claimed to provide support related to four activity domains: mobility, self-care, interpersonal interaction & relationships, and other activities. Of the many robots developed, only a small percentage is commercially available. Technical ambitions seem to be guiding robot development. To prolong independent living, the step towards physical support is inevitable and needs to be taken. However, it will be a long time before a robot will be capable of supporting multiple activities in a physical manner in the home of an elderly person in order to enhance their independent living.

  4. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  5. Culture and African contexts of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and support.

    PubMed

    Airhihenbuwa, C O; Webster, J DeWitt

    2004-05-01

    Culture plays a vital role in determining the level of health of the individual, the family and the community. This is particularly relevant in the context of Africa, where the values of extended family and community significantly influence the behaviour of the individual. The behaviour of the individual in relation to family and community is one major cultural factor that has implications for sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS prevention and control efforts. As the impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa remains unabated, a culture-centered approach to prevention, care and support is increasingly recognised as a critical strategy. In this article PEN-3, a model developed to centralise culture in health promotion interventions, is presented as a framework to be used in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and support in Africa. The three domains of the PEN-3 model incorporate specific constructs: relationships and expectations, cultural empowerment, and cultural identity. The cultural empowerment and relationships and expectations domains are 'assessment/appraisal' domains used for cultural assessment. Community identity is the 'application/transformation' domain that helps the public health practitioner assist the community to identify the point of entry of the intervention. In this paper the authors describe PEN-3 and then present examples of how the assessment/appraisal domains can be utilised to frame HIV/AIDS-related concerns in the context of Africa.

  6. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Donald J.; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Samuels, Jay Osi; Sarr, Abdoulaye D.; Chaplin, Beth; Ofuche, Eke; Meloni, Seema T.; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction From 2004–2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Methods Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Results Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Conclusions Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform and encourage the development of other

  7. Mesoscopic Patterns of Neural Activity Support Songbird Cortical Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Guitchounts, Grigori; Velho, Tarciso; Lois, Carlos; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Time-locked sequences of neural activity can be found throughout the vertebrate forebrain in various species and behavioral contexts. From “time cells” in the hippocampus of rodents to cortical activity controlling movement, temporal sequence generation is integral to many forms of learned behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying sequence generation are not well known. Here, we describe a spatial and temporal organization of the songbird premotor cortical microcircuit that supports sparse sequences of neural activity. Multi-channel electrophysiology and calcium imaging reveal that neural activity in premotor cortex is correlated with a length scale of 100 µm. Within this length scale, basal-ganglia–projecting excitatory neurons, on average, fire at a specific phase of a local 30 Hz network rhythm. These results show that premotor cortical activity is inhomogeneous in time and space, and that a mesoscopic dynamical pattern underlies the generation of the neural sequences controlling song. PMID:26039895

  8. Support for e-Health Services Among Elderly Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pirogowicz, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: E-health has a substantial potential to improve access to as well as support efficient and effective care for the elderly. Questions remain and must be addressed, however, regarding the challenges faced by the elderly in the use of this technology. The aim of the study was to assess the attitude (needs) and preferences of the elderly in a selected region of Poland regarding selected e-health services and the factors associated with them. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among 286 patients over 60 years of age being served by general practitioners in southwest Poland's Lower Silesia Province. The assessment pertaining to e-health was based on a specially designed questionnaire. Results: Nearly one-third of the study respondents had a computer at home, and 61% of these (19% of all surveyed elderly) used it. Twenty-two percent of respondents used the Internet, at least occasionally, whereas 62% used mobile phones. Approximately 41% (n=116) of the elderly had a favorable attitude toward e-health services (labeled here as supporters) and were willing to use it if/when offered an opportunity to do so. A substantial majority (84%) of supporters expressed a desire to receive simple medical recommendations via mobile phone or a computer, although significant majorities (61% and 60%, respectively) would like to receive the results of tests by e-mail or short message service reminders for scheduled visits or prescribed medications. Slightly less than half (47%) of e-health supporters would request appointments online. Among the more important factors associated with support of e-health services were urban residence, higher education, and normal cognitive function, as well as having a computer, Internet access, or a mobile phone. Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients in this Polish community are not overly enthusiastic about using information and communications technology tools in their healthcare. Nevertheless, a substantial

  9. Matched-Pair Comparison of Radioembolization Plus Best Supportive Care Versus Best Supportive Care Alone for Chemotherapy Refractory Liver-Dominant Colorectal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Ricarda; Denecke, Timm; Kraus, Patrick; Seidensticker, Max; Mohnike, Konrad; Fahlke, Joerg; Kettner, Erika; Dudeck, Oliver; Pech, Maciej; Amthauer, Holger; Ricke, Jens

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate overall survival after radioembolization or best supportive care (BSC) in patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: This was a matched-pair comparison of patients who received radioembolization plus BSC or BSC alone for extensive liver disease. Twenty-nine patients who received radioembolization were retrospectively matched with a contemporary cohort of >500 patients who received BSC from 3 centers in Germany. Using clinical databases, patients were initially matched for prior treatments and tumor burden and then 29 patients were consecutively identified with two or more of four matching criteria: synchronous/metachronous metastases, tumor burden, increased ALP, and/or CEA >200 U/ml. Survival was calculated from date of progression before radioembolization or BSC by using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 29 patients in each study arm, 16 pairs (55.2%) matched for all four criteria, and 11 pairs (37.9%) matched three criteria. Patients in both groups had a similar performance status (Karnofsky index, median 80% [range, 60-100%]). Compared with BSC alone, radioembolization prolonged survival (median, 8.3 vs. 3.5 months; P < 0.001) with a hazard ratio of 0.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.55; P < 0.001) in a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Treatment-related adverse events following radioembolization included: grade 1-2 fatigue (n = 20, 69%), grade 1 abdominal pain/nausea (n = 14, 48.3%), and grade 2 gastrointestinal ulceration (n = 3, 10.3%). Three cases of grade 3 radiation-induced liver disease were symptomatically managed. Conclusions: Radioembolization offers a promising addition to BSC in treatment-refractory patients for whom there are limited options. Survival was prolonged and adverse events were generally mild-to-moderate in nature and manageable.

  10. 42 CFR 423.2430 - Activities that improve health care quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Information Technology (HIT) expenses, are required to accomplish the activities that improve health care... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities that improve health care quality. 423... Requirements for a Minimum Medical Loss Ratio § 423.2430 Activities that improve health care quality....

  11. 42 CFR 422.2430 - Activities that improve health care quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Information Technology (HIT) expenses, are required to accomplish the activities that improve health care... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities that improve health care quality. 422... Minimum Medical Loss Ratio § 422.2430 Activities that improve health care quality. (a)...

  12. HOBE+, a case study: a virtual community of practice to support innovation in primary care in Basque Public Health Service

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A virtual professional community of practice (VCoP), HOBE+, has been set up to foster and facilitate innovation in primary care. It is aimed at all primary care professionals of the Basque Public Health Service (Osakidetza) in the provinces of Biscay and Araba. HOBE + is a VCoP that incorporates innovation management from the generation of ideas to their implementation in primary care practice. Methods We used a case study method, based on the data provided by the technology platform that supports the VCoP, and from a survey completed by HOBE + users. The target population was all primary care staff (including all professional categories) from Araba and Biscay provinces of the Basque Country (Spain), who represent the target users of the VCoP. Results From a total of 5190 professionals across all the professional categories invited to join, 1627 (31.3%) actually registered in the VCoP and, during the study period, 90 (5.5% of the registered users) participated actively in some way. The total number of ideas proposed by the registered users was 133. Of these, 23 ideas (17.2%) are being implemented. Finally, 80% of the users who answered the satisfaction survey about their experience with HOBE + considered the initiative useful in order to achieve continuous improvement and real innovation in clinical and managerial processes. Conclusions The experience shows that it is possible to create a virtual CoP for innovation in primary care where professionals from different professional categories propose ideas for innovation that are ultimately implemented. This manuscript objectives are to assess the process of developing and implementing a VCoP open to all primary care professionals in Osakidetza, including the take-up, participation and use of this VCoP in the first 15 months after its launch in October 2011. In addition, the usefulness of the VCoP was assessed through a survey gathering the opinions of the professionals involved. PMID:24188617

  13. Effectiveness of Peer Support on Care Engagement and Preventive Care Intervention Utilization among Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy, HIV-Infected Adults in Rakai, Uganda: a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Larry W.; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Billioux, Veena G; Gray, Ronald H.; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C.; Wawer, Maria J; Bollinger, Robert C.; Reynolds, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    442 pre-ART, HIV-infected adults were randomized to peer support consisting of structured home visits to promote clinic attendance and preventive care intervention use or standard of care. At baseline, 62% reported previously visiting an HIV clinic, 45% reported taking cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 31% were “care-naïve” (no previous clinic visit and not on cotrimoxazole). After one year, intervention participants were more likely to report being in care (92% vs 84%; PRR 1.09, p=0.039), on cotrimoxazole (89% vs 81%; PRR 1.10, p=0.047), and safe water vessel adherence (23% vs 14%; PRR 1.64, p=0.024). The effect was observed only among care-naïve participants (n=139) with 83% intervention vs 53% controls reporting being in HIV care (PRR 1.47, p=0.006), 78% vs 58% on cotrimoxazole (PRR 1.35, p=0.04), and 20% vs 4% safe water vessel adherence (PRR 5.78, p=0.017). Peer support may be an effective intervention to facilitate pre-ART care compliance in this important population. PMID:26271815

  14. Social Support, Nutrition Intake, and Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Shanice; Berg, Carla J.; Thompson, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine depressive symptoms, hope, social support, and quality of life in relation to fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and physical activity (PA) among cancer survivors diagnosed within the past 4 years. Methods In 2010, participants were recruited from a southeastern US cancer center and completed a mail-based survey (response rate 22.7%) assessing these psychosocial factors, FV intake, and PA. Results Among 128 participants, 72% consumed ≥5 FV/ day; 77.8% walked for exercise ≥4 times/ week. Controlling for sociodemographics, consuming ≥5 FV/day was associated with greater significant other social support (p = .004); walking for exercise ≥4 times/week was associated with greater friend support (p = .003). Conclusions These findings can inform tertiary cancer prevention interventions. PMID:24636037

  15. Sources of support reported by mothers and fathers of infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Miles, M S; Carlson, J; Funk, S G

    1996-04-01

    Over the past two decades, awareness of the importance of social support for individuals faced with a major life transition or a stressful event has increased. The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of mothers and fathers of critically ill infants about the helpfulness of support provided to them by family, health care professionals, and other when their infants were in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Social support in this study is conceptualized as the interpersonal transactions that parents of preterm infants perceive as helpful in reducing their stress and coping with their child's illness. Data were collected using the Illness Support Scale, on which subjects rated the helpfulness of support from individuals across their network. Findings indicate that these parents experienced a moderately high level of support and perceived NICU nurses as very helpful. Nurses need to continue to develop their role in helping families by identifying specific supportive interventions.

  16. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  17. The Adam language: Ada extended with support for multiway activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlesworth, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    The Adam language is an extension of Ada that supports multiway activities, which are cooperative activities involving two or more processes. This support is provided by three new constructs: diva procedures, meet statements, and multiway accept statements. Diva procedures are recursive generic procedures having a particular restrictive syntax that facilitates translation for parallel computers. Meet statements and multiway accept statements provide two ways to express a multiway rendezvous, which is an n-way rendezvous generalizing Ada's 2-way rendezvous. While meet statements tend to have simpler rules than multiway accept statements, the latter approach is a more straightforward extension of Ada. The only nonnull statements permitted within meet statements and multiway accept statements are calls on instantiated diva procedures. A call on an instantiated diva procedure is also permitted outside a multiway rendezvous; thus sequential Adam programs using diva procedures can be written. Adam programs are translated into Ada programs appropriate for use on parallel computers.

  18. A conceptual model and key variables for guiding supportive interventions for family caregivers of people receiving palliative care.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Peter

    2003-12-01

    According to the World Health Organization, the patient and family should be viewed as the "unit of care" when palliative care is required. Therefore family caregivers should receive optimal supportive care from health professionals. However, the impact of supporting a dying relative is frequently described as having negative physical and psychosocial sequalae. Furthermore, family caregivers consistently report unmet needs and there has been a dearth of rigorous supportive interventions published. In addition, comprehensive conceptual frameworks to navigate the family caregiver experience and guide intervention development are lacking. This article draws on Lazarus and Folkman's seminal work on the transactional stress and coping framework to present a conceptual model specific to family caregivers of patients receiving palliative care. A comprehensive account of key variables to aid understanding of the family caregiver experience and intervention design is provided.

  19. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  20. TraumaTalk: content-to-speech generation for decision support at point of care.

    PubMed

    Bierner, G

    1998-01-01

    Communicating information in clinical environments is a crucial concern for medical decision support systems. Some systems can provide this support through text output that can be read by the clinician either from a screen or hard copy. However, speech is often a more appropriate way of conveying information in cases where the decision maker's eyes are already committed to another task or in cases where the telephone is the mode of communication. Some systems synthesize speech directly from text, while others piece together bits of pre-recorded human speech. In either case, producing correct intonation is vital because intonation both aids the listener's comprehension and conveys discourse meaning not necessarily evident in the words alone. Although systems that use text-to-speech or human recorded speech segments sometimes attempt to provide good intonation, they are severely hampered by the fact that intonation spans entire clauses. Systems that connect phonemes, words, or phrases fail to capture this. This paper describes a content-to-speech system that provides spoken decision support for trauma care that is correctly intoned over full clauses.

  1. TraumaTalk: content-to-speech generation for decision support at point of care.

    PubMed

    Bierner, G

    1998-01-01

    Communicating information in clinical environments is a crucial concern for medical decision support systems. Some systems can provide this support through text output that can be read by the clinician either from a screen or hard copy. However, speech is often a more appropriate way of conveying information in cases where the decision maker's eyes are already committed to another task or in cases where the telephone is the mode of communication. Some systems synthesize speech directly from text, while others piece together bits of pre-recorded human speech. In either case, producing correct intonation is vital because intonation both aids the listener's comprehension and conveys discourse meaning not necessarily evident in the words alone. Although systems that use text-to-speech or human recorded speech segments sometimes attempt to provide good intonation, they are severely hampered by the fact that intonation spans entire clauses. Systems that connect phonemes, words, or phrases fail to capture this. This paper describes a content-to-speech system that provides spoken decision support for trauma care that is correctly intoned over full clauses. PMID:9929309

  2. Enteral nutrition support of the preterm infant in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Groh-Wargo, Sharon; Sapsford, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of a preterm baby is a nutrition emergency. Growth and the accumulation of nutrient reserves are higher during the third trimester of pregnancy than at any other time during the life cycle. Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of support and human milk the preferred source of enteral nutrition. Human milk is highly digestible and contains many anti-infective components, which confer a lower risk of infection. The mother of a preterm infant requires education, equipment, and encouragement to successfully initiate and sustain lactation. Human milk requires nutrient fortification to meet the protein and mineral needs of the rapidly growing preterm infant. Commercial human milk fortifiers are available. If human milk is unavailable or the volume is insufficient, preterm formulas are available. Preterm formulas have different sources of macronutrients and greater density of all nutrients than formulas intended for term newborns. Preterm infants benefit from early enteral feedings with slow but steady increases in feedings to achieve full support. Infants born at <35 weeks gestational age are supported with tube feedings. A transition to feedings at the breast or to bottle feedings is gradually made as the baby matures. Nutrient recommendations specific to the preterm infant are available. Special products and feeding strategies exist to respond to common medical conditions that can complicate nutrition management. Optimal nutrition care of the preterm infant offers the opportunity to improve outcomes for children.

  3. 76 FR 44091 - Proposed Information Collection (Child Care Subsidy) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Child Care Subsidy) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Human...' eligibility to participate in VA's child care subsidy program. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on.... Child Care Subsidy Application Form, VA Form 0730a. b. Child Care Provider Information (For the...

  4. 76 FR 60134 - Agency Information Collection (Child Care Subsidy) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Child Care Subsidy) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Human... INFORMATION: Titles a. Child Care Subsidy Application Form, VA Form 0730a. b. Child Care Provider Information (For the Child Care Subsidy Program), VA Form 0730b. OMB Control Number: 2900-0717. Type of...

  5. The effect of clothing care activities on textile formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel M; Nelson, Mindy L; McKinley, Meg A; Anderson, Grace L; Keenan, James J

    2013-01-01

    Textiles are commonly treated with formaldehyde-based residues that may potentially induce allergic contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals. This study examined the initial formaldehyde content in clothing and resulting changes due to care activities. Twenty clothing articles were examined and 17 of them did not have detectable levels of formaldehyde. One shirt contained a formaldehyde concentration of 3172 ppm, and two pairs of pants had formaldehyde concentrations of 1391 ppm and 86 ppm. The two highest results represent formaldehyde levels that are up to 40-fold greater than international textile regulations. The two items with the greatest formaldehyde content were washed and dried in a manner similar to that used by consumers, including hand and machine washing in hot or cold water followed by air or machine drying. The washing and drying procedures reduced formaldehyde levels to between 26 and 72% of untreated controls. Differences in the temperature or type of washing and drying did not result in a clear trend in the subsequent formaldehyde content. In addition, samples were hot ironed, which did not affect the formaldehyde content as significantly. Understanding the formaldehyde content in clothing and its potential reduction through care activities may be useful for manufacturers and formaldehyde-sensitive individuals.

  6. Neglecting the Importance of the Decision Making and Care Regimes of Personal Support Workers: A Critique of Standardization of Care Planning Through the RAI/MDS

    PubMed Central

    Kontos, Pia C.; Miller, Karen-Lee; Mitchell, Gail J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Resident Assessment Instrument–Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS) is an interdisciplinary standardized process that informs care plan development in nursing homes. This standardized process has failed to consistently result in individualized care planning, which may suggest problems with content and planning integrity. We examined the decision making and care practices of personal support workers (PSWs) in relation to the RAI/MDS standardized process. Design and Methods: This qualitative study utilized focus groups and semi-structured interviews with PSWs (n = 26) and supervisors (n = 9) in two nursing homes in central Canada. Results: PSWs evidenced unique occupational contributions to assessment via proximal familiarity and biographical information as well as to individualizing care by empathetically linking their own bodily experiences and forging bonds of fictive kinship with residents. These contributions were neither captured by RAI/MDS categories nor relayed to the interdisciplinary team. Causal factors for PSW exclusion included computerized records, low status, and poor interprofessional collaboration. Intraprofessional collaboration by PSWs aimed to compensate for exclusion and to individualize care. Implications: Exclusive institutional reliance on the RAI/MDS undermines quality care because it fails to capture residents’ preferences and excludes input by PSWs. Recommendations include incorporating PSW knowledge in care planning and documentation and examining PSWs’ nascent occupational identity and their role as interprofessional brokers in long-term care. PMID:20026525

  7. Enhanced support for shared decision making reduced costs of care for patients with preference-sensitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Veroff, David; Marr, Amy; Wennberg, David E

    2013-02-01

    Shared decision making is an approach to care that seeks to fully inform patients about the risks and benefits of available treatments and engage them as participants in decisions about the treatments. Although recent federal and state policies pursue the expanded use of shared decision making as a way to improve care quality and patient experience, payers and providers want evidence that this emerging model of care is cost-effective. We examined data obtained from a year-long randomized investigation. The study compared the effects on patients of receiving a usual level of support in making a medical treatment decision with the effects of receiving enhanced support, which included more contact with trained health coaches through telephone, mail, e-mail, and the Internet. We found that patients who received enhanced support had 5.3 percent lower overall medical costs than patients who received the usual level of support. The enhanced-support group had 12.5 percent fewer hospital admissions than the usual-support group, and 9.9 percent fewer preference-sensitive surgeries, including 20.9 percent fewer preference-sensitive heart surgeries. These findings indicate that support for shared decision making can generate savings. They also suggest that a "remote" model of support-combining telephonic coaching with decision aids, for example-may constitute a relatively low-cost and effective intervention that could reach broader populations without the need for the direct involvement of regular medical care team members.

  8. Lessons Learnt from Applying Action Research to Support Strategy Formation Processes in Long-Term Care Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has failed to explain how to apply AR and action learning…

  9. Circles of Care: Development and Initial Evaluation of a Peer Support Model for African Americans with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Laura C.; Armstrong, Tonya D.; Green, Melissa A.; Hayes, Michelle; Peacock, Stacie; Elliot-Bynum, Sharon; Goldmon, Moses V.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Earp, Jo Anne

    2013-01-01

    Peer support interventions extend care and health information to underserved populations yet rarely address serious illness. Investigators from a well-defined academic-community partnership developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for African Americans facing advanced cancer. Evaluation methods used the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption,…

  10. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  11. A quasi-experimental study of the effects of an integrated care intervention for the frail elderly on informal caregivers’ satisfaction with care and support

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study explored the effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on informal caregivers’ satisfaction with care and support services. Methods A 62-item instrument was developed and deployed in an evaluative before/after study using a quasi-experimental design and enrolling a control group. The definitive study population (n = 63) consisted mainly of female informal caregivers who did not live with the care recipient. Analysis of separate items involved group comparisons, using paired and unpaired tests, and regression analyses, with baseline measurements, control variables (sex, age and living together with care recipient) and the intervention as independent variables. Subsequently, the underlying factor structure of the theoretical dimensions was investigated using primary component analysis. Group comparisons and regression analyses were performed on the resulting scales. Results Satisfaction with the degree to which care was provided according to the need for care of the recipients increased, while satisfaction with the degree to which professionals provided help with administrative tasks, the understandability of the information provided and the degree to which informal caregivers knew which professionals to call, decreased. Primary component analysis yielded 6 scales for satisfaction with care and 5 scales for satisfaction with caregiver support, with sufficient reliability. Conclusions The results suggest that expectations regarding the effects of integrated care on informal caregiver satisfaction may not be realistic. However, the results must be seen in light of the small sample size and should therefore be considered as preliminary. Nonetheless, this study provides guidance for further research and integrated care interventions involving informal caregivers. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN05748494. Date of registration: 14/03/2013. PMID:24678804

  12. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. AIM: To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as within the appropriate therapeutic range of International Normalised Ratio (INR). METHOD: All patients receiving warfarin from two Birmingham inner city general practices were invited to attend a practice-based anticoagulation clinic. In practice A all patients were managed using DSS. In practice B patients were randomized to receive dosing advice either through DSS or through the local hospital laboratory. Clinical outcomes, adverse events and patient acceptability were recorded. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were seen in total. There were significant improvements in INR control from 23% to 86% (P > 0.001) in the practice where all patients received dosing through DSS. In the practice where patients were randomized to either DSS or hospital dosing, logistic regression showed a significant trend for improvement in intervention patients which was not apparent in the hospital-dosed patients (P < 0.001). Mean recall times were significantly extended in patients who were dosed by the practice DSS through the full 12 months (24 days to 36 days) (P = 0.033). Adverse events were comparable between hospital and practice-dosed patients, although a number of esoteric events occurred. Patient satisfaction with the practice clinics was high. CONCLUSION: Computerized DSS enables the safe and effective transfer of anticoagulation management from hospital to primary care and may result in improved patient outcome in terms of the level of control, frequency of review and general acceptability. PMID

  13. Perspectives and experiences related to physical activity of elders in long-term-care settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Flesner, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated individual and situational factors influencing physical activity (PA) practices of elders in residential-care/assisted-living (RC/AL) communities. This article describes the results of focus-group interviews involving 47 residents across 6 RC/AL settings. Thematic analysis revealed 6 themes: staying active, past PA experiences, value of PA, barriers to PA, strategies to facilitate PA, and support needs to promote PA. Staying active meant walking indoors and out, attending chair-exercise programs, performing professionally prescribed home exercises, and using available exercise equipment. Past PA experiences shaped current preferences and practices. Participants agreed that exercise helped maintain physical functioning but recounted cognitive and situational barriers to PA. Lack of dedicated exercise space and short corridors hampered efforts to stay active. Participants wished for individualized home exercise programs and supervised exercise sessions. Future research should examine the extent to which the physical environment and PA programming in RC/AL communities affect elders' PA.

  14. Children’s Oncology Group’s 2012 Blueprint for Research: Cancer Control and Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Lillian; Zaoutis, Theo; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Johnston, Donna; Dupuis, Lee; Ladas, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In cancer control research, the objective is to reduce overall morbidity and mortality by decreasing acute and delayed treatment-related toxicities in all children with cancer. To date, the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) has focused on infection, neurocognition, quality of life (QoL), and nutrition/antiemetics. COG is conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine prophylaxis strategies that will reduce infections in high-risk populations. Two RCTs are determining if modafinil or computerized cognitive training improve cognitive functioning in pediatric brain tumor patients. QoL is being assessed in acute leukemia patients. Improved supportive care outcomes will only occur when the most effective interventions are established. PMID:23255159

  15. Long-term conditions. 2: supporting and enabling self-care.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia M; Mayor, Vina

    2006-01-01

    This article is the second of a series focusing on long-term conditions. It explores supported self-care identifying that this is the most appropriate approach to managing long-term conditions in 70-80% of patients with a chronic illness. The paper focuses on the Department of Health for England and Wales flagship initiative; the Expert Patient Programme. This lay-led self-management programme for people affected by a physical long-term condition is currently being rolled out by PCTs throughout the NHS and is seen as a key mechanism for empowering individuals and reducing resource demand in long-term conditions. The history, content, current and future models of the Expert Patient Programme will be described and the paper concludes by discussing future challenges for the programme as illuminated by two external evaluations.

  16. Supporting Reflective Activities in Information Seeking on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitomi; Miwa, Kazuhisa

    Recently, many opportunities have emerged to use the Internet in daily life and classrooms. However, with the growth of the World Wide Web (Web), it is becoming increasingly difficult to find target information on the Internet. In this study, we explore a method for developing the ability of users in information seeking on the Web and construct a search process feedback system supporting reflective activities of information seeking on the Web. Reflection is defined as a cognitive activity for monitoring, evaluating, and modifying one's thinking and process. In the field of learning science, many researchers have investigated reflective activities that facilitate learners' problem solving and deep understanding. The characteristics of this system are: (1) to show learners' search processes on the Web as described, based on a cognitive schema, and (2) to prompt learners to reflect on their search processes. We expect that users of this system can reflect on their search processes by receiving information on their own search processes provided by the system, and that these types of reflective activity helps them to deepen their understanding of information seeking activities. We have conducted an experiment to investigate the effects of our system. The experimental results confirmed that (1) the system actually facilitated the learners' reflective activities by providing process visualization and prompts, and (2) the learners who reflected on their search processes more actively understood their own search processes more deeply.

  17. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  18. A Comparative Study on Resilience, Perceived Social Support and Hopelessness Among Cancer Patients Treated with Curative and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Ravindran Ottilingam; Devamani, Kiran A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Psychological distress is common among patients affected by cancer. In this study, we examined the relationship between resilience, social support, and hopelessness among cancer patients treated with curative and palliative care. Patients and Methods: Sixty cancer patients in the age range of 18–65 years were randomly selected and divided into two groups based on their treatment intent namely, curative care (n = 30) and palliative care (n = 30). Both groups were assessed by the following instruments: Bharathiar University Resilience Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Results: Resilience was significantly associated with less hopelessness and higher levels of perceived social support. Conclusion: Cancer patients are found to be resilient, and the role of social support and hopelessness on promoting resilience cannot be ignored. PMID:27162423

  19. Active Negotiation: Mothers with Intellectual Disabilities Creating Their Social Support Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Rachel; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McConnell, David

    2008-01-01

    Background: The support networks of mothers with intellectual disabilities play an important role in caring for children. Understanding the support provided by the network is therefore vital in understanding the capacity of a mother to care for her child. Nevertheless, how these important networks came into existence is yet to be explored.…

  20. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  1. Using videotelephony to support paediatric oncology-related palliative care in the home: from abandoned RCT to acceptability study.

    PubMed

    Bensink, M E; Armfield, N R; Pinkerton, R; Irving, H; Hallahan, A R; Theodoros, D G; Russell, T; Barnett, A G; Scuffham, P A; Wootton, R

    2009-04-01

    Videotelephony (real-time audio-visual communication) has been used successfully in adult palliative home care. This paper describes two attempts to complete an RCT (both of which were abandoned following difficulties with family recruitment), designed to investigate the use of videotelephony with families receiving palliative care from a tertiary paediatric oncology service in Brisbane, Australia. To investigate whether providing videotelephone-based support was acceptable to these families, a 12-month non-randomised acceptability trial was completed. Seventeen palliative care families were offered access to a videotelephone support service in addition to the 24 hours 'on-call' service already offered. A 92% participation rate in this study provided some reassurance that the use of videotelephones themselves was not a factor in poor RCT participation rates. The next phase of research is to investigate the integration of videotelephone-based support from the time of diagnosis, through outpatient care and support, and for palliative care rather than for palliative care in isolation. Trial registration ACTRN 12606000311550.

  2. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l−1 CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l−1 CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8–9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l−1 extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5′,6′-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Automated Telephone Self-Management Support With Nurse Care Management Among Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Margaret A.; Shumway, Martha; Schillinger, Dean

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of an automated telephone self-management support with nurse care management (ATSM) intervention for patients with type 2 diabetes, which was tested among patients receiving primary care in publicly funded (safety net) clinics, focusing on non-English speakers. METHODS We performed cost analyses in the context of a randomized trial among primary care patients comparing the effects of ATSM (n = 112) and usual care (n = 114) on diabetes-related outcomes in 4 San Francisco safety net clinics. ATSM uses interactive phone technology to provide surveillance, patient education, and one-on-one counseling, and was implemented in 3 languages for a 9-month period. Cost utility was examined using quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) derived from changes in scores on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. We also examined cost-effectiveness for costs associated with a 10% increase in the proportion of patients meeting diabetes-specific public health goals for increasing exercise, as recommended by Healthy People 2010 and the American Diabetes Association. RESULTS The annual cost of the ATSM intervention per QALY gained, relative to usual care, was $65,167 for start-up and ongoing implementation costs combined, and $32,333 for ongoing implementation costs alone. In sensitivity analyses, costs per QALY ranged from $29,402 to $72,407. The per-patient cost to achieve a 10% increase in the proportion of intervention patients meeting American Diabetes Association exercise guidelines was estimated to be $558 when all costs were considered and $277 when only ongoing costs were considered. CONCLUSIONS The ATSM intervention for diverse patients with diabetes had a cost utility for functional outcomes similar to that of many other accepted interventions targeted at diabetes prevention and treatment, and achieved public health physical activity objectives at modest costs. Because a considerable proportion of costs were fixed, cost

  4. Children and Young People Requiring Home Assisted Ventilation in the South of England: Incidence, Receipt of Care Support and Components of the Care Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    While, Alison E.; Cockett, Andrea M.; Lewis, Samantha

    2004-01-01

    The study found an increasing number of ventilator dependent children and young people living at home. Almost three quarters of the sample had a physical disability as a result of or in addition to their primary diagnosis. There was wide variation in the amount of paid care supporting these families which appeared unrelated to the level of…

  5. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  6. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  7. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  8. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability. (1) The purpose of this section is to implement, with respect to health care services provided...

  9. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  10. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  11. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  12. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  13. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  14. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... supplemental health care for active duty members—(1) Hospitals covered by DRG-based payment system. For a... the supplemental care program. As a participating provider, each hospital must accept the DRG-based... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active...

  15. Sex Differences in Muscle Pain: Self-care Behaviors and Effects on Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Knoll, Victoria; Robinson, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Women have a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia and myofascial pain than men, but sex differences in muscle pain are inconsistently detected. We examined sex differences in ratings and effects of recalled and experimentally-induced muscle pain. In Study 1 (N = 188), participants completed a questionnaire about recalled muscle pain. In Study 2 (N = 55), participants’ described muscle pain from an exercise stimulus across three days by telephone. Muscle pain ratings, self-care behaviors for muscle pain, and effects of muscle pain on activities were measured. No significant sex differences were found except that women tended to view exercise as more effective for decreasing muscle pain than men (F1, 187 = 5.43, p = .02, η2 = .03), fewer women performed exercise for induced muscle pain than men, and women’s activity interference was significantly higher than men’s at the third day post-exercise (F2, 42 = 6.54, p= .01, η2 = .14). These findings support the absence of meaningful sex differences in muscle pain ratings. However, additional investigations are needed that consider the daily activities completed by people and the prevalence and incidence of performing a wide range of self-care behaviors for pain. Perspective: These studies support that sex differences are not present in recalled and experimentally-induced muscle pain ratings. Therefore, we must be cautious about generalizing the musculoskeletal pain literature to muscle pain. Additional research is needed to interpret potential sex differences in self-care behaviors for muscle pain and activity interference from muscle pain. PMID:18088556

  16. Implementation of 'matrix support' (collaborative care) to reduce asthma and COPD referrals and improve primary care management in Brazil: a pilot observational study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Sonia Maria; Salibe-Filho, William; Tonioli, Luís Paulo; Pfingesten, Luís Eduardo; Braz, Patrícia Dias; McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; do Carmo, Débora; de Sousa, Jaime Correia; Pinnock, Hilary; Stelmach, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are leading causes of hospitalisation and death in the city of Sao Bernardo do Campo. The municipality had difficulties in sustaining a pulmonology specialist team. Local policy has strengthened the knowledge of the primary care teams to improve the management of these diseases. Our aim is to pilot the implementation of an educational intervention based on collaborative care focused on reducing respiratory-related referrals. We implemented 'matrix support': a Brazilian collaborative educational intervention promoting specialist training and support for primary care physicians in three health territories with the highest number of referrals. Clinicians and nurses from primary care attended an 8-h workshop. The backlog of respiratory referrals was prioritised, where Asthma and COPD represented 70% of referral reasons. Initially, pulmonologists held joint consultations with physicians and nurses; as confidence grew, these were replaced by round-table note-based case discussions. The primary outcome was the number of asthma and COPD referrals. Almost all primary healthcare professionals in the three areas (132 of 157-87%) were trained; 360 patients were discussed, including 220 joint consultations. The number of respiratory referrals dropped from 290 (the year before matrix support) to 134 (the year after) (P<0.05). Referrals for asthma/COPD decreased from 13.4 to 5.4 cases per month (P=0.09) and for other lung diseases from 10.8 to 5.3 cases per month (P<0.05). Knowledge scores showed a significant improvement (P<0.001). Matrix-support collaborative care was well-accepted by primary care professionals associated with improved knowledge and reduced respiratory referrals. The initiative attracted specialists to the region overcoming historical recruitment problems. PMID:27536853

  17. Fathers sharing about early parental support in health-care - virtual discussions on an Internet forum.

    PubMed

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Eriksson, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Becoming a father is a life changing event and this transition is associated with various emotions. Educational activities aimed at new parents are important in healthcare parental support (HCPS). HCPS has been critiqued for its predominant focus on mothers, while the needs of fathers seem to have been downplayed. As a result, fathers often turn to Internet-based forums for support. As virtual discussions and mutual support among fathers take place in cyberspace, it is important to monitor these forums to observe the ways in which the fathers discuss HCPS. The aim of this study is to explore the ways in which new fathers visiting an Internet-based forum for fathers communicated their experiences of HCPS. A netnographic method consisting of six steps was used to gather and analyse the data. The findings show that fathers shared with one another their experiences of the attitudes expressed by HCPS workers as well as their own attitudes towards HCPS. The attitudes of HCPS workers that were directed towards the fathers were perceived as highly personal and individual, while fathers described their attitudes towards the HCPS in general terms, towards HCPS as a system. Overall, the fathers described HCPS as a valuable confirmatory support that eased their worries concerning sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), colic, weight gain, fever and teething. Although the fathers expressed gratitude towards HCPS, they also shared their negative experiences, such as feeling invisible, disregarded and insulted. In fact, the twofold attitudes that exist in the relationship between the fathers and HCPS can act as a barrier rather than being a confirmatory support. We recommend that HCPS adopts a broader approach using more targeted and strategic didactic methods for supporting fathers in the growth of their own personal awareness, as such an approach would offer a competitive and professional alternative to the support offered in informal experience-based Internet forums. PMID

  18. Bidirectional Linkages between Psychological Symptoms and Sexual Activities among African- American Adolescent Girls in Psychiatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Lisa R.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The current study examines longitudinal associations between light and heavy sexual experiences and psychiatric symptoms in African-American girls receiving mental health care. Research supports bidirectional associations between adolescent romantic and sexual behaviors and depression and other mental health problems, but this finding has not been examined among African-American youth or in clinical samples. African-American girls in psychiatric treatment suffer disparities in HIV/AIDS vulnerability, and understanding the context of girls’ risk-taking (and how psychological symptoms contribute) may aid prevention efforts. Method 265 African-American girls seeking psychiatric care were assessed for mental health symptoms and light and heavy sexual behaviors. Participants completed a six-month follow-up. Results Baseline light sexual activity predicted increased internalizing and externalizing symptoms and substance use at follow-up. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicted increased heavy sexual behaviors over time, including HIV-risk behaviors. Conclusions Results support the association between romantic involvement and depression. Psychological symptoms may play a key role in the emergence of risky sexual behaviors among African-American girls in psychiatric care, and should be considered in prevention program development. PMID:22742458

  19. Nutrition support for wound healing in the intensive care unit patient.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The integumentary system is not considered immediately vital to the survival of the acutely and critically ill patient. The skin, however, is a vibrant organ that functions as a physical and immunological barrier between the external world and the sterile underlying tissues. Preclinical and observational studies depict the deleterious effect of insufficient energy, protein, and micronutrients on wound healing and on pressure ulcer (PU) burden, and demonstrate that serious PUs raise patients' daily energy expenditure. In addition, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the impact of a nutritional intervention on the incidence and healing of PUs. RCTs have been heterogeneous vis- à- vis patient population and healthcare setting, methodological quality, type (e.g. single vs. multiple nutrients) and duration of nutritional support, method of PU assessment, etc. Most studies evaluate oral supplementation in hospitalized patients and institutionalized elderly. The paucity of RCTs focusing on intensive care unit (ICU) nutrition in the support of wound healing and the prevention of pathologic healing precludes formulation of evidence-based guidelines for clinicians. Nevertheless, supplying ICU patients with at- least the required quantities of calories, protein and micronutrients (in accordance with ICU nutrition guidelines) can be endorsed with sufficient certainty, in order to prevent and treat PUs. Initial evidence suggests that immunonutrition that includes long-chain omega- 3 fatty acids may prove to be cost-effective in preventing PUs in high- risk patients, and in treating existent ulcers.

  20. Behavioral Informatics and Computational Modeling in Support of Proactive Health Management and Care.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B; Korhonen, Ilkka; Gordon, Christine M; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-12-01

    Health-related behaviors are among the most significant determinants of health and quality of life. Improving health behavior is an effective way to enhance health outcomes and mitigate the escalating challenges arising from an increasingly aging population and the proliferation of chronic diseases. Although it has been difficult to obtain lasting improvements in health behaviors on a wide scale, advances at the intersection of technology and behavioral science may provide the tools to address this challenge. In this paper, we describe a vision and an approach to improve health behavior interventions using the tools of behavioral informatics, an emerging transdisciplinary research domain based on system-theoretic principles in combination with behavioral science and information technology. The field of behavioral informatics has the potential to optimize interventions through monitoring, assessing, and modeling behavior in support of providing tailored and timely interventions. We describe the components of a closed-loop system for health interventions. These components range from fine grain sensor characterizations to individual-based models of behavior change. We provide an example of a research health coaching platform that incorporates a closed-loop intervention based on these multiscale models. Using this early prototype, we illustrate how the optimized and personalized methodology and technology can support self-management and remote care. We note that despite the existing examples of research projects and our platform, significant future research is required to convert this vision to full-scale implementations.