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Sample records for active switching elements

  1. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  2. Mechanistic insights into an engineered riboswitch: a switching element which confers riboswitch activity.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Julia E; Schmidtke, Sina R; Will, Tristan J; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Hammann, Christian; Wöhnert, Jens; Suess, Beatrix

    2011-04-01

    While many different RNA aptamers have been identified that bind to a plethora of small molecules only very few are capable of acting as engineered riboswitches. Even for aptamers binding the same ligand large differences in their regulatory potential were observed. We address here the molecular basis for these differences by using a set of unrelated neomycin-binding aptamers. UV melting analyses showed that regulating aptamers are thermally stabilized to a significantly higher degree upon ligand binding than inactive ones. Regulating aptamers show high ligand-binding affinity in the low nanomolar range which is necessary but not sufficient for regulation. NMR data showed that a destabilized, open ground state accompanied by extensive structural changes upon ligand binding is important for regulation. In contrast, inactive aptamers are already pre-formed in the absence of the ligand. By a combination of genetic, biochemical and structural analyses, we identified a switching element responsible for destabilizing the ligand free state without compromising the bound form. Our results explain for the first time the molecular mechanism of an engineered riboswitch. PMID:21149263

  3. ATRX tolerates activity-dependent histone H3 methyl/phos switching to maintain repetitive element silencing in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Zhao, Dan; Xiang, Bin; Wenderski, Wendy; Lewis, Peter W.; Shen, Li; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David

    2015-01-01

    ATRX (the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein) is a member of the switch2/sucrose nonfermentable2 (SWI2/SNF2) family of chromatin-remodeling proteins and primarily functions at heterochromatic loci via its recognition of “repressive” histone modifications [e.g., histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3)]. Despite significant roles for ATRX during normal neural development, as well as its relationship to human disease, ATRX function in the central nervous system is not well understood. Here, we describe ATRX’s ability to recognize an activity-dependent combinatorial histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation/serine 10 phosphorylation (H3K9me3S10ph), in postmitotic neurons. In neurons, this “methyl/phos” switch occurs exclusively after periods of stimulation and is highly enriched at heterochromatic repeats associated with centromeres. Using a multifaceted approach, we reveal that H3K9me3S10ph-bound Atrx represses noncoding transcription of centromeric minor satellite sequences during instances of heightened activity. Our results indicate an essential interaction between ATRX and a previously uncharacterized histone modification in the central nervous system and suggest a potential role for abnormal repetitive element transcription in pathological states manifested by ATRX dysfunction. PMID:25538301

  4. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  5. Granular acoustic switches and logic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Anzel, Paul; Yang, Jinkyu; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-10-01

    Electrical flow control devices are fundamental components in electrical appliances and computers; similarly, optical switches are essential in a number of communication, computation and quantum information-processing applications. An acoustic counterpart would use an acoustic (mechanical) signal to control the mechanical energy flow through a solid material. Although earlier research has demonstrated acoustic diodes or circulators, no acoustic switches with wide operational frequency ranges and controllability have been realized. Here we propose and demonstrate an acoustic switch based on a driven chain of spherical particles with a nonlinear contact force. We experimentally and numerically verify that this switching mechanism stems from a combination of nonlinearity and bandgap effects. We also realize the OR and AND acoustic logic elements by exploiting the nonlinear dynamical effects of the granular chain. We anticipate these results to enable the creation of novel acoustic devices for the control of mechanical energy flow in high-performance ultrasonic devices.

  6. S-S Synapsis during Class Switch Recombination Is Promoted by Distantly Located Transcriptional Elements and Activation-Induced Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Wuerffel, Robert; Wang, Lili; Grigera, Fernando; Manis, John; Selsing, Erik; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W.; Cogne, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular mechanisms underlying synapsis of activation-induced deaminase (AID)-targeted S regions during class switch recombination (CSR) are poorly understood. By using chromosome conformation capture techniques, we found that in B cells, the Eμ and 3′Eα enhancers were in close spatial proximity, forming a unique chromosomal loop configuration. B cell activation led to recruitment of the germline transcript (GLT) promoters to the Eμ:3′Eα complex in a cytokine-dependent fashion. This structure facilitated S-S synapsis because Sμ was proximal to Eμ and a downstream S region was corecruited with the targeted GLT promoter to Eμ:3′Eα. We propose that GLT promoter association with the Eμ:3′Eα complex creates an architectural scaffolding that promotes S-S synapsis during CSR and that these interactions are stabilized by AID. Thus, the S-S synaptosome is formed as a result of the self-organizing transcription system that regulates GLT expression and may serve to guard against spurious chromosomal translocations. PMID:17980632

  7. Sub-terahertz microsecond optically controlled switch with GaAs active element beyond the photoelectric threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulygin, M.; Denisov, G.; Vlasova, K.; Andreev, N.; Shubin, S.; Salahetdinov, S.

    2016-01-01

    We study an unusual working regime of a recently developed sub-terahertz microwave cavity-based switch. The resonator cavity includes a semiconductor plate which is illuminated by laser emission beyond the photoelectric threshold. Despite a significant change to the conventional process of photoelectric effect we have found that the switch works. Typical switching performance rate is about 1 μs for the regime. A process of carrier density relaxation beyond the photoelectric threshold is discussed. An idea of diagnostic method for the semiconductor's quality is proposed.

  8. Sub-terahertz microsecond optically controlled switch with GaAs active element beyond the photoelectric threshold.

    PubMed

    Kulygin, M; Denisov, G; Vlasova, K; Andreev, N; Shubin, S; Salahetdinov, S

    2016-01-01

    We study an unusual working regime of a recently developed sub-terahertz microwave cavity-based switch. The resonator cavity includes a semiconductor plate which is illuminated by laser emission beyond the photoelectric threshold. Despite a significant change to the conventional process of photoelectric effect we have found that the switch works. Typical switching performance rate is about 1 μs for the regime. A process of carrier density relaxation beyond the photoelectric threshold is discussed. An idea of diagnostic method for the semiconductor's quality is proposed. PMID:26827338

  9. A strand-specific switch in noncoding transcription switches the function of a Polycomb/Trithorax response element

    PubMed Central

    Trupke, Johanna; Okulski, Helena; Altmutter, Christina; Ruge, Frank; Boidol, Bernd; Kubicek, Stefan; Schmauss, Gerald; Aumayr, Karin; Ruf, Marius; Pospisilik, Andrew; Dimond, Andrew; Senergin, Hasene Basak; Vargas, Marcus L.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Ringrose, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PRE/TREs) can switch their function reversibly between silencing and activation, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that a switch in forward and reverse noncoding transcription from the Drosophila vestigial (vg) PRE/TRE switches the status of the element between silencing (induced by the forward strand) and activation (induced by the reverse strand). In vitro, both ncRNAs inhibit PRC2 histone methyltransferase activity, but in vivo only the reverse strand binds PRC2. Over-expression of the reverse strand evicts PRC2 from chromatin and inhibits its enzymatic activity. We propose that interactions of RNAs with PRC2 are differentially regulated in vivo, allowing regulated inhibition of local PRC2 activity. Genome-wide analysis shows that strand switching of ncRNAs occurs at several hundred PcG binding sites in fly and vertebrate genomes. This work identifies a novel and potentially widespread class of PRE/TREs that switch function by switching the direction of ncRNA transcription. PMID:25108384

  10. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Petr, R.A.; Kachen, G.I.; Reilly, J.P.; Schaefer, R.B. ); Heyse, M.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Light-activated solid-state opening switches are shown to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings needed to develop compact inductive power systems.

  11. Light activated solid-state opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr, R. A.; Kachen, G. I.; Reilly, J. P.; Schaefer, R. B.; Heyse, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The paper shows light-activated solid-state opening switches to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings required to develop compact inductive power systems.

  12. Monolithic active-passive 16 × 16 optoelectronic switch.

    PubMed

    Stabile, R; Albores-Mejia, A; Williams, K A

    2012-11-15

    We present what is to our knowledge the first active-passive monolithically integrated 16×16 switch. The active InP/InGaAsP elements provide semiconductor optical amplifier gates in a multistage rearrangeably nonblocking switch design. Thirty-two representative connections, including the shortest, longest, and comprehensive range of intermediate paths have been assessed across the switch circuit. The 10 Gb/s signal routing is demonstrated with an optical signal-to-noise ratio up to 28.3 dB/0.1 nm and a signal extinction ratio exceeding 50 dB. PMID:23164873

  13. Creation of Principally New Generation of Switching Technique Elements (Reed Switches) with Nanostructured Contact Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabanov, S. M.; Zeltser, I. A.; Maizels, R. M.; Moos, E. N.; Arushanov, K. A.

    2011-04-01

    The cycle of activities of the creation of principally new generation of reed switches with nanostructured contact surfaces was implemented. Experimental justification of the opportunity of reed switches creation with modified contact surface was given (instead of precious metals-based galvanic coating). Principally new technological process of modification of magnetically operated contacts contacting surfaces was developed, based on the usage of the ion-plasma methods of nanolayers and nanostructures forming having specified contact features.

  14. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  15. Design of a 2*2 fault-tolerant switching element

    SciTech Connect

    Woei Lin; Chuan-lin Wu

    1982-01-01

    The architecture of a 2*2 fault-tolerant switching element which can be used to modularly construct interconnection networks for multiprocessing and local computer networking is described. The switching element uses distributed control and circuit switching. Its good gate-to-pin ratio can facilitate VLSI implementation. 18 references.

  16. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a "naturally" energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  17. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-09-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a ``naturally'' energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted.

  18. Active plasmonics in WDM traffic switching applications

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitrios; Vyrsokinos, Konstantinos; Weeber, Jean-Claude; Hassan, Karim; Markey, Laurent; Dereux, Alain; Kumar, Ashwani; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Baus, Matthias; Tekin, Tolga; Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios; Avramopoulos, Hercules; Pleros, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    With metal stripes being intrinsic components of plasmonic waveguides, plasmonics provides a “naturally” energy-efficient platform for merging broadband optical links with intelligent electronic processing, instigating a great promise for low-power and small-footprint active functional circuitry. The first active Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton (DLSPP) thermo-optic (TO) switches with successful performance in single-channel 10 Gb/s data traffic environments have led the inroad towards bringing low-power active plasmonics in practical traffic applications. In this article, we introduce active plasmonics into Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) switching applications, using the smallest TO DLSPP-based Mach-Zehnder interferometric switch reported so far and showing its successful performance in 4×10 Gb/s low-power and fast switching operation. The demonstration of the WDM-enabling characteristics of active plasmonic circuits with an ultra-low power × response time product represents a crucial milestone in the development of active plasmonics towards real telecom and datacom applications, where low-energy and fast TO operation with small-size circuitry is targeted. PMID:22973502

  19. Holographic perfect shuffle permutation element for a miniaturized switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobolla, H.; Schmidt, J.; Gluch, E.; Schwider, J.

    1995-06-01

    A holographic perfect shuffle element with 80 channels for a miniaturized switching network is reported. An array of vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers is used as a transmitter. The whole permutation is carried out totally in glass. The 80 channels are permuted within a rectangle with a volume of 3 mm \\times 4 mm \\times 2 mm. Four planes of stacked volume holograms recorded in dichromated gelatin form this perfect shuffle element with an angular spectrum between 7 deg and 35 deg. Changes in the wavelength of the diode lasers to Delta lambda = +/-10 nm can be compensated with this setup. The overall efficiency per channel lies between 40% and 60%. When Fresnel reflections and absorption are taken into account, a transmission per hologram between 78% and 90% is achieved.

  20. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  1. Visible-Light-Activated Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Bléger, David; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    The ability to influence key properties of molecular systems by using light holds much promise for the fields of materials science and life sciences. The cornerstone of such systems is molecules that are able to reversibly photoisomerize between two states, commonly referred to as photoswitches. One serious restriction to the development of functional photodynamic systems is the necessity to trigger switching in at least one direction by UV light, which is often damaging and penetrates only partially through most media. This review provides a summary of the different conceptual strategies for addressing molecular switches in the visible and near-infrared regions of the optical spectrum. Such visible-light-activated molecular switches tremendously extend the scope of photoswitchable systems for future applications and technologies. PMID:26096635

  2. Brain Activation of Identity Switching in Multiple Identity Tracking Task

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Chuang; Hu, Siyuan; Wei, Liuqing; Zhang, Xuemin; Talhelm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    When different objects switch identities in the multiple identity tracking (MIT) task, viewers need to rebind objects’ identity and location, which requires attention. This rebinding helps people identify the regions targets are in (where they need to focus their attention) and inhibit unimportant regions (where distractors are). This study investigated the processing of attentional tracking after identity switching in an adapted MIT task. This experiment used three identity-switching conditions: a target-switching condition (where the target objects switched identities), a distractor-switching condition (where the distractor objects switched identities), and a no-switching condition. Compared to the distractor-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the frontal eye fields (FEF), intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and visual cortex. Compared to the no-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the FEF, inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis) (IFG-Orb), IPS, visual cortex, middle temporal lobule, and anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, the distractor-switching condition showed greater activation in the IFG-Orb compared to the no-switching condition. These results suggest that, in the target-switching condition, the FEF and IPS (the dorsal attention network) might be involved in goal-driven attention to targets during attentional tracking. In addition, in the distractor-switching condition, the activation of the IFG-Orb may indicate salient change that pulls attention away automatically. PMID:26699865

  3. Size-dependent switching of multilayer magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. A.; Castaño, F. J.; Rodriguez, E.; Haratani, S.; Vögeli, B.; Smith, Henry I.

    2005-03-01

    Pseudo-spin-valve NiFe /Cu/NiFe, Co /Cu/Co, NiFe /Cu/Co films and magnetic tunnel junction films have been patterned into arrays of rectangular elements with widths of 40-140nm and aspect ratios of 1.5-18. The switching field of the hard and soft layers and the interaction field between the layers have been measured as a function of aspect ratio. In the pseudo-spin-valve structures the behavior is dominated by magnetostatic interactions between the layers, leading to antiparallel alignment of the hard and soft layers at remanence for small aspect ratios. Patterned tunnel junction films show weaker magnetostatic effects, and the exchange bias from the antiferromagnetic layer is preserved on patterning.

  4. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  5. Light-activated solid-state opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Petr, Rodney A.; Kachen, George I.; Reilly, James P.; Schaefer, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    Light-activated solid-state opening switches are shown to be a viable approach for switching inductive circuits. Measured photoswitch performance indicates that light-activated opening switches have the power density ratings needed to develop compact inductive power systems.

  6. MEMS electrostatic vibration energy harvester without switches and inductive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorzhiev, V.; Karami, A.; Basset, P.; Dragunov, V.; Galayko, D.

    2014-11-01

    The paper is devoted to a novel study of monophase MEMS electrostatic Vibration Energy Harvester (e-VEH) with conditioning circuit based on Bennet's doubler. Unlike the majority of conditioning circuits that charge a power supply, the circuit based on Bennet's doubler is characterized by the absence of switches requiring additional control electronics, and is free from hardly compatible with batch fabrication process inductive elements. Our experiment with a 0.042 cm3 batch fabricated MEMS e-VEH shows that a pre-charged capacitor as a power supply causes a voltage increase, followed by a saturation which was not reported before. This saturation is due to the nonlinear dynamics of the system and the electromechanical damping that is typical for MEMS. It has been found that because of that coupled behavior there exists an optimal power supply voltage at which output power is maximum. At 187 Hz / 4 g external vibrations the system is shown to charge a 12 V supply with a output power of 1.8 μW.

  7. Theoretical study of thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance: Switching paths and barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, H.; Kudo, K.; Nagasawa, T.; Kanao, T.; Mizushima, K.; Sato, R.; Okamoto, S.; Kikuchi, N.; Kitakami, O.

    2015-03-01

    Energy barrier height for magnetization switching is theoretically studied for a system with uniaxial anisotropy in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field. A formulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a rotating frame introduces an effective energy that includes the effects of both the microwave field and static field. This allows the effective-energy profiles to rigorously describe the switching paths and corresponding barrier height, which govern thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance. We show that fixed points and limit cycles in the rotating frame lead to various switching paths and that under certain conditions, switching becomes a two-step process with an intermediate state.

  8. Selenium bond decreases ON resistance of light-activated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Vitrified amorphous selenium bond decreases the ON resistance of a gallium arsenide-silicon light-activated, low-level switch. The switch is used under a pulse condition to prolong switch life and minimize errors due to heating, devitrification, and overdrawing.

  9. Plasma RF Switching Elements for Cell Phone Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linardakis, Peter; Borg, Gerard G.; Harris, Jeffrey H.

    2002-10-01

    The functionality of modern multi-band, multi-system cell phones is provided by a large number of RF switches. Future phones will require an even greater number of these switches to implement hardware such as agile antennas. The ever increasing need for higher performance and lower power consumption have brought the RF PIN diode to the edge of its capabilities in these applications. RF micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switches can easily provide the required low insertion loss, low inter-modulation and low power consumption combination, but their reliability limits are not yet satisfactory to industry. In conjunction with Motorola Personal Communications Sector (PCS), PRL is undertaking a project to examine the possibility of using plasma in a completely novel type of RF switch. A basic concept of variable ``plasma capacitors'' constructed from DC commercial fluorescent tubes has been analyzed up to 1.3 GHz. The four different configurations tested show some consistent behavior and a definite impedance change between the on and off states. A simple model reliant on RF sheath theory also shows some agreement.

  10. Parallel access alignment network with barrel switch implementation for d-ordered vector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An alignment network between N parallel data input ports and N parallel data outputs includes a first and a second barrel switch. The first barrel switch fed by the N parallel input ports shifts the N outputs thereof and in turn feeds the N-1 input data paths of the second barrel switch according to the relationship X=k.sup.y modulo N wherein x represents the output data path ordering of the first barrel switch, y represents the input data path ordering of the second barrel switch, and k equals a primitive root of the number N. The zero (0) ordered output data path of the first barrel switch is fed directly to the zero ordered output port. The N-1 output data paths of the second barrel switch are connected to the N output ports in the reverse ordering of the connections between the output data paths of the first barrel switch and the input data paths of the second barrel switch. The second switch is controlled by a value m, which in the preferred embodiment is produced at the output of a ROM addressed by the value d wherein d represents the incremental spacing or distance between data elements to be accessed from the N input ports, and m is generated therefrom according to the relationship d=k.sup.m modulo N.

  11. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Altindal, Tuba; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward Δf and backward Δb intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, P(Δf) and P(Δb), of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor reversal dynamics as a first-passage problem, which results from conformation fluctuations of the motor switch, we calculated P(Δf) and P(Δb) and found good agreement with the measurements. PMID:26554590

  12. Electron-beam patterned sub-micron magnetic elements and switching mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mun Hyoun

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the magnetization configuration and switching behavior of sub-micron patterned elements for magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications. The investigated shapes include rings and "Pac-man" (PM) shaped elements. The PM element is a newly designed shape proposed in this dissertation. In Chapter 1, currently emerging non-volatile memories are reviewed, which include flash memory, ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), ovonic unified memory (OUM), and MRAM. In particular, MRAM memory is emphasized, and the goals of this dissertation related with MRAM are introduced. In order to fabricate patterned magnetic elements, DC and RF sputtering deposition, electron-beam lithography with lift-off or ion milling processes were used. Magnetization configuration and switching behavior of patterned magnetic elements were characterized by a magnetic force microscope, vibration sample magnetometer, BH loop tracer, and magneto-optic Kerr effect system. Micromagnetic simulation was also performed to study the switching mechanism and energy contribution on their reversal process. Detailed fabrication steps and measurement tools are presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, magnetization modes are classified and reviewed depending on element shape applied to MRAM. In this chapter, current challenges of linear and circular magnetic elements are discussed. In Chapter 4, the geometry dependence of magnetization configuration, switching field distribution, selectivity, and magnetic switching behavior of PM elements are reported. The geometry includes the slot angle, thickness, elements size, shape anisotropy, and slot line. Finally, the most appropriate element showing a well-defined single domain at remanent state, for a low switching field distribution, for high selectivity, and for coherent magnetic switching are explored for its MRAM application. In Chapter 5, the magnetic properties and head-to-head (HTH) domain wall of patterned

  13. A Ubl/ubiquitin switch in the activation of Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Véronique; Lilov, Asparouh; Seirafi, Marjan; Vranas, Marta; Rasool, Shafqat; Kozlov, Guennadi; Sprules, Tara; Wang, Jimin; Trempe, Jean-François; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Parkin and PINK1 cause an inherited early-onset form of Parkinson's disease. The two proteins function together in a mitochondrial quality control pathway whereby PINK1 accumulates on damaged mitochondria and activates Parkin to induce mitophagy. How PINK1 kinase activity releases the auto-inhibited ubiquitin ligase activity of Parkin remains unclear. Here, we identify a binding switch between phospho-ubiquitin (pUb) and the ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl) of Parkin as a key element. By mutagenesis and SAXS, we show that pUb binds to RING1 of Parkin at a site formed by His302 and Arg305. pUb binding promotes disengagement of the Ubl from RING1 and subsequent Parkin phosphorylation. A crystal structure of Parkin Δ86–130 at 2.54 Å resolution allowed the design of mutations that specifically release the Ubl domain from RING1. These mutations mimic pUb binding and promote Parkin phosphorylation. Measurements of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH7 binding to Parkin and Parkin E3 ligase activity suggest that Parkin phosphorylation regulates E3 ligase activity downstream of pUb binding. PMID:26254305

  14. A Ubl/ubiquitin switch in the activation of Parkin.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Véronique; Lilov, Asparouh; Seirafi, Marjan; Vranas, Marta; Rasool, Shafqat; Kozlov, Guennadi; Sprules, Tara; Wang, Jimin; Trempe, Jean-François; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-10-14

    Mutations in Parkin and PINK1 cause an inherited early-onset form of Parkinson's disease. The two proteins function together in a mitochondrial quality control pathway whereby PINK1 accumulates on damaged mitochondria and activates Parkin to induce mitophagy. How PINK1 kinase activity releases the auto-inhibited ubiquitin ligase activity of Parkin remains unclear. Here, we identify a binding switch between phospho-ubiquitin (pUb) and the ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl) of Parkin as a key element. By mutagenesis and SAXS, we show that pUb binds to RING1 of Parkin at a site formed by His302 and Arg305. pUb binding promotes disengagement of the Ubl from RING1 and subsequent Parkin phosphorylation. A crystal structure of Parkin Δ86-130 at 2.54 Å resolution allowed the design of mutations that specifically release the Ubl domain from RING1. These mutations mimic pUb binding and promote Parkin phosphorylation. Measurements of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH7 binding to Parkin and Parkin E3 ligase activity suggest that Parkin phosphorylation regulates E3 ligase activity downstream of pUb binding. PMID:26254305

  15. Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    Switching on clean energy technologies means strengthening the economy while protecting the environment. This activity book for all ages promotes energy awareness, with facts on different types of energy and a variety of puzzles in an energy theme.

  16. Study on 12kV outdoor vacuum switch with replaceable HRC element drop out fuse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiimei

    1996-12-31

    A new type of vacuum interrupter for 12kV outdoor vacuum switch was experimentally studied, the envelope of which was made of porcelain with petticoat flange for outdoor insulation. In order to produce an axial magnetic field and improve the capacity of transfer current in the vacuum interrupter, an iron plate of horse-shoe construction ingeniously designed was chosen as an electrode. The drop-out fuse with replaceable sand-filled HRC element in series with the vacuum switch is a new conception of design to increase breaking capacity. However, it is a vacuum switch of newly designed to form {open_quotes}a vacuum switch and drop-out type fuse combination{close_quotes}.

  17. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  18. Effect of platform switching on the peri-implant bone: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Amparo; Peiró, Germán; Ródenas, Juan-José; López-Mollá, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a relation between the presence and location of the micro-gap and the loss of peri implant bone. Several authors have shown that the treatments based on the use of platform switching result in less peri-implant bone loss and an increased tissue stability. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the platform switching on the distribution of stresses on the peri-implant bone using the finite element method. Material and Methods A realistic 3D full-mandible finite element model representing cortical bone and trabecular bone was used to study the distribution of the stress on the bone induced by an implant of diameter 4.1 mm. Two abutments were modelled. The first one, of diameter 4.1 mm, was used in the reference model to represent a conventional implant. The second one, of diameter 3.2 mm, was used to represent the implant with platform switching. Both models were subjected to axial and oblique masticatory loads. Results The analyses showed that, although no relevant differences can be found for the trabecular bone, the use of platform switching reduces the maximum stress level in the cortical bone by almost 36% with axial loads and by 40% with oblique loads. Conclusions The full 3D Finite Element model, that can be used to investigate the influence of other parameters (implant diameter, connexion type, …) on the biomechanical behaviour of the implant, showed that this stress reduction can be a biomechanical reasons to explain why the platform switching seems to reduce or eliminate crestal bone resorption after the prosthetic restoration. Key words:Dental implant, platform switching, finite element method. PMID:26535094

  19. Active Q switching of a fiber laser with a microsphere resonator.

    PubMed

    Kieu, Khanh; Mansuripur, Masud

    2006-12-15

    We propose and demonstrate an active Q-switched fiber laser using a high-Q microsphere resonator as the Q-switching element. The laser cavity consists of an Er-doped fiber as the gain medium, a glass microsphere reflector (coupled through a fiber taper) at one end of the cavity, and a fiber Bragg grating reflector at the other end. The reflectivity of the microsphere is modulated by changing the gap between the microsphere and the fiber taper. Active Q switching is realized by oscillating the microsphere in and out of contact with the taper. Using this novel technique, we have obtained giant pulses (maximum peak power approximately 102 W, duration approximately 160 ns) at a low pump-power threshold (approximately 3 mW). PMID:17130905

  20. Analysis of signal degradation in an integrated active crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, David K.; Sodergren, Clifford C.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most desirable features for a modern systems architecture is reconfigurability. It facilitates the sharing of various processing and memory resources among many different subsystems, thereby reducing the need for each subsystem to duplicate these resources. Reducing duplication also reduces size, weight, power consumption, and cost; all important considerations, especially in modern military systems. Sensor data requires very-wide- bandwidth, point-to-point connections, which are easily provided by fiber optics with good noise immunity, but the switching of such wide-bandwidth signals is problematic because electrical switches have both limited bandwidth and limited switching times. A wide- bandwidth, reconfigurable optical switch is required that overcomes coupling and splitting losses experienced by the optical signal passing through the switch so that sufficient signal- fidelity is maintained. In this paper, we investigate an integrated, active (i.e. amplifying) photonic crossbar switch to determine the signal degradation incurred for intensity modulation and direct detection using an NRZ data format and an ideal, matched-filter receiver. Various device configurations are analyzed in order to determine which produces the smallest degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  2. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  3. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  4. Modeling and design optimization of switched reluctance machine by boundary element analysis and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Kline, J.A. Sr.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear boundary element analysis provides a more accurate and detailing tool for the design of switched reluctance machines, than the conventional equivalent-circuit methods. Design optimization through more detailed analysis and simulation can reduce development and prototyping costs and time to market. Firstly, magnetic field modeling of an industrial switched reluctance machine by boundary element method is reported in this paper. Secondly, performance prediction and dynamic simulation of motor and control design are presented. Thirdly, magnetic forces that cause noise and vibration are studied, to include the effects of motor and control design variations on noise in the design process. Testing of the motor in NEMA 215-Frame size is carried out to verify the accuracy of modeling and simulation.

  5. A biochemical logic gate using an enzyme and its inhibitor. 1. The inhibitor as switching element.

    PubMed

    Sivan, S; Lotan, N

    1999-01-01

    Molecular-scale logic systems will allow for further miniaturization of information processing assemblies and contribute to a better understanding of brain function. Of much interest are the pertinent biological systems, some of the basic components of which are biomolecular switching elements and enzyme-based logic gates. In this series of accounts, results of investigations are presented on the implementation of an enzyme/inhibitor logic gate operating under the rules of Boolean algebra. In this report (part 1 of the series), consideration is given to the experimental conditions-particularly the irradiation mode-that affect the performance of proflavine as inhibitor of alpha-chymotrypsin. Also, assessments are made on the reversibility of the process involved and the long-term stability of the system. Moreover, using a theoretical conformational analysis of proflavine and its reduction products, detailed features were established regarding their three-dimensional structure, partial charge distribution, and hydrophobicity. Accordingly, an understanding was reached as to the factors affecting the interaction between these compounds and the enzyme. In part 2 of this series, the actual implementation of an AND logic gate will be presented. This gate involves proflavine and a chemically derivatized alpha-chymotrypsin, and its operation relies on the conclusions reached in this report regarding the optimal mode for controlling the inhibitory activity of proflavine. PMID:10585179

  6. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  7. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  8. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  9. A robust all-fiber active Q-switched 1-µm Yb3+ fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintov, Yoav; Goldring, Sharone; Pearl, Shaul; Lebiush, Eyal; Sfez, Bruno; Malka, Dror; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    An all-fiber active Q-switched Yb3+-doped fiber laser at 1 µm is presented. The laser is composed of a ring resonator with an embedded all-fiber Q-switch element, based on a null coupler with an attached piezoelectric transducer (PZT). The PZT is used as an acoustic actuator, for inducing longitudinal acoustic disturbance along the null coupler and causing light coupling between the null coupler's ports. A stable operation is achieved with an overall average output power of up to 275 mW at various pulse repetition rates (PRR), ranging from 10 to 35 kHz and typical pulse energy of 15 μJ. In addition, a self-monitoring method is implemented by an embedded microcontroller, in order to maintain stable Q-switch performance, in changing environmental conditions. An average power of 8.5 W and pulse energy of 420 μJ at a PRR of 20 kHz are demonstrated in a master oscillator power amplifier containing the Q-switched laser, followed by a power amplifier.

  10. All-optical active switching in individual semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccione, Brian; Cho, Chang-Hee; van Vugt, Lambert K.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-10-01

    The imminent limitations of electronic integrated circuits are stimulating intense activity in the area of nanophotonics for the development of on-chip optical components, and solutions incorporating direct-bandgap semiconductors are important in achieving this end. Optical processing of data at the nanometre scale is promising for circumventing these limitations, but requires the development of a toolbox of components including emitters, detectors, modulators, waveguides and switches. In comparison to components fabricated using top-down methods, semiconductor nanowires offer superior surface properties and stronger optical confinement. They are therefore ideal candidates for nanoscale optical network components, as well as model systems for understanding optical confinement. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching in individual CdS nanowire cavities with subwavelength dimensions through stimulated polariton scattering, as well as a functional NAND gate built from multiple switches. The device design exploits the strong light-matter coupling present in these nanowires, leading to footprints that are a fraction of those of comparable silicon-based dielectric contrast and photonic crystal devices.

  11. Electron-beam-activated zinc selenide and diamond switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Kennedy, Mark R.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Brinkmann, Ralf P.; Ho, Ping-Tong

    1992-05-01

    Zinc Selenide, in polycrystalline and single crystal form, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown diamond films were studied with respect to their application as materials for electron-beam activated switches. The hold-off fields of the three materials were found to exceed that of semi-insulating gallium arsenide by at least an order of magnitude. Highest hold-off fields for pulsed voltage operation were recorded for diamond at 1.8 MV/cm. The electron-beam induced conductance in the 1 mm thick single crystal zinc selenide switches reached values of 0.5 (Ωcm2)-1 with an electron-beam current density of 20 mA/cm2 at electron-energies of 150 keV. This corresponds to an electron-beam induced reduction of switch resistance from 108 Ω to 2 Ω per square centimeter. The dominant carrier loss mechanism in the single crystal zinc selenide switch was found to be direct recombination of electron-hole pairs. In this material, the current, after electron-beam turn-off, decays hyperbolically with 90% to 10% falitimes in the range of hundreds of nanoseconds. The electron-beam induced conductivity in CVD grown diamond films of 1 micrometer thickness is due to the subnanosecond carrier lifetime less than three orders lower than that of single crystal zinc selenide. Both materials, single crystal zinc selenide and diamond, showed a lock-on effect in current. For diamond it could be demonstrated, as before for gaffium arsenide, that this effect can be suppressed by proper choice of contacts.

  12. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  13. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  14. Network-element view information model for an optical burst core switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Chao; Balt, Halt; Michel, Stephane R.; Verchere, Dominique G.

    2001-10-01

    To natively support the bursty IP datagrams over all-optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) networks, the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) WDM network has been proposed as a suitable architecture for future optical Internet backbone networks. However, managing the OBS network will be complicated due to the scale of the networks and the correlation between different technology layers. This paper presents an information model for the OBS core node, from the network-element view, to describe the management information flows between the optical burst layer and the traditional WDM transport layer, and how to model them using various Managed Objects (MOs). We also provide the structure of Management Information Base (MIB) used in SNMP management interface for managing the parameters identified at different layers.

  15. IGBT convertor with active snubber for soft switching. [Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masserant, B. J.; Shriver, J.; Stuart, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    This full bridge dc-dc convertor with IGBTs uses zero voltage switching (ZVS) for one leg of the bridge and zero current switching (ZCS) for the other. It is shown that an active snubber greatly improves the performance over previous methods. Experimental results are shown for a 6 kW circuit switching at 20 kHz.

  16. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2008-01-30

    In this paper, we will present our recent results on the research of the ultra-fast high power RF switches based on silicon. We have developed a switch module at X-band which can use a silicon window as the switch. The switching is realized by generation of carriers in the bulk silicon. The carriers can be generated electrically or/and optically. The electrically controlled switches use PIN diodes to inject carrier. We have built the PIN diode switches at X-band, with <300ns switching time. The optically controlled switches use powerful lasers to excite carriers. By combining the laser excitation and electrical carrier generation, significant reduction in the required power of both the laser and the electrical driver is expected. High power test is under going.

  17. Hotspots for Vitamin-Steroid-Thyroid Hormone Response Elements Within Switch Regions of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Loci Predict a Direct Influence of Vitamins and Hormones on B Cell Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Julia L; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Partridge, Janet F; Maul, Robert W; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiencies are common throughout the world and have a significant negative influence on immune protection against viral infections. Mouse models demonstrate that the production of IgA, a first line of defense against viruses at mucosal sites, is inhibited in the context of vitamin A deficiency. In vitro, the addition of vitamin A to activated B cells can enhance IgA expression, but downregulate IgE. Previous reports have demonstrated that vitamin A modifies cytokine patterns, and in so doing may influence antibody isotype expression by an indirect mechanism. However, we have now discovered hundreds of potential response elements among Sμ, Sɛ, and Sα switch sites within immunoglobulin heavy chain loci. These hotspots appear in both mouse and human loci and include targets for vitamin receptors and related proteins (e.g., estrogen receptors) in the nuclear receptor superfamily. Full response elements with direct repeats are relatively infrequent or absent in Sγ regions although half-sites are present. Based on these results, we pose a hypothesis that nuclear receptors have a direct effect on the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination event. We propose that vitamin A may alter S site accessibility to activation-induced deaminase and nonhomologous end-joining machinery, thereby influencing the isotype switch, antibody production, and protection against viral infections at mucosal sites. PMID:26741514

  18. Dissociable effects of game elements on motivation and cognition in a task-switching training in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Dörrenbächer, Sandra; Müller, Philipp M; Tröger, Johannes; Kray, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Although motivational reinforcers are often used to enhance the attractiveness of trainings of cognitive control in children, little is known about how such motivational manipulations of the setting contribute to separate gains in motivation and cognitive-control performance. Here we provide a framework for systematically investigating the impact of a motivational video-game setting on the training motivation, the task performance, and the transfer success in a task-switching training in middle-aged children (8-11 years of age). We manipulated both the type of training (low-demanding/single-task training vs. high-demanding/task-switching training) as well as the motivational setting (low-motivational/without video-game elements vs. high-motivational/with video-game elements) separately from another. The results indicated that the addition of game elements to a training setting enhanced the intrinsic interest in task practice, independently of the cognitive demands placed by the training type. In the task-switching group, the high-motivational training setting led to an additional enhancement of task and switching performance during the training phase right from the outset. These motivation-induced benefits projected onto the switching performance in a switching situation different from the trained one (near-transfer measurement). However, in structurally dissimilar cognitive tasks (far-transfer measurement), the motivational gains only transferred to the response dynamics (speed of processing). Hence, the motivational setting clearly had a positive impact on the training motivation and on the paradigm-specific task-switching abilities; it did not, however, consistently generalize on broad cognitive processes. These findings shed new light on the conflation of motivation and cognition in childhood and may help to refine guidelines for designing adequate training interventions. PMID:25431564

  19. Dissociable effects of game elements on motivation and cognition in a task-switching training in middle childhood

    PubMed Central

    Dörrenbächer, Sandra; Müller, Philipp M.; Tröger, Johannes; Kray, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Although motivational reinforcers are often used to enhance the attractiveness of trainings of cognitive control in children, little is known about how such motivational manipulations of the setting contribute to separate gains in motivation and cognitive-control performance. Here we provide a framework for systematically investigating the impact of a motivational video-game setting on the training motivation, the task performance, and the transfer success in a task-switching training in middle-aged children (8–11 years of age). We manipulated both the type of training (low-demanding/single-task training vs. high-demanding/task-switching training) as well as the motivational setting (low-motivational/without video-game elements vs. high-motivational/with video-game elements) separately from another. The results indicated that the addition of game elements to a training setting enhanced the intrinsic interest in task practice, independently of the cognitive demands placed by the training type. In the task-switching group, the high-motivational training setting led to an additional enhancement of task and switching performance during the training phase right from the outset. These motivation-induced benefits projected onto the switching performance in a switching situation different from the trained one (near-transfer measurement). However, in structurally dissimilar cognitive tasks (far-transfer measurement), the motivational gains only transferred to the response dynamics (speed of processing). Hence, the motivational setting clearly had a positive impact on the training motivation and on the paradigm-specific task-switching abilities; it did not, however, consistently generalize on broad cognitive processes. These findings shed new light on the conflation of motivation and cognition in childhood and may help to refine guidelines for designing adequate training interventions. PMID:25431564

  20. Quitting activity and tobacco brand Switching: findings from the ITC-4 Country Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Genevieve A.; Swift, Elena; Partos, Timea; Borland, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among Australian smokers, to examine associations between cigarette brand switching, quitting activity and possible causal directions by lagging the relationships in different directions. Methods Current smokers from nine waves (2002 to early 2012) of the ITC-4 Country Survey Australian dataset were surveyed. Measures were brand switching, both brand family and product type (roll-your-own versus factory-made cigarettes) reported in adjacent waves, interest in quitting, recent quit attempts, and one month sustained abstinence. Results Switching at one interval was unrelated to concurrent quit interest. Quit interest predicted switching at the following interval, but the effect disappeared once subsequent quit attempts were controlled for. Recent quit attempts more strongly predicted switching at concurrent (OR 1.34, 95% CI=1.18–1.52, p<0.001) and subsequent intervals (OR 1.31, 95% CI= 1.12–1.53, p=0.001) than switching predicted quit attempts, with greater asymmetry when both types of switching were combined. One month sustained abstinence and switching were unrelated in the same interval; however after controlling for concurrent switching and excluding type switchers, sustained abstinence predicted lower chance of switching at the following interval (OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.47–0.93, p=0.016). Conclusions The asymmetry suggests brand switching does not affect subsequent quitting. Implications Brand switching does not appear to interfere with quitting. PMID:25827182

  1. SPICE macromodel for a 1-megawatt power MOSFET switch

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.; Ackermann, M.; Fischer, T.; Deveney, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a SPICE macromodel for a 1-megawatt high power electrical switch which uses power MOSFETs as the active switching elements. The model accurately predicts the time dependent switching current and provides a reasonable representation of the time dependent switch resistance and voltage drop across the switch. Techniques for extracting model parameters for commercial power MOSFETs are discussed along with suggestions for extending the model to spark gaps and other high power switches.

  2. Plasmonic activation of a fluorescent carbazole-oxazine switch.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Swaminathan, Subramani; Sortino, Salvatore; Raymo, Françisco M

    2014-08-11

    The covalent attachment of a carbazole fluorophore to an oxazine photochrome permits the reversible activation of fluorescence under optical control. Ultraviolet irradiation with a pulsed laser opens the oxazine ring to shift bathochromically the absorption of the carbazole component. Concomitant visible illumination excites selectively the carbazole fluorophore of the photochemical product to produce fluorescence. The photogenerated and fluorescent species reverts spontaneously on a submicrosecond timescale to the initial nonemissive state of the carbazole-oxazine dyad. The photochemical and photophysical properties engineered into this particular molecular switch allow the convenient monitoring of plasmonic effects on photochemical reactions with fluorescence measurements. In close proximity to silver nanoparticles, visible illumination with a continuous-wave laser also results in fluorescence activation. The metallic nanostructures enable the two-photon excitation of the oxazine component to induce the photochromic transformation and then facilitate the one-photon excitation of the photochemical product to generate fluorescence. Thus, these operating principles offer the opportunity to avoid altogether the need of pulsed ultraviolet irradiation to trigger the photochromic transformation and, instead, allow fluorescence activation with a single visible source operating at low illumination power. PMID:25056267

  3. The Heritable Activation of Cryptic Suppressor-Mutator Elements by an Active Element

    PubMed Central

    Fedoroff, N.

    1989-01-01

    A weakly active maize Suppressor-mutator (Spm-w) element is able to heritably activate cryptic Spm elements in the maize genome. The spontaneous activation frequency, which is 1-5 X 10(-5) in the present genetic background, increases by about 100-fold in the presence of an Spm-w and remains an order of magnitude above the background level a generation after removal of the activating Spm-w. Sectorial somatic reactivation of cryptic elements can be detected phenotypically in kernels. Selection of such kernels constitutes an efficient selection for plants with reactivated Spm elements. Analysis of the reactivation process reveals that it is gradual and proceeds through genetically metastable intermediates that exhibit different patterns of element expression during plant development. Newly reactivated elements tend to return to an inactive form. However, the probability that an element will remain in a heritably active state increases when the element is maintained in the presence of an active Spm element for several generations. PMID:2541047

  4. Implant platform switching: biomechanical approach using two-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Adelino Ricardo Barão, Valentim; de Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Gomes, Erica Alves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    In implant therapy, a peri-implant bone resorption has been noticed mainly in the first year after prosthesis insertion. This bone remodeling can sometimes jeopardize the outcome of the treatment, especially in areas in which short implants are used and also in aesthetic cases. To avoid this occurrence, the use of platform switching (PS) has been used. This study aimed to evaluate the biomechanical concept of PS with relation to stress distribution using two-dimensional finite element analysis. A regular matching diameter connection of abutment-implant (regular platform group [RPG]) and a PS connection (PS group [PSG]) were simulated by 2 two-dimensional finite element models that reproduced a 2-piece implant system with peri-implant bone tissue. A regular implant (prosthetic platform of 4.1 mm) and a wide implant (prosthetic platform of 5.0 mm) were used to represent the RPG and PSG, respectively, in which a regular prosthetic component of 4.1 mm was connected to represent the crown. A load of 100 N was applied on the models using ANSYS software. The RPG spreads the stress over a wider area in the peri-implant bone tissue (159 MPa) and the implant (1610 MPa), whereas the PSG seems to diminish the stress distribution on bone tissue (34 MPa) and implant (649 MPa). Within the limitation of the study, the PS presented better biomechanical behavior in relation to stress distribution on the implant but especially in the bone tissue (80% less). However, in the crown and retention screw, an increase in stress concentration was observed. PMID:20098182

  5. Electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxides as a switching element and methods for production and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Yao, Jun; Natelson, Douglas; Zhong, Lin; He, Tao

    2015-09-08

    In various embodiments, electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxide as a switching element are described herein. The electronic devices are two-terminal devices containing a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact in which at least one of the first electrical contact or the second electrical contact is deposed on a substrate to define a gap region therebetween. A switching layer containing a switchably conductive silicon oxide resides in the gap region between the first electrical contact and the second electrical contact. The electronic devices exhibit hysteretic current versus voltage properties, enabling their use in switching and memory applications. Methods for configuring, operating and constructing the electronic devices are also presented herein.

  6. Electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxides as a switching element and methods for production and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M; Yao, Jun; Natelson, Douglas; Zhong, Lin; He, Tao

    2013-11-26

    In various embodiments, electronic devices containing switchably conductive silicon oxide as a switching element are described herein. The electronic devices are two-terminal devices containing a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact in which at least one of the first electrical contact or the second electrical contact is deposed on a substrate to define a gap region therebetween. A switching layer containing a switchably conductive silicon oxide resides in the the gap region between the first electical contact and the second electrical contact. The electronic devices exhibit hysteretic current versus voltage properties, enabling their use in switching and memory applications. Methods for configuring, operating and constructing the electronic devices are also presented herein.

  7. Comparative efficacy of switching to natalizumab in active multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Spelman, Timothy; Kalincik, Tomas; Zhang, Annie; Pellegrini, Fabio; Wiendl, Heinz; Kappos, Ludwig; Tsvetkova, Larisa; Belachew, Shibeshih; Hyde, Robert; Verheul, Freek; Grand-Maison, Francois; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grammond, Pierre; Duquette, Pierre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Hupperts, Raymond; Petersen, Thor; Barnett, Michael; Trojano, Maria; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare treatment efficacy and persistence in patients who switched to natalizumab versus those who switched between glatiramer acetate (GA) and interferon-beta (IFNβ) after an on-treatment relapse on IFNβ or GA using propensity score matched real-world datasets. Methods Patients included were registered in MSBase or the TYSABRI Observational Program (TOP), had relapsed on IFNβ or GA within 12 months prior to switching to another therapy, and had initiated natalizumab or IFNβ/GA treatment ≤6 months after discontinuing prior therapy. Covariates were balanced across post switch treatment groups by propensity score matching at treatment initiation. Relapse, persistence, and disability measures were compared between matched treatment arms in the total population (n = 869/group) and in subgroups defined by prior treatment history (IFNβ only [n = 578/group], GA only [n = 165/group], or both IFNβ and GA [n = 176/group]). Results Compared to switching between IFNβ and GA, switching to natalizumab reduced annualized relapse rate in year one by 65–75%, the risk of first relapse by 53–82% (mean follow-up 1.7–2.2 years) and treatment discontinuation events by 48–65% (all P ≤ 0.001). In the total population, switching to natalizumab reduced the risk of confirmed disability progression by 26% (P = 0.036) and decreased the total disability burden by 1.54 EDSS-years (P < 0.0001) over the first 24 months post switch. Interpretation Using large, real-world, propensity-matched datasets we demonstrate that after a relapse on IFNβ or GA, switching to natalizumab (rather than between IFNβ and GA) led to superior outcomes for patients in all measures assessed. Results were consistent regardless of the prior treatment identity. PMID:25909083

  8. Reward sensitivity modulates brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, ACC and striatum during task switching.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies. PMID:25875640

  9. Reward Sensitivity Modulates Brain Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex, ACC and Striatum during Task Switching

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C.; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies. PMID:25875640

  10. Electronic switching circuit uses complementary non-linear components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zucker, O. S.

    1972-01-01

    Inherent switching properties of saturable inductors and storage diodes are combined to perform large variety of electronic functions, such as pulse shaping, gating, and multiplexing. Passive elements replace active switching devices in generation of complex waveforms.

  11. Thermally activated switching of perpendicular magnet by spin-orbit spin torque

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ki-Seung; Lee, Seo-Won; Min, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2014-02-17

    We theoretically investigate the threshold current for thermally activated switching of a perpendicular magnet by spin-orbit spin torque. Based on the Fokker-Planck equation, we obtain an analytic expression of the switching current, in agreement with numerical result. We find that thermal energy barrier exhibits a quasi-linear dependence on the current, resulting in an almost linear dependence of switching current on the log-scaled current pulse-width even below 10 ns. This is in stark contrast to standard spin torque switching, where thermal energy barrier has a quadratic dependence on the current and the switching current rapidly increases at short pulses. Our results will serve as a guideline to design and interpret switching experiments based on spin-orbit spin torque.

  12. Perturbation of the switch-on of transcriptase activity in intermediate subviral particles from reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Borsa, J.; Sargent, M.D.; Ewing, D.D.; Einspenner, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intermediate subviral particles (ISVP) derived from reovirus represent a simple model system for the switch-on of transcriptase function. In such particles the endogenous transcriptase is present in a switched-off form, one step removed from the switched-on state. Switch-on of transcriptase function is an active process in this system and can be triggered by K+ ions. A variety of agents which affect gene expression in cells were tested for an effect on switch-on in ISVP. Marked effects on switch-on in ISVP were observed with a diverse group of test agents, including DMSO and other solvents, BUdR, TdR, caffeine, theophylline, and temperature. The correlation in response between ISVP and cells suggests that the ISVP system may be useful as a model for studying the biochemical mechanisms underlying the perturbative effects of such agents on gene expression in cells.

  13. Non-symmetrical semi-active vibration control based on synchronized switching damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhang, Jin; Nie, Hong; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    An unsymmetrical switch circuit is designed for semi-active control method based on synchronized switching damping principle of piezoelectric actuators. A bypass capacitor and an additional switch are used to realize unsymmetrical bipolar voltage. The control logic of the switches is introduced in detail and the switched voltages, which directly influence the control performance, are derived as functions of the vibration amplitude and the outputs of the voltage sources. Simulations were carried out to verify the design circuit and the theoretical results of the switched voltage. The voltage ratio increases with increasing bypass capacitance, but its increasing rate decreases. The results show that large bypass capacitor is needed to realize a voltage ratio of 3, which is common in some piezoelectric actuator such as MFC.

  14. A new perspective on lysogeny: prophages as active regulatory switches of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Ron; Argov, Tal; Rabinovich, Lev; Sigal, Nadejda; Borovok, Ilya; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-10-01

    Unlike lytic phages, temperate phages that enter lysogeny maintain a long-term association with their bacterial host. In this context, mutually beneficial interactions can evolve that support efficient reproduction of both phages and bacteria. Temperate phages are integrated into the bacterial chromosome as large DNA insertions that can disrupt gene expression, and they may pose a fitness burden on the cell. However, they have also been shown to benefit their bacterial hosts by providing new functions in a bacterium-phage symbiotic interaction termed lysogenic conversion. In this Opinion article, we discuss another type of bacterium-phage interaction, active lysogeny, in which phages or phage-like elements are integrated into the bacterial chromosome within critical genes or operons and serve as switches that regulate bacterial genes via genome excision. PMID:26373372

  15. Optical switching in bistable active cavity containing nonlinear absorber on bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, Vladimir Y.; Taranenko, Victor B.; Vasnetsov, Mikhail V.

    1993-04-01

    The transverse nonlinear dynamics of switchings in an active system (laser with nonlinear saturable absorber on bacteriorhodopsin in a self-imaging cavity) is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The soliton-like light field structure formation and continuously cycled self-switching process are investigated.

  16. DREAM Controls the On/Off Switch of Specific Activity-Dependent Transcription Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mellström, Britt; Sahún, Ignasi; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Murtra, Patricia; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Savignac, Magali; Oliveros, Juan C.; Gonzalez, Paz; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Knafo, Shira; Zhuo, Min; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Errington, Michael L.; Maldonado, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Jefferys, John G. R.; Bliss, Tim V. P.; Dierssen, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Changes in nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis activate specific gene expression programs and are central to the acquisition and storage of information in the brain. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), also known as calsenilin/KChIP-3 (K+ channel interacting protein 3), is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To study the function of DREAM in the brain, we used transgenic mice expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Using genome-wide analysis, we show that DREAM regulates the expression of specific activity-dependent transcription factors in the hippocampus, including Npas4, Nr4a1, Mef2c, JunB, and c-Fos. Furthermore, DREAM regulates its own expression, establishing an autoinhibitory feedback loop to terminate activity-dependent transcription. Ablation of DREAM does not modify activity-dependent transcription because of gene compensation by the other KChIP family members. The expression of daDREAM in the forebrain resulted in a complex phenotype characterized by loss of recurrent inhibition and enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus and impaired learning and memory. Our results indicate that DREAM is a major master switch transcription factor that regulates the on/off status of specific activity-dependent gene expression programs that control synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:24366545

  17. Progress in system design using integrated multi-element interferometric switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayas, E.; Kanellos, G. T.; Stampoulidis, L.; Theophilopoulos, G.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2007-11-01

    In the present communication we discuss recent advances in the development of Semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based interferometric optical gates and their use through the implementation of functional high-speed optical systems. SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometers (SOA-MZI) show great potential for being used as fundamental building blocks in developing intelligent high speed all-optical sub-systems. In this context we discuss the development of optical systems that perform diverse and non-trivial network functionalities that find application in Optical Packet/Burst Switching networks (OPS/OBS). The use of generic building blocks to develop a variety of optical sub-systems is essential, as this avoids the requirement for custom-made technological solutions and allows for a common fabrication procedure for all subsystems. In this context, we discuss latest research on integration of arrays of such optical switches onto the same photonic chip using hybrid integration technology. The development of such arrays reduces the cost of photonic devices by sharing the packaging and pigtailing costs. By using an integrated quadruple array of SOA-MZI switches we demonstrate the front-end unit of an All-optical Label Switched node that performs clock recovery, data recovery and label/payload separation, and a scalable Time Slot Interchanger (TSI), proving the multi-functionality and processing power of such device. Both functional systems exhibit comparable performance compared to implementations using single switches with significantly lower device costs. The cost reduction offered by the integration of multiple switches on the same chip is also evident in high-speed WDM networks, where multi-wavelength regeneration can be achieved with the use of several integrated switch arrays.

  18. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  19. Photoconductive switch package

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  20. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  1. Passive and Variable Active Switching Control by Mechanical Energy with Dual Structural Mass Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Naoto; Nishioka, Nobuhiro

    Switching vibration control between dynamic absorber and active control has been proposed for the dual structural vibration device on the basis of the kinetic energy as the threshold. For the active control with a fixed feedback gain, the threshold of switching should be set conservative and the effect of the active control was not enough. Therefore, a variable feedback gain control is introduced, which is assumed the mechanical energy as an indicator. It is expected that the actuator moves in a stroke range as possible and the performance will be better than the conventional switching control. In this paper, the effective variable feedback and switching control on the basis of mechanical energy as the two threshold are considered by experimental results.

  2. TnphoA and TnphoA' elements for making and switching fusions for study of transcription, translation, and cell surface localization.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes-Riesenberg, M R; Wanner, B L

    1992-01-01

    We describe a set of elements based on the transposon TnphoA for making transcriptional fusions to the lacZ gene and for making translational fusions to the phoA or lacZ structural gene. Each element can be switched, one for another, by homologous recombination, thereby allowing testing for transcription, translation, or cell surface localization determinants at the same site within a gene. We describe three kinds of elements for making each fusion type. Two kinds are transposition proficient (Tnp+): one encodes kanamycin resistance, and the other encodes tetracycline resistance. The third kind is transposition defective (Tnp-) and encodes kanamycin resistance. In addition, we describe one Tnp- element that has no reporter gene and encodes chloramphenicol resistance; this element is used primarily as a tool to aid in switching fusions. Switching is efficient because each element has in common 254 bp of DNA at the phoA end and 187 bp (or more) of DNA at the IS50R end of TnphoA, and switching is straightforward because individual elements encode different drug resistances. Thus, switched recombinants can be selected as drug-resistant transductants, and they can be recognized as ones that have lost the parental drug resistance and fusion phenotype. Further, switching Tnp+ elements to Tnp- elements reduces problems due to transposition that can arise in P1 crosses or cloning experiments. Some TnphoA and TnphoA' elements cause polar mutations, while others provide an outward promoter for downstream transcription. This feature is especially useful in the determination of operon structures. Strategies for the use of TnphoA and TnphoA' elements in gene analysis are also described. PMID:1378054

  3. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  4. Reconfigurable Patch-Slot Reflectarray Elements using RF MEMS Switches: A Subreflector Wavefront Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopalan, Harish; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Imbriale, William A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate potential reflectarray elements by taking into consideration the eventual implementation of MEMS technology for this particular application and detailed characterization of one of the potential element designs.

  5. Modeling and optimization of actively Q-switched Nd-doped quasi-three-level laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Gao, Jing

    2013-09-01

    The energy transfer upconversion and the ground state absorption are considered in solving the rate equations for an active Q-switched quasi-three-level laser. The dependence of output pulse characters on the laser parameters is investigated by solving the rate equations. The influence of the energy transfer upconversion on the pulsed laser performance is illustrated and discussed. By this model, the optimal parameters could be achieved for arbitrary quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers. An acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser is constructed and the reliability of the theoretical model is demonstrated.

  6. Short-pulse actively Q-switched Er:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, David J; Harris, Lachlan; Veitch, Peter J

    2016-07-11

    We report the shortest duration pulses obtained to date from an actively Q-switched Er:YAG laser pumped by a low spectral and spatial brightness laser diode. The 14.5 ns, 6 mJ pulses were obtained using a 1470 nm laser diode end-pumped co-planar folded zigzag slab architecture. We also present an analytical model that accurately predicts the pulse energy-duration product achievable from virtually all Q-switched Er:YAG lasers and high repetition rate quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers in general. PMID:27410810

  7. Context-dependent function of regulatory elements and a switch in chromatin occupancy between GATA3 and GATA2 regulate Gata2 transcription during trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soma; Dutta, Debasree; Rumi, M A Karim; Kent, Lindsey N; Soares, Michael J; Paul, Soumen

    2009-02-20

    GATA transcription factors are important regulators of tissue-specific gene expression during development. GATA2 and GATA3 have been implicated in the regulation of trophoblast-specific genes. However, the regulatory mechanisms of GATA2 expression in trophoblast cells are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Gata2 is transcriptionally induced during trophoblast giant cell-specific differentiation. Transcriptional induction is associated with displacement of GATA3-dependent nucleoprotein complexes by GATA2-dependent nucleoprotein complexes at two regulatory regions, the -3.9- and +9.5-kb regions, of the mouse Gata2 locus. Analyses with reporter genes showed that, in trophoblast cells, -3.9- and +9.5-kb regions function as transcriptional enhancers in GATA motif independent and dependent fashions, respectively. We also found that knockdown of GATA3 by RNA interference induces GATA2 in undifferentiated trophoblast cells. Interestingly, three other known GATA motif-dependent Gata2 regulatory elements, the -1.8-, -2.8-, and -77-kb regions, which are important to regulate Gata2 in hematopoietic cells are not occupied by GATA factors in trophoblast cells. These elements do not show any enhancer activity and also possess inaccessible chromatin structure in trophoblast cells indicating a context-dependent function. Our results indicate that GATA3 directly represses Gata2 in undifferentiated trophoblast cells, and a switch in chromatin occupancy between GATA3 and GATA2 (GATA3/GATA2 switch) induces transcription during trophoblast differentiation. We predict that this GATA3/GATA2 switch is an important mechanism for the transcriptional regulation of other trophoblast-specific genes. PMID:19106099

  8. Large-scale IP router using a high-speed optical switch element [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2003-07-01

    The system design and architectural considerations for a large, high-performance IP packet router that uses a nonblocking optical switching fabric are presented. The objective of the router is to provide fully network-compatible routing of IP, multiprotocol label switching (MPLS), and Ethernet packets in a router with a very large number of high speed ports while maintaining the low-delay, low-jitter, low-packet-loss, and line-rate throughput characteristics of today's small port-count routers over a large scale. Such a large router is useful for the core of a packetized transport network capable of supporting various classes of real-time and best-effort service in a reliable and efficient manner.

  9. Comparative study of bolometric and non-bolometric switching elements for microwave phase shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of semiconductor and high critical temperature superconductor switches is compared as they are used in delay-line-type microwave and millimeter-wave phase shifters. Such factors as their ratios of the off-to-on resistances, parasitic reactances, power consumption, speed, input-to-output isolation, ease of fabrication, and physical dimensions are compared. Owing to their almost infinite off-to-on resistance ratio and excellent input-to-output isolation, bolometric superconducting switches appear to be quite suitable for use in microwave phase shifters; their only drawbacks are their speed and size. The SUPERFET, a novel device whose operation is based on the electric field effect in high critical temperature ceramic superconductors is also discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the SUPERFET is fast and that it can be scaled; therefore, it can be fabricated with dimensions comparable to semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  10. Age-related shifts in brain activity dynamics during task switching.

    PubMed

    Jimura, Koji; Braver, Todd S

    2010-06-01

    Cognitive aging studies have suggested that older adults show declines in both sustained and transient cognitive control processes. However, previous neuroimaging studies have primarily focused on age-related change in the magnitude, but not temporal dynamics, of brain activity. The present study compared brain activity dynamics in healthy old and young adults during task switching. A mixed blocked/event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging design enabled separation of transient and sustained neural activity associated with cognitive control. Relative to young adults, older adults exhibited not only decreased sustained activity in the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) during task-switching blocks but also increased transient activity on task-switch trials. Another pattern of age-related shift in dynamics was present in the lateral PFC (lPFC) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC), with younger adults showing a cue-related response during task-switch trials in lPFC and PPC, whereas older adults exhibited switch-related activation during the cue period in PPC only. In all 3 regions, these qualitatively distinct patterns of brain activity predicted qualitatively distinct patterns of behavioral performance across the 2 age groups. Together, these results suggest that older adults may shift from a proactive to reactive cognitive control strategy as a means of retaining relatively preserved behavioral performance in the face of age-related neurocognitive changes. PMID:19805420

  11. Age-Related Shifts in Brain Activity Dynamics during Task Switching

    PubMed Central

    Braver, Todd S.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive aging studies have suggested that older adults show declines in both sustained and transient cognitive control processes. However, previous neuroimaging studies have primarily focused on age-related change in the magnitude, but not temporal dynamics, of brain activity. The present study compared brain activity dynamics in healthy old and young adults during task switching. A mixed blocked/event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging design enabled separation of transient and sustained neural activity associated with cognitive control. Relative to young adults, older adults exhibited not only decreased sustained activity in the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) during task-switching blocks but also increased transient activity on task-switch trials. Another pattern of age-related shift in dynamics was present in the lateral PFC (lPFC) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC), with younger adults showing a cue-related response during task-switch trials in lPFC and PPC, whereas older adults exhibited switch-related activation during the cue period in PPC only. In all 3 regions, these qualitatively distinct patterns of brain activity predicted qualitatively distinct patterns of behavioral performance across the 2 age groups. Together, these results suggest that older adults may shift from a proactive to reactive cognitive control strategy as a means of retaining relatively preserved behavioral performance in the face of age-related neurocognitive changes. PMID:19805420

  12. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  13. An electrically tunable depth-of-field endoscope using a liquid crystal lens as an active focusing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Shan; Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2013-09-01

    An electrically tunable depth-of-field (DOF) endoscope using a liquid crystal lens (LC lens) as an active focusing element is demonstrated. The optical mechanism of the electrically-tunable DOF endoscope adopting a two-mode switching LC lens is introduced. The two-mode switching LC lens provides not only a positive lens power but also a negative lens power. Therefore, we could extend the range of DOF originally from 27 mm ~ 55 mm to 12.4 mm ~ 76.4 mm by using the two-mode switching LC lens as an active focusing element. The detail derivations of the optical mechanism of the endoscopic system adopting a LC lens are invistgated. The more detail experimental results are demonstrated. We believe this study can provide a more detail understanding of an endoscopic system adopting a tunable focusing lens.

  14. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical "molecular switch" to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  15. Preparation time modulates pro-active control and enhances task conflict in task switching.

    PubMed

    Kalanthroff, Eyal; Henik, Avishai

    2014-03-01

    Performance in the Stroop task reflects two conflicts--informational (between the incongruent word and ink color) and task (between relevant color naming and irrelevant word reading). Neuroimaging findings support the existence of task conflict in congruent trials. A behavioral indication for task conflict--Stroop reverse facilitation--was found in previous studies under low task-control conditions. Task switching also causes reduction in task control because the task set frequently changes. We hypothesized that it would be harder to efficiently manage task conflicts in switching situations and, specifically, as cue-target interval (CTI) decreases. This suggestion was examined in two experiments using a combined Stroop task-switching design. We found a large interference effect and reverse facilitation that decreased with elongation of CTI. Results imply that task switching reduces pro-active task control and thereby enhances the informational and the task conflicts. This calls for a revision of recent control models to include task conflict. PMID:23712333

  16. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming. PMID:27231914

  17. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming. PMID:27231914

  18. Final report: Photochromism as a switching mechanism for electronically active organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pollagi, T.P.; Sinclair, M.B.; Jacobs, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    Recent discoveries in the field of conjugated polymers in environmental stability, regiochemical regularity, and electrical conductivity, particularly of polythiophene and polyaniline, have intensified interest in device applications. Present or anticipated applications include development of electrical circuitry on a molecular scale, as well as conducting and semiconducting materials for a variety of applications including thin film transistors and batteries. The authors have investigated a series of compounds comprising conjugated segments coupled to photochromic elements. The photochromic reaction in these compounds reversibly alters the conjugation length and provides a mechanism for switching both the electrical and optical properties of these materials. The authors are currently investigating the nature and scope of this switching mechanism and preparing extended materials that take advantage of this novel form of switching behavior. Preparation and photochromic behavior of several of these materials are described.

  19. Anisotropic mechanism on distinct transition modes of tip-activated multipolorizaion switching in epitaxial BiFeO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. P.; Soh, A. K.; Weng, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the extended Kittel's law, an anisotropic mechanism has been developed to investigate the complex multipolarization switching in (001) and (110) epitaxial BiFeO3 films, under a biased-tip field. Switching inhomogeneity and domain wall width evolution have been specifically accounted for. It has been found that distinct switching modes, i.e., the breakdown mode of 71°-switched domain and the activation mode of 180°/109° switching, exist and dominate the switching orders within switching process. Our predicted switching orders show excellent agreements with the existing experimental data and phase-field results. A two-step procedure is also proposed to fabricate single-phase 71° ferroelastic domain array of controllable density using (001) BiFeO3 films, which is favored in practice to significantly enhance the magnetoelectric coupling and photovoltage.

  20. Non-Cell-Autonomous Mechanism of Activity-Dependent Neurotransmitter Switching

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Xu, Lin; Meng, Da; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Activity-dependent neurotransmitter switching engages genetic programs regulating transmitter synthesis but the mechanism by which activity is transduced is unknown. We suppressed activity in single neurons in the embryonic spinal cord to determine whether glutamate-GABA switching is cell-autonomous. Transmitter respecification did not occur, suggesting that it is homeostatically regulated by the level of activity in surrounding neurons. Graded increase in the number of silenced neurons in cultures led to graded decrease in the number of neurons expressing GABA, supporting non-cell-autonomous transmitter switching. We found that BDNF is expressed in the spinal cord during the period of transmitter respecification and that spike activity causes release of BDNF. Activation of TrkB receptors triggers a signaling cascade involving JNK-mediated activation of cJun that regulates tlx3, a glutamate/GABA selector gene, accounting for calcium-spike-BDNF-dependent transmitter switching. Our findings identify a molecular mechanism for activity-dependent respecification of neurotransmitter phenotype in developing spinal neurons. PMID:24908484

  1. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train. PMID:19756079

  2. Efficient photo-thermal activation of gold nanoparticle-doped polymer plasmonic switches.

    PubMed

    Weeber, J-C; Hassan, K; Saviot, L; Dereux, A; Boissière, C; Durupthy, O; Chaneac, C; Burov, E; Pastouret, A

    2012-12-01

    We report on the photo-thermal activation of dielectric loaded plasmonic switches comprised of gold nanoparticle-doped polymer deposited onto a gold film. The plasmonic switches rely on a multi-mode interferometer design and are fabricated by electron beam lithography applied to a positive resin doped with gold nanoparticles at a volume ratio of 0.52%. A cross-bar switching is obtained at telecom wavelengths by pumping the devices with a visible beam having a frequency within the localized surface plasmon resonance band of the embedded nanoparticles. By comparing the switching performances of doped and undoped devices, we show that for the modest doping level we consider, the power needed to activate the doped switches is reduced by a factor 2.5 compared to undoped devices. The minimization of activation power is attributed to enhanced light-heat conversion and optimized spatial heat generation for doped devices and not to a change of the thermo-optic coefficient of the doped polymer. PMID:23262712

  3. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    PubMed

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  4. Continuous-wave and actively Q-switched Nd:LSO crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, S.; Li, D.; Xu, X.; Wang, Z.; Yu, H.; Xu, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, L.; Xu, X.

    2012-04-01

    With a fiber coupled laser diode array as the pump source, Nd-doped Lu2SiO5 (Nd:LSO) crystal lasers at 4F3/2→4I11/2 and 4F3/2→4I13/2 transitions were demonstrated. The active Q-switched dual-wavelength lasers at about 1.08 μm, as well as continuous-wave (CW) and active Q-switched lasers at 1357 nm are reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Considering the small emission cross-sections and long fluorescence lifetime, this material possesses large energy storage ability and excellent Q-switched properties. The special emission wavelength at 1357 nm will have promising applications to be used in many fields, such as THz generation, pumping of Cr3+:LiSAF, repumping of strontium optical clock, laser Doppler velocimeter and distributed fiber sensor.

  5. A new autoinhibited kinase conformation reveals a salt-bridge switch in kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Yang, Shaoyuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of autoinhibited EphA2 tyrosine kinase reported herein, we have captured the entire activation segment, revealing a previously unknown role of the conserved Arg762 in kinase autoinhibition by interacting with the essential Mg2+-chelating Asp757. While it is well known that this Arg residue is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the phospho-residue of the activation loop to stabilize the active conformation, our structure determination revealed a new role for the Arg, acting as a switch between the autoinhibited and activated conformations. Mutation of Arg762 to Ala in EphA2 sensitized Mg2+ response, resulting in enhanced kinase catalytic activity and Mg2+ cooperativity. Furthermore, mutation of the corresponding Arg/Lys to Ala in PKA and p38MAPK also exhibited similar behavior. This new salt bridge-mediated switch may thus be an important mechanism of activation on a broader scope for kinases which utilize autophosphorylation. PMID:27324091

  6. Paramagnetic Molecular Grippers: The Elements of Six-State Redox Switches.

    PubMed

    Milić, Jovana; Zalibera, Michal; Pochorovski, Igor; Trapp, Nils; Nomrowski, Julia; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Boudon, Corinne; Wenger, Oliver S; Savitsky, Anton; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Gescheidt, Georg; Diederich, François

    2016-07-01

    The development of semiquinone-based resorcin[4]arene cavitands expands the toolbox of switchable molecular grippers by introducing the first paramagnetic representatives. The semiquinone (SQ) states were generated electrochemically, chemically, and photochemically. We analyzed their electronic, conformational, and binding properties by cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) spectroelectrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and transient absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The utility of UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry and EPR spectroscopy in evaluating the conformational features of resorcin[4]arene cavitands is demonstrated. Guest binding properties were found to be enhanced in the SQ state as compared to the quinone (Q) or the hydroquinone (HQ) states of the cavitands. Thus, these paramagnetic SQ intermediates open the way to six-state redox switches provided by two conformations (open and closed) in three redox states (Q, SQ, and HQ) possessing distinct binding ability. The switchable magnetic properties of these molecular grippers and their responsiveness to electrical stimuli has the potential for development of efficient molecular devices. PMID:27300355

  7. Active inductor based fully integrated CMOS transmit/ receive switch for 2.4 GHz RF transceiver.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad A S; Zijie, Yeoh; Yu, Jae S; Reaz, Mamun B I; Kamal, Noorfazila; Chang, Tae G

    2016-05-31

    Modern Radio Frequency (RF) transceivers cannot be imagined without high-performance (Transmit/Receive) T/R switch. Available T/R switches suffer mainly due to the lack of good trade-off among the performance parameters, where high isolation and low insertion loss are very essential. In this study, a T/R switch with high isolation and low insertion loss performance has been designed by using Silterra 0.13µm CMOS process for 2.4GHz ISM band RF transceivers. Transistor aspect ratio optimization, proper gate bias resistance, resistive body floating and active inductor-based parallel resonance techniques have been implemented to achieve better trade-off. The proposed T/R switch exhibits 0.85dB insertion loss and 45.17dB isolation in both transmit and receive modes. Moreover, it shows very competitive values of power handling capability (P1dB) and linearity (IIP3) which are 11.35dBm and 19.60dBm, respectively. Due to avoiding bulky inductor and capacitor, the proposed active inductor-based T/R switch became highly compact occupying only 0.003mm2 of silicon space; which will further trim down the total cost of the transceiver. Therefore, the proposed active inductor-based T/R switch in 0.13µm CMOS process will be highly useful for the electronic industries where low-power, high-performance and compactness of devices are the crucial concerns. PMID:27254443

  8. A simple device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Seung-Eon; Lee, Chang Bum; Kim, Chang-Jung; Jeon, Sanghun; Chung, U-In; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Park, Gyeong-Su; Han, Seungwu; Hwang, In Rok; Park, Bae-Ho

    2011-11-01

    Present charge-based silicon memories are unlikely to reach terabit densities because of scaling limits. As the feature size of memory shrinks to just tens of nanometers, there is insufficient volume available to store charge. Also, process temperatures higher than 800 °C make silicon incompatible with three-dimensional (3D) stacking structures. Here we present a device unit consisting of all NiO storage and switch elements for multilevel terabit nonvolatile random access memory using resistance switching. It is demonstrated that NiO films are scalable to around 30 nm and compatible with multilevel cell technology. The device unit can be a building block for 3D stacking structure because of its simple structure and constituent, high performance, and process temperature lower than 300 °C. Memory resistance switching of NiO storage element is accompanied by an increase in density of grain boundary while threshold resistance switching of NiO switch element is controlled by current flowing through NiO film. PMID:21988144

  9. Active Microwave Pulse Compressor Using an Electron-Beam Triggered Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, O. A.; Lobaev, M. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Isaev, V. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that operates by modulating the quality factor of an energy storage cavity by means of mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge across a switch cavity. This Letter describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch cavity, the configuration used for the tests, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140-165 MW peak power, record peak power gains of 16∶1-20∶1, and FWHM pulse duration of 16-20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  10. Active microwave pulse compressor using an electron-beam triggered switch.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, O A; Lobaev, M A; Vikharev, A L; Gorbachev, A M; Isaev, V A; Hirshfield, J L; Gold, S H; Kinkead, A K

    2013-03-15

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that operates by modulating the quality factor of an energy storage cavity by means of mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge across a switch cavity. This Letter describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch cavity, the configuration used for the tests, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140-165 MW peak power, record peak power gains of 16∶1-20∶1, and FWHM pulse duration of 16-20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz. PMID:25166547

  11. Low-power, fast-response active gas-gap heat switches for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore T.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2015-12-01

    Heat switches are critical to many low temperature applications, where control of heat flow and selective thermal isolation are required. Their designs tend to be driven by the need for the lowest possible off-state conductance, while meeting requirements for on-state conduction. As a result, heat switches tend to be designed as close as possible to the limits of material strength and machinability, using materials that have the lowest thermal conductivity to strength ratio. In addition, switching speed is important for many applications, and many designs and switch types require a compromise between the power used for actuation and on/off transition times. We present a design for an active gas-gap heat switch, developed for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Japanese Astro-H mission, that requires less than 0.5 mW of power to operate, has on/off transition times of < 1 minute, and that achieves a conductance of > 50 mW/K at 1 K with a heat leak of < 0.5 μW from 1 K to very low temperature. Details of the design and performance will be presented.

  12. Automatic antenna switching design for Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randhawa, Manjit S.

    1987-01-01

    An Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) crewmember had two-way communications with the space station in the Ku-band frequency (12 to 18 GHz). The maximum range of the EVA communications link with the space station is approximately one kilometer for nominal values for transmitter power, antenna gains, and receiver noise figure. The EVA Communications System, that will continue to function regardless of the astronaut's position and orientation, requires an antenna system that has full spherical coverage. Three or more antennas that can be flush mounted on the astronaut's space suit (EMU) and/or his propulsive backpack (MMU), will be needed to provide the desired coverage. As the astronaut moves in the space station, the signal received by a given EVA antenna changes. An automatic antenna switching system is needed that will switch the communication system to the antenna with the largest signal strength. A design for automatic antenna switching is presented and discussed.

  13. A phosphotyrosine switch determines the antitumor activity of ERβ

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bin; Cheng, Long; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Xu, Xiaojie; Han, Yongjian; Su, Hang; Wang, Lingxue; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Jing; Li, Xiaobing; Xie, Xiangyang; Wang, Tao; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R.; Curiel, Tyler J.; Yuan, Zhi-Min; Elledge, Richard; Hu, Yanfen; Ye, Qinong; Li, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ share considerable sequence homology yet exert opposite effects on breast cancer cell proliferation. While the proliferative role of ERα in breast tumors is well characterized, it is not clear whether the antitumor activity of ERβ can be mobilized in breast cancer cells. Here, we have shown that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue (Y36) present in ERβ, but not in ERα, dictates ERβ-specific activation of transcription and is required for ERβ-dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth in culture and in murine xenografts. Additionally, the c-ABL tyrosine kinase and EYA2 phosphatase directly and diametrically controlled the phosphorylation status of Y36 and subsequent ERβ function. A nonphosphorylatable, transcriptionally active ERβ mutant retained antitumor activity but circumvented control by upstream regulators. Phosphorylation of Y36 was required for ERβ-mediated coactivator recruitment to ERβ target promoters. In human breast cancer samples, elevated phosphorylation of Y36 in ERβ correlated with high levels of c-ABL but low EYA2 levels. Furthermore, compared with total ERβ, the presence of phosphorylated Y36–specific ERβ was strongly associated with both disease-free and overall survival in patients with stage II and III disease. Together, these data identify a signaling circuitry that regulates ERβ-specific antitumor activity and has potential as both a prognostic tool and a molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:24960160

  14. P-glycoprotein ATPase activity requires lipids to activate a switch at the first transmission interface.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) drug pump. A common feature of ABC proteins is that they are organized into two wings. Each wing contains a transmembrane domain (TMD) and a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). Drug substrates and ATP bind at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Drug transport involves ATP-dependent conformational changes between inward- (open, NBDs far apart) and outward-facing (closed, NBDs close together) conformations. P-gps crystallized in the presence of detergent show an open structure. Human P-gp is inactive in detergent but basal ATPase activity is restored upon addition of lipids. The lipids might cause closure of the wings to bring the NBDs close together to allow ATP hydrolysis. We show however, that cross-linking the wings together did not activate ATPase activity when lipids were absent suggesting that lipids may induce other structural changes required for ATPase activity. We then tested the effect of lipids on disulfide cross-linking of mutants at the first transmission interface between intracellular loop 4 (TMD2) and NBD1. Mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C but not G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C were cross-linked with oxidant when in membranes. The mutants were then purified and cross-linked with or without lipids. Mutants G471C/S909C and V472C/S909C cross-linked only in the absence of lipids whereas mutants L443C/S909C and L443C/R905C were cross-linked only in the presence of lipids. The results suggest that lipids activate a switch at the first transmission interface and that the structure of P-gp is different in detergents and lipids. PMID:26944019

  15. Phospholipase A2 regulates eicosanoid class switching during inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Norris, Paul C; Gosselin, David; Reichart, Donna; Glass, Christopher K; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-09-01

    Initiation and resolution of inflammation are considered to be tightly connected processes. Lipoxins (LX) are proresolution lipid mediators that inhibit phlogistic neutrophil recruitment and promote wound-healing macrophage recruitment in humans via potent and specific signaling through the LXA4 receptor (ALX). One model of lipoxin biosynthesis involves sequential metabolism of arachidonic acid by two cell types expressing a combined transcellular metabolon. It is currently unclear how lipoxins are efficiently formed from precursors or if they are directly generated after receptor-mediated inflammatory commitment. Here, we provide evidence for a pathway by which lipoxins are generated in macrophages as a consequence of sequential activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a receptor for endotoxin, and P2X7, a purinergic receptor for extracellular ATP. Initial activation of TLR4 results in accumulation of the cyclooxygenase-2-derived lipoxin precursor 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in esterified form within membrane phospholipids, which can be enhanced by aspirin (ASA) treatment. Subsequent activation of P2X7 results in efficient hydrolysis of 15-HETE from membrane phospholipids by group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2, and its conversion to bioactive lipoxins by 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate how a single immune cell can store a proresolving lipid precursor and then release it for bioactive maturation and secretion, conceptually similar to the production and inflammasome-dependent maturation of the proinflammatory IL-1 family cytokines. These findings provide evidence for receptor-specific and combinatorial control of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoid biosynthesis, and potential avenues to modulate inflammatory indices without inhibiting downstream eicosanoid pathways. PMID:25139986

  16. Cross-language Activation and the Phonetics of Code-switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, Page Elizabeth

    It is now well established that bilinguals have both languages activated to some degree at all times. This cross-language activation has been documented in several research paradigms, including picture naming, reading, and electrophysiological studies. What is less well understood is how the degree a language is activated can vary in different language environments or contexts. Furthermore, when investigating effects of order of acquisition and language dominance, past research has been mixed, as the two variables are often conflated. In this dissertation, I test how degree of cross-language activation can vary according to context by examining phonetic productions in code-switching speech. Both spontaneous speech and scripted speech are analyzed. Follow-up perception experiments are conducted to see if listeners are able to anticipate language switches, potentially due to the phonetic cues in the signal. Additionally, by focusing on early bilinguals who are L1 Spanish but English dominant, I am able to see what plays a greater role in cross-language activation, order of acquisition or language dominance. I find that speakers do have intermediate phonetic productions in code-switching contexts relative to monolingual contexts. Effects are larger and more consistent in English than Spanish. Similar effects are found in speech perception. Listeners are able to anticipate language switches from English to Spanish but not Spanish to English. Together these results suggest that language dominance is a more important factor than order of acquisition in cross-language activation for early bilinguals. Future models on bilingual language organization and access should take into account both context and language dominance when modeling degrees of cross-language activation.

  17. Master switches of T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beier, K C; Kallinich, T; Hamelmann, E

    2007-04-01

    T-cells play a central role in allergic airway diseases such as bronchial asthma. The imbalance between allergen-specific pro-inflammatory and pro-allergic T-cell responses on one hand and regulatory or suppressive T-cell responses on the other may best explain the development of unwanted immune responses against environmental allergens, which lead to immunoglobulin E production and airway inflammation. A key role in the fine tuning of any T-cell response is provided by the engagement of so-called co-stimulatory molecules that are required for the full activation of T-cells and the recognition of antigens via the antigen-specific T-cell receptor. Many of these co-stimulatory molecules have been identified only recently, leading to a fundamental change in the overall understanding of T-cell regulation. Due to their pivotal impact on T-cell differentiation and control, co-stimulatory molecules are promising targets for therapeutic intervention in T-cell-regulated or -mediated immune disorders, including allergic diseases and asthma. In the present article, an attempt is made to summarise the current knowledge on the basic concept of co-stimulation, the presently known co-stimulatory molecules and their various functions on T-cell activation or suppression. The mini-series will be completed by two more articles describing the recent experimental studies and preliminary clinical findings regarding the role of co-stimulatory molecules in allergic disorders and bronchial asthma, and a discussion regarding the feasibility of co-stimulatory molecules as potential targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease. Although it is too early for any clinical implication or utilisation at this moment, the authors are convinced that a better understanding of co-stimulation in the context of allergic asthma will finally provide novel and promising approaches for treatment and prevention. PMID:17400879

  18. Comparison of switching control algorithms effective in restricting the switching in the neighborhood of the origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, JinWook; Smyth, Andrew W.; Chung, Lan

    2010-06-01

    The active interaction control (AIC) system consisting of a primary structure, an auxiliary structure and an interaction element was proposed to protect the primary structure against earthquakes and winds. The objective of the AIC system in reducing the responses of the primary structure is fulfilled by activating or deactivating the switching between the engagement and the disengagement of the primary and auxiliary structures through the interaction element. The status of the interaction element is controlled by switching control algorithms. The previously developed switching control algorithms require an excessive amount of switching, which is inefficient. In this paper, the excessive amount of switching is restricted by imposing an appropriately designed switching boundary region, where switching is prohibited, on pre-designed engagement-disengagement conditions. Two different approaches are used in designing the newly proposed AID-off and AID-off2 algorithms. The AID-off2 algorithm is designed to affect deactivated switching regions explicitly, unlike the AID-off algorithm, which follows the same procedure of designing the engagement-disengagement conditions of the previously developed algorithms, by using the current status of the AIC system. Both algorithms are shown to be effective in reducing the amount of switching times triggered from the previously developed AID algorithm under an appropriately selected control sampling period for different earthquakes, but the AID-off2 algorithm outperforms the AID-off algorithm in reducing the number of switching times.

  19. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  20. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  1. Novel implementations of optical switch control module and 3D-CSP for 10 Gbps active optical access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Koji; Okuno, Michitaka; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Hosomi, Kazuhiko; Sagawa, Misuzu; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2009-11-01

    We propose an optical switch control procedure for high-performance and cost-effective 10 Gbps Active Optical Access System (AOAS) in which optical switches are used instead of optical splitters in PON (Passive Optical Network). We demonstrate the implemented optical switch control module on Optical Switching Unit (OSW) with logic circuits works effectively. We also propose a compact optical 3D-CSP (Chip Scale Package) to achieve the high performance of AOAS without losing cost advantage of PON. We demonstrate the implemented 3D-CSP works effectively.

  2. Conserved molecular switch interactions in modeled cardioactive RF-NH2 peptide receptors: Ligand binding and activation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, M; Leander, M; Ons, S; Nichols, R

    2015-09-01

    Peptides may act through G protein-coupled receptors to influence cardiovascular performance; thus, delineating mechanisms involved in signaling is a molecular-based strategy to influence health. Molecular switches, often represented by conserved motifs, maintain a receptor in an inactive state. However, once the switch is broken, the transmembrane regions move and activation occurs. The molecular switches of Drosophila melanogaster myosuppressin (MS) receptors were previously identified to include a unique ionic lock and novel 3-6 lock, as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. In addition to MS, cardioactive ligands structurally related by a C-terminal RF-NH2 include sulfakinin, neuropeptide F (NPF), short NPF, and FMRF-NH2-containing peptide subfamilies. We hypothesized receptor molecular switch motifs were conserved within a RF-NH2 subfamily and across species. Thus, we investigated RF-NH2 receptor (RFa-R) molecular switches in D. melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum, Anopheles gambiae, Rhodnius prolixus, and Bombyx mori. Adipokinetic hormone (AKH), which does not contain a RF-NH2, was also examined. The tyrosine toggle switch and ionic lock showed a higher degree of conservation within a RF-NH2 subfamily than the transmission switch and 3-7 lock. AKH receptor motifs were not representative of a RF-NH2 subfamily. The motifs and interactions of switches in the RFa-Rs were consistent with receptor activation and ligand-specific binding. PMID:26211890

  3. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  4. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  5. Design and real time implementation of fuzzy switched controller for single phase active power filter.

    PubMed

    Afghoul, Hamza; Krim, Fateh; Chikouche, Djamel; Beddar, Antar

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel fuzzy switched controller (FSC) integrated in direct current control (DCC) algorithm for single phase active power filter (SPAPF). The controller under study consists of conventional PI controller, fractional order PI controller (FO-PI) and fuzzy decision maker (FDM) that switches between them using reduced fuzzy logic control. The proposed controller offers short response time with low damping and deals efficiently with the external disturbances while preserving the robustness properties. To fulfill the requirements of power quality, unity power factor and harmonics limitations in active power filtering an experimental test bench has been built using dSPACE 1104 to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed controller. The obtained results present high performance in steady and transient states. PMID:26233491

  6. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasmine Ware; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Charles T Robbins; Joy Erlenbach; Shannon Jensen; Amy Cutting; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey; Amy Hash; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  7. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  8. Design and development of a shape memory alloy activated heat pipe-based thermal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Notardonato, W. U.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-10-01

    This work reports on the design, fabrication and testing of a thermal switch wherein the open and closed states were actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) elements while heat was transferred by a two-phase heat pipe. The motivation for such a switch comes from NASA’s need for thermal management in advanced spaceport applications associated with future lunar and Mars missions. As the temperature can approximately vary between -233 and 127 ° C during lunar day/night cycles, the switch was designed to reject heat from a cryogen tank into space during the night cycle while providing thermal isolation during the day cycle. A Ni47.1Ti49.6Fe3.3 (at.%) alloy that exhibited a reversible phase transformation between a trigonal R-phase and a cubic austenite phase was used as the sensing and actuating elements. Thermomechanical actuation, accomplished through an antagonistic spring system, resulted in strokes up to 7 mm against bias forces of up to 45 N. The actuation system was tested for more than thirty cycles, equivalent to one year of operation. The thermal performance, accomplished via a variable length, closed two-phase heat pipe, was evaluated, resulting in heat transfer rates of 13 W using pentane and 10 W using R-134a as working fluids. Experimental data were also compared to theoretical predictions where possible. Direct comparisons between different design approaches of SMA helical actuators, highlighting the effects of the helix angle, were carried out to give a layout of more accurate design methodologies.

  9. All-optical switching of localized surface plasmon resonance in single gold nanosandwich using GeSbTe film as an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Kihara, Y.; Saiki, T.

    2015-01-19

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching was investigated in a Au/GeSbTe/Au nanosandwich as a key active element for plasmonic integrated circuits and devices. Near-infrared single-particle spectroscopy was conducted to examine the interaction of a Au nanorod (AuNR) and Au film, between which a GeSbTe layer was incorporated as an active phase-change media. Numerical calculation revealed that hybridized modes of the AuNR and Au film exhibit a significant change of scattering intensity with the phase change. In particular, the antisymmetric (magnetic resonance) mode can be modulated effectively by the extinction coefficient of GST, as well as its refractive index. Experimental demonstration of the switching operation was performed by alternate irradiation with a picosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization. Repeatable modulation was obtained by monitoring the scattering light around the LSPR peak at λ = 1070 nm.

  10. All-optical switching of localized surface plasmon resonance in single gold nanosandwich using GeSbTe film as an active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Kihara, Y.; Saiki, T.

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching was investigated in a Au/GeSbTe/Au nanosandwich as a key active element for plasmonic integrated circuits and devices. Near-infrared single-particle spectroscopy was conducted to examine the interaction of a Au nanorod (AuNR) and Au film, between which a GeSbTe layer was incorporated as an active phase-change media. Numerical calculation revealed that hybridized modes of the AuNR and Au film exhibit a significant change of scattering intensity with the phase change. In particular, the antisymmetric (magnetic resonance) mode can be modulated effectively by the extinction coefficient of GST, as well as its refractive index. Experimental demonstration of the switching operation was performed by alternate irradiation with a picosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization. Repeatable modulation was obtained by monitoring the scattering light around the LSPR peak at λ = 1070 nm.

  11. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  12. Control and switching synchronization of fractional order chaotic systems using active control technique.

    PubMed

    Radwan, A G; Moaddy, K; Salama, K N; Momani, S; Hashim, I

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the continuous effect of the fractional order parameter of the Lü system where the system response starts stable, passing by chaotic behavior then reaching periodic response as the fractional-order increases. In addition, this paper presents the concept of synchronization of different fractional order chaotic systems using active control technique. Four different synchronization cases are introduced based on the switching parameters. Also, the static and dynamic synchronizations can be obtained when the switching parameters are functions of time. The nonstandard finite difference method is used for the numerical solution of the fractional order master and slave systems. Many numeric simulations are presented to validate the concept for different fractional order parameters. PMID:25685479

  13. Prediction of switching time between movement preparation and execution by neural activity in monkey premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbao; Liao, Yuxi; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Premotor cortex is a higher level cortex than primary motor cortex in movement controlling hierarchy, which contributes to the motor preparation and execution simultaneously during the planned movement. The mediation mechanism from movement preparation to execution has attracted many scientists' attention. Gateway hypothesis is one possible explanation that some neurons act as "gating" to release the movement intention at the "on-go" cue. We propose to utilize a local-learning based feature extraction method to target the neurons in premotor cortex, which functionally contribute mostly to the discrimination between motor preparation and execution without tuning information to either target or movement trajectory. Then the support vector machine is utilized to predict the single trial switching time. With top three functional "gating" neurons, the prediction accuracy rate of the switching time is above 90%, which indicates the potential of asynchronous BMI control using premotor cortical activity. PMID:26736827

  14. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  15. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  16. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  17. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  18. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  19. Distinct DNA-based epigenetic switches trigger transcriptional activation of silent genes in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Taniguchi, Junichi; Junetha, Syed; Sato, Shinsuke; Han, Le; Saha, Abhijit; AnandhaKumar, Chandran; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Vaijayanthi, Thangavel; Taylor, Rhys D.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The influential role of the epigenome in orchestrating genome-wide transcriptional activation instigates the demand for the artificial genetic switches with distinct DNA sequence recognition. Recently, we developed a novel class of epigenetically active small molecules called SAHA-PIPs by conjugating selective DNA binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. Screening studies revealed that certain SAHA-PIPs trigger targeted transcriptional activation of pluripotency and germ cell genes in mouse and human fibroblasts, respectively. Through microarray studies and functional analysis, here we demonstrate for the first time the remarkable ability of thirty-two different SAHA-PIPs to trigger the transcriptional activation of exclusive clusters of genes and noncoding RNAs. QRT-PCR validated the microarray data, and some SAHA-PIPs activated therapeutically significant genes like KSR2. Based on the aforementioned results, we propose the potential use of SAHA-PIPs as reagents capable of targeted transcriptional activation. PMID:24457603

  20. Lag Synchronization of Switched Neural Networks via Neural Activation Function and Applications in Image Encryption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Huang, Tingwen; Meng, Qinggang; Yao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential lag synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays via neural activation function and applications in image encryption. The controller is dependent on the output of the system in the case of packed circuits, since it is hard to measure the inner state of the circuits. Thus, it is critical to design the controller based on the neuron activation function. Comparing the results, in this paper, with the existing ones shows that we improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. Several examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential applications in image encryption. PMID:25594985

  1. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  2. Semi-active vibration control based on unsymmetrical synchronized switch damping: Analysis and experimental validation of control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li; Nie, Hong

    2016-05-01

    In semi-active synchronized switch damping (SSD) approaches for structural vibration control, the damping effect is achieved by properly switching the voltage on the piezoelectric actuators. Unsymmetrical SSD switch circuit has been designed in the previous paper to increase the effective voltage range on the PZT actuator for improvement of the control performance. In this study, analysis and experimental validation of control performance of a synchronized switch damping system based on the unsymmetrical switch circuit are carried out. First the model of an unsymmetrical SSD system is presented and the working principle is introduced. The general expression of the switched voltage on the piezoelectric actuator is derived. Based on its periodicity in steady-state control, the harmonic components of the actuator voltage are derived using Fourier series expansion. Next, the displacement response of the system is derived under combined actions of the excitation and switched voltage. Finally, a setup of a flexible beam with unsymmetrical switch circuit is used to demonstrate the control performance under different voltage sources and to verify the theoretical results. The results show that the control performance mainly depends on the voltage range on the PZT. A higher effective voltage range can be generated in unsymmetrical SSDV than in symmetrical SSDV and better control performance can be achieved at the same negative actuator voltage. The unsymmetrical SSDV makes better utilization of the actuator capability.

  3. Monolithic mm-wave phase shifter using optically activated superconducting switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phase shifter is disclosed having a reference path and a delay path, light sources, and superconductive switches. Each of the superconductive switches is terminated in a virtual short circuit, which may be a radial stub. Switching between the reference path and delayed path is accomplished by illuminating the superconductive switches connected to the desired path, while not illuminating the superconductive switches connected to the other path.

  4. A cell cycle-controlled redox switch regulates the topoisomerase IV activity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sharath; Janakiraman, Balaganesh; Kumar, Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase IV (topo IV), an essential factor during chromosome segregation, resolves the catenated chromosomes at the end of each replication cycle. How the decatenating activity of the topo IV is regulated during the early stages of the chromosome cycle despite being in continuous association with the chromosome remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel cell cycle-regulated protein in Caulobacter crescentus, NstA (negative switch for topo IV decatenation activity), that inhibits the decatenation activity of the topo IV during early stages of the cell cycle. We demonstrate that in C. crescentus, NstA acts by binding to the ParC DNA-binding subunit of topo IV. Most importantly, we uncover a dynamic oscillation of the intracellular redox state during the cell cycle, which correlates with and controls NstA activity. Thus, we propose that predetermined dynamic intracellular redox fluctuations may act as a global regulatory switch to control cellular development and cell cycle progression and may help retain pathogens in a suitable cell cycle state when encountering redox stress from the host immune response. PMID:26063575

  5. Evolutionary active transposable elements in the genome of the coelacanth.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Simakov, Oleg; Meyer, Axel; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    The apparent morphological stasis in the lineage of the coelacanth, which has been called a "living fossil" by many, has been suggested to be causally related to a slow evolution of its genome, with strongly reduced activity of transposable elements (TEs). Analysis of the African coelacanth showed that at least 25% of its genome is constituted of transposable elements including retrotransposons, endogenous retroviruses and DNA transposons, with a strong predominance of non-Long Terminal Repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons. The coelacanth genome has been shaped by four major general bursts of transposition during evolution, with major contributions of LINE1, LINE2, CR1, and Deu non-LTR retrotransposons. Many transposable elements are expressed in different tissues and might be active. The number of TE families in coelacanth, but also in lungfish, is lower than in teleost fish, but is higher than in chicken and human. This observation is in agreement with the hypothesis of a sequential elimination of many TE families in the sarcopterygian lineage during evolution. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the coelacanth contains more TE families than birds and mammals, and that these elements have been active during the evolution of the coelacanth lineage. Hence, at the level of transposable element activity, the coelacanth genome does not appear to evolve particularly slowly. PMID:23908136

  6. Toxin-Antitoxin Modules Are Pliable Switches Activated by Multiple Protease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muthuramalingam, Meenakumari; White, John C.; Bourne, Christina R.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are bacterial regulatory switches that facilitate conflicting outcomes for cells by promoting a pro-survival phenotypic adaptation and/or by directly mediating cell death, all through the toxin activity upon degradation of antitoxin. Intensive study has revealed specific details of TA module functions, but significant gaps remain about the molecular details of activation via antitoxin degradation used by different bacteria and in different environments. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the interaction of antitoxins with cellular proteases Lon and ClpP to mediate TA module activation. An understanding of these processes can answer long-standing questions regarding stochastic versus specific activation of TA modules and provide insight into the potential for manipulation of TA modules to alter bacterial growth. PMID:27409636

  7. Mutation of the TERT promoter, switch to active chromatin, and monoallelic TERT expression in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Stern, Josh Lewis; Theodorescu, Dan; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-11-01

    Somatic mutations in the promoter of the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are the most common noncoding mutations in cancer. They are thought to activate telomerase, contributing to proliferative immortality, but the molecular events driving TERT activation are largely unknown. We observed in multiple cancer cell lines that mutant TERT promoters exhibit the H3K4me2/3 mark of active chromatin and recruit the GABPA/B1 transcription factor, while the wild-type allele retains the H3K27me3 mark of epigenetic silencing; only the mutant promoters are transcriptionally active. These results suggest how a single-base-pair mutation can cause a dramatic epigenetic switch and monoallelic expression. PMID:26515115

  8. Mutation of the TERT promoter, switch to active chromatin, and monoallelic TERT expression in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Josh Lewis; Theodorescu, Dan; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the promoter of the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are the most common noncoding mutations in cancer. They are thought to activate telomerase, contributing to proliferative immortality, but the molecular events driving TERT activation are largely unknown. We observed in multiple cancer cell lines that mutant TERT promoters exhibit the H3K4me2/3 mark of active chromatin and recruit the GABPA/B1 transcription factor, while the wild-type allele retains the H3K27me3 mark of epigenetic silencing; only the mutant promoters are transcriptionally active. These results suggest how a single-base-pair mutation can cause a dramatic epigenetic switch and monoallelic expression. PMID:26515115

  9. A single PWM section solar array shunt switching unit with an active ripple filter

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, B.H.; Lee, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    A single pulse-width-modulation (PWM) section shunt switching unit (SSU) for multi-kilowatt space power systems is presented. Due to the output capacitance of the solar cell, the PWM section in the array draws a pulsating current, which must be suppressed with a large filter inductor for each section. Proposed design uses a single designated PWM section with an active inductance enhancement filter. This leads to drastic reduction in size and weight of the SSU compared to the existing designs for the Space Station and Earth Observation System (EOS). A prototype has been designed and tested.

  10. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators.

    PubMed

    Akam, Eman A; Chang, Tsuhen M; Astashkin, Andrei V; Tomat, Elisa

    2014-10-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  11. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  12. Finite-element model of the active organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen J; Baumgart, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The cochlear amplifier that provides our hearing with its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity is thought to be the result of an active biomechanical process within the sensory auditory organ, the organ of Corti. Although imaging techniques are developing rapidly, it is not currently possible, in a fully active cochlea, to obtain detailed measurements of the motion of individual elements within a cross section of the organ of Corti. This motion is predicted using a two-dimensional finite-element model. The various solid components are modelled using elastic elements, the outer hair cells (OHCs) as piezoelectric elements and the perilymph and endolymph as viscous and nearly incompressible fluid elements. The model is validated by comparison with existing measurements of the motions within the passive organ of Corti, calculated when it is driven either acoustically, by the fluid pressure or electrically, by excitation of the OHCs. The transverse basilar membrane (BM) motion and the shearing motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina are calculated for these two excitation modes. The fully active response of the BM to acoustic excitation is predicted using a linear superposition of the calculated responses and an assumed frequency response for the OHC feedback. PMID:26888950

  13. The structure of Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase reveals a novel redox switch that regulates its activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chitnumsub, Penchit Ittarat, Wanwipa; Jaruwat, Aritsara; Noytanom, Krittikar; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Pornthanakasem, Wichai; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of P. falciparum SHMT revealed snapshots of an intriguing disulfide/sulfhydryl switch controlling the functional activity. Plasmodium falciparum serine hydroxymethyltransferase (PfSHMT), an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is an antimalarial target because inhibition of its expression or function has been shown to be lethal to the parasite. As the wild-type enzyme could not be crystallized, protein engineering of residues on the surface was carried out. The surface-engineered mutant PfSHMT-F292E was successfully crystallized and its structure was determined at 3 Å resolution. The PfSHMT-F292E structure is a good representation of PfSHMT as this variant revealed biochemical properties similar to those of the wild type. Although the overall structure of PfSHMT is similar to those of other SHMTs, unique features including the presence of two loops and a distinctive cysteine pair formed by Cys125 and Cys364 in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) substrate binding pocket were identified. These structural characteristics have never been reported in other SHMTs. Biochemical characterization and mutation analysis of these two residues confirm that they act as a disulfide/sulfhydryl switch to regulate the THF-dependent catalytic function of the enzyme. This redox switch is not present in the human enzyme, in which the cysteine pair is absent. The data reported here can be further exploited as a new strategy to specifically disrupt the activity of the parasite enzyme without interfering with the function of the human enzyme.

  14. Migfilin, a Molecular Switch in Regulation of Integrin Activation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ithychanda, Sujay Subbayya; Das, Mitali; Ma, Yan-Qing; Ding, Keyang; Wang, Xiaoxia; Gupta, Sudhiranjan; Wu, Chuanyue; Plow, Edward F.; Qin, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The linkage of heterodimeric (α/β) integrin receptors with their extracellular matrix ligands and intracellular actin cytoskeleton is a fundamental step for controlling cell adhesion and migration. Binding of the actin-linking protein, talin, to integrin β cytoplasmic tails (CTs) induces high affinity ligand binding (integrin activation), whereas binding of another actin-linking protein, filamin, to the integrin β CTs negatively regulates this process by blocking the talin-integrin interaction. Here we show structurally that migfilin, a novel cytoskeletal adaptor highly enriched in the integrin adhesion sites, strongly interacts with the same region in filamin where integrin β CTs bind. We further demonstrate that the migfilin interaction dissociates filamin from integrin and promotes the talin/integrin binding and integrin activation. Migfilin thus acts as a molecular switch to disconnect filamin from integrin for regulating integrin activation and dynamics of extracellular matrix-actin linkage. PMID:19074766

  15. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  16. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-07-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  17. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  18. Switching control of sympathetic activity from forebrain to hindbrain in chronic dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Colombari, Débora S A; Colombari, Eduardo; Freiria-Oliveira, Andre H; Antunes, Vagner R; Yao, Song T; Hindmarch, Charles; Ferguson, Alastair V; Fry, Mark; Murphy, David; Paton, Julian F R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the mechanisms responsible for increased blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) caused by 2–3 days dehydration (DH) both in vivo and in situ preparations. In euhydrated (EH) rats, systemic application of the AT1 receptor antagonist Losartan and subsequent pre-collicular transection (to remove the hypothalamus) significantly reduced thoracic (t)SNA. In contrast, in DH rats, Losartan, followed by pre-collicular and pontine transections, failed to reduce tSNA, whereas transection at the medulla–spinal cord junction massively reduced tSNA. In DH but not EH rats, selective inhibition of the commissural nucleus tractus solitarii (cNTS) significantly reduced tSNA. Comparable data were obtained in both in situ and in vivo (anaesthetized/conscious) rats and suggest that following chronic dehydration, the control of tSNA transfers from supra-brainstem structures (e.g. hypothalamus) to the medulla oblongata, particularly the cNTS. As microarray analysis revealed up-regulation of AP1 transcription factor JunD in the dehydrated cNTS, we tested the hypothesis that AP1 transcription factor activity is responsible for dehydration-induced functional plasticity. When AP1 activity was blocked in the cNTS using a viral vector expressing a dominant negative FosB, cNTS inactivation was ineffective. However, tSNA was decreased after pre-collicular transection, a response similar to that seen in EH rats. Thus, the dehydration-induced switch in control of tSNA from hypothalamus to cNTS seems to be mediated via activation of AP1 transcription factors in the cNTS. If AP1 activity is blocked in the cNTS during dehydration, sympathetic activity control reverts back to forebrain regions. This unique reciprocating neural structure-switching plasticity between brain centres emphasizes the multiple mechanisms available for the adaptive response to dehydration. PMID:21708906

  19. Cell Signaling Switches HOX-PBX Complexes from Repressors to Activators of Transcription Mediated by Histone Deacetylases and Histone Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maya; Rambaldi, Isabel; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Featherstone, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    The Hoxb1 autoregulatory element comprises three HOX-PBX binding sites. Despite the presence of HOXB1 and PBX1, this enhancer fails to activate reporter gene expression in retinoic acid-treated P19 cell monolayers. Activation requires cell aggregation in addition to RA. This suggests that HOX-PBX complexes may repress transcription under some conditions. Consistent with this, multimerized HOX-PBX binding sites repress reporter gene expression in HEK293 cells. We provide a mechanistic basis for repressor function by demonstrating that a corepressor complex, including histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 3, mSIN3B, and N-CoR/SMRT, interacts with PBX1A. We map a site of interaction with HDAC1 to the PBX1 N terminus and show that the PBX partner is required for repression by the HOX-PBX complex. Treatment with the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A not only relieves repression but also converts the HOX-PBX complex to a net activator of transcription. We show that this activation function is mediated by the recruitment of the coactivator CREB-binding protein by the HOX partner. Interestingly, HOX-PBX complexes are switched from transcriptional repressors to activators in response to protein kinase A signaling or cell aggregation. Together, our results suggest a model whereby the HOX-PBX complex can act as a repressor or activator of transcription via association with corepressors and coactivators. The model implies that cell signaling is a direct determinant of HOX-PBX function in the patterning of the animal embryo. PMID:11046157

  20. Negligible fronto-parietal BOLD activity accompanying unreportable switches in bistable perception

    PubMed Central

    Brascamp, Jan; Blake, Randolph; Knapen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The human brain's executive systems play a vital role in deciding and selecting among actions. Selection among alternatives also occurs in the perceptual domain, for instance when perception switches between interpretations during perceptual bistability. Whether executive systems also underlie this functionality remains debated, with known fronto-parietal concomitants of perceptual switches being variously interpreted as reflecting the switches' cause, or as reflecting their consequences. We developed a paradigm where the two eyes receive different inputs and perception demonstrably switches between these inputs, yet where switches themselves are so inconspicuous as to become unreportable, minimizing their executive consequences. Fronto-parietal fMRI BOLD responses that accompany perceptual switches were similarly minimized in this paradigm, indicating that these reflect the switches' consequences rather than their cause. We conclude that perceptual switches do not always rely on executive brain areas, and that processes responsible for selection among alternatives may operate outside of the brain's executive systems. PMID:26436901

  1. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  2. p53 can repress transcription of cell cycle genes through a p21WAF1/CIP1-dependent switch from MMB to DREAM protein complex binding at CHR promoter elements

    PubMed Central

    Quaas, Marianne; Müller, Gerd A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in cell cycle arrest by downregulating transcription. Many genes repressed by p53 code for proteins with functions in G₂/M. A large portion of these genes is controlled by cell cycle-dependent elements (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology regions (CHR) in their promoters. Cyclin B2 is an example of such a gene, with a function at the transition from G₂ to mitosis. We find that p53-dependent downregulation of cyclin B2 promoter activity is dependent on an intact CHR element. In the presence of high levels of p53 or p21WAF1/CIP1, protein binding to the CHR switches from MMB to DREAM complex by shifting MuvB core-associated proteins from B-Myb to E2F4/DP1/p130. The results suggest a model for p53-dependent transcriptional repression by which p53 directly activates p21WAF1/CIP1. The inhibitor then prevents further phosphorylation of p130 by cyclin-dependent kinases. The presence of hypophosphorylated pocket proteins shifts the equilibrium for complex formation from MMB to DREAM. In the case of promoters that do not hold CDE or E2F elements, binding of DREAM and MMB solely relies on a CHR site. Thus, p53 can repress target genes indirectly through CHR elements. PMID:23187802

  3. σ1 receptor ligands control a switch between passive and active threat responses.

    PubMed

    Rennekamp, Andrew J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Wang, You; Patel, Samir; Lorello, Paul J; Cade, Lindsay; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Caldarone, Barbara J; Roth, Bryan L; Kokel, David; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-07-01

    Humans and many animals show 'freezing' behavior in response to threatening stimuli. In humans, inappropriate threat responses are fundamental characteristics of several mental illnesses. To identify small molecules that modulate threat responses, we developed a high-throughput behavioral assay in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and evaluated 10,000 compounds for their effects on freezing behavior. We found three classes of compounds that switch the threat response from freezing to escape-like behavior. We then screened these for binding activity across 45 candidate targets. Using target profile clustering, we identified the sigma-1 (σ1) receptor as having a role in the mechanism of behavioral switching and confirmed that known σ1 ligands also disrupt freezing behavior. Furthermore, mutation of the gene encoding σ1 prevented the behavioral effect of escape-inducing compounds. One compound, which we call finazine, potently bound mammalian σ1 and altered threat-response behavior in mice. Thus, pharmacological and genetic interrogation of the freezing response revealed σ1 as a mediator of threat responses in vertebrates. PMID:27239788

  4. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  5. Simple ligand effects switch a hydrogenase mimic between H2 and O2 activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungmok; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Robertson, Andrew; Nakai, Hidetaka; Ogo, Seiji

    2012-06-01

    Herein, we report a [NiRu] biomimetic system for O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]hydrogenases and demonstrate that electron donation to the [NiRu] center can switch the system between the activation of H(2) and O(2) through simple ligand effects by using hexamethylbenzene and pentamethylcyclopentadienyl ligands, respectively. Furthermore, we present the synthesis and direct observations of a [NiRu]-peroxo species, which was formed by the oxygenation of a Ni-SIa model [NiRu] complex, that we propose as a biomimetic analogue of O(2)-bound species (OBS) of O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]hydrogenases. The [NiRu]-peroxo complex was fully characterized by X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), mass spectrometry, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The OBS analogue was capable of oxidizing p-hydroquinone and sodium borohydride to turn back into the Ni-SIa model complex. PMID:22383335

  6. Switching strategies: a dolphin's use of passive and active acoustics to imitate motor actions.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Kelly; Guarino, Emily; Rodriguez, Mandy; Hecksher, Jane

    2013-09-01

    Scientists have long debated the extent to which animals can imitate. Observations of bottlenose dolphins suggest a sophisticated capacity for social imitation, but little is known about the nature of these abilities. Here, we explore the behavioral mechanisms underlying a dolphin's ability to copy motor actions while blindfolded (i.e., wearing eyecups). When a dolphin was asked to imitate a dolphin, a human, and then another dolphin blindfolded, his accuracy remained relatively consistent across models. However, his blindfolded echolocation dramatically increased when copying a human as compared to other dolphins, suggesting he actively switched between strategies: recognizing behaviors via characteristic sounds when possible, but via echolocation for the more novel sounding behaviors of the human. Such flexibility in changing perceptual routes demonstrates that the dolphin's imitation was not automatically elicited, but rather results from an intentional, problem-solving approach to imitation. PMID:23389771

  7. Transform-limited pulses generated by an actively Q-switched distributed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Pérez-Millán, P; Andrés, M V; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Barmenkov, Yu O

    2008-11-15

    A single-mode, transform-limited, actively Q-switched distributed-feedback fiber laser is presented, based on a new in-line acoustic pulse generator. Our technique permits a continuous adjustment of the repetition rate that modulates the Q factor of the cavity. Optical pulses of 800 mW peak power, 32 ns temporal width, and up to 20 kHz repetition rates were obtained. The measured linewidth demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited: 6 MHz for a train of pulses of 10 kHz repetition rate, 80 ns temporal width, and 60 mW peak power. Efficient excitation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is demonstrated. PMID:19015677

  8. Regulation of aicda expression and AID activity: Relevance to somatic hypermutation and class switch DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenming; Pone, Egest J.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Park, Seok-Rae; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Expression and activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) encoded by the aicda gene are essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch DNA recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR unfold in general in germinal centers and are central to the maturation of effective antibody responses. AID expression is induced by activated B cell CD40 signaling, which is critical for the germinal center reaction, and is further enhanced by other stimuli, including interleukin-4 (IL-4) secreted from CD4+ T cells or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activating bacterial and/or viral molecules. Integration of different intracellular signal transduction pathways, as activated by these stimuli, leads to a dynamic aicda-regulating program, which involves both positively acting trans-factors, such as Pax5, HoxC4, E47 and Irf8, and negative modulators, such as Blimp1 and Id2, to restrict aicda expression primarily to germinal center B cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), which functions downstream of activated B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, likely plays an important role in triggering the downregulation of aicda expression in post-germinal center B cells and throughout plasmacytoid differentiation. In B cells undergoing SHM and CSR, AID activity and, possibly, AID targeting to the Ig locus are regulated at a post-translational level, including AID dimerization/oligomerization, nuclear/cytoplasmic AID translocation and phosphorylation of the AID Ser38 residue by protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we will discuss the role of B cell activation signals, transcription regulation programs and post-translational modifications in controlling aicda expression and AID activity, thereby delineating an integrated model of modulation of SHM and CSR in the germinal center reaction. PMID:18197815

  9. Digital radiography using amorphous selenium: photoconductively activated switch (PAS) readout system.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Nikita; Komljenovic, Philip T; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, John A

    2008-03-01

    A new amorphous selenium (a-Se) digital radiography detector is introduced. The proposed detector generates a charge image in the a-Se layer in a conventional manner, which is stored on electrode pixels at the surface of the a-Se layer. A novel method, called photoconductively activated switch (PAS), is used to read out the latent x-ray charge image. The PAS readout method uses lateral photoconduction at the a-Se surface which is a revolutionary modification of the bulk photoinduced discharge (PID) methods. The PAS method addresses and eliminates the fundamental weaknesses of the PID methods--long readout times and high readout noise--while maintaining the structural simplicity and high resolution for which PID optical readout systems are noted. The photoconduction properties of the a-Se surface were investigated and the geometrical design for the electrode pixels for a PAS radiography system was determined. This design was implemented in a single pixel PAS evaluation system. The results show that the PAS x-ray induced output charge signal was reproducible and depended linearly on the x-ray exposure in the diagnostic exposure range. Furthermore, the readout was reasonably rapid (10 ms for pixel discharge). The proposed detector allows readout of half a pixel row at a time (odd pixels followed by even pixels), thus permitting the readout of a complete image in 30 s for a 40 cm x 40 cm detector with the potential of reducing that time by using greater readout light intensity. This demonstrates that a-Se based x-ray detectors using photoconductively activated switches could form a basis for a practical integrated digital radiography system. PMID:18404939

  10. Digital radiography using amorphous selenium: Photoconductively activated switch (PAS) readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Reznik, Nikita; Komljenovic, Philip T.; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, John A.

    2008-03-15

    A new amorphous selenium (a-Se) digital radiography detector is introduced. The proposed detector generates a charge image in the a-Se layer in a conventional manner, which is stored on electrode pixels at the surface of the a-Se layer. A novel method, called photoconductively activated switch (PAS), is used to read out the latent x-ray charge image. The PAS readout method uses lateral photoconduction at the a-Se surface which is a revolutionary modification of the bulk photoinduced discharge (PID) methods. The PAS method addresses and eliminates the fundamental weaknesses of the PID methods--long readout times and high readout noise--while maintaining the structural simplicity and high resolution for which PID optical readout systems are noted. The photoconduction properties of the a-Se surface were investigated and the geometrical design for the electrode pixels for a PAS radiography system was determined. This design was implemented in a single pixel PAS evaluation system. The results show that the PAS x-ray induced output charge signal was reproducible and depended linearly on the x-ray exposure in the diagnostic exposure range. Furthermore, the readout was reasonably rapid (10 ms for pixel discharge). The proposed detector allows readout of half a pixel row at a time (odd pixels followed by even pixels), thus permitting the readout of a complete image in 30 s for a 40 cmx40 cm detector with the potential of reducing that time by using greater readout light intensity. This demonstrates that a-Se based x-ray detectors using photoconductively activated switches could form a basis for a practical integrated digital radiography system.

  11. Activation of antiferromagnetic domain switching in exchange-coupled Fe/CoO/MgO(001) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Chen, G.; Ma, T. P.; Zhu, J.; N'Diaye, A. T.; Sun, L.; Gu, T.; Huo, Y.; Liang, J. H.; Li, R. W.; Won, C.; Ding, H. F.; Qiu, Z. Q.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the extensive study of domain reversal in ferromagnetic materials, the domain switching process in antiferromagnets is much less studied due to the difficulty of probing antiferromagnetic spins. Using a combination of hysteresis loop, Kerr microscope, and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism measurements, we investigated the antiferromagnetic (AFM) domain switching process in single crystalline Fe/CoO bilayers on MgO(001). We demonstrate that the CoO AFM switching is a Kolmogorov-Avrami process in which the thermal activation energy creates AFM domain nucleation centers which further expand by domain wall propagation. From the temperature- and thickness-dependent measurements, we are able to retrieve quantitatively the important parameter of the CoO AFM activation energy, which is shown to increase linearly with CoO thickness.

  12. RhoA GTPase Switch Controls Cx43-Hemichannel Activity through the Contractile System

    PubMed Central

    Hertens, Fréderic; Parys, Jan B.; Leybaert, Luc; Vereecke, Johan; Himpens, Bernard; Bultynck, Geert

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent paracrine signaling, mediated via the release of ATP through plasma membrane-embedded hemichannels of the connexin family, coordinates a synchronized response between neighboring cells. Connexin 43 (Cx43) hemichannels that are present in the plasma membrane need to be tightly regulated to ensure cell viability. In monolayers of bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCEC),Cx43-mediated ATP release is strongly inhibited when the cells are treated with inflammatory mediators, in particular thrombin and histamine. In this study we investigated the involvement of RhoA activation in the inhibition of hemichannel-mediated ATP release in BCEC. We found that RhoA activation occurs rapidly and transiently upon thrombin treatment of BCEC. The RhoA activity correlated with the onset of actomyosin contractility that is involved in the inhibition of Cx43 hemichannels. RhoA activation and inhibition of Cx43-hemichannel activity were both prevented by pre-treatment of the cells with C3-toxin as well as knock down of RhoA by siRNA. These findings provide evidence that RhoA activation is a key player in thrombin-induced inhibition of Cx43-hemichannel activity. This study demonstrates that RhoA GTPase activity is involved in the acute inhibition of ATP-dependent paracrine signaling, mediated by Cx43 hemichannels, in response to the inflammatory mediator thrombin. Therefore, RhoA appears to be an important molecular switch that controls Cx43 hemichannel openings and hemichannel-mediated ATP-dependent paracrine intercellular communication under (patho)physiological conditions of stress. PMID:22860057

  13. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  14. VISUAL ELEMENTS OF SUBJECTIVE PREFERENCE MODULATE AMYGDALA ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Moshe; Neta, Maital

    2010-01-01

    What are the basic visual cues that determine our preference towards mundane everyday objects? We previously showed that a highly potent cue is the nature of the object’s contour: people generally like objects with a curved contour compared with objects that have pointed features and a sharp-angled contour. This bias is hypothesized here to stem from an implicit perception of potential threat conveyed by sharp elements. Using human neuroimaging to test this hypothesis, we report that the amygdala, a brain structure that is involved in fear processing and has been shown to exhibit activation level that is proportional to arousal in general, is significantly more active for everyday sharp objects (e.g., a sofa with sharp corners) compared with their curved-contour counterparts. Therefore, our results indicate that a preference bias towards a visual object can be induced by low-level perceptual properties, independent of semantic meaning, via visual elements that on some level could be associated with threat. We further present behavioral results that provide initial support for the link between the sharpness of the contour and threat perception. Our brains might be organized to extract these basic contour elements rapidly for deriving an early warning signal in the presence of potential danger. PMID:17462678

  15. Smectic A Filled Birefringent Elements and Fast Switching Twisted Dual Frequency Nematic Cells Used for Digital Light Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Kreminskia, Liubov; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Winker, Bruce K.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the application of smectic A (SmA) liquid crystals for beam deflection. SmA materials can be used in digital beam deflectors (DBDs) as fillers for passive birefringent prisms. SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Fast rotation of the incident light polarization in DBDs is achieved by an electrically switched 90 twisted nematic (TN) cell.

  16. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  17. A force-activated trip switch triggers rapid dissociation of a colicin from its immunity protein.

    PubMed

    Farrance, Oliver E; Hann, Eleanore; Kaminska, Renata; Housden, Nicholas G; Derrington, Sasha R; Kleanthous, Colin; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2013-01-01

    Colicins are protein antibiotics synthesised by Escherichia coli strains to target and kill related bacteria. To prevent host suicide, colicins are inactivated by binding to immunity proteins. Despite their high avidity (K(d) ≈ fM, lifetime ≈ 4 days), immunity protein release is a pre-requisite of colicin intoxication, which occurs on a timescale of minutes. Here, by measuring the dynamic force spectrum of the dissociation of the DNase domain of colicin E9 (E9) and immunity protein 9 (Im9) complex using an atomic force microscope we show that application of low forces (<20 pN) increases the rate of complex dissociation 10(6)-fold, to a timescale (lifetime ≈ 10 ms) compatible with intoxication. We term this catastrophic force-triggered increase in off-rate a trip bond. Using mutational analysis, we elucidate the mechanism of this switch in affinity. We show that the N-terminal region of E9, which has sparse contacts with the hydrophobic core, is linked to an allosteric activator region in E9 (residues 21-30) whose remodelling triggers immunity protein release. Diversion of the force transduction pathway by the introduction of appropriately positioned disulfide bridges yields a force resistant complex with a lifetime identical to that measured by ensemble techniques. A trip switch within E9 is ideal for its function as it allows bipartite complex affinity, whereby the stable colicin:immunity protein complex required for host protection can be readily converted to a kinetically unstable complex whose dissociation is necessary for cellular invasion and competitor death. More generally, the observation of two force phenotypes for the E9:Im9 complex demonstrates that force can re-sculpt the underlying energy landscape, providing new opportunities to modulate biological reactions in vivo; this rationalises the commonly observed discrepancy between off-rates measured by dynamic force spectroscopy and ensemble methods. PMID:23431269

  18. pH-Dependent Conformational Switch Activates the Inhibitor of Transcription Elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Laptenko,O.; Kim, S.; Lee, J.; Starodubtseva, M.; Cava, F.; Berenguer, J.; Kong, X.; Borukhov, S.

    2006-01-01

    Gfh1, a transcription factor from Thermus thermophilus, inhibits all catalytic activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP). We characterized the Gfh1 structure, function and possible mechanism of action and regulation. Gfh1 inhibits RNAP by competing with NTPs for coordinating the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. This coordination requires at least two aspartates at the tip of the Gfh1 N-terminal coiled-coil domain (NTD). The overall structure of Gfh1 is similar to that of the Escherichia coli transcript cleavage factor GreA, except for the flipped orientation of the C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that depending on pH, Gfh1-CTD exists in two alternative orientations. At pH above 7, it assumes an inactive 'flipped' orientation seen in the structure, which prevents Gfh1 from binding to RNAP. At lower pH, Gfh1-CTD switches to an active 'Gre-like' orientation, which enables Gfh1 to bind to and inhibit RNAP.

  19. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  20. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation of actively Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser with considering ETU effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, R.; Yu, X.; Li, X.; Chen, D.; Yu, J.

    2012-09-01

    A theoretical model on actively Q-switched Nd3+-doped quasi-three-level laser including the energy transfer upconversion and the ground state reabsorption is developed. The analytical expressions of the fractional thermal loading and the average output power are obtained, and the influence of ETU effects on laser performance for different repetition rate is analyzed. The average output power and the thermal focal length of the Q-switched 946 nm laser are acquired in experiment. The good agreement between the experimental data and theoretical results demonstrates the reliability of the theoretical model.

  2. Solid-state active switch matrix for high energy, moderate power battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Deal, Larry; Paris, Peter; Ye, Changqing

    2016-06-07

    A battery management system employs electronic switches and capacitors. No traditional cell-balancing resistors are used. The BMS electronically switches individual cells into and out of a module of cells in order to use the maximum amount of energy available in each cell and to completely charge and discharge each cell without overcharging or under-discharging.

  3. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Passive Q switching of a neodymium laser by a Cr4+ : YAG crystal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichev, Nikolai N.; Gulyamova, E. S.; Pashinin, Pavel P.

    1997-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations were made of passive Q switching of a neodymium laser by a Cr4+ : YAG switch. Analytic expressions were derived for estimating the output energy of the TEM00 mode of a passively Q-switched laser from the known parameters of the Cr4+ : YAG switch, of the active element, and of the cavity. The adopted description makes it possible to cover the range from generation of the first spike of a free-running transient to generation of a giant pulse. An experimental study was made of the dependence of the output energy on the cavity parameters, on the material of the active element (in this investigation it was Nd :YAG and Cr, Nd : GSGG), and on the angle of rotation of the Cr4+ : YAG switch. The experimental results obtained agreed to within 30% with calculations.

  4. Active control of multi-element rotor blade airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, Michael S. (Inventor); Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Bagai, Ashish (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A multi-element rotor blade includes an individually controllable main element and fixed aerodynamic surface in an aerodynamically efficient location relative to the main element. The main element is controlled to locate the fixed aerodynamic surface in a position to increase lift and/or reduce drag upon the main element at various azimuthal positions during rotation.

  5. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  6. Chronic bacterial infection activates autoreactive B cells and induces isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sophie; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Kern, Aurélie; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Eftekhari, Pierre; Da Silva, Sylvia; Jaulhac, Benoît; Brink, Robert; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Korganow, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The links between infections and the development of B-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases are still unclear. In particular, it has been suggested that infection-induced stimulation of innate immune sensors can engage low affinity autoreactive B lymphocytes to mature and produce mutated IgG pathogenic autoantibodies. To test this hypothesis, we established a new knock-in mouse model in which autoreactive B cells could be committed to an affinity maturation process. We show that a chronic bacterial infection allows the activation of such B cells and the production of nonmutated IgM autoantibodies. Moreover, in the constitutive presence of their soluble antigen, some autoreactive clones are able to acquire a germinal center phenotype, to induce Aicda gene expression and to introduce somatic mutations in the IgG heavy chain variable region on amino acids forming direct contacts with the autoantigen. Paradoxically, only lower affinity variants are detected, which strongly suggests that higher affinity autoantibodies secreting B cells are counterselected. For the first time, we demonstrate in vivo that a noncross-reactive infectious agent can activate and induce autoreactive B cells to isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations, but on a nonautoimmune background, tolerance mechanisms prevent the formation of consequently dangerous autoimmunity. PMID:26474536

  7. Redox Switches for Single-Molecule Magnet Activity: An Ab Initio Insight.

    PubMed

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-04-01

    A dinuclear Co(II) complex (1) featuring unprecedented anodic and cathodic switches for single-molecule magnet (SMM) activity has been recently investigated (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 14670). The presence of sandwiched radicals in different oxidation states of this compound mediates magnetic coupling between the high-spin (S=3/2) cobalt ions, which gives rise to SMM activity in both the oxidized ([1(OEt2 )](+) ) and reduced ([1](-) ) states. This feature represents the first example of a SMM exhibiting fully reversible, dual ON/OFF switchability. Here we apply ab initio and broken-symmetry DFT calculations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for magnetic properties and magnetization blocking in these compounds. It is found that due to the strong delocalization of the magnetic molecular orbital, there is a strong antiferromagnetic interaction between the radical and cobalt ions. The lack of high axiality of the cobalt centres explains why these compounds possess slow relaxation of magnetization only in an applied dc magnetic field. PMID:26918833

  8. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Elizabeth G.; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum ‘white’ light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these ‘light-intolerant’ bat species. PMID:27008274

  9. The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Elizabeth G; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species. PMID:27008274

  10. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical “molecular switch” to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  11. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  12. Fiber-laser pumped actively Q-switched Er:LuYAG laser at 1648 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, H. Y.; Shen, D. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an acousto-optic Q-switched 1648 nm Er:LuYAG laser resonantly pumped by a cladding-pumped Er,Yb fiber laser at 1532 nm. Stable Q-switching operation was obtained with the pulse repetition rate (PRR) varying from 200 Hz to 10 kHz. At PRR of 200 Hz, the laser yielded Q-switched pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy and 65 ns pulse duration, corresponding to a peak power of 50.7 kW for 10.4 W of incident pump power.

  13. Acute tryptophan depletion promotes an anterior-to-posterior fMRI activation shift during task switching in older adults.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Craig, Michael; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Tang, Christine; Brammer, Michael; Rubia, Katya; Murphy, Declan G M

    2014-02-01

    Studies have long reported that aging is associated with declines in several functions modulated by the prefrontal cortex, including executive functions like working memory, set shifting, and inhibitory control. The neurochemical basis to this is poorly understood, but may include the serotonergic system. We investigated the modulatory effect of serotonin using acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) during a cognitive switching task involving visual-spatial set shifting modified for a functional MRI environment. Ten healthy women over 55 years were tested on two separate occasions in this within-group double-blind sham-controlled crossover study to compare behavioral and physiological brain functioning following ATD and following a ("placebo") sham depletion condition. ATD did not significantly affect task performance. It did modulate brain functional recruitment. During sham depletion women significantly activated the expected task-relevant brain regions associated with the Switch task including prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In contrast, following ATD participants activated posterior regions of brain more during switch than repeat trials. In addition to the main effects of depletion condition, a comparison of the ATD relative to the sham condition confirmed this anterior-to-posterior shift in activation. The posterior (increased) activation clusters significantly and negatively correlated with the reduced prefrontal activation clusters suggesting a compensation mechanism for reduced prefrontal activation during ATD. Thus, serotonin modulates an anterior-to-posterior shift of activation during cognitive switching in older adults. Neural adaptation to serotonin challenge during cognitive control may prove useful in determining cognitive vulnerability in older adults with a predisposition for serontonergic down-regulation (e.g., in vascular or late life depression). PMID:23281064

  14. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  15. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  16. Opening the conformation is a master switch for the dual localization and phosphatase activity of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nghia; Yang, Jr-Ming; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Itoh, Kie; Rho, Elmer; Zhang, Qiang; Inoue, Takanari; Devreotes, Peter N.; Sesaki, Hiromi; Iijima, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN mainly functions at two subcellular locations, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. At the plasma membrane, PTEN dephosphorylates the tumorigenic second messenger PIP3, which drives cell proliferation and migration. In the nucleus, PTEN controls DNA repair and genome stability independently of PIP3. Whereas the concept that a conformational change regulates protein function through post-translational modifications has been well established in biology, it is unknown whether a conformational change simultaneously controls dual subcellular localizations of proteins. Here, we discovered that opening the conformation of PTEN is the crucial upstream event that determines its key dual localizations of this crucial tumor suppressor. We identify a critical conformational switch that regulates PTEN’s localization. Most PTEN molecules are held in the cytosol in a closed conformation by intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal tail and core region. Dephosphorylation of the tail opens the conformation and exposes the membrane-binding regulatory interface in the core region, recruiting PTEN to the membrane. Moreover, a lysine at residue 13 is also exposed and when ubiquitinated, transports PTEN to the nucleus. Thus, opening the conformation of PTEN is a key mechanism that enhances its dual localization and enzymatic activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer treatments. PMID:26216063

  17. Organic optical bistable switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic optical bistable switch by integrating an efficient organic photodetector on top of a transparent electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (TOLED). The bistability is achieved with an external field-effect transistor providing positive feedback. In the "LOW" state, the TOLED is off and the current in the photodetector is solely its dark current. In the "HIGH" state, the TOLED emits light that is directly coupled into the integrated photodetector through the transparent cathode. The photocurrent then is fed back to the TOLED, maintaining it in the HIGH state. The green electrophosphorescent material, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] doped into a 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl host was used as the luminescent material in the TOLED, while alternating thin layers of copper phthalocyanine and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bis-benzimidazole were used as the active region of the organic photodetector. The circuit has a 3 dB bandwidth of 25 kHz, and can be switched between HIGH and LOW using pulses as narrow as 60 ns. The bistable switch can be both electrically and optically reset, making it a candidate for image-retaining displays (e.g., electronic paper) and other photonic logic applications. The integrated organic device also has broad use as a linear circuit element in applications such as automatic brightness control.

  18. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  19. The Indirect Effect of Age Group on Switch Costs via Gray Matter Volume and Task-Related Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Steffener, Jason; Gazes, Yunglin; Habeck, Christian; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging simultaneously affects brain structure, brain function, and cognition. These effects are often investigated in isolation ignoring any relationships between them. It is plausible that age related declines in cognitive performance are the result of age-related structural and functional changes. This straightforward idea is tested in within a conceptual research model of cognitive aging. The current study tested whether age-related declines in task-performance were explained by age-related differences in brain structure and brain function using a task-switching paradigm in 175 participants. Sixty-three young and 112 old participants underwent MRI scanning of brain structure and brain activation. The experimental task was an executive context dual task with switch costs in response time as the behavioral measure. A serial mediation model was applied voxel-wise throughout the brain testing all pathways between age group, gray matter volume, brain activation and increased switch costs, worsening performance. There were widespread age group differences in gray matter volume and brain activation. Switch costs also significantly differed by age group. There were brain regions demonstrating significant indirect effects of age group on switch costs via the pathway through gray matter volume and brain activation. These were in the bilateral precuneus, bilateral parietal cortex, the left precentral gyrus, cerebellum, fusiform, and occipital cortices. There were also significant indirect effects via the brain activation pathway after controlling for gray matter volume. These effects were in the cerebellum, occipital cortex, left precentral gyrus, bilateral supramarginal, bilateral parietal, precuneus, middle cingulate extending to medial superior frontal gyri and the left middle frontal gyri. There were no significant effects through the gray matter volume alone pathway. These results demonstrate that a large proportion of the age group effect on switch costs can

  20. Nanoscale memory elements based on the superconductor-ferromagnet proximity effect and spin-transfer torque magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Burm

    Superconducting-ferromagnetic hybrid devices have potential for a practical memory technology compatible with superconducting logic circuits and may help realize energy-efficient, high-performance superconducting computers. We have developed Josephson junction devices with pseudo-spin-valve barriers. We observed changes in Josephson critical current depending on the magnetization state of the barrier (parallel or anti-parallel) through the superconductor-ferromagnet proximity effect. This effect persists to nanoscale devices in contrast to the remanent field effect. In nanopillar devices, the magnetization states of the pseudo-spin-valve barriers could also be switched with applied bias currents at 4 K, which is consistent with the spin-transfer torque effect in analogous room-temperature spin valve devices. These results demonstrate devices that combine major superconducting and spintronic effects for scalable read and write of memory states, respectively. Further challenges and proposals towards practical devices will also be discussed.In collaboration with: William Rippard, NIST - Boulder, Matthew Pufall, NIST - Boulder, Stephen Russek, NIST-Boulder, Michael Schneider, NIST - Boulder, Samuel Benz, NIST - Boulder, Horst Rogalla, NIST-Boulder, Paul Dresselhaus, NIST - Boulder

  1. Piezoelectric MEMS switch to activate event-driven wireless sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Okada, H.; Makimoto, N.; Maeda, R.; Itoh, T.

    2013-09-01

    We have developed piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches and applied them to ultra-low power wireless sensor nodes, to monitor the health condition of chickens. The piezoelectric switches have ‘S’-shaped piezoelectric cantilevers with a proof mass. Since the resonant frequency of the piezoelectric switches is around 24 Hz, we have utilized their superharmonic resonance to detect chicken movements as low as 5-15 Hz. When the vibration frequency is 4, 6 and 12 Hz, the piezoelectric switches vibrate at 0.5 m s-2 and generate 3-5 mV output voltages with superharmonic resonance. In order to detect such small piezoelectric output voltages, we employ comparator circuits that can be driven at low voltages, which can set the threshold voltage (Vth) from 1 to 31 mV with a 1 mV increment. When we set Vth at 4 mV, the output voltages of the piezoelectric MEMS switches vibrate below 15 Hz with amplitudes above 0.3 m s-2 and turn on the comparator circuits. Similarly, by setting Vth at 5 mV, the output voltages turn on the comparator circuits with vibrations above 0.4 m s-2. Furthermore, setting Vth at 10 mV causes vibrations above 0.5 m s-2 that turn on the comparator circuits. These results suggest that we can select small or fast chicken movements to utilize piezoelectric MEMS switches with comparator circuits.

  2. A Hyperactive Transposase of the Maize Transposable Element Activator (Ac)

    PubMed Central

    Lazarow, Katina; Du, My-Linh; Weimer, Ruth; Kunze, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable elements from maize are widely used as insertional mutagenesis and gene isolation tools in plants and more recently also in medaka and zebrafish. They are particularly valuable for plant species that are transformation-recalcitrant and have long generation cycles or large genomes with low gene densities. Ac/Ds transposition frequencies vary widely, however, and in some species they are too low for large-scale mutagenesis. We discovered a hyperactive Ac transposase derivative, AcTPase4x, that catalyzes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-fold more frequent Ds excisions than the wild-type transposase, whereas the reintegration frequency of excised Ds elements is unchanged (57%). Comparable to the wild-type transposase in plants, AcTPase4x catalyzes Ds insertion preferentially into coding regions and to genetically linked sites, but the mutant protein apparently has lost the weak bias of the wild-type protein for insertion sites with elevated guanine–cytosine content and nonrandom protein-DNA twist. AcTPase4x exhibits hyperactivity also in Arabidopsis thaliana where it effects a more than sixfold increase in Ds excision relative to wild-type AcTPase and thus may be useful to facilitate Ac/Ds-based insertion mutagenesis approaches. PMID:22562933

  3. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  4. A lipid-mediated conformational switch modulates the thermosensing activity of DesK.

    PubMed

    Inda, María Eugenia; Vandenbranden, Michel; Fernández, Ariel; de Mendoza, Diego; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía

    2014-03-01

    The thermosensor DesK is a multipass transmembrane histidine-kinase that allows the bacterium Bacillus subtilis to adjust the levels of unsaturated fatty acids required to optimize membrane lipid fluidity. The cytoplasmic catalytic domain of DesK behaves like a kinase at low temperature and like a phosphatase at high temperature. Temperature sensing involves a built-in instability caused by a group of hydrophilic residues located near the N terminus of the first transmembrane (TM) segment. These residues are buried in the lipid phase at low temperature and partially "buoy" to the aqueous phase at higher temperature with the thinning of the membrane, promoting the required conformational change. Nevertheless, the core question remains poorly understood: How is the information sensed by the transmembrane region converted into a rearrangement in the cytoplasmic catalytic domain to control DesK activity? Here, we identify a "linker region" (KSRKERERLEEK) that connects the TM sensor domain with the cytoplasmic catalytic domain involved in signal transmission. The linker adopts two conformational states in response to temperature-dependent membrane thickness changes: (i) random coiled and bound to the phospholipid head groups at the water-membrane interface, promoting the phosphatase state or (ii) unbound and forming a continuous helix spanning a region from the membrane to the cytoplasm, promoting the kinase state. Our results uphold the view that the linker is endowed with a helix/random coil conformational duality that enables it to behave like a transmission switch, with helix disruption decreasing the kinase/phosphatase activity ratio, as required to modulate the DesK output response. PMID:24522108

  5. The modality-switch effect: visually and aurally presented prime sentences activate our senses

    PubMed Central

    Scerrati, Elisa; Baroni, Giulia; Borghi, Anna M.; Galatolo, Renata; Lugli, Luisa; Nicoletti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Verifying different sensory modality properties for concepts results in a processing cost known as the modality-switch effect. It has been argued that this cognitive cost is the result of a perceptual simulation. This paper extends this argument and reports an experiment investigating whether the effect is the result of an activation of sensory information which can also be triggered by perceptual linguistically described stimuli. Participants were first exposed to a prime sentence describing a light or a sound’s perceptual property (e.g., “The light is flickering”, “The sound is echoing”), then required to perform a property-verification task on a target sentence (e.g., “Butter is yellowish”, “Leaves rustle”). The content modalities of the prime and target sentences could be compatible (i.e., in the same modality: e.g., visual–visual) or not (i.e., in different modalities). Crucially, we manipulated the stimuli’s presentation modality such that half of the participants was faced with written sentences while the other half was faced with aurally presented sentences. Results show a cost when two different modalities alternate, compared to when the same modality is repeated with both visual and aural stimuli presentations. This result supports the embodied and grounded cognition view which claims that conceptual knowledge is grounded into the perceptual system. Specifically, this evidence suggests that sensory modalities can be pre-activated through the simulation of either read or listened linguistic stimuli describing visual or acoustic perceptual properties. PMID:26579049

  6. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  7. Isotype-switched follicular lymphoma displays dissociation between activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Florian; Navarrete, Marcelo A; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Boehm, Joachim; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    In B-cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin genes. AID introduces mutations in immunoglobulin variable regions (IGV) during B-cell receptor affinity maturation, but may also introduce aberrant mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes, most commonly BCL6. Follicular lymphoma (FL) B-cells constitutively express AID and undergo CSR, SHM and aberrant SHM. We have studied AID expression, the presence of SHM mutations, CSR, and aberrant SHM in BCL6 in a cohort of 75 FL patients. Whereas IgM-expressing (non-switched) FL were characterized by an expected positive correlation between AID and IGV and BCL6 mutations, isotype-switched FL showed dissociation between AID expression and aberrant SHM, and inverse correlation between SHM and AID expression. Our results unveil two manifest biological subgroups of FL and indicate that the specific dissociation between AID and SHM after isotype switch may correlate with the clinical outcome of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:25860234

  8. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  9. A Simplified model of mutually inhibitory sleep-active and wake-active neuronal populations employing a noise-based switching mechanism.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mainak

    2016-04-01

    Infant rats switch randomly between the sleeping and waking states; during early infancy (up to postnatal day 8), sleep and wake bouts are random, brief (with means on the order of several seconds) and exponentially distributed, with the length of a particular bout independent of the length of prior bouts. As the rat ages during this early period, mean sleep and wake bout lengths gradually increase, though sleep and wake bouts remain exponentially distributed. Additionally, sleep and wake bouts are regulated independently of each other - alterations in the development of sleep (wake) bouts has no impact on the regulation wake (sleep) bouts. Sleep and wake bout behavior is associated with the activity of mutually inhibitory sleep-active and wake-active brainstem populations. In this work, I employ a simplified biophysical model of two mutually inhibitory populations consisting of ten integrate-and-fire neurons each and a noise-based switching mechanism. I show that such a noise-based switching mechanism naturally accounts for the experimentally observed features of sleep-wake switching during early infancy - random alternating activity bouts occur as a consequence of noise (provided inhibition is strong relative to excitation), bout durations are exponential (due to a lack of memory within the system), and cross-population inhibition or intrapopulation excitatory coupling provide mechanisms for changing and independently regulated sleep and wake bout means. PMID:26802484

  10. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser with active Q-switching and mode locking for hole drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solokhin, S. A.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Garnov, S. V.

    2011-06-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating with active-passive Q-switch mode locking, has been developed. The acousto-optic repetition train was one kilohertz with generated pulse train widths 65 ns, single pulse widths 200 ps and an average power of 6.5 W. Improvement of efficiency of small diameter deep holes laser drilling in different materials was studied.

  11. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  12. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  13. Assessment of nose protector for sport activities: finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Coto, Neide Pena; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Brito e Dias, Reinaldo; Driemeier, Larissa; de Oliveira Roveri, Guilherme; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of facial fractures stemming from sport activities in recent years, with the nasal bone one of the most affected structures. Researchers recommend the use of a nose protector, but there is no standardization regarding the material employed. Clinical experience has demonstrated that a combination of a flexible and rigid layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) offers both comfort and safety to practitioners of sports. The aim of the present study was the investigation into the stresses generated by the impact of a rigid body on the nasal bone on models with and without an EVA protector. For such, finite element analysis was employed. A craniofacial model was constructed from images obtained through computed tomography. The nose protector was modeled with two layers of EVA (1 mm of rigid EVA over 2 mm of flexible EVA), following the geometry of the soft tissue. Finite element analysis was performed using the LS Dyna program. The bone and rigid EVA were represented as elastic linear material, whereas the soft tissues and flexible EVA were represented as hyperelastic material. The impact from a rigid sphere on the frontal region of the face was simulated with a constant velocity of 20 m s(-1) for 9.1 μs. The model without the protector served as the control. The distribution of maximal stress of the facial bones was recorded. The maximal stress on the nasal bone surpassed the breaking limit of 0.13-0.34 MPa on the model without a protector, while remaining below this limit on the model with the protector. Thus, the nose protector made from both flexible and rigid EVA proved effective at protecting the nasal bones under high-impact conditions. PMID:21790992

  14. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  15. A fail safe laser activated switch used as an emergency control link at the Langley Vortex Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassel, P. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A fail safe light activated switch was used as an emergency control link at the Langley Vortex Research Facility. In this facility aircraft models were towed through a still air test chamber by a gasoline powered vehicle which was launched from one end of a 427-meter track and attained velocities to 31 m/sec in the test chamber. A 5 mW HeNe laser with a mechanical copper provided a connecting link with the moving tow vehicle on which a silicon photodiode receiver with a specially designed amplifier provided a fail safe switching action. This system provided an emergency means of stopping the vehicle by turning off the laser to interrupt the power to the vehicle ignition and brake release systems.

  16. Longevity of optically activated, high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1997-08-01

    The longevity of high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) has been extended to well over 10 million pulses by reducing the density of carriers at the semiconductor to metal interface. This was achieved by reducing the density in the vertical and lateral directions. The first was achieved by varying the spatial distribution of the trigger light thereby widening the current filaments that are characteristic of the high gain switches. The authors reduced the carrier density in the vertical direction by using ion implantation. These results were obtained for currents of about 10 A, current duration of 3.5 ns, and switched voltage of {approximately}2 kV. At currents of {approximately}70 A, the switches last for 0.6 million pulses. In order to improve the performance at high currents new processes such as deep diffusion and epitaxial growth of contacts are being pursued. To guide this effort the authors measured a carrier density of 6 x 10{sup 18} electrons (or holes)/cm{sup 3} in filaments that carry a current of 5 A.

  17. Doped Contacts for High-Longevity Optically Activated, High Gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; BROWN,DARWIN JAMES; HJALMARSON,HAROLD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; THORNTON,R.L.; DONALDSON,R.D.

    1999-12-17

    The longevity of high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) has been extended to over 100 million pulses. This was achieved by improving the ohmic contacts through the incorporation of a doped layer that is very effective in the suppression of filament formation, alleviating current crowding. Damage-free operation is now possible with virtually infinite expected lifetime at much higher current levels than before. The inherent damage-free current capacity of the bulk GaAs itself depends on the thickness of the doped layers and is at least 100A for a dopant diffusion depth of 4pm. The contact metal has a different damage mechanism and the threshold for damage ({approx}40A) is not further improved beyond a dopant diffusion depth of about 2{micro}m. In a diffusion-doped contact switch, the switching performance is not degraded when contact metal erosion occurs, unlike a switch with conventional contacts. This paper will compare thermal diffusion and epitaxial growth as approaches to doping the contacts. These techniques will be contrasted in terms of the fabrication issues and device characteristics.

  18. Longevity improvement of optically activated, high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; BROWN,DARWIN JAMES; HJALMARSON,HAROLD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-03-02

    The longevity of high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) has been extended to over 100 million pulses at 23A, and over 100 pulses at 1kA. This is achieved by improving the ohmic contacts by doping the semi-insulating GaAs underneath the metal, and by achieving a more uniform distribution of contact wear across the entire switch by distributing the trigger light to form multiple filaments. This paper will compare various approaches to doping the contacts, including ion implantation, thermal diffusion, and epitaxial growth. The device characterization also includes examination of the filament behavior using open-shutter, infra-red imaging during high gain switching. These techniques provide information on the filament carrier densities as well as the influence that the different contact structures and trigger light distributions have on the distribution of the current in the devices. This information is guiding the continuing refinement of contact structures and geometries for further improvements in switch longevity.

  19. Doped Contacts for High-Longevity Optically Activated, High Gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Brown, D.J.; Donaldson, R.D.; Helgeson, W.D.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; O'Malley, M.W.; Thornton, R.L.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1999-08-05

    The longevity of high gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) has been extended to over 50 million pulses. This was achieved by improving the ohmic contacts through the incorporation of a doped layer beneath the PCSS contacts which is very effective in the suppression of filament formation and alleviating current crowding to improve the longevity of PCSS. Virtually indefinite, damage-free operation is now possible at much higher current levels than before. The inherent damage-free current capacity of the switch depends on the thickness of the doped layers and is at least 100A for a dopant diffusion depth of 4pm. The contact metal has a different damage mechanism and the threshold for damage ({approximately}40A) is not further improved beyond a dopant diffusion depth of about 2{micro}m. In a diffusion-doped contact switch, the switching performance is not degraded when contact metal erosion occurs. This paper will compare thermal diffusion and epitaxial growth as approaches to doping the contacts. These techniques will be contrasted in terms of the fabrication issues and device characteristics.

  20. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-β gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15 kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  1. Germinal and Somatic Activity of the Maize Element Activator (Ac) in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, J.; Lim, E.; James-Jr., D. W.; Dooner, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the germinal and somatic activity of the maize Activator (Ac) element in Arabidopsis with the objective of developing an efficient transposon-based system for gene isolation in that plant. Transposition activity was assayed with a chimeric marker that consists of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and a bacterial streptomycin phosphotransferase gene (SPT). Somatic activity was detected in seedlings germinated on plates containing streptomycin as green-resistant sectors against a background of white-sensitive cells. Germinal excisions resulted in fully green seedlings. The transposition frequency was extremely low when a single copy of the transposon was present, but appeared to increase with an increase in Ac copy number. Plants that were selected as variegated produced an increased number of green progeny. The methylation state of the Ac elements in lines with either low or high levels of excision was assessed by restriction analysis. No difference was found between these lines, indicating that the degree of methylation did not contribute to the level of Ac activity. Germinal excision events were analyzed molecularly and shown to carry reinserted transposons in about 50% of the cases. In several instances, streptomycin-resistant siblings carried the same transposed Ac element, indicating that excision had occurred prior to meiosis in the parent. We discuss parameters that need to be considered to optimize the use of Ac as a transposon tag in Arabidopsis. PMID:1322854

  2. Emergy of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Biologically Active Elements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate estimates of the emergy of elemental flows are needed to accurately evaluate the far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformity and specific emergy of the elements and of their different chemical species is also needed to quantify the inputs to many producti...

  3. Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

  4. A molecular switch for targeting between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria: conversion of a mitochondria-targeting element into an ER-targeting signal in DAKAP1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuliang; Taylor, Susan S

    2008-04-25

    dAKAP1 (AKAP121, S-AKAP84), a dual specificity PKA scaffold protein, exists in several forms designated as a, b, c, and d. Whether dAKAP1 targets to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or mitochondria depends on the presence of the N-terminal 33 amino acids (N1), and these N-terminal variants are generated by either alternative splicing and/or differential initiation of translation. The mitochondrial targeting motif, which is localized between residues 49 and 63, is comprised of a hydrophobic helix followed by positive charges ( Ma, Y., and Taylor, S. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 27328-27336 ). dAKAP1 is located on the cytosolic surface of mitochondria outer membrane and both smooth and rough ER membrane. A single residue, Asp(31), within the first 33 residues of dAKAP1b is required for ER targeting. Asp(31), which functions as a separate motif from the mitochondrial targeting signal, converts the mitochondrial-targeting signal into a bipartite ER-targeting signal, without destroying the mitochondria-targeting signal. Therefore dAKAP1 possesses a single targeting element capable of targeting to both mitochondria and ER, with the ER signal overlapping the mitochondria signal. The specificity of ER or mitochondria targeting is determined and switched by the availability of the negatively charged residue, Asp(31). PMID:18287098

  5. The influence of catalytic activity on the phase transition governed binary switch point of MISiC-FET lambda sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingbrant, Helena; Lloyd Spetz, Anita

    2006-08-01

    A metal insulator silicon carbide field effect transistor (MISiC-FET) sensor with a catalytic metal gate is currently under development for detecting the lambda value, or air-to-fuel ratio, of gasoline exhausts. It has been noticed that a change from a low to a high signal level of the sensor occurs at a lambda value above 1.00, which is an oxidizing atmosphere. The exact location of the switch point depends both on the kind of gas and gas concentrations chosen to obtain a specific lambda value. The switch point would rather have been expected at 1.00, which is at stoichiometry, irrespective of the composition of the gas mixture. The origin of this phenomenon is studied here by exposing the sensor to lambda stairs while changing different operating parameters. An increase in catalytic activity has been observed to move the switch point of the device towards a lambda value of 1.00. A similar effect is achieved when decreasing the flow or increasing the temperature of operation of the device. The behavior is explained through the introduction of mass transport limitations in the measurement cell, and the difference in diffusion constants and sticking coefficients among the gases when reaction limitation prevails.

  6. Substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T-cell-independent antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingyue; Yi, Junyang; Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Kai; Song, Ping; Chau, Alicia; Wang, Fei; Chang, Zai; Han, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Chunyang; Liu, Wanli

    2015-06-01

    B cells use B-cell receptors (BCRs) to sense antigens that are usually presented on substrates with different stiffness. However, it is not known how substrate stiffness affects B-cell proliferation, class switch, and in vivo antibody responses. We addressed these questions using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with different stiffness (20 or 1100 kPa). Live cell imaging experiments suggested that antigens on stiffer substrates more efficiently trigger the synaptic accumulation of BCR and phospho-Syk molecules compared with antigens on softer substrates. In vitro expansion of mouse primary B cells shows different preferences for substrate stiffness when stimulated by different expansion stimuli. LPS equally drives B-cell proliferation on stiffer or softer substrates. Anti-CD40 antibodies enhance B-cell proliferation on stiffer substrates, while antigens enhance B-cell proliferation on softer substrates through a mechanism involving the enhanced phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO1. In vitro class switch differentiation of B cells prefers softer substrates. Lastly, NP67-Ficoll on softer substrates accounted for an enhanced antibody response in vivo. Thus, substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T cell independent antibody responses in vivo, suggesting its broad application in manipulating the fate of B cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25756957

  7. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  8. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  9. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  10. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  11. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  12. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  13. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  14. Active Q-switching of a fiber laser using a modulated fiber Fabry-Perot filter and a fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Manuel, Rodolfo; Kaboko, J. J. M.; Shlyagin, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and robust actively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring cavity laser. The Q-switching is based on dynamic spectral overlapping of two filters, namely a fiber Bragg grating-based filter and a fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter. Using 3.5 m of erbium-doped fiber and a pump power of only 60 mW, Q-switched pulses with a peak power of 9.7 W and a pulse duration of 500 ns were obtained. A pulse repetition rate can be continuously varied from a single shot to a few KHz.

  15. The WEE1 regulators CPEB1 and miR-15b switch from inhibitor to activators at G2/M.

    PubMed

    Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Pritchard, Linda L; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Vislovukh, Andrii; Meng, Qingwei; Groisman, Regina; Degerny, Cindy; Deforzh, Evgeny; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Groisman, Irina

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in the AGO-containing RISC complex control messenger RNA (mRNA) translation by binding to mRNA 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The relationship between miRNAs and other regulatory factors that also bind to mRNA 3'UTR, such as CPEB1 (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein), remains elusive. We found that both CPEB1 and miR-15b control the expression of WEE1, a key mammalian cell cycle regulator. Together, they repress WEE1 protein expression during G1 and S-phase. Interestingly, the 2 factors lose their inhibitory activity at the G2/M transition, at the time of the cell cycle when WEE1 expression is maximal, and, moreover, rather activate WEE1 translation in a synergistic manner. Our data show that translational regulation by RISC and CPEB1 is essential in cell cycle control and, most importantly, is coordinated, and can be switched from inhibition to activation during the cell cycle. PMID:27027998

  16. High-efficient diode-pumped actively Q-switched Nd:YAG/KTP Raman laser at 1096 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fufang; Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Weitao; Cong, Zhenhua; Shi, Men; Yang, Xiuqin; Kong, Weijin; Ma, Lili; Wu, Wendi

    2013-09-01

    With Nd:YAG as the gain medium and KTP crystal as the Raman medium, the characteristics of an LD pumped intracavity actively Q-switched Nd:YAG/KTP Raman laser at 1096 nm wavelength were studied. The output characteristics of 1096 nm were investigated. At a pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz an average power up to 1.97 W was obtained with the incident pump power of 11.75 W, corresponding to a diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency of 16.8%.

  17. A redox-dependent dimerization switch regulates activity and tolerance for reactive oxygen species of barley seed glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Navrot, Nicolas; Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per

    2015-05-01

    Monomeric and dimeric forms of recombinant barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) glutathione peroxidase 2 (HvGpx2) are demonstrated to display distinctly different functional properties in vitro. Monomeric HvGpx2 thus has five fold higher catalytic efficiency than the dimer towards tert-butyl hydroperoxide, but is more sensitive to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide. Treatment of the monomer with hydrogen peroxide results in dimer formation. This observed new behavior of a plant glutathione peroxidase suggests a mechanism involving a switch from a highly catalytically competent monomer to a less active, but more oxidation-resistant dimer. PMID:25796076

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  19. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  20. Detection of mercury ions based on mercury-induced switching of enzyme-like activity of platinum/gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chao-Wei; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2012-11-01

    In this study, bimetallic platinum/gold nanoparticles (Pt/Au NPs) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, and the deposition of mercury was found to switch the enzymatic activity to a catalase-like activity. Based on this phenomenon, we developed a new method for detecting mercury ions through their deposition on bimetallic Pt/Au NPs to switch the catalytic activity of Pt/Au NPs. Pt/Au NPs could be easily prepared through reduction of Au(3+) and Pt(4+) by sodium citrate in a one-pot synthesis. The peroxidase catalytic activity of the Pt/Au NPs was controlled by varying the ratios of Pt to Au. The Pt(0.1)/Au NPs (prepared with a [Au(3+)]/[Pt(4+)] molar ratio of 9.0/1.0) showed excellent oxidation catalysis for H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of Amplex® Red (AR) to resorufin. The oxidized product of AR, resorufin, fluoresces more strongly (excitation/emission wavelength maxima ca. 570/585 nm) than AR alone. The peroxidase catalytic activity of Pt(0.1)/Au NPs was switched to catalase-like activity in the presence of mercury ions in a 5.0 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-borate solution (pH 7.0) through the deposition of Hg on the particle surfaces owing to the strong Hg-Au metallic bond. The catalytic activity of Hg-Pt(0.1)/Au NPs is superior (by at least 5-fold) to that of natural catalase (from bovine liver). Under optimal solution conditions [5.0 mM Tris-borate (pH 7.0), H(2)O(2) (50 mM), and AR (10 μM)] and in the presence of the masking agents polyacrylic acid and tellurium nanowires, the Pt(0.1)/Au NPs allowed the selective detection of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and methylmercury ions (MeHg(+)) at concentrations as low as several nanomolar. This simple, fast, and cost-effective system enabled selective determination of the spiked concentrations of Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) in tap, pond, and stream waters. PMID:23011048

  1. An Endocrine-Exocrine Switch in the Activity of the Pancreatic Homeodomain Protein PDX1 through Formation of a Trimeric Complex with PBX1b and MRG1 (MEIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Galvin H.; Liu, Ying; Rose, Scott D.; Bischof, Larry J.; Steelman, Scott; Buchberg, Arthur M.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    1998-01-01

    HOX proteins and some orphan homeodomain proteins form complexes with either PBX or MEIS subclasses of homeodomain proteins. This interaction can increase the binding specificity and transcriptional effectiveness of the HOX partner. Here we show that specific members of both PBX and MEIS subclasses form a multimeric complex with the pancreatic homeodomain protein PDX1 and switch the nature of its transcriptional activity. The two activities of PDX1 are exhibited through the 10-bp B element of the transcriptional enhancer of the pancreatic elastase I gene (ELA1). In pancreatic acinar cells the activity of the B element requires other elements of the ELA1 enhancer; in β-cells the B element can activate a promoter in the absence of other enhancer elements. In acinar cell lines the activity is mediated by a complex comprising PDX1, PBX1b, and MRG1 (MEIS2). In contrast, β-cell lines are devoid of PBX1b and MRG1, so that a trimeric complex does not form, and the β-cell-type activity is mediated by PDX1 without PBX1b and MRG1. The presence of specific nuclear isoforms of PBX and MEIS is precisely regulated in a cell-type-specific manner. The β-cell-type activity can be detected in acinar cells if the B element is altered to retain binding of PDX1 but prevent binding of the PDX1-PBX1b-MRG1 complex. These observations suggest that association with PBX and MEIS partners controls the nature of the transcriptional activity of the organ-specific PDX1 transcription factor in exocrine versus endocrine cells. PMID:9710595

  2. Finite Element Learning Modules as Active Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ashland O.; Jensen, Daniel; Rencis, Joseph; Wood, Kristin; Wood, John; White, Christina; Raaberg, Kristen Kaufman; Coffman, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of active learning is to solicit participation by students beyond the passive mode of traditional classroom lectures. Reading, writing, participating in discussions, hands-on activities, engaging in active problem solving, and collaborative learning can all be involved. The skills acquired during active learning tend to go above and…

  3. Trace elements removal from water using modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Campos, V; Buchler, P M

    2008-02-01

    This paper present the possible alternative options for the remove of trace elements from drinking water supplies in the trace. Arsenic and chromium are two of the most toxic pollutants, introduced into natural waters from a variety of sources and causing various adverse effects on living bodies. The performance of three filter bed methods was evaluated in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted to investigate the sorption of arsenic and chromium on carbon steel and removal of trace elements from drinking water with a household filtration process. The affinity of the arsenic and chromium species for Fe/Fe3C (iron/iron carbide) sites is the key factor controlling the removal of the elements. The method is based on the use of powdered block carbon, powder carbon steel and ceramic spheres in the ion-sorption columns as a cleaning process. The modified powdered block carbon is a satisfactory and economical sorbent for trace elements (arsenite and chromate) dissolved in water due to its low unit cost of about $23 and compatibility with the traditional household filtration system. PMID:18613611

  4. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  5. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  6. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  8. Detection of mercury ions based on mercury-induced switching of enzyme-like activity of platinum/gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chao-Wei; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2012-10-01

    In this study, bimetallic platinum/gold nanoparticles (Pt/Au NPs) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, and the deposition of mercury was found to switch the enzymatic activity to a catalase-like activity. Based on this phenomenon, we developed a new method for detecting mercury ions through their deposition on bimetallic Pt/Au NPs to switch the catalytic activity of Pt/Au NPs. Pt/Au NPs could be easily prepared through reduction of Au3+ and Pt4+ by sodium citrate in a one-pot synthesis. The peroxidase catalytic activity of the Pt/Au NPs was controlled by varying the ratios of Pt to Au. The Pt0.1/Au NPs (prepared with a [Au3+]/[Pt4+] molar ratio of 9.0/1.0) showed excellent oxidation catalysis for H2O2-mediated oxidation of Amplex® Red (AR) to resorufin. The oxidized product of AR, resorufin, fluoresces more strongly (excitation/emission wavelength maxima ca. 570/585 nm) than AR alone. The peroxidase catalytic activity of Pt0.1/Au NPs was switched to catalase-like activity in the presence of mercury ions in a 5.0 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-borate solution (pH 7.0) through the deposition of Hg on the particle surfaces owing to the strong Hg-Au metallic bond. The catalytic activity of Hg-Pt0.1/Au NPs is superior (by at least 5-fold) to that of natural catalase (from bovine liver). Under optimal solution conditions [5.0 mM Tris-borate (pH 7.0), H2O2 (50 mM), and AR (10 μM)] and in the presence of the masking agents polyacrylic acid and tellurium nanowires, the Pt0.1/Au NPs allowed the selective detection of inorganic mercury (Hg2+) and methylmercury ions (MeHg+) at concentrations as low as several nanomolar. This simple, fast, and cost-effective system enabled selective determination of the spiked concentrations of Hg2+ and MeHg+ in tap, pond, and stream waters.In this study, bimetallic platinum/gold nanoparticles (Pt/Au NPs) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, and the deposition of mercury was found to switch the enzymatic

  9. MRI-based detection of alkaline phosphatase gene reporter activity using a porphyrin solubility switch

    PubMed Central

    Westmeyer, Gil G.; Emer, Elena G.; Lintelmann, Jutta; Jasanoff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to map patterns of gene expression noninvasively in living animals could have impact in many areas of biology. Reporter systems compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be particularly valuable, but existing strategies tend to lack sensitivity or specificity. Here we address the challenge of MRI-based gene mapping using the reporter enzyme secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), in conjunction with a water soluble metalloporphyrin contrast agent. SEAP cleaves the porphyrin into an insoluble product that accumulates at sites of enzyme expression and can be visualized by MRI and optical absorbance. The contrast mechanism functions in vitro, in brain slices, and in animals. The system also provides the possibility of readout both in the living animal and by post mortem histology, and it notably does not require intracellular delivery of the contrast agent. The solubility switch mechanism used to detect SEAP could be adapted for imaging of additional reporter enzymes or endogenous targets. PMID:24613020

  10. Intracavity optical parametric oscillator pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Wang, H.; Chang, J.; Fan, S. Z.; Ma, F. S.; Jin, G. F.

    2008-03-01

    A non-critically phase-matched KTiOPO4 optical parametric oscillator (OPO) intracavity pumped by a laser diode end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switchedNd:YAG laser is experimentally demonstrated. The highest average power is obtained at the pulse repetition rate (PRR) of around 15 kHz, which is different from the widely reported Nd:YVO4 laser pumped OPO in which the highest average power is obtained at a very high PRR, e.g. 80 kHz. With an incident laser diode power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, an average signal power of 0.72 W is obtained with a peak power of 7.7 kW and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 10.4%.

  11. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  12. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  13. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4. PMID:20855884

  14. Preconcentration and Speciation of Trace Elements and Trace-Element Analogues of Radionuclides by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.

    1999-11-14

    We have developed a number of preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) methods in our laboratory for the determination of trace elements in a variety of complex sample matrices. We developed a number of cocrystallization and coprecipitation methods for the determination of trace elements in water samples. We developed several methods for the determination of I in foods and diets. We have developed a number of PNAA methods in our laboratory We determined As and Sb in geological materials and natural waters by coprecipitation with Se and Au in silicate rocks and ores by coprecipitation with Te followed by NAA. We developed an indirect NAA method for the determination of B in leachates of borosilicate glass. We have been interested in studying the speciation of Am, Tc, and Np in simulated vitrified groundwater leachates of high-level wastes under oxid and anoxic conditions using a number of techniques. We then used PNAA methods to study speciation of trace-element analogues of radionuclides. We have been able to apply biochemical techniques and NAA for the separation, preconcentration, and characterization of metalloprotein and protein-bound trace-element species in subcellular fractions of bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop chemical and biochemical methods in conjunction with NAA, NMR, and MS for the separation and identification of extractable organohalogens (EOX) in tissues of beluga whales, cod, and northern pink shrimp

  15. A switch region determines the cell type-specific positive or negative action of YY1 on the activity of the human papillomavirus type 18 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bauknecht, T; Jundt, F; Herr, I; Oehler, T; Delius, H; Shi, Y; Angel, P; Zur Hausen, H

    1995-01-01

    YY1 is a zinc finger transcription factor which acts as either a repressor or an activator dependent on the promoter context. YY1 is a potent activator of the genuine human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) upstream regulatory region (URR) in HeLa cells, which are known for high-level expression of the HPV-18 early genes. The activating activity of YY1 is dependent on the presence of a newly identified switch region located upstream of the YY1 binding site. Deletion of this region causes YY1 to act as a repressor of HPV-18 promoter activity. In vivo footprinting of the HPV-18 URR and an in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay identified proteins binding to the switch region. Site-directed mutagenesis of the switch region and YY1 binding sites suggests that these two regions work in concert to yield high-level HPV-18 URR activity in HeLa cells but not in HepG2 cells, where HPV-18 is almost inactive. These data identified a novel mode of cell type-specific regulation of HPV-18 promoter activity by positive or negative action of YY1, determined by the switch region binding factor(s). PMID:7983700

  16. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  17. Study of DNA light switch Ru(II) complexes: synthesis, characterization, photocleavage and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Yata, Praveen Kumar; Shilpa, M; Nagababu, P; Reddy, M Rajender; Kotha, Laxma Reddy; Gabra, Nazar Md; Satyanarayana, S

    2012-05-01

    The three Ru(II) complexes of [Ru(phen)(2)dppca](2+) (1) [Ru(bpy)(2)dppca](2+) (2) and [Ru(dmb)(2)dppca](2+) (3) (where phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, dmb = 2 ,2-dimethyl 2',2'-bipyridine and polypyridyl ligand containing a single carboxylate functionality dppca ligand (dipyridophenazine-11-carboxylic acid) have been synthesized and characterized. These complexes have been shown to act as promising calf thymus DNA intercalators and a new class of DNA light switches, as evidenced by UV-visible and luminescence titrations with Co(2+) and EDTA, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) and KI, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, viscosity measurements, and DNA melting experiments. The results suggest that 1, 2, and 3 complexes bind to CT-DNA through intercalation and follows the order 1 > 2 > 3. Under irradiation at 365 nm, the three complexes have also been found to promote the photocleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA. PMID:22194001

  18. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  19. Emergy Evaluations of the Global Biogeochemical Cycles of Six Biologically Active Elements and Two Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the emergy carried by the flows of biologically active elements (BAE) and compounds are needed to accurately evaluate the near and far field effects of anthropogenic wastes. The transformities and specific emergies of these elements and of their different chemical sp...

  20. Experimental Observation of Redox-Induced Fe-N Switching Behavior as a Determinant Role for Oxygen Reduction Activity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Hafiz, Hasnain; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Wu, Gang; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun; Holby, Edward F; Zelenay, Piotr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-12-22

    The commercialization of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices relies largely upon the development of highly active catalysts based on abundant and inexpensive materials. Despite recent achievements in this respect, further progress is hindered by the poor understanding of the nature of active sites and reaction mechanisms. Herein, by characterizing representative iron-based catalysts under reactive conditions, we identify three Fe-N4-like catalytic centers with distinctly different Fe-N switching behaviors (Fe moving toward or away from the N4-plane) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and show that their ORR activities are essentially governed by the dynamic structure associated with the Fe(2+/3+) redox transition, rather than the static structure of the bare sites. Our findings reveal the structural origin of the enhanced catalytic activity of pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts compared to nonpyrolyzed Fe-macrocycle compounds. More generally, the fundamental insights into the dynamic nature of transition-metal compounds during electron-transfer reactions will potentially guide rational design of these materials for broad applications. PMID:26566192

  1. Cardiolipin Switch in Mitochondria: Shutting off the Reduction of Cytochrome c and Turning on the Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Basova, Liana V.; Kurnikov, Igor V.; Wang, Lei; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Vlasova, Irina I.; Pacheco, Andy A.; Winnica, Daniel E.; Peterson, Jim; Bayir, Hülya; Waldeck, David H.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Upon interaction with anionic phospholipids, particularly mitochondria-specific cardiolipin (CL), cytochrome c (cyt c) loses its tertiary structure and its peroxidase activity dramatically increases. CL induced peroxidase activity of cyt c has been found to be important for selective CL oxidation in cells undergoing programmed death. During apoptosis, the peroxidase activity and the fraction of CL-bound cyt c markedly increases suggesting that CL may act as a switch to regulate cyt c’s mitochondrial functions. Using cyclic voltammetry and equilibrium redox-titrations, we show that the redox potential of cyt c shifts negatively by 350–400 mV upon binding to CL-containing membranes. Consequently, functions of cyt c as an electron transporter and cyt c reduction by Complex III are strongly inhibited. Further, CL/cyt c complexes are not effective in scavenging superoxide anions and are not effectively reduced by ascorbate. Thus, both redox properties and functions of cyt c change upon interaction with CL in the mitochondrial membrane, diminishing cyt c’s electron donor/acceptor role and stimulating its peroxidase activity. PMID:17319652

  2. The p38alpha/beta MAPK functions as a molecular switch to activate the quiescent satellite cell.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathan C; Tyner, Kristina J; Nibarger, Lisa; Stanley, Heather M; Cornelison, Dawn D W; Fedorov, Yuri V; Olwin, Bradley B

    2005-04-11

    Somatic stem cells cycle slowly or remain quiescent until required for tissue repair and maintenance. Upon muscle injury, stem cells that lie between the muscle fiber and basal lamina (satellite cells) are activated, proliferate, and eventually differentiate to repair the damaged muscle. Satellite cells in healthy muscle are quiescent, do not express MyoD family transcription factors or cell cycle regulatory genes and are insulated from the surrounding environment. Here, we report that the p38alpha/beta family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) reversibly regulates the quiescent state of the skeletal muscle satellite cell. Inhibition of p38alpha/beta MAPKs (a) promotes exit from the cell cycle, (b) prevents differentiation, and (c) insulates the cell from most external stimuli allowing the satellite cell to maintain a quiescent state. Activation of satellite cells and p38alpha/beta MAPKs occurs concomitantly, providing further support that these MAPKs function as a molecular switch for satellite cell activation. PMID:15824134

  3. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  4. Methods and apparatus for switching a transponder to an active state, and asset management systems employing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Jones, Alex K. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Hawrylak, Peter J. (Inventor); Marx, Frank (Inventor); Hoare, Raymond R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A transponder that may be used as an RFID tag includes a passive circuit to eliminate the need for an "always on" active RF receiving element to anticipate a wake-up signal for the balance of the transponder electronics. This solution allows the entire active transponder to have all circuit elements in a sleep (standby) state, thus drastically extending battery life or other charge storage device life. Also, a wake-up solution that reduces total energy consumption of an active transponder system by allowing all non-addressed transponders to remain in a sleep (standby) state, thereby reducing total system or collection energy. Also, the transponder and wake-up solution are employed in an asset tracking system.

  5. Methods and apparatus for switching a transponder to an active state, and asset management systems employing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Jones, Alex K. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Hawrylak, Peter J. (Inventor); Marx, Frank (Inventor); Hoare, Raymond R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A transponder that may be used as an RFID tag includes a passive circuit to eliminate the need for an "always on" active RF receiving element to anticipate a wake-up signal for the balance of the transponder electronics. This solution allows the entire active transponder to have all circuit elements in a sleep (standby) state, thus drastically extending battery life or other charge storage device life. Also, a wake-up solution that reduces total energy consumption of an active transponder system by allowing all non-addressed transponders to remain in a sleep (standby) state, thereby reducing total system or collection energy. Also, the transponder and wake-up solution are employed in an asset tracking system.

  6. Os2 -Os4 Switch Controls DNA Knotting and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Romero, María J; Salassa, Luca; Cheng, Xi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Clarkson, Guy J; Prokes, Ivan; Rodger, Alison; Costantini, Giovanni; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-07-25

    Dinuclear trihydroxido-bridged osmium-arene complexes are inert and biologically inactive, but we show here that linking dihydroxido-bridged Os(II) -arene fragments by a bridging di-imine to form a metallacycle framework results in strong antiproliferative activity towards cancer cells and distinctive knotting of DNA. The shortened spacer length reduces biological activity and stability in solution towards decomposition to biologically inactive dimers. Significant differences in behavior toward plasmid DNA condensation are correlated with biological activity. PMID:27240103

  7. Compensation for thermally induced birefringence in polycrystalline ceramic active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M A; Khazanov, E A

    2003-10-31

    Polycrystalline ceramics differ significantly from single crystals in that the crystallographic axes (and hence of the axes of thermally induced birefringence) are oriented randomly in each granule of the ceramic. The quaternion formalism is employed to calculate the depolarisation in the ceramics and the efficiency of its compensation. The obtained analytic expressions are in good agreement with the numerical relations. It is shown that the larger the ratio of the sample length to the granule size, the closer the properties of the ceramics to those of a single crystal with the [111] orientation (in particular, the uncompensated depolarisation is inversely proportional to this ratio). (active media)

  8. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  9. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  10. A High Conductance Detachable Heat Switch for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, C. Y.; Wong, Y.; Rodenbush, A. J.; Joshi, C. H.; Shirron, P. J.

    2004-06-01

    Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) are being increasingly considered for instrumentation and detector cooling on space missions such as Constellation-X. A multistage ADR is presently under development to operate between 6 K and the detector temperature of 50 mK. Energen, Inc. has developed and demonstrated a high conductance detachable thermal link (the heat switch) for operation at sub-Kelvin temperatures using a high-force cryogenic magnetostrictive actuator. A more efficient detachable thermal link decreases the number of cooling stages, thereby reducing the weight, cost and complexity of the cooling system. This heat switch uses KelvinAll, a magnetostrictive material developed by Energen, as the active element. Unlike other magnetostrictive materials, KelvinAll operates over a broad temperature range. At cryogenic temperatures it delivers a long stroke allowing a large separation gap between the contacting surfaces when the switch is disengaged. This makes alignment and operation of the heat switch simple.

  11. High gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches: Switch longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1998-07-01

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different pulsed power applications that require long lifetime (longevity). The switches have p and n contact metallization (with intentional or unintentional dopants) configured in such a way as to produce p-i-n or n-i-n switches. The longevity of the switches is determined by circuit parameters and by the ability of the contacts to resist erosion. This paper will describe how the switches performed in test-beds designed to measure switch longevity. The best longevity was achieved with switches made with diffused contacts, achieving over 50 million pulses at 10 A and over 2 million pulses at 80 A.

  12. HIFI-α activation underlies a functional switch in the paradoxical role of Ezh2/PRC2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Sylvia; Lee, Puay Leng; Feng, Min; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chng, Wee Joo; Yu, Qiang

    2016-06-28

    Despite the established oncogenic function of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in human cancers, its role as a tumor suppressor is also evident; however, the mechanism underlying the regulation of the paradoxical functions of PRC2 in tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here we show that hypoxia-inducible factor 1, α-subunit (HIFI-α) is a crucial modulator of PRC2 and enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) function in breast cancer. Interrogating the genomic expression of breast cancer indicates high HIF1A activity correlated with high EZH2 expression but low PRC2 activity in triple-negative breast cancer compared with other cancer subtypes. In the absence of HIFIA activation, PRC2 represses the expression of matrix metalloproteinase genes (MMPs) and invasion, whereas a discrete Ezh2 complexed with Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) acts to promote the expression of MMPs. HIF1-α induction upon hypoxia results in PRC2 inactivation by selective suppression of the expression of suppressor of zeste 12 protein homolog (SUZ12) and embryonic ectoderm development (EED), leading to a functional switch toward Ezh2/FoxM1-dependent induction of the expression of MMPs and invasion. Our study suggests a tumor-suppressive function of PRC2, which is restricted by HIF1-α, and an oncogenic function of Ezh2, which cooperates with FoxM1 to promote invasion in triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27303043

  13. Fast integrated optical switching by the protein bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábián, László; Wolff, Elmar K.; Oroszi, László; Ormos, Pál; Dér, András

    2010-07-01

    State-of-the-art photonic integration technology is ready to provide the passive elements of optical integrated circuits, based either on silicon, glass or plastic materials. The bottleneck is to find the proper nonlinear optical (NLO) materials in waveguide-based integrated optical circuits for light-controlled active functions. Recently, we proposed an approach where the active role is performed by the chromoprotein bacteriorhodopsin as an NLO material, that can be combined with appropriate integrated optical devices. Here we present data supporting the possibility of switching based on a fast photoreaction of bacteriorhodopsin. The results are expected to have important implications for photonic switching technology.

  14. Influence of a health education intervention on physical activity and screen time in primary school children: 'Switch Off--Get Active'.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael; Burns, Con F; McGuinness, Meabh; Heslin, Julie; Murphy, Niamh M

    2006-10-01

    Low levels of physical activity coupled with high levels of television viewing have been linked with obesity in children. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of 'Switch Off-Get Active', a 16-week controlled health education intervention, in increasing physical activity and reducing screen time and BMI in primary school children. A secondary objective was to compare children with high and low screen time. Participants were 312 children aged 10.2+/-0.7 years, attending nine schools in areas of social disadvantage. The 10-lesson, teacher-led intervention, conducted in spring 2003, emphasised self-monitoring, budgeting of time and selective viewing. Differences, adjusted for baseline values by ANCOVA, existed between intervention and control children at follow-up for self-reported physical activity (intervention +0.84 30 min blocks/day, 95%CI 0.11-1.57, p<0.05) and self-efficacy for physical activity (p<0.05) but not self-reported screen time (intervention--0.41 blocks/day, 95%CI--0.93-0.12, p=0.13) or BMI (p=0.63). Cross-sectional comparisons at baseline indicated lower physical activity, self-efficacy for physical activity and aerobic fitness and a higher BMI in children with high screen time. In conclusion, health education interventions can increase physical activity in primary school children but follow-ups of longer duration may be needed to demonstrate intervention effects on BMI. PMID:16872900

  15. Os2–Os4 Switch Controls DNA Knotting and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Romero, María J.; Salassa, Luca; Cheng, Xi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Clarkson, Guy J.; Prokes, Ivan; Rodger, Alison; Costantini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dinuclear trihydroxido‐bridged osmium–arene complexes are inert and biologically inactive, but we show here that linking dihydroxido‐bridged OsII–arene fragments by a bridging di‐imine to form a metallacycle framework results in strong antiproliferative activity towards cancer cells and distinctive knotting of DNA. The shortened spacer length reduces biological activity and stability in solution towards decomposition to biologically inactive dimers. Significant differences in behavior toward plasmid DNA condensation are correlated with biological activity. PMID:27240103

  16. Which Neuronal Elements are Activated Directly by Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holsheimer, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss which nerve fibers in the various quadrants of the spinal cord are immediately activated under normal conditions of spinal cord stimulation, ie, at voltages within the therapeutic range. The conclusions are based on both empirical and computer modeling data. The recruitment of dorsal column (DC) fibers is most likely restricted to Aβ fibers with a diameter ≥ 10.7 μm in a 0.20-0.25 mm layer under the pia mater and fibers of 9.4-10.7 μm in an even smaller outer layer when a conventional SCS lead is used. In a 0.25-mm outer layer of the T11 segment the number of Aβ fibers ≥ 10.7 μm, as estimated in a recent morphometric study, is about 56 in each DC. Because a DC at T11 innervates 12 dermatomes, a maximum of 4-5 fibers (≥ 10.7 μm) may be recruited in each dermatome near the discomfort threshold. The dermatome activated just below the discomfort threshold is likely to be stimulated by just a single fiber, suggesting that paresthesia and pain relief may be effected in a dermatome by the stimulation of a single large Aβ fiber. The depth of stimulation in the DCs, and thereby the number of recruited Aβ fibers, may be increased 2-3 fold when stimulation is applied by an optimized electrode configuration (a narrow bi/tripole or a transverse tripole). Assuming that the largest Aβ fibers in a dorsal root have a diameter of 15 μm, the smallest ones recruited at discomfort threshold would be 12 μm. The latter are presumably of proprioceptive origin and responsible for segmental reflexes and uncomfortable sensations. Furthermore, it is shown to be unlikely that, apart from dorsal roots and a thin outer layer of the DCs, any other spinal structures are recruited when stimulation is applied in the dorsal epidural space. Finally, anodal excitation and anodal propagation block are unlikely to occur with SCS. PMID:22151778

  17. Activation of enhancer elements by the homeobox gene Cdx2 is cell line specific.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J K; Levy, T; Suh, E R; Traber, P G

    1997-01-01

    Cdx2 is a caudal-related homeodomain transcription factor that is expressed in complex patterns during mouse development and at high levels in the intestinal epithelium of adult mice. Cdx2 activates transcription of intestinal gene promoters containing specific binding sites. Moreover, Cdx2 has been shown to induce intestinal differentiation in cell lines. In this study, we show that Cdx2 is able to bind to two well defined enhancer elements in the HoxC8 gene. We then demonstrate that Cdx2 is able to activate transcription of heterologous promoters when its DNA binding element is placed in an enhancer context. Furthermore, the ability to activate enhancer elements is cell-line dependent. When the Cdx2 activation domain was linked to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, the chimeric protein was able to activate Gal4 enhancer constructs in an intestinal cell line, but was unable to activate transcription in NIH3T3 cells. These data suggest that there are cell-specific factors that allow the Cdx2 activation domain to function in the activation of enhancer elements. We hypothesize that either a co-activator protein or differential phosphorylation of the activation domain may be the mechanism for intestinal cell line-specific function of Cdx2 and possibly in other tissues in early development. PMID:9171078

  18. Tunable diffractive optical elements on various electro active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Sebastian; Kollosche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Niko; Stumpe, Joachim; Kofod, Guggi

    2010-05-01

    An innovative approach for voltage-tunable optical gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) using electro active polymers is presented. Sinusoidal surface gratings, holographically written into azobenzene containing films, are transferred via nanoimprinting to DEAs of different carrier materials. We demonstrate that the surface relief deformation depends on the mechanical and geometrical properties of the actuators. The tested DEAs were made using commercially available elastomers, including a tri-block copolymer poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS), a silicone polydimethylsiloxane rubber (PDMS) and commonly used polyacrylic glue. The polyacrylic glue is ready to use, whereas the SEBS and the PDMS precursors have to be processed into thin films via different casting methods. The DEA material was pre-stretched, fixed to a stiff frame and coated with stretchable electrodes in appropriate designs. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly upon the conditions such as material properties, pre-stretch and geometry, the desired voltage-controllable deformations can be optimized during manufacturing of the DEA and also in the choice of materials in the grating transfer process. A full characterization of the grating deformation includes measurements of the grating pitch and depth modulation, plus the change of the diffraction angle and efficiency. The structural surface distortion was characterized by measuring the shape of the transmitted and diffracted laser beam with a beam profiling system while applying an electro-mechanical stress to the grating. Such surface distortions may lead to decreasing diffraction efficiency and lower beam quality. With properly chosen manufacturing parameters, we found a period shift of up to 9 % in a grating with 1 μm pitch. To describe the optical behavior, a model based on independently measured material parameters is presented.

  19. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  20. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  1. Design and application of gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Gas-gap heat switches can serve as an effective means of thermally disconnecting a standby cryocooler when the primary (operating) cooler is connected and vice versa. The final phase of the development and test of a cryogenic heat switch designed for loads ranging from 2 watts at 8 K, to 100 watts at 80 K are described. Achieved heat-switch on/off conductance ratio ranged from 11,000 at 8 K to 2200 at 80 K. A particularly challenging element of heat-switch design is achieving satisfactory operation when large temperatures differentials exist across the switch. A special series of tests and analyses was conducted and used in this Phase-2 activity to evaluate the developed switches for temperature differentials ranging up to 200 K. Problems encountered at the maximum levels are described and analyzed, and means of avoiding the problems in the future are presented. A comprehensive summary of the overall heat-switch design methodology is also presented with special emphasis on lessons learned over the course of the 4-year development effort.

  2. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers.

    PubMed

    Zhulyn, Olena; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Vakili, Niki Alizadeh; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Hopyan, Sevan; Hui, Chi-chung

    2014-04-28

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, Shh expression is not observed during the first 12 hr of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatterned into anterior and posterior regions through the antagonistic actions of transcription factors Gli3 and Hand2. We demonstrate that precocious activation of Shh signaling during this early phase interferes with the Gli3-dependent specification of anterior progenitors, disturbing establishment of signaling centers and normal outgrowth of the limb. Our findings illustrate that limb development requires a sweet spot in the level and timing of pathway activation that allows for the Shh-dependent expansion of posterior progenitors without interfering with early prepatterning functions of Gli3/Gli3R or specification of anterior progenitors. PMID:24726283

  3. Bacterial lipids activate, synergize, and inhibit a developmental switch in choanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Woznica, Arielle; Cantley, Alexandra M.; Beemelmanns, Christine; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Clardy, Jon; King, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In choanoflagellates, the closest living relatives of animals, multicellular rosette development is regulated by environmental bacteria. The simplicity of this evolutionarily relevant interaction provides an opportunity to identify the molecules and regulatory logic underpinning bacterial regulation of development. We find that the rosette-inducing bacterium Algoriphagus machipongonensis produces three structurally divergent classes of bioactive lipids that, together, activate, enhance, and inhibit rosette development in the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta. One class of molecules, the lysophosphatidylethanolamines (LPEs), elicits no response on its own but synergizes with activating sulfonolipid rosette-inducing factors (RIFs) to recapitulate the full bioactivity of live Algoriphagus. LPEs, although ubiquitous in bacteria and eukaryotes, have not previously been implicated in the regulation of a host–microbe interaction. This study reveals that multiple bacterially produced lipids converge to activate, enhance, and inhibit multicellular development in a choanoflagellate. PMID:27354530

  4. Cardiac Contractility Structure-Activity Relationship and Ligand-Receptor Interactions; the Discovery Of Unique and Novel Molecular Switches in Myosuppressin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Leander, Megan; Bass, Chloe; Marchetti, Kathryn; Maynard, Benjamin F.; Wulff, Juan Pedro; Ons, Sheila; Nichols, Ruthann

    2015-01-01

    Peptidergic signaling regulates cardiac contractility; thus, identifying molecular switches, ligand-receptor contacts, and antagonists aids in exploring the underlying mechanisms to influence health. Myosuppressin (MS), a decapeptide, diminishes cardiac contractility and gut motility. Myosuppressin binds to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) proteins. Two Drosophila melanogaster myosuppressin receptors (DrmMS-Rs) exist; however, no mechanism underlying MS-R activation is reported. We predicted DrmMS-Rs contained molecular switches that resembled those of Rhodopsin. Additionally, we believed DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 interactions would reflect our structure-activity relationship (SAR) data. We hypothesized agonist- and antagonist-receptor contacts would differ from one another depending on activity. Lastly, we expected our study to apply to other species; we tested this hypothesis in Rhodnius prolixus, the Chagas disease vector. Searching DrmMS-Rs for molecular switches led to the discovery of a unique ionic lock and a novel 3–6 lock, as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. The DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 contacts suggested tissue-specific signaling existed, which was in line with our SAR data. We identified R. prolixus (Rhp)MS-R and discovered it, too, contained the unique myosuppressin ionic lock and novel 3–6 lock found in DrmMS-Rs as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. Further, these motifs were present in red flour beetle, common water flea, honey bee, domestic silkworm, and termite MS-Rs. RhpMS and DrmMS decreased R. prolixus cardiac contractility dose dependently with EC50 values of 140 nM and 50 nM. Based on ligand-receptor contacts, we designed RhpMS analogs believed to be an active core and antagonist; testing on heart confirmed these predictions. The active core docking mimicked RhpMS, however, the antagonist did not. Together, these data were consistent with the unique ionic lock, novel 3–6 lock

  5. Cardiac contractility structure-activity relationship and ligand-receptor interactions; the discovery of unique and novel molecular switches in myosuppressin signaling.

    PubMed

    Leander, Megan; Bass, Chloe; Marchetti, Kathryn; Maynard, Benjamin F; Wulff, Juan Pedro; Ons, Sheila; Nichols, Ruthann

    2015-01-01

    Peptidergic signaling regulates cardiac contractility; thus, identifying molecular switches, ligand-receptor contacts, and antagonists aids in exploring the underlying mechanisms to influence health. Myosuppressin (MS), a decapeptide, diminishes cardiac contractility and gut motility. Myosuppressin binds to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) proteins. Two Drosophila melanogaster myosuppressin receptors (DrmMS-Rs) exist; however, no mechanism underlying MS-R activation is reported. We predicted DrmMS-Rs contained molecular switches that resembled those of Rhodopsin. Additionally, we believed DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 interactions would reflect our structure-activity relationship (SAR) data. We hypothesized agonist- and antagonist-receptor contacts would differ from one another depending on activity. Lastly, we expected our study to apply to other species; we tested this hypothesis in Rhodnius prolixus, the Chagas disease vector. Searching DrmMS-Rs for molecular switches led to the discovery of a unique ionic lock and a novel 3-6 lock, as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. The DrmMS-DrmMS-R1 and DrmMS-DrmMS-R2 contacts suggested tissue-specific signaling existed, which was in line with our SAR data. We identified R. prolixus (Rhp)MS-R and discovered it, too, contained the unique myosuppressin ionic lock and novel 3-6 lock found in DrmMS-Rs as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. Further, these motifs were present in red flour beetle, common water flea, honey bee, domestic silkworm, and termite MS-Rs. RhpMS and DrmMS decreased R. prolixus cardiac contractility dose dependently with EC50 values of 140 nM and 50 nM. Based on ligand-receptor contacts, we designed RhpMS analogs believed to be an active core and antagonist; testing on heart confirmed these predictions. The active core docking mimicked RhpMS, however, the antagonist did not. Together, these data were consistent with the unique ionic lock, novel 3-6 lock, transmission

  6. Correlating In Vitro Splice Switching Activity With Systemic In Vivo Delivery Using Novel ZEN-modified Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Suzan M; McClorey, Graham; Nordin, Joel Z; Godfrey, Caroline; Stenler, Sofia; Lennox, Kim A; Smith, CI Edvard; Jacobi, Ashley M; Varela, Miguel A; Lee, Yi; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Andaloussi, Samir E L

    2014-01-01

    Splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) induce alternative splicing of pre-mRNA and typically employ chemical modifications to increase nuclease resistance and binding affinity to target pre-mRNA. Here we describe a new SSO non-base modifier (a naphthyl-azo group, “ZEN™”) to direct exon exclusion in mutant dystrophin pre-mRNA to generate functional dystrophin protein. The ZEN modifier is placed near the ends of a 2′-O-methyl (2′OMe) oligonucleotide, increasing melting temperature and potency over unmodified 2′OMe oligonucleotides. In cultured H2K cells, a ZEN-modified 2′OMe phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotide delivered by lipid transfection greatly enhanced dystrophin exon skipping over the same 2′OMePS SSO lacking ZEN. However, when tested using free gymnotic uptake in vitro and following systemic delivery in vivo in dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the same ZEN-modified SSO failed to enhance potency. Importantly, we show for the first time that in vivo activity of anionic SSOs is modelled in vitro only when using gymnotic delivery. ZEN is thus a novel modifier that enhances activity of SSOs in vitro but will require improved delivery methods before its in vivo clinical potential can be realized. PMID:25423116

  7. Dlx-2 is implicated in TGF-β- and Wnt-induced epithelial-mesenchymal, glycolytic switch, and mitochondrial repression by Snail activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Yeon; Jeon, Hyun Min; Ju, Min Kyung; Jeong, Eui Kyong; Kim, Cho Hee; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Park, Hye Gyeong; Han, Song Iy; Kang, Ho Sung

    2015-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and oncogenic metabolism (including glycolytic switch) are important for tumor development and progression. Here, we show that Dlx-2, one of distal-less (Dlx) homeobox genes, induces EMT and glycolytic switch by activation of Snail. In addition, it was induced by TGF-β and Wnt and regulates TGF-β- and Wnt-induced EMT and glycolytic switch by activating Snail. We also found that TGF-β/Wnt suppressed cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, in a Dlx-2/Snail-dependent manner. TGF-β/Wnt appeared to downregulate the expression of various COX subunits including COXVIc, COXVIIa and COXVIIc; among these COX subunits, COXVIc was a common target of TGF-β, Wnt, Dlx-2 and Snail, indicating that COXVIc downregulation plays an important role(s) in TGF-β/Wnt-induced COX inhibition. Taken together, our results showed that Dlx-2 is involved in TGF-β- and Wnt-induced EMT, glycolytic switch, and mitochondrial repression by Snail activation. PMID:25651912

  8. Heavy metals and rare earth elements source-sink in some Egyptian cigarettes as determined by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nada, A; Abdel-Wahab, M; Sroor, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S; Abdel-Sabour, M F

    1999-07-01

    Heavy metals and rare earth elements in two types of cigarettes were studied. The contents of trace elements were determined by using delayed neutron activation analysis. In the present study 11 elements have been detected in popular and fine brand cigarettes marketed in Egypt. Evaluation of these elements with their potential hazards for smokers is briefly discussed. The material balance (source and sink) for each element was determined. Also the ratio of element recovery to the total amount was assessed. PMID:10376325

  9. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, "Shh" expression is not observed during the first 12 hours of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatter...

  10. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  13. Tuning of fast-spiking interneuron properties by an activity-dependent transcriptional switch*

    PubMed Central

    Dehorter, Nathalie; Ciceri, Gabriele; Bartolini, Giorgia; Lim, Lynette; del Pino, Isabel; Marín, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The function of neural circuits depends on the generation of specific classes of neurons. Neural identity is typically established near the time when neurons exit the cell cycle to become postmitotic cells, and it is generally accepted that, once the identity of a neuron has been established, its fate is maintained throughout life. Here, we show that network activity dynamically modulates the properties of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons through the postmitotic expression of the transcriptional regulator Er81. In the adult cortex, Er81 protein levels define a spectrum of FS basket cells with different properties, whose relative proportions are, however, continuously adjusted in response to neuronal activity. Our findings therefore suggest that interneuron properties are malleable in the adult cortex, at least to a certain extent. PMID:26359400

  14. IN-FLIGHT CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY A CHLORINE-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the in-flight capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) by a chlorine (C1)-impregnated activated carbon. Efforts to develop sorbents for the control of Hg emissions have demonstrated that C1-impregnation of virgin activated carbons using dilute solutions of hydrogen ...

  15. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  16. EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON ADSORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses experiments using activated carbon to capture elemental mercury (Hgo), and a bench-scale dixed-bed reactor and a flow reactor to determine the role of surface moisture in Hgo adsorption. Three activated-carbon samples, with different pore structure and ash co...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  18. Prediction of Geomagnetic Activity and Key Parameters in High-Latitude Ionosphere-Basic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Prediction of geomagnetic activity and related events in the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere is an important task of the Space Weather program. Prediction reliability is dependent on the prediction method and elements included in the prediction scheme. Two main elements are a suitable geomagnetic activity index and coupling function -- the combination of solar wind parameters providing the best correlation between upstream solar wind data and geomagnetic activity. The appropriate choice of these two elements is imperative for any reliable prediction model. The purpose of this work was to elaborate on these two elements -- the appropriate geomagnetic activity index and the coupling function -- and investigate the opportunity to improve the reliability of the prediction of geomagnetic activity and other events in the Earth's magnetosphere. The new polar magnetic index of geomagnetic activity and the new version of the coupling function lead to a significant increase in the reliability of predicting the geomagnetic activity and some key parameters, such as cross-polar cap voltage and total Joule heating in high-latitude ionosphere, which play a very important role in the development of geomagnetic and other activity in the Earth s magnetosphere, and are widely used as key input parameters in modeling magnetospheric, ionospheric, and thermospheric processes.

  19. BENCH-SCALE INVESTIGATION OF MECHANISMS OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the sorption and desorption of gaseous elemental mercury by activated carbon sorbents. wo sorbents were chosen for the study, one (PC-100) thermally activated and the other (HGR) chemically impregnated with sulfur. he sorbents had si...

  20. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  1. Reversible ubiquitination shapes NLRC5 function and modulates NF-κB activation switch.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingcai; Cai, Chunmei; Sun, Tingzhe; Wang, Qianliang; Xie, Weihong; Wang, Rongfu; Cui, Jun

    2015-12-01

    NLRC5 is an important regulator in innate immune responses. However, the ability of NLRC5 to inhibit NF-κB activation is controversial in different cell types. How dynamic modification of NLRC5 shapes NF-κB signaling remains unknown. We demonstrated that NLRC5 undergoes robust ubiquitination by TRAF2/6 after lipopolysaccharide treatment, which leads to dissociation of the NLRC5-IκB kinase complex. Experimental and mathematical analyses revealed that the K63-linked ubiquitination of NLRC5 at lysine 1,178 generates a coherent feedforward loop to further sensitize NF-κB activation. Meanwhile, we found USP14 specifically removes the polyubiquitin chains from NLRC5 to enhance NLRC5-mediated inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, we found that different cell types may exhibit different sensitivities to NF-κB activation in response to NLRC5 ablation, possibly as a result of the various intrinsic levels of deubiquitinases and NLRC5. This might partially reconcile controversial studies and explain why NLRC5 exhibits diverse inhibitory efficiencies. Collectively, our results provide the regulatory mechanisms of reversible NLRC5 ubiquitination and its role in the dynamic control of innate immunity. PMID:26620909

  2. Fusion-Triggered Switching of Enzymatic Activity on an Artificial Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Masaru; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi

    2012-01-01

    A nanosensory membrane device was constructed for detecting liposome fusion through changes in an enzymatic activity. Inspired by a biological signal transduction system, the device design involved functionalized liposomal membranes prepared by self-assembly of the following molecular components: a synthetic peptide lipid and a phospholipid as matrix membrane components, a Schiff's base of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate with phosphatidylethanolamine as a thermo-responsive artificial receptor, NADH-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase as a signal amplifier, and Cu2+ ion as a signal mediator between the receptor and enzyme. The enzymatic activity of the membrane device was adjustable by changing the matrix lipid composition, reflecting the thermotropic phase transition behavior of the lipid membranes, which in turn controlled receptor binding affinity toward the enzyme-inhibiting mediator species. When an effective fusogen anionic polymer was added to these cationic liposomes, membrane fusion occurred, and the functionalized liposomal membranes responded with changes in enzymatic activity, thus serving as an effective nanosensory device for liposome fusion detection. PMID:22778625

  3. Tum/RacGAP functions as a switch activating the Pav/kinesin-6 motor.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Fasulo, Barbara; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2016-01-01

    Centralspindlin is essential for central spindle and cleavage furrow formation. Drosophila centralspindlin consists of a kinesin-6 motor (Pav/kinesin-6) and a GTPase-activating protein (Tum/RacGAP). Centralspindlin localization to the central spindle is mediated by Pav/kinesin-6. While Tum/RacGAP has well-documented scaffolding functions, whether it influences Pav/kinesin-6 function is less well-explored. Here we demonstrate that both Pav/kinesin-6 and the centralspindlin complex (co-expressed Pav/Tum) have strong microtubule bundling activity. Centralspindlin also has robust plus-end-directed motility. In contrast, Pav/kinesin-6 alone cannot move microtubules. However, the addition of Tum/RacGAP or a 65 amino acid Tum/RacGAP fragment to Pav/kinesin-6 restores microtubule motility. Further, ATPase assays reveal that microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity of centralspindlin is seven times higher than that of Pav/kinesin-6. These findings are supported by in vivo studies demonstrating that in Tum/RacGAP-depleted S2 Drosophila cells, Pav/kinesin-6 exhibits severely reduced localization to the central spindle and an abnormal concentration at the centrosomes. PMID:27091402

  4. Tum/RacGAP functions as a switch activating the Pav/kinesin-6 motor

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li; Fasulo, Barbara; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2016-01-01

    Centralspindlin is essential for central spindle and cleavage furrow formation. Drosophila centralspindlin consists of a kinesin-6 motor (Pav/kinesin-6) and a GTPase-activating protein (Tum/RacGAP). Centralspindlin localization to the central spindle is mediated by Pav/kinesin-6. While Tum/RacGAP has well-documented scaffolding functions, whether it influences Pav/kinesin-6 function is less well-explored. Here we demonstrate that both Pav/kinesin-6 and the centralspindlin complex (co-expressed Pav/Tum) have strong microtubule bundling activity. Centralspindlin also has robust plus-end-directed motility. In contrast, Pav/kinesin-6 alone cannot move microtubules. However, the addition of Tum/RacGAP or a 65 amino acid Tum/RacGAP fragment to Pav/kinesin-6 restores microtubule motility. Further, ATPase assays reveal that microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity of centralspindlin is seven times higher than that of Pav/kinesin-6. These findings are supported by in vivo studies demonstrating that in Tum/RacGAP-depleted S2 Drosophila cells, Pav/kinesin-6 exhibits severely reduced localization to the central spindle and an abnormal concentration at the centrosomes. PMID:27091402

  5. Reversible ubiquitination shapes NLRC5 function and modulates NF-κB activation switch

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingcai; Cai, Chunmei; Wang, Qianliang; Xie, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    NLRC5 is an important regulator in innate immune responses. However, the ability of NLRC5 to inhibit NF-κB activation is controversial in different cell types. How dynamic modification of NLRC5 shapes NF-κB signaling remains unknown. We demonstrated that NLRC5 undergoes robust ubiquitination by TRAF2/6 after lipopolysaccharide treatment, which leads to dissociation of the NLRC5–IκB kinase complex. Experimental and mathematical analyses revealed that the K63-linked ubiquitination of NLRC5 at lysine 1,178 generates a coherent feedforward loop to further sensitize NF-κB activation. Meanwhile, we found USP14 specifically removes the polyubiquitin chains from NLRC5 to enhance NLRC5-mediated inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, we found that different cell types may exhibit different sensitivities to NF-κB activation in response to NLRC5 ablation, possibly as a result of the various intrinsic levels of deubiquitinases and NLRC5. This might partially reconcile controversial studies and explain why NLRC5 exhibits diverse inhibitory efficiencies. Collectively, our results provide the regulatory mechanisms of reversible NLRC5 ubiquitination and its role in the dynamic control of innate immunity. PMID:26620909

  6. Label-free luminescence switch-on detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity using a G-quadruplex-selective probe.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Wang, Wei; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2014-05-25

    A label-free, oligonucleotide-based, switch-on luminescence detection method for T4 polynucleotide kinase activity has been developed using a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent Ir(iii) complex probe. The application of the assay for screening potential T4 PNK inhibitors is also demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first metal-based assay for PNK activity. PMID:24336506

  7. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  8. Parylene-based active micro space radiator with thermal contact switch

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Ai; Suzuki, Yuji

    2014-03-03

    Thermal management is crucial for highly functional spacecrafts exposed to large fluctuations of internal heat dissipation and/or thermal boundary conditions. Since thermal radiation is the only means for heat removal, effective control of radiation is required for advanced space missions. In the present study, a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) active radiator using the contact resistance change has been proposed. Unlike previous bulky thermal louvers/shutters, higher fill factor can be accomplished with an array of electrostatically driven micro diaphragms suspended with polymer tethers. With an early prototype developed with parylene MEMS technologies, radiation heat flux enhancement up to 42% has been achieved.

  9. Retinal dynamics underlie its switch from inverse agonist to agonist during rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Struts, Andrey V; Salgado, Gilmar F J; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Brown, Michael F

    2011-03-01

    X-ray and magnetic resonance approaches, though central to studies of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling, cannot address GPCR protein dynamics or plasticity. Here we show that solid-state (2)H NMR relaxation elucidates picosecond-to-nanosecond-timescale motions of the retinal ligand that influence larger-scale functional dynamics of rhodopsin in membranes. We propose a multiscale activation mechanism whereby retinal initiates collective helix fluctuations in the meta I-meta II equilibrium on the microsecond-to-millisecond timescale. PMID:21278756

  10. Impact of detector-element active-area shape and fill factor on super-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Russell; Droege, Douglas; Dapore, Alexander; Greiner, Mark

    2015-05-01

    In many undersampled imaging systems, spatial integration from the individual detector elements is the dominant component of the system point spread function (PSF). Conventional focal plane arrays (FPAs) utilize square detector elements with a nearly 100% fill factor, where fill factor is defined as the fraction of the detector element area that is active in light detection. A large fill factor is generally considered to be desirable because more photons are collected for a given pitch, and this leads to a higher signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). However, the large active area works against super-resolution (SR) image restoration by acting as an additional low pass filter in the overall PSF when modeled on the SR sampling grid. A high fill factor also tends to increase blurring from pixel cross-talk. In this paper, we study the impact of FPA detector-element shape and fill factor on SR. A detailed modulation transfer function analysis is provided along with a number of experimental results with both simulated data and real data acquired with a midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging system. We demonstrate the potential advantage of low fill factor detector elements when combined with SR image restoration. Our results suggest that low fill factor circular detector elements may be the best choice. New video results are presented using robust adaptive Wiener filter SR processing applied to data from a commercial MWIR imaging system with both high and low detector element fill factors.

  11. Survey of trace elements in coals and coal-related materials by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.; Cahill, R.A.; Frost, J.K.; Camp, L.R.; Gluskoter, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing primarily instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and other analytical methods as many as 61 elements were quantitatively surveyed in 170 U.S. whole coals, 70 washed coals, and 40 bench samples. Data on areal and vertical distributions in various regions were obtained along with extensive information on the mode of occurrence of various elements in the coal matrix itself. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  12. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k(o) neutron activation analysis

    PubMed

    Acharya; Mondal; Burte; Nair; Reddy; Reddy; Reddy; Manohar

    2000-12-01

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k0 method (k0 INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method. PMID:11077961

  13. Switch Using Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for use as a switch. In one embodiment, the switch comprises at least one RFID tag, each RFID tag comprising an antenna element and an RFID integrated circuit, at least one source element, and at least one lever arm. Each lever arm is connected to one of the RFID tags, and each lever arm is capable of two positions. One of the positions places the lever arm and the RFID tag connected thereto into alignment with the source element. Other embodiments are also described.

  14. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-09-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS. PMID:27387237

  15. Immunoglobulin class-switched B cells provide an active immune axis between CNS and periphery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengzhi; Pitts, Steven J.; Sundar, Purnima D.; Telman, Dilduz; Zhao, Lora Z.; Derstine, Mia; Abounasr, Aya; Hauser, Stephen L.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian

    2014-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), an exchange of lymphocytes, in particular B cells, between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery is believed to be required for the maintenance of active disease. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that prevent lymphocytes from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or induce near-complete peripheral B cell depletion rapidly mitigate MS disease activity. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we recently found that clonally related B cells exist in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) of MS patients, establishing the existence of an immune axis across the BBB. However, it remains unclear which subpopulations of the highly diverse peripheral B cell compartment share antigen-specificity with intrathecal B cell repertoires, and whether their antigen stimulation occurs on both sides of the BBB. To address these questions, we combined flow cytometry sorting of PB B cell subsets with deep immune repertoire sequencing of CSF and PB B cells. Immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG) heavy chain variable (VH) region repertoires of five PB B cell subsets from MS patients (n=8) were compared with their CSF Ig-VH transcriptomes. In 6 of 8 patients, we identified peripheral CD27+IgD−memory B cells, CD27hiCD38hi plasma cells/plasmablasts, or CD27−IgD− B cells providing an immune connection to the CNS compartment. Pinpointing Ig class-switched B cells as key component of the immune axis thought to contribute to ongoing MS disease activity strengthens the rationale of current therapeutic strategies and may lead to more targeted approaches. PMID:25100740

  16. Determination of Interesting Toxicological Elements in PM2.5 by Neutron and Photon Activation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capannesi, Geraldo; Lopez, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Human activities introduce compounds increasing levels of many dangerous species for environment and population. In this way, trace elements in airborne particulate have a preeminent position due to toxic element presence affecting the biological systems. The main problem is the analytical determination of such species at ultratrace levels: a very specific methodology is necessary with regard to the accuracy and precision and contamination problems. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis assure these requirements. A retrospective element analysis in airborne particulate collected in the last 4 decades has been carried out for studying their trend. The samples were collected in urban location in order to determine only effects due to global aerosol circulation; semiannual samples have been used to characterize the summer/winter behavior of natural and artificial origin. The levels of natural origin element are higher than those in other countries owing to geological and meteorological factors peculiar to Central Italy. The levels of artificial elements are sometimes less than those in other countries, suggesting a less polluted general situation for Central Italy. However, for a few elements (e.g., Pb) the levels measured are only slight lower than those proposed as air ambient standard. PMID:23878525

  17. Identification of three kinds of mutually related composite elements conferring S phase-specific transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Taoka, K; Kaya, H; Nakayama, T; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1999-06-01

    Conservation of the Oct motif (CGCGGATC) is a remarkable feature of plant histone gene promoters. Many of the Oct motifs are paired with a distinct motif, Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box, constituting the type I element (CCACGTCANCGATCCGCG), type II element (TCACGCGGATC) and type III element (GATCCGCG-N14-ACCAATCA). To clarify the roles of these Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) in cell cycle-dependent and tissue-specific expression, we performed gain-of-function experiments with transgenic tobacco cell lines and plants harboring a derivative of the 35S core promoter/beta-glucuronidase fusion gene in which three or four copies of an OCE had been placed upstream. Although their activities were slightly different, results showed that each of the three types of OCEs could confer the ability to direct S phase-specific expression on a heterologous promoter. In transgenic plants, the type I and III elements exhibited a similar activity, directing expression in meristematic tissues, whereas the activity of the type II element appeared to be restricted to young cotyledons and maturating guard cells. Mutational analyses demonstrated that the co-operation of Oct with another module (Hex, TCA or CCAAT-box) was absolutely required for both temporal and spatial regulation. Thus, OCEs play a pivotal role in regulation of the expression of plant histone genes. PMID:10417712

  18. XAF1 directs apoptotic switch of p53 signaling through activation of HIPK2 and ZNF313.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Goo; Han, Jikhyon; Jeong, Seong-In; Her, Nam-Gu; Lee, Jin-Hee; Ha, Tae-Kyu; Kang, Min-Ju; Ryu, Byung-Kyu; Chi, Sung-Gil

    2014-10-28

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently inactivated in many human cancers. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its growth-inhibitory function remains largely unknown. Here, we report that XAF1 forms a positive feedback loop with p53 and acts as a molecular switch in p53-mediated cell-fate decisions favoring apoptosis over cell-cycle arrest. XAF1 binds directly to the N-terminal proline-rich domain of p53 and thus interferes with E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 binding and ubiquitination of p53. XAF1 stimulates homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2)-mediated Ser-46 phosphorylation of p53 by blocking E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2 interaction with and ubiquitination of HIPK2. XAF1 also steps up the termination of p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest by activating zinc finger protein 313 (ZNF313), a p21(WAF1)-targeting ubiquitin E3 ligase. XAF1 interacts with p53, Siah2, and ZNF313 through the zinc finger domains 5, 6, and 7, respectively, and truncated XAF1 isoforms preferentially expressed in cancer cells fail to form a feedback loop with p53. Together, this study uncovers a novel role for XAF1 in p53 stress response, adding a new layer of complexity to the mechanisms by which p53 determines cell-fate decisions. PMID:25313037

  19. Structure of a Ca2+-Myristoyl Switch Protein That Controls Activation of a Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sunghyuk; Strahl, Thomas; Thorner, Jeremy; Ames, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins transduce Ca2+ signals and are highly conserved from yeast to humans. We determined NMR structures of the NCS-1 homolog from fission yeast (Ncs1), which activates a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. Ncs1 contains an α-NH2-linked myristoyl group on a long N-terminal arm and four EF-hand motifs, three of which bind Ca2+, assembled into a compact structure. In Ca2+-free Ncs1, the N-terminal arm positions the fatty acyl chain inside a cavity near the C terminus. The C14 end of the myristate is surrounded by residues in the protein core, whereas its amide-linked (C1) end is flanked by residues at the protein surface. In Ca2+-bound Ncs1, the myristoyl group is extruded (Ca2+-myristoyl switch), exposing a prominent patch of hydrophobic residues that specifically contact phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase. The location of the buried myristate and structure of Ca2+-free Ncs1 are quite different from those in other NCS proteins. Thus, a unique remodeling of each NCS protein by its myristoyl group, and Ca2+-dependent unmasking of different residues, may explain how each family member recognizes distinct target proteins. PMID:21288895

  20. Aggregation-Induced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (AIRROA) and Time-Dependent Helicity Switching of Astaxanthin Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Monika; Zajac, Grzegorz; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-08-18

    New methods for enhancing the Raman optical activity (ROA) signal are desirable due to the low efficiency of ROA, demanding otherwise high sample concentrations, high laser powers, and/or long acquisition times. Previously, we have demonstrated a new phenomenon, aggregation-induced resonance ROA (AIRROA), that produces significant enhancement of the ROA signal provided that the excitation wavelength coincides with the absorption of the measured species and that the electronic circular dichroism (ECD) signal in the range of this absorption is nonzero. In this work, analyzing three very different supramolecular astaxanthin aggregates (H1, H2, and J), we confirm the phenomenon and demonstrate that aggregation itself is not enough to enhance the ROA signal and that the above-mentioned conditions are necessary for induction of the resonance ROA effect. Additionally, by analyzing the changes in the ECD spectra of the H1 assembly, we demonstrate that the supramolecular helicity sign switches with time, which is dependent on the prevalence of kinetic or thermodynamic stabilization of the obtained aggregates. PMID:27438433

  1. Biomechanical insult switches PEA-15 activity to uncouple its anti-apoptotic function and promote erk mediated tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Exler, Rachel E; Guo, Xiaoxin; Chan, Darren; Livne-Bar, Izhar; Vicic, Nevena; Flanagan, John G; Sivak, Jeremy M

    2016-01-15

    Biomechanical insult contributes to many chronic pathological processes, yet the resulting influences on signal transduction mechanisms are poorly understood. The retina presents an excellent mechanotransduction model, as mechanical strain on sensitive astrocytes of the optic nerve head (ONH) is intimately linked to chronic tissue remodeling and excavation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and apoptotic cell death. However, the mechanism by which these effects are induced by biomechanical strain is unclear. We previously identified the small adapter protein, PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes), through proteomic analyses of human ONH astrocytes subjected to pathologically relevant biomechanical insult. Under resting conditions PEA-15 is regulated through phosphorylation of two key serine residues to inhibit extrinsic apoptosis and ERK1/2 signaling. However, we surprisingly observed that biomechanical insult dramatically switches PEA-15 phosphorylation and function to uncouple its anti-apoptotic activity, and promote ERK1/2-dependent MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. These results reveal a novel cell autonomous mechanism by which biomechanical strain rapidly modifies this signaling pathway to generate altered tissue injury responses. PMID:26615958

  2. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation. PMID:27085802

  3. Src activation by β-adrenoreceptors is a key switch for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Allen, Julie K.; Cruz, Anthony; Stone, Rebecca L.; Nick, Alpa M.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Han, Liz Y.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Rodriguez-Aquayo, Cristian; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Wu, Zheng; English, Robert D.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Shazhad, Mian M. K.; Zigler, Maya; Deavers, Michael T.; Zien, Alexander; Soldatos, Theodoros G.; Jackson, David B.; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Young, Tom; De Geest, Koen; Gallick, Gary E.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Cole, Steve W.; Lopez, Gustavo E.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Sood, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) can modulate multiple cellular functions important for cancer progression; however, how this single extracellular signal regulates such a broad array of cellular processes is unknown. Here, we identify Src as a key regulator of phosphoproteomic signaling networks activated in response to beta-adrenergic signaling in cancer cells. These results also identify a new mechanism of Src phosphorylation that mediates beta-adrenergic/PKA regulation of downstream networks, thereby enhancing tumor cell migration, invasion and growth. In human ovarian cancer samples, high tumoral NE levels were correlated with high pSrcY419 levels. Moreover, among cancer patients, the use of beta blockers was significantly associated with reduced cancer-related mortality. Collectively, these data provide a pivotal molecular target for disrupting neural signaling in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:23360994

  4. Src activation by β-adrenoreceptors is a key switch for tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Allen, Julie K; Cruz, Anthony; Stone, Rebecca L; Nick, Alpa M; Lin, Yvonne G; Han, Liz Y; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Villares, Gabriel J; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Nagaraja, Archana S; Gharpure, Kshipra M; Wu, Zheng; English, Robert D; Soman, Kizhake V; Shahzad, Mian M K; Shazhad, Mian M K; Zigler, Maya; Deavers, Michael T; Zien, Alexander; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Jackson, David B; Wiktorowicz, John E; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Young, Tom; De Geest, Koen; Gallick, Gary E; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Cole, Steve W; Lopez, Gustavo E; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Noradrenaline can modulate multiple cellular functions important for cancer progression; however, how this single extracellular signal regulates such a broad array of cellular processes is unknown. Here we identify Src as a key regulator of phosphoproteomic signalling networks activated in response to beta-adrenergic signalling in cancer cells. These results also identify a new mechanism of Src phosphorylation that mediates beta-adrenergic/PKA regulation of downstream networks, thereby enhancing tumour cell migration, invasion and growth. In human ovarian cancer samples, high tumoural noradrenaline levels were correlated with high pSrc(Y419) levels. Moreover, among cancer patients, the use of beta blockers was significantly associated with reduced cancer-related mortality. Collectively, these data provide a pivotal molecular target for disrupting neural signalling in the tumour microenvironment. PMID:23360994

  5. Molecular mechanism of L-DNase II activation and function as a molecular switch in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, Alicia; Leprêtre, Chloé; Padrón-Barthe, Laura; Chahory, Sabine; Martin, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of caspase activation counts as one of the most important finds in the biochemistry of apoptosis. However, targeted disruption of caspases does not impair every type of apoptosis. Other proteases can replace caspases and several so called "caspase independent" pathways are now described. Here we review our current knowledge on one of these pathways, the LEI/L-DNase II. It is a serine protease-dependent pathway and its key event is the transformation of LEI (leukocyte elastase inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor) into L-DNase II (an endonuclease). The molecular events leading to this change of enzymatic function as well as the cross-talk and interactions of this molecule with other apoptotic pathway, including caspases, are discussed. PMID:18761000

  6. Reduction of a Redox-Active Ligand Drives Switching in a Cu(I) Pseudorotaxane by a Bimolecular Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McNitt, Kristy A.; Parimal, Kumar; Share, Andrew I.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Witlicki, Edward H.; Pink, Maren; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Plaisier, Christina L.; Le, Nga; Heeringa, Lee P.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; Flood, Amar H.

    2009-04-02

    The reduction of a redox-active ligand is shown to drive reversible switching of a Cu(I) [2]pseudorotaxane ([2]PR{sup 2+}) into the reduced [3]pseudorotaxane ([3]PR{sup 2+}) by a bimolecular mechanism. The unreduced pseudorotaxanes [2]PR{sup 2+} and [3]PR{sup 2+} are initially self-assembled from the binucleating ligand, 3,6-bis(5-methyl-2-pyridine)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (Me2BPTZ), and a preformed copper-macrocycle moiety (Cu-M{sup 2+}) based on 1,10-phenanthroline. X-ray crystallography revealed a syn geometry of the [3]PR{sup 2+}. The UV-vis-NIR spectra show low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions that red shift from 808 nm for [2]PR{sup 2+} to 1088 nm for [3]PR{sup 2+}. Quantitative analysis of the UV-vis-NIR titration shows the stepwise formation constants to be K{sub 1} = 8.9 x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} and K{sub 2} = 3.1 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, indicative of negative cooperativity. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and coulometry of Me{sub 2}BPTZ, [2]PR{sup 2+}, and [3]PR{sup 2+} shows the one-electron reductions at E{sub 1/2} = -0.96, -0.65, and -0.285 V, respectively, to be stabilized in a stepwise manner by each Cu{sup 2+} ion. CVs of [2]PR{sup 2+} show changes with scan rate consistent with an EC mechanism of supramolecular disproportionation after reduction: [2]PR{sup 0} + [2]PR{sup 2+} = [3]PR{sup 2+} + Me{sub 2}BPTZ{sup 0} (K*{sub D}, k{sub d}). UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry was used to confirm the 1:1 product stoichiometry for [3]PR{sup 2+}:Me{sub 2}BPTZ. The driving force ({Delta}G*{sub D} = -5.1 kcal mol{sup -1}) for the reaction is based on the enhanced stability of the reduced [3]PR{sup 2+} over reduced [2]PR{sup 0} by 365 mV (8.4 kcal mol{sup -1}). Digital simulations of the CVs are consistent with a bimolecular pathway (k{sub d} = 12,000 s{sup -1} M{sup -1}). Confirmation of the mechanism provides a basis to extend this new switching modality to molecular machines.

  7. Nutritional strategies to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress pathways via activation of the master antioxidant switch Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Ludmila F M F; Pedruzzi, Liliana M; Stenvinkel, Peter; Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Daleprane, Julio B; Leite, Maurilo; Mafra, Denise

    2013-08-01

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays an important role in cellular protection against cancer, renal, pulmonary, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases where oxidative stress and inflammation are common conditions. The Nrf2 regulates the expression of detoxifying enzymes by recognizing the human Antioxidant Response Element (ARE) binding site and it can regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cellular responses, playing an important protective role on the development of the diseases. Studies designed to investigate how effective Nrf2 activators or modulators are need to be initiated. Several recent studies have shown that nutritional compounds can modulate the activation of Nrf2-Keap1 system. This review aims to discuss some of the key nutritional compounds that promote the activation of Nrf2, which may have impact on the human health. PMID:23643732

  8. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  9. Synthetic promoter elements obtained by nucleotide sequence variation and selection for activity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Gerald M.; Meech, Robyn; Owens, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Frederick S.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional regulation in different cells involves large numbers and arrangements of cis and trans elements. To survey the number of cis regulatory elements that are active in different contexts, we have devised a high-throughput selection procedure permitting synthesis of active cis motifs that enhance the activity of a minimal promoter. This synthetic promoter construction method (SPCM) was used to identify >100 DNA sequences that showed increased promoter activity in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2A. After determining DNA sequences of selected synthetic promoters, database searches for known elements revealed a predominance of eight motifs: AP2, CEBP, GRE, Ebox, ETS, CREB, AP1, and SP1/MAZ. The most active of the selected synthetic promoters contain composites of a number of these motifs. Assays of DNA binding and promoter activity of three exemplary motifs (ETS, CREB, and SP1/MAZ) were used to prove the effectiveness of SPCM in uncovering active sequences. Up to 10% of 133 selected active sequences had no match in currently available databases, raising the possibility that new motifs and transcriptional regulatory proteins to which they bind may be revealed by SPCM. The method may find uses in constructing databases of active cis motifs, in diagnostics, and in gene therapy. PMID:10725347

  10. Trace Elements Affect Methanogenic Activity and Diversity in Enrichments from Subsurface Coal Bed Produced Water

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2 = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community. PMID

  11. Sequential Effects in Deduction: Cost of Inference Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milan, Emilio G.; Moreno-Rios, Sergio; Espino, Orlando; Santamaria, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The task-switch paradigm has helped psychologists gain insight into the processes involved in changing from one activity to another. The literature has yielded consistent results about switch cost reconfiguration (abrupt offset in regular task-switch vs. gradual reduction in random task-switch; endogenous and exogenous components of switch cost;…

  12. RNA Profiles of Porcine Embryos during Genome Activation Reveal Complex Metabolic Switch Sensitive to In Vitro Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Østrup, Olga; Olbricht, Gayla; Østrup, Esben; Hyttel, Poul; Collas, Philippe; Cabot, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA). While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, only a handful of reports characterize changing transcriptome profiles and resulting metabolic changes in cleavage stage embryos. The aims of the current study were to investigate RNA profiles of in vivo developed (ivv) and in vitro produced (ivt) porcine embryos before (2-cell stage) and after (late 4-cell stage) EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery), protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism), different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate from oocyte and are imposed either before oocyte aspiration or during in vitro maturation. IVT embryos have altered content of apoptotic factors, cell cycle regulation factors and spindle components, and transcription factors, which all may contribute to reduced developmental competence of embryos produced in vitro. Overall, our data are in good accordance with previously published, genome-wide profiling data in other species. Moreover, comparison with mouse and human embryos

  13. Fast Switching Ferroelectric Materials for Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanareykin, A.; Nenasheva, E.; Yakovlev, V.; Dedyk, A.; Karmanenko, S.; Kozyrev, A.; Osadchy, V.; Kosmin, D.; Schoessow, P.; Semenov, A.

    2006-11-01

    Fast switching (<10 nsec) measurement results on the recently developed BST(M) (barium strontium titanium oxide composition with magnesium-based additions) ferroelectric materials are presented. These materials can be used as the basis for new advanced technology components suitable for high-gradient accelerators. A ferroelectric ceramic has an electric field-dependent dielectric permittivity that can be altered by applying a bias voltage. Ferroelectric materials offer significant benefits for linear collider applications, in particular, for switching and control elements where a very short response time of <10 nsec is required. The measurement results presented here show that the new BST(M) ceramic exhibits a high tunability factor: a bias field of 40-50 kV/cm reduces the permittivity by a factor of 1.3-1.5. The recently developed technology of gold biasing contact deposition on large diameter (110 cm) thin wall ferroelectric rings allowed ˜few nsec switching times in witness sample experiments. The ferroelectric rings can be used at high pulsed power (tens of megawatts) for X-band components as well as at high average power in the range of a few kilowatts for the L-band phase-shifter, under development for optimization of the ILC rf coupling. Accelerator applications include fast active X-band and Ka-band high-power ferroelectric switches, high-power X-band and L-band phase shifters, and tunable dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

  14. Bipolar Conductance Switching of Single Anthradithiophene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Borca, Bogdana; Schendel, Verena; Pétuya, Rémi; Pentegov, Ivan; Michnowicz, Tomasz; Kraft, Ulrike; Klauk, Hagen; Arnau, Andrés; Wahl, Peter; Schlickum, Uta; Kern, Klaus

    2015-12-22

    Single molecular switches are basic device elements in organic electronics. The pentacene analogue anthradithiophene (ADT) shows a fully reversible binary switching between different adsorption conformations on a metallic surface accompanied by a charge transfer. These transitions are activated locally in single molecules in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope . The switching induces changes between bistable orbital structures and energy level alignment at the interface. The most stable geometry, the "off" state, which all molecules adopt upon evaporation, corresponds to a short adsorption distance at which the electronic interactions of the acene rings bend the central part of the molecule toward the surface accompanied by a significant charge transfer from the metallic surface to the ADT molecules. This leads to a shift of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital down to the Fermi level (EF). In the "on" state the molecule has a flat geometry at a larger distance from the surface; consequently the interaction is weaker, resulting in a negligible charge transfer with an orbital structure resembling the highest occupied molecular orbital when imaged close to EF. The potential barrier between these two states can be overcome reversibly by injecting charge carriers locally into individual molecules. Voltage-controlled current traces show a hysteresis characteristic of a bipolar switching behavior. The interpretation is supported by first-principles calculations. PMID:26580569

  15. Thermally activated switching at long time scales in exchange-coupled magnetic grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almudallal, Ahmad M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Plumer, M. L.; van Ek, J.; Fal, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    Rate coefficients of the Arrhenius-Néel form are calculated for thermally activated magnetic moment reversal for dual layer exchange-coupled composite (ECC) media based on the Langer formalism and are applied to study the sweep rate dependence of M H hysteresis loops as a function of the exchange coupling I between the layers. The individual grains are modeled as two exchange-coupled Stoner-Wohlfarth particles from which the minimum energy paths connecting the minimum energy states are calculated using a variant of the string method and the energy barriers and attempt frequencies calculated as a function of the applied field. The resultant rate equations describing the evolution of an ensemble of noninteracting ECC grains are then integrated numerically in an applied field with constant sweep rate R =-d H /d t and the magnetization calculated as a function of the applied field H . M H hysteresis loops are presented for a range of values I for sweep rates 105Oe /s ≤R ≤1010Oe /s and a figure of merit that quantifies the advantages of ECC media is proposed. M H hysteresis loops are also calculated based on the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations for 108Oe /s ≤R ≤1010Oe /s and are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained from the direct integration of rate equations. The results are also used to examine the accuracy of certain approximate models that reduce the complexity associated with the Langer-based formalism and which provide some useful insight into the reversal process and its dependence on the coupling strength and sweep rate. Of particular interest is the clustering of minimum energy states that are separated by relatively low-energy barriers into "metastates." It is shown that while approximating the reversal process in terms of "metastates" results in little loss of accuracy, it can reduce the run time of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of the magnetic decay of an ensemble of dual layer ECC media by 2 -3 orders of magnitude

  16. Integrator element as a promoter of active learning in engineering teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Paulo C.; Oliveira, Cristina G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching proposal used in an Introductory Physics course to civil engineering students from Porto's Engineering Institute/Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP). The proposal was born from the need to change students' perception and motivation for learning physics. It consists in the use of an integrator element, called the physics elevator project. This integrator element allows us to use, in a single project, all the content taught in the course and uses several active learning strategies. In this paper, we analyse this project as: (i) a clarifying element of the contents covered in the course; (ii) a promoter element of motivation and active participation in class and finally and (iii) a link between the contents covered in the course and the 'real world'. The data were collected by a questionnaire and interviews to students. From the data collected, it seems that the integrator element improves students' motivation towards physics and develops several skills that they consider to be important to their professional future. It also acts as a clarifying element and makes the connection between the physics that is taught and the 'real world'.

  17. Studies of generalized elemental imbalances in neurological disease patients using INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.; Vance, D.E.; Khare, S.S.; Kasarskis, E.J.; Markesbery, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence has been presented in the literature to implicate trace elements in the etiology of several age-related neurological diseases. Most of these studies are based on brain analyses. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed trace element imbalances in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Picks's disease. The most prevalent elemental imbalances found in the brain were for bromine, mercury, and the alkali metals. In this study the authors report INAA studies of trace elements in nonneural tissues from Alzheimer's disease and ALS patients. Samples from household relatives were collected for use as controls wherever possible. Hair samples were washed according to the International Atomic Energy Agency recommended procedure. Fingernail samples were scraped with a quartz knife prior to washing by the same procedure. For ALS patients, blood samples were also collected. These data indicate that elemental imbalances in Alzheimer's disease and ALS are not restricted to the brain. Many elements perturbed in the brain are also altered in the several nonneural tissues examined to date. The imbalances in different tissues, however, are not always in the same direction. The changes observed may represent causes, effects, or simply epiphenomena. Longitudinal studies of nonneural tissues and blood, as well as tissue microprobe analyses at the cellular and subcellular level, will be required in order to better assess the role of trace elements in the etiology of these diseases.

  18. Which Socio-Ecological Factors Associate with a Switch to or Maintenance of Active and Passive Transport during the Transition from Primary to Secondary School?

    PubMed Central

    Vanwolleghem, Griet; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Meester, Femke; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet; Gheysen, Freja

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to investigate which individual, psychosocial and physical neighborhood environmental factors associate with children’s switch to or maintenance of active/passive transport to school and to leisure time destinations during the transition from primary to secondary school. Methods Children (n = 313) filled out a questionnaire in the last year of primary school and 2 years later to assess socio-demographic characteristics and self-reported transport. One of their parents completed a questionnaire to assess parental perceptions of psychosocial and physical neighborhood environmental factors. Results The increase of the home-school distance was significantly associated with children’s switch to or maintenance of passive transport to school compared to a switch to (OR = 0.81; p = 0.03) and maintenance (OR = 0.87; p = 0.03) of active transport to school. Low SES was associated with children’s switch to active transport to school compared to maintenance of active transport (OR = 3.67; p = 0.07). For transport to leisure time destinations, other factors such as parental perceived neighborhood safety from traffic and crime (OR = 2.78; p = 0.004), a positive social norm (OR = 1.49; p = 0.08), positive attitudes (OR = 1.39; p = 0.08) (i.e. more benefits, less barriers) towards their children’s physical activity and poor walking/cycling facilities in the neighborhood (OR = 0.70; p = 0.06) were associated with children’s maintenance of active transport to leisure time destinations compared to a switch to or maintenance of passive transport. Conclusions This longitudinal study can give directions for interventions promoting children’s active transport during the transition to secondary school. It is necessary to promote different possibilities at primary school for children to use active transport when going to secondary school. Walking/cycling a part of the home-school trip can be a possible solution for children who will be living at non

  19. Electrically active light-element complexes in silicon crystals grown by cast method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kuniyuki; Ogura, Atsushi; Ono, Haruhiko

    2016-09-01

    Electrically active light-element complexes called thermal donors and shallow thermal donors in silicon crystals grown by the cast method were studied by low-temperature far-infrared absorption spectroscopy. The relationship between these complexes and either crystal defects or light-element impurities was investigated by comparing different types of silicon crystals, that is, conventional cast-grown multicrystalline Si, seed-cast monolike-Si, and Czochralski-grown Si. The dependence of thermal and the shallow thermal donors on the light-element impurity concentration and their annealing behaviors were examined to compare the crystals. It was found that crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries did not affect the formation of thermal or shallow thermal donors. The formation of these complexes was dominantly affected by the concentration of light-element impurities, O and C, independent of the existence of crystal defects.

  20. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  1. Elemental characterization of Hazm El-Jalamid phosphorite by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A; Khater, Ashraf E M

    2016-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA) have been used to achieve accurate knowledge about the elemental analysis of phosphate ore deposits collected from Hazm El-Jalamid Northeast of Saudi Arabia. The samples were prepared for irradiation by thermal neutrons using a thermal neutron flux of 7×10(12)ncm(-2)s(-1) at ACT Lab Canada. The concentrations of 19 elements were determined. These included 12 major, minor and trace elements (Au, As, Ba, Br, Cr, Mo, Sb, Sc, Sr, Th, U and Zn) and 7 rare earth elements (REEs) (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb and Lu). Major elements (Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cr, Ti, Mn, P, Sr and Ba) were determined using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The comparison of the concentration of U and the REEs in the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate samples with those of the Umm Wu'al phosphate from Saudi Arabia and El-Sibayia and El Hamrawein phosphate from Egypt shows that the contents of U and REEs are clearly higher in the Umm Wu'al, El-Sibayia and El Hamrawein phosphates than in the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate samples. The results of major, trace elements, uranium and rare earth elements (REE) from El Jalamid phosphate have been compared with the global values of these elements. The concentrations for most of the elements studied are lower than the concentrations reported in the literature. The acquired data will serve as a reference for the follow-up studies to assess the agronomic effectiveness of the Hazm El-Jalamid phosphate rocks. PMID:27235886

  2. Overabundance of s-process elements in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.

    2015-11-01

    Based on high-resolution ( R = 60 000) spectra taken with the NES spectrograph (the 6-m BTA telescope, the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences), we have determined the abundances of 26 elements, from lithium to europium, in the atmosphere of the active red giant PZ Mon, which belongs to the class of RS CVn variable stars, by the method of model stellar atmospheres. We have taken into account the hyperfine splitting, the isotopic shift, and the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis of our data has revealed an overabundance of lithium and neutron-capture elements compared to normal red giants. For lithium, this is explained by the activity of the star, while the overabundance of s-elements is presumably similar in nature to that inmild bariumstars.

  3. Molecular switch for CLC-K Cl- channel block/activation: optimal pharmacophoric requirements towards high-affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Liantonio, Antonella; Picollo, Alessandra; Carbonara, Giuseppe; Fracchiolla, Giuseppe; Tortorella, Paolo; Loiodice, Fulvio; Laghezza, Antonio; Babini, Elena; Zifarelli, Giovanni; Pusch, Michael; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2008-01-29

    ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb Cl(-) channels are pivotal for renal salt reabsorption and water balance. There is growing interest in identifying ligands that allow pharmacological interventions aimed to modulate their activity. Starting from available ligands, we followed a rational chemical strategy, accompanied by computational modeling and electrophysiological techniques, to identify the molecular requisites for binding to a blocking or to an activating binding site on ClC-Ka. The major molecular determinant that distinguishes activators from blockers is the level of planarity of the aromatic portions of the molecules: only molecules with perfectly coplanar aromatic groups display potentiating activity. Combining several molecular features of various CLC-K ligands, we discovered that phenyl-benzofuran carboxylic acid derivatives yield the most potent ClC-Ka inhibitors so far described (affinity <10 microM). The increase in affinity compared with 3-phenyl-2-p-chlorophenoxy-propionic acid (3-phenyl-CPP) stems primarily from the conformational constraint provided by the phenyl-benzofuran ring. Several other key structural elements for high blocking potency were identified through a detailed structure-activity relationship study. Surprisingly, some benzofuran-based drugs inhibit ClC-Kb with a similar affinity of <10 microM, thus representing the first inhibitors for this CLC-K isoform identified so far. Based on our data, we established a pharmacophore model that will be useful for the development of drugs targeting CLC-K channels. PMID:18216243

  4. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  5. The Element Effect Revisited: Factors Determining Leaving Group Ability in Activated Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Nicholas A.; Bo, Bo; Cheng, Qian; Keeffe, James R.; Gronert, Scott; Wu, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    The “element effect” in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions (SNAr) is characterized by the leaving group order, F > NO2 > Cl ≈ Br > I, in activated aryl halides. Multiple causes for this result have been proposed. Experimental evidence shows that the element effect order in the reaction of piperidine with 2,4-dinitrophenyl halides in methanol is governed by the differences in enthalpies of activation. Computational studies of the reaction of piperidine and dimethylamine with the same aryl halides using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation indicate that polar, polarizability, solvation, and negative hyperconjugative effects are all of some importance in producing the element effect in methanol. In addition, a reversal of polarity of the C–X bond from reactant to transition state in the case of ArCl and ArBr compared to ArF also contributes to their difference in reactivity. The polarity reversal, and hyperconjugative influences have received little or no attention in the past. Nor has differential solvation of the different transition states been strongly emphasized. An anionic nucleophile, thiolate, gives very early transition states and negative activation enthalpies with activated aryl halides. The element effect is not established for these reactions. We suggest that the leaving group order in the gas phase will be dependent on the exact combination of nucleophile, leaving group, and substrate framework. The geometry of the SNAr transition state permits useful, qualitative conceptual distinctions to be made between this reaction and other modes of nucleophilic attack. PMID:23057717

  6. Measurement of the gain in a disk amplification stage with neodymium phosphate glass active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Voronich, Ivan N; Galakhov, I V; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zaretskii, Aleksei I; Zimalin, B G; Ignat'ev, Ivan V; Kirdyashkin, M Yu; Kirillov, G A; Osin, Vladimir A; Rukavishnikov, N N; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Sharov, Oleg A; Charukhchev, Aleksandr V

    2003-06-30

    The measuring technique is described and time-resolved measurements of the small-signal gain as a function of the pump energy in a disk amplification stage with neodymium phosphate glass active elements in the 'Luch' facility are presented. The distribution of the gain over the amplifier aperture in the horizontal plane is measured. (lasers)

  7. Development of an active truss element for control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Moore, Donald M.; Fanson, James L.; Ealey, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    An active structural element for use in precision control of large space structures is described. The active member is intended to replace a passive strut in a truss-like structure. It incorporates an eddy current displacement sensor and an actuator that is either piezoelectric (PZT) or electrostrictive (PMN). The design of the device is summarized. Performance of separate PZT and PMN actuators is compared for several properties relevant to submicrometer control of precision structures.

  8. Proof of principle in a de novo designed protein maquette: an allosterically regulated, charge-activated conformational switch in a tetra-alpha-helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Grosset, A M; Gibney, B R; Rabanal, F; Moser, C C; Dutton, P L

    2001-05-01

    New understanding of the engineering and allosteric regulation of natural protein conformational switches (such as those that couple chemical and ionic signals, mechanical force, and electro/chemical free energy for biochemical activation, catalysis, and motion) can be derived from simple de novo designed synthetic protein models (maquettes). We demonstrate proof of principle of both reversible switch action and allosteric regulation in a tetra-alpha-helical bundle protein composed of two identical di-helical subunits containing heme coordinated at a specific position close to the disulfide loop region. Individual bundles assume one of two switch states related by large-scale mechanical changes: a syn-topology (helices of the different subunits parallel) or anti-topology (helices antiparallel). Both the spectral properties of a coproporphyrin probe appended to the loop region and the distance-dependent redox interaction between the hemes identify the topologies. Beginning from a syn-topology, introduction of ferric heme in each subunit (either binding or redox change) shifts the topological balance by 25-50-fold (1.9-2.3 kcal/mol) to an anti-dominance. Charge repulsion between the two internal cationic ferric hemes drives the syn- to anti-switch, as demonstrated in two ways. When fixed in the syn-topology, the second ferric heme binding is 25-80-fold (1.9-2.6 kcal/mol) weaker than the first, and adjacent heme redox potentials are split by 80 mV (1.85 kcal/mol), values that energetically match the shift in topological balance. Allosteric and cooperative regulation of the switch by ionic strength exploits the shielded charge interactions between the two hemes and the exposed, cooperative interactions between the coproporphyrin carboxylates. PMID:11331012

  9. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  10. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  11. Rare-earth elements in Egyptian granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2007-04-01

    The mobilization of rare-earth elements (REEs) in the environment requires monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are mainly present at trace levels. The similarity in REEs chemical behavior makes the separate determination of each element by chemical methods difficult; instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), based on nuclear properties of the elements to be determined, is a method of choice in trace analysis of REEs and related elements. Therefore, INAA was applied as a sensitive nondestructive analytical tool for the determination of REEs to find out what information could be obtained about the REEs of some Egyptian granite collected from four locations in Aswan area in south Egypt as follows wadi El-Allaqi, El-Shelal, Gabel Ibrahim Pasha and from Sehyel Island and to estimate the accuracy, reproducibility and detection limit of NAA method in case of the given samples. The samples were properly prepared together with standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7 x 10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor facilities. The following elements have been determined: La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb and Lu. The gamma spectra was collected by HPGe detector and the analysis was done by means of computerized multichannel analyzer. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was also used. PMID:17208446

  12. ICE Afe 1, an actively excising genetic element from the biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Paula; Covarrubias, Paulo C; Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; Tapia, Pablo; Holmes, David; Quatrini, Raquel; Orellana, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are self-transferred mobile genetic elements that contribute to horizontal gene transfer. An ICE (ICEAfe1) was identified in the genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270. Excision of the element and expression of relevant genes under normal and DNA-damaging growth conditions was analyzed. Bioinformatic tools and DNA amplification methods were used to identify and to assess the excision and expression of genes related to the mobility of the element. Both basal and mitomycin C-inducible excision as well as expression and induction of the genes for integration/excision are demonstrated, suggesting that ICEAfe1 is an actively excising SOS-regulated mobile genetic element. The presence of a complete set of genes encoding self-transfer functions that are induced in response to DNA damage caused by mitomycin C additionally suggests that this element is capable of conjugative transfer to suitable recipient strains. Transfer of ICEAfe1 may provide selective advantages to other acidophiles in this ecological niche through dissemination of gene clusters expressing transfer RNAs, CRISPRs, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis enzymes, probably by modification of translation efficiency, resistance to bacteriophage infection and biofilm formation, respectively. These data open novel avenues of research on conjugative transformation of biotechnologically relevant microorganisms recalcitrant to genetic manipulation. PMID:23486178

  13. A pH Switch Regulates the Inverse Relationship between Membranolytic and Chaperone-like Activities of HSP-1/2, a Major Protein of Horse Seminal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Sudheer; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-07-01

    HSP-1/2, a major protein of horse seminal plasma binds to choline phospholipids present on the sperm plasma membrane and perturbs its structure by intercalating into the hydrophobic core, which results in an efflux of choline phospholipids and cholesterol, an important event in sperm capacitation. HSP-1/2 also exhibits chaperone-like activity (CLA) in vitro and protects target proteins against various kinds of stress. In the present study we show that HSP-1/2 exhibits destabilizing activity toward model supported and cell membranes. The membranolytic activity of HSP-1/2 is found to be pH dependent, with lytic activity being high at mildly acidic pH (6.0-6.5) and low at mildly basic pH (8.0-8.5). Interestingly, the CLA is also found to be pH dependent, with high activity at mildly basic pH and low activity at mildly acidic pH. Taken together the present studies demonstrate that the membranolytic and chaperone-like activities of HSP-1/2 have an inverse relationship and are regulated via a pH switch, which is reversible. The higher CLA observed at mildly basic pH could be correlated to an increase in surface hydrophobicity of the protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting regulation of two different activities of a chaperone protein by a pH switch. PMID:27292547

  14. Large arrays and properties of 3-terminal graphene nanoelectromechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinghui; Suk, Ji Won; Boddeti, Narasimha G; Cantley, Lauren; Wang, Luda; Gray, Jason M; Hall, Harris J; Bright, Victor M; Rogers, Charles T; Dunn, Martin L; Ruoff, Rodney S; Bunch, J Scott

    2014-03-12

    Large arrays of 3-terminal nanoelectromechanical graphene switches are fabricated. The switch is designed with a novel geometry that leads to low actuation voltages and improved mechanical integrity, while reducing adhesion forces, which improves the reliability of the switch. A finite element model including non-linear electromechanics is used to simulate the switching behavior and to deduce a scaling relation between the switching voltage and device dimensions. PMID:24339026

  15. Reducing sedentary behaviour and increasing physical activity among 10-year-old children: overview and process evaluation of the 'Switch-Play' intervention.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Jo; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Booth, Michael; Telford, Amanda; Hume, Clare; Jolley, Damien; Worsley, Anthony

    2005-03-01

    Overweight and obesity has doubled among children in Australia. There is an urgent need to develop primary prevention strategies to prevent current and future unhealthy weight gain. The aims of this paper are to describe a randomized controlled trial ('Switch-Play') developed to prevent unhealthy weight gain among 10-year-old children and to report the findings of the process evaluation. Children from three government primary schools were randomized by class to one of four conditions: a behavioural modification group (BM; n = 69); a fundamental motor skills group (FMS; n = 73); a combined BM and FMS group (n = 90); or a control (usual classroom lessons) group (n = 61). Children in the BM group participated in 19 sessions that encouraged them to reduce screen-based behaviours, and identified physical activity alternatives. The FMS group participated in 19 lessons that focused on mastery of six skills: run, throw, dodge, strike, vertical jump and kick. The combined group participated in all the BM and FMS activities. The intervention specialist teacher reported that the children showed high enjoyment and engagement (88% lessons attended) in most aspects of the programme. At-home tasks were completed by 57-62% of the children, and 92% completed the in-class tasks. Two-thirds of the children in the BM group participated in the behavioural contracting to switch off the TV. Most of the children reported high enjoyment of the programmes, and only a small proportion (7-17%) reported difficulties in switching off their nominated TV shows. More than half the children reported reducing their TV viewing; however, less than half reported increasing their physical activity. It was found that most aspects of the intervention arms of the programme were successfully delivered to the majority of children participating in 'Switch-Play'; that the programmes were delivered as intended; and that the programmes were favourably evaluated by participating children and their parents. PMID

  16. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  17. A finite element method for active vibration control of uncertain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. L.; Rongong, J. A.; Sims, N. D.

    2012-10-01

    This work introduces a fuzzy design method using the finite element procedure to simulate and analyze active vibration control of structures subjected to uncertain parameters. The purpose of this work is to provide a tool for studying the influence of uncertainty propagation on both stability and performance of a vibration control system, whilst avoiding the need for computationally expensive probabilistic methods or complex robust control techniques. The proposed procedure applies a general and efficient strategy for computing fuzzy results to a sequence of finite element calculations. Finally, the applicability of the methodology is illustrated through some realistic case studies related to structural control where spillover instability may arise.

  18. Nuclear activation method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.F.

    1993-08-17

    A method is described for characterizing at least one activated element in an earth formation surrounding a borehole, comprising the steps of: (a) displacing in said borehole a sonde comprising a neutron source and at least two gamma ray detectors longitudinally spaced from said source, while irradiating said formation with neutrons of sufficient energy to interact with said element according to the activation reaction; (b) detecting and counting at each detector the gamma rays resulting from the activation of atoms of said element; (c) determining, at each depth, the number of gamma ray counts detected during the time period defined by the time instants when respectively said source and said detectors pass that depth, said determination of gamma ray counts being made for each detector at each depth; (d) establishing a relationship, for each depth, between the counts from the respective detectors for that depth and the corresponding time instants when the corresponding detector passes that depth; and (e) deriving from said relationship at least one characteristic of said element.

  19. Hop, an active Mutator-like element in the genome of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, Fabienne; Grimaldi, Christine; Kaper, Fiona; Langin, Thierry; Daboussi, Marie-Josée

    2003-08-01

    A new type of active DNA transposon has been identified in the genome of Fusarium oxysporum by its transposition into the niaD target gene. Two insertions within the final exon, in opposite orientations at the same nucleotide site, have been characterized. These elements, called Hop, are 3,299 bp long, with perfect terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 99 bp. The sequencing of genomic copies reveals a 9-bp target site duplication and no apparent sequence specificity at the insertion sites. The sequencing of a cDNA indicates that Hop does not contain an intron and encodes a putative transposase of 836 amino acids. The structural features (length, TIRs size, and 9-bp duplication), together with the presence of conserved domains in the transposase, strongly suggest that Hop is a Mutator-like element (MULE). Hop is thus the first active member of this family found beyond plants. The high rate of excision observed indicates that Hop is very active and thus represents a promising efficient tagging system for the isolation of fungal genes. The distribution of Hop elements within the Fusarium genus revealed that they are present in different species, suggesting that related elements could be present in other fungal genomes. In fact, Hop-related sequences have been identified in the survey of the entire genome sequence of three other ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:12777515

  20. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W; Peterson, Abigail L; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Kreiling, Jill A

    2013-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells. PMID:24323947

  1. Active muscle response using feedback control of a finite element human arm model.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Happee, Riender

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical human body models (HBMs) are important research tools that are used to study the human response in car crash situations. Development of automotive safety systems requires the implementation of active muscle response in HBM, as novel safety systems also interact with vehicle occupants in the pre-crash phase. In this study, active muscle response was implemented using feedback control of a nonlinear muscle model in the right upper extremity of a finite element (FE) HBM. Hill-type line muscle elements were added, and the active and passive properties were assessed. Volunteer tests with low impact loading resulting in elbow flexion motions were performed. Simulations of posture maintenance in a gravity field and the volunteer tests were successfully conducted. It was concluded that feedback control of a nonlinear musculoskeletal model can be used to obtain posture maintenance and human-like reflexive responses in an FE HBM. PMID:21294008

  2. Controlled trial of polymeric versus elemental diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Giaffer, M H; North, G; Holdsworth, C D

    1990-04-01

    30 patients with active Crohn's disease, mean Crohn's Disease Activity Index 301 (SE 32), who would otherwise have been treated with steroids, were randomised to receive for 4 weeks either an elemental diet ('Vivonex') (n = 16) or a polymeric diet ('Fortison') (n = 14). Assessment on days 10 and 28 showed that clinical remission occurred in 5 (36%) of the 14 patients on fortison compared with 12 (75%) of the 16 patients assigned to vivonex. The difference in remission rate was significant (p less than 0.03). Dietary treatment resulted in little change in the nutritional state and various laboratory indices of activity over a 4 week period despite clinical improvement. Polymeric diets do not seem to offer an effective therapeutic alternative to elemental diets in patients with acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease. PMID:1969560

  3. Temperature-driven switching of the catalytic activity of artificial glutathione peroxidase by the shape transition between the nanotubes and vesicle-like structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zou, Huixin; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhou, Lipeng; Li, Jiaxi; Luo, Quan; Zhu, Junyan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-04-15

    Smart supramolecular nanoenzymes with temperature-driven switching property have been successfully constructed by the self-assembly of supra-amphiphiles formed by the cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry. The self-assembled nanostructures were catalyst-functionalized and thermosensitively-functionalized through conveniently linking the catalytic center of glutathione peroxidase and thermosensitive polymer to the host cyclodextrin molecules.The ON-OFF switches for the peroxidase activity by reversible transformation of nanostructures from tube to sphere have been achieved through changing the temperature. We anticipate that such intelligent enzyme mimics could be developed to use in an antioxidant medicine with controlled catalytic efficiency according to the needs of the human body in the future. PMID:24654792

  4. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marino, A.; Cammarata, M.; Matar, S. F.; Létard, J.-F.; Chastanet, G.; Chollet, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-01

    We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA)2(NCS)2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS) states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs) induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules. PMID:26798836

  5. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Marino, A; Cammarata, M; Matar, S F; Létard, J-F; Chastanet, G; Chollet, M; Glownia, J M; Lemke, H T; Collet, E

    2016-03-01

    We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA)2(NCS)2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS) states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs) induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules. PMID:26798836

  6. Switched steerable multiple beam antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Richard S.

    1988-09-01

    A steerable multibeam five element cross-feed cluster antenna system is described. The feed power is divided into five branches. Each branch includes a switching network comprised of a plurality of time delay elements each individually controlled by a respective electromagnetic latching switch. Frequency independent individual two-dimensional beam steering at intermediate (IF) scanning frequencies is thereby provided wherein discrete incremental time delays are introduced by the switching networks into each branch and the signals recombined thereafter to form each beam. The electromagnetic latched switching reduces power consumption and permits higher power switching and reciprocal coincident tranmsit and receive operation. Frequency independence due to incremental time delay switching permits coincident reciprocal operation and steering for transmit-receive signal paths carrying different transmit-receive frequencies. Diagonal quarter wave plates in the waveguides alter polarization from the circular to orthogonal linear to provide transmitter-receiver isolation.

  7. Frequency-dependence of the switching voltage in electronic switching of Pt-dispersed SiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung Joon; Chen, I.-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The switching time-voltage dependence of electronic resistive switching was studied for understanding the switching dynamics in Pt-dispersed SiO2 thin film devices. Trapezoidal voltage pulses with opposite polarities were consecutively introduced and thereby transient on-switching and offswitching were examined. A prior on-switching voltage determines the off-switching voltage regardless of the sweeping rate of the pulse for the prior on-switching. However, the off-switching voltage was sensitive to the sweeping rate of the subsequent pulses for off-switching. The frequencydependent impedance of both the device and the surrounding circuit element are thought to result in the variation of the off-switching voltage; otherwise, the switching voltage is independent of time.

  8. Neutron activation analysis of major, minor, and trace elements in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, S.F.; Zeisler, R.; Koster, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques are well established in the multielement assay of geological materials. Similarly, applications of NAA to the analysis of marine sediments have been described. The different emphasis on elemental composition in studying and monitoring the health of the environment, however, presents a new challenge to the analyst. To investigate as many elements as possible, previous multielement procedures need to be reevaluated and modified. In this work, the authors have utilized the NAA steps of a recently developed sequential analysis procedure that obtained concentrations for 45 biological and pollutant elements in marine bivalves. This procedure, with modification, was applied to samples of marine sediments collected for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Status and Trends (NS T) specimen banking program.

  9. Elemental characterization of the Avogadro silicon crystal WASO 04 by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, G.; Bergamaschi, L.; Giordani, L.; Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Oddone, M.

    2012-12-01

    Impurity measurements of the 28Si crystal used for the determination of the Avogadro constant are essential to prevent biased results or underestimated uncertainties. A review of the existing data confirmed the high purity of silicon with respect to a large number of elements. In order to obtain direct evidence of purity, we developed a relative analytical method based on neutron activation. As a preliminary test, this method was applied to a sample of the Avogadro natural silicon crystal WASO 04. The investigation concerned 29 elements. The mass fraction of Au was quantified to be (1.03 ± 0.18) × 10-12. For the remaining 28 elements, the mass fractions were below the detection limits, which ranged between 1 × 10-12 and 1 × 10-5.

  10. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  11. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    PubMed Central

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O.; Lauridsen, Felicia B.; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  12. The Holozoan Capsaspora owczarzaki Possesses a Diverse Complement of Active Transposable Element Families

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Martin; Suga, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Capsaspora owczarzaki, a protistan symbiont of the pulmonate snail Biomphalaria glabrata, is the centre of much interest in evolutionary biology due to its close relationship to Metazoa. The whole genome sequence of this protist has revealed new insights into the ancestral genome composition of Metazoa, in particular with regard to gene families involved in the evolution of multicellularity. The draft genome revealed the presence of 23 families of transposable element, made up from DNA transposon as well as long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon families. The phylogenetic analyses presented here show that all of the transposable elements identified in the C. owczarzaki genome have orthologous families in Metazoa, indicating that the ancestral metazoan also had a rich diversity of elements. Molecular evolutionary analyses also show that the majority of families has recently been active within the Capsaspora genome. One family now appears to be inactive and a further five families show no evidence of current transposition. Most individual element copies are evolutionarily young; however, a small proportion of inserts appear to have persisted for longer in the genome. The families present in the genome show contrasting population histories and appear to be in different stages of their life cycles. Transcriptome data have been analyzed from multiple stages in the C. owczarzaki life cycle. Expression levels vary greatly both between families and between different stages of the life cycle, suggesting an unexpectedly complex level of transposable element regulation in a single celled organism. PMID:24696401

  13. Optimization of high temperature sulfur impregnation on activated carbon for permanent sequestration of elemental mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Vidic, R.D.; Brown, T.D.

    2000-02-01

    Following previous success with the use of activated carbon impregnated with sulfur at elevated temperatures for elemental mercury control, possible improvements in the impregnation procedure were evaluated in this study. Adsorbents prepared by thoroughly mixing sulfur and activated carbon in the furnace at the initial sulfur-to-carbon ratio (SCR) ranging from 4:1 to 1:2 showed similar adsorptive behavior in a fixed-bed system. Maintaining a stagnant inert atmosphere during the impregnation process improves sulfur deposition resulting in the enhanced dynamic capacity of the adsorbent when compared to other sulfur impregnated carbons. The fate of spent adsorbents was assessed using a toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP). Although mercury concentration in all leachates was below the TCLP limit, virgin activated carbon lost a significant fraction of the adsorbed elemental mercury during storage, while no loss was observed for sulfur-impregnated carbons. This finding suggests that virgin activated carbon may not be appropriate adsorbent for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic elemental mercury emissions.

  14. Amidase activity in soils. IV. Effects of trace elements and pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T., Jr.; Tabatabai, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    Amidase was recently detected in soils, and this study was carried out to assess the effects of 21 trace elements, 12 herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 2 insecticides on the activity of this enzyme. Results showed that most of the trace elements and pesticides studied inhibited amidase activity in soils. The degree of inhibition varied among the soils used. When the trace elements were compared by using 5 ..mu..mol/g of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils showed that Ag(I), Hg(I), As(III), and Se(IV) were the most effective inhibitors, but only Ag(I) and As(III) showed average inhibition > 50%. The least effective inhibitors (average inhibition < 3%) included Cu(I), Ba(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), Ti(IV), V(IV), As(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI). Other elements that inhibited amidase activity in soils were Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), Sn(II), Zn(II), B(III), and Cr(III). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that As(III) was a competitive inhibitor of amidase, whereas Ag(I), Hg(II), and Se(IV) were noncompetitive inhibitors. When the pesticides studied were compared by using 10 ..mu..g of active ingredient per gram of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils ranged from 2% with dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, and captan to 10% with butylate. Other pesticides that inhibited amidase activity in soils were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, paraquat, trifluralin, maneb, diazinon, and malathion. The inhibition of amidase by diazinon, alachlor, and butylate followed noncompetitive kinetics.

  15. Transmit B1 Field Correction at 7T using Actively Tuned Coupled Inner Elements

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Hellmut; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; van Gelderen, Peter; Wang, Shumin; Li, Tie-Qiang; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Josef H.

    2011-01-01

    When volume coils are used for 1H imaging of the human head at 7T, wavelength effects in tissue cause intensity variations that are typically brighter at the center of the head and darker in the periphery. Much of this image non-uniformity can be attributed to variation in the effective transmit B1 field, which falls by about 50% to the left and right of center at mid-elevation in the brain. Because most of this B1 loss occurs in the periphery of the brain, we have explored use of actively controlled, off-resonant loop elements to locally enhance the transmit B1 field in these regions. When tuned to frequencies above the NMR frequency, these elements provide strong local enhancement of the B1 field of the transmit coil. Because they are tuned off-resonance, some volume coil detuning results, but resistive loading of the coil mode remains dominated by the sample. By digitally controlling their frequency offsets, the field enhancement of each inner element can be placed under active control. Using an array of eight, digitally-controlled elements placed around a custom-built head phantom, we demonstrate the feasibility of improving the B1 homogeneity of a transmit/receive volume coil without the need for multiple RF transmit channels. PMID:21437974

  16. Micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling of electromechanical properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qingli; Ng, Kenny

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the combined micromechanics analysis and finite element modeling of the electromechanical properties of piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites. The active piezoelectric materials are widely used due to their high stiffness, voltage-dependent actuation capability, and broadband electro-mechanical interactions. However, the fragile nature of piezoceramics limits their sensing and actuating applications. In this study, the active PSF composites were made by deploying the longitudinally poled PSFs into a polymer matrix. The PSF itself consists a silicon carbide (SiC) or carbon core fiber as reinforcement to the fragile piezoceramic shell. To predict the electromechanical properties of PSF composites, the micromechanics analysis was firstly conducted with the dilute approximation model and the Mori-Tanaka approach. The extended Rule of Mixtures was also applied to accurately predict the transverse properties by considering the effects of microstructure including inclusion sizes and geometries. The piezoelectric finite element (FE) modeling was developed with the ABAQUS software to predict the detailed mechanical and electrical field distribution within a representative volume element (RVE) of PSF composites. The simulated energy or deformation under imposed specific boundary conditions was used to calculate each individual property with constitutive laws. The comparison between micromechanical analysis and finite element modeling indicates the combination of the dilute approximation model, the Mori-Tanaka approach and the extended Rule of Mixtures can favorably predict the electromechanical properties of three-phase PSF composites.

  17. Elemental abundances in atmospheres of cool dwarfs with solar-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances in the atmosphere of the red dwarf HD 32147, which belongs to the HR 1614 moving groups, are analyzed. The atmospheric parameters determined from spectroscopic data (the condition of equal abundances for neutral and ionized atoms of a given element) differ considerably from those derived from photometry and parallax data. The abundances of several elements are also anomalous, with the anomaly increasing with decreasing ionization potential. It is concluded that this star is a red dwarf displaying solar-like activity; i.e., having dark (cool) spots on its surface, which may sometimes be considerable in size. Modeling synthetic spectra of stars with cool spots on their surfaces, with the spectral lines consisting of two components formed in media with different temperatures, indicate that the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters derived in such cases are incorrect; this can also explain the observed dependence of the elemental abundances on the corresponding ionization potentials. This leads to the conclusion thatHD32147 is indeed a star with solar-like activity. Several other such stars considered as examples display the same anomalies as those of HD 32147. These modeling results are also valid for Ap and Am stars, and are able to explain short-wavelength observations of the Sun and some stars (the FIP effect).

  18. ERV-L Elements: a Family of Endogenous Retrovirus-Like Elements Active throughout the Evolution of Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bénit, Laurence; Lallemand, Jean-Baptiste; Casella, Jean-François; Philippe, Hervé; Heidmann, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified in the human genome a family of 200 endogenous retrovirus-like elements, the HERV-L elements, disclosing similarities with the foamy retroviruses and which might be the evolutionary intermediate between classical intracellular retrotransposons and infectious retroviruses. Southern blot analysis of a large series of mammalian genomic DNAs shows that HERV-L-related elements—so-called ERV-L—are present among all placental mammals, suggesting that ERV-L elements were already present at least 70 million years ago. Most species exhibit a low copy number of ERV-L elements (from 10 to 30), while simians (not prosimians) and mice (not rats) have been subjected to bursts resulting in increases in the number of copies up to 200. The burst of copy number in primates can be dated to shortly after the prosimian and simian branchpoint, 45 to 65 million years ago, whereas murine species have been subjected to two much more recent bursts (less than 10 million years ago), occurring after the Mus/Rattus split. We have amplified and sequenced 360-bp ERV-L internal fragments of the highly conserved pol gene from a series of 22 mammalian species. These sequences exhibit high percentages of identity (57 to 99%) with the murine fully coding MuERV-L element. Phylogenetic analyses allowed the establishment of a plausible evolutionary scheme for ERV-L elements, which accounts for the high level of sequence conservation and the widespread dispersion among mammals. PMID:10074184

  19. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  20. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  1. Development of multi-element active aerodynamics for the formula sae car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, James Patrick

    This thesis focuses on the design, development, and implementation of an active aerodynamics system on 2013 Formula SAE car. The aerodynamics package itself consists of five element front and rear wings as well as an under body diffuser. Five element wings produce significant amounts of drag which is a compromise between the cornering ability of the car and the acceleration capability on straights. The active aerodynamics system allows for the wing angle of attack to dynamically change their configuration on track based on sensory data to optimize the wings for any given scenario. The wings are studied using computational fluid dynamics both in their maximum lift configuration as well as a minimum drag configuration. A control system is then developed using an electro mechanical actuation system to articulate the wings between these two states.

  2. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  3. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  4. Post-translational environmental switch of RadA activity by extein–intein interactions in protein splicing

    PubMed Central

    Topilina, Natalya I.; Novikova, Olga; Stanger, Matthew; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational control based on an environmentally sensitive intervening intein sequence is described. Inteins are invasive genetic elements that self-splice at the protein level from the flanking host protein, the exteins. Here we show in Escherichia coli and in vitro that splicing of the RadA intein located in the ATPase domain of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii is strongly regulated by the native exteins, which lock the intein in an inactive state. High temperature or solution conditions can unlock the intein for full activity, as can remote extein point mutations. Notably, this splicing trap occurs through interactions between distant residues in the native exteins and the intein, in three-dimensional space. The exteins might thereby serve as an environmental sensor, releasing the intein for full activity only at optimal growth conditions for the native organism, while sparing ATP consumption under conditions of cold-shock. This partnership between the intein and its exteins, which implies coevolution of the parasitic intein and its host protein may provide a novel means of post-translational control. PMID:26101259

  5. Native Thrombocidin-1 and Unfolded Thrombocidin-1 Exert Antimicrobial Activity via Distinct Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; de Boer, Leonie; Nguyen, Leonard T.; Boszhard, Laura; Vreede, Jocelyne; Dekker, Henk L.; Speijer, Dave; Drijfhout, Jan W.; te Velde, Anje A.; Crielaard, Wim; Vogel, Hans J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can have direct antimicrobial activity, which is apparently related to the presence of a distinct positively charged patch on the surface. However, chemokines can retain antimicrobial activity upon linearization despite the loss of their positive patch, thus questioning the importance of this patch for activity. Thrombocidin-1 (TC-1) is a microbicidal protein isolated from human blood platelets. TC-1 only differs from the chemokine NAP-2/CXCL7 by a two-amino acid C-terminal deletion, but this truncation is crucial for antimicrobial activity. We assessed the structure-activity relationship for antimicrobial activity of TC-1. Reduction of the charge of the TC-1-positive patch by replacing lysine 17 with alanine reduced the activity against bacteria and almost abolished activity against the yeast Candida albicans. Conversely, augmentation of the positive patch by increasing charge density or size resulted in a 2–3-fold increased activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis but did not substantially affect activity against C. albicans. Reduction of TC-1 resulted in loss of the folded conformation, but this disruption of the positive patch did not affect antimicrobial activity. Using overlapping 15-mer synthetic peptides, we demonstrate peptides corresponding to the N-terminal part of TC-1 to have similar antimicrobial activity as intact TC-1. Although we demonstrate that the positive patch is essential for activity of folded TC-1, unfolded TC-1 retained antimicrobial activity despite the absence of a positive patch. This activity is probably exerted by a linear peptide stretch in the N-terminal part of the molecule. We conclude that intact TC-1 and unfolded TC-1 exert antimicrobial activity via distinct structural elements. PMID:22025617

  6. Thin-disk laser based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-03-01

    A thin-disk laser module based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element is developed with a small-signal gain of 1.25 and a stored energy of 400 mJ under cw pumping. The gain and thermally induced phase distortions in the module are studied experimentally. Based on this module, a thin-disk laser with an average power of 300 W and a slope efficiency of 42% is designed.

  7. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  8. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-09-01

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  9. New Fast Shower Max Detector Based on MCP as an Active Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2015-02-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photo detectors based on micro channel plates (MCP) as secondary emitter. The SM time resolution - we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30 ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP.

  10. Qualitative Elemental Analyses of a Meteorite Sample Found in Turkey by Photo-activation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertugay, C.; Boztosun, I.; Ozmen, S. F.; Dapo, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a meteorite sample provided from TÜBITAK National Observatory found in Turkey has been investigated by using a clinical linear accelerator that has endpoint energy of 18 MeV, and a high purity Germanium detector for qualitative elemental analysis within photo-activation analysis method. 21 nuclei ranging from 24Na to 149Nd have been identified in the meteorite sample.

  11. Switching antipsychotic therapy: what to expect and clinical strategies for improving therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Tim J

    2007-01-01

    When a patient taking an antipsychotic is not experiencing symptomatic remission, or is experiencing adverse effects (AEs) that are intolerable or damaging to his or her physical health, a change in medication may be the best path to a good outcome. However, many clinicians are reluctant to switch medications in all but the clearest cases of failure. This reluctance is intensified by the occurrence of AEs caused by transitioning patients too rapidly between agents with different receptor-binding profiles. Emergent antipsychotic-switching syndromes include the "withdrawal triad," comprised of cholinergic rebound, supersensitivity psychosis, and emergent withdrawal dyskinesias (and other motor syndromes). More recently, another element has been observed consistent with an activation syndrome. This activation syndrome may occur as a consequence of switching from highly sedative agents or as a consequence of initial prodopaminergic drive. All of these effects can be minimized by careful planning of gradual switch procedures and judicious use of adjunctive medications. PMID:17650054

  12. Multiphase soft switched DC/DC converter and active control technique for fuel cell ripple current elimination

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Changrong; Ridenour, Amy

    2009-04-14

    DC/DC converter has a transformer having primary coils connected to an input side and secondary coils connected to an output side. Each primary coil connects a full-bridge circuit comprising two switches on two legs, the primary coil being connected between the switches on each leg, each full-bridge circuit being connected in parallel wherein each leg is disposed parallel to one another, and the secondary coils connected to a rectifying circuit. An outer loop control circuit that reduces ripple in a voltage reference has a first resistor connected in series with a second resistor connected in series with a first capacitor which are connected in parallel with a second capacitor. An inner loop control circuit that reduces ripple in a current reference has a third resistor connected in series with a fourth resistor connected in series with a third capacitor which are connected in parallel with a fourth capacitor.

  13. Actively Q-switched 2.9 μm Ho(3+)Pr(3+)-doped fluoride fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tomonori; Hudson, Darren D; Jackson, Stuart D

    2012-06-01

    We report an efficient Q-switched Ho(3+)Pr(3+)-doped fluoride fiber laser, producing a peak power of 77 W, with pulse width of 78 ns. A slope efficiency of 20% with respect to the launched pump power was achieved. A TeO(2) acousto-optic modulator allowed continuous tunability of the pulse repetition frequency from 40 to 300 kHz. PMID:22660149

  14. Design of a Command-Triggered Plasma Opening Switch for Terawatt Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SAVAGE,MARK E.; MENDEL,C.W.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.

    1999-10-29

    Inductive energy storage systems can have high energy density, lending to smaller, less expensive systems. The crucial element of an inductive energy storage system is the opening switch. This switch must conduct current while energy is stored in an inductor, then open quickly to transfer this energy to a load. Plasma can perform this function. The Plasma Opening Switch (POS) has been studied for more than two decades. Success with the conventional plasma opening switch has been limited. A system designed to significantly improve the performance of vacuum opening switches is described in this paper. The gap cleared of plasma is a rough figure-of-merit for vacuum opening switches. Typical opened gaps of 3 mm are reported for conventional switches. The goal for the system described in this paper is more than 3 cm. To achieve this, the command-triggered POS adds an active opening mechanism, which allows complete separation of conduction and opening. This separation is advantageous because of the widely different time scales of conduction and opening. The detrimental process of magnetic field penetration into the plasma during conduction is less important in this switch. The opening mechanism duration is much shorter than the conduction time, so penetration during opening is insignificant. Opening is accomplished with a fast magnetic field that pushes plasma out of the switch region. Plasma must be removed from the switch region to allow high voltage. This paper describes some processes important during conduction and opening, and show calculations on the trigger requirements. The design of the switch is shown. This system is designed to demonstrate both improved performance and nanosecond output jitter at levels greater than one terawatt. An amplification mechanism is described which reduces the trigger energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the system are also shown.

  15. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis harbors multiple lineages of transcriptionally active Mutator-like elements

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fabrício R; Silva, Joana C; Benchimol, Marlene; Costa, Gustavo GL; Pereira, Gonçalo AG; Carareto, Claudia MA

    2009-01-01

    Background For three decades the Mutator system was thought to be exclusive of plants, until the first homolog representatives were characterized in fungi and in early-diverging amoebas earlier in this decade. Results Here, we describe and characterize four families of Mutator-like elements in a new eukaryotic group, the Parabasalids. These Trichomonas vaginalis Mutator- like elements, or TvMULEs, are active in T. vaginalis and patchily distributed among 12 trichomonad species and isolates. Despite their relatively distinctive amino acid composition, the inclusion of the repeats TvMULE1, TvMULE2, TvMULE3 and TvMULE4 into the Mutator superfamily is justified by sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses. In addition, we identified three new TvMULE-related sequences in the genome sequence of Candida albicans. While TvMULE1 is a member of the MuDR clade, predominantly from plants, the other three TvMULEs, together with the C. albicans elements, represent a new and quite distinct Mutator lineage, which we named TvCaMULEs. The finding of TvMULE1 sequence inserted into other putative repeat suggests the occurrence a novel TE family not yet described. Conclusion These findings expand the taxonomic distribution and the range of functional motif of MULEs among eukaryotes. The characterization of the dynamics of TvMULEs and other transposons in this organism is of particular interest because it is atypical for an asexual species to have such an extreme level of TE activity; this genetic landscape makes an interesting case study for causes and consequences of such activity. Finally, the extreme repetitiveness of the T. vaginalis genome and the remarkable degree of sequence identity within its repeat families highlights this species as an ideal system to characterize new transposable elements. PMID:19622157

  16. The coelacanth: Can a “living fossil” have active transposable elements in its genome?

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Casane, Didier; Laurenti, Patrick; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The coelacanth has long been regarded as a “living fossil,” with extant specimens looking very similar to fossils dating back to the Cretaceous period. The hypothesis of a slowly or even not evolving genome has been proposed to account for this apparent morphological stasis. While this assumption seems to be sustained by different evolutionary analyses on protein-coding genes, recent studies on transposable elements have provided more conflicting results. Indeed, the coelacanth genome contains many transposable elements and has been shaped by several major bursts of transposition during evolution. In addition, comparison of orthologous genomic regions from the genomes of the 2 extant coelacanth species L. chalumnae and L. menadoensis revealed multiple species-specific insertions, indicating transposable element recent activity and contribution to post-speciation genome divergence. These observations, which do not support the genome stasis hypothesis, challenge either the impact of transposable elements on organismal evolution or the status of the coelacanth as a “living fossil.” Closer inspection of fossil and molecular data indicate that, even if coelacanths might evolve more slowly than some other lineages due to demographic and/or ecological factors, this variation is still in the range of a “non-fossil” vertebrate species. PMID:26442185

  17. A developmentally regulated Caulobacter flagellar promoter is activated by 3' enhancer and IHF binding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The transcription of a group of flagellar genes is temporally and spatially regulated during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. These genes all share the same 5' cis-regulatory elements: a sigma 54 promoter, a binding site for integration host factor (IHF), and an enhancer sequence, known as the ftr element. We have partially purified the ftr-binding proteins, and we show that they require the same enhancer sequences for binding as are required for transcriptional activation. We have also partially purified the Caulobacter homolog of IHF and demonstrate that it can facilitate in vitro integrase-mediated lambda recombination. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we provide the first demonstration that natural enhancer sequences and IHF binding elements that reside 3' to the sigma 54 promoter of a bacterial gene, flaNQ, are required for transcription of the operon, in vivo. The IHF protein and the ftr-binding protein is primarily restricted to the predivisional cell, the cell type in which these promoters are transcribed. flaNQ promoter expression is localized to the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, as are other flagellar promoters that possess these regulatory sequences 5' to the start site. The requirement for an IHF binding site and an ftr-enhancer element in spatially transcribed flagellar promoters indicates that a common mechanism may be responsible for both temporal and polar transcription. Images PMID:1392079

  18. Experimental analysis of biasing elements for dielectric electro-active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, Micah; Seelecke, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of three different, small profile and scalable DEAP actuators. These actuators are designed for use in small scale pumping and valve applications. The actuators used in this paper consist of a biasing element (either a mass, linear spring, or a non-linear spring) coupled with a circular dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP). These mechanisms bias the DEAP allowing out-of-plane actuation when the voltage is cycled. A constant force input, a linear spring, and a non-linear spring are separately tested as the biasing element of a circular/diaphragm DEAP. Tests are systematically performed at various DEAP pre-deflections, biasing stiffness and electrical loading rates. The displacement stroke performance of each test is examined and analyzed. It was found that the non-linear spring provided the largest displacement stroke over two other biasing elements. It also showed better performance at higher electrical loading rates. Thus, of the three types of biasing tested the non-linear spring shows most promise for use in fluid pump/valve applications. Future work will include optimizing this biasing element for the current DEAP design.

  19. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  20. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  1. Observation of new spontaneous fission activities from elements 100 to 105

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, L.P.

    1982-03-01

    Several new Spontaneous Fission (SF) activities have been found. No definite identification could be made for any of the new SF activities; however, half-lives and possible assignments to element-104 isotopes consistent with several cross bombardments include /sup 257/Rf(3.8 s, 14% SF), /sup 258/Rf(13 ms), /sup 259/Rf(approx. 3 s, 8% SF), /sup 260/Rf(approx. 20 ms), and /sup 262/Rf(approx. 50 ms). The 80-ms SF activity claimed by the Dubna group for the discovery of element 104 (/sup 260/104) was not observed. A difficulty exists in the interpretation that /sup 260/Rf is a approx. 20-ms SF activity: in order to be correct, for example, the SF activities with half-lives between 14 and 24 ms produced in the reactions 109- to 119-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 248/Cm, 88- to 100-MeV /sup 15/N + /sup 249/Bk, and 96-MeV /sup 18/O + /sup 249/Cf must be other nuclides due to their large production cross sections, or the cross sections for production of /sup 260/Rf must be enhanced by unknown mechanisms. Based on calculated total production cross sections a possible approx. 1% electron-capture branch in /sup 258/Lr(4.5 s) to the SF emitter /sup 258/No(1.2 ms) and an upper limit of 0.05% for SF branching in /sup 254/No(55 s) were determined. Other measured half-lives from unknown nuclides produced in respective reactions include approx. 1.6 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 248/CM), indications of a approx. 47-s SF activity (75-MeV /sup 12/C + /sup 249/Cf), and two or more SF activities with 3 s less than or equal to T/sub 1/2/ less than or equal to 60 s (/sup 18/O + /sup 249/Bk). The most exciting conclusion of this work is that if the tentative assignments to even-even element 104 isotopes are correct, there would be a sudden change in the SF half-life systematics at element 104 which has been predicted theoretically and attributed to the disappearance of the second hump of the double-humped fission barrier.

  2. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  3. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages.

    PubMed

    Ma, J-L; Carasco, C; Perot, B; Mauerhofer, E; Kettler, J; Havenith, A

    2012-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R&D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a ∼20kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Jülich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. PMID:22406218

  4. Low threshold, actively Q-switched Nd 3+:YVO 4 self-Raman laser and frequency doubled 588 nm yellow laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoshan; Tan, Huiming; Peng, Jiying; Miao, Jieguang; Gao, Lanlan

    2007-03-01

    We reported an actively Q-switched, intracavity Nd3+:YVO4 self-Raman laser at 1176 nm with low threshold and high efficiency. From the extracavity frequency doubling by use of LBO nonlinear crystal, over 3.5 mW, 588 nm yellow laser is achieved. The maximum Raman laser output at is 182 mW with 1.8 W incident pump power. The threshold is only 370 mW at a pulse repetition frequency of 5 kHz. The optical conversion efficiency from incident to the Raman laser is 10%, and 1.9% from Raman laser to the yellow.

  5. Nanoelectromechanical contact switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Y.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are similar to conventional semiconductor switches in that they can be used as relays, transistors, logic devices and sensors. However, the operating principles of NEM switches and semiconductor switches are fundamentally different. These differences give NEM switches an advantage over semiconductor switches in some applications -- for example, NEM switches perform much better in extreme environments -- but semiconductor switches benefit from a much superior manufacturing infrastructure. Here we review the potential of NEM-switch technologies to complement or selectively replace conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, and identify the challenges involved in the large-scale manufacture of a representative set of NEM-based devices.

  6. Alarm toe switch. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, F.P.

    1980-11-18

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

  7. Hoxa5 gene regulation: A gradient of binding activity to a brachial spinal cord element.

    PubMed

    Nowling, T; Zhou, W; Krieger, K E; Larochelle, C; Nguyen-Huu, M C; Jeannotte, L; Tuggle, C K

    1999-04-01

    The Hox genes cooperate in providing positional information needed for spatial and temporal patterning of the vertebrate body axis. However, the biological mechanisms behind spatial Hox expression are largely unknown. In transgenic mice, gene fusions between Hoxa5 (previously called Hox-1.3) 5' flanking regions and the lacZ reporter gene show tissue- and time-specific expression in the brachial spinal cord in day 11-13 embryos. A 604-bp regulatory region with enhancer properties directs this spatially specific expression. Fine-detail mapping of the enhancer has identified several elements involved in region-specific expression, including an element required for expression in the brachial spinal cord. Factors in embryonic day 12.5 nuclear extracts bind this element in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and protect three regions from DNase digestion. All three sites contain an AAATAA sequence and mutations at these sites reduce or abolish binding. Furthermore, this element binds specific individual embryonic proteins on a protein blot. The binding activity appears as a gradient along the anterior-posterior axis with two- to threefold higher levels observed in extracts from anterior regions than from posterior regions. In parallel with the EMSA, the proteins on the protein blot also show reduced binding to probes with mutations at the AAATAA sites. Most importantly, transgenic mice carrying Hoxa5/lacZ fusions with the three AAATAA sites mutated either do not express the transgene or have altered transgene expression. The brachial spinal cord element and its binding proteins are likely to be involved in spatial expression of Hoxa5 during development. PMID:10075847

  8. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  9. Evaluation of the JPL X-band 32 element active array. [for deep space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Conroy, B. L.

    1979-01-01

    Tests performed on an X-band 32-element active array are described. Antenna pattern characteristics of the array were tested in its standard operating mode as well as several degraded performance modes, including failures of 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 31 elements. Additionally, the array was characterized with the addition of a metallic shroud, and also characterized versus rf drive level and at a single off-axis electronic beamsteered position. Characterization was performed on several of the 3/4-watt, three-stage, X-band solid-state power amplifier modules. The characterization included swept amplitude response, amplitude and phase versus temperature from -20 to +60 C, and intermodulation distortion of selected modules. The array is described and conclusions and recommendations based upon the experience and results achieved are included.

  10. Distribution of trace elements in the human body determined by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, M.; Suzuki-Yasumoto, M.; Amano, K.; Terai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis and instrumental semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometry were used for analysis of 20 trace elements in 10 autopsied human organs and tissues (liver, kidney, cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, muscle, pancreas, spleen, lung, and aorta) from 63 Japanese persons, whose ages ranged from 15 days to 85 yr. Distributions of aluminum, bromine, magnesium, manganese, rubidium, selenium, and vanadium in human body were almost uniform. High concentrations of cadmium were found in kidney and liver samples. There was a high mercury concentration in the liver, kidney, and brain samples. Concentrations of other elements (arsenic, gold, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, indium, antimony, selenium, titanium, and zinc) in each organ or tissue are also presented in this paper.

  11. Class-switch recombination: after the dawn of AID

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Isotype class switching is central to the humoral immune response. The discovery that mutations in the activation-induced deaminase (AID) gene inhibit class-switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and gene conversion is a major step forward in defining the underlying mechanisms of these gene modification events. The propensity of mutations to occur at dC/dG nucleotides during somatic hypermutation and the homology between AID and cytidine deaminase has resulted in studies demonstrating that AID has the properties of a cytidine-specific mutator and also that elements of the base-excision repair pathway play a central role in class switching and hypermutation. AID is not a promiscuous mutator in the B cell, suggesting that there are specific molecular targeting mechanisms that regulate the accessibility of DNA to AID and differentially regulate class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. During class switching, isotype-specific targeting occurs independently of AID and provides another level of specificity to this recombination event. PMID:12633669

  12. Trace element landscape of resting and activated human neutrophils on the sub-micrometer level.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, M J; De Samber, B; Garrevoet, J; Vergucht, E; Vekemans, B; De Rycke, R; Björn, E; Sandblad, L; Wellenreuther, G; Falkenberg, G; Cloetens, P; Vincze, L; Urban, C F

    2015-06-01

    Every infection is a battle for trace elements. Neutrophils migrate first to the infection site and accumulate quickly to high numbers. They fight pathogens by phagocytosis and intracellular toxication. Additionally, neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to inhibit extracellular microbes. Yet, neutrophil trace element characteristics are largely unexplored. We investigated unstimulated and phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) on the sub-micron spatial resolution level. PMA activates pinocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements and the release of NETs, all mechanisms deployed by neutrophils to combat infection. By analyzing Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, P, S, and Ca, not only the nucleus but also vesicular granules were identifiable in the elemental maps. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed a neutrophil-specific composition of Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn in comparison with J774 and HeLa cells, indicating a neutrophil-specific metallome complying with their designated functions. When investigating PMA-activated neutrophils, the SR-XRF analysis depicted typical subcellular morphological changes: the transformation of nucleus and granules and the emergence of void vacuoles. Mature NETs were evenly composed of Fe, P, S, and Ca with occasional hot spots containing Zn, Fe, and Ca. An ICP-MS-based quantification of NET supernatants revealed a NETosis-induced decrease of soluble Zn, whereas Fe, Cu, and Mn concentrations were only slightly affected. In summary, we present a combination of SR-XRF and ICP-MS as a powerful tool to analyze trace elements in human neutrophils. The approach will be applicable and valuable to numerous aspects of nutritional immunity. PMID:25832493

  13. Frequency shifting with a solid-state switching capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Viola, T. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency shifting, commonly used in electronic signal processing, is applied in tuning, automatic frequency control, antenna element switching, phase shifting, etc. Frequency shifting can be accomplished economically and reliably with simple circuit comprising conventional resistor and solid-state switching device which can be equivalent to two capacitors, depending on switching state.

  14. A protein kinase C isozyme is translocated to cytoskeletal elements on activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Henrich, C J; Cheever, L; Khaner, H; Simpson, P C

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)1 isozymes comprise a family of related cytosolic kinases that translocate to the cell particulate fraction on stimulation. The activated enzyme is thought to be on the plasma membrane. However, phosphorylation of protein substrates occurs throughout the cell and is inconsistent with plasma membrane localization. Using an isozyme-specific monoclonal antibody we found that, on activation, this PKC isozyme translocates to myofibrils in cardiac myocytes and to microfilaments in fibroblasts. Translocation of this activated PKC isozyme to cytoskeletal elements may explain some of the effects of PKC on cell contractility and morphology. In addition, differences in the translocation site of individual isozymes--and, therefore, phosphorylation of different substrates localized at these sites--may explain the diverse biological effects of PKC. Images PMID:2078573

  15. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  16. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency.

  17. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  18. Innovative Application of Mechanical Activation for Rare Earth Elements Recovering: Process Optimization and Mechanism Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanyin; Deng, Chao; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding use of fluorescent lamps (FLs) and increasing interest in conservation and sustainable utilization of critical metals such as rare earth elements (REEs), the recovering of REEs from phosphors in waste FLs is becoming a critical environmental and economic issue. To effectively recycle REEs with metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the waste phosphors. This current study put the emphasis on the mechanical activation and leaching processes for REEs, and explored the feasibility of the method from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Results showed physicochemical changes of structural destruction and particle size reduction after mechanical activation, leading to the easy dissolution of REEs in the activated samples. Under optimal conditions, dissolution yields of 89.4%, 93.1% and 94.6% for Tb, Eu and Y, respectively, were achieved from activated waste phosphors using hydrochloric acid as the dissolution agent. The shrinking core model proved to be the most applicable for the leaching procedure, with an apparent activation energy of 10.96 ± 2.79 kJ/mol. This novel process indicates that mechanical activation is an efficient method for recovering REEs from waste phosphors, and it has promising potential for REE recovery with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:26819083

  19. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  20. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  1. Structural elements in the Girk1 subunit that potentiate G protein-gated potassium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Wickman, Kevin

    2012-12-26

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk/K(IR)3) channels mediate the inhibitory effect of many neurotransmitters on excitable cells. Girk channels are tetramers consisting of various combinations of four mammalian Girk subunits (Girk1 to -4). Although Girk1 is unable to form functional homomeric channels, its presence in cardiac and neuronal channel complexes correlates with robust channel activity. This study sought to better understand the potentiating influence of Girk1, using the GABA(B) receptor and Girk1/Girk2 heteromer as a model system. Girk1 did not increase the protein levels or alter the trafficking of Girk2-containing channels to the cell surface in transfected cells or hippocampal neurons, indicating that its potentiating influence involves enhancement of channel activity. Structural elements in both the distal carboxyl-terminal domain and channel core were identified as key determinants of robust channel activity. In the distal carboxyl-terminal domain, residue Q404 was identified as a key determinant of receptor-induced channel activity. In the Girk1 core, three unique residues in the pore (P) loop (F137, A142, Y150) were identified as a collective potentiating influence on both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent channel activity, exerting their influence, at least in part, by enhancing mean open time and single-channel conductance. Interestingly, the potentiating influence of the Girk1 P-loop is tempered by residue F162 in the second membrane-spanning domain. Thus, discontinuous and sometime opposing elements in Girk1 underlie the Girk1-dependent potentiation of receptor-dependent and receptor-independent heteromeric channel activity. PMID:23236146

  2. THYRATRON SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.; Bourgeois, N.A. Jr.

    1959-04-21

    An arrangement for utilizing a thyratron as a noise free switch is described. It has been discovered that the voltage between plate and cathode of a thyratron will oscillate, producing voltage spikes, if the tube carries only a fraction of its maximum rated current. These voltage spikes can produce detrimental effects where the thyratron is used in critical timing circuits. To alleviate this problem the disclosed circuit provides a charged capacitor and a resistor in parallel with the tube and of such value that the maximum current will flow from the capacitor through the thyratron when it is triggered. During this time the signal current is conducted through the tube, before the thyratron voltage starts to oscillate, and the signal current output is free of noise spikes.

  3. Aortic ascorbic acid, trace elements, and superoxide dismutase activity in human aneurysmal and occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Hunter, G.C.; Casey, S.M.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Altered trace elements and ascorbic acid metabolism have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, their role in the disease process, or the effect of atherosclerosis on their tissue levels within plaque, is poorly understood. The presence study analyzes the concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn, and ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in tissue samples from 29 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and 14 patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD). It was observed that the Fe and Mn concentrations in AAA and AOD tissue were higher than the levels in nondiseased control aorta, whereas Cu and Zn levels in AAA and AOD tissue were similar to the levels in controls. The Zn:Cu ratio was significantly lower in the AAA tissue in comparison to both AOD and control tissue. In addition, AAA and AOD tissue had low ascorbic acid levels and low Cu, Zn-SOD activity with Cu,Zn-SOD:Mn-SOD ratios of 0.27 and 0.19, respectively, compared to a ratio of 3.20 in control aorta. These data indicate that aorta affected by aneurysms and occlusive disease have altered trace element and ascorbic acid concentrations, as well as low Cu,Zn-SOD activity. Although these observations do not directly support the hypothesis that AAA is associated with aortic Cu deficiency they do suggest a role for oxygen radicals or increased lipid peroxidation in occlusive and aneurysmal disease of the aorta.

  4. Transcription of Mammalian cis-Regulatory Elements Is Restrained by Actively Enforced Early Termination.

    PubMed

    Austenaa, Liv M I; Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Masella, Silvia; Della Chiara, Giulia; Ghisletti, Serena; Curina, Alessia; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; de Pretis, Stefano; Piccolo, Viviana; Termanini, Alberto; Prosperini, Elena; Pelizzola, Mattia; de Laat, Wouter; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2015-11-01

    Upon recruitment to active enhancers and promoters, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) generates short non-coding transcripts of unclear function. The mechanisms that control the length and the amount of ncRNAs generated by cis-regulatory elements are largely unknown. Here, we show that the adaptor protein WDR82 and its associated complexes actively limit such non-coding transcription. WDR82 targets the SET1 H3K4 methyltransferases and the nuclear protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complexes to the initiating Pol II. WDR82 and PP1 also interact with components of the transcriptional termination and RNA processing machineries. Depletion of WDR82, SET1, or the PP1 subunit required for its nuclear import caused distinct but overlapping transcription termination defects at highly expressed genes and active enhancers and promoters, thus enabling the increased synthesis of unusually long ncRNAs. These data indicate that transcription initiated from cis-regulatory elements is tightly coordinated with termination mechanisms that impose the synthesis of short RNAs. PMID:26593720

  5. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  6. Activation of carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) by ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Ross, Ruth A.; Crabb, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Its function is in part under the control of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Given known effects of ethanol on AMPK and PP2A, it is plausible that ethanol might enhance fatty acid synthesis by increasing the activity of ChREBP. We hypothesized that another potential pathway of ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis is mediated by activation of ChREBP. Methods The effects of ethanol on ChREBP were assessed in hepatoma cells and in C57BL/6J mice fed with the Lieber-DeCarli diet. Results When the cells were exposed to ethanol (50 mM) for 24 hrs, the activity of a liver pyruvate kinase (LPK) promoter-luciferase reporter was increased by ~4-fold. Ethanol feeding of mice resulted in the translocation of ChREBP from cytosol to the nucleus. PP2A activity was increased in the liver of ethanol-fed mice by 22%. We found no difference in the levels of hepatic Xu-5-P between ethanol-fed mice and controls. Transfection of a constitutively active AMPK expression plasmid suppressed the basal activity of the LPK luciferase reporter and abolished the effect of ethanol on the reporter activity. However, transfection of rat hepatoma cells with a dominant negative AMPK expression plasmid induced basal LPK luciferase activity by only ~20%. The effect of ethanol on ChREBP was attenuated in the presence of okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A. Conclusions The effects of ethanol on AMPK and PP2A may result in activation of ChREBP, providing another potential mechanism for ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis. However, additional okadaic acid-insensitive effects appear to be important as well. PMID:23266705

  7. What automaticity deficit? Activation of lexical information by readers with dyslexia in a rapid automatized naming Stroop-switch task.

    PubMed

    Jones, Manon W; Snowling, Margaret J; Moll, Kristina

    2016-03-01

    Reading fluency is often predicted by rapid automatized naming (RAN) speed, which as the name implies, measures the automaticity with which familiar stimuli (e.g., letters) can be retrieved and named. Readers with dyslexia are considered to have less "automatized" access to lexical information, reflected in longer RAN times compared with nondyslexic readers. We combined the RAN task with a Stroop-switch manipulation to test the automaticity of dyslexic and nondyslexic readers' lexical access directly within a fluency task. Participants named letters in 10 × 4 arrays while eye movements and speech responses were recorded. Upon fixation, specific letter font colors changed from black to a different color, whereupon the participant was required to rapidly switch from naming the letter to naming the letter color. We could therefore measure reading group differences on "automatic" lexical processing, insofar as it was task-irrelevant. Readers with dyslexia showed obligatory lexical processing and a timeline for recognition that was overall similar to typical readers, but a delay emerged in the output (naming) phase. Further delay was caused by visual-orthographic competition between neighboring stimuli. Our findings outline the specific processes involved when researchers speak of "impaired automaticity" in dyslexic readers' fluency, and are discussed in the context of the broader literature in this field. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26414305

  8. The nature of catalytically active complexes of Ziegler-type systems based on iron subgroup elements

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskii, A.R.; Noskova, N.F.

    1995-02-01

    Complexation processes that occur in Ziegler-type systems on the basis of the carboxylate compounds of elements belonging mainly to the Iron Subgroup are investigated. The influence of genesis on the composition and structure of the complexes forming in the catalytic systems is demonstrated. A general scheme to describe the interaction of the catalyst components depending on their formation conditions is proposed. It is established that, along with other complexes, polynuclear associated species are present in the catalysts and play a decisive role in the catalytic activity of the investigated systems.

  9. Detection and analysis on versatile coding strategies of high frequency active Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser for irradiance of different targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; Talaat, Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    We report an active Q-switching with different coded schemes generated in the high power diode end pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (DEPSS) using two different techniques of special combination of optical choppers and acousto-optic modulator (AOM) at higher repetition rates of 100 kHz for the first time to the best of our knowledge in any practical laser target designation (LTD) systems. The highest peak power of 95.4 kW with the lowest pulse repetition frequency of 222 Hz and pulse width of 46 ns at FWHM with the pulse-to-pulse stability of ~95% was measured at certain regime of operation. Special modulation and coding of high stable, high peak power Nd:YVO4 laser pulses at 1064 nm using the combination of different optical chopper blades were achieved. A high peak power of more than 4.84 kW with the shortest pulse width of 25 ns at FWHM has been obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as an active Q-switched. The pulse-to-pulse stability was measured and improved to be ~97% at high repetition rate ranges from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The correlation between the coded laser irradiation (transmitted) and the scattered (received) laser signals for three different targets materials of sand, wood and metal using this laser designation system are examined and discussed.

  10. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches. PMID:26876376

  11. Sensing Nature's Electric Fields: Ion Channels as Active Elements of Linear Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2003-05-01

    Given the parameters of familiar cellular elements — voltage-sensitive ion channels, carriers, pumps, phospholipid insulators, and electrolytic conductors — is it possible to construct an amplifier whose sensitivity matches the 5 nV/cm threshold found in behavioral experiments on elasmobranch fish? Or, in addition to clever circuitry that uses commonly known elements and principles, do we need something else to understand this sensitivity? The resolution of this question is important not only for studies in sensory biophysics seeking to reveal underlying mechanisms and molecular structures. More generally, it deepens our appreciation of the stochastic nature of inter- and intra-cellular control circuits. Here I analyze a simplified circuit involving negative differential resistance of voltage-sensitive ion channels. The analysis establishes an off-equilibrium criterion for amplification, shows that ion channels are the dominant noise sources, and, by minimizing channel noise within the given constraints, demonstrates that generic voltage-sensitive ion channels are likely candidates for the active elements of the linear cellular amplifiers. Finally, I highlight a number of unsolved issues.

  12. Reward Contingency Modulates Neuronal Activity in Rat Septal Nuclei during Elemental and Configural Association Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Nozomu; Uwano, Teruko; Hori, Etsuro; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that septal nuclei are important in the control of behavior during various reward and non-reward situations. In the present study, neuronal activity was recorded from rat septal nuclei during discrimination of conditioned sensory stimuli (CSs) of the medial forebrain bundle associated with or without a reward (sucrose solution or intracranial self-stimulation, ICSS). Rats were trained to lick a spout protruding close to the mouth just after a CS to obtain a reward stimulus. The CSs included both elemental and configural stimuli. In the configural condition, the reward contingency of the stimuli presented together was opposite to that of each elemental stimulus presented alone, although the same sensory stimuli were involved. Of the 72 responsive septal neurons, 18 responded selectively to the CSs predicting reward (CS+-related), four to the CSs predicting non-reward (CS0-related), nine to some CSs predicting reward or non-reward, and 15 non-differentially to all CSs. The remaining 26 neurons responded mainly during the ingestion/ICSS phase. A multivariate analysis of the septal neuronal responses to elemental and configural stimuli indicated that septal neurons encoded the CSs based on reward contingency, regardless of the stimulus physical properties and were categorized into three groups; CSs predicting the sucrose solution, CSs predicting a non-reward, and CSs predicting ICSS. The results suggest that septal nuclei are deeply involved in discriminating the reward contingency of environmental stimuli to manifest appropriate behaviors in response to changing stimuli. PMID:21633493

  13. Waveguide switches using asymmetric coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Kenneth J.; Horst, Scott C.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the results of a three-year effort to investigate the use of Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Well in optical waveguide cross bar switches. The two types of devices investigated are the standard delta beta switch and the delta alpha switch. The delta alpha switch uses the imaginary part of the refractive index to modulate the intensity along different waveguide paths in the switch structure. Both types of switch were fabricated and tested. The delta beta switches produced are suitable as 1-input 2-output devices. The delta alpha switches were demonstrated as 2 by 2 cross bar switches with up to 40% throughput. To compensate for losses in the switches the use of amplifying elements was investigated. To provide gain at a longer wavelength than that of the excitons in the modulation waveguides, the quantum wells in the modulation waveguides were blue shifted using vacancy induced disordering (VID). The VID shifted quantum wells showed less Stark shift than the unshifted quantum wells. This effect is explained by the nearly parabolic shape of the disordered wells. Coupled quantum wells can be used to create a structure that will maintain a strongly Stark shifted spatially indirect transition even after VID. Modeling of the various waveguide structures used is also discussed.

  14. Evaluation of a combination of continuum and truss finite elements in a model of passive and active muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, S; Halldin, P; Brolin, K

    2008-12-01

    The numerical method of finite elements (FE) is a powerful tool for analysing stresses and strains in the human body. One area of increasing interest is the skeletal musculature. This study evaluated modelling of skeletal muscle tissue using a combination of passive non-linear, viscoelastic solid elements and active Hill-type truss elements, the super-positioned muscle finite element (SMFE). The performance of the combined materials and elements was evaluated for eccentric motions by simulating a tensile experiment from a published study on a stimulated rabbit muscle including three different strain rates. It was also evaluated for isometric and concentric contractions. The resulting stress-strain curves had the same overall pattern as the experiments, with the main limitation being sensitivity to the active force-length relation. It was concluded that the SMFE could model active and passive muscle tissue at constant rate elongations for strains below failure, as well as isometric and concentric contractions. PMID:18642161

  15. Ca2+ Switches the Effect of PS-containing Membranes on Factor Xa from Activating to Inhibiting: Implications for Initiation of Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Koklic, Tilen; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in cellular and organismal physiology. The Ca2+ ion has an intermediate protein-binding affinity, thus it can serve as an on/off switch in regulation of different biochemical processes. The serum level of ionized Ca2+ is regulated with normal ionized Ca2+ being in the range from 1.10 to 1.29 mM. Hypocalcaemia (free Ca2+ < 1.1mM) in critically ill patients is commonly accompanied by hemostatic abnormalities, ranging from isolated thrombocytopenia to complex defects such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, commonly thought to be due to insufficient functioning of anticoagulation pathways. A small amount of Factor Xa (fXa) produced by Factor VIIa and exposed tissue factor is key to initiating blood coagulation by producing enough thrombin to induce later stages of coagulation. FXa must bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to produce thrombin at a physiologically significant rate. In this work, we show that overall fXa activity on PS-containing membranes is sharply regulated by a “Ca2+ switch” centered at 1.16 mM, below which fXa is active and above which fXa forms inactive dimers on PS-exposing membranes. Our data lead to a mathematical model that predicts the variation of fXa activity as a function of both calcium and membrane concentrations. Because the critical Ca2+ concentration is at the lower end of the normal plasma ionized Ca2+ concentration range, we propose a new regulatory mechanism by which local Ca2+ concentration switches fXa from an intrinsically active form to a form requiring its cofactor (fVa) to achieve significant activity. PMID:24920080

  16. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  17. Potassium Acts as a GTPase-Activating Element on Each Nucleotide-Binding Domain of the Essential Bacillus subtilis EngA

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Ebel, Christine; Housset, Dominique; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    EngA proteins form a unique family of bacterial GTPases with two GTP-binding domains in tandem, namely GD1 and GD2, followed by a KH (K-homology) domain. They have been shown to interact with the bacterial ribosome and to be involved in its biogenesis. Most prokaryotic EngA possess a high GTPase activity in contrast to eukaryotic GTPases that act mainly as molecular switches. Here, we have purified and characterized the GTPase activity of the Bacillus subtilis EngA and two shortened EngA variants that only contain GD1 or GD2-KH. Interestingly, the GTPase activity of GD1 alone is similar to that of the whole EngA, whereas GD2-KH has a 150-fold lower GTPase activity. At physiological concentration, potassium strongly stimulates the GTPase activity of each protein construct. Interestingly, it affects neither the affinities for nucleotides nor the monomeric status of EngA or the GD1 domain. Thus, potassium likely acts as a chemical GTPase-activating element as proposed for another bacterial GTPase like MnmE. However, unlike MnmE, potassium does not promote dimerization of EngA. In addition, we solved two crystal structures of full-length EngA. One of them contained for the first time a GTP-like analogue bound to GD2 while GD1 was free. Surprisingly, its overall fold was similar to a previously solved structure with GDP bound to both sites. Our data indicate that a significant structural change must occur upon K+ binding to GD2, and a comparison with T. maritima EngA and MnmE structures allowed us to propose a model explaining the chemical basis for the different GTPase activities of GD1 and GD2. PMID:23056455

  18. Switching on the Aire conditioner.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Aire has been cloned as the gene responsible for a hereditary type of organ-specific autoimmune disease. Aire controls the expression of a wide array of tissue-restricted Ags by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), thereby leading to clonal deletion and Treg-cell production, and ultimately to the establishment of self-tolerance. However, relatively little is known about the mechanism responsible for the control of Aire expression itself. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Haljasorg et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 3246-3256] have reported the presence of an enhancer element for Aire that binds with NF-κB components downstream of the TNF receptor family member, RANK (receptor activator of NF-κB). The results suggest that RANK has a dual mode of action in Aire expression: one involving the promotion of mTEC differentiation and the other involving activation of the molecular switch for Aire within mature mTECs. PMID:26643138

  19. Active magnetic bearings used as exciters for rolling element bearing outer race defect diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanping; Di, Long; Zhou, Jin; Jin, Chaowu; Guo, Qintao

    2016-03-01

    The active health monitoring of rotordynamic systems in the presence of bearing outer race defect is considered in this paper. The shaft is assumed to be supported by conventional mechanical bearings and an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is used in the mid of the shaft location as an exciter to apply electromagnetic force to the system. We investigate a nonlinear bearing-pedestal system model with the outer race defect under the electromagnetic force. The nonlinear differential equations are integrated using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the characteristic signal of outer race incipient defect is significantly amplified under the electromagnetic force through the AMBs, which is helpful to improve the diagnosis accuracy of rolling element bearing׳s incipient outer race defect. PMID:26803551

  20. [Antilipoxygenase activity and the trace elements content of Aloe vera in relation to the therapeutical effect].

    PubMed

    Bezáková, L; Oblozinský, M; Sýkorová, M; Paulíková, I; Kostálová, D

    2005-01-01

    Aloe vera is a rich source of many natural-health-promoting substances. The results of contemporary research on animal models indicate that the extracts have an antiinflammatory property. In this work the results of some in vitro experiments are shown: determination of the inhibitory effect of the Aloe vera extracts on the activity of partially purified lipoxygenase from the rat lung cytosol fraction, and quantitative determination of the trace elements presented in the extract (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) carried out by using the x-ray fluorescence analysis. The findings could explain the inhibitory effect (antilipoxygenase activity) of the Aloe vera extract in the acute inflammation process, expecially in the topical application for healing of minor burns and skin ulcers. PMID:15751795

  1. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  2. Active transposable elements recover species boundaries and geographic structure in Madagascan coffee species.

    PubMed

    Roncal, Julissa; Guyot, Romain; Hamon, Perla; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Konan, Olivier N'Guessan; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Nowak, Michael D; Davis, Aaron P; de Kochko, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    The completion of the genome assembly for the economically important coffee plant Coffea canephora (Rubiaceae) has allowed the use of bioinformatic tools to identify and characterize a diverse array of transposable elements (TEs), which can be used in evolutionary studies of the genus. An overview of the copy number and location within the C. canephora genome of four TEs is presented. These are tested for their use as molecular markers to unravel the evolutionary history of the Millotii Complex, a group of six wild coffee (Coffea) species native to Madagascar. Two TEs from the Gypsy superfamily successfully recovered some species boundaries and geographic structure among samples, whereas a TE from the Copia superfamily did not. Notably, species occurring in evergreen moist forests of eastern and southeastern Madagascar were divergent with respect to species in other habitats and regions. Our results suggest that the peak of transpositional activity of the Gypsy and Copia TEs occurred, respectively, before and after the speciation events of the tested Madagascan species. We conclude that the utilization of active TEs has considerable potential to unravel the evolutionary history and delimitation of closely related Coffea species. However, the selection of TE needs to be experimentally tested, since each element has its own evolutionary history. Different TEs with similar copy number in a given species can render different dendrograms; thus copy number is not a good selection criterion to attain phylogenetic resolution. PMID:26231981

  3. Elemental abundances and temperatures of quiescent solar active region cores from X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    A brief review of studies of elemental abundances and emission measures in quiescent solar active region cores is presented. Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations of strong iron spectral lines have shown sharply peaked distributions around 3 MK. EIS observations of lines emitted by a range of elements have allowed good estimates of abundances relative to iron. However, X-ray observations are required to measure the plasma emission above 3 MK and the abundances of oxygen and neon. We revisit, using up-to-date atomic data, older X-ray observations obtained by a sounding rocket and by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). We find that the Fe/O and Fe/Ne ratios are normally increased by a factor of 3.2, compared to the photospheric values. Similar results are obtained from FCS observations of six quiescent active region cores. The FCS observations also indicate that the emission measure above 3 MK has a very steep negative slope, with very little plasma observed at 5 MK or above. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Role of surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, B.; Tsukamoto, S.; Rai, R.; DebRoy, T.

    2011-12-01

    During high power density laser welding of mild steel, the keyhole depth, liquid metal flow, weld geometry and weld integrity are affected by base-metal sulfur content and oxygen (O2) present in the atmosphere or shielding gas. The role of these surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding of steels is not well understood. In order to better understand their effects, welding of mild steel specimens containing various concentrations of oxygen and sulfur are examined. In addition, a numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the surface-active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole-mode laser welding. Increase in base-metal sulfur concentration or O2 content of shielding gas results in decreased weld widths. Sulfur results in a negligible increase in penetration depth whereas the presence of O2 in shielding gas significantly affects the weld penetration. It has earlier been proposed that oxygen, if present in the shielding gas, can get introduced into the weld pool resulting in formation of carbon monoxide (CO) at the keyhole surface and additional pressure from CO can result in increased penetration. Numerical modelling has been used in this work to understand the effects of formation of CO on the keyhole and weld geometries.

  5. Three-element trap filter radiometer based on large active area silicon photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Salim, S G R; Anhalt, K; Taubert, D R; Hollandt, J

    2016-05-20

    This paper shows the opto-mechanical design of a new filter radiometer built at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for the accurate determination of the thermodynamic temperature of high-temperature blackbodies. The filter radiometer is based on a three-element reflection-type trap detector that uses three large active area silicon photodiodes. Its spectral coverage and field of view are defined by a detachable narrow-band filter and a diamond-turned precision aperture, respectively. The temperature of the filter radiometer is stabilized using a water-streamed housing and is measured using a thin-film platinum thermometer placed onto the first photodiode element. The trap "mount" has been made as compact as possible, which, together with the large active area of the chosen photodiodes, allows a wide field of view. This work presents the design of the filter radiometer and discusses the criteria that have been considered in order for the filter radiometer to suit the application. PMID:27411121

  6. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data.

    PubMed

    Danko, Charles G; Hyland, Stephanie L; Core, Leighton J; Martins, Andre L; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G; Kraus, W Lee; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Modifications to the global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) protocol that enrich for 5'-capped RNAs can be used to reveal active transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) with high accuracy. Here, we introduce discriminative regulatory-element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), a sensitive machine learning method that uses support vector regression to identify active TREs from GRO-seq data without requiring cap-based enrichment (https://github.com/Danko-Lab/dREG/). This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Predicted TREs are more enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation—including expression quantitative trait loci, disease-associated polymorphisms, acetylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and transcription factor binding—than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we surveyed TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  7. The level of elements and antioxidant activity of commercial dietary supplement formulations based on edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Stilinović, Nebojša; Škrbić, Biljana; Živančev, Jelena; Mrmoš, Nataša; Pavlović, Nebojša; Vukmirović, Saša

    2014-12-01

    Commercial preparations of Cordyceps sinensis, Ganoderma lucidum and Coprinus comatus mushroom marketed as healthy food supplements in Serbia were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry with a graphite furnace (GFAAS) for their element content. Antioxidant activity potential and total phenolics of the same mushrooms were determined. The element content of mushroom samples was in the range of 0.130-0.360 mg kg(-1) for lead (Pb), <0.03-0.46 mg kg(-1) for arsenic (As), 0.09-0.39 mg kg(-1) for cadmium (Cd), 98.14-989.18 mg kg(-1) for iron (Fe), 0.10-101.32 mg kg(-1) for nickel (Ni), 5.06-26.50 mg kg(-1) for copper (Cu), 0.20-0.70 mg kg(-1) for cobalt (Co), 1.74-136.33 mg kg(-1) for chromium (Cr) and 2.19-21.54 mg kg(-1) for manganese (Mn). In the tests for measuring the antioxidant activity, the methanolic extract of C. sinensis showed the best properties. The same was seen for the analysis of selected phenolic compounds; C. sinensis was found to have the highest content. Commercial preparations of C. sinensis and C. comatus can be considered to be safe and suitable food supplements included in well-balanced diets. PMID:25294630

  8. Bisphenol A activates the Nrf1/2-antioxidant response element pathway in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Enikanolaiye, Mutiat I; Chepelev, Leonid L; Almohaisen, Abdulrahman; Chen, Qixuan; Scoggan, Kylie A; Coughlan, Melanie C; Cao, Xu-Liang; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G

    2013-03-18

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins for baby bottles, liners of canned food, and many other consumer products. Previously, BPA has been shown to reduce the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, which may contribute to oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanism of the BPA-mediated effect upon antioxidant enzyme activity is unknown. Antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes protect cells from oxidative stress and are transcriptionally activated by Nrf1 and Nrf2 factors through their cis-regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). In this work, we have assessed the effect of BPA on the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Surprisingly, glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays revealed that BPA application created a more reduced intracellular environment in cultured HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, BPA increased the transactivation activity of ectopic Nrf1 and Nrf2 and increased the expression of ARE-target genes ho-1 and nqo1 at high (100-200 μM) BPA concentrations only. Our study suggests that BPA activates the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway at high (>10 μM) micromolar concentrations. PMID:23360430

  9. High-efficiency diode-pumped actively Q-switched ceramic Nd:YAG/BaWO₄ Raman laser operating at 1666 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H N; Chen, X H; Wang, Q P; Zhang, X Y; Chang, J; Gao, L; Shen, H B; Cong, Z H; Liu, Z J; Tao, X T; Li, P

    2014-05-01

    A diode-pumped actively Q-switched Raman laser employing BaWO4 as the Raman active medium and a ceramic Nd:YAG laser operating at 1444 nm as the pump source is demonstrated. The first-Stokes-Raman generation at 1666 nm is achieved. With a pump power of 20.3 W and pulse repetition frequency rate of 5 kHz, a maximum output power of 1.21 W is obtained, which is the highest output power for a 1.6 μm Raman laser. The corresponding optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is 6%; the pulse energy and peak power are 242 μJ and 8.96 kW, respectively. PMID:24784068

  10. Analysis of solid-rocket effluents for aluminum, silicon, and other trace elements by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furr, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The sensitivity and reliability of neutron activation analysis in detecting trace elements in solid rocket effluents are discussed. Special attention was given to Al and Si contaminants. The construction and performance of a thermal column irradiation unit was reported.

  11. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  12. Quantitative comparison of cis-regulatory element (CRE) activities in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William A; Williams, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression patterns are specified by cis-regulatory element (CRE) sequences, which are also called enhancers or cis-regulatory modules. A typical CRE possesses an arrangement of binding sites for several transcription factor proteins that confer a regulatory logic specifying when, where, and at what level the regulated gene(s) is expressed. The full set of CREs within an animal genome encodes the organism's program for development, and empirical as well as theoretical studies indicate that mutations in CREs played a prominent role in morphological evolution. Moreover, human genome wide association studies indicate that genetic variation in CREs contribute substantially to phenotypic variation. Thus, understanding regulatory logic and how mutations affect such logic is a central goal of genetics. Reporter transgenes provide a powerful method to study the in vivo function of CREs. Here a known or suspected CRE sequence is coupled to heterologous promoter and coding sequences for a reporter gene encoding an easily observable protein product. When a reporter transgene is inserted into a host organism, the CRE's activity becomes visible in the form of the encoded reporter protein. P-element mediated transgenesis in the fruit fly species Drosophila (D.) melanogaster has been used for decades to introduce reporter transgenes into this model organism, though the genomic placement of transgenes is random. Hence, reporter gene activity is strongly influenced by the local chromatin and gene environment, limiting CRE comparisons to being qualitative. In recent years, the phiC31 based integration system was adapted for use in D. melanogaster to insert transgenes into specific genome landing sites. This capability has made the quantitative measurement of gene and, relevant here, CRE activity feasible. The production of transgenic fruit flies can be outsourced, including phiC31-based integration, eliminating the need to purchase expensive equipment and/or have proficiency at

  13. Evidence for NH/sub 4//sup +/ switch-off regulation of nitrogenase activity by bacteria in salt marsh sediments and roots of the grass Spartina alterniflora

    SciTech Connect

    Yoch, D.C.; Whiting, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory effect of NH/sub 4//sup +/ on nitrogen fixation in a Spartina alterniflora salt marsh was examined. Acetylene reduction activity (ARA) measured in situ was only partially inhibited by NH/sub 4//sup +/ in both the light and dark after 2 h. In vitro analysis of bulk sediment divided into sediment particles, live and dead roots, and rhizomes showed that microbes associated with sediment and dead roots have a great potential for anaerobic C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction, but only if amended with a carbon source such as mannose. Only live roots had significant rates of ARA without an added carbon source. In sediment, N/sub 2/-fixing mannose enrichment cultures could be distinguished from those enriched by lactate in that only the latter were rapidly inhibited by NH/sub 4//sup +/. Ammonia also inhibited ARA in dead and live roots and in surface-sterilized roots. The rate of this inhibition appeared to be too rapid to be attributed to the repression and subsequent dilution of nitrogenase. The kinetic characteristics of this inhibition and its prevention in root-associated microbes by methionine sulfoximine are consistent with the NH/sub 4//sup +/ switch-off-switch-on mechanism of nitrogenase regulation.

  14. Activity of a Py-Im Polyamide Targeted to the Estrogen Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Nicholas G.; Szablowski, Jerzy O.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; Li, Benjamin C.; Raskatov, Jevgenij A.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides are a class of programmable DNA minor groove binders capable of modulating the activity of DNA-binding proteins and affecting changes in gene expression. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated hormone receptor that binds as a homodimer to estrogen response elements (EREs) and is a driving oncogene in a majority of breast cancers. We tested a selection of structurally similar Py-Im polyamides with differing DNA sequence specificity for activity against 17β-estadiol (E2) induced transcription and cytotoxicity in ERα positive, E2 stimulated T47D-KBLUC cells, which express luciferase under ERα control. The most active polyamide targeted the sequence: 5’-WGGWCW-3’ (W = A or T), which is the canonical ERE-half site. Whole transcriptome analysis using RNA-Seq revealed that treatment of E2-stimulated breast cancer cells with this polyamide reduced the effects of E2 on the majority of those most strongly affected by E2, but had much less effect on the majority of E2 induced transcripts. In vivo, this polyamide circulated at detectable levels following subcutaneous injection and reduced levels of ER-driven luciferase expression in xenografted tumors in mice after subcutaneous compound administration without significant host toxicity. PMID:23443804

  15. Effects of heavy metal and other elemental additives to activated sludge on growth of Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Narahara, A.

    1981-09-01

    The approximate level at which added concentrations of certain elements would cause an activated sludge to induce a toxic effect upon the growth of Eisenia foetida was determined. During 43 trials on sludge samples obtained throughout 1 year of study, earthworms grew from 3 to 10 mg live wt at hatching to 792 mg +- 18% (mean +- C.V.) in 8 weeks, when sludge was 24/sup 0/C and contained no additives. None of several elements commonly used in microbial growth media enhanced the growth rate of the earthworm. At salt concentrations up to about 6.6% on a dry wt basis, none of six anions tested was in and of itself toxic, while five of 15 cations - Co, Hg, Cu, Ni, and Cd - appeared specifically to inhibit growth rate or cause death. Manganese, Cr, and Pb were innocuous even at the highest levels of application - 22,000, 46,000, and 52,000 mg/kg, respectively. Neither the anionic nor cationic component of certain salts, such as NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl, could be said to inhibit growth, which occurred only at high concentrations of these salts (about 3.3 and/or 6.6%). Below 7 mmho/cm, toxicity could not be correlated with electrolytic conductance, though higher values may help to explain the nonspecific growth inhibitory effects of salts like NaCl and KCl. Nor could toxicity ever be ascribed to hydrogen ion activity, since sludge pH was not altered even at the highest salt dose. It is concluded that except under very extreme conditions, the levels of heavy metals and salts generally found in activated sludges will not have an adverse affect on the growth of E. foetida.

  16. Digital switching noise as a stochastic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, Giorgio; Trucco, Gabriella; Liberali, Valentino

    2007-06-01

    Switching activity of logic gates in a digital system is a deterministic process, depending on both circuit parameters and input signals. However, the huge number of logic blocks in a digital system makes digital switching a cognitively stochastic process. Switching activity is the source of the so-called "digital noise", which can be analyzed using a stochastic approach. For an asynchronous digital network, we can model digital switching currents as a shot noise process, deriving both its amplitude distribution and its power spectral density. From spectral distribution of digital currents, we can also calculate the spectral distribution and the power of disturbances injected into the on-chip power supply lines.

  17. Glucosidase II β-subunit, a novel substrate for caspase-3-like activity in rice, plays as a molecular switch between autophagy and programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Chen, Bing; Wang, Hongjuan; Han, Yue; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy. However, prolonged, severe stresses activate programmed cell death (PCD) in both animal and plant cells. Compared to the well-studied UPR pathway, the molecular mechanisms of ER-stress-induced PCD are less understood. Here, we report the identification of Gas2, the glucosidase II β subunit in the ER, as a potential switch between PCD and autophagy in rice. MS analysis identified Gas2, GRP94, and HSP40 protein in a purified caspase-3-like activity from heat stressed rice cell suspensions. The three corresponding genes were down-regulated under DTT-induced ER stress. Gas2 and GRP94 were localized to the ER, while HSP40 localized to the cytoplasm. Compared to wild-type, a Gas2 RNAi cell line was much sensitive to DTT treatment and had high levels of autophagy. Both caspase-3 and heat-stressed cell suspension lysate could cleave Gas2, producing a 14 kDa N-terminal fragment. Conditional expression of corresponding C-terminal fragment resulted in enhanced caspase-3-like activity in the protoplasts under heat stress. We proposed that mild ER stress causes down-regulation of Gas2 and induces autophagy, while severe stress results in Gas2 cleavage by caspase-3-like activity and the cleavage product amplifies this activity, possibly participating in the initiation of PCD. PMID:27538481

  18. Glucosidase II β-subunit, a novel substrate for caspase-3-like activity in rice, plays as a molecular switch between autophagy and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing; Chen, Bing; Wang, Hongjuan; Han, Yue; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy. However, prolonged, severe stresses activate programmed cell death (PCD) in both animal and plant cells. Compared to the well-studied UPR pathway, the molecular mechanisms of ER-stress-induced PCD are less understood. Here, we report the identification of Gas2, the glucosidase II β subunit in the ER, as a potential switch between PCD and autophagy in rice. MS analysis identified Gas2, GRP94, and HSP40 protein in a purified caspase-3-like activity from heat stressed rice cell suspensions. The three corresponding genes were down-regulated under DTT-induced ER stress. Gas2 and GRP94 were localized to the ER, while HSP40 localized to the cytoplasm. Compared to wild-type, a Gas2 RNAi cell line was much sensitive to DTT treatment and had high levels of autophagy. Both caspase-3 and heat-stressed cell suspension lysate could cleave Gas2, producing a 14 kDa N-terminal fragment. Conditional expression of corresponding C-terminal fragment resulted in enhanced caspase-3-like activity in the protoplasts under heat stress. We proposed that mild ER stress causes down-regulation of Gas2 and induces autophagy, while severe stress results in Gas2 cleavage by caspase-3-like activity and the cleavage product amplifies this activity, possibly participating in the initiation of PCD. PMID:27538481

  19. Miniature intermittent contact switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, A.

    1972-01-01

    Design of electric switch for providing intermittent contact is presented. Switch consists of flexible conductor surrounding, but separated from, fixed conductor. Flexing of outside conductor to contact fixed conductor completes circuit. Advantage is small size of switch compared to standard switches.

  20. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  1. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  2. Putative cis-Regulatory Elements Associated with Heat Shock Genes Activated During Excystation of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Ana M.; Serrano, Myrna; Sheth, Nihar; Buck, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, leading to acute, persistent and chronic diarrhea worldwide. Although the complications of this disease can be serious, even fatal, in immunocompromised patients of any age, they have also been found to lead to long term effects, including growth inhibition and impaired cognitive development, in infected immunocompetent children. The Cryptosporidium life cycle alternates between a dormant stage, the oocyst, and a highly replicative phase that includes both asexual vegetative stages as well as sexual stages, implying fine genetic regulatory mechanisms. The parasite is extremely difficult to study because it cannot be cultured in vitro and animal models are equally challenging. The recent publication of the genome sequence of C. hominis and C. parvum has, however, significantly advanced our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, our goal was to identify cis-regulatory elements associated with heat shock response in Cryptosporidium using a combination of in silico and real time RT-PCR strategies. Analysis with Gibbs-Sampling algorithms of upstream non-translated regions of twelve genes annotated as heat shock proteins in the Cryptosporidium genome identified a highly conserved over-represented sequence motif in eleven of them. RT-PCR analyses, described herein and also by others, show that these eleven genes bearing the putative element are induced concurrent with excystation of parasite oocysts via heat shock. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses suggest that occurrences of a motif identified in the upstream regions of the Cryptosporidium heat shock genes represent parts of the transcriptional apparatus and function as stress response elements that activate expression of these genes during excystation, and possibly at other stages in the life cycle of the parasite

  3. Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼1–2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  4. Photoresistance switching of plasmonic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Nicoli, Francesca; Chen, Chang; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Zandbergen, Henny W; Dekker, Cees; Van Dorpe, Pol; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2015-01-14

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼ 1-2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  5. [KIL-d] Protein Element Confers Antiviral Activity via Catastrophic Viral Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Weissman, Jonathan S; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells are targeted by pathogenic viruses and have developed cell defense mechanisms against viral infection. In yeast, the cellular extrachromosomal genetic element [KIL-d] alters killer activity of M double-stranded RNA killer virus and confers cell resistance against the killer virus. However, its underlying mechanism and the molecular nature of [KIL-d] are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that [KIL-d] is a proteinaceous prion-like aggregate with non-Mendelian cytoplasmic transmission. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that [KIL-d] selectively increases the rate of de novo mutation in the killer toxin gene of the viral genome, producing yeast harboring a defective mutant killer virus with a selective growth advantage over those with WT killer virus. These results suggest that a prion-like [KIL-d] element reprograms the viral replication machinery to induce mutagenesis and genomic inactivation via the long-hypothesized mechanism of "error catastrophe." The findings also support a role for prion-like protein aggregates in cellular defense and adaptation. PMID:26590718

  6. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  7. Determination of trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis in Anatolian bentonitic clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, N.; Tulun, T.; Alemdar, A.

    1998-08-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was carried out for the determination of trace elements in non-swelling type bentonitic clays. Samples were irradiated in Triga Mark II type of reactor at the Nuclear Institute of Technical University of Istanbul. Irradiation was performed in two steps for "short and long lived" isotopes. The γ spectra of short lived isotopes were interpreted with respect to Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, V qualitatively and that of long lived isotopes with respect to Sc, Cr, Br, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Sm, Yb, Hf quantitatively. The relative richness of the trace elements (Al, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K) observed in the Sampo 90 program was obtained using Atomic Absorption technique by normalizing its value to that of sodium. The silicon content of samples was determined by gravimetry. The results indicated that Sample I contained relatively higher amount of REE, Sb, Ca and Na than Sample II. The amount of Sc, Cr and Br were about similar in both samples. Concentrations of La, Ce, Sm and Yb are higher than REE abundances found in all natural waters. These results suggest that Ca-bentonite samples are representative of primary deposition environment. In addition, the Sc content of both the samples indicates that Ca-bentonite deposits originated from continental crust. The relatively high amount of REE might bring about porosity problems in the use of Ca-bentonite in cement and concrete production.

  8. Finite element modeling of the cyclic wetting mechanism in the active part of wheat awns.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Gerald A; Ruffoni, Davide; Dunlop, John W C; Elbaum, Rivka; Weinkamer, Richard; Fratzl, Peter; Antretter, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Many plant tissues and organs are capable of moving due to changes in the humidity of the environment, such as the opening of the seed capsule of the ice plant and the opening of the pine cone. These are fascinating examples for the materials engineer, as these tissues are non-living and move solely through the differential swelling of anisotropic tissues and in principle may serve as examples for the bio-inspired design of artificial actuators. In this paper, we model the microstructure of the wild wheat awn (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) by finite elements, especially focusing on the specific microscopic features of the active part of the awn. Based on earlier experimental findings, cell walls are modeled as multilayered cylindrical tubes with alternating cellulose fiber orientation in successive layers. It is shown that swelling upon hydration of this system leads to the formation of gaps between the layers, which could act as valves, thus enabling the entry of water into the cell wall. This supports the hypothesis that this plywood-like arrangement of cellulose fibrils enhances the effect of ambient humidity by accelerated water or vapor diffusion along the gaps. The finite element model shows that a certain distribution of axially and tangentially oriented fibers is necessary to generate sufficient tensile stresses within the cell wall to open nanometer-sized gaps between cell wall layers. PMID:22791359

  9. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  10. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge. 69... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.111 Tandem-switched transport and tandem...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching...

  11. 47 CFR 69.111 - Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tandem-switched transport and tandem charge. 69... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.111 Tandem-switched transport and tandem...-switched transport shall consist of two rate elements, a transmission charge and a tandem switching...

  12. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  13. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  14. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  15. The activation of IgM- or isotype-switched IgG- and IgE-BCR exhibits distinct mechanical force sensitivity and threshold

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhengpeng; Chen, Xiangjun; Chen, Haodong; Ji, Qinghua; Chen, Yingjia; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Fei; Lou, Jizhong; Tang, Zhuo; Liu, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocytes use B cell receptors (BCRs) to sense the physical features of the antigens. However, the sensitivity and threshold for the activation of BCRs resulting from the stimulation by mechanical forces are unknown. Here, we addressed this question using a double-stranded DNA-based tension gauge tether system serving as a predefined mechanical force gauge ranging from 12 to 56 pN. We observed that IgM-BCR activation is dependent on mechanical forces and exhibits a multi-threshold effect. In contrast, the activation of isotype-switched IgG- or IgE-BCR only requires a low threshold of less than 12 pN, providing an explanation for their rapid activation in response to antigen stimulation. Mechanistically, we found that the cytoplasmic tail of the IgG-BCR heavy chain is both required and sufficient to account for the low mechanical force threshold. These results defined the mechanical force sensitivity and threshold that are required to activate different isotyped BCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06925.001 PMID:26258882

  16. A mix-and-read fluorescence strategy for the switch-on probing of kinase activity based on an aptameric-peptide/graphene-oxide platform.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chunyang; Xu, Xiahong; Zhou, Jiang; Liu, Xin; Nie, Zhou; Qing, Meng; Li, Pei; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-09-01

    Protein kinase plays a vital role in regulating signal-transduction pathways and its simple and quick detection is highly desirable because traditional kinase assays typically rely on a time-consuming kinase-phosphorylation process (ca. 1 h). Herein, we report a new and rapid fluorescence-based sensing platform for probing the activity of protein kinase that is based on the super-quenching capacity of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and specific recognition of the aptameric peptide (FITC-IP20). On the GO/peptide platform, the fluorescence quenching of FITC-IP20 that is adsorbed onto GO can be restored by selective binding of active protein kinase to the aptameric peptide, thereby resulting in the fast switch-on detection of kinase activity (ca. 15 min). The feasibility of this method has been demonstrated by the sensitive measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), with a detection limit of 0.053 mU μL(-1). This assay technique was also successfully applied to the detection of kinase activation in cell lysate. PMID:25048161

  17. Var Gene promoter activation in clonal Plasmodium falciparum isolates follows a hierarchy and suggests a conserved switching program that is independent of genetic background.

    PubMed

    Enderes, Corinna; Kombila, Davy; Dal-Bianco, Matthias; Dzikowski, Ron; Kremsner, Peter; Frank, Matthias

    2011-11-15

    Antigenic variation of Plasmodium falciparum is mediated by a mutually exclusive expression mechanism that limits expression to an individual member of the multicopy var gene family. This process determines the antigenic and adhesive phenotype of the infected red blood cell. Previously, we showed that var gene switching is influenced by chromosomal position. Here, we address whether var gene transcription follows a general conserved pattern in long-term laboratory parasites and in recently culture-adapted field parasites. Activation of the var gene family was monitored in biological replicates in each parasite isolate every 3-5 generations for up to 3 months. We used transgenic parasites carrying a drug-selectable marker at a defined var locus to characterize var gene activation after the exclusive expression of the transgene. Transgenic parasites exhibited a repeatable hierarchy of var gene activation and a fluctuating transcriptional activity of the transgenic var locus. Transcriptional profiling of wild-type laboratory and field parasites showed a universal bias toward transcription of UpsC var genes and a fluctuating transcriptional activity of the dominant var promoter. The data suggest the existence of an intrinsic var gene transcription program that is independent of genetic background. PMID:21926380

  18. Urokinase receptor-dependent and -independent p56/59(hck) activation state is a molecular switch between myelomonocytic cell motility and adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradonna, F; Fontana, L; Iavarone, C; Carriero, M V; Scholz, G; Barone, M V; Stoppelli, M P

    1999-01-01

    Anchorage-independent myelomonocytic cells acquire adherence within minutes of differentiation stimuli, such as the proteolytically inactive N-terminal fragment of urokinase binding to its cognate glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptor. Here, we report that urokinase-treated differentiating U937 monocyte-like cells exhibit a rapid and transient inhibition of p56/59(hck) and p55(fgr) whereas no changes in the activity of other Src family kinases, such as p53/56(lyn) and p59(fyn) were observed. U937 transfectants expressing a kinase-defective (Lys267 to Met) p56/59(hck) variant exhibit enhanced adhesiveness and a marked F-actin redistribution in thin protruding structures. Conversely, urokinase as well as expression of wild-type or constitutively active (Tyr499 to Phe) p56/59(hck) stimulates the directional migration of uninduced U937 cells. Accordingly, expression of constitutively active or kinase inactive p56/59(hck) selectively prevents urokinase receptor-dependent induction of either adhesion or motility, indicating that a specific activation state of p56/59(hck) is required for each cell response. In conclusion, modulation of the intracellular p56/59(hck) tyrosine kinase activity switches cell motility towards adherence, providing a mutually exclusive mechanism to regulate these properties during monocyte/macrophage differentiation in vivo. PMID:10357814

  19. Activation of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes by roasted coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Yazheng, Liu; Kitts, David D

    2012-09-01

    Coffee beans contain numerous bioactive components that exhibit antioxidant capacity when assessed using both chemical, cell free, and biological, cell-based model systems. However, the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effects of coffee in biological systems are not totally understood and in some cases vary considerably from results obtained with simpler in vitro chemical assays. In the present study, the physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts were investigated in both cell free (ORAC(FL)) and cell-based systems. A profile of antioxidant gene expression in cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells treated with both roasted and non-roasted coffee extracts, respectively, was investigated using Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array technology. Results demonstrated that the mechanisms of the antioxidant activity associated with coffee constituents assessed by the ORAC(FL) assay were different to those observed using an intracellular oxidation assay with Caco-2 cells. Moreover, roasted coffee (both light and dark roasted) extracts produced both increased- and decreased-expressions of numerous genes that are involved in the management of oxidative stress via the antioxidant defence system. The selective and specific positive induction of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent genes, including gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPX2), sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), peroxiredoxin 4 (PDRX4) and peroxiredoxin 6 (PDRX6) were identified with the activation of the endogenous antioxidant defence system in Caco-2 cells. PMID:22699814

  20. Prediction and Validation of Gene Regulatory Elements Activated During Retinoic Acid Induced Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Simandi, Zoltan; Horvath, Attila; Nagy, Peter; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development is a multistep process involving activation and repression of many genes. Enhancer elements in the genome are known to contribute to tissue and cell-type specific regulation of gene expression during the cellular differentiation. Thus, their identification and further investigation is important in order to understand how cell fate is determined. Integration of gene expression data (e.g., microarray or RNA-seq) and results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide studies (ChIP-seq) allows large-scale identification of these regulatory regions. However, functional validation of cell-type specific enhancers requires further in vitro and in vivo experimental procedures. Here we describe how active enhancers can be identified and validated experimentally. This protocol provides a step-by-step workflow that includes: 1) identification of regulatory regions by ChIP-seq data analysis, 2) cloning and experimental validation of putative regulatory potential of the identified genomic sequences in a reporter assay, and 3) determination of enhancer activity in vivo by measuring enhancer RNA transcript level. The presented protocol is detailed enough to help anyone to set up this workflow in the lab. Importantly, the protocol can be easily adapted to and used in any cellular model system. PMID:27403939

  1. Effects of Physical Activity on Trace Elements and Depression Related Biomarkers in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-08-01

    Not much is known about the role of physical activity (PA), obesity related variables, and trace elements as potential risk factors affecting neurotransmitters in schoolchildren with depression. Our objective was to investigate the effect of physical activity (PA) on depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. Also, we aimed to study the association of demographic variables, serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), serotonin, and salivary cortisol with depression in this population. One hundred and fifty school children (90 boys and 60 girls) aged 7-18 years were recruited for this study. All participants were evaluated for depression using CDI-score analysis. Their physical activity levels were checked using pre-validated questionnaires. The serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), cortisol, and serotonin were estimated using atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques. About 48.7 % of the study population had depressive symptoms (CDI-score; ≥13), and were classified into mild, moderate, and severe categories. Older children, especially girls, had higher levels of depression. Participants with moderate and severe depression had significantly lower physical activity, serotonin, and zinc levels, Zn/Cu ratios, and significantly higher copper and cortisol levels. Physically active boys showed significantly lower depressive CDI-scores and improvement in cortisol, serotonin, Cu, and Zn concentrations compared to girls of sedentary life style. CDI- scores correlated positively with BMI, cortisol and Cu, and negatively with PA, serotonin and Zn concentrations. BMI, cortisol, serotonin, Cu and Zn, could explain about 59.3-79 % of the depressive symptoms among schoolchildren, according to stepwise regression analysis. This was especially true in especially older girls. PA and an adequate balance in Zn and Cu levels, plays a positive role in improving CDI-depressive score, BMI, serotonin and cortisol levels among schoolchildren. PMID:26701336

  2. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  3. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  4. Sustained impact of community-based physical activity interventions: key elements for success

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compelling evidence supports the cost effectiveness and potential impact of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion. Quality of evidence is one piece, but certainly not the sole determinant of whether public health interventions, physical activity focused or otherwise, achieve their full potential for impact. Health promotion at both population and community levels must progress beyond health intervention models that isolate individuals from social, environmental, and political systems of influence. We offer a critical evaluation of lessons learned from two successful research initiatives to provide insights as to how health promotion research contributes to sustained impact. We highlight factors key to success including the theoretical and methodological integration of: i) a social ecological approach; ii) participatory action research (PAR) methods; and iii) an interdisciplinary team. Methods To identify and illustrate the key elements of our success we layered an evaluation of steps taken atop a review of relevant literature. Results In the school-based case study (Action Schools! BC), the success of our approach included early and sustained engagement with a broad cross-section of stakeholders, establishing partnerships across sectors and at different levels of government, and team members across multiple disciplines. In the neighbourhood built environment case study, the three domains guided our approach through study design and team development, and the integration of older adults’ perspectives into greenway design plans. In each case study we describe how elements of the domains serve as a guide for our work. Conclusion To sustain and maximize the impact of community-based public health interventions we propose the integration of elements from three domains of research that acknowledge the interplay between social, environmental and poilitical systems of influence. We emphasize that a number of key factors determine

  5. Natural IgM Switches the Function of Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells to a Regulatory Dendritic Cell That Suppresses Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Peter I; Schlegel, Kailo H; Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Wang, Binru; Ye, Hong; Tedder, Thomas F; Kinsey, Gilbert R; Okusa, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We have previously shown that polyclonal natural IgM protects mice from renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) by inhibiting the reperfusion inflammatory response. We hypothesized that a potential mechanism involved IgM modulation of dendritic cells (DC), as we observed high IgM binding to splenic DC. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) with polyclonal murine or human IgM prior to LPS activation and demonstrated that 0.5 × 10(6) IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC, when injected into wild-type C57BL/6 mice 24 h before renal ischemia, protect mice from developing renal IRI. We show that this switching of LPS-activated BMDC to a regulatory phenotype requires modulation of BMDC function that is mediated by IgM binding to nonapoptotic BMDC receptors. Regulatory BMDC require IL-10 and programmed death 1 as well as downregulation of CD40 and p65 NF-κB phosphorylation to protect in renal IRI. Blocking the programmed death ligand 1 binding site just before i.v. injection of IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC or using IL-10 knockout BMDC fails to induce protection. Similarly, IgM/LPS-pretreated BMDC are rendered nonprotective by increasing CD40 expression and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB. How IgM/LPS regulatory BMDC suppress in vivo ischemia-induced innate inflammation remains to be determined. However, we show that suppression is dependent on other in vivo regulatory mechanisms in the host, that is, CD25(+) T cells, B cells, IL-10, and circulating IgM. There was no increase in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the spleen either before or after renal IRI. Collectively, these findings show that natural IgM anti-leukocyte Abs can switch BMDC to a regulatory phenotype despite the presence of LPS that ordinarily induces BMDC maturation. PMID:26519533

  6. Microwave switching power divider. [antenna feeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R. J.; Johnson, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pair of parallel, spaced-apart circular ground planes define a microwave cavity with multi-port microwave power distributing switching circuitry formed on opposite sides of a thin circular dielectric substrate disposed between the ground planes. The power distributing circuitry includes a conductive disk located at the center of the substrate and connected to a source of microwave energy. A high speed, low insertion loss switching diode and a dc blocking capacitor are connected in series between the outer end of a transmission line and an output port. A high impedance, microwave blocking dc bias choke is connected between each switching diode and a source of switching current. The switching source forward biases the diodes to couple microwave energy from the conductive disk to selected output ports and, to associated antenna elements connected to the output ports to form a synthesized antenna pattern.

  7. Enhancer and promoter elements directing activation and glucocorticoid repression of the. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein gene in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, M.; La Rue, H.; Bernier, D.; Wrange, O.; Chevrette, M.; Gingras, M.C.; Belanger, L.

    1988-04-01

    Mutations were introduced in 7 kilobases of 5'-flanking rat ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) genomic DNA, linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. AFP promoter activity and its repression by a glucocorticoid hormone were assessed by stable and transient expression assays. Stable transfection assays were more sensitive and accurate than transient expression assays in a Morris 7777 rat hepatoma recipient (Hepa7.6), selected for its strong AFP repression by dexamethasone. The segment of DNA encompassing a hepatocyte-constitutive chromatin DNase I-hypersensitive site at -3.7 kilobases and a liver developmental stage-specific site at -2.5 kilobases contains interacting enhancer elements sufficient for high AFP promoter activity in Hepa7.6 or HepG2 cells. Deletions and point mutations define an upstream promoter domain of AFP gene activation, operating with at least three distinct promoter-activating elements, PEI at -65 base pairs, PEII at -120 base pairs, and DE at -160 base pairs. PEI and PEII share homologies with albumin promoter sequences, PEII is a near-consensus nuclear factor I recognition sequence, and DE overlaps a glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence. An element conferring glucocorticoid repression of AFP gene activity is located in the upstream AFP promoter domain. Receptor-binding assays indicate that this element is the glucocorticoid receptor recognition sequence which overlaps with promoter-activating element DE.

  8. Tuning the switching behavior of binary oxide-based resistive memory devices by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer: a case study on the Ta2O5-Ta system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Zeng, Fei; Wang, Minjuan; Wang, Guangyue; Song, Cheng; Pan, Feng

    2015-05-21

    The common nonpolar switching behavior of binary oxide-based resistive random access memory devices (RRAMs) has several drawbacks in future application, such as the requirements for a high forming voltage, a large reset current, and an additional access device to settle the sneak-path issue. Herein, we propose the tuning of the switching behavior of binary oxide-based RRAMs by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer, and a case study on Ta2O5-Ta systems is provided. The devices are designed to be Pt/Ta2O5(5 - x/2)/Ta(x)/Ta2O5(5 - x/2)/Pt with x = 0, 2, or 4 nm. The reference devices without the Ta nanolayer exhibit an expected nonpolar switching behavior with a high forming voltage of ∼-4.5 V and a large reset current of >10 mA. In contrast, a self-compliance bipolar switching behavior with a low forming voltage of ∼-2 V and a small reset current of <1 mA is observed after inserting a 2 nm Ta nanolayer. When the Ta nanolayer is increased to 4 nm, a complementary resistive switching (CRS) behavior is found, which can effectively settle the sneak-path issue. The appearance of CRS behavior suggests that a thin Ta nanolayer of 4 nm is robust enough to act as an inner electrode. Besides, the behind switching mechanisms are thoroughly discussed with the help of a transmission electron microscope and temperature-dependent electrical measurements. All these results demonstrate the feasibility of tuning switching behavior of binary oxide-based RRAMs by inserting an ultra-thin chemically active metal nanolayer and might help to advance the commercialization of binary oxide-based RRAMs. PMID:25907552

  9. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hannon, Gregory J; Hodges, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  10. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  11. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Hodges, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  12. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  13. Neutron activation analysis for the determination of trace elements in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Versieck, J

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis, in both its radiochemical and instrumental forms, is a precious technique for the determination of trace elements in biological materials. Probably its most important advantage is its relative freedom from errors resulting from contamination of the samples. Invaluable characteristics are also its excellent sensitivity, outstanding selectivity, and remarkable multielement capability. It is, however, necessary to warn against uncritical expectations. This is best illustrated by the seriously inconsistent results obtained in several laboratories. Because of the necessity to have access to a nuclear research reactor, the stringent safety rules to be observed, the rather high costs of the analyses, the relatively low sample throughput, and the sometimes long delay between the taking of a sample and the obtaining the final result, the use of neutron activation analysis remained restricted to a few--essentially research--laboratories. It found its main application in solving arduous problems and in paving the way for other analytical techniques better suited to routine applications. PMID:7710855

  14. Experimental analysis of tablet properties for discrete element modeling of an active coating process.

    PubMed

    Just, Sarah; Toschkoff, Gregor; Funke, Adrian; Djuric, Dejan; Scharrer, Georg; Khinast, Johannes; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Coating of solid dosage forms is an important unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, numerical simulations of drug manufacturing processes have been gaining interest as process analytical technology tools. The discrete element method (DEM) in particular is suitable to model tablet-coating processes. For the development of accurate simulations, information on the material properties of the tablets is required. In this study, the mechanical parameters Young's modulus, coefficient of restitution (CoR), and coefficients of friction (CoF) of gastrointestinal therapeutic systems (GITS) and of active-coated GITS were measured experimentally. The dynamic angle of repose of these tablets in a drum coater was investigated to revise the CoF. The resulting values were used as input data in DEM simulations to compare simulation and experiment. A mean value of Young's modulus of 31.9 MPa was determined by the uniaxial compression test. The CoR was found to be 0.78. For both tablet-steel and tablet-tablet friction, active-coated GITS showed a higher CoF compared with GITS. According to the values of the dynamic angle of repose, the CoF was adjusted to obtain consistent tablet motion in the simulation and in the experiment. On the basis of this experimental characterization, mechanical parameters are integrated into DEM simulation programs to perform numerical analysis of coating processes. PMID:23354469

  15. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  16. Analysis and design of a 1×2 ring resonator-based plasmonic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatuzian, Hassan; Keshavarz Moazzam, Mostafa

    2014-08-01

    Relying on the next generation chip-scale technology, Plasmonics, here is presented a novel plan for Dielectric-Loaded Surface Plasmon Polariton-based Ring Resonator (DLSPP-RR) switching configuration. The device is a 1x2 switch with a left-rob Y splitter in the middle of coupling region to share the electromagnetic energy between the two straight and bend output waveguides. Like other active devices, specially switching structures, this plan also will have the potential to be prepared as an active device if its trapped-modes into ring resonator can be controlled on the frequency axis. We implemented simulation of the device by means of the rigorous 3D Finite Element Method (3D-FEM) to certificate its truly passive performance. The obtained results are mixed as transmission spectrums of two output ports on a relatively close frequency band around the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1550 nm.

  17. Sampling and major element chemistry of the recent (A.D. 1631-1944) Vesuvius activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Kilburn, C.R.J.; de Vivo, B.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed sampling of the Vesuvius lavas erupted in the period A.D. 1631-1944 provides a suite of samples for comprehensive chemical analyses and related studies. Major elements (Si, Ti, Al, Fetotal, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K and P), volatile species (Cl, F, S, H2O+, H2O- and CO2), and ferrous iron (Fe2+) were determined for one hundred and forty-nine lavas and five tephra from the A.D. 1631-1944 Vesuvius activity. The lavas represent a relatively homogeneous suite with respect to SiO2, TiO2, FeOtotal, MnO and P2O5, but show systematic variations among MgO, K2O, Na2O, Al2O3 and CaO. The average SiO2 content is 48.0 wt.% and the rocks are classified as tephriphonolites according to their content of alkalis. All of the lavas are silica-undersaturated and are nepheline, leucite, and olivine normative. There is no systematic variation in major-element composition with time, over the period A.D. 1631-1944. The inter-eruption and intra-eruption compositional differences are the same magnitude. The lavas are highly porphyritic with clinopyroxene and leucite as the major phases. Fractionation effects are not reflected in the silica content of the lavas. The variability of MgO, K2O, Na2O, and CaO can be modelled as a relative depletion or accumulation of clinopyroxene. ?? 1993.

  18. Study of the generation characteristics of laser converters with dye-based wide-aperture solid--liquid active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, A.S.; Zemskii, V.I.; Kolesnikov, Y.L.; Malinin, B.G.; Meshkovsky, I.K.; Savkin, N.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Shildyaev, V.S.

    1986-11-01

    The lasing characteristics of an active element, consisting of a fine porous silicate matrix, has been studied. Molecules of a dye (rhodamine 6G) and an ethanol solution of the same dye were introduced into the cells. It has been shown that under conditions of large heat release (when thermooptical distortions begin to appear in the dye solutions), the solid--liquid element preserves the stability of its own lasing characteristics.

  19. [Hygienic study of an activated fibrous charcoal material as a sorbing filtering element for drinking water afterpurification].

    PubMed

    Prokopov, V A; Mironets, N V; Gakal, R K; Maktaz, E D; Dugan, A M; Teteneva, I A; Tarabarova, S B; Martyshchenko, N V; Nadvornaia, Zh D

    1993-01-01

    The results of complex toxicological and hygienic study showed that the quality of pipe water filtered through the activated carbonic fibrous material (ACFM) "Dnepr-F" forming a part of absorptive filtering element improved markedly. The content of organic substances decreased drastically as well as that of nitrates and iron. Microbiological indices did not suffer appreciable changes and were within permissible limits. The water filtered through the absorptive element with ACFM had no adverse influence on the organisms of warm-blooded animals. Proceeding from foregoing one can conclude that the "Dnepr-F" may be recommended as a part of absorptive filtering element for the final refinement of drinking water. PMID:8209499

  20. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.