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Sample records for active systemic anaphylaxis

  1. Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Brockow, Knut; Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    The term anaphylaxis was coined by Charles Richet and Paul Portier when they tried to immunize dogs with actinia extracts, but after a repeated injection of a small amount of the toxin the dog died within 25 min. The new term rapidly spread all over the world. The discovery of the phenomenon of anaphylaxis showed that by immunization not only protection but also harmful events could be induced. For this discovery Richet received the Nobel Prize in 1913, but he still believed the condition of anaphylaxis was a lack of protection to the poisonous effect of the substance. Already earlier similar clinical phenomena had been observed but not well described. A major breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology came through the experiments of Dale and Laidlaw who showed that the newly discovered histamine was able to induce quite similar symptoms to anaphylaxis. For decades reactions mimicking anaphylaxis but without involvement of the immune systems were called 'anaphylactoid', 'allergy-like' or 'pseudo-allergic'. Since the new definition of the World Allergy Organization (WAO) anaphylaxis is defined on the basis of clinical symptoms independent of pathomechanisms involved: one distinguishes between allergic and non-immune anaphylaxis. Epinephrine (Adrenalin) was soon recognized as treatment of choice of this dramatic condition. PMID:24925384

  2. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

    ... being exposed to a substance such as bee sting venom, the person's immune system becomes sensitized to ... causes include: Drug allergies Food allergies Insect bites/stings Pollen and other inhaled allergens rarely cause anaphylaxis. ...

  3. Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Lorenzo; Papalia, Sarah; Pujalte, George G A

    2016-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, systemic reaction mediated by immunoglobulin E hypersensitivity. Release of bioactive factors causes vasodilation and bronchiole constriction that can lead to hypotensive shock and asphyxiation. Differential diagnosis includes acute asthma, localized angioedema, syncope, and anxiety/panic attacks. Diagnostic tests lack specificity. Clinical diagnosis is based on demonstration of specific airway or cardiovascular compromise within proximity of allergen exposure. Treatment includes epinephrine, antihistamines, fluid resuscitation, and airway management. Prevention focuses on awareness/avoidance of triggers, implementation of personalized action plans, as well as immune modulation by desensitization in a closely controlled setting where available. PMID:27545736

  4. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

    ... All » Peanut allergy prevention strategy does not impact growth or nutrition » Trends, characteristics, and incidence of anaphylaxis: A population-based study » Transcriptome analysis reveals clues into the ...

  5. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

    ... products in your home Insect stings, especially from bees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, sawflies, and fire ants ... If you have had anaphylaxis because of a bee or wasp sting, desensitization shots are almost always ...

  6. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

    ... After being exposed to a substance such as bee sting venom, the person's immune system becomes sensitized ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the stinger off the skin with ...

  7. Idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2007-05-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a prednisone-responsive condition without external cause, but it can coexist with food-, medication-, or exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Mast cell activation may occur at night or after foods that have been eaten with impunity many times previously. Idiopathic anaphylaxis can be classified into frequent (if there are six or more episodes per year or two episodes in the last 2 months) or infrequent (if episodes occur less often). Idiopathic anaphylaxis-generalized consists of urticaria or angioedema associated with severe respiratory distress, syncope or hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Idiopathic anaphylaxis-angioedema consists of massive tongue enlargement or severe pharyngeal or laryngeal swelling with urticaria or peripheral angioedema. The differential diagnosis of idiopathic anaphylaxis is reviewed, and treatment approaches are presented. PMID:17493503

  8. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  9. Nitric oxide decreases intestinal haemorrhagic lesions in rat anaphylaxis independently of mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, J. Carvalho; Moreno, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the intestinal lesions of passive anaphylaxis, since this experimental model resembles necrotizing enterocolitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were sensitized with IgE anti-dinitrophenol monoclonal antibody. Extravasation of protein-rich plasma and haemorrhagia were measured in the small intestine. Plasma histamine was measured to assess mast cell activation. The effect of exogenous NO on the lesions was assessed by using two structurally unrelated NO-donors: sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-Nacetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). An increased basal production of NO was observed in cells taken after anaphylaxis, associated with a reduced response to platelet-activating factor, interleukin 1beta, and IgE/DNP-bovine serum albumin complexes. The response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) was enhanced 24 h after challenge, but at earlier times was not significantly different from that observed in controls. Treatment with either sodium nitroprusside or SNAP produced a significant reduction of the haemorrhagic lesions, which are a hallmark of rat anaphylaxis. The extravasation of protein-rich plasma was not influenced by NO-donors. The increase of plasma histamine elicited by the anaphylactic challenge was not influenced by SNAP treatment. NO-donors protect intestinal haemorrhagic lesions of rat anaphylaxis by a mechanism apparently independent of mast cell histamine release. PMID:18472830

  10. Mechanisms of Anaphylaxis Beyond IgE.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Cano, R; Picado, C; Valero, A; Bartra, J

    2016-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, life-threatening, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mediators derived from mast cells and basophils. Food allergens are the main triggers of anaphylaxis, accounting for 33%-56% of all cases and up to 81% of cases of anaphylaxis in children. Human anaphylaxis is generally thought to be mediated by IgE, with mast cells and basophils as key players, although alternative mechanisms have been proposed. Neutrophils and macrophages have also been implicated in anaphylactic reactions, as have IgG-dependent, complement, and contact system activation. Not all allergic reactions are anaphylactic, and the presence of the so-called accompanying factors (cofactors or augmenting factors) may explain why some conditions lead to anaphylaxis, while in other cases the allergen elicits a milder reaction or is even tolerated. In the presence of these factors, allergic reactions may be induced at lower doses of allergen or become more severe. Cofactors are reported to be relevant in up to 30% of anaphylactic episodes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and exercise are the best-documented cofactors, although estrogens, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, lipid-lowering drugs, and alcohol have also been involved. The mechanisms underlying anaphylaxis are complex and involve several interrelated pathways. Some of these pathways may be key to the development of anaphylaxis, while others may only modulate the severity of the reaction. An understanding of predisposing and augmenting factors could lead to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27164622

  11. The Basophil Activation Test Is Safe and Useful for Confirming Drug-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Yeon; Kim, Joo Hee; Jang, Young Sook; Choi, Jeong Hee; Park, Sunghoon; Hwang, Yong Il; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki Suck

    2016-11-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) has been suggested as a complementary method for diagnosing drug allergies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of this test in patients with drug-induced anaphylaxis. In total, 19 patients, all of whom had a history of moderate to severe anaphylaxis, were enrolled. None of the causative drugs had available in vitro tests or reliable skin tests; these drugs included, among others, first and second-generation cephalosporins, H2 blockers, and muscle relaxants. The BAT yielded positive results in 57.9% of the cases, which was similar those results of skin prick and intradermal tests (42.1% and 57.9%, respectively). When basophils were double labelled with CD63 and CD203c, both of which are basophil activation markers, the positive rate was increased from 57.9% to 73.7%. Therefore, the results of this study confirm that the BAT is a quick, reliable, and safe diagnostic tool for patients with drug-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:27582406

  12. International consensus on (ICON) anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ICON: Anaphylaxis provides a unique perspective on the principal evidence-based anaphylaxis guidelines developed and published independently from 2010 through 2014 by four allergy/immunology organizations. These guidelines concur with regard to the clinical features that indicate a likely diagnosis of anaphylaxis -- a life-threatening generalized or systemic allergic or hypersensitivity reaction. They also concur about prompt initial treatment with intramuscular injection of epinephrine (adrenaline) in the mid-outer thigh, positioning the patient supine (semi-reclining if dyspneic or vomiting), calling for help, and when indicated, providing supplemental oxygen, intravenous fluid resuscitation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, along with concomitant monitoring of vital signs and oxygenation. Additionally, they concur that H1-antihistamines, H2-antihistamines, and glucocorticoids are not initial medications of choice. For self-management of patients at risk of anaphylaxis in community settings, they recommend carrying epinephrine auto-injectors and personalized emergency action plans, as well as follow-up with a physician (ideally an allergy/immunology specialist) to help prevent anaphylaxis recurrences. ICON: Anaphylaxis describes unmet needs in anaphylaxis, noting that although epinephrine in 1 mg/mL ampules is available worldwide, other essentials, including supplemental oxygen, intravenous fluid resuscitation, and epinephrine auto-injectors are not universally available. ICON: Anaphylaxis proposes a comprehensive international research agenda that calls for additional prospective studies of anaphylaxis epidemiology, patient risk factors and co-factors, triggers, clinical criteria for diagnosis, randomized controlled trials of therapeutic interventions, and measures to prevent anaphylaxis recurrences. It also calls for facilitation of global collaborations in anaphylaxis research. In addition to confirming the alignment of major anaphylaxis guidelines, ICON

  13. [Emergency treatment and management of anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2013-02-01

    Anaphylaxis, the maximal manifestation of an immediate allergic reaction, is a life-threatening systemic reaction. The immediate therapy is chosen according to the clinical manifestations and new German guidelines are in preparation. Required measures include immediate removal of allergen, adequate positioning, assessment of severity and organ involvement and activation of emergency medical services. In anaphylaxis with primarily cardiovascular involvement, epinephrine is the treatment of choice and given together with volume substitution, oxygen, H(1)-antihistamines and corticosteroids. Obstruction of the airways is treated with intramuscular and inhaled epinephrine, or alternatively β(2)-sympathicomimetics, and oxygen. Abdominal or cutaneous involvement, such as generalized urticaria, usually can be treated with intravenous H(1)-antihistamines, glucocorticoids and surveillance. In patients with anaphylaxis, the elicitor of the reaction has to be diagnosed by allergy testing. Patients with sustained risk for anaphylaxis should receive a self-medication kit and should be educated about behavioral patterns needed for prophylaxis and therapy of anaphylactic reactions. Patient educational intervention increases knowledge about anaphylaxis, and practical competence and thus, is a basis of a successful management of anaphylaxis. PMID:23385622

  14. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered. PMID:22586882

  15. Histamine and antihistamines in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Winbery, Stephen L; Lieberman, Philip L

    2002-01-01

    Anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions are potentially fatal. These disorders are sometimes iatrogenic, and increase with increased exposure to drugs, synthetic substances, and medical procedures. Non-IgE-mediated anaphylactoid reactions are common in medical settings and are clinically indistinguishable from anaphylaxis. These reactions may be unrecognized if a rigid classic definition of anaphylaxis is used. Histamine is a primary mediator of anaphylaxis and signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis can be reproduced by histamine infusion. Histamine triggers a cascade of inflammatory mediators and modulates its own release. H1-antihistamines are adjunctive treatment therapy for acute anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, in which many mediators of inflammation are involved. Compared with epinephrine, the first-response medication of choice, antihistamines have a slow onset of action, and they cannot block events that occur subsequent to histamine binding to its receptors. Antihistamines are an important component of regimens for the prevention of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions in patients at risk, and may eventually have more widespread application in the perioperative setting. In some instances, such as with exercise-induced anaphylaxis and reactions to latex in sensitized individuals, prophylaxis regimens are not always effective. H2-antagonists are not detrimental in the therapy of anaphylaxis and many studies show a favorable outcome when combining H1- and H2-antagonist therapy for prophylaxis. They should be added to therapy at the discretion of the treating physician. Because of decreased antimuscarinic and central nervous system side effects, the newer antihistamines can be given in high doses, allowing more complete blockade of histamine receptors. These agents should lead to a reevaluation of the usefulness of antihistamines in both the treatment of acute anaphylaxis and in prophylactic regimens. The unavailability of parenterally administered

  16. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis and antileukotriene montelukast.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Sapna; Agrawal, Rajendra Prasad; Atal, Shubham; Tiwari, Vikalp; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA), occurring exclusively with exercise, without any other associated trigger, detected in the prodromal phase, and prevented from additional anaphylaxis episodes by treatment with cetirizine and 10 mg daily of antileukotriene montelukast to date. EIA is a syndrome in which patients experience a spectrum of the symptoms of anaphylaxis ranging from mild cutaneous signs to severe systemic manifestations such as hypotension, syncope, and even death after increased physical activity. Many people have triggers, such as, a variety of foods, various medications, alcohol, cold weather, humidity, and seasonal and hormonal changes along with exercise that cause the symptoms. Typically, either exercise or the specific trigger alone will rarely cause symptoms. It is differentiated from cholinergic urticaria by the absence of response to passive body warming and emotional stress. PMID:26312002

  17. The mechanisms, causes, and treatment of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Anthony; Bardana, Emil J

    2002-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe life-threatening systemic reaction that offers many challenges to the clinician. The incidence of anaphylaxis is significant in the general population and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. While the most common causes of anaphylaxis include drugs, foods, and venoms, other important etiologies must be considered. The etiology of anaphylaxis is classically based on IgE mediated hypersensitivity but multiple mechanisms may be involved. The clinical presentation of anaphylaxis may be extremely variable with a broad differential diagnosis which will be outlined. Although the diagnosis of anaphylaxis can many times be based on a careful history and physical examination, there are laboratory and skin tests which may be helpful in establishing a diagnosis in some cases. The cornerstone of treatment of anaphylaxis remains epinephrine. Other supportive therapies will be discussed. PMID:12109526

  18. Management and Prevention of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Anne-Marie; Akl, Elias G.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis prevalence has increased within the last few years. This may be due to a marked increase in allergic sensitization to foods especially in the pediatric population, as well as to an increase in outdoor recreational habits and the availability of new biologic medications.  Furthermore, guidelines for the diagnosis of anaphylaxis have been published, thus facilitating the recognition of this disorder. Diagnosis of anaphylaxis is mainly based on history and clinical criteria of organ system involvement. The serum tryptase assay is now commercially available and may be a helpful diagnostic tool in certain clinical situations involving hypotension, but not in the context of food-induced anaphylaxis. Treatment of anaphylaxis mainly involves the use of epinephrine as a first line medication for severe manifestations followed by  symptomatic management of specific  symptoms, such as antihistamines for urticaria and albuterol for wheezing. Although commonly practiced, treatment with systemic corticosteroids  is not supported by evidence-based literature. Observation in a medical facility for 4-6 hours is recommended to monitor for late phase reactions, although these rarely occur. Education is an essential component of management of a patient with a previous history of anaphylaxis, emphasizing early use of epinephrine and providing a written action plan. Referral to a board-certified allergist/immunologist is recommended to determine  the cause of the anaphylaxis as well as to rule out other potential conditions. In this review, our main focus will be on the treatment and prevention of anaphylaxis while providing our readers with a brief introduction to the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, its prevalence and its most common causes. PMID:26918144

  19. Evaluation of anti-allergic properties of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in a murine model of systemic anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sae-Gwang; Lee, Da-Young; Seo, Su-Kil; Lee, Soo-Woong; Kim, Se-Kwon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kang, Mi-Seon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Yea, Sung Su; Choi, Inhak Choi, Il-Whan

    2008-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of honeybee propolis extracts. It has several positive effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidation, anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal, and immunomodulatory effects. In particular, the suppressive effect of NF-{kappa}B may disrupt a component of allergic induction. The principal objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of CAPE on the active systemic anaphylaxis induced by ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in mice. Mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and intravenously challenged with OVA. Histopathological analysis, nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activation, and the plasma levels of histamine and total IgE after allergen challenge were evaluated. After challenges, all of the sham-treated mice developed anaphylactic symptoms, increased plasma levels of histamine and OVA-specific IgE, marked vascular leakage, NF-{kappa}B activation, platelet-activating factor (PAF) production, and histological changes including pulmonary edema and hemorrhage in the renal medullae within 20 min. By way of contrast, a reduction in the plasma levels of histamine and OVA-specific IgE and an inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and PAF release were observed in the CAPE-treated mice. In addition, a significant prevention of hemoconcentration and OVA-induced pathological changes were noted. These results indicate that CAPE demonstrates an anti-allergic effect, which may be the result of its protective effects against IgE-mediated allergy.

  20. [Food-induced anaphylaxis - data from the anaphylaxis registry].

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Grünhagen, Josefine; Dölle, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions due to food occur in the context of food allergy and, together with venom and drugs, are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions. In small children the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions according to data from the anaphylaxis registry are hen's egg and milk, whereas in school children peanut and hazelnut are frequent elicitors of allergic reactions. Other frequent elicitors of anaphylactic reactions in childhood are wheat and soy. In adults the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions due to food, based on data from the anaphylaxis registry, are wheat, soy, celery, shellfish and hazelnut. Rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis in German-speaking countries are mustard and cabbage. However, the panel of rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis show regional differences. As of March 2015, 17 cases of fatal anaphylaxis were registered and among these seven were food-induced. Co-factors can either trigger the elicitation of a severe allergic reaction or affect its severity. Among such co-factors are physical activity, the intake of certain drugs, and psychological stress. The data on the role of cofactors is sparse. The management of food-induced anaphylaxis includes acute management according to current guidelines, but also long-term management, which should include educational measures regarding treatment but also information about the food allergen in daily life. PMID:27255298

  1. Exercise–induced Anaphylaxis: the Role of Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Zogaj, Dukagjin; Ibranji, Alkerta; Hoxha, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anaphylaxis is a dramatic clinical emergency. It is a very severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction. Based on immunologic mechanism the anaphylaxis is divided in IgE, IgG, complement, or immune complexes-mediated vs non allergic anaphylaxis. There are a lot of etiologic factors of anaphylaxis, but the three principal immunologic triggers are drugs, insect stings, and foods. Regarding the clinical severity there are several proposed grading systems. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is mainly clinical. Discussion: The anaphylaxis markers measured in clinical laboratories are total tryptase and histamine. There are some conditions that modulate the onset of anaphylaxis, acting as co- or augmentation factors, which significantly lower the allergen dose necessary for triggering anaphylaxis. The well-documented cofactors of anaphylaxis are physical exercise, alcohol consumption, some foods, co-administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and concomitant infectious diseases. Development of anaphylaxis depends on the sensitization pattern, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, characteristics of the allergen, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, the avidity and affinity of immunoglobulins to bind an allergen, the route of allergen application, and, last but not least, the presence of cofactors of anaphylaxis. Conclusion: Anaphylaxis remains a continuous challenge for the diagnosis and treatment. The adequate management of anaphylaxis requires rapid diagnosis, implementation of primary and secondary prevention measures, and immediate administration of subcutaneous epinephrine. PMID:25685088

  2. History and classification of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; de Weck, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis as the maximal variant of an acute systemic hypersensitivity reaction can involve several organ systems, particularly the skin, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and the cardiovascular system. The severity of anaphylactic reaction is variable and can be classified into severity grades I-IV. Some reactions are fatal. Most frequent elicitors of anaphylaxis are foods in childhood, later insect stings and drugs. The phenomenon itself has been described in ancient medical literature, but was actually recognized and named at the beginning of the 20th century by Charles Richet and Paul Portier. In the course of experiments starting on the yacht of the Prince of Monaco and continued in the laboratory in Paris, they tried to immunize dogs with extracts of Physalia species in an attempt to develop an antitoxin to the venom of the Portuguese man-of-war. While Charles Richet believed that anaphylaxis was a 'lack of protection', it has become clear that an exaggerated immune reaction, especially involving immunoglobulin E antibodies, is the underlying pathomechanism in allergic anaphylaxis besides immune complex reactions. Non-immunologically mediated reactions leading to similar clinical symptomatology have been called 'anaphylactoid' or 'pseudo-allergic'--especially by Paul Kallos--and are now called 'non-immune anaphylaxis' according to a consensus of the World Allergy Organization (WAO). The distinction of different pathophysiological processes is important since non-immune anaphylaxis cannot be detected by skin test or in vitro allergy diagnostic procedures. History and provocation tests are crucial. The intensity of the reaction is not only influenced by the degree of sensitization but also by concomitant other factors as age, simultaneous exposure to other allergens, underlying infection, physical exercise or psychological stress or concomitant medication (e.g. beta-blockers, NSAIDs); this phenomenon has been called augmentation or summation

  3. Network analysis of possible anaphylaxis cases reported to the US vaccine adverse event reporting system after H1N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Ball, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The identification of signals from spontaneous reporting systems plays an important role in monitoring the safety of medical products. Network analysis (NA) allows the representation of complex interactions among the key elements of such systems. We developed a network for a subset of the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) by representing the vaccines/adverse events (AEs) and their interconnections as the nodes and the edges, respectively; this subset we focused upon included possible anaphylaxis reports that were submitted for the H1N1 influenza vaccine. Subsequently, we calculated the main metrics that characterize the connectivity of the nodes and applied the island algorithm to identify the densest region in the network and, thus, identify potential safety signals. AEs associated with anaphylaxis formed a dense region in the 'anaphylaxis' network demonstrating the strength of NA techniques for pattern recognition. Additional validation and development of this approach is needed to improve future pharmacovigilance efforts. PMID:21893812

  4. A case of korean ginseng-induced anaphylaxis confirmed by open oral challenge and basophil activation test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Jin, Hyun Jung; Park, Jung-Won; Jung, Soon Kwang; Jang, Jeng-Yun; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-03-01

    Two case reports discussing Korean ginseng-induced allergic reactions have been published; both were inhalation-induced respiratory allergies in occupational settings. In this report we discuss the first case of anaphylaxis that developed after an oral intake of ginseng, confirmed by an open oral challenge, a skin prick test (SPT), and a basophil activation test (BAT). A 44-year-old man experienced rhinorrhea and nasal stiffness, followed by respiratory difficulty with wheeze and abdominal pain 10 minutes after oral intake of fresh ginseng. He had suffered from episodes of allergic rhinitis during the spring season for several years. Upon presentation, a physical examination, chest radiograph, and routine laboratory tests were unremarkable. Total serum IgE level was 41 IU/mL. The SPT results showed strong positive responses to alder, birch pollens, and ginseng extracts (1:500 w/v). The methacholine bronchial challenge test revealed a positive result at PC20 of 5.83 mg/mL. The open oral challenge was performed using 50 g of fresh ginseng and showed immediate onset of facial flushing, cough, respiratory difficulty with wheeze, and abdominal pain combined with a significant decrease in FEV1 levels (54% from the baseline). Serum-specific IgE and IgG4 antibodies were not detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. BAT showed a remarkable increase in the expression of CD203c and CD63 with the addition of ginseng extract in a dose-dependent manner, while no changes were noted in the controls. In conclusion, oral intake of Korean ginseng could induce anaphylaxis, which is mediated by non-IgE-dependent direct activation of basophil/mast cells. PMID:22379608

  5. A regional approach to unmet needs in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Minale, P; Bignardi, D; Troise, C; Voltolini, S; Dignetti, P

    2016-05-01

    Allergic diseases are under-diagnosed and undertreated despite their wide prevalence, and particularly anaphylaxis is often under-estimated. Evidence-based anaphylaxis guidelines developed by principal allergy organizations agree on increased prevalence of anaphylaxis, especially in patients younger than 18 years (18-27,30): this trend highlights the need for actions on anaphylaxis management and prevention (3,4). Lack of prompt connection between emergency department and allergy unit after discharge, and of a dedicated ICD-9th identification code (18-26), can delay diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis (28,29). Also in the experience of our Allergy Unit, patients reach the allergist office after several attacks treated in ED (17), without a previous evaluation and risk assessment. Keeping in mind unmet needs in anaphylaxis (4), we focused on regional approaches to health care delivery. The key point of our project was to establish an active collaboration between allergist clinicians and their counterparts in emergency medicine, with a system of quick filing report of patients discharged from ED with the suspect of anaphylactic reaction, directed to a central allergy unit, acting in a hub and spoke model with the Ligurian allergy network (31). Aim of the project was to improve epidemiological data collection via direct connection among ED and allergy network; moreover, we tried to provide a quick and proper evaluation of all reported patients, identifying, when possible, the agent responsible for anaphylaxis, to provide instructions on how to minimize future exposure; as all individuals at risk for anaphylaxis should carry and know how to self-administer epinephrine, we managed to provide auto injector and proper training when appropriate. A follow up on readmissions was carried out during the study and four months later. In a 20 months observation period (2013/2014), 205 patients were reported: it was possible to reach a diagnosis and risk assessment in 64

  6. Anaphylaxis and Anaphylactoid Reactions: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Luskin, Allan T.; Luskin, Susan S.

    1996-07-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute fatal or potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction. Anaphylaxis represent a clinical diagnosis based on history and physical examination and includes symptoms of airway obstruction, generalized skin reactions, particularly flushing, itching, urticaria, angioedema cardiovascular symptoms including hypotension and gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms result from the action of mast cell mediators, especially histamine and lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and platelet activating factor on shock tissue. The shock tissue includes blood vessels, mucous glands, smooth muscle, and nerve endings. Anaphylaxis follows the typical immediate hypersensitivity time course, with a reaction beginning within minutes of antigen exposure. A late-phase reaction hours after the initial reaction may occur. Mast cell mediator release can be triggered by both IgE and non--IgE-mediated factors. Therefore, anaphylaxis may be termed anaphylaxis (IgE mediated) or anaphylactoid (non--IgE mediated). The most common IgE-mediated triggers are drugs, typically penicillin or other beta-lactam antibiotics, foods, most commonly nuts, peanuts, fish and shellfish, or hymenoptera stings. Non-IgE-mediated causes include factors causing marked complement activation such as plasma proteins or compounds which act directly on the mast cell membrane, such as vancomycin, quinolone antibiotics, or radiographic contrast media. The pathophysiology of some trigger factors, such as aspirin, remains unclear. Therapy of anaphylaxis revolves around patient education, avoidance, desensitization or pharmacologic pretreatment when agents causing anaphylaxis need to be readministered, and early recognition and prompt therapy of reactions should they occur. PMID:11862283

  7. Peri-operative anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Linda; Eren, Efrem

    2011-01-01

    Peri-operative anaphylaxis is an important cause for mortality and morbidity associated with anaesthesia. The true incidence is unknown and is most likely under reported. Diagnosis can be difficult, particularly as a number of drugs are given simultaneously and any of these agents can potentially cause anaphylaxis. This review covers the clinical features, differential diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis associated with anaesthesia. The investigations to confirm the clinical suspicion of anaphylaxis and further tests to identify the likely drug(s) are examined. Finally the salient features of common and rare causes including non-drug substances are described. PMID:21235622

  8. Management of anaphylaxis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dhami, S; Panesar, S S; Roberts, G; Muraro, A; Worm, M; Bilò, M B; Cardona, V; Dubois, A E J; DunnGalvin, A; Eigenmann, P; Fernandez-Rivas, M; Halken, S; Lack, G; Niggemann, B; Rueff, F; Santos, A F; Vlieg-Boerstra, B; Zolkipli, Z Q; Sheikh, A

    2014-02-01

    To establish the effectiveness of interventions for the acute and long-term management of anaphylaxis, seven databases were searched for systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series and - only in relation to adrenaline - case series investigating the effectiveness of interventions in managing anaphylaxis. Fifty-five studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. We found no robust studies investigating the effectiveness of adrenaline (epinephrine), H1-antihistamines, systemic glucocorticosteroids or methylxanthines to manage anaphylaxis. There was evidence regarding the optimum route, site and dose of administration of adrenaline from trials studying people with a history of anaphylaxis. This suggested that administration of intramuscular adrenaline into the middle of vastus lateralis muscle is the optimum treatment. Furthermore, fatality register studies have suggested that a failure or delay in administration of adrenaline may increase the risk of death. The main long-term management interventions studied were anaphylaxis management plans and allergen-specific immunotherapy. Management plans may reduce the risk of further reactions, but these studies were at high risk of bias. Venom immunotherapy may reduce the incidence of systemic reactions in those with a history of venom-triggered anaphylaxis. PMID:24251536

  9. [Approach and Registry of Anaphylaxis in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Mota, Inês; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Celso; Tomaz, Elza; Ferreira, Manuel Branco; Sabino, Filipa; Coelho, Anabela; Santos, Anabela; Martins, Henrique; Morais-Almeida, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis has a growing incidence, especially in children. It represents a medical emergency and its successful therapy depends on early and proper intervention. Intramuscular epinephrine, with dose adjustment according to weight and age, is the drug of choice for anaphylaxis treatment. After resolution of the acute reaction, the patient should be kept under clinical surveillance for 6 to 24 hours, due to possible biphasic reactions. Prescription of an epinephrine auto injectable device should be considered in all patients with diagnosed or suspected anaphylaxis; additionally these patients should always be referred to an Immunoallergy consultation, to perform adequate investigation and management in order to reduce future risk. All anaphylaxis episodes must be recorded in The Portuguese Catalogue of Allergies and other Adverse Reactions (Catálogo Português de Alergias e outras Reações Adversas, CPARA), which represents a fundamental tool to share clinical information within the Health System. The present manuscript intends to disclose the most recent Portuguese guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis, making its clinical approach more effective and homogeneous, and to promote the use of The Portuguese Catalogue of Allergies and other Adverse Reactions as an essential tool to register and share information on anaphylaxis in Portugal. PMID:26849768

  10. Recognition and first-line treatment of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Phillip L

    2014-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 included a code only for anaphylactic shock. The improved ICD-10 coding defines the different symptoms and types of anaphylaxis and includes coding for anaphylaxis without shock. This new coding is consistent with the efforts of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), who convened a panel to formulate a definition of and the diagnostic criteria for anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a serious reaction that has a rapid onset and may cause death. It is a systemic immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction resulting from the sudden release of multiple mediators from mast cells and basophils. Foods are the most common triggers for anaphylactic reactions, followed by drugs, insect stings, and idiopathic anaphylaxis (anaphylaxis of unknown cause). If the NIAID/FAAN criteria are met and anaphylaxis is diagnosed, epinephrine administration is mandatory. Delays in epinephrine administration have been associated with fatalities. Patients should have ready access to >1 epinephrine autoinjector in the outpatient setting. An individualized emergency action plan should be developed for each patient at risk for anaphylaxis. PMID:24384138

  11. Anaphylaxis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Brown, Simon G A; Mullins, Raymond J; Gold, Michael S

    2006-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is a serious, rapid-onset, allergic reaction that may cause death. Severe anaphylaxis is characterised by life-threatening upper airway obstruction, bronchospasm and/or hypotension. Anaphylaxis in children is most often caused by food. Bronchospasm is a common symptom, and there is usually a background of atopy and asthma. Venom- and drug-induced anaphylaxis are more common in adults, in whom hypotension is more likely to occur. Diagnosis can be difficult, with skin features being absent in up to 20% of people. Anaphylaxis must be considered as a differential diagnosis for any acute-onset respiratory distress, bronchospasm, hypotension or cardiac arrest. The cornerstones of initial management are putting the patient in the supine position, administering intramuscular adrenaline into the lateral thigh, resuscitation with intravenous fluid, support of the airway and ventilation, and giving supplementary oxygen. If the response to initial management is inadequate, intravenous infusion of adrenaline should be commenced. Use of vasopressors should be considered if hypotension persists. The patient should be observed for at least 4 hours after symptom resolution and referred to an allergist to assist with diagnosis, allergen avoidance measures, risk assessment, preparation of an action plan and education on the use of self-injectable adrenaline. Provision of a MedicAlert bracelet should also be arranged. PMID:16948628

  12. Anaphylaxis in the young adult population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchi S

    2014-01-01

    It is critical that clinicians treating young adults understand the presentation and management of anaphylaxis. The most common trigger for anaphylaxis in this population is food. The prevalence of food allergy is growing, with 8% of US children and adolescents affected. All patients at risk for anaphylaxis should be prescribed epinephrine autoinjectors, as epinephrine is the only life-saving medication for a severe anaphylactic reaction. The presentation of anaphylaxis can involve multiple organ systems (eg, mucocutaneous, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal) and, as such, patient education is needed to assist in prompt recognition. Appropriate training of patients and caregivers about how to identify anaphylaxis and what to do in an emergency is critical. Training of school and college staff also is essential, as 1 in 4 first-time reactions occurs outside the home. Additional counseling for adolescents at risk for anaphylactic reactions should address increased risk-taking behavior, decreased adult supervision, dating, and the transition of disease management from an adult to the patient. PMID:24384134

  13. Marking nut anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Anita Christine; Hayball, John; Smith, William B

    2016-01-01

    Marking nut Semecarpus anacardium, so-called because it contains a pigment that has been used in the past to mark fabrics, is a known cause of contact hypersensitivity. It may be ingested as an ingredient of some traditional Hindi foods. We describe the first reported case of anaphylaxis to marking nut. PMID:27489793

  14. Marking nut anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Fok, Jie Shen; Kral, Anita Christine; Hayball, John; Smith, William B

    2016-07-01

    Marking nut Semecarpus anacardium, so-called because it contains a pigment that has been used in the past to mark fabrics, is a known cause of contact hypersensitivity. It may be ingested as an ingredient of some traditional Hindi foods. We describe the first reported case of anaphylaxis to marking nut. PMID:27489793

  15. Lyn is essential for fcgamma receptor III-mediated systemic anaphylaxis but not for the Arthus reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, T; Ono, M; Watanabe, T; Takai, T

    2001-03-01

    The Src family kinase Lyn initiates intracellular signal transduction by associating with a variety of immune receptors such as antigen receptor on B cells and high-affinity Fc receptor (FcR) for immunoglobulin Ig(E) (FcepsilonRI) on mast cells. Involvement of Lyn in the IgE-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity is well documented, but the physiological significance of Lyn in IgG-dependent, type III low-affinity FcR for IgG (FcgammaRIII)-mediated responses is largely unknown. In this study, we generated a double-mutant mouse strain deficient in both type II FcR for IgG (FcgammaRIIB) and Lyn to exclude any involvement of inhibitory signaling by FcgammaRIIB, which otherwise downregulates FcgammaRIII-mediated cellular responses. FcgammaRIIB-deficient but Lyn-sufficient mice served as controls. The Lyn deficiency attenuated IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis in vivo, and significantly reduced calcium mobilization and degranulation responses of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in vitro. However, we found that either interleukin 4 or tumor necrosis factor alpha release by BMMCs was comparable to that from Lyn-deficient and control mice, and the reverse-passive Arthus reaction was equally induced in both mutant mice, indicating that Lyn is not involved in the onset of the IgG-mediated, FcgammaRIII-dependent late phase responses of mast cells. These findings provide us with insight into distinct signaling mechanisms in mast cells underlying the development of diverse pathologies as well as a therapeutic potential for selective treatment of allergic disorders. PMID:11238587

  16. Common Causes of Anaphylaxis in Children: The First Report of Anaphylaxis Registry in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is an acute, systemic, and potentially fatal allergic reaction. Many things can cause anaphylaxis potentially but some agents are more common like some foods (milk, egg, soy, wheat, peanut, tree nut, shellfish, and fish), insect stings, medications, latex, and food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis. The goal of this study is to show the common causes of anaphylaxis among the children with anaphylaxis history who were referred to the Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI) during a 4-year period (2005-2009). Methods and Materials During those 4 years, we registered all children (<14 years old) with a history of anaphylactic reaction. To prove the cause of anaphylaxis, we performed skin prick tests with suspected agents according to their history and measured specific IgE against them by the ImmunoCAP test. Recognition of common allergens was based on having a positive history for 1 allergen and positive skin prick test or specific IgE for that at the same time, or having positive results from both tests when the allergen was unclear. Idiopathic anaphylaxis was a reaction when any known allergen and positive tests were not obtained. Results One hundred ninety-three nonfatal anaphylactic attacks among 63 children were recognized. In total, the most current cause of anaphylaxis in children was food (89.7%). Milk (49.3%) and wheat (26.1%) were the most common. Other foods were egg (8.7%), nuts (2.8%), and spices (2.8%). Six children (8.7%) were sensitive to multiple food allergens like milk, egg, and wheat. Five (7.1%) of 63 patients had anaphylactic attack because of stinging. Wasp was the trigger in 3 (4.3%) of them and honeybee was the cause in 1 (1.4%). The last one was because of unknown hymenoptera. There were 2 idiopathic cases of all 63 patients. Conclusions Food allergens, especially milk and wheat, are the most common cause of anaphylaxis in children. Because anaphylaxis can be fatal, it is advisable to recognize

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Inpatients with Anaphylaxis in China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Xu, Han-Yi; Chen, Shi; Sun, Jin-Lu; Hu, Hong; Li, Hai-Chao; Diao, Ying; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical characteristics of inpatients with anaphylaxis and the factors that influenced those characteristics. Methods. Using the patient records from 1990 to 2013 from three highly ranked Chinese hospitals, we retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of 108 inpatients with anaphylaxis (not anaphylaxis admitted). Results. The mean patient age was 42 ± 20 years old and male-to-female ratio was 1 : 1.3. The number of patients with anaphylaxis increased gradually, and cases diagnosed after 2005 accounted for 68.5% of the 108 total cases. The most common trigger was medications. The most common clinical manifestations included cutaneous, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, and digestive signs and symptoms. Male patients were more likely to experience loss of consciousness. Multisystem involvement was more likely to develop in patients with low BP, whereas it was uncommon in those with anaphylaxis induced by antibiotics or anesthetics. Epinephrine was used as the first-line treatment for 56 cases. Conclusions. Inpatient with anaphylaxis was more common in female patients and the number increased gradually during the study period. The most common trigger was medications. Patients with low BP were prone to having multisystem involvement, whereas the cases of anaphylaxis induced by antibiotics and anesthetics were less likely to involve multiple organ systems. PMID:26064911

  18. Antagonism of peptidoleukotrienes and inhibition of systemic anaphylaxis by RG 12525 in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Inwegen, R.G.; Nuss, G.W.; Carnathan, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    RG 12525 was determined to be a specific, competitive and orally effective antagonist of the peptidoleukotrienes, LTC/sub 4/, LTD/sub 4/ and LTE/sub 4/, in several assays utilizing guinea pigs. In vitro, RG 12525 competitively inhibited /sup 3/H-LTD/sub 4/ binding to lung membranes and competitively antagonized the spasmogenic activity of LTC/sub 4/, LTD/sub 4/ and LTE/sub 4/ on lung strips with > 8000 fold selectivity. In vivo, RG 12525 orally inhibited LTD/sub 4/ induced wheal formation LTD/sub 4/ induced bronchoconstriction and anaphylactic death and antigen induced bronchoconstriction. RG 12525 represents a significant improvement in receptor affinity and oral efficacy and thus, is a valuable pharmacological tool to evaluate peptidoleukotrienes in allergic diseases.

  19. Pediatric Anaphylaxis Management in the Prehospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Linda; Cone, David C.; Langhan, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs after contact with an allergy-causing substance. Timely administration of intramuscular epinephrine is the treatment of choice for controlling symptoms and decreasing fatalities. Our purpose was to investigate the prehospital management of anaphylaxis among patients receiving care in an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review from May, 2008 to January, 2010 of patients 18 years or younger who received care in the PED for anaphylaxis. Data were extracted by one investigator and included demographic information, patient symptoms, past medical history, medications administered (including route and provider), and final disposition. Results We reviewed 218 cases of anaphylaxis in 202 children. Mean age of patients was 7.4 years; 56% of patients were male. Two hundred and fourteen (98%) manifested symptoms in the skin/mucosal system, 68% had respiratory symptoms, 44% had gastrointestinal symptoms, and 2% had hypotension. Sixty-seven percent had a previous history of allergic reaction and 38% had a history of asthma. Seventy-six percent of the patients presented with anaphylaxis to food products, 8% to medications, 1% to stings, and 16% to unknown allergens. Reactions occurred at home or with family members 87% of the time, and at school 12% of the time. Only 36% of the patients who met criteria for anaphylaxis had epinephrine administered by emergency medical services (EMS). Among 26 patients with anaphylactic reactions at school, 69% received epinephrine by the school nurse. Of the 117 patients with known allergies who were with their parents at the time of anaphylactic reaction, 41% received epinephrine. Thirteen patients were seen by a physician prior to coming to the PED; all received epinephrine at the physician’s office. In total, epinephrine was given to 41% (89) of the 218 cases prior to coming to the PED

  20. Research to practice: developing an integrated anaphylaxis education curriculum for school nurses.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Rebecca; Strickland, C June

    2011-06-01

    The numbers of school-aged children with life-threatening allergies that cause anaphylaxis continues to increase. Many states, including Washington, have responded to this by developing specific guidelines for school districts to follow in order to provide a safe learning environment for children with medical conditions that put them at risk for anaphylaxis. School nurses require resources to assist them in providing health training for school staff on how to manage potentially life-threatening health conditions for children in their school, however, resources to address this training are limited. A search for and content analysis of currently available literature and resources about anaphylaxis and anaphylaxis training curricula revealed a lack of an integrated curriculum to train school staff. This article presents a discussion of the development of a train-the-trainer anaphylaxis education program providing school nurses with curriculum, lesson plans, teaching-learning activities, and resources for anaphylaxis education of all school staff. PMID:21444745

  1. A case of trimebutine-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Song, Woo-Jung; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2011-12-01

    Trimebutine maleate [2-dimethylamino-2-phenylbutyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid] has been demonstrated to be active for relieving abdominal pain and it is widely used for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Adverse drug reactions are mostly mild and well-tolerated. To our knowledge, only two cases of trimebutine induced hypersensitivity have been reported, and both were delayed type reactions. Here, we report the first case of trimebutine maleate-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:22113162

  2. A pharmacologic review of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Nancy S; Wagner, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis occurs in the surgical population and may have devastating consequences. Anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions are immediate hypersensitivity reactions that are most commonly precipitated by medications, insect stings, and foods. In the surgical population, 47.4% of immediate hypersensitivity reactions were precipitated by neuromuscular blocking agents, followed by latex and antibiotics in 20% and 18.1% of cases, respectively. Initial treatment consists of removing the precipitating trigger, administering epinephrine, and correct patient positioning. Secondary prevention measures should be instituted to prevent future occurrences. All health care professionals should have an understanding of the clinical presentation and medical management of anaphylaxis to improve patient outcomes. PMID:25461639

  3. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Heather C.; Bruner, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. PMID:25987924

  4. Anaphylaxis induced by lentil inhalation.

    PubMed

    Ayşenur, Kaya; Akan, Ayşegül; Mustafa, Erkoçoğlu; Müge, Toyran; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2012-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction which may be fatal. Foods are the most common allergens leading to anaphylaxis especially for childhood. Most of the food-induced anaphylactic reactions take place after ingestion of the allergic food and only a few cases exist with anaphylactic reactions induced by inhalation of foods such as peanut, soybean and lupine. The case we present is unusual in that an 8 1/2-year-old boy developed anaphylaxis with the inhalation of steam from boiling lentils. PMID:22830298

  5. Acute treatment of anaphylaxis in children

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Question A 3-year-old was rushed to my office after eating a friend’s chocolate bar that contained nuts. He immediately developed urticaria on his face and swelling of his lips, and he had a persistent cough. What is the best treatment for a child with anaphylaxis? Should this family receive a prescription for an epinephrine autoinjector device? Answer Intramuscular epinephrine injection is a safe and effective treatment of anaphylaxis in children. Children with systemic allergic reactions should carry epinephrine autoinjectors at all times, and should certainly have one with them at school. In order for epinephrine autoinjectors to be effective, children and their families need to be educated on how to properly use the devices, as well as keep in mind the product’s expiration date. PMID:23851537

  6. Severe anaphylaxis: the secret ingredient.

    PubMed

    Buergi, Andreas; Jung, Barbara; Padevit, Christian; John, Hubert; Ganter, Michael T

    2014-02-01

    In this case report, we describe a healthy urological patient who suffered severe intraoperative anaphylaxis to chlorhexidine, an ingredient contained in frequently used lubricants (Instillagel, Endosgel). Chlorhexidine is a well-known skin disinfectant and antiseptic component in mouthwash or other over the counter antiseptic pharmaceuticals. There is little awareness that commonly used lubricants may contain hidden chlorhexidine. After severe intraoperative anaphylaxis, it is important to investigate all potential (including hidden) agents that might have caused this life-threatening reaction. PMID:25611155

  7. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: A clinical view

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is a distinct form of physical allergy. The development of anaphylaxis during exertion often requires the concomitant exposure to triggering factors such as intake of foods (food dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis) or drugs prior to exercise, extreme environmental conditions. EIA is a rare, but serious disorder, which is often undetected or inadequately treated. This article summarizes current evidences on pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. We reviewed recent advances in factors triggering the release of mediators from mast cells which seems to play a pathogenetic role. A correct diagnosis is essential to avoid unnecessary restricted diet, to allow physical activity in subjects with EIA dependent from triggering factors such as food, and to manage attacks. An algorithm for diagnosing EIA based on medical history, IgE tests and exercise challenge test has been provided. In the long-term management of EIA, there is a need for educating patients and care-givers to avoid exposure to precipitating factors and to recognize and treat episodes. Future researches on existing questions are discussed. PMID:22980517

  8. Anaphylaxis to topically applied sodium fusidate.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ran; Kim, Do-Soo; Kim, Jihyun; Ahn, Kangmo

    2013-03-01

    Fusidic acid is a bacteriostatic antibiotic that is effective primarily on gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium species. It is often topically applied to the skin, but is also given systemically as a tablet or injection. Allergic contact dermatitis, or urticaria, has been reported as a side effect of fusidic acid treatment, whereas anaphylaxis to topically administered fusidic acid has not been reported previously. A 16-year-old boy visited an outpatient clinic for further evaluation of anaphylaxis. He suffered abrasions on his arms during exercise, which were treated with a topical ointment containing sodium fusidate. Within 30 minutes, he developed urticaria and eyelid swelling, followed by a cough and respiratory difficulty. His symptoms were relieved by emergency treatment in a nearby hospital. To investigate the etiology, oral provocation with fusidate was performed. After 125 mg (1/2 tablet) of sodium fusidate was administered, he developed a cough and itching of the throat within 30 minutes, which was followed by chest discomfort and urticaria. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) dropped from 4.09 L at baseline to 3.50 L after challenge, although wheezing was not heard in his chest. After management with an inhaled bronchodilator using a nebulizer, chest discomfort was relieved and FEV1 rose to 3.86 L. The patient was directed not to use fusidate, especially on abrasions. Here we report the first case of anaphylaxis resulting from topical fusidic acid application to abrasions. PMID:23450038

  9. Anaphylaxis in the pediatric patient: optimizing management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christine W

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports describing a rise in serious allergies and life-threatening reactions have prompted the need for pediatric nurse practitioners to re-evaluate and hone their clinical skills with regard to the recognition of anaphylaxis. An accredited symposium entitled, "Anaphylaxis in the Pediatric Patient: Optimizing Management and Prevention" was held in conjunction with the 2012 Annual Conference of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. This article is an accredited enduring activity from that symposium. Goals of this activity are to (a) provide participants with information regarding current trends in serious allergies and anaphylaxis, (b) discuss recommendations from clinical guidelines designed to standardize practice, and (c) address medical and educational needs of patients with anaphylaxis. This article focuses on the point of care where pediatric nurse practitioners require the diagnostic skills to determine whether a patient's acute symptoms are consistent with a diagnosis of anaphylaxis and whether epinephrine should be used to treat those symptoms. The rationale for the use of intramuscular epinephrine, insights into the development and execution of an emergency action plan, and patient education also are discussed. PMID:23419548

  10. Anaphylaxis following a transvaginal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jakubovic, Baruch D; Saperia, Corey; Sussman, Gordon L

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol is a ubiquitous, water-soluble, organic compound found in a wide variety of commercially available products. While generally a benign substance, in rare instances, it can induce hypersensitivity reactions. Herein, we describe a case of anaphylaxis to polyethylene glycol-containing lubricating gel used for a transvaginal ultrasound. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of a rare cause of anaphylaxis that may occur in the health-care setting. It is of particular importance given the widespread use of similar lubricating materials in multiple practice settings for the use of internal examinations and ultrasonography. PMID:26807134

  11. Delayed Anaphylaxis to Red Meat Masquerading as Idiopathic Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Anubha; Commins, Scott P.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally recognized as a rapidly developing combination of symptoms often including hives and hypotension or respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, when a specific cause is identified, exposure to this cause is usually noted to have occurred within minutes to 2 hours before the onset of symptoms. This case is of a 79 year-old female who developed a severe episode of anaphylaxis 3 hours after eating pork. Prior to 2012, she had not experienced any symptoms after ingestion of meat products. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat has many contrasting features to immediate food-induced anaphylaxis. The relevant IgE antibody is specific for the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), a blood group substance of non-primate mammals. Evidence from Australia, Sweden, and the U.S. demonstrates that the primary cause of this IgE antibody response is tick bites. These bites characteristically itch for ten days or more. Diagnosis can be made by the presence of specific IgE to beef, pork, lamb, and milk and lack of IgE to chicken, turkey, and fish. Prick skin tests (but not intradermal tests) are generally negative. Management of these cases, now common across the southeastern U.S., consists of education combined with avoidance of both red meat and further tick bites. PMID:24811014

  12. Odor-associated idiopathic anaphylaxis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Saunders, R L; Halpern, G M; Gershwin, M E

    1995-01-01

    A 44 year old woman is described who appears to have idiopathic anaphylaxis triggered by chemical odors. Her case and a general discussion of anaphylaxis are presented. The known causes of anaphylaxis and a discourse on idiopathic anaphylaxis are given. The treatment of idiopathic anaphylaxis is discussed. PMID:7631593

  13. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides promote oral allergic sensitization and orally induced anaphylaxis to peanut protein in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianing; Wang, Yu; Tang, Lihua; de Villiers, Willem JS; Cohen, Donald; Woodward, Jerold; Finkelman, Fred D; Eckhardt, Erik RM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of peanut allergies is rising. Peanuts and many other allergen sources contain significant amounts of triglycerides, which affect absorption of antigens but have unknown effects on sensitization and anaphylaxis. We recently reported that dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), which bypass mesenteric lymph and directly enter portal blood, reduce intestinal antigen absorption into blood compared to long-chain triglycerides (LCT), which stimulate mesenteric lymph flow and are absorbed in chylomicrons via mesenteric lymph. OBJECTIVE Test how dietary MCT affect food allergy. METHODS C3H/HeJ mice were fed peanut butter protein in MCT, LCT (peanut oil), or LCT plus an inhibitor of chylomicron formation (Pluronic L81; “PL81”). Peanut-specific antibodies in plasma, responses of the mice to antigen challenges, and intestinal epithelial cytokine expression were subsequently measured. RESULTS MCT suppressed antigen absorption into blood, but stimulated absorption into Peyer's patches. A single gavage of peanut protein with MCT as well as prolonged feeding in MCT-based diets caused spontaneous allergic sensitization. MCT-sensitized mice experienced IgG-dependent anaphylaxis upon systemic challenge and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis upon oral challenge. MCT feeding stimulated jejunal-epithelial TSLP, IL-25 and IL-33 expression compared to LCT, and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in splenocytes. Moreover, oral challenges of sensitized mice with antigen in MCT significantly aggravated anaphylaxis compared to challenges with LCT. Importantly, effects of MCT could be mimicked by adding PL81 to LCT, and in vitro assays indicated that chylomicrons prevent basophil activation. CONCLUSION Dietary MCT promote allergic sensitization and anaphylaxis by affecting antigen absorption and availability and by stimulating Th2 responses. PMID:23182172

  14. Anaphylaxis and cardiovascular disease: therapeutic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, P; Simons, F E R

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases the risk of severe or fatal anaphylaxis, and some medications for CVD treatment can exacerbate anaphylaxis. The aim of this article is to review the effect of anaphylaxis on the heart, the potential impact of medications for CVD on anaphylaxis and anaphylaxis treatment, and the cardiovascular effects of epinephrine. The therapeutic dilemmas arising from these issues are also discussed and management strategies proposed. PubMed searches were performed for the years 1990-2014 inclusive, using terms such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, adrenaline, allergic myocardial infarction, anaphylaxis, angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-adrenergic blockers, epinephrine, and Kounis syndrome. Literature analysis indicated that: cardiac mast cells are key constituents of atherosclerotic plaques; mast cell mediators play an important role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS); patients with CVD are at increased risk of developing severe or fatal anaphylaxis; and medications for CVD treatment, including beta-adrenergic blockers and ACE inhibitors, potentially exacerbate anaphylaxis or make it more difficult to treat. Epinephrine increases myocardial contractility, decreases the duration of systole relative to diastole, and enhances coronary blood flow. Its transient adverse effects include pallor, tremor, anxiety, and palpitations. Serious adverse effects (including ventricular arrhythmias and hypertension) are rare, and are significantly more likely after intravenous injection than after intramuscular injection. Epinephrine is life-saving in anaphylaxis; second-line medications (including antihistamines and glucocorticoids) are not. In CVD patients (especially those with ACS), the decision to administer epinephrine for anaphylaxis can be difficult, and its benefits and potential harms need to be carefully considered. Concerns about potential adverse effects need to be weighed against concerns about possible death from

  15. Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... more of these body systems: skin digestive system respiratory system cardiovascular system For example, someone may feel tightness or closing in the throat (respiratory system) together with a fast heartbeat (cardiovascular system). Here ...

  16. A case of anaphylaxis after the ingestion of yacon.

    PubMed

    Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Hyun Sik; Kim, You Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ma, Jeong Eun; Lee, Gi Dong; Cho, Yu Ji; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deok; Hwang, Young Sil; Jeong, Yi Yeong

    2010-04-01

    Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening systemic allergic reaction, often with an explosive onset; the symptoms range from mild flushing to upper respiratory obstruction, with or without vascular collapse. Foods are common offending allergens and remain the leading cause of outpatient anaphylaxis in most surveys. Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) is a plant native to the Andes region, where its root is cultivated and consumed mainly as food. Unlike most edible roots, yacon contains large amounts of ructooligosaccharides. Traditionally, yacon tubers have been used as a source of natural sweetener and syrup for people suffering from various disorders. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who developed syncope and generalized urticaria after ingesting yacon roots. The patient had positive skin prick and intradermal tests to yacon extract. An open food challenge test was performed to confirm food anaphylaxis and was positive 10 minutes after the consumption of yacon roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of anaphylaxis after the ingestion of yacon roots. PMID:20358031

  17. A Case of Anaphylaxis After the Ingestion of Yacon

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Hyun Sik; Kim, You Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ma, Jeong Eun; Lee, Gi Dong; Cho, Yu Ji; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deok; Hwang, Young Sil

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening systemic allergic reaction, often with an explosive onset; the symptoms range from mild flushing to upper respiratory obstruction, with or without vascular collapse. Foods are common offending allergens and remain the leading cause of outpatient anaphylaxis in most surveys. Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) is a plant native to the Andes region, where its root is cultivated and consumed mainly as food. Unlike most edible roots, yacon contains large amounts of ructooligosaccharides. Traditionally, yacon tubers have been used as a source of natural sweetener and syrup for people suffering from various disorders. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who developed syncope and generalized urticaria after ingesting yacon roots. The patient had positive skin prick and intradermal tests to yacon extract. An open food challenge test was performed to confirm food anaphylaxis and was positive 10 minutes after the consumption of yacon roots. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of anaphylaxis after the ingestion of yacon roots. PMID:20358031

  18. Fatal anaphylaxis in the United States 1999-2010: temporal patterns and demographic associations

    PubMed Central

    Jerschow, Elina; Lin, Robert Y.; Scaperotti, Moira M.; McGinn, Aileen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis-related deaths in the United States (US) have not been well characterized in recent years. Objectives To define epidemiological features and time trends of fatal anaphylaxis in the US from 1999 to 2010. Methods Anaphylaxis-related deaths were identified by the 10th clinical modification of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system diagnostic codes on death certificates from the US National Mortality Database. Rates were calculated using census population estimates. Results There were a total of 2,458 anaphylaxis deaths in the US from 1999 to 2010. Medications were the most common cause (58.8%), followed by unspecified anaphylaxis (19.3%), venom (15.2%), and food (6.7%). There was a significant increase in fatal drug anaphylaxis over twelve years: from 0.27 (95%CI: 0.23-0.30) in 1999-2001 to 0.51 (95%CI: 0.47-0.56) per million in 2008-2010, P<0.001. Fatal anaphylaxis due to medications, food, and unspecified allergens was significantly associated with African-American race and older age, P<0.001. Fatal anaphylaxis to venom was significantly associated with White race, older age, and male gender, P<0.001. The rates of fatal anaphylaxis to foods in African-American males increased from 0.06 (95%CI 0.01-0.17) in 1999-2001 to 0.21 (95%CI 0.11-0.37) per million in 2008-2010, P<0.001. The rates of unspecified fatal anaphylaxis decreased overtime from 0.30 (95%CI: 0.26-0.34) in 1999-2001 to 0.09 (95%CI: 0.07-0.11) per million in 2008-2010, P<0.001. Conclusion There are strong and disparate associations between race and specific classes of anaphylaxis mortality in the United States. The increase in medication-related anaphylaxis deaths likely relates to increased medication and radiocontrast use, enhanced diagnosis, and coding changes. PMID:25280385

  19. Recognition and management of food induced anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Keet, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Food-induced anaphylactic reactions are common and increasing in frequency. Despite the existence of a consensus definition of anaphylaxis, many cases are missed, recommended treatments are not given and follow-up is inadequate. New aspects of its pathophysiology and causes, including atypical food-induced causes., are still being uncovered. Epinephrine remains the cornerstone for successfully treating anaphylaxis; H1 and H2 antihistamines, glucocorticoids and β-agonists are ancillary medications that may be used in some cases in addition to epinephrine. However, the added utility of these secondary medications in anaphylaxis has not been conclusively demonstrated. Early recognition of anaphylaxis, appropriate emergency treatment and follow-up, including prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, are essential to prevent death and significant morbidity from anaphylaxis. PMID:21453808

  20. Risk factors and management of severe life-threatening anaphylaxis in patients with clonal mast cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Valent, P

    2014-07-01

    Several different risk factors and conditions may predispose to severe life-threatening anaphylaxis. Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is one such condition. Although many SM patients are suffering from mild or even no mediator-related symptoms, others have recurrent episodes of severe anaphylaxis, with clear signs of a mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) despite prophylactic therapy with anti-mediator-type drugs. In several of these patients, an IgE-dependent allergy is diagnosed. The severity and frequency of MCAS reactions neither correlate with the burden of neoplastic mast cells nor with the levels of specific IgE or the basal tryptase level. However, there is a relationship between severe anaphylaxis in SM and the type of allergen. Notably, many of these patients suffer from hymenoptera venom allergy. Currently recommended therapies include the prophylactic use of anti-mediator-type drugs, long-term immunotherapy for hymenoptera venom allergic patients, and epinephrine-self-injector treatment for emergency situations. In patients who present with an excess burden of mast cells, such as smouldering SM, cytoreductive therapy with cladribine (2CdA) may reduce the frequency of severe events. For the future, additional treatment options, such as IgE-depletion or the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocking IgE-dependent mediator secretion as well as KIT activation, may be useful alternatives. PMID:24702655

  1. Mast Cells and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Phil; Garvey, Lene Heise

    2016-03-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the mast cell is the cell responsible for the majority of anaphylactic events. Its mediators, taken as a whole, are capable of producing all of the clinical manifestations of these events. With the discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE), it was originally felt that the vast majority of anaphylactic episodes were due to antigen coupling with two cell-bound IgE molecules. More recently it has been learned that many episodes are produced by direct activation of mast cells, not involving antigen binding to IgE, and that monomeric IgE under certain conditions can also cause degranulation. Of note--in regard to antigen independent degranulation--are recent reports that the human G-protein-coupled receptor, MRGPRX2, may be the receptor for many drugs and cationic proteins capable of producing direct mast cell degranulation and anaphylactic events. PMID:26857018

  2. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  3. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  4. Anaphylaxis following intranasal challenge of mice sensitized with ovalbumin.

    PubMed Central

    McCaskill, A C; Hosking, C S; Hill, D J

    1984-01-01

    Mice sensitized with two intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin and challenged intranasally with the same antigen developed a non-fatal anaphylactic shock peaking in severity 30 min after challenge. Increases in haematocrit were noted which corresponded to the severity of signs of shock displayed by mice. Severity of shock also correlated with IgE and IgG levels. Sensitization by the nasal route, and use of B. pertussis vaccine as adjuvant had no qualitative effect upon the response. Cobra venom factor depletion of C3 in vivo did not alter the response of mice, which suggests anaphylaxis did not involve complement activation. Sensitivity was not transferrable to non-immune mice with serum. Passive sensitization with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies produced inconsistent results. Possible mechanisms of anaphylaxis are discussed. PMID:6706376

  5. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. PMID:20109740

  6. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Anaphylaxis

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Anaphylaxis: a payor's perspective on epinephrine autoinjectors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jeffrey D; Sclar, David A

    2014-01-01

    The scope of expenditures due to anaphylaxis likely is underestimated by health care payors because anaphylaxis is underdiagnosed and, when reported, most costs of anaphylaxis borne by payors relate to direct medical expenses. Direct costs of anaphylaxis have been estimated at $1.2 billion per year, with direct expenditures of $294 million for epinephrine, and indirect costs of $609 million. More accurate diagnostic coding will allow payors to improve their understanding of the full impact of anaphylaxis on health care plans, employers, patients, and their families. Similarly, more accurate diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis should have a direct effect on overall cost savings achieved in this disease state. This includes savings in both direct costs, such as emergency department visits, and indirect costs, such as lost productivity of patients and caregivers. Educating medical personnel on treatment guidelines regarding the specific use of appropriate epinephrine autoinjectors will contribute to cost savings. Even though the cost of autoinjectors has been increasing, evidence indicates that the cost of improper response to, and treatment of, anaphylaxis outweighs that increase. At this time, there are several branded epinephrine autoinjectors and one generic equivalent for one of these branded products available on the US market; the branded autoinjectors are not considered equivalents for substitution. Barriers to coverage and access, such as managed care organization tier classification, medication copay, and socioeconomic status of specific patients, need to be examined more closely and addressed. Education in the proper use of epinephrine autoinjectors, including regular checking of medication expiration dates, is critical for proper management of anaphylaxis and minimizing the costs of anaphylactic events. Managed care organizations can play a role in educational initiatives. PMID:24384137

  9. Chlorhexidine: an unrecognised cause of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Odedra, Katy Mara; Farooque, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Chlorhexidine is a highly effective antiseptic and disinfectant. In the past 20 years there has been a substantial increase in the number of chlorhexidine containing products used in healthcare. Anaphylaxis to chlorhexidine was first reported in 1984 and was almost always seen in men. However, in the last 4 years we have observed a surge in confirmed cases of anaphylaxis to chlorhexidine, with increasing numbers of female patients recently diagnosed. Yet, awareness of chlorhexidine as a cause of anaphylaxis is low because it is not a drug but a 'hidden' allergen, for example as a coating on medical devices such as central lines and urinary catheters. Patients will often have more than one allergic/anaphylactic reaction before the diagnosis is suspected. We have observed that there is poor recognition of an initial allergic reaction to chlorhexidine, which is well described. This, alongside poor labelling of chlorhexidine containing products, has resulted in further inadvertent exposure resulting in severe anaphylaxis. Prompt referral to a specialist allergy centre ensures appropriate investigations, diagnosis and management. Increasing awareness of the potential risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis associated with chlorhexidine use is vital, particularly in perioperative procedures. Healthcare workers are fundamental in avoiding and preventing further reactions to chlorhexidine containing products in patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis to chlorhexidine. PMID:25352674

  10. Lipoic acid suppresses compound 48/80-induced anaphylaxis-like reaction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Ho; Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Choi, Su-Young; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), a naturally occurring dithiol compound, is an essential cofactor in metabolic reactions involved in energy utilization. LA improves glycemic control, reduces diabetic polyneuropathies, atherosclerosis, and allergic inflammation. The effects of LA on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions, however, are unknown. LA dose-dependently inhibited systemic and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reactions in mice induced by compound 48/80, a condensation product of N-methyl-p-methoxyphenethylamine and formaldehyde. Pretreatment with LA, prior to induction of the systemic anaphylaxis-like reaction with compound 48/80, reduced plasma histamine levels in a dose-dependent manner. In our in vitro study, LA decreased histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) triggered by compound 48/80. Moreover, an increase in calcium uptake activated by compound 48/80 was inhibited by LA. LA also significantly elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine-3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) levels in RPMCs. This inhibition of mediator release from RPMCs may be due to inhibition of calcium uptake and augmentation of intracellular cAMP levels. Based on these results, we suggest that LA may be a potential remedy for allergy-related diseases. PMID:21267406

  11. Occupational anaphylaxis--an EAACI task force consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, A; Folletti, I; Gerth van Wijk, R; Jeebhay, M F; Moscato, G; Quirce, S; Raulf, M; Ruëff, F; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Whitaker, P; Tarlo, S M

    2015-02-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction, potentially life-threatening that can be due to nonoccupational or, less commonly, to occupational triggers. Occupational anaphylaxis (OcAn) could be defined as anaphylaxis arising out of triggers and conditions attributable to a particular work environment. Hymenoptera stings and natural rubber latex are the commonest triggers of OcAn. Other triggers include food, medications, insect/mammal/snake bites, and chemicals. The underlying mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions due to occupational exposure are usually IgE-mediated and less frequently non-IgE-mediated allergy or nonallergic. Some aspects of work-related allergen exposure, such as route and frequency of exposure, type of allergens, and cofactors may explain the variability of symptoms in contrast to the nonoccupational setting. When assessing OcAn, both confirmation of the diagnosis of anaphylactic reaction and identification of the trigger are required. Prevention of further episodes is important and is based on removal from further exposure. Workers with a history of OcAn should immediately be provided with a written emergency management plan and an adrenaline auto-injector and educated to its use. Immunotherapy is recommended only for OcAn due to Hymenoptera stings. PMID:25369880

  12. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis. PMID:23454785

  13. Jackfruit anaphylaxis in a latex allergic patient.

    PubMed

    Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2015-03-01

    Several fruits have been reported to crossreact with latex antigen in latex allergy patients but little is known regarding tropical fruits in particular. Here we report the case of a 34-year old nurse who developed anaphylaxis following the ingestion of dried jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus). The patient had a history of chronic eczema on both hands resulting from a regular wear of latex gloves. She and her family also had a history of atopy (allergic rhinitis and/or atopic dermatitis). The results of skin prick tests were positive for jackfruit, latex glove, kiwi and papaya, but the test was negative for banana. While we are reporting the first case of jackfruit anaphylaxis, further research needs to be conducted to identify the mechanisms underlying it. In particular, in-vitro studies need to be designed to understand if the anaphylaxis we describe is due to a cross reactivity between latex and jackfruit or a coincidence of allergy to these 2 antigens. PMID:25840636

  14. An unexpected cause of anaphylaxis: potato.

    PubMed

    Eke Gungor, H; Uytun, S; Murat Sahiner, U; Altuner Torun, Y

    2016-07-01

    Immediate reactions against contact to raw potato has been reported in adults with generally being in the form of an oral contact dermatitis or contact urticaria, but it may also manifest as rhinitis symptoms, wheezing or even anaphylaxis. Cooked or raw potato allergy has been rarely reported in children as some is being immediate and others being late reactions, and it usually results from ingestion. Herein, we report two cases with a background of allergic diseases developed anaphylaxis one with cooked potato and the other one with raw potato. PMID:27425172

  15. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kui Lea; Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hang-Rae; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  16. Knockout of the Trpc1 gene reveals that TRPC1 can promote recovery from anaphylaxis by negatively regulating mast-cell TNF-α production

    PubMed Central

    Medic, Nevenka; Desai, Avanti; Olivera, Ana; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Beaven, Michael A.; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell (MC) degranulation is the critical early event in the induction of allergic reactions. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPC), particularly TRPC1, are thought to contribute to such MC activation. To explore the contribution of TRPC1 in MC-driven allergic reactions, we examined antigen-mediated anaphylaxis in Trpc1−/− and WT mice, and TRPC1 involvement in the activation of MCs derived from the bone marrow (BMMCs) of these mice. In vivo, we observed a similar induction of passive systemic anaphylaxis in the Trpc1−/− mice compared to WT controls. Nevertheless, there was delayed recovery from this response in Trpc1−/− mice. Furthermore, contrary to expectations, Trpc1−/− BMMCs responded to antigen with enhanced calcium signalling but with little defect in degranulation or associated signalling. In contrast, antigen-mediated production of TNF-α, and other cytokines, was enhanced in the Trpc1−/− BMMCs, as were calcium-dependent events required for these responses. Additionally, circulating levels of TNF-α in response to antigen were preferentially elevated in the Trpc1−/− mice, and administration of an anti-TNF-α antibody blocked the delay in recovery from anaphylaxis in these mice. These data thus provide evidence that, in this model, TRPC1 promotes recovery from the anaphylactic response by repressing antigen-mediated TNF-α release from MCs. PMID:23489970

  17. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  18. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician’s role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25031541

  19. Anaphylaxis: How Do You Live with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Deena; Curtis, Ruth; Gold, Milton; Hardie, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the needs of families coping with life-threatening allergies in a child. Due to the scarcity of publications on the psychosocial dimensions of anaphylaxis, the authors draw on selected literature on family coping with chronic illness, asthma, and allergy to provide a conceptual context for the research and…

  20. Preparedness for Students and Staff with Anaphylaxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Patty; Baker, Dian; Belot, Carol; Edwards, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Background: Schools are responsible for handling life-threatening events due to a variety of conditions, including anaphylaxis. California is one of a few states that permits school districts to stock emergency epinephrine auto-injectors and to train unlicensed assistive personnel to administer epinephrine for a life-threatening event. We surveyed…

  1. Acridanone alkaloid in Baliospermum montanum--evaluation of its effect against anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pichairajan; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Pal, Bikas C

    2011-11-01

    Baliospermum montanum leaves yielded 3-hydroxy-2,4-dimethoxy-10-methyl-9-acridanone (1), an alkaloid from the CHCl₃ fraction. Spectroscopic analysis was performed to assign the structure of the new compound (1) and its absolute configuration. The compound was evaluated for its effect in anaphylaxis by estimation of the release of histamine in systemic anaphylaxis model. The acridanone alkaloid significantly inhibited the degranulation of mast cells up to 65.22 % and 75.12 % at a dose of 50 and 75 mg/kg, respectively. PMID:21678235

  2. Predictors of the Severity and Serious Outcomes of Anaphylaxis in Korean Adults: A Multicenter Retrospective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Young-Min; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Tae-Bum; Sohn, Seong-Wook; Koh, Young-Il; Park, Hye-Kyung; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Hur, Gyu-Young; Kim, Joo-Hee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Choi, Gil-Soon; Lee, Soo-Keol

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in definitions of the condition, relevant triggers, and the geographical locations of study centers, cause estimates of the prevalence of anaphylaxis to vary. Recent epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of anaphylaxis is rising. Methods To investigate the causes and clinical features of anaphylaxis in Korean adults, factors associated with the severity of the condition, and serious outcomes, a retrospective medical record review was performed on adult patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2007 and 2011 in 15 University Hospitals of South Korea. Results A total of 1,806 cases (52% male, age 16-86 years) were reported. Cutaneous symptoms (84.0%), combined with respiratory (53.9%) and/or cardiovascular (55.4%) symptoms, were the most frequent presentations. Using a recognized grading system, 1,776 cases could be classified as either mild, 340; moderate, 690; or severe, 746. Although eliciting factors varied significantly by age, gender, and regional and seasonal factors, drugs (46.5%; including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and radiocontrast media) were the most common cause of anaphylaxis, followed by foods (24.2%), insect stings (16.4%), exercise (5.9%), and unknown etiology (7.0%). All of age, multi-organ involvement, a history of allergic disease, and drug-induced anaphylaxis, were significant predictors of serious outcomes requiring hospital admission or prolongation of hospital stay. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed for 7.4% of reported cases. Conclusions The principal causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adults were drugs, food, and insect stings. Drug-associated anaphylaxis, a history of allergic disease, multi-organ involvement, and older age, were identified as predictors of serious outcomes. PMID:25553259

  3. Anaphylaxis to honey in pollinosis to mugwort: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fuiano, N; Incorvaia, C; Riario-Sforza, G G; Casino, G

    2006-12-01

    A case of anaphylaxis to honey in a 19 year old female sensitized to Compositae pollen is described. The patient suffered from summer rhinoconjunctivitis since seven years; in January 2006, ten minutes after eating bread and honey she developed angioedema of the lips and tongue, runny nose, cough, dyspnoea, and collapse, requiring hospitalization and treatment with high dose corticosteroids and anti-histamines. After two weeks, skin prick tests (SPT) with a standard panel of inhalant allergens and prick + prick with a number of kinds of honey were performed. SPTs were positive to mugwort, ragweed, dandelion, and goldenrod. Concerning honey, the prick + prick was positive to "Millefiori" (obtained from bees foraging on Compositae) and also to sunflower, limetree, and gum tree honey, while was negative for other kinds of honey, including the frequently used chestnut honey and acacia honey. The allergenic component responsible of anaphylaxis in this case seems to be a molecule occurring in Compositae pollens, as previously reported for other three reports, but also in pollen from plants of different families. Honey contains a large number of components derived from bees, such as gland secretions and wax, as well as from substances related to their foraging activity, such flower nectar and pollens (1, 2). Honey as a food has been associated to allergic reactions and particularly to anaphylaxis (3-6). Among the pollens, the role of Compositae is somewhat controversial, since its responsibility is clear in some studies (3, 5, 6) but considered negligible in others (7). Here we present the case of a patient sensitized to Compositae pollen who had an anaphylactic reaction to the ingestion of honey obtained from bees foraging on Compositae flowers and was tested with a number of different varieties of honey. PMID:17274522

  4. Epicutaneous sensitization results in IgE-dependent intestinal mast cell expansion and food anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikas, Lisa M.; Gurish, Michael F.; Burton, Oliver T.; Leisten, Sabine; Janssen, Erin; Oettgen, Hans C.; Beaupré, Jacqueline; Lewis, Christopher N.; Austen, K. Frank; Schulte, Stephanie; Hornick, Jason L.; Geha, Raif S.; Oyoshi, Michiko K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensitization to food antigen may occur through cutaneous exposure. Objective Test the hypothesis that epicutaneous (EC) sensitization with food antigen predisposes to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis upon oral allergen challenge. Methods BALB/c mice were EC sensitized by repeated application of ovalbumin (OVA) to tape-stripped skin over 7 weeks, or orally immunized with OVA and cholera toxin (CT) weekly for 8 weeks, then orally challenged with OVA. Body temperature was monitored and serum mouse mast cell protease 1 (mMCP-1) level was determined following challenge. Tissue mast cells (MCs) were examined by chloroacetate esterase (CAE) staining. Serum OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies, and cytokines in supernatants of OVA-stimulated splenocytes, were measured by ELISA. Serum interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels were measured using an in vivo cytokine capture assay (IVCCA). Results EC sensitized mice exhibited expansion of connective tissue MC in the jejunum, increased serum IL-4 levels, and systemic anaphylaxis following oral challenge, as evidenced by decreased body temperature and increased serum mMCP-1 level. Intestinal MC expansion and anaphylaxis were IgE-dependent, as they did not occur in EC sensitized IgE−/− mice. Mice orally immunized with OVA+CT failed to increase serum IL-4 levels, expand their intestinal MCs, or develop anaphylaxis following oral challenge, despite OVA-specific IgE levels and splenocyte cytokine production in response to OVA stimulation, which were comparable to those of EC sensitized mice. Conclusion EC sensitized mice, but not mice orally immunized with antigen+CT, develop expansion of intestinal MCs and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis following single oral antigen challenge. IgE is necessary but not sufficient for food anaphylaxis, and MC expansion in the gut may play an important role in the development of anaphylaxis. Clinical Implications The skin may be an important route of sensitization to food antigens. Avoidance of cutaneous

  5. Amniotic fluid embolism induces uterine anaphylaxis and atony following cervical laceration.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Naoaki; Nagai, Hisashi; Maeda, Hidyuki; Kuroda, Ryo-hei; Nakajima, Makoto; Igarashi, Atsuko; Kanayama, Naohiro; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare, high-risk obstetric complication primarily found in the lungs and potentially related to anaphylaxis. Tryptase release from the mast cell reflects anaphylaxis. Case report and findings: A female, aged over 40 years, presented with uterine atony and lethal hemorrhage after induced vaginal labor. Cervical laceration was accompanied by severe hemorrhage. Stromal edema and myometrial swelling were consistent with uterine atony. Alcian blue staining and zinc coproporphyrin immunostaining disclosed AFE, which was more prominent in the uterus than in the lungs. Tryptase immunostaining was diffuse and prominent around the activated mast cells (halos) in the uterus, including the cervix. Similar distribution of findings on the AFE markers, tryptase halos, complement receptor C5aR, and atony in the uterus suggested the causality of AFE to anaphylaxis, complement activation and atony. It is probable that disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), induced by AFE, uterine atony and cervical laceration, caused the lethal hemorrhage. It is likely that AFE, in association with cervical laceration, induces uterine anaphylaxis, complement activation, atony, DIC and lethal hemorrhage. PMID:24925137

  6. Anaphylaxis treatment: current barriers to adrenaline auto-injector use.

    PubMed

    Song, T T; Worm, M; Lieberman, P

    2014-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening condition that is increasing in prevalence in the developed world. There is universal expert agreement that rapid intramuscular injection of adrenaline is life-saving and constitutes the first-line treatment of anaphylaxis. The unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis and its rapid progression makes necessary the availability of a portable emergency treatment suitable for self-administration. Thus, anaphylaxis treatment guidelines recommend that at-risk patients are provided with adrenaline auto-injectors (AAIs). Despite these clear recommendations, current emergency treatment of anaphylaxis continues to be inadequate in many cases. The aim of this review is to highlight the barriers that exist to the use and availability of AAIs and that prevent proper management of anaphylaxis. In addition, we review the characteristics of all AAIs that are presently available in Europe and the USA and discuss the need for regulatory requirements to establish the performance characteristics of these devices. PMID:24835773

  7. Anaphylaxis as a Manifestation of Horse Allergy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Allergic disease induced by animal exposure is a common phenomenon worldwide. Whereas cat and dog dander exposure are well recognized as causative of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and contact urticaria, horse allergy can present with anaphylaxis. Horse allergy is induced by exposure to the major horse allergens Equ 1 through 5. The severity of the symptoms may be related to the level of exposure. Greatest risk of anaphylaxis occurs in those sensitized patients who have large amounts of animal allergen exposure, such as when in a barn, or when an animal bite occurs exposing sensitized persons to large quantities of the animal allergen that resides in the saliva. Horse allergy may be successfully treated with allergen specific immunotherapy. PMID:23283110

  8. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  9. Bortezomib treatment diminishes hazelnut-induced intestinal anaphylaxis in mice.

    PubMed

    Mudnakudu Nagaraju, Kiran Kumar; Babina, Magda; Weise, Christin; Kühl, Anja; Schulzke, Joerg; Worm, Margitta

    2016-07-01

    Food allergy is a common health problem and can cause anaphylaxis. Avoidance of the offending food allergen is still the mainstay therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated the role of plasma cell reduction by proteasome inhibition in a murine model of food allergy and examined the impact of this treatment on the systemic and local immune response. For this purpose, intestinal anaphylaxis was induced in BALB/c mice with the food allergen hazelnut, in conjunction with different adjuvants (alum and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B SEB) and different administration routes (oral and intraperitoneal). In both models, allergy symptoms were observed, but the clinical severity was more pronounced in the hazelnut-alum model than in the hazelnut-SEB model. Accordingly, allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) against hazelnut was detectable, and mast cell protease-1 in serum was increased after allergen provocation. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib reduced plasma cells and resulted in an abolishment of hazelnut allergen-specific IgE, which was associated with amelioration of clinical symptoms as well as a significant decrease in both CD19(+) and follicular B lymphocytes. Our data demonstrate the importance of allergen-specific IgE in food allergy and point to B cells as potential therapeutic targets for its treatment. PMID:27111856

  10. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA. PMID:26943835

  11. Anaphylaxis: a one-year survey on Medical Emergency Service in Liguria (Italy).

    PubMed

    Ruffoni, S; Furgani, A; Schiavetti, I; Ciprandi, G

    2015-05-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical ground. This study aimed at evaluating the records of phone calls and medical visits for anaphylaxis occurred in Region Liguria during 2013. The phone call is managed in each headquarter, and classified according to a level of care intensity and a presumed level of criticality, according to established criteria. Criticality is then re-evaluated (detected criticality) at the end of medical visit, following the same score adding the black code defining died patients. Most of the phone calls (553) to the MES were recorded in summer (37.4%). Anaphylaxis was confirmed in about half of patients. There was a fair agreement between presumed and detected criticality (k=0.322, p<0.001). In addition, 530 patients (95.8%) were transported to Emergency Room. In conclusion, the present study shows that anaphylaxis represents a serious and relevant medical problem in the general population at any age, and should always be carefully managed. PMID:25951146

  12. Suspected Intraoperative Anaphylaxis to Gelatin Absorbable Hemostatic Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Joonyoung; Barrett, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylaxis under anesthesia is a life-threatening medical emergency that requires rapid identification and treatment. Allergies to agents with which the general population are likely to come into contact are usually identified, but patients are exposed to uncommon agents during anesthesia and surgery. Here, we describe a case of anaphylaxis under anesthesia implicating Gelfoam sponges. PMID:25849471

  13. What are the 'ideal' features of an adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injector in the treatment of anaphylaxis?

    PubMed

    Frew, A J

    2011-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction that often involves respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular collapse, which are potentially life-threatening if not treated promptly with intramuscular adrenaline. Owing to the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis and accidental exposure to allergens (such as peanuts and shellfish), patients should be prescribed intramuscular adrenaline auto-injectors and carry these with them at all times. Patients also need to be able to use their auto-injectors correctly while under high stress, when an anaphylactic attack occurs. Despite this, an alarming number of patients fail to carry their auto-injectors and many patients, carers of children with known anaphylaxis and healthcare professionals do not know how to use the device correctly, despite having had training. Currently available auto-injector devices have various limitations that may impede their use in the management of anaphylaxis. There is also a lack of validated assessment criteria and regulatory requirements for new devices. This review describes the different delivery systems used in currently available auto-injectors and discusses the key barriers to the use of adrenaline auto-injectors, with the goal of identifying the 'ideal' features/characteristics of such devices in the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis that will ensure ease of use, portability and accurate delivery of a life-saving drug. PMID:20716315

  14. A case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Young; Yang, Min-Suk; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of most abundant free amino acids in mammalian tissue. It has been used for various health functional foods as a main ingredient in food industry. A 33-year-old female patient repeatedly experienced generalized itching, urticaria, dyspnea and dizziness after drinking taurine-containing drinks. The patient showed positive response to oral challenge tests with taurine-containing drinks. The patient also showed positive response with synthetic taurine but not with natural taurine. Skin prick test and basophil activation test with the synthetic taurine were negative. To our knowledge, there has been no report of taurine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. We herein report the first case of taurine-containing drink induced anaphylaxis, especially by synthetic taurine. PMID:23404176

  15. Increased regional vascular albumin permeation in the rat during anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, W.; Chang, K.; Williamson, J.R.; Jakschik, B.A.

    1989-03-15

    The changes in vascular albumin permeation induced by systemic anaphylaxis were studied simultaneously in 21 different tissues of the same animal. Before Ag challenge sensitized rats were injected i.v. with 125I-albumin (test tracer), 51Cr-RBC (vascular space marker) and 57Co-EDTA (extravascular space marker). The index of vascular permeation used was the tissue to blood isotope ratio (tbir), which was obtained by dividing the ratio of 125I/51Cr counts in each tissue by the ratio of the same isotopes in the arterial blood sample. After Ag challenge, the increase in the tbir varied considerably among the different tissues. The most pronounced increase was noted in the lymph node (ninefold) followed by the aorta and mesentery (six- to sevenfold) and the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract (four- to sixfold). In the skin less than skeletal muscle less than lung less than liver and eye two- to fourfold increases occurred. Relatively minor increases in albumin permeation (less than twofold) were observed in the brain less than kidney less than heart and less than spleen. The testis was the only organ in which no significant change occurred. For some of the tissues there was also an increase in the tbir for 57Co/51Cr (an index of the extracellular fluid space) suggesting edema formation. The highest increase was noted in the aorta (fourfold). Minor increases occurred in the atrium of the heart, stomach, duodenum, and lymph nodes. There was also a 36% increase in hematocrit. Therefore, systemic anaphylaxis caused extensive extravasation of albumin and hemoconcentration.

  16. Patient's perspective and public policy regarding anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Furlong, Anne

    2004-01-01

    It is estimated that dose to 7 million Americans have food allergy. The incidence of food allergy, particularly peanut allergy, is believed to be on the rise. Several studies have shown that in spite of a patient's best efforts to avoid ingesting the allergy-causing food, reactions will occur. These reactions occur from incorrect ingredient information in food service or restaurant settings, incorrect product labels, or mistakes in label reading. In the hospital setting, patients are sometimes treated for an anaphylactic reaction in the emergency room but are not given instructions to see a specialist to determine the cause of their reaction, nor are they given a prescription for epinephrine to arm them to treat future allergic emergencies. Two studies of fatal and near fatal allergic reactions concluded that a delay in administration of epinephrine could have been a factor in the fatal outcomes. However, schools often do not have written emergency action plans in place for children with documented food allergy, and patients and caregivers often report not knowing when to use the epinephrine kit or how to use it. Until there is a cure for food allergy and anaphylaxis, avoidance of the allergen is key. There is much work to be done in education and public policy regarding anaphylaxis. PMID:15025404

  17. A review of perioperative anaphylaxis at a Singapore tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuanxuan; Thong, Sze Ying; Chong, Yong Yeow; Ng, Shin Yi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Perioperative anaphylaxis is an anaesthetic emergency, but its incidence is not well described in the local literature. This retrospective study aims to look at a group of patients who had perioperative anaphylaxis in our institution. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of electronic databases and clinical case sheets, and identified 34 patients who had possible perioperative anaphylaxis during anaesthesia in our institution between 1 January 2007 and 30 April 2012. RESULTS After reviewing clinical and biochemical data, we found that 16 out of 151,876 patients who underwent surgery had confirmed perioperative anaphylaxis, an incidence of 1:10,000. Neuromuscular blockers were identified as the most common causative agent for perioperative anaphylaxis. The offending agent could not be identified in seven patients. CONCLUSION To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in Southeast Asia on the incidence of perioperative anaphylaxis. Having a preoperative history of allergy did not seem to predispose patients to the subsequent development of perioperative anaphylaxis. PMID:26996282

  18. Anaphylaxis: a history with emphasis on food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Stephen R.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Summary In the century since Paul Portier and Charles Richet described their landmark findings of severe fatal reactions in dogs re-exposed to venom after vaccination with sea anemone venom, treatment for anaphylaxis continues to evolve. The incidence of anaphylaxis continues to be difficult to measure. Underreporting due to patients not seeking medical care as well as failure to identify anaphylaxis affects our understanding of the magnitude of the disease. Treatment with intramuscular epinephrine continues to be the recommended first line therapy although studies indicate that education of both the patients and the medical community is needed. Adverse food reactions continue to be the leading cause of anaphylaxis presenting for emergency care. Current therapy for food-induced anaphylaxis is built on the foundation of strict dietary avoidance, rapid access to injectable epinephrine, and education to recognize signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Investigation into therapy with oral and sublingual immunotherapy as well as other modalities holds hope for improved treatment of food-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:21682750

  19. Anaphylaxis cases presenting to primary care paramedics in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Kimchi, Nofar; Clarke, Ann; Moisan, Jocelyn; Lachaine, Colette; La Vieille, Sebastien; Asai, Yuka; Joseph, Lawrence; Mill, Chris; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Data on anaphylaxis cases in pre-hospital settings is limited. As part of the Cross Canada Anaphylaxis Registry (C-CARE), we assessed anaphylaxis cases managed by paramedics in Outaouais, Quebec. A software program was developed to prospectively record demographic and clinical characteristics as well as management of cases meeting the definition of the anaphylaxis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were compared to assess factors associated with severity of reactions and epinephrine use. Among 33,788 ambulance calls of which 23,486 required transport, 104 anaphylaxis cases were identified (anaphylaxis rate of 0.31% [95%CI, 0.25%, 0.37%] among all ambulance calls and 0.44% [95%CI, 0.36%, 0.54%] among those requiring transport). The median age was 46.8 years and 41.3% were males. The common triggers included food (32.7% [95%CI, 24.0%, 42.7%]), drugs (24.0% [16.4%, 33.6%]), and venom (17.3% [10.8%, 26.2%]). Among all reactions, 37.5% (95%CI, 28.4%, 47.6%) were severe. Epinephrine was not administered in 35.6% (95%CI, 26.6%, 45.6%) of all cases. Males were more likely to have severe reactions (Odds ratio [OR]: 2.50 [95%CI, 1.03, 6.01]). Venom-induced reactions and severe anaphylaxis were more likely to be managed with epinephrine (OR: 6.9 [95%CI, 1.3, 35.3] and 4.2 [95%CI, 1.5, 12.0], respectively). This is the first prospective study evaluating anaphylaxis managed by paramedics. Anaphylaxis accounts for a substantial proportion of the cases managed by paramedics in Outaouais, Quebec and exceeds prior reports of the proportion of Quebec emergency room visits attributed to anaphylaxis. Although guidelines recommend prompt use of epinephrine for all cases of anaphylaxis, more than a third of cases did not receive epinephrine. It is crucial to develop educational programs targeting paramedics to promote the use of epinephrine in all cases of anaphylaxis regardless of the specific trigger. PMID:26734462

  20. Severe anaphylaxis to Propofol: first case of evidence of sensitization to soy oil.

    PubMed

    Richard, C; Beaudouin, E; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kohler, C; Nguyen-Grosjean, V M; Jacquenet, S

    2016-05-01

    The growing worldwide prevalence of food allergies is drawing attention to the risk of allergenic proteins found in intravenous medicinal products, particularly anaesthetics. Propofol induced anaphylaxis has been described. The presence of soybean oil and egg lecithins in the lipid emulsion highlights their suspected responsibility in certain cases. We report a case of anaphylaxis to propofol in an adult patient without food allergy to soy, but with a latent sensitization to soy. An IgE-dependent allergy to propofol was established by a basophil activation test. Here, we document for the first time the existence of specific IgEs to a 65kDa protein, found in soybean oil and soy flour. In the absence of data on the reactogenic threshold for allergenic food proteins injected intravenously, a risk appears to be established and leads us to recommend a systematic detection for proteins in the refined soybean oil used in the pharmaceutical industry for intravenous products. PMID:27152608

  1. Evaluation of the antigenicity of hydrolyzed cow's milk protein formulas using the mouse basophil activation test.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Takeshi; Nakazato, Yuki; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas are widely used for infants with cow's milk allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the mouse basophil activation test (BAT) in the evaluation of residual antigenicity in these formulas. Whole blood samples derived from β-lactoglobulin- or casein-immunized mice were incubated with one of the following formulas: conventional, partially hydrolyzed, or extensively hydrolyzed. Basophilic activation was analyzed by flow cytometry using an IgE-dependent activation marker CD200R1 and an IgG-dependent activation marker CD200R3. Systemic anaphylaxis was induced by i.v. injection of milk formula and results were compared. Conventional formula induced pronounced changes in CD200R1 and CD200R3 expression on basophils, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not elicit any changes in these markers. Similarly, challenge with conventional formula induced anaphylaxis, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not induce anaphylaxis. Although the partially hydrolyzed formula also induced basophilic activation and systemic anaphylaxis, the magnitude of these effects was smaller than that observed with the conventional formula. Compared to CD200R1, the observed trend in CD200R3 expression resembled the results obtained from systemic anaphylaxis test more closely. These findings show that mouse BAT, in particular using CD200R3, is highly useful for the evaluation of antigenicity of milk formulas. PMID:26626100

  2. Anaphylaxis treatment: ergonomics of epinephrine autoinjector design.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Jack T

    2014-01-01

    Epinephrine administration is a critical component of individualized emergency action plans for patients at risk for anaphylaxis. Fundamental ergonomic principles can be used to facilitate rapid and effective use of an epinephrine autoinjector when appropriate. Specific patient characteristics, including age and strength, that impact physical and cognitive capabilities, should be considered when choosing an epinephrine autoinjector. Considerations in the optimal functioning of an autoinjector include the device being portable, identifiable, safe, and effective. Size, shape, coloring, and labeling of the device all contribute to the device being portable and identifiable. Trigger-lock features, designs resistant to physical perturbations, and safety technology to prevent injury after use contribute to safety and reliability. Optimal grip designs, tailored in size and/or shape to specific patient types, contribute to reliability and effectiveness. After selection of the most appropriate autoinjector, hands-on training, practice, and drills should be implemented. PMID:24384133

  3. Long-term Effectiveness of Online Anaphylaxis Education for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Sandra; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Loh, Richard; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of an Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) anaphylaxis e-learning program compared to lectures or no training. Design. A controlled interrupted-time-series study of Australian pharmacists and pharmacy students who completed ASCIA anaphylaxis e-learning or lecture programs was conducted during 2011-2013. Effectiveness was measured using a validated test administered pretraining, posttraining, and 3 and 7 months after training. Assessment. All learning groups performed significantly better on all posttests compared to the pretest, and compared to a control group (p<0.001). The proportion of e-learners achieving the minimum standard for anaphylaxis knowledge improved from 45% at pretest to 87% at 7 months. Conclusion. The ASCIA e-learning program significantly increased anaphylaxis knowledge. The high proportion of participants achieving the minimum standard at 7 months indicates long-term knowledge change. PMID:25258441

  4. Anaphylaxis to Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, LR; Subedi, A; Shah, BK

    2014-01-01

    Liposomal doxorubicin is used for the treatment of various cancers like epithelial ovarian cancers, multiple myeloma and sarcomas. We report the first case of anaphylaxis to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. PMID:25429486

  5. CLINICAL FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING SHOCK IN RADIOCONTRAST MEDIA INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Min; Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Ha, Sang Ook; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Kim, Won Young

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time interval between radiocontrast media (RCM) administration and the development of anaphylactic shock, and risk factors associated with RCM-induced anaphylactic shock. We reviewed the medical records of 154 patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Clinical features of RCM-induced anaphylaxis were analyzed, and patients were categorized into shock and non-shock groups to identify associated factors in affected patients. Of the 154 cases of RCM-induced anaphylaxis, 101 (65.9%) patients experienced shock. The median time between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was 11 min (interquartile range, 7.0-18.8). In patients with RCM-induced anaphylaxis accompanying shock, the median time from RCM to the first symptom onset was 6 min (interquartile range, 5.0-10.0). In the multivariate analysis, age, neurological manifestations, and allergy history except RCM were associated with the development of shock. RCM-induced anaphylaxis was commonly accompanied with shock, and the time interval between RCM exposure and the onset of shock was short. Physicians should pay attention to the development of potential cardiovascular collapse in anaphylaxis patients of old age and with neurologic manifestations. PMID:26506069

  6. Anaphylaxis in Israel: experience with 92 hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, V; Scheuerman, O; Marcus, N; Levy, Y; Segal, N; Lagovsky, I; Monselise, Y; Garty, B Z

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the courses, causes, and clinical features of anaphylaxis in children outside the USA and Europe. Our objective was to evaluate the events of anaphylaxis in children admitted to the Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, a major tertiary facility, over a 12-year period. Ninety-two children with anaphylaxis (50 boys, 42 girls) aged 14 days to 18 yr (mean, 7.4 yr) were hospitalized during the study period. The event occurred at home in 52 children (56%), in a medical institution in 24 (26%), outdoors in 13 (15%), at school in 2 (2%), and in an unspecified location in 1 (1%). The main causes were foods (43%), mainly milk and nuts, medications (22%), and hymenoptera venom (11%); in five children, anaphylaxis occurred during general anesthesia, and in 5, the causative agent could not be determined. Food-induced anaphylaxis tended to occur in younger children. Forty-eight children (52%) had a history of atopy (mainly asthma). Hospital treatment consisted of corticosteroids (85%), antihistamines (75%), epinephrine (72%), and β2 agonists (42%). Seven patients were admitted to intensive care units. There were no fatalities. EpiPen was used by only one of the 16 patients with more than one episode of anaphylaxis, indicating that patient and parent education in the application of the EpiPen needs to be improved. PMID:20536784

  7. Infection with influenza a virus leads to flu antigen-induced cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, Susanne M; Hahn, Christian; Wohlleben, Gisela; Teufel, Martin; Major, Tamas; Moll, Heidrun; Bröcker, Eva-B; Erb, Klaus J

    2002-04-01

    It is well established, that viral infections may trigger urticaria or allergic asthma; however, as viral infections induce T helper 1 polarized responses, which lead to the inhibition of T helper 2 cell development, the opposite would be plausible. We wanted to investigate how viral infections may mediate allergic symptoms in a mouse model; therefore, we infected BALB/C mice with influenza A virus intranasally. Histologic analyses of lung sections and bronchoalveolar lavages were performed. In addition, cells from the mediastinal lymph nodes were restimulated in vitro to analyze which types of cytokines were induced by the flu infection. Furthermore, flu-specific antibody titers were determined and local anaphylaxis was measured after rechallenge with flu antigen. We found that airways inflammation consisted predominately of macrophages and lymphocytes, whereas only a few eosinophils were observed. interferon-gamma but no interleukin-4 and little interleukin-5 could be detected in the culture supernatants from in vitro restimulated T cells from the draining lymph nodes. The antibody response was characterized by high levels of virus-specific IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG1 and, surprisingly, low levels of virus-specific IgE antibodies. Interestingly, flu-infected mice developed active and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis after rechallenge with flu-antigen. As the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction persisted over 48 h and was significantly lower after passive transfer of the serum, which was IgE depleted, local anaphylaxis seemed to be mediated predominately by specific IgE antibodies. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mice infected with flu virus develop virus-specific mast cell degranulation in the skin. Our results may also have implications for the pathogenesis of urticaria or other atopic disorders in humans. PMID:11918711

  8. Anaphylaxis to Polyethylene Glycol (Colyte®) in a Patient with Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Hee; Hwang, Sun Hyuk; Park, Jin Soo; Park, Hae Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-10-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are believed to be chemically inert agents, but larger PEG polymers could have immunogenicity. A 39-year-old man was referred to emergency room for loss of consciousness and dyspnea after taking of PEG-3350 (Colyte®). In laboratory findings, the initial serum tryptase level was increased to 91.9 mg/L (normal range: 0.00-11.40 mg/L) without any other laboratory abnormalities. The intradermal test with 10 mg/mL Colyte® showed a 5 × 5 mm wheal, but basophil activation and histamine releasability tests were negative. PEG-3350 is widely used as an osmotic laxative due to its lack of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the loss of mucosal integrity at gastrointestinal membrane such as diverticulitis may be a predisposing factor for anaphylaxis to Colyte®. We report a case of anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of PEG-3350 in a patient with diverticulitis which might be a risk factor of anaphylaxis. PMID:27550498

  9. [Anaphylaxis Due to Ingestion of Ivy Syrup (Hedera hÈlix). Report of two Cases].

    PubMed

    Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; Rosas-Alvarado, Alejandro; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Common ivy is an ornamental plant, that is ubiquitous in Mexico. Its allergens can cause contact dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis. We describe two cases of anaphylaxis related to common ivy syrup ingestion. We performed skin prick test with Hedera helix syrup, and using a dialized and ultrafiltered of common ivy syrup commercial presentation (dry common ivy extract: 7mg/ml), as well as using Hedera helix pollen extract. We describe two cases of anaphylaxis related to ingestion of Hedera helix syrup. Skin prick test with the commercial presentation and with the pollen extract were positive in both patients. In this study we confirmed the causal relationship of anaphylaxis due to the ingestion of ivy syrup in two patients through skin prick tests with ivy syrup and ivy pollen extract. Common ivy can cause contact dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis, but we do not know the allergens that could be related to systemic and respiratory reactions, then, more studies in this topic are requiered. PMID:24007931

  10. Epinephrine (adrenaline) in the first-aid, out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Simons, F Estelle R

    2004-01-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline), the initial treatment of choice for systemic anaphylaxis, is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist with bidirectional, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated pharmacological effects on target organs, and a narrow therapeutic index. In a recent study, 0.95% of a geographically-defined population was found to have had epinephrine dispensed for out-of-hospital use; dispensing rates within this population varied from 1.44% for individuals under age 17 years to 0.32% for those older than 65 years. Although epinephrine is widely available in the community, it is not necessarily given in a timely manner when anaphylaxis occurs. Individuals with anaphylaxis may fail to respond to first-aid treatment with epinephrine for a variety of reasons. These include: (1) delay in treatment (in an animal model, epinephrine injection at the nadir of shock fails to provide sustained haemodynamic recovery); (2) administration of epinephrine by sub-optimal routes such as subcutaneous injection or inhalation from a pressurized metered-dose inhaler instead of intramuscular injection; (3) administration of an inappropriately low epinephrine dose due to the limitations currently imposed by the availability of only two fixed-dose auto-injectors: EpiPen Jr 0.15 mg or EpiPen 0.3 mg; and (4) injection of 'outdated' epinephrine, with inadvertent administration of an inadequate dose. Additional fixed-dose formulations of epinephrine are needed to facilitate optimal first-aid dosing in patients of all ages and sizes. PMID:15025402

  11. Buckwheat anaphylaxis: an unusual allergen in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsung-Chi; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Wen, Da-Chin; Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to buckwheat is common in Korea, Japan, and some other Asian countries. However, buckwheat is not a common allergen in Taiwan. We report a woman with asthma who had anaphylactic shock, generalized urticaria, and an acute exacerbation of asthma five minutes after ingesting buckwheat. The patient underwent skin prick and Pharmacia CAP testing (Uppsala, Sweden) for specific IgE to buckwheat, white sesame and soybean as well as other common allergens in Taiwan including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), D. farinae (Df), cat and dog dander, cockroach, egg white, cow milk and codfish. The patient had a strongly positive skin prick test response to buckwheat and positive reactions to Dp and latex. Specific IgE results were class 6 for buckwheat, class 4 for Dp and Df, and class 2 for dog dander, wheat, sesame and soybean. Results of an open food challenge with white sesame and soybean were negative. Although buckwheat is a rare allergen in Taiwan, it can cause extremely serious reactions and should be considered in patients presenting with anaphylaxis after exposure to buckwheat. PMID:17136883

  12. 467 Clinical Case. Bee Venom Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Skin testing remains the principal confirmatory test for sensitization to hymenopteravenoms. Mechanisms on how venom induces vascular permeability in the skinfollowing intradermal testing are elucidated and how tolerance is induced followinghigh-dose venom exposure. For management, venom immunotherapy remains the mosteffective treatment. Use of immunotherapy in large local reactors to reduce morbidity is discussed. Baseline serum tryptase levels have been identified as one potential markerfor severe systemic reactions to a subsequent sting. Bee venom immunotherapy is effective in most patients immediately after the conventionalmaintenance dose has been reached. In the minority of patients who are not protected withthis dose, an increased maintenance dose will provide appropriate protection immediately after itis achieved usually by 3 to 6 months withstandarding protocols. Thus, the dosage of the maintenance dose seems to be the major factor affectingprotection from re-stings rather than the accumulated venom dose or the durationon the Maintenance Dose. A rush protocol would be recommendedif the patient's risk of being stung againbefore standard immunotherapy could work wereconsidered high. Although immunotherapy is oftenadministered by allergists, it may be deliveredby any practitioner who is willing to observe the patientand to treat anaphylaxis if it should occur. Methods A 17-year-old man reported being stung by a bee in his workplace. He had been stung several times before, with no clinical manifestations. This last time, he developed face edema, respiratory distress, dyspnea, vomiting recieveing treatment with hydrocortisone. Some time later, he was stung another time, presenting more severe symptoms including dyspnea, stridor, altered mental status, hives, so he was taken to a local clinic where he received epinephrine, dextrose, was hospitalized 4 hours until clinical remission. How should his case be managed subsequently? Results Intradermal test

  13. The etiology and incidence of anaphylaxis in Rochester, Minnesota: A report from the Rochester Epidemiology Project

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Wyatt W.; Campbell, Ronna L.; Manivannan, Veena; Luke, Anuradha; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Amy; Bellolio, M. Fernanda; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Stead, Latha G.; Li, James T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Reported incidences of anaphylaxis range from 3.2 to 20 per 100,000 population. The incidence and trend over time has meaningful public health implications but has not been well characterized because of a lack of a standard definition and deficiencies in reporting of events. Objective We sought to determine the incidence and cause of anaphylaxis over a 10-year period. Methods We performed a population-based incidence study that was conducted in Rochester, Minnesota, from 1990 through 2000. Anaphylaxis episodes were identified on the basis of symptoms and signs of mast cell and basophil mediator release plus mucocutaneous, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, or cardiovascular system involvement. Results Two hundred eleven cases of anaphylaxis were identified (55.9% in female subjects). The mean age was 29.3 years (SD, 18.2 years; range, 0.8–78.2 years). The overall age-and sex-adjusted incidence rate was 49.8 (95% CI, 45.0–54.5) per 100,000 person-years. Age-specific rates were highest for ages 0 to 19 years (70 per 100,000 person-years). Ingested foods accounted for 33.2% (70 cases), insect stings accounted for 18.5% (39 cases), medication accounted for 13.7% (29 cases), radiologic contrast agent accounted for 0.5% (1 case), “other” causes accounted for 9% (19 cases), and “unknown” causes accounted for 25.1% (53 cases). The “other” group included cats, latex, cleaning agents, environmental allergens, and exercise. There was an increase in the annual incidence rate during the study period from 46.9 per 100,000 persons in 1990 to 58.9 per 100,000 persons in 2000 (P = .03). Conclusion The overall incidence rate is 49.8 per 100,000 person-years, which is higher than previously reported. The annual incidence rate is also increasing. Food and insect stings continue to be major inciting agents for anaphylaxis. PMID:18992928

  14. [Morphine-induced Anaphylaxis before Induction of Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Arai, Takero; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe a case of anaphylaxia that occurred in a 67-year-old man. He was planned to have an operation on mitral valve prolapse (MVP) for mitral regurgitation (MR). Morphine 5 mg was injected intramusculaly 45 min before operation. Since then, he felt itchy sensation around his inguinal region. After he came to the operating room, he felt itchy sensation all over the body. Initially, his vatal signs were stable. We started to give extracellular fluid including ulinastatin 300,000 U, methylprednisolone 2 g, and ranitidine 50 mg. A few minutes later, he had nettle rash all over the body and his blood pressure decreased to 40/20 mmHg, and the heart rate increased to 120 beats x min(-1). Soon after, he had pulseless electric activity (PEA). We started chest compression and tracheal intubation. We injected adrenaline 1 mg. After doing the continuous chest compression for 2 min, he revived. He had continuous medications including dopamine 5 μg x kg(-1) x min(-1), dobutamine 5 μg x kg(-1) x min(-1), noradrenaline 0.05 μg x kg(-1) x min(-1). We cancelled the operation, and he was transfered to the high care unit (HCU), where his blood pressure was 120/65 mmHg, and heart rate 120 beats x min(-1). After 24 hours, we extubated his trachea. In this case, morphine was considered to be the most likely cause for anaphylaxis. PMID:27188106

  15. Early skin and challenge testing after rocuronium anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Schulberg, E M; Webb, A R; Kolawole, H

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of early skin and challenge testing in a patient following severe anaphylaxis to rocuronium. The patient presented for semi-elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and developed anaphylaxis with severe cardiovascular collapse after induction of anaesthesia. Surgery was cancelled but was considered necessary before the recommended four to six weeks for formal allergy testing. Limited skin and challenge testing was performed to rocuronium and cisatracurium while the patient was in the intensive care unit to identify a safe neuromuscular blocking drug for subsequent early surgery. The subsequent surgery, 48 hours after the initial reaction, was uneventful. The case highlights the difficulties when anaesthetising patients with recent anaphylaxis who have not yet had formal allergy testing and presents a potential management strategy involving early skin testing. PMID:27246945

  16. Severe allergic reaction: management of anaphylaxis in hospital.

    PubMed

    Jevon, Phil

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, hypersensitivity reaction that can lead to asphyxia, cardiovascular collapse and cardiac arrest. This reaction is sudden, severe, and involves the whole body. Common causes include foods such as nuts, shellfish, dairy products and eggs. Non-food causes include bee/wasp stings, latex and drugs, e.g. penicillin. Common clinical features include urticaria, angioedema, respiratory distress and shock. Summoning expert help, reclining the patient flat, administering high concentration oxygen, and administering intramuscular adrenaline are key aspects of the nursing management of anaphylaxis in hospital. The aim of this article is to understand the management of anaphylaxis in hospital, with particular reference to national consensus guidelines. PMID:18414282

  17. The Hidden Culprit: A Case of Repeated Anaphylaxis to Cremophor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Jin Hae; Kim, Hye In; Yune, Sehyo; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is a big pitfall in patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. We report a case of lung cancer patient who experienced two near-fatal anaphylactic reactions that resulted from paclitaxel and multivitamin, seperately. Recurrent severe reactions to different agents led to further investigation to which material the patient was hypersensitive. The skin prick test revealed sensitization to cremophor, which is a commonly used emulsifying agent. This case emphasizes the importance of correctly identifying the culprit drug of anaphylaxis to avoid potentially fatal reaction. PMID:26739412

  18. A Case of Immunoglobulin E Mediated Anaphylaxis to Levodropropizine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Yun, Il Seon; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a case of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated anaphylaxis to levodropropizine. The patient was an 18-year old Korean woman. After taking the common cold medication including acetaminophen, domperidone, and levodropropizine, skin rash, angioedema and anaphylaxis were developed immediately. As she was tolerable to acetaminophen alone, we thought the culprit agent was maybe a levodropropizine tablet. To confirm the culprit, she underwent skin prick test and oral drug provocation test with the suspected one. Finally we detected levodropropizine specific IgE and confirmed the specificity by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PMID:23225830

  19. Fatal and near-fatal anaphylaxis: factors that can worsen or contribute to fatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    Anaphylaxis implies a risk of death even in patients whose prior episodes have been considered mild and managed easily. Anaphylaxis occurs in all age groups, from infants to the elderly, but most deaths occur in adults. Factors or circumstances associated with near-fatal or fatal anaphylaxis are reviewed from the following 10 perspectives: accidents and mishaps, adulterated products, age, allergens, atopy, comorbidities, Munchausen syndrome or contrived anaphylaxis, patient factors, route of administration, and treatment-related issues. There are no absolute contraindications to self-injectable epinephrine, and epinephrine can be administered for anaphylaxis to elderly patients or to those patients receiving beta-adrenergic blockers. PMID:25841558

  20. Management of hymenoptera sting anaphylaxis: a preventive medicine survey.

    PubMed

    McDougle, L; Klein, G L; Hoehler, F K

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of aftercare instructions given to patients suffering from hymenoptera sting anaphylaxis was the objective of the study. Part of this evaluation included asking the physicians questions to examine the knowledge on which they based their aftercare instructions. Survey questionnaires were completed by 124 of 174 (71%) physicians who worked in an emergency department or urgent care center. Fifty-eight percent of the physicians never provided written avoidance instructions, 24% provided or prescribed anaphylaxis ID bracelets, 44% referred all of their patients to an allergist for further evaluation, and 73% reported prescribing an Epi-pen or Ana-kit to all hymenoptera sting anaphylaxis victims. Twenty-four percent of physicians did not know where to obtain anaphylaxis identification bracelets. This survey demonstrates that a substantial number of physicians practicing emergency medicine are not providing appropriate aftercare instructions to patients, and substantiates the need for educational efforts to increase the awareness of physicians concerning the implications of hymenoptera allergy and the value of proper preventive measures. PMID:7782631

  1. Munchausen Stridor-A Strong False Alarm of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is often based on reported symptoms which may not be accurate and lead to major psychosocial and financial impacts. We describe two adult patients who were diagnosed as having recurrent anaphylaxis witnessed by multiple physicians based on recurrent laryngeal symptoms. The claimed cause was foods in one and drugs in the other. We questioned the diagnosis because of absent documentation of objective findings to support anaphylaxis, and the symptoms occurred during skin testing though the test sites were not reactive. Our initial skin testing with placebos reproduced the symptoms without objective findings. Subsequent skin tests with the suspected allergens were negative yet reproduced the symptoms without objective findings. Disclosing the test results markedly displeased one patient but reassured the other who subsequently tolerated the suspected allergen. In conclusion, these 2 patients' symptoms and evaluation were not supportive of their initial diagnosis of recurrent anaphylaxis. The compatible diagnosis was Munchausen stridor which requires psychiatric evaluation and behavior modification, but often rejected by patients. PMID:25374759

  2. Munchausen stridor-a strong false alarm of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Bahna, Sami L; Oldham, Jennifer L

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is often based on reported symptoms which may not be accurate and lead to major psychosocial and financial impacts. We describe two adult patients who were diagnosed as having recurrent anaphylaxis witnessed by multiple physicians based on recurrent laryngeal symptoms. The claimed cause was foods in one and drugs in the other. We questioned the diagnosis because of absent documentation of objective findings to support anaphylaxis, and the symptoms occurred during skin testing though the test sites were not reactive. Our initial skin testing with placebos reproduced the symptoms without objective findings. Subsequent skin tests with the suspected allergens were negative yet reproduced the symptoms without objective findings. Disclosing the test results markedly displeased one patient but reassured the other who subsequently tolerated the suspected allergen. In conclusion, these 2 patients' symptoms and evaluation were not supportive of their initial diagnosis of recurrent anaphylaxis. The compatible diagnosis was Munchausen stridor which requires psychiatric evaluation and behavior modification, but often rejected by patients. PMID:25374759

  3. Improving Diagnostic Accuracy of Anaphylaxis in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Hjalti M.; Graffeo, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The identification and appropriate management of those at highest risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis remains a clinical enigma. The most widely used criteria for such patients were developed in a symposium convened by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. In this paper we review the current literature on the diagnosis of acute allergic reactions as well as atypical presentations that clinicians should recognize. Review of case series reveals significant variability in definition and approach to this common and potentially life-threatening condition. Series on fatal cases of anaphylaxis indicate that mucocutaneous signs and symptoms occur less frequently than in milder cases. Of biomarkers studied to aid in the work-up of possible anaphylaxis, drawing blood during the initial six hours of an acute reaction for analysis of serum tryptase has been recommended in atypical cases. This can provide valuable information when a definitive diagnosis cannot be made by history and physical exam. PMID:21293765

  4. Anaphylaxis to Patent Blue V: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Ania L.; Juneja, Rohit; Self, Robert; Farquhar-Smith, Paul; MacNeill, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Blue dyes such as Patent Blue V (PBV) have been used in medical procedures for decades, and in the United Kingdom they are routinely utilised in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for staging the axilla in early breast cancer. However, it has long been recognised that such dyes are associated with anaphylaxis. It has recently been estimated in a prospective study that allergy to PBV occurs with a frequency of 0.9%. Since repeated SLNB (and therefore further exposure to PBV) is increasingly being advocated for the small proportion of patients who develop a local (in-breast) recurrence, and because anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, it is important that those individuals that are allergic to PBV are recognised on their first medical exposure. The measurement of serum mast-cell tryptase (MCT) and skin prick test (SPT) are used in the investigation of suspected anaphylaxis because positive results are supportive of type-1 mediated hypersensitivity. Here we report the clinical features, MCT results and SPT results that pertain to a series of four patients referred to our drug allergy clinic with suspected anaphylaxis following SLNB. We recommend that all patients that show clinical evidence of allergy following exposure to PBV are referred to a specialist drug allergy service for further evaluation to investigate the cause. PMID:22348211

  5. Anaphylaxis challenges on the front line: perspectives from community medicine.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John R; Fromer, Leonard; Hayden, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    This report reflects a discussion from the multidisciplinary Partnership for Anaphylaxis Round Table meeting, held in November 2012, in Dallas, Texas. Community medicine participants included John R. Bennett, MD, an internist who practiced in Cumming, Georgia, and whose patients were adults; Leonard Fromer, MD, a family practitioner in Los Angeles, California, who was the medical director of a network of 600 medical groups, including pediatricians, internists, and family physicians, and who in his previous practice treated children and adults, many of them with severe allergies; and Mary Lou Hayden, MS, RN, FNP-BC, AE-C, a nurse practitioner who treated adults in a university employee health clinic and in an allergy clinic in Charlottesville, Virginia, and whose prior practice focused on allergy and immunology in children and adults. This discussion was moderated by Dr Bennett. Participants provided their perspectives as primary care providers (PCPs) concerning anaphylaxis, which has become a major public health concern. The rising prevalence of severe allergies and incidence of anaphylaxis and other severe allergic reactions among children and adults is shifting more care to PCPs. This discussion provides insights into challenges faced by PCPs in treating patients at risk for anaphylaxis in the community setting and provides potential solutions to those challenges. PMID:24384135

  6. An unusual case of anaphylaxis. Mold in pancake mix.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A T; Collins, K A

    2001-09-01

    Anaphylactic reactions involve contact with an antigen that evokes an immune reaction that is harmful. This type of reaction is a rapidly developing immunologic reaction termed a type I hypersensitivity reaction. The antigen complexes with an IgE antibody that is bound to mast cells and basophils in a previously sensitized individual. Upon re-exposure, vasoactive and spasmogenic substances are released that act on vessels and smooth muscle. The reaction can be local or systemic and may be fatal. The authors report the death of a 19-year-old white male who had a history of "multiple allergies," including pets, molds, and penicillin. One morning, he and his friends made pancakes with a packaged mix that had been opened and in the cabinet for approximately 2 years. The friends stopped eating the pancakes because they said that they tasted like "rubbing alcohol." The decedent continued to eat the pancakes and suddenly became short of breath. He was taken to a nearby clinic, where he became unresponsive and died. At autopsy, laryngeal edema and hyperinflated lungs with mucous plugging were identified. Microscopically, edema and numerous degranulating mast cells were identified in the larynx. The smaller airways contained mucus, and findings of chronic asthma were noted. Serum tryptase was elevated at 14.0 ng/ml. The pancake mix was analyzed and found to contain a total mold count of 700/g of mix as follows: Penicillium, Fusarium, Mucor, and Aspergillus. Witness statements indicate that the decedent ate two pancakes; thus he consumed an approximate mold count of 21,000. The decedent had a history of allergies to molds and penicillin, and thus was allergic to the molds in the pancake mix. The authors present this unusual case of anaphylaxis and a review of the literature. PMID:11563743

  7. Higher latitude and lower solar radiation influence on anaphylaxis in Chilean children

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Morales, Pamela S.; Cerda, Jaime; Talesnik, Eduardo; González, Gilberto; Camargo, Carlos A.; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an association between higher latitude, a proxy of vitamin D (VD) status, and allergic diseases. Chile provides an ideal setting to study this association due to its latitude span and high rates of VD deficiency in southern regions. The aim of this study is to explore the associations of latitude and solar radiation with anaphylaxis admission rates. Methods We reviewed anaphylaxis admissions in Chile’s hospital discharge database between 2001 and 2010 and investigated associations with latitude and solar radiation. Results 2316 anaphylaxis admissions were registered. Median age of patients was 41 years; 53% were female. National anaphylaxis admission rate was 1.41 per 100,000 persons per year. We observed a strong north-south increasing gradient of anaphylaxis admissions (β 0.04, P=0.01), with increasing rates south of latitude 34°S. A significant association was also observed between solar radiation and anaphylaxis admissions (β −0.11, P=0.009). Latitude was associated with food-induced (β 0.05, P=0.02), but not drug-induced (β −0.002, P=0.27), anaphylaxis. The association between latitude and food-induced anaphylaxis was significant in children (β 0.01, P=0.006), but not adults (β 0.003, P=0.16). Anaphylaxis admissions were not associated with regional sociodemographic factors like poverty, rurality, educational level, ethnicity, or physician density. Conclusions Anaphylaxis admission rates in Chile are highest at higher latitudes and lower solar radiation, used as proxies of VD status. The associations appear driven by food-induced anaphylaxis. Our data support a possible role of VD deficiency as an etiological factor in the high anaphylaxis admission rates found in southern Chile. PMID:24628618

  8. Fullerene carbon-70 derivatives dampen anaphylaxis and allergic asthma pathogenesis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Sarah Brooke

    Fullerenes are carbon nanospheres that can be solublized by the addition of polar chemical groups to the carbon cage, forming fullerene derivatives. One specifically derivatized fullerene compound, termed C 70-Tetragylocolate (C70-TGA), has been shown to stabilize mast cell responses in vitro thus we hypothesized it may have an effect on mast cell-driven diseases such as asthma and systemic anaphylaxis. To observe the effects of C70-TGA on systemic anaphylaxis, mice were subjected to a model of passive systemic anaphylaxis. In this model, mice were injected with DNP-specific IgE 16 hours prior to challenge, then treated with C 70-TGA. Immediately prior to DNP challenge, mice were subjected to a second injection of C70-TGA. Following DNP challenge, body temperature was recorded and blood was collected for quantitation of histamine levels. Treatment with C70-TGA significantly reduced body temperature drop associated with systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine levels. To observe the effects of C70-TGA on chronic features of asthma in vivo, we utilized a heavily MC influenced model of asthma pathogenesis. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ovalbumin (OVA) in saline, challenged intranasally (i.n.) with OVA, and one of two treatment strategies was pursued. In one, C70-TGA was given i.n. throughout disease development. In the other, C70-TGA was given following an initial set of challenges to allow disease to develop prior to treatment; mice were then re-challenged with OVA to assess the effect on established disease. We found that C70-TGA treatment significantly reduced airway inflammation and eosinophilia and dramatically reduced bronchoconstriction in either model. Cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and serum IgE levels are significantly reduced in C70-TGA treated animals. Interestingly, we also saw an increase in the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid 11, 12-epoxyeicosatreinoic acid (11,12-EET) in the BAL fluid, suggesting the involvement of this mediator in

  9. Alpha-gal anaphylaxis: the first case report in Italy.

    PubMed

    Calamari, A M; Poppa, M; Villalta, D; Pravettoni, V

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man who went into anaphylactic shock six hours after eating a meal containing meat. He reported having had several tick bites in months before the reaction. The serum specific IgE showed strong positivity to alpha-gal. This is clearly alpha-gal anaphylaxis with delayed onset after meat ingestion caused by tick bite, confirmed by alpha-gal IgE positivity. PMID:26357002

  10. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis related to specific foods.

    PubMed

    Tilles, S; Schocket, A; Milgrom, H

    1995-10-01

    We describe the case, documented by challenge results, of a 16-year-old girl with exercise-induced anaphylaxis associated with eating pizza and a cheese sandwich. Patients in whom a specific coprecipitating food has been identified should avoid it for at least 12 hours before exercise. All patients should be instructed to avoid eating 6 to 8 hours before exercise, discontinue exercise at the first sign of symptoms, and exercise only with a companion prepared to administer epinephrine. PMID:7562280

  11. Ranitidine-induced perioperative anaphylaxis: A rare occurrence and successful management

    PubMed Central

    Neema, Shekhar; Sen, Subrato; Chatterjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative anaphylaxis is a rare and catastrophic event. Anaphylaxis during perioperative period changes the entire management plan for the patient. Since a large number of drugs are administered to the patient during the short span of time, it becomes difficult to identify the culprit drug. This has an impact on the management of the patients who have to undergo surgery. Ranitidine is considered a safe drug used in perioperative period; however, rarely it can lead to perioperative anaphylaxis. We present one such case of ranitidine-induced perioperative anaphylaxis which was successfully managed by early diagnosis and avoidance of drug. PMID:27127327

  12. Ranitidine-induced perioperative anaphylaxis: A rare occurrence and successful management.

    PubMed

    Neema, Shekhar; Sen, Subrato; Chatterjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative anaphylaxis is a rare and catastrophic event. Anaphylaxis during perioperative period changes the entire management plan for the patient. Since a large number of drugs are administered to the patient during the short span of time, it becomes difficult to identify the culprit drug. This has an impact on the management of the patients who have to undergo surgery. Ranitidine is considered a safe drug used in perioperative period; however, rarely it can lead to perioperative anaphylaxis. We present one such case of ranitidine-induced perioperative anaphylaxis which was successfully managed by early diagnosis and avoidance of drug. PMID:27127327

  13. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: is wheat unique?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gabriel K; Krishna, Mamidipudi T

    2013-12-01

    This review draws comparisons between wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) and other food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAs) and discusses the importance of co-factors in its pathophysiology. FDEIA remains an enigmatic condition since it was first described 30 years ago. The sporadic and unpredictable nature of its reactions has puzzled clinicians and scientists for decades, but recent studies on WDEIA have enlightened us about the pathophysiology of this condition. The identification of defined allergic epitopes such as Tri a 19, α-gliadin, β-gliadin and γ-gliadin in WDEIA enables it to become the perfect model for studying FDEIA, but WDEIA is by no means a unique condition. On a larger scale, FDEIA represents a crucial link between IgE-mediated and anaphylactoid reactions and provides supportive evidence for the concept of 'summation anaphylaxis' and the need to overcome the 'allergen threshold'. Future work should focus on identifying more of the FDEIA epitopes and understanding their distinct molecular properties. The development of a biomarker in order to identify patients susceptible to co-factor influences would be invaluable. PMID:24127054

  14. Anaphylaxis in Latin America: a report of the online Latin American survey on anaphylaxis (OLASA)

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Dirceu; Ivancevich, Juan Carlos; Borges, Mario Sánchez; Coelho, Magna Adaci; Rosário, Nelson A; Ardusso, Ledit Ramón Francisco; Bernd, Luis Antônio Guerra

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the Online Latin American Survey of Anaphylaxis (OLASA) were to identify the main clinical manifestations, triggers, and treatments of severe allergic reactions in patients who were seen by allergists from July 2008 to June 2010 in 15 Latin American countries and Portugal (n = 634). RESULTS: Of all patients, 68.5% were older than 18 years, 41.6% were male, and 65.4% experienced the allergic reaction at home. The etiologic agent was identified in 87.4% of cases and predominantly consisted of drugs (31.2%), foods (23.3%), and insect stings (14.9%). The main symptom categories observed during the acute episodes were cutaneous (94.0%) and respiratory (79.0%). The majority of patients (71.6%) were treated initially by a physician (office/emergency room) within the first hour after the reaction occurred (60.2%), and 43.5% recovered in the first hour after treatment. Most patients were treated in an emergency setting, but only 37.3% received parenteral epinephrine alone or associated with other medication. However, 80.5% and 70.2% were treated with corticosteroids or antihistamines (alone or in association), respectively. A total of 12.9% of the patients underwent reanimation maneuvers, and 15.2% were hospitalized. Only 5.8% of the patients returned to the emergency room after discharge, with 21.7% returning in the first 6 hours after initial treatment. CONCLUSION: The main clinical manifestations of severe allergic reactions were cutaneous. The etiologic agents that were identified as causing these acute episodes differed according to age group. Following in order: drugs (31.2%), foods (23.3% and insect stings (14.9%) in adults with foods predominance in children. Treatment provided for acute anaphylactic reactions was not appropriate. It is necessary to improve educational programs in order to enhance the knowledge on this potentially fatal emergency. PMID:21808856

  15. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  16. Acute Onset of Vancomycin Anaphylaxis With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in an Orthopedic Patient Despite Prior Repeated Exposure.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brock; Roboubi, Babak; Henshaw, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic that exhibits bactericidal activity against gram-positive cocci. It is commonly recommended for surgical prophylaxis in cases of suspected bacterial resistance or penicillin allergy. There are 2 main types of hypersensitivity reactions associated with vancomycin. Red man syndrome is an anaphylactoid reaction caused by direct release of histamine. The second is an anaphylactic reaction, which is an immunoglobulin E-mediated response. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with a history of metastatic giant cell tumor of the right proximal tibia. She had undergone multiple surgeries for this and other nonorthopedic conditions. The patient received vancomycin for the majority of these procedures and extended courses of vancomycin on 2 separate occasions. In the present case, the patient was taken to the operating room for a prosthetic infection, and vancomycin was given after cultures were taken. The patient immediately developed signs consistent with anaphylaxis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This was treated acutely with hemodynamic resuscitation, replacement of blood components, steroids, and repeated boluses of epinephrine. She recovered and was taken back to the operating room during that same admission without incident. The patient has since been treated with systemic daptomycin and a tobramycin cement spacer without further incident. PMID:26665256

  17. World Allergy Organization Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ardusso, Ledit R. F.; Bilò, M. Beatrice; El-Gamal, Yehia M.; Ledford, Dennis K.; Ring, Johannes; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Senna, Gian Enrico; Sheikh, Aziz; Thong, Bernard Y.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The illustrated World Allergy Organization (WAO) Anaphylaxis Guidelines were created in response to absence of global guidelines for anaphylaxis. Uniquely, before they were developed, lack of worldwide availability of essentials for the diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis was documented. They incorporate contributions from more than 100 allergy/immunology specialists on 6 continents. Recommendations are based on the best evidence available, supported by references published to the end of December 2010. The Guidelines review patient risk factors for severe or fatal anaphylaxis, co-factors that amplify anaphylaxis, and anaphylaxis in vulnerable patients, including pregnant women, infants, the elderly, and those with cardiovascular disease. They focus on the supreme importance of making a prompt clinical diagnosis and on the basic initial treatment that is urgently needed and should be possible even in a low resource environment. This involves having a written emergency protocol and rehearsing it regularly; then, as soon as anaphylaxis is diagnosed, promptly and simultaneously calling for help, injecting epinephrine (adrenaline) intramuscularly, and placing the patient on the back or in a position of comfort with the lower extremities elevated. When indicated, additional critically important steps include administering supplemental oxygen and maintaining the airway, establishing intravenous access and giving fluid resuscitation, and initiating cardiopulmonary resuscitation with continuous chest compressions. Vital signs and cardiorespiratory status should be monitored frequently and regularly (preferably, continuously). The Guidelines briefly review management of anaphylaxis refractory to basic initial treatment. They also emphasize preparation of the patient for self-treatment of anaphylaxis recurrences in the community, confirmation of anaphylaxis triggers, and prevention of recurrences through trigger avoidance and immunomodulation. Novel strategies

  18. Oral food challenge to wheat: a near-fatal anaphylaxis and review of 93 food challenges in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat allergy is among the most common food allergy in children, but few publications are available assessing the risk of anaphylaxis due to wheat. Methods In this study, we report the case of near-fatal anaphylaxis to wheat in a patient undergoing an oral food challenge (OFC) after the ingestion of a low dose (256 mg) of wheat. Moreover, for the first time, we analyzed the risk of anaphylaxis during an OFC to wheat in 93 children, compared to other more commonly challenged foods such as milk, egg, peanuts, and soy in more than 1000 patients. Results This study, which includes a large number of OFCs to wheat, shows that wheat is an independent risk factor that is associated with anaphylaxis requiring epinephrine administration (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.4) and anaphylaxis requiring epinephrine administration to low dose antigen (OR = 8.02). Other risk factors for anaphylaxis, anaphylaxis requiring epinephrine administration, and anaphylaxis to low dose antigen was a history of a prior reaction not involving only the skin (OR = 1.8, 1.9 and 1.8 respectively). None of the clinical variables available prior to performing the OFC could predict which children among those undergoing OFCs to wheat would develop anaphylaxis or anaphylaxis for low dose antigen. Conclusion This study shows that wheat is an independent risk factor that is associated with anaphylaxis requiring epinephrine administration and anaphylaxis requiring epinephrine administration to low dose antigen. PMID:23965733

  19. A case of the first documented fire ant anaphylaxis in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first documented confirmed case of an imported fire ant causing anaphylaxis in Canada is herein reported. In a patient with anaphylaxis to ants a physician in Canada should be aware that an allergic reaction to fire ant is a possibility. PMID:23837799

  20. Recognition and Treatment of Anaphylaxis in the School Setting: The Essential Role of the School Nurse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoessler, Sally; White, Martha V.

    2013-01-01

    Since anaphylaxis is unpredictable, rapid in onset, and potentially life threatening, it is critical for school staff to recognize and respond to its symptoms quickly. The symptoms of anaphylaxis can be challenging to differentiate, particularly in school-age children who may have trouble explaining what they are experiencing. School staff must…

  1. Cashew nut allergy is associated with a high risk of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Davoren, M; Peake, J

    2005-10-01

    Cashew allergy is an evolving clinical problem. A retrospective chart review of 213 children with peanut or tree nut allergy was undertaken over a 42 month period. Anaphylaxis to cashew nut was more common than to peanut (74.1% v 30.5%). Children with cashew allergy are at risk of anaphylaxis. PMID:16177166

  2. Anaphylaxis Preparedness among Preschool Staff before and after an Educational Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ashley A.; Campbell, Ronna L.; Lee, Sangil; Anderson, Jana L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Children with severe food allergies may spend many hours in the preschool setting. Little is known about anaphylaxis recognition and management preparedness among preschool staff. The objective of this study was to assess anaphylaxis preparedness among preschool staff. Methods. Anonymous questionnaires were administered before and after a 40-minute educational seminar on anaphylaxis recognition and management. Results. In total, 181 individuals participated in the preintervention survey and 171 participated in the postintervention survey. The comfort level with recognizing anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector significantly increased after the intervention (P < .001 for both). Of the 5 steps needed to administer an epinephrine autoinjector, staff named a mean (SD) of 3 (1.3) steps in the correct order compared with 4.2 (1.1) steps after the educational intervention (P < .001). Conclusion. This study shows that a brief education intervention can significantly increase caregiver comfort regarding identifying anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector. PMID:26300926

  3. Anaphylaxis and asthma in a scrimshander due to deer bone dust.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R; Ganz, M A; Roberts, M

    1991-11-01

    A boilermaker who engraved deer bone (scrimshaw) as his artistic vocation developed recurrent anaphylaxis while scraping deer bones. These bones has been boiled in NaClO and dried, leaving residual NaOH and altered deer protein. He had recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis when exposed to the bone dust. The anaphylaxis appears to be the result of exposure of traumatized skin to NaOH and antigen with sufficient absorption of antigen to result in anaphylaxis, although inhalation may have been contributory. The most severe, near fatal episode of anaphylaxis may have been worsened by captopril. The patient's reaction by prick test to protein extracted in buffered saline from the deer bones boiled in NaClO and NaOH but not to natural deer protein suggested IgE antibody against deer protein altered by boiling in alkali. The scrimshander is now working with deer bone after prophylactic therapy and control of exposure. PMID:1958009

  4. Chloramine-induced anaphylaxis while showering: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sodium-N-chlorine-p-toluene sulfonamide, commonly known as chloramine-T, is a derivative of chlorine which is widely used as a disinfectant. For many years, chloramine-T has been described as a cause of immediate-type hypersensitivity, especially with regard to asthma and rhinitis, and as a cause of occupational dermatoses in cleaning personnel in hospitals, although no anaphylactic reaction has yet been reported. Hence, to the best of our knowledge we present the first case of anaphylaxis to chloramine-T with evidence of specific immunoglobulin E antibodies. Case presentation We describe the case of a 25-year-old Caucasian woman who was in good health and with a negative history for atopy, including no respiratory symptoms of rhinitis or asthma, and with no professional exposure to chloramine-T. She, while showering, applied a chloramine-T solution to a skin area with folliculitis on her leg, and within a few minutes developed generalized urticaria and angioedema, followed by vomiting and collapse with loss of consciousness. A skin prick test with a chloramine-T solution at 10mg/mL concentration was positive, and specific immunoglobulin E to chloramine-T was quantified at a value of 2.9 optical density as measured by the enzyme allergosorbent test technique. Conclusion The strict cause-effect relationship and the results of the skin test and the in vitro test make certain the causative role of chloramine-T in this case of anaphylaxis. This suggests that chloramine-T, based on its wide use as a disinfectant, should be considered a possible cause in anaphylaxis of unknown origin. PMID:23009577

  5. Anaphylaxis following intravenous paracetamol: the problem is the solution.

    PubMed

    Jain, S S; Green, S; Rose, M

    2015-11-01

    Paracetamol is a ubiquitous analgesic and antipyretic that is widely administered, including by anaesthetists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous paracetamol are particularly rare. We report two cases involving four separate episodes of anaphylaxis to intravenous paracetamol in different perioperative settings without a past history of intolerance to the oral form. The allergological investigations are described, during which it became evident that both patients were allergic to an excipient (mannitol) present in the formulation and that neither was allergic to the principal agent (paracetamol). The importance of referral and investigation of perioperative drug reactions is underscored by these two cases. PMID:26603804

  6. A Novel Model of IgE-Mediated Passive Pulmonary Anaphylaxis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Thaler, Eva; Blum, Sylvia; Lamb, David

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are central effector cells in allergic asthma and are augmented in the airways of asthma patients. Attenuating mast cell degranulation and with it the early asthmatic response is an important intervention point to inhibit bronchoconstriction, plasma exudation and tissue oedema formation. To validate the efficacy of novel pharmacological interventions, appropriate and practicable in vivo models reflecting mast cell-dependent mechanisms in the lung, are missing. Thus, we developed a novel model of passive pulmonary anaphylaxis in rats. Rats were passively sensitized by concurrent intratracheal and intradermal (ear) application of an anti-DNP IgE antibody. Intravenous application of the antigen, DNP-BSA in combination with Evans blue dye, led to mast cell degranulation in both tissues. Quantification of mast cell degranulation in the lung was determined by (1) mediator release into bronchoalveolar lavage, (2) extravasation of Evans blue dye into tracheal and bronchial lung tissue and (3) invasive measurement of antigen-induced bronchoconstriction. Quantification of mast cell degranulation in the ear was determined by extravasation of Evans blue dye into ear tissue. We pharmacologically validated our model using the SYK inhibitor Fostamatinib, the H1-receptor antagonist Desloratadine, the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist Formoterol. Fostamatinib was equally efficacious in lung and ear. Desloratadine effectively inhibited bronchoconstriction and ear vascular leakage, but was less effective against pulmonary vascular leakage, perhaps reflecting the differing roles for histamine receptor sub-types. DSCG attenuated both vascular leakage in the lung and bronchoconstriction, but with a very short duration of action. As an inhaled approach, Formoterol was more effective in the lung than in the ear. This model of passive pulmonary anaphylaxis provides a tissue relevant readout of early mast cell activity and

  7. A novel model of IgE-mediated passive pulmonary anaphylaxis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Thaler, Eva; Blum, Sylvia; Lamb, David

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are central effector cells in allergic asthma and are augmented in the airways of asthma patients. Attenuating mast cell degranulation and with it the early asthmatic response is an important intervention point to inhibit bronchoconstriction, plasma exudation and tissue oedema formation. To validate the efficacy of novel pharmacological interventions, appropriate and practicable in vivo models reflecting mast cell-dependent mechanisms in the lung, are missing. Thus, we developed a novel model of passive pulmonary anaphylaxis in rats. Rats were passively sensitized by concurrent intratracheal and intradermal (ear) application of an anti-DNP IgE antibody. Intravenous application of the antigen, DNP-BSA in combination with Evans blue dye, led to mast cell degranulation in both tissues. Quantification of mast cell degranulation in the lung was determined by (1) mediator release into bronchoalveolar lavage, (2) extravasation of Evans blue dye into tracheal and bronchial lung tissue and (3) invasive measurement of antigen-induced bronchoconstriction. Quantification of mast cell degranulation in the ear was determined by extravasation of Evans blue dye into ear tissue. We pharmacologically validated our model using the SYK inhibitor Fostamatinib, the H1-receptor antagonist Desloratadine, the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist Formoterol. Fostamatinib was equally efficacious in lung and ear. Desloratadine effectively inhibited bronchoconstriction and ear vascular leakage, but was less effective against pulmonary vascular leakage, perhaps reflecting the differing roles for histamine receptor sub-types. DSCG attenuated both vascular leakage in the lung and bronchoconstriction, but with a very short duration of action. As an inhaled approach, Formoterol was more effective in the lung than in the ear. This model of passive pulmonary anaphylaxis provides a tissue relevant readout of early mast cell activity and

  8. Why Do People Die of Anaphylaxis?—A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a source of anxiety for patients and healthcare providers. It is a medical emergency that presents with a broad array of symptoms and signs, many of which can be deceptively similar to other diseases such as myocardial infarction, asthma, or panic attacks. In addition to these diagnostic challenges, anaphylaxis presents management difficulties due to rapid onset and progression, lack of appropriate self-treatment education and implementation by patients, severity of the allergic response, exacerbating medications or concurrent disease, and unpredictability. The most common causes of anaphylaxis are food allergies, stinging insects and immunotherapy (allergy shots) but idiopathic anaphylaxis, latex allergy and drug hypersensitive all contribute to the epidemiology. Reactions to IVP and other dyes are coined anaphylactoid reactions but have identical pathophysiology and treatment, once the mast cell has been degranulated. As many antigens can be the trigger for fatal anaphylaxis, it is useful to examine the features of each etiology individually, highlighting factors common to all fatal anaphylaxis and some specific to certain etiologies. Generally what distinguishes a fatal from non fatal reaction is often just the rapidity to apply correct therapy. Prevention is clearly the key and should identify high-risk patients in an attempt to minimize the likely of a severe reaction. Although fatal anaphylaxis is rare, it is likely underreported. PMID:16584114

  9. The epidemiology of anaphylaxis in Europe: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is in the process of developing its Guideline for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis, and this systematic review is one of seven inter-linked evidence syntheses that are being undertaken in order to provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of the current evidence base in relation to epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and clinical management and impact on quality of life, which will be used to inform clinical recommendations. The aims of this systematic review will be to understand and describe the epidemiology of anaphylaxis, i.e. frequency, risk factors and outcomes of anaphylaxis, and describe how these characteristics vary by person, place and time. Methods A highly sensitive search strategy has been designed to retrieve all articles combining the concepts of anaphylaxis and epidemiology from electronic bibliographic databases. Discussion This review will aim to provide some estimates of the incidence and prevalence of anaphylaxis in Europe. The occurrence of anaphylaxis can have a profound effect on the quality of life of the sufferer and their family. Estimates of disease frequency will help us to ascertain the burden of anaphylaxis and provide useful comparators for management strategies. PMID:23537345

  10. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  11. Allergy and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, M; Patella, V; Staiano, R I; Granata, F; Marone, G

    2008-09-01

    The most dangerous and life-threatening manifestation of allergic diseases is anaphylaxis, a condition in which the cardiovascular system is responsible for the majority of clinical symptoms and for potentially fatal outcome. The heart is both a source and a target of chemical mediators released during allergic reactions. Mast cells are abundant in the human heart, where they are located predominantly around the adventitia of large coronary arteries and in close contact with the small intramural vessels. Cardiac mast cells can be activated by a variety of stimuli including allergens, complement factors, general anesthetics and muscle relaxants. Mediators released from immunologically activated human heart mast cells strongly influence ventricular function, cardiac rhythm and coronary artery tone. Histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes and platelet-activating factor (PAF) exert negative inotropic effects and induce myocardial depression that contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock. Moreover, cardiac mast cells release chymase and renin that activates the angiotensin system locally, which further induces arteriolar vasoconstriction. The number and density of cardiac mast cells is increased in patients with ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathies. This observation may help explain why these conditions are major risk factors for fatal anaphylaxis. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in cardiac mast cell activation may lead to an improvement in prevention and treatment of systemic anaphylaxis. PMID:18721322

  12. Use of alpha-agonists for management of anaphylaxis occurring under anaesthesia: case studies and review.

    PubMed

    Heytman, M; Rainbird, A

    2004-12-01

    Anaphylaxis is an uncommon but serious complication of anaesthesia. Most current guidelines for the management of anaphylaxis list only epinephrine as a vasopressor to use in the event of cardiovascular collapse. We present two cases of anaphylaxis under anaesthesia where return of spontaneous circulation was refractory to epinephrine, but occurred following the administration of the alpha-agonist metaraminol. Potential advantages and disadvantages of using epinephrine in this setting, the role of alpha-agonists and some potential mechanisms accounting for their role in successful management are reviewed. PMID:15549981

  13. Pharmacists’ response to anaphylaxis in the community (PRAC): a randomised, simulated patient study of pharmacist practice

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Sandra M; Delfante, Brock; de Klerk, Sarah; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how community pharmacists manage patients with anaphylaxis. Design A randomised, cross-sectional, simulated patient study of community pharmacist practice. Setting 300 metropolitan pharmacies located in Perth Australia, randomised to three groups of 100 pharmacies. Each group corresponded to a different epinephrine autoinjector: original EpiPen, new-look EpiPen or Anapen. Participants 300 pharmacies were visited with 271 simulated patient visits included in the final analysis (88=original EpiPen, 92=new-look EpiPen, 91=Anapen). Outcome measures Primary anaphylaxis preparedness (readiness to treat acute anaphylaxis). Secondary anaphylaxis engagement (willingness to engage the patient in a discussion about their anaphylaxis). Methods Simulated patients approached pharmacists, using a standardised scenario, for assistance with epinephrine autoinjector use and advice about the use of antihistamines in anaphylaxis. Scores for each outcome were obtained based on the number of predefined statements addressed by the pharmacist during the consultation (maximum score=5 for preparedness and 8 for engagement). Results The mean anaphylaxis preparedness score was 2.39 points (SD 1.17). Scores for new-look EpiPen were significantly higher than for original EpiPen and Anapen (2.75 vs 2.38 points, p=0.027; 2.75 vs 2.03 points, p<0.001, respectively). Overall, 17.3% of pharmacists correctly demonstrated the epinephrine autoinjector. The mean anaphylaxis engagement score was 3.11 points (SD 1.73). Scores for new-look EpiPen were similar to original EpiPen and Anapen (3.11 vs 3.32 points; 3.11 vs 2.90 points, both p=0.42). Engagement was associated with preparedness. For each additional engagement point, preparedness increased by 7% (0.357 points; 95% CI 0.291 to 0.424; p<0.001). Conclusions Pharmacists demonstrated reasonable knowledge of anaphylaxis symptoms and emergency care, but had poor epinephrine autoinjector technique and rarely discussed anaphylaxis

  14. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  15. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  16. Managing nut-induced anaphylaxis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Jeanne M; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergy in the USA has increased, especially in the pediatric population. Nut allergy remains the leading cause of fatal anaphylactic reactions. Management of anaphylaxis includes not only treatment of symptoms during a reaction, but strict dietary avoidance and education on potential situations, which may place the patient at high risk for accidental exposure. Cross-reactivity between various nuts along with various cross-contamination sources should be discussed with all nut-allergic individuals. Exciting research continues to emerge on other potential treatments for patients allergic to nuts, including allergen immunotherapy. Results of such interventions have been encouraging, though further studies are needed regarding safety and long-term outcomes before these can be applied to clinical practice. PMID:26604803

  17. Anaphylaxis caused by tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Eisuke; Shirai, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Rie; Mitsui, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Masami; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug, is widely used in the management of cough and is generally safe and well tolerated. We present here a case of anaphylaxis caused by this drug. When the patient had caught a cold over the previous 10 years, she had received medications, including tipepidine hibenzate, from her family doctor. However, this time, she developed dyspnea, skin eruption, and anaphylactic shock after taking a Chinese herbal medicine and this drug. After her conditions improved due to adequate treatment, she was referred to our hospital to confirm the causative drug. Double-blind placebo-controlled oral challenge tests were performed after obtaining informed consent. Oral challenge with one-third tablet dose of tipepidine hibenzate caused a positive reaction. Urinary leukotriene E4 rose during the challenge with tipepidine hibenzate, but not with control. Clinicians should keep in mind that common antitussive drug use can cause anaphylactic reactions in very rare cases and can be harmful. PMID:25802739

  18. Anaphylaxis caused by tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Eisuke; Shirai, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Rie; Mitsui, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Masami; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-03-01

    Tipepidine hibenzate, a central antitussive drug, is widely used in the management of cough and is generally safe and well tolerated. We present here a case of anaphylaxis caused by this drug. When the patient had caught a cold over the previous 10 years, she had received medications, including tipepidine hibenzate, from her family doctor. However, this time, she developed dyspnea, skin eruption, and anaphylactic shock after taking a Chinese herbal medicine and this drug. After her conditions improved due to adequate treatment, she was referred to our hospital to confirm the causative drug. Double-blind placebo-controlled oral challenge tests were performed after obtaining informed consent. Oral challenge with one-third tablet dose of tipepidine hibenzate caused a positive reaction. Urinary leukotriene E4 rose during the challenge with tipepidine hibenzate, but not with control. Clinicians should keep in mind that common antitussive drug use can cause anaphylactic reactions in very rare cases and can be harmful. PMID:25802739

  19. Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus

    PubMed Central

    Bhoite, Rahul Ramesh; Bhoite, Girija Ramesh; Bagdure, Dayanand N.; Bawaskar, Himmatrao S.

    2015-01-01

    Mesobuthus tamulus is an Indian red scorpion that is responsible for numerous cases of scorpion stings in the Indian subcontinent. Antivenin, vasodilators, and benzodiazepines are medications of choice in the treatment of scorpion bites. Adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis to antivenin have been infrequently described in the literature. We, herein, present a case of a 42-year-old man stung by Indian red scorpion while gardening at home in India, who presented with extreme pain at the sting site and signs of cardio-toxicity. He was treated with scorpion antivenin and vasodilators but developed anaphylaxis to antivenin. We discuss management strategies. Anaphylaxis to antivenin should be on the differential during management of scorpion bites because classical signs of anaphylaxis may be absent. PMID:26430342

  20. A 71-year-old man with anaphylaxis after eating grits

    PubMed Central

    Posthumus, Jonathon; Borish, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The allergist is frequently called on to evaluate patients after episodes of anaphylaxis to determine the cause and implement preventive measures that will reduce the patient’s risk from future episodes. The etiology of anaphylaxis can be the result of numerous causes that may go undiagnosed if a thorough evaluation is not performed. We present a 71-year-old man with no history of food allergy or atopy who presented to the emergency room and then our allergy clinic for evaluation after suffering anaphylaxis after a meal of grits and shrimp. The underlying diagnosis, which was subsequently determined, requires a high index of suspicion and should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with unexplained anaphylaxis. PMID:22370536

  1. Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus.

    PubMed

    Bhoite, Rahul Ramesh; Bhoite, Girija Ramesh; Bagdure, Dayanand N; Bawaskar, Himmatrao S

    2015-09-01

    Mesobuthus tamulus is an Indian red scorpion that is responsible for numerous cases of scorpion stings in the Indian subcontinent. Antivenin, vasodilators, and benzodiazepines are medications of choice in the treatment of scorpion bites. Adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis to antivenin have been infrequently described in the literature. We, herein, present a case of a 42-year-old man stung by Indian red scorpion while gardening at home in India, who presented with extreme pain at the sting site and signs of cardio-toxicity. He was treated with scorpion antivenin and vasodilators but developed anaphylaxis to antivenin. We discuss management strategies. Anaphylaxis to antivenin should be on the differential during management of scorpion bites because classical signs of anaphylaxis may be absent. PMID:26430342

  2. [Bupivacaine-induced Anaphylaxis in a Parturient Undergoing Cesarean Section].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Mitsuo; Tachibana, Kazuya; Mitsuda, Nobuaki; Kinouchi, Keiko

    2015-02-01

    We describe a case of anaphylaxis that occurred in a 33-year-old gravida 1, para 1 term woman scheduled for cesarean delivery for breech presentation. Her past history was unremarkable except for orciprenaline allergy. Spinal anesthesia was performed at L3-4 using 2.5 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.1 mg morphine. Seven minutes after spinal anesthesia, she complained of hoarseness and difficulty in breathing and 3 minutes later, blood pressure decreased to 76/51 mmHg, and oxygen saturation to 87% with supplemental oxygen. Skin flushing was noted in the face and trunk of the body and anaphylaxis was diagnosed. She was treated with a rapid intravenous infusion and iv administration of phenylephrine (total dose 0.4 mg), ephedrine (total dose 25 mg), hydrocortisone and famotidine. Cesarean section was started 23 minutes after spinal anesthesia when blood pressure and oxygen saturation recovered. A male infant was delivered (18 minutes after the onset of anaphylactic event) with Apgar scores of 2 and 5 at 1 and 5 min, respectively and resuscitated with mask ventilation. Umbilical artery blood gas analysis revealed pH 6.85, base excess -20.3 mmol x l (-1) and lactate 109 mg x dl (-1). The mother was discharged from the hospital on the 6th postoperative day. The baby's electroencephalogram, however, demonstrated a pattern consistent with mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Lymphocyte stimulation test revealed that she was allergic to bupivacaine. If maternal hypotension persists, i.m. or i.v. adrenaline should be administered immediately because maternal hypotension and hypoxemia may cause significant fetal morbidity and mortality and prompt cesarean section should be considered. PMID:26121818

  3. Anaphylaxis to muscle relaxants: rational for skin tests.

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kanny, G

    2002-09-01

    IgE-dependent allergy to muscle relaxants (MR) has an estimated prevalence of 1 out of 6500 General Anesthesias (GA). 62% of anaphylaxis during surgery are due to MR anaphylaxis. All the molecules are divalent, carrying two NH4+ epitopes (quaternary ammonium ions), either structurally or after rapid in vivo protonization (vecuronium). The excellent overall performance of skin test makes them the golden standard for the diagnosis of anaphylactoid reactions. Techniques include intradermal tests and prick-tests. The current localizations are the forearm and the back. Positivity criteria are 3 mm for prick-tests. For IDTs, the criterium is the doubling of the size of the injection papula, when 0.02 to 0.04 ml is injected: 8 mm. The recommended concentrations are not falsely negative. Commercial concentrations can be tested by prick tests, except for mivacurium and atracurium tested of 1:10 dilution. A scale of concentrations is advised for IDT starting with 1:10,000, up to a normally non reactive concentration that is: 100 micrograms/ml (succinylcholine), 200 micrograms/ml (gallamine), 10 micrograms/ml (atracurium), 2 micrograms/ml (mivacurium), 200 micrograms/ml (pancuronium), 400 micrograms/ml (vecuronium), 1,000 micrograms/ml (rocuronium), 200 micrograms/ml (cis atracurium). The specificity and sensitivity of the skin tests to MRs are greater than 95%. The reproducibility over years is 88%. The overall concordance of PT and IDR is 97%. Both types of tests can be used for the diagnosis. IDT have to be carried out for the search of the cross sensitization. 84% of patients do have cross sensitization to MRs but only 16% react to all MRs. The further use of MRs selected by negative IDTs has been proved to be safe. PMID:12389445

  4. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  5. Fifty-six-year-old man with anaphylaxis: A novel delayed food hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kendall D; Bell, Matthew C; Pesek, Robert D; Kennedy, Joshua L

    2015-11-01

    Anaphylaxis and urticaria are commonly seen in both primary care and allergy clinics. Foods, drugs, and insects are frequent culprits for immediate reactions; however, the trigger for recurring and/or chronic episodes is often unclear. We present a 56-year-old male with recurrent symptoms of urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylaxis found to be triggered by sensitization to galactose-alpha 1, 3-galactose (alpha-gal), a novel food allergen. PMID:26625604

  6. Anaphylaxis: guidelines from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Roberts, G; Worm, M; Bilò, M B; Brockow, K; Fernández Rivas, M; Santos, A F; Zolkipli, Z Q; Bellou, A; Beyer, K; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Cardona, V; Clark, A T; Demoly, P; Dubois, A E J; DunnGalvin, A; Eigenmann, P; Halken, S; Harada, L; Lack, G; Jutel, M; Niggemann, B; Ruëff, F; Timmermans, F; Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; Werfel, T; Dhami, S; Panesar, S; Akdis, C A; Sheikh, A

    2014-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a clinical emergency, and all healthcare professionals should be familiar with its recognition and acute and ongoing management. These guidelines have been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Taskforce on Anaphylaxis. They aim to provide evidence-based recommendations for the recognition, risk factor assessment, and the management of patients who are at risk of, are experiencing, or have experienced anaphylaxis. While the primary audience is allergists, these guidelines are also relevant to all other healthcare professionals. The development of these guidelines has been underpinned by two systematic reviews of the literature, both on the epidemiology and on clinical management of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening condition whose clinical diagnosis is based on recognition of a constellation of presenting features. First-line treatment for anaphylaxis is intramuscular adrenaline. Useful second-line interventions may include removing the trigger where possible, calling for help, correct positioning of the patient, high-flow oxygen, intravenous fluids, inhaled short-acting bronchodilators, and nebulized adrenaline. Discharge arrangements should involve an assessment of the risk of further reactions, a management plan with an anaphylaxis emergency action plan, and, where appropriate, prescribing an adrenaline auto-injector. If an adrenaline auto-injector is prescribed, education on when and how to use the device should be provided. Specialist follow-up is essential to investigate possible triggers, to perform a comprehensive risk assessment, and to prevent future episodes by developing personalized risk reduction strategies including, where possible, commencing allergen immunotherapy. Training for the patient and all caregivers is essential. There are still many gaps in the evidence base for anaphylaxis. PMID:24909803

  7. Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Serious tick-induced allergies comprise mammalian meat allergy following tick bites and tick anaphylaxis. Mammalian meat allergy is an emergent allergy, increasingly prevalent in tick-endemic areas of Australia and the United States, occurring worldwide where ticks are endemic. Sensitisation to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) has been shown to be the mechanism of allergic reaction in mammalian meat allergy following tick bite. Whilst other carbohydrate allergens have been identified, this allergen is unique amongst carbohydrate food allergens in provoking anaphylaxis. Treatment of mammalian meat anaphylaxis involves avoidance of mammalian meat and mammalian derived products in those who also react to gelatine and mammalian milks. Before initiating treatment with certain therapeutic agents (e.g., cetuximab, gelatine-containing substances), a careful assessment of the risk of anaphylaxis, including serological analysis for α-Gal specific-IgE, should be undertaken in any individual who works, lives, volunteers or recreates in a tick endemic area. Prevention of tick bites may ameliorate mammalian meat allergy. Tick anaphylaxis is rare in countries other than Australia. Tick anaphylaxis is secondarily preventable by prevention and appropriate management of tick bites. Analysis of tick removal techniques in tick anaphylaxis sufferers offers insights into primary prevention of both tick and mammalian meat anaphylaxis. Recognition of the association between mammalian meat allergy and tick bites has established a novel cause and effect relationship between an environmental exposure and subsequent development of a food allergy, directing us towards examining environmental exposures as provoking factors pivotal to the development of other food allergies and refocusing our attention upon causation of allergy in general. PMID:25653915

  8. First study of pattern of anaphylaxis in a large tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rashid; Rehan Khaliq, Agha M.; Al Otaibi, Talal; Al Hashim, Samia; Al Gazlan, Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that may cause death. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis have not been examined in the Saudi population before. Objective The present study examined the signs, symptoms, triggers, and demographic patterns of patients treated for anaphylaxis at a large tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods All the patients who were prescribed new prescriptions of adrenaline auto-injectors (AAs) between February 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 were included in this study. Information was collected using a standardized form. Results There were 238 patients who were analyzed. The median age at the time of first AA prescription was 15.5 years. Female to male ratio was 52:48 and 54% of the subjects were more than 18 years of age. There were some differences in the presenting signs and symptoms observed in our study compared with similar studies from around the world. Urticaria and angioedema were the most common at about 70% across all ages, followed by shortness of breath at 28%. Some triggers were found to be more common in our region. Food was the commonest trigger for anaphylaxis including tree nuts, egg, and sesame. Drug allergy was also a common trigger, with penicillins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs being the commonest. Regarding insect allergy, samsam ant was the commonest trigger in our study. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study on anaphylaxis in Saudi Arabia. Some of the manifestations of anaphylaxis are significantly different in our population study compared to previously published data from other parts of the world. While managing anaphylaxis, we should be mindful of these differences. This improved understanding should help reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with anaphylaxis in our region. PMID:26539404

  9. Systematic review of outcome measures in trials of pediatric anaphylaxis treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considerable heterogeneity has been observed in the selection and reporting of disease-specific pediatric outcome measures in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This makes interpretation of results and comparison across trials challenging. Outcome measures in pediatric anaphylaxis trials have never previously been systematically assessed. This systematic review (SR) identified and assessed outcome measures used in RCTs of anaphylaxis treatment in children. As a secondary objective, this SR assessed the evidence for current treatment modalities for anaphylaxis in the pediatric population. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and CINAHL from 2001 until December 2012. We also searched websites listing ongoing trials. We included randomized and controlled trials of anaphylaxis treatment in patients 0–18 years of age. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. Results No published studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Conclusions There is an alarming absence of RCTs evaluating the treatments for anaphylaxis in children. High quality studies are needed and are possible to design, despite the severe and acute nature of this condition. Consensus about the selection and validation of appropriate outcome measures will enhance the quality of research and improve the care of children with anaphylaxis. Trial registration CRD42012002685 PMID:24950840

  10. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  11. Effect of immunologic reactions on rat intestinal epithelium. Correlation of increased permeability to chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ovalbumin during acute inflammation and anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramage, J.K.; Stanisz, A.; Scicchitano, R.; Hunt, R.H.; Perdue, M.H.

    1988-06-01

    In these studies we compared jejunal permeability to two probes--chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) (mol wt, 360) and ovalbumin (mol wt, 45,000)--under control conditions, during acute intestinal inflammation, and in response to systemic anaphylaxis. Acute inflammation was produced after infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and rats were studied at day 0 (control), day 4 (early), day 10 (acute), and day 35 (postinfection). At the latter stage, immune rats were also studied during anaphylaxis induced by i.v. N. brasiliensis antigen. In each study, blood and urine were sampled over 5 h after the probes were simultaneously injected into ligated loops in anesthetized rats. In controls, small quantities (less than 0.04% and 0.002% of the administered dose for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively) appeared in the circulation and plateaued at 1 h. During acute inflammation, the appearance of both probes continued to increase with time. Compared with controls, 5-h values for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin were (a) significantly elevated at day 4 (p less than 0.005), (b) increased approximately 20-fold at day 10 (p less than 0.005 and less than 0.01, respectively), and (c) normal at day 35. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA followed the same pattern. During anaphylaxis, appearance of the probes in the circulation increased at 1 h to values approximately 10-fold those in controls (p less than 0.001 and less than 0.01, for 51Cr-EDTA and ovalbumin, respectively), and then declined. Urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA over 5 h was also significantly increased. We conclude that epithelial barrier function becomes impaired during both acute inflammation and anaphylaxis. In this rat model, gut permeability changes to 51Cr-EDTA reflect gut permeability changes to macromolecular antigens.

  12. Anaphylaxis in referred pediatric patients: demographic and clinical features, triggers, and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    De Swert, Liliane F A; Bullens, Dominique; Raes, Marc; Dermaux, Anna-Maria

    2008-11-01

    Anaphylaxis remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A better knowledge of patterns and triggers of anaphylaxis might contribute to a better management. In this study we evaluated the demographic and clinical features of anaphylaxis in pediatric patients, as well as its triggers and therapeutic approach. From May 1st 2004 until April 30th 2006 we prospectively collected data on all patients referred for investigation of anaphylaxis to the pediatric department of the University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven and to two private pediatric practices. Data were stored in a MYSQL database by use of an online encrypted web form. Sixty-four cases of anaphylaxis occurred in 48 children, aged 6 months to 14.8 years. Twenty-seven episodes (42.2%) occurred at home. The symptoms were dermatologic in 62 (96.9%) episodes, respiratory in 57 (89.1%), gastrointestinal in 19 (29.7%), cardiovascular in 14 (21.8%), and neurological or behavioural in 19 (29.7%). Antihistamines were administered in 41/57 (71.9%) cases, corticosteroids in 26/57 (45.6%), beta-2-mimetics in 14/57 (24.6%), and adrenaline in 11/57 (19.3%). Out of nine cases where Epipen was available at the moment of anaphylaxis, it was administered in one case only. Food was the cause of anaphylaxis in 42/55 (76.4%) cases with identified trigger, while medication, insect stings, latex, and birch pollen triggered 5 (9.1%), 4 (7.3%), 3 (5.5%), and 1 (1.8%) case(s), respectively. Allergy to the trigger was known prior to anaphylaxis in 19/55 (34.5%) cases. In conclusion, anaphylaxis in pediatric patients generally presents with dermatologic and respiratory symptoms, while in 1/5 episodes cardiovascular symptoms occur. Food is by far the most frequent trigger. Allergy to the trigger is known in 1/3 cases only. Anaphylaxis is under-treated, even when appropriate medication is available. PMID:18204859

  13. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  14. FORMATION OF SLOW-REACTING SUBSTANCE OF ANAPHYLAXIS IN HUMAN LUNG TISSUE AND CELLS BEFORE RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert A.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Goetzl, Edward J.; Austen, K. Frank

    1974-01-01

    The capacity to extract slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from human lung tissue or cells after immunologic activation, together with the measurement of SRS-A in both the extract and the surrounding fluid, permits study of total SRS-A generation. That the material extracted is SRS-A was established by both differential bioassay and purification. SRS-A accumulation was entirely intracellular after limited IgE-dependent direct or reversed anaphylactic activation. Intracellular accumulation also generally preceded release, with generation of SRS-A continuing well beyond a plateau in the cellular SRS-A level and the release of preformed mediators. The quantity of SRS-A generated after immunologic activation was modulated by the introduction of exogenous cyclic nucleotides, revealing a site of cyclic nucleotide action distinct from that on mediator release. The capacity to determine not only the release of preformed mediators but also the generation of a newly formed mediator, the sum of SRS-A in cells and supernate, adds an additional dimension to the analysis of the cellular events of immediate hypersensitivity. PMID:4378429

  15. [DRUG RELATED SYSTEMIC ANAPHYLAXES AND ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK].

    PubMed

    Diot-Junique, Nathalie; Mullet, Christine; Mertes, Paul-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a systemic immediate hypersensitivity reaction involving 2 or more organs. Symptoms occur in the minutes after the administration of a drug, a food or after hymenoptera sting and are the consequence of the activation of tissue mast cells and blood basophils which release histamine and other inflammatory mediatars. This chapter, written by allergo-anesthesists, concerns mostly, but not exclusively, per-anesthetic anaphylaxis, its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26619739

  16. Protective effect of relaxin in cardiac anaphylaxis: involvement of the nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Masini, E; Zagli, G; Ndisang, J F; Solazzo, M; Mannaioni, P F; Bani, D

    2002-01-01

    Relaxin (RLX) is a multifunctional hormone best known for its role in pregnancy and parturition, that has been also shown to influence coronary perfusion and mast cell activation through the generation of endogenous nitric oxide (NO). In this study we report on the effects of RLX on the biochemical and mechanical changes of ex vivo perfused hearts isolated from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs induced by challenge with the specific antigen. The possible involvement of NO in the RLX action has been also investigated. A 30-min perfusion with RLX (30 ng ml−1) before ovalbumin challenge fully abated the positive chronotropic and inotropic effects evoked by anaphylactic reaction to the antigen. RLX also blunted the short-term coronary constriction following to antigen challenge. Conversely, perfusion with chemically inactivated RLX had no effect. The release of histamine in the perfusate and the accumulation of calcium in heart tissue induced by antigen challenge were significantly decreased by RLX, while the amounts of nitrites in the perfusate were significantly increased, as were NO synthase activity and expression and cGMP levels in heart tissue. These findings indicate that RLX has a protective effect in cardiac anaphylaxis which involves an up-regulation of the NO biosynthetic pathway. PMID:12237253

  17. Anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria from eating Chinese bayberry fruit*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-ying; Gao, Zhong-shan; Yang, Zhao-wei; Shao, Jing-xin; Zhao, Xiu-zhen; Dai, Yu; Van Ree, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Chinese bayberry myrica rubra is a very popular fruit in southeastern China. In spite of its wide consumption, no allergies to this fruit have been reported previously. Here we report on a 40-year-old woman suffering from anaphylaxis to Chinese bayberry fruit. Prick-prick skin tests revealed strong reactions to fresh Chinese bayberry fruits as well as to peach, and weaker reactions to some other fruits including apple, melon, and banana. ImmunoCAP analysis revealed identical titers of specific IgE (4.3 kUA/L) to peach extract and its lipid transfer protein (LTP, rPru p 3), which was confirmed by detection of a 9 kD band following immunoblotting. Immunoblot analysis with Chinese bayberry extract gave bands of 22, 45, and 90 kD, but no 9 kD band was recognized. There was also no evidence of LTP recognition for loquat (36 kD) or melon (24 kD). This first report of a severe allergic reaction to Chinese bayberry fruit in a patient with LTP-mediated peach allergy indicates that other as yet unidentified non-pollen related fruit allergens are involved in this new severe fruit allergy. PMID:23024053

  18. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  19. A single glycan on IgE is indispensable for initiation of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Shade, Kai-Ting C; Platzer, Barbara; Washburn, Nathaniel; Mani, Vinidhra; Bartsch, Yannic C; Conroy, Michelle; Pagan, Jose D; Bosques, Carlos; Mempel, Thorsten R; Fiebiger, Edda; Anthony, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Immunoglobulin ε (IgE) antibodies are the primary mediators of allergic diseases, which affect more than 1 in 10 individuals worldwide. IgE specific for innocuous environmental antigens, or allergens, binds and sensitizes tissue-resident mast cells expressing the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI. Subsequent allergen exposure cross-links mast cell-bound IgE, resulting in the release of inflammatory mediators and initiation of the allergic cascade. It is well established that precise glycosylation patterns exert profound effects on the biological activity of IgG. However, the contribution of glycosylation to IgE biology is less clear. Here, we demonstrate an absolute requirement for IgE glycosylation in allergic reactions. The obligatory glycan was mapped to a single N-linked oligomannose structure in the constant domain 3 (Cε3) of IgE, at asparagine-394 (N394) in human IgE and N384 in mouse. Genetic disruption of the site or enzymatic removal of the oligomannose glycan altered IgE secondary structure and abrogated IgE binding to FcεRI, rendering IgE incapable of eliciting mast cell degranulation, thereby preventing anaphylaxis. These results underscore an unappreciated and essential requirement of glycosylation in IgE biology. PMID:25824821

  20. Survival after anaphylaxis induced by a bumblebee sting in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emily; Mandell, Deborah C; Waddell, Lori S

    2013-01-01

    A 3.5 yr old castrated male miniature schnauzer was referred with a history of collapse after a bee sting to the left hind limb. At the time of presentation, 14 hr after the sting, the dog was hypotensive, comatose, seizuring, and had a brief period of cardiac arrest. Over the following 48 hr, the dog developed azotemia, severely elevated liver enzyme levels, hypertension, hematochezia, hematemesis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The dog's neurologic status improved slowly, but significant behavioral abnormalities remained. The dog was discharged after 7 days with ongoing polyuria, polydipsia, and behavioral changes. The polydipsia and polyuria resolved within a few days, but the behavioral changes continued for 6 wk. Reports of anaphylaxis from any cause are sparse in the veterinary literature. This is the first report of suspected anaphylaxis following a bee sting. There are no previous reports of behavioral changes after physical recovery from anaphylaxis. PMID:23535750

  1. Pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis: an EAACI position statement.

    PubMed

    Ansley, L; Bonini, M; Delgado, L; Del Giacco, S; Du Toit, G; Khaitov, M; Kurowski, M; Hull, J H; Moreira, A; Robson-Ansley, P J

    2015-10-01

    This document is the result of a consensus on the mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn), an unpredictable and potentially fatal syndrome. A multidisciplinary panel of experts including exercise physiologists, allergists, lung physicians, paediatricians and a biostatistician reached the given consensus. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn) describes a rare and potentially fatal syndrome in which anaphylaxis occurs in conjunction with exercise. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying EIAn have not yet been elucidated although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. This review evaluates the validity of each of the popular theories in relation to exercise physiology and immunology. On the basis of this evidence, it is concluded that proposed mechanisms lack validity, and it is recommended that a global research network is developed with a common approach to the diagnosis and treatment of EIAn in order to gain sufficient power for scientific evaluation. PMID:26100553

  2. Late Onset Anaphylaxis in a Hydatid Cyst Case Presenting with Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Omur; Okoh, Alexis; Misirligil, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is still endemic in various regions of the world. It is the most frequent cause of liver cysts worldwide. Urticaria is sometimes the first manifestation of the disease. However anaphylactic reaction and urticaria have been very rarely reported in the literature. Traditionally, surgery has been the only accepted mode of treatment; however, percutaneous treatment has recently been proposed as an alternative. Cases of anaphylaxis have been reported after percutaneous drainage of hydatid cyst. However, anaphylaxis usually develops within a few hours. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who presented with hydatid cyst causing chronic urticaria and late anaphylactic reaction following percutaneous aspiration of a liver hydatid cyst. We emphasize that physicians should be aware of hydatid cyst as a possible etiology for seemingly chronic spontaneous urticaria, especially in endemic regions. Patients should be kept under observation for at least one day due to the risk of early and late anaphylaxis after percutaneous aspiration treatment. PMID:23956751

  3. Allergy evaluation after emergency treatment: anaphylaxis to the over-the-counter medication clobutinol.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva-B; Trautmann, Axel

    2007-03-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally diagnosed and treated as an acute emergency but should be always followed by a search for specific triggers, resulting in avoidance strategies. This case report highlights the relevance of a detailed evaluation after anaphylaxis for diagnosis of a rare but potentially life-threatening allergy. Considering the high frequency of clobutinol application, IgE-mediated allergic hypersensitivity seems extremely rare and has to be distinguished from infection-associated urticaria and angioedema as well as non-specific summation effects. Accidental re-exposure has to be strictly avoided and therefore after identification of clobutinol as the anaphylaxis trigger, the patient received detailed allergy documents including international non-proprietary and trade names of the culprit drug. PMID:17351213

  4. Allergy evaluation after emergency treatment: anaphylaxis to the over‐the‐counter medication clobutinol

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva‐B; Trautmann, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally diagnosed and treated as an acute emergency but should be always followed by a search for specific triggers, resulting in avoidance strategies. This case report highlights the relevance of a detailed evaluation after anaphylaxis for diagnosis of a rare but potentially life‐threatening allergy. Considering the high frequency of clobutinol application, IgE‐mediated allergic hypersensitivity seems extremely rare and has to be distinguished from infection‐associated urticaria and angioedema as well as non‐specific summation effects. Accidental re‐exposure has to be strictly avoided and therefore after identification of clobutinol as the anaphylaxis trigger, the patient received detailed allergy documents including international non‐proprietary and trade names of the culprit drug. PMID:17351213

  5. Serious Shortcomings in the Management of Children with Anaphylaxis in Scottish Schools

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Kirsty E; Sheikh, Aziz

    2006-01-01

    Background The United Kingdom incidence of anaphylaxis has increased very sharply over the last decade, with the highest rates of hospital admissions occurring in school-aged children. This raises concerns about the extent to which schools are aware of approaches to the prevention and treatment of anaphylaxis. Methods and Findings We undertook a national postal survey of 250 Scottish schools enquiring about approaches to managing children considered to be at risk of anaphylaxis. We obtained responses from 148 (60%) schools, 90 (61%) of which reported having at least one at risk child. Most (80%) schools with children considered to be at risk reported having personalised care plans and invariably reported having at least one member of staff trained in the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis. Access to adrenaline was available on-site in 97% of these schools. However, significantly fewer schools without children considered to be at risk reported having a trained member of staff (48%, p < 0.001), with access to adrenaline being very poor (12%, p < 0.001). Overall, 59% of respondents did not feel confident in their school's ability to respond in an emergency situation. Conclusions Most schools with children considered to be at risk of anaphylaxis report using personal care plans and having a member of staff trained in the use of, and with access to, adrenaline. The picture is, however, less encouraging in schools without known at risk children, both in relation to staff training and access to adrenaline. The majority of schools with at risk children have poorly developed strategies for preventing food-triggered anaphylaxis reactions. There is a need for detailed national guidelines for all schools, which the Scottish Executive must now ensure are developed and implemented. PMID:16933965

  6. Protracted anaphylaxis developed after peginterferon α-2a administration for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshiya; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Peginterferon is a key drug used to treat chronic viral hepatitis that is known for causing various side effects. Side effects occurring immediately after administration include headache, nausea, and influenza-like symptoms, such as fever and joint pain. However, reports of anaphylactic shock are extremely rare. Here we report a patient with protracted anaphylaxis who suffered shock symptoms after peginterferon α-2a administration for chronic hepatitis C. Although the patient improved temporarily with shock treatment, symptoms of anaphylaxis recurred. As peginterferon is often administered on an outpatient basis, it is important to recognize life-threatening side effects that may develop in a protracted manner. PMID:25759556

  7. Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with different culprit foods

    PubMed Central

    Mobayed, Hassan M.S.; Ali Al-Nesf, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is one of the severe allergic reactions in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating a specific food. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). We herein report the first two cases of FDEIA in the Middle East. The first one is induced by wheat, while the other by peanut. The pathophysiology, predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:24551018

  8. Beware of the caterpillar: Anaphylaxis to the spotted tussock moth caterpillar, Lophocampa maculata

    PubMed Central

    Sterbank, Julie; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a 5-year-old boy with presumed anaphylaxis to the caterpillar, Lophocampa maculata, manifesting as the acute development of diffuse urticaria and progressive dyspnea. This reaction required prompt treatment with antihistamines and a bronchodilator. Allergen scratch testing with a homogenized caterpillar extract suggests that immunoglobulin E–mediated type I hypersensitivity as the pathophysiological mechanism responsible for the boy's anaphylaxis. This case report represents the first documented occurrence of an anaphylactic reaction to Lophocampa maculata and adds to the rare incidence of documented hypersensitivity to the order Lepidoptera. PMID:24988176

  9. Beware of the caterpillar: Anaphylaxis to the spotted tussock moth caterpillar, Lophocampa maculata.

    PubMed

    DuGar, Brandon; Sterbank, Julie; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2014-07-01

    We present a case report of a 5-year-old boy with presumed anaphylaxis to the caterpillar, Lophocampa maculata, manifesting as the acute development of diffuse urticaria and progressive dyspnea. This reaction required prompt treatment with antihistamines and a bronchodilator. Allergen scratch testing with a homogenized caterpillar extract suggests that immunoglobulin E-mediated type I hypersensitivity as the pathophysiological mechanism responsible for the boy's anaphylaxis. This case report represents the first documented occurrence of an anaphylactic reaction to Lophocampa maculata and adds to the rare incidence of documented hypersensitivity to the order Lepidoptera. PMID:24988176

  10. Portable active interrogation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Brener, M. W.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

  11. Polydatin (PD) inhibits IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice by stabilizing mast cells through modulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Meichun; Li, Jianjie; Lv, Jingzhang; Mo, Xucheng; Yang, Chengbin; Chen, Xiangdong; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Jie

    2012-11-01

    Mast cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and are a promising target for therapeutic intervention in asthma. This study investigated the effects of polydatin (PD), a resveratrol glucoside, on mast cell degranulation upon cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), as well as the anti-allergic activity of PD in vivo. Herein, we demonstrated that PD treatment for 30 min suppressed FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, PD significantly decreased FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase in mast cells. The suppressive effects of PD on FcεRI-mediated Ca{sup 2+} increase were largely inhibited by using LaCl{sub 3} to block the Ca{sup 2+} release-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels (CRACs). Furthermore, PD significantly inhibited Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRACs evoked by thapsigargin (TG). Knocking down protein expression of Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of CRACs, significantly decreased PD suppression of FcεRI-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx and mast cell degranulation. In a mouse model of mast cell-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), in vivo PD administration suppressed mast cell degranulation and inhibited anaphylaxis. Taken together, our data indicate that PD stabilizes mast cells by suppressing FcεRI-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization mainly through inhibiting Ca{sup 2+} entry via CRACs, thus exerting a protective effect against PCA. -- Highlights: ► Polydatin can prevent the pathogenesis of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. ► Polydatin stabilizes mast cells by decreasing FcεRI-mediated degranulation. ► Polydatin suppresses Ca{sup 2+} entry through CRAC channels in mast cells.

  12. Management and treatment of anaphylaxis in children: still too low the rate of prescription and administration of intramuscular epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Calamelli, E; Mattana, F; Cipriani, F; Ricci, G

    2014-01-01

    Despite it being well known that anaphylaxis is a severe life-threatening reaction requiring prompt management and treatment, this entity is still under-recognized and not correctly managed, above all in children. The aim of this study was to analyze the most frequent features of anaphylaxis in a pediatric population (n=65 patients) and to identify factors predicting more severe reactions. Among the 70 recorded episodes, food was the main culprit of anaphylaxis, and patients with a positive history for allergic asthma had more severe episodes (P=0.008). A self-injectable adrenaline was used only in 2 of the 70 episodes and none of the 50 episodes managed in the Emergency Department was treated with intramuscular adrenaline. Only 10/65 patients (15%) had a prescription for an auto-injector prior to the first episode of anaphylaxis. The retrospective analysis of the risk factors potentially requiring an epinephrine auto-injector prescription before the first anaphylactic episode, showed that of the 55 patients without prescription, at least 10 (18%) should have been provided with a device, according to the most recent guidelines. In conclusion, notwithstanding intramuscular adrenaline being the first-line treatment of anaphylaxis, many episodes are still undertreated and the risk of anaphylaxis is still under-estimated. More efforts should be made to promote the correct management of anaphylaxis among both healthcare-providers and patients. PMID:25572739

  13. Allergy/Anaphylaxis Management in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharski, Susan; DeSisto, Marie; Pontius, Deborah; Sheets, Jodi; Richesin, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the safe and effective management of allergies and anaphylaxis in schools requires a collaborative, multidisciplinary team approach. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as the school nurse), is the leader in a comprehensive management approach…

  14. Exploring the link between pholcodine exposure and neuromuscular blocking agent anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Brusch, Anna M; Clarke, Russell C; Platt, Peter R; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are the most commonly implicated drugs in IgE-mediated anaphylaxis during anaesthesia that can lead to perioperative morbidity and mortality. The rate of NMBA anaphylaxis shows marked geographical variation in patients who have had no known prior exposure to NMBAs, suggesting that there may be external or environmental factors that contribute to the underlying aetiology and pathophysiology of reactions. Substituted ammonium ions are shared among NMBAs and are therefore thought to be the main allergenic determinant of this class of drugs. Substituted ammonium ions are found in a wide variety of chemical structures, including prescription medications, over-the-counter medications and common household chemicals, such as the quaternary ammonium disinfectants. Epidemiological studies have shown parallels in the consumption of pholcodine, a nonprescription antitussive drug which contains a tertiary ammonium ion, and the incidence of NMBA anaphylaxis. This link has prompted the withdrawal of pholcodine in some countries, with an ensuing fall in the observed rate of NMBA anaphylaxis. While such observations are compelling in their suggestion of a relationship between pholcodine exposure and NMBA hypersensitivity, important questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which pholcodine is able to sensitize against NMBAs and whether there are other, as yet unidentified, agents that can elicit similar hypersensitivity reactions. This review aims to explore the evidence linking pholcodine exposure to NMBA hypersensitivity and discuss the implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of these reactions. PMID:24251966

  15. Anaphylaxis presentations to an emergency department in Hong Kong: incidence and predictors of biphasic reactions.

    PubMed

    Smit, De Villiers; Cameron, Peter A; Rainer, Timothy H

    2005-05-01

    We describe the epidemiology, clinical features and management of anaphylaxis in a population in Hong Kong, including the features associated with progression to biphasic reactions and the nature of these reactions. A retrospective review was undertaken of patients of all age groups, presenting consecutively to the resuscitation room of a large Hong Kong emergency department with the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, from March 1999 to February 2003. There were 282 patients included. Median age was 28 years, with 59% male. A precipitant was identified in 89%, with 19% of patients claiming a known allergy to the precipitant. Seafood was responsible for 71% of all food-related reactions. More patients reacted to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rather than antibiotics. Cutaneous features were present in 79%, and 12% presented with hypotension. Ninety-five percent received H1 antagonist, and 67% received epinephrine. Biphasic reactions were reported in 15 (5.3%) cases with 20% of these patients having unstable vital signs. The mean time from treatment to onset of biphasic reaction was 8 h (range 1-23). Patients with respiratory features on initial presentation were less likely to develop biphasic reactions. It is concluded that prolonged observation of patients with anaphylaxis is important, because of the risk of biphasic reactions. Better education could prevent recurrent anaphylaxis. PMID:15837017

  16. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst with subsequent anaphylaxis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Benjamin; Abbara, Aula; Kadaba, Raghunandan; Sheth, Hemant; Sandhu, Gurjinder

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid cyst rupture into the abdomen is a serious complication of cystic hydatid disease of the liver (Cystic Echinococcosis) with an incidence of up to 16% in some series and can result in anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions in up to 12.5% of cases. At presentation, 36-40% of hydatid cysts have ruptured or become secondarily infected. Rupture can be microscopic or macroscopic and can be fatal without surgery. Hydatid disease of the liver is primarily caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus and occurs worldwide, with incidence of up to 200 per 100,000 in endemic areas. Our case describes a 24-year-old Bulgarian woman presenting with epigastric pain and evidence of anaphylaxis. Abdominal CT demonstrated a ruptured hydatid cyst in the left lobe of the liver. A partial left lobe hepatectomy, cholecystectomy, and peritoneal washout was performed with good effect. She was treated for anaphylaxis and received antihelminthic treatment with Albendazole and Praziquantel. She made a good recovery following surgery and medical treatment and was well on follow-up. Intraperitoneal rupture with anaphylaxis is a rare occurrence, and there do not seem to be any reported cases from UK centres prior to this. PMID:25431702

  17. Delayed Anaphylaxis to the flu vaccine unrelated to known non-viral components.

    PubMed

    David, J; Horbal, J; Tcheurekdjian, H; Sher, T H; Hostoffer, R

    2015-09-01

    On February 4, 2010 the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted for universal flu vaccination to expand protection against the flu throughout the United States. In addition to this administration expansion, six new influenza vaccines have been introduced into the market possibly introducing new allergenic potentials. We report two cases of delayed anaphylaxis to the flu vaccine. PMID:26357001

  18. Edible "bird's nest"-induced anaphylaxis: An under-recognized entity?

    PubMed

    Goh, D L; Chew, F T; Chua, K Y; Chay, O M; Lee, B W

    2000-08-01

    The Chinese delicacy "bird's nest" is the most common cause of food-induced anaphylaxis requiring hospitalization among Chinese children in Singapore. This investigation has established an immunoglobulin E-mediated cause and has characterized the major putative allergens. PMID:10931428

  19. Comparison of School Food Allergy Emergency Plans to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network's Standard Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jill; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Finnegan, Lorna

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-four percent of children with food allergies have a reaction in school, and 25% of first food reactions occur in schools. An evaluation was conducted comparing food allergy emergency plans to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network's (FAAN) Food Allergy Action Plan. Of the 94 respondents, 60 provided food allergy emergency plans for…

  20. Research to Practice: Developing an Integrated Anaphylaxis Education Curriculum for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Rebecca; Strickland, C. June

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of school-aged children with life-threatening allergies that cause anaphylaxis continues to increase. Many states, including Washington, have responded to this by developing specific guidelines for school districts to follow in order to provide a safe learning environment for children with medical conditions that put them at risk for…

  1. Food-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Related to Chickpea Ingestion and Review

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is recognized as a distinct category of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) but is very likely underdiagnosed. This report describes a 41-year-old Indian woman who experienced two separate episodes of anaphylaxis while dancing after she had eaten chickpea-containing foods. The chickpea, a small legume, is a staple ingredient in culinary traditions from around the world, especially in India, the Middle East, and North Africa. Chickpea-containing dishes are also becoming more widespread in the Western world with the growing popularity of South Asian, Middle Eastern, and African cuisines. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). Furthermore, no reaction occurs if a sensitized individual eats the culprit food(s) without exercising afterward; therefore, triggering foods can easily be overlooked. Current ideas on the pathophysiology, predisposing factors, workup, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:20525119

  2. The radiocontrast molecule in anaphylaxis: a surprising antigen.

    PubMed

    Lasser, Elliott C

    2004-01-01

    X-ray contrast media are individually injected into human blood vessels in greater quantities than any other pharmacological substance. Adverse reactions to these substances have heretofore been considered anaphylactoid in nature. Others and we have demonstrated that the mechanisms involved are multifactorial and may involve activation of mast cells and basophils, activation of the complement system, activation of the contact system, and the conversion of L-arginine into nitric oxide. Appropriate pretreatment with corticosteriods will diminish the incidence of reactions. Most recently we have demonstrated that the contrast media function as 'pseudoantigens' (PsA). They can combine with antibodies, but cannot themselves produce antibodies. This property appears to be dependent on aggregation in high concentrations and varies with the individual media. It furthermore appears to be non-specific in relation to antibodies, and suggests that binding occurs to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. We have now demonstrated that the least toxic of current media demonstrate the best antibody binding and in sufficient concentration can inhibit contrast induced mast cell activation and/or non-contrast antigen induced mast cell activation, apparently due to in vivo pseudoantigen excess. In lesser concentrations and/or lesser binding, the media can trigger mast cell activation. PMID:15025400

  3. Utility of rotational thromboelastometry for the diagnosis of asymptomatic hyperfibrinolysis secondary to anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Furukawa, Takashi; Imahase, Hisashi; Iwamura, Takashi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of hyperfibrinolysis induced by oxaliplatin-derived anaphylactic shock, which was diagnosed with rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). A 57-year-old male patient underwent a second course of oxaliplatin (126 mg/m/course)-based chemotherapy for stage IV metastatic rectal cancer. Two minutes after the infusion of oxaliplatin, the patient lost consciousness and developed generalized urticarial lesions, followed by hemodynamic instability and respiratory insufficiency. He was diagnosed anaphylactic shock and transported to emergency department (ED) after intramuscular injection of 0.2 mg of adrenaline, an intravenous injection of 100 mg of hydrocortisone, and 500 mg of methylprednisolone. After arriving in the ED, the patient remained in shock and early resuscitation with administration of 5 mg of D-chlorpheniramine maleate and 20 mg of famotidine was performed. He recovered from his state of shock 30 min after the resuscitation. ROTEM findings showed fulminant hyperfibrinolysis with minimal changes in standard coagulation tests (SCTs) and no remarkable coagulopathy. Seven hours after the attack, he became asymptomatic and follow-up ROTEM revealed values within normal limits with the exception of sustained slight abnormalities of SCTs. He was discharged the next day without any signs of spontaneous bleeding and has continued his outpatient chemotherapy uneventfully. A review of the literature on anaphylaxis-induced hyperfibrinolysis and a discussion of the mechanism between anaphylactic shock and hyperfibrinolysis were performed. Although administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator can play a vital role in anaphylactic shock-induced hyperfibrinolysis, early effective resuscitation is imperative to prevent severe hemorrhagic complications. Therefore, ROTEM is a useful tool that can detect these dynamic changes faster and more accurately than SCTs. PMID:26569513

  4. Characteristics of Anaphylaxis in 907 Chinese Patients Referred to a Tertiary Allergy Center: A Retrospective Study of 1,952 Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nannan; Wen, Liping; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Comprehensive evaluation of anaphylaxis in China is currently lacking. In this study, we characterized the clinical profiles, anaphylactic triggers, and emergency treatment in pediatric and adult patients. Methods Outpatients diagnosed with "anaphylaxis" or "severe allergic reactions" in the Department of Allergy, Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results A total of 1,952 episodes of anaphylaxis in 907 patients were analyzed (78% were adults and 22% were children). Foods are the most common cause (77%), followed by idiopathic etiologies (15%), medications (7%) and insects (0.6%). In food-induced anaphylaxis, 62% (13/21) of anaphylaxis in infants and young children (0-3 years of age) were triggered by milk, 59% (36/61) of anaphylaxis in children (4-9 years of age) were triggered by fruits/vegetables, while wheat was the cause of anaphylaxis in 20% (56/282) of teenagers (10-17 years of age) and 42% (429/1,016) in adults (18-50 years of age). Mugwort pollen sensitization was common in patients with anaphylaxis induced by spices, fruits/vegetables, legume/peanuts, and tree nuts/seeds, with the prevalence rates of 75%, 67%, 61%, and 51%, respectively. Thirty-six percent of drug-induced anaphylaxis was attributed to traditional Chinese Medicine. For patients receiving emergency care, only 25% of patients received epinephrine. Conclusions The present study showed that anaphylaxis appeared to occur more often in adults than in infants and children, which were in contrast to those found in other countries. In particular, wheat allergens played a prominent role in triggering food-induced anaphylaxis, followed by fruits/vegetables. Traditional Chinese medicine was a cause of drug-induced anaphylaxis. Furthermore, exercise was the most common factor aggravating anaphylaxis. Education regarding the more aggressive use of epinephrine in the emergency setting is clearly needed. PMID:27126729

  5. Anaphylaxis: incidence, presentation, causes and outcome in patients in a tertiary-care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, N.; Makda, A.; Mallick, A.S.; Ali Memon, M.; Hashmi, S.H.; Khan, U.R.; Razzak, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anaphylaxis is a potentially fatal condition requiring immediate resuscitation. Data regarding the epidemiology of anaphylaxis are limited and inconsistent. A reason for the variability was unavailability of a universally acceptable case definition till 2005. We reviewed cases using this new definition Aim: To review the incidence, clinical presentation, cause and outcome of anaphylaxis at a tertiary-care centre in a low-income country. Design: Retrospective, case series Methods: Chart review of all patients discharged from Aga Khan University Hospital between January 1988 and December 2012 (24 years) with anaphylaxis definition as per second National Institute of Allergy and Infection disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network Symposium Results: Total of 129 cases were found with mean age of 41.6 years (SD 18.8). Majority of patients had cutaneous features (76.7%), followed by respiratory (68.9%), cardiac (64.3%) and gastrointestinal (20.9%) symptoms, respectively. About 22.4% of patients had positive history for allergens out of which 31% (n = 9) were exposed to the same allergens. The common causes identified for anaphylaxis were drugs (60.5%), food (16.3%) and intravenous contrast (10.9%), respectively. Only 22.5% of cases received epinephrine as a part of their initial management. In four patients (3.1%) the cause of death was attributed to anaphylaxis. Conclusion: Anaphylaxis is a rare but life-threatening condition. Though cutaneous features are most common, their absence does not exclude the diagnosis. Drugs were the most common cause and epinephrine was not commonly used as first-line agent for its management. PMID:24082151

  6. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  7. Should adrenaline be used in patients with hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis? Incident case control study nested within a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Sheikh, Aziz; Bates, David W

    2016-01-01

    Although adrenaline (epinephrine) is a cornerstone of initial anaphylaxis treatment, it is not often used. We sought to assess whether use of adrenaline in hemodynamically stable patients with anaphylaxis could prevent the development of hypotension. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 761 adult patients with anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care hospital over a 10-year period. We divided the patients into two groups according to the occurrence of hypotension and compared demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatments and outcomes. Of the 340 patients with anaphylaxis who were normotensive at first presentation, 40 patients experienced hypotension during their ED stay. The ED stay of the hypotension group was significantly longer than that of patients who did not experience hypotension (496 min vs 253 min, P = 0.000). Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patient was independently associated with a lower risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension: OR, 0.254 [95% CI, 0.091-0.706]. Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patients was associated with a reduced risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension. Adverse events induced by adrenaline were rare when the intramuscular route was used. PMID:26837822

  8. The effect of two cognitive aid designs on team functioning during intra-operative anaphylaxis emergencies: a multi-centre simulation study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S D; Sanderson, P; McIntosh, C A; Kolawole, H

    2016-04-01

    This multi-centre repeated measures study was undertaken to determine how contrasting designs of cognitive aids affect team performance during simulated intra-operative anaphylaxis crises. A total of 24 teams consisting of a consultant anaesthetist, an anaesthetic trainee and anaesthetic assistant managed three simulated intra-operative anaphylaxis emergencies. Each team was assigned at random to a counterbalanced order of: no cognitive aid; a linear cognitive aid; and a branched cognitive aid, and scored for team functioning. Scores were significantly higher with a linear compared with either a branched version of the cognitive aid or no cognitive aid for 'Team Overall Behavioural Performance', difference between study groups (F-value) 5.8, p = 0.01. Aggregate scores were higher with the linear compared with the branched aid design (p = 0.03). Cognitive aids improve co-ordination of the team's activities and support team members to verbalise their actions. A linear design of cognitive aid improves team functioning more than a branched design. PMID:26792648

  9. Wheat-Induced Anaphylaxis in Korean Adults: A Report of 6 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Wheat is a common cause of food allergy. Wheat-induced anaphylaxis (WIA) and wheat-dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) are severe forms of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated allergic reaction to wheat protein. As the diagnosis of WIA or WDEIA is not easy because of the risk of oral challenge, identification of specific IgE of various wheat proteins is helpful for diagnosis. In Korea, there are only a few reports on WIA in adults. We report six cases of WIA diagnosed on the basis of clinical history and specific IgE of wheat proteins or provocation test. For immunologic evaluation of severe wheat allergy including WIA and WDEIA, it is important to measure specific IgE to each component of wheat including gluten and ω-5 gliadin not just measuring wheat-specific IgE. PMID:23429235

  10. Perceived history of anaphylaxis and parental overprotection, autonomy, anxiety, and depression in food allergic young adults.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda J; Dahlquist, Lynnda M

    2008-12-01

    This study examined autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior in 86 food allergic young adults and 344 healthy young adults between the ages of 18 and 22. Participants completed an online survey measuring self-reported autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior. Results indicated that, as a group, food allergic young adults did not differ from healthy peers. However, food allergic young adults who reported having experienced an anaphylactic reaction described their disease as more severe, reported more worry about their disease, and rated their parents as more overprotective than food allergic young adults who reported never having experienced anaphylaxis. The experience of anaphylaxis may be a reliable indicator of food allergic individuals who are at risk for psychological distress. PMID:19104982

  11. The JET Neutron Activation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G.; van Belle, P.

    1997-11-01

    The JET activation system provides the absolute value of the neutron yields as well as a check on the linearity of other neutron detector systems. The total neutron yield is standardized to one irradiation end reentrant in the top of the vessel, while the results from the other seven irradiation ends are normalized to this standard end and provide redundancy as well as information on the plasma position. A pneumatic transfer system is used to transfer up to five capsules containing elemental foils for a single discharge on JET. Eleven different elemental foils have been utilized to determine the yields from both DD and DT plasmas. By placing several different foils with different activation energy thresholds in a single capsule for one DT discharge, neutron spectral information has been obtained by use of the SAND-II unfolding code. A description of the activation system hardware and calibration of the activation detector system will be presented along with the results from the DT neutron calibration campaign.

  12. A Cases of Near-fatal Anaphylaxis: Parsley “Over-use” as an Herbal Remedy

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sevket; Ucar, Ramazan; Caliskaner, Ahmet Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbal products in patients with allergic diseases is a special problem and still controversial. But, many people often use herbs to maintain good health. The patients use self-prescribed remedies as medications but do not inform their physicians about herbal use. Unfortunately, some herbal self-medications may have unexpected effects and interactions which may lead to fatal complications. In this report, we describe a female patient who suffered near-fatal anaphylaxis to parsley. PMID:25648063

  13. Key components of anaphylaxis management plans: consensus findings from a national electronic Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Worth, Allison; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Sheikh, Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Objectives There is no international consensus on the components of anaphylaxis management plans and responsibility for their design and delivery is contested. We set out to establish consensus among relevant specialist and generalist clinicians on this issue to inform future randomized controlled trials. Design A two-round electronic Delphi study completed by a 25-person, multidisciplinary expert panel. Participants scored the importance of a range of statements on anaphylaxis management, identified from a systematic review of the literature, on a five-point scale ranging from ‘very important’ to ‘irrelevant’. Consensus was defined a priori as being achieved if 80% or more of panel members rated a statement as ‘important’ or ‘very important’ after Round 2. Setting Primary and secondary care and academic settings in the UK and Ireland. Participants Twenty-five medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Main outcome measures Consensus on the key components of anaphylaxis management plans. Results The response rate was 84% (n = 21) for Round 1 and 96% (n = 24) for Round 2. The key components of emergency care on which consensus was achieved included: awareness of trigger factors (100%); recognition and emergency management of reactions of different severity (100%); and clear information on adrenaline (epinephrine) use (100%). Consensus on longer-term management issues included: clear written guidelines on anaphylaxis management (96%); annual review of plans (87%); and plans that were tailored to individual needs (82%). Conclusions This national consensus-building exercise generated widespread agreement that emergency plans need to be simple, clear and generic, making them easy to implement in a crisis. In contrast, long-term plans need to be negotiated between patient/carers and professionals, and tailored to individual needs. The effectiveness of this expert-agreed long-term plan now needs to be evaluated rigorously. PMID:21103134

  14. Galactose-α-1,3-galactose and Delayed Anaphylaxis, Angioedema, and Urticaria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Joshua L.; Stallings, Amy P.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Oliveira, Walter M.; Workman, Lisa; James, Haley R.; Tripathi, Anubha; Lane, Charles J.; Matos, Luis; Heymann, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Despite a thorough history and comprehensive testing, many children who present with recurrent symptoms consistent with allergic reactions elude diagnosis. Recent research has identified a novel cause for “idiopathic” allergic reactions; immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody specific for the carbohydrate galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) has been associated with delayed urticaria and anaphylaxis that occurs 3 to 6 hours after eating beef, pork, or lamb. We sought to determine whether IgE antibody to α-Gal was present in sera of pediatric patients who reported idiopathic anaphylaxis or urticaria. METHODS: Patients aged 4 to 17 were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved protocol at the University of Virginia and private practice allergy offices in Lynchburg, VA. Sera was obtained and analyzed by ImmunoCAP for total IgE and specific IgE to α-Gal, beef, pork, cat epithelium and dander, Fel d 1, dog dander, and milk. RESULTS: Forty-five pediatric patients were identified who had both clinical histories supporting delayed anaphylaxis or urticaria to mammalian meat and IgE antibody specific for α-Gal. In addition, most of these cases had a history of tick bites within the past year, which itched and persisted. CONCLUSIONS: A novel form of anaphylaxis and urticaria that occurs 3 to 6 hours after eating mammalian meat is not uncommon among children in our area. Identification of these cases may not be straightforward and diagnosis is best confirmed by specific testing, which should certainly be considered for children living in the area where the Lone Star tick is common. PMID:23569097

  15. A Cases of Near-fatal Anaphylaxis: Parsley "Over-use" as an Herbal Remedy.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Sevket; Ucar, Ramazan; Caliskaner, Ahmet Zafer

    2014-12-01

    The use of herbal products in patients with allergic diseases is a special problem and still controversial. But, many people often use herbs to maintain good health. The patients use self-prescribed remedies as medications but do not inform their physicians about herbal use. Unfortunately, some herbal self-medications may have unexpected effects and interactions which may lead to fatal complications. In this report, we describe a female patient who suffered near-fatal anaphylaxis to parsley. PMID:25648063

  16. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis in a cardiopathic patient on chronic aspirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Micucci, C; Amico, D; Braconi, M; Pareo, C; Cimarelli, M E; Subiaco, S

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 73 year old man on chronic aspirin therapy who went in anaphylactic shock during his daily farm chores following a meal rich in wheat products. The serum specific IgE assay (ImmunoCAP) showed strong positive specific IgE responses to ω-5 gliadin. A two-year period avoiding wheat meals 3 hours prior to exercise, resulted in a lack of further anaphylaxis; this results aided us in making the diagnosis. PMID:24739129

  17. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  18. A Case of Anaphylaxis Induced by Contact with Young Radish (Raphanus sativus L).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyoung; Kang, Hye-Ran; Ha, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Byoung-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Young radish (Raphanus sativus L), a member of the mustard family (Cruciferae), is a common ingredient of Kimchi. Although few reports have described anaphylaxis to cruciferous vegetables, we report the case of anaphylaxis induced by contact with young radish. A 46-year-old female with a history of contact allergy to metal presented to our emergency room (ER) with dizziness, generalized eruption and gastrointestinal upset. Her symptoms developed after re-exposure to young radish while chopping it. Hypotensive blood pressures were noted. Three days prior, the patient had experienced generalized urticaria with pruritus immediately after chopping the fresh young radish, which resolved spontaneously. In the ER, her symptoms improved by the administration of epinephrine (0.3 mL), antihistamine (chlorpheniramine) and isotonic saline hydration. A skin prick test with young radish extract showed positive reactivity. The same skin test was negative in five adult controls. IgE-mediated hypersensitivity could be an important immunologic mechanism in the development of young radish-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:25553270

  19. Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P; Jerath, Maya R; Cox, Kelly; Erickson, Loren D; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity refers to immune reactions that can be rapidly progressing and, in the case of anaphylaxis, are occasionally fatal. To that end, identification of the associated allergen is important for facilitating both education and allergen avoidance that are essential to long-term risk reduction. As the number of known exposures associated with anaphylaxis is limited, discovery of novel causative agents is crucial to evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Within the last 10 years several apparently separate observations were recognized to be related, all of which resulted from the development of antibodies to a carbohydrate moiety on proteins. Interestingly, the exposure differed from airborne allergens but was nevertheless capable of producing anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions. Our recent work has identified these responses as being due to a novel IgE antibody directed against a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose ("alpha-gal"). This review will present the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discuss the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as current goals and directions of our research programs. PMID:26666477

  20. Excess subcutaneous tissue may preclude intramuscular delivery when using adrenaline autoinjectors in patients with anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, J; Hobbins, S; Parekh, D; O'Hickey, S

    2015-06-01

    Intramuscular adrenaline is the gold standard treatment for anaphylaxis. Intramuscular injection provides more rapid and higher plasma concentrations than subcutaneous routes. Given the increasing epidemic of obesity patients are at increased risk of subcutaneous delivery, we therefore assessed the depth of subcutaneous tissue in a population of patients with anaphylaxis. Patients already prescribed adrenaline autoinjectors (AAIs) for anaphylaxis were examined with ultrasound, and measurements of skin-to-muscle depth (STMD) at anterolateral thigh and anterior thigh were performed. Twenty-eight patients (23 female, 5 male) with an age range of 18-75 took part in the study, and in 68%, the STMD was greater than AAI needle length (15.02 mm), using the anterolateral thigh as the recommended administration site. The key predictors for increased STMD were female gender (P=0.0003) and a BMI > 30 (P=0.04). AAIs require longer needles to ensure intramuscular administration, and ultrasound at point of prescription would aid needle length selection. PMID:25676800

  1. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  2. A Simple Allergist-Led Intervention Improves Resident Training in Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Jongco, Artemio M.; Bina, Sheila; Sporter, Robert J.; Cavuoto Petrizzo, Marie A.; Kaplan, Blanka; Kline, Myriam; Schuval, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Physicians underrecognize and undertreat anaphylaxis. Effective interventions are needed to improve physician knowledge and competency regarding evidence-based anaphylaxis diagnosis and management (ADAM). We designed and evaluated an educational program to improve ADAM in pediatrics, internal medicine, and emergency medicine residents from two academic medical centers. Anonymous questionnaires queried participants' demographics, prior ADAM clinical experience, competency, and comfort. A pretest assessing baseline knowledge preceded a 45-minute allergist-led evidence-based presentation, including practice with epinephrine autoinjectors, immediately followed by a posttest. A follow-up test assessed long-term knowledge retention twelve weeks later. 159 residents participated in the pretest, 152 participated in the posttest, and 86 participated in the follow-up test. There were no significant differences by specialty or site. With a possible score of 10, the mean pretest score (7.31 ± 1.50) was lower than the posttest score (8.79 ± 1.29) and follow-up score (8.17 ± 1.72) (P < 0.001 for both). Although participants' perceived confidence in diagnosing or managing anaphylaxis improved from baseline to follow-up (P < 0.001 for both), participants' self-reported clinical experience with ADAM or autoinjector use was unchanged. Allergist-led face-to-face educational intervention improves residents' short-term knowledge and perceived confidence in ADAM. Limited clinical experience or reinforcement contributes to the observed decreased knowledge. PMID:26997960

  3. A case of anaphylaxis apparently induced by sugammadex and rocuronium in successive surgeries.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takuji; Tanabe, Kumiko; Fukuoka, Naokazu; Takenaka, Motoyasu; Iida, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Rocuronium is the agent most frequently involved in perioperative anaphylaxis, and sugammadex has also been known to induce anaphylactic reactions. We describe a case of successive anaphylactic episodes that seemed to be induced by clinical doses of rocuronium and sugammadex. The patient was a 19-year-old woman who had a medical history of asthma, but no history of surgery. She had been injured in a fall, and several surgeries were scheduled for multiple bone fractures. At the first surgery under general anesthesia, she developed anaphylaxis 5 min after sugammadex administration. A second general anesthesia for treatment of calcaneal fracture was induced uneventfully without neuromuscular blockade after 10 days. A third general anesthesia was scheduled to reinforce the spinal column 12 days after the first surgery. She developed anaphylaxis 8 min after rocuronium administration. The level of plasma histamine was elevated, but serum tryptase level remained normal. This surgery was canceled and rescheduled without use of a neuromuscular blockade. Skin tests were performed in a later investigation. The patient showed positive results on intradermal tests for sugammadex and rocuronium, supporting a diagnosis of allergic reactions to both drugs. Clinicians must be aware that anaphylactic reactions can be induced by both sugammadex and rocuronium. PMID:27290941

  4. Delayed anaphylaxis to alpha-gal, an oligosaccharide in mammalian meat

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Cox, Kelly; Erickson, Loren D.; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity refers to immune reactions that can be rapidly progressing and, in the case of anaphylaxis, are occasionally fatal. To that end, identification of the associated allergen is important for facilitating both education and allergen avoidance that are essential to long-term risk reduction. As the number of known exposures associated with anaphylaxis is limited, discovery of novel causative agents is crucial to evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Within the last 10 years several apparently separate observations were recognized to be related, all of which resulted from the development of antibodies to a carbohydrate moiety on proteins. Interestingly, the exposure differed from airborne allergens but was nevertheless capable of producing anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions. Our recent work has identified these responses as being due to a novel IgE antibody directed against a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (“alpha-gal”). This review will present the historical summary of the identification of cetuximab hypersensitivity due to alpha-gal IgE and discuss the non-primate mammalian meat food allergy as well as current goals and directions of our research programs. PMID:26666477

  5. Immunologic analysis of anaphylaxis to protamine component in neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin.

    PubMed

    Dykewicz, M S; Kim, H W; Orfan, N; Yoo, T J; Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    We report the clinical and immunologic analysis of two patients with diabetes who had anaphylaxis to neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) human insulin in the absence of allergy to regular insulin. A 36-year-old woman without a recent history of local insulin reactions or interruption of insulin therapy experienced anaphylaxis within 15 minutes of her usual morning dose of subcutaneously administered NPH human insulin. A 62-year-old man with a history of generalized reactions to NPH human insulin and of anaphylaxis to intravenously administered protamine had generalized urticaria after injection of NPH human insulin. Both patients subsequently tolerated Lente human insulin. Skin test results in both patients were negative to regular and Lente insulin preparations but positive to NPH insulin and to protamine at concentrations tested. In vitro assays demonstrated that both patients had markedly elevated serum levels of IgE and IgG to protamine, but not to regular human insulin, and that their IgE antibodies to protamine recognized protamine antigenic determinants in NPH human insulin. We conclude that the anaphylactic reactions to NPH insulin in our patients were mediated by IgE to protamine, which should be a pathogenetic consideration in the evaluation of immediate-type reactions to protamine-containing insulins. PMID:8308177

  6. The activation system EASY-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.; Kopecky, J.

    2009-04-01

    Safety and waste management of materials for ITER, IFMIF and future power plants require knowledge of the activation caused by irradiation with neutrons, or in the case of IFMIF, deuterons. The European Activation System has been developed for such calculations and a new version was released earlier this year. This contains a large amount of nuclear data in the European Activation File covering neutron-, deuteron- and proton-induced cross sections. These data are input to the FISPACT code for activation calculations. EASY-2007 is being validated using integral and differential measurements. However, only a minority of reactions have experimental support and a statistical method is described that can test the complete library. Importance diagrams are useful in finding the dominant nuclides formed following irradiation and the reactions responsible for their production. These diagrams now cover energies above 20 MeV and examples of new dominant nuclides and reactions relevant to IFMIF are given.

  7. [A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by various foods which contained flour for thirty years].

    PubMed

    Terao, Hiroshi; Kishikawa, Reiko; Kato, Mariko; Noda, Keishi; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Shouji, Shunsuke; Nishima, Sankei

    2004-11-01

    The patient was a 65-year-old man with chief complaints of flare, swelling, itching and loss of consciousness. He had a history of diabetes diagnosed at the age of 34 years and was receiving medication from a local doctor. He had experienced systemic flare, swelling and loss of consciousness 20 minutes after drinking beer at a party at the age of 34 years. Since that time, he had frequently experienced urticaria and loss of consciousness while taking a walk after eating various foods (all of which contained flour). In February 2001, he experienced systemic flare, swelling and loss of consciousness when he returned home from a walk after eating a meal that included meat dumplings. Laboratory tests on admission showed a serum IgE level of 253 IU/ml, and the IgE level for flour in a RAST was 2.13 UA/ml (class 2). The results of exercise tolerance tests were normal during fasting, after ingestion of food that did not include allergens (wheat, shrimps and crab) and after ingestion of half of a thick slice of white bread, but systemic wheal and flare reactions appeared during an exercise tolerance test after ingestion of one thick slice of white bread. A diagnosis of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by flour was made on the basis of the results. PMID:15719649

  8. Justified concern or exaggerated fear: the risk of anaphylaxis in percutaneous treatment of cystic echinococcosis-a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Neumayr, Andreas; Troia, Giuliana; de Bernardis, Chiara; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Goblirsch, Sam; Piccoli, Luca; Hatz, Christoph; Filice, Carlo; Brunetti, Enrico

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous treatment (PT) emerged in the mid-1980s as an alternative to surgery for selected cases of abdominal cystic echinococcosis (CE). Despite its efficacy and widespread use, the puncture of echinococcal cysts is still far from being universally accepted. One of the main reasons for this reluctance is the perceived risk of anaphylaxis linked to PTs. To quantify the risk of anaphylactic reactions and lethal anaphylaxis with PT, we systematically searched MEDLINE for publications on PT of CE and reviewed the PT-related complications. After including 124 publications published between 1980 and 2010, we collected a total number of 5943 PT procedures on 5517 hepatic and non-hepatic echinococcal cysts. Overall, two cases of lethal anaphylaxis and 99 reversible anaphylactic reactions were reported. Lethal anaphylaxis occurred in 0.03% of PT procedures, corresponding to 0.04% of treated cysts, while reversible allergic reactions complicated 1.7% of PTs, corresponding to 1.8% of treated echinococcal cysts. Analysis of the literature shows that lethal anaphylaxis related to percutaneous treatment of CE is an extremely rare event and is observed no more frequently than drug-related anaphylactic side effects. PMID:21695106

  9. Justified Concern or Exaggerated Fear: The Risk of Anaphylaxis in Percutaneous Treatment of Cystic Echinococcosis—A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Neumayr, Andreas; Troia, Giuliana; de Bernardis, Chiara; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Goblirsch, Sam; Piccoli, Luca; Hatz, Christoph; Filice, Carlo; Brunetti, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous treatment (PT) emerged in the mid-1980s as an alternative to surgery for selected cases of abdominal cystic echinococcosis (CE). Despite its efficacy and widespread use, the puncture of echinococcal cysts is still far from being universally accepted. One of the main reasons for this reluctance is the perceived risk of anaphylaxis linked to PTs. To quantify the risk of anaphylactic reactions and lethal anaphylaxis with PT, we systematically searched MEDLINE for publications on PT of CE and reviewed the PT-related complications. After including 124 publications published between 1980 and 2010, we collected a total number of 5943 PT procedures on 5517 hepatic and non-hepatic echinococcal cysts. Overall, two cases of lethal anaphylaxis and 99 reversible anaphylactic reactions were reported. Lethal anaphylaxis occurred in 0.03% of PT procedures, corresponding to 0.04% of treated cysts, while reversible allergic reactions complicated 1.7% of PTs, corresponding to 1.8% of treated echinococcal cysts. Analysis of the literature shows that lethal anaphylaxis related to percutaneous treatment of CE is an extremely rare event and is observed no more frequently than drug-related anaphylactic side effects. PMID:21695106

  10. The severe adverse reaction to vitamin k1 injection is anaphylactoid reaction but not anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yan-Ni; Ping, Na-Na; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    The severe adverse reaction to vitamin K1 injection is always remarkable and is thought to result from anaphylaxis. Paradoxically, however, some patients administered vitamin K1 injection for the first time have adverse reactions. Using beagle dogs, the present study tested the hypothesis that the response to vitamin K1 is an anaphylactoid reaction. The results showed that serious anaphylaxis-like symptoms appeared in beagle dogs after the administration of vitamin K1 injection for the first time. The plasma histamine concentration increased, and blood pressure decreased sharply. After sensitization, dogs were challenged with vitamin K1 injection and displayed the same degree of symptoms as prior to sensitization. However, when the vitamin K1 injection-sensitized dogs were challenged with a vitamin K1-fat emulsion without solubilizers such asTween-80, the abnormal reactions did not occur. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the plasma immunoglobulin E concentration after vitamin K1 challenge. Following treatment with vitamin K1 injection, the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase by rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells as well as the rate of apoptosis increased. The Tween-80 group displayed results similar to those observed following vitamin K1 injection in vivo. However, the dogs in the vitamin K1-fat emulsion group did not display any abnormal behavior or significant change in plasma histamine. Additionally, degranulation and apoptosis did not occur in rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells. Our results indicate that the adverse reaction induced by vitamin K1 injection is an anaphylactoid reaction, not anaphylaxis. Vitamin K1 injection induces the release of inflammatory factors via a non-IgE-mediated immune pathway, for which the trigger may be the solubilizer. PMID:24594861

  11. The Severe Adverse Reaction to Vitamin K1 Injection Is Anaphylactoid Reaction but Not Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yan-Ni; Ping, Na-Na; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    The severe adverse reaction to vitamin K1 injection is always remarkable and is thought to result from anaphylaxis. Paradoxically, however, some patients administered vitamin K1 injection for the first time have adverse reactions. Using beagle dogs, the present study tested the hypothesis that the response to vitamin K1 is an anaphylactoid reaction. The results showed that serious anaphylaxis-like symptoms appeared in beagle dogs after the administration of vitamin K1 injection for the first time. The plasma histamine concentration increased, and blood pressure decreased sharply. After sensitization, dogs were challenged with vitamin K1 injection and displayed the same degree of symptoms as prior to sensitization. However, when the vitamin K1 injection-sensitized dogs were challenged with a vitamin K1-fat emulsion without solubilizers such asTween-80, the abnormal reactions did not occur. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the plasma immunoglobulin E concentration after vitamin K1 challenge. Following treatment with vitamin K1 injection, the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase by rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells as well as the rate of apoptosis increased. The Tween-80 group displayed results similar to those observed following vitamin K1 injection in vivo. However, the dogs in the vitamin K1-fat emulsion group did not display any abnormal behavior or significant change in plasma histamine. Additionally, degranulation and apoptosis did not occur in rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells. Our results indicate that the adverse reaction induced by vitamin K1 injection is an anaphylactoid reaction, not anaphylaxis. Vitamin K1 injection induces the release of inflammatory factors via a non-IgE-mediated immune pathway, for which the trigger may be the solubilizer. PMID:24594861

  12. Signs and Symptoms of Food Allergy and Food-Induced Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hemant P; Bansil, Shweta; Uygungil, Burcin

    2015-12-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence. In order for pediatric clinicians to appropriately diagnose and manage food allergies, the characteristic signs and symptoms of these potentially severe reactions must be recognized. Unlike nonimmunologic adverse food reactions (such as lactose intolerance and food poisoning), food allergies by definition are immune-mediated responses that occur reproducibly on food ingestion. The varying clinical presentations of food allergy include IgE-mediated disorders, mixed IgE- and cell-mediated disorders, and cell-mediated food allergies. This review describes the clinical manifestations of each of these categories of food allergy, with special emphasis on recognition of food-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:26456438

  13. Anaphylaxis Triggered by Benzyl Benzoate in a Preparation of Depot Testosterone Undecanoate

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Gregory S. Y.; Somerville, Colin P.; Jones, Timothy W.; Walsh, John P.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of an anaphylactic reaction to Reandron 1000 (depot testosterone undecanoate with a castor oil and benzyl benzoate vehicle). While considered to have a favourable safety profile, serious complications such as oil embolism and anaphylaxis can occur. In our patient, skin testing identified benzyl benzoate to be the trigger, with no reaction to castor oil or testosterone undecanoate components. As benzyl benzoate exists in multiple pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics, individual components of pharmaceuticals should be tested when investigating drug allergies. Doctors should be alert to the potential for serious reactions to any of the components of Reandron 1000. PMID:22272209

  14. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  15. Effect of a cocoa-enriched diet on immune response and anaphylaxis in a food allergy model in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cocoa intake decreased Th2 immune-related antibodies in rats. In consequence, we aimed to study in depth this cocoa action, particularly assessing its effect on a rat model of food allergy (FA) and also on an anaphylactic response. The involvement of the intestinal immune system was analyzed to allow the action mechanisms to be investigated. The role of cocoa flavonoids in the antiallergic properties of cocoa was also established. Brown Norway rats were fed either a reference diet or diets containing conventional cocoa (CC) or nonfermented cocoa (NFC). FA to ovalbumin (OVA) was induced and, later, an anaphylactic response was provoked. As expected, the synthesis of anti-OVA IgE and other Th2-related antibodies was inhibited by CC diet. In addition, the release of mast cell protease II after anaphylaxis was partially prevented by CC, although other variables were not modified. The CC diet also attenuated the increase of some Th2-related cytokines released from mesenteric lymph node and spleen cells, and modulated the intestinal gene expression of molecules involved in allergic response. These results demonstrated the local and systemic influence of CC diet. The effects of the NFC diet were weaker than those of CC, suggesting that cocoa components other than flavonoids play a role in cocoa's action. In conclusion, by acting on intestinal and systemic immune functions, a cocoa-enriched diet in rats exhibited a protective effect against FA and partially against anaphylaxis, making this a food of high interest to the fields of health and immunonutrition. PMID:26601599

  16. Elicitors and co-factors in food-induced anaphylaxis in adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis (FIA) in adults is often insufficiently diagnosed. One reason is related to the presence of co-factors like exercise, alcohol, additives and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The objective of this analysis was to retrospectively investigate the role of co-factors in patients with FIA. 93 adult patients with suspected FIA underwent double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges with suspected allergens and co-factors. The elicitors of anaphylaxis were identified in 44/93 patients. 27 patients reacted to food allergens upon challenge, 15 patients reacted only when a co-factor was co-exposed with the allergen. The most common identified allergens were celery (n = 7), soy, wheat (n = 4 each) and lupine (n = 3). Among the co-factors food additives (n = 8) and physical exercise (n = 6) were most frequent. In 10 patients more than one co-factor and/or more than one food allergen was necessary to elicit a positive reaction. The implementation of co-factors into the challenge protocol increases the identification rate of elicitors in adult food anaphylactic patients. PMID:24262093

  17. [Animal experimental studies on immunogenicity, humoral response and danger of anaphylaxis in parenteral administration of hyaluronidase].

    PubMed

    Storch, H; Dellas, T; Bellmann, H

    1978-01-01

    The widespread intravenous application of hyaluronidase rises questions for its potential immunogenicity, formation of humoral antibodies, and danger of anaphylaxis. In experiments on 21 rabbits and 40 rats, the authors searched for precipitating antibodies after subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravenous application of hyaluronidase in doses equivalent to the human. Intravenous and intramuscular shots of 150 to 75 000 IU of Hylase were applied in order to test anaphylaxis. By all proving procedures antibodies against Hylase were found. The formation of antibodies occurred earlier and in higher concentrations after subcutaneous and intramuscular application. The antibodies belonged to the IgG group. One third of the animals showed anaphylactic responses at doses which were 13 to 630 times as high. 26 per cent of human patients developed antibodies after application of Hylase. No anaphylactic reactions were observed in 17 patients with antibodies when intravenous application of hyaluronidase was continued. In the dosage used in the man anaphylactic response is obviously rare though it is possible. PMID:654375

  18. Clonal differences in IgE antibodies affect cutaneous anaphylaxis-associated thermal sensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Madison; Tonc, Elena; Ashbaugh, Alyssa; Wetzel, Abigail; Sykes, Akilah; Engblom, Camilla; Shabani, Estela; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Trier, Anna; Swanson, Linnea; Ewan, Emily; Martinov, Tijana; Chatterjea, Devavani

    2014-01-01

    Cellular and molecular mediators of immune responses are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic pain pathophysiologies. Here we demonstrate that passive cutaneous IgE/Ag anaphylaxis provokes increased thermal sensitivity in the hind paw tissue of mice. The murine anti-DNP IgE antibodies SPE-7 and ε26 are known to induce differential cytokine production in bone marrow cultured mast cells in vitro without antigen challenge. We found a novel, antigen-dependent heterogeneity in the thermal pain responses elicited in the hind paws between SPE-7 and ε26 sensitized DNP-challenged mice. Mice experienced pronounced hind paw thermal sensitivity lasting 6 hours after DNP challenge when sensitized with SPE-7 but not ε26 IgE. The two IgE clones induced equivalent hind paw edema, neutrophil influx, cytokine production, and reduction in tissue histamine content in vivo, and bound to the same or overlapping epitopes on the DNP antigen in vitro. Therefore IgE antibodies against the same antigen can induce comparable inflammation, yet contribute to markedly different anaphylaxis-associated pain within an allergic response, suggesting that non-canonical IgE binding partners such as sensory neurons may play a role in allergy-related pain responses. PMID:25149207

  19. Skin testing with food, codeine, and histamine in exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Barnard, M

    1993-06-01

    A 33-year-old Chinese woman with exercise-induced anaphylaxis after ingesting Chinese seafood noodle soup, was studied for skin test reactivity to food, histamine, and codeine. Prick skin tests were negative for shrimp, wheat, and chicken soup base, but were positive at 5 to 6 mm (wheal diameter) to the whole broth after it had been combined with the other ingredients. No significant (> 3 mm) wheals were observed in eight controls who were simultaneously tested with the broth. To assess the role of exercise, three series of skin tests were performed with histamine, codeine, and whole broth before and after aerobic exercise on two occasions. Codeine elicited consistent increases in wheal size after exercise compared with pre-exercise skin tests. Histamine and whole broth wheal sizes did not increase significantly. Three control subjects also had codeine and histamine skin tests before and after exercise, No exercise-associated increases were noted for codeine. Potential insights into mast cell abnormalities in exercise-induced anaphylaxis may be gained by skin testing patterns with codeine and other mast cell degranulating agents. PMID:8507042

  20. Why do few food-allergic adolescents treat anaphylaxis with adrenaline?--Reviewing a pressing issue.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Tom; Lack, Gideon

    2013-05-01

    Food allergic adolescents are at higher risk of fatal anaphylaxis than other children. Both allergen avoidance and maintaining access to adrenaline auto-injectors (AAI) are key goals in effective food allergy management, for which written guidance is often supplied. However, adolescents are rarely sufficiently prepared to use adrenaline during anaphylaxis. It is likely that further didactic education would bring limited improvement in management in this population. Focused discussion of each adolescent's perspectives and current management practice may allow more effective behavioural strategies to be adopted. Key areas for appraisal include subjects' experiences after previous allergen exposure with reference to worst response, recognising specific symptoms requiring AAI administration, and appropriate priority being given to timeliness of administering adrenaline. Behavioural strategies should be discussed to increase AAI accessibility. Rigor of allergen avoidance should not be compromised by false reassurance of proximity to emergency medication or medical services. Food allergic adolescents are motivated by the psychological impact of their condition, which often makes them feel different to their peers and may result in bullying. Methods of appropriately empowering adolescents may be considered, such as involvement of close friends and lay organisations to support appropriate management. Open discussion is crucial in engaging with adolescents' reasoning for adopting their chosen management strategies. Further research is warranted to identify cognitive patterns associated with high-risk behaviour, and to design appropriate interventions for the augmentation of adolescent self-management skills. PMID:23173610

  1. Clonal differences in IgE antibodies affect cutaneous anaphylaxis-associated thermal sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Mack, Madison; Tonc, Elena; Ashbaugh, Alyssa; Wetzel, Abigail; Sykes, Akilah; Engblom, Camilla; Shabani, Estela; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Trier, Anna; Swanson, Linnea; Ewan, Emily; Martinov, Tijana; Chatterjea, Devavani

    2014-11-01

    Cellular and molecular mediators of immune responses are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic pain pathophysiologies. Here we demonstrate that passive cutaneous IgE/Ag anaphylaxis provokes increased thermal sensitivity in the hind paw tissue of mice. The murine anti-DNP IgE antibodies SPE-7 and ɛ26 are known to induce differential cytokine production in bone marrow cultured mast cells in vitro without antigen challenge. We found a novel, antigen-dependent heterogeneity in the thermal pain responses elicited in the hind paws between SPE-7 and ɛ26 sensitized DNP-challenged mice. Mice experienced pronounced hind paw thermal sensitivity lasting 6h after DNP challenge when sensitized with SPE-7 but not ɛ26 IgE. The two IgE clones induced equivalent hind paw edema, neutrophil influx, cytokine production, and reduction in tissue histamine content in vivo, and bound to the same or overlapping epitopes on the DNP antigen in vitro. Therefore IgE antibodies against the same antigen can induce comparable inflammation, yet contribute to markedly different anaphylaxis-associated pain within an allergic response, suggesting that non-canonical IgE binding partners such as sensory neurons may play a role in allergy-related pain responses. PMID:25149207

  2. Management of Levofloxacin Induced Anaphylaxis and Acute Delirium in a Palliative Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Levofloxacin is a commonly prescribed antibiotic for managing chest and urinary tract infections in a palliative care setting. Incidence of Levofloxacin-associated anaphylaxis is rare and delirium secondary to Levofloxacin is a seldom occurrence with only few published case reports. It is an extremely rare occurrence to see this phenomenon in combination. Early identification and prompt intervention reduces both mortality and morbidity. A 17-year-old male with synovial sarcoma of right thigh with chest wall and lung metastasis and with no prior psychiatric morbidity presented to palliative medicine outpatient department with community-acquired pneumonia. He was initiated on intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Levofloxacin. Post IV Levofloxacin patient developed anaphylaxis and acute delirium necessitating IV Hydrocortisone, IV Chlorpheneramine, Oxygen and IV Haloperidol. Early detection and prompt intervention helped in complete recovery. Patient was discharged to hospice for respite after 2 days of hospitalization and then discharged home. Acute palliative care approach facilitated management of two life-threatening medical complications in a palliative care setting improving both quality and length of life. PMID:25709191

  3. [A CASE OF NATTOU (FERMENTED-SOYBEAN)-INDUCED LATE-ONSET ANAPHYLAXIS FOLLOWING SCUBA DIVING].

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Katsuichirou; Horikawa, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We here report a 34-years old male who had nattou-(fermented-soybean) induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving to about 20 m in the ocean off a small remote Japanese island (Kuroshima, Okinawa). He had eaten nattou for breakfast at 7:30 am. He traveled by boat to the dive site, dove twice and then ate lunch at 12:30 on the diving boat (no nattou at lunch). After lunch at 14:30 he dove again (third dive of the day) during which time itchiness started. Back on the diving boat, urticarial was noticed. At 15:30, while washing his diving gear at the diving shop near the harbor, he fainted. A physician arrived on the scene at 15:45. Chest sound was clear and SpO2 was 98%, and blood pressure was 60/- mmHg. Intra-venous hydrocortisone was given, however, his recovery was not satisfactory. Then he was transferred to the Yaeyama Hospital by helicopter at 17:45. The examination of diving computer analysis reveals no sign of increased residual nitrogen, denying the possibility of decompression syndrome. Prick to prick test shows a strongly positive response to nattou. Nattou-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving was suspected. PMID:26380912

  4. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    PubMed

    Chinuki, Yuko; Morita, Eishin

    2012-12-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE. PMID:23093796

  5. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. PMID:24373349

  6. Pyrazolones metabolites are relevant for identifying selective anaphylaxis to metamizole.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; García-Martín, Elena; Salas, María; Montañez, María I; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Andreu, Inmaculada; Perkins, James; Blanca, Miguel; Agúndez, José A G; Torres, María J

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common cause of hypersensitivity reactions, with pyrazolones the most frequent drugs inducing selective reactions. Immediate selective hypersensitivity to pyrazolones is thought to be mediated by specific-IgE. Sensitivity of in vitro diagnostic tests is low and this may be due to the incomplete characterization of the structures involved. Here we investigated whether main metabolites of metamizole (dipyrone) in human could be involved in the immune response using the basophil activation test (BAT). We studied subjects with confirmed selective immediate hypersensitivity to metamizole and performed BAT with metamizole and its metabolites: 4-methylamino-antipyrine (MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (AA), 4-acetylamino-antipyrine (AAA) and 4-formylamino-antipyrine (FAA). BAT results showed an increase of positive results from 37.5% to 62.5% using metamizole plus metabolites as compared with the BAT carried out only with the parent drug, demonstrating that metamizole metabolites have a role in the reaction and can induce specific basophil activation in patients with immediate hypersensitivity to this drug. Our findings indicate that pyrazolone metabolites are useful for improving the in vitro diagnosis of allergic reactions to metamizole. PMID:27030298

  7. Pyrazolones metabolites are relevant for identifying selective anaphylaxis to metamizole

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adriana; García-Martín, Elena; Salas, María; Montañez, María I.; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Andreu, Inmaculada; Perkins, James; Blanca, Miguel; Agúndez, José A. G.; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common cause of hypersensitivity reactions, with pyrazolones the most frequent drugs inducing selective reactions. Immediate selective hypersensitivity to pyrazolones is thought to be mediated by specific-IgE. Sensitivity of in vitro diagnostic tests is low and this may be due to the incomplete characterization of the structures involved. Here we investigated whether main metabolites of metamizole (dipyrone) in human could be involved in the immune response using the basophil activation test (BAT). We studied subjects with confirmed selective immediate hypersensitivity to metamizole and performed BAT with metamizole and its metabolites: 4-methylamino-antipyrine (MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (AA), 4-acetylamino-antipyrine (AAA) and 4-formylamino-antipyrine (FAA). BAT results showed an increase of positive results from 37.5% to 62.5% using metamizole plus metabolites as compared with the BAT carried out only with the parent drug, demonstrating that metamizole metabolites have a role in the reaction and can induce specific basophil activation in patients with immediate hypersensitivity to this drug. Our findings indicate that pyrazolone metabolites are useful for improving the in vitro diagnosis of allergic reactions to metamizole. PMID:27030298

  8. Evaluation of IgE Antibodies to Omalizumab (Xolair®) and Their Potential Correlation to Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Dana L; Nakamura, Gerald R; Lowman, Henry B; Fischer, Saloumeh Kadkhodayan

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab (Xolair®) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to human immunoglobulin E (IgE). Omalizumab is used to treat IgE-mediated diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and moderate to severe allergic asthma. In pre-marketing clinical trials in patients with asthma, anaphylaxis was reported in 3 of 3,507 (0.1%) patients. In post-marketing spontaneous reports, the frequency of anaphylaxis attributed to omalizumab use was estimated to be at least 0.2% of patients based on an estimated exposure of about 57,300 patients from June 2003 through December 2006. To better understand the risk of anaphylaxis in patients with allergic asthma receiving omalizumab, a post-marketing pharmacosurveillance study was initiated in 2009. As part of this study, an assay was developed to detect antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Serum samples from patients in the study were evaluated using this assay. Our results indicated that there was no observable correlation between either anaphylaxis or skin test reactivity and the presence of antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Here, we discuss the development of this assay as well as the results of the immunogenicity assessment. PMID:26340860

  9. First case report of anaphylaxis caused by Rajgira seed flour (Amaranthus paniculatus) from India: a clinico-immunologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kasera, Ramkrashan; Niphadkar, P V; Saran, Aditya; Mathur, Chandni; Singh, A B

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is reported to be 3-4% in adults and about 6% in children. However food allergy across different countries accounts for 35-50 % all cases of anaphylaxis to foods. In the present study, we have reported a case of anaphylaxis to Amaranth grain (Amaranthus paniculatus) commonly known as Rajgira (Ramdana) in India. A 60 year old female suffered anaphylaxis after consuming Rajgira seed flour generally consumed during fasting. Food allergy to Amaranth seeds is not reported so far. The patient reported to hospital with complaints of itching in mouth, choking throat, redness and swelling of face and burning abdomen within 5 min of consuming Rajgira flour. Clinical and immunological investigations revealed SPT and oral challenge positivity beside high allergen specific IgE in the serum of the patient. Three IgE binding protein fractions were detected in roasted Rajgira seed flour extract which could be considered to be allergenically important for triggering anaphylaxis. PMID:23517398

  10. [A Case of Rocuronium-induced Anaphylaxis in Which Surgery was Subsequently Performed under General Anesthesia without Neuromuscular Blocking Agents].

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tatsuo; Takazawa, Tomonori; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    We report here a case of rocuronium-induced anaphylactic shock in a 41-year-old woman. She was scheduled for partial hepatectomy due to liver metastasis of a pheochromocytoma. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium. Bag-mask ventilation was difficult, and her blood pressure fell to around 40 mmHg just after induction. Subsequently, her trachea was intubated and adrenaline was injected. However, due to the subsequent persistence of severe hypotension and hypoxia, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was necessary. Suspecting the development of pulmonary embolism or anaphylaxis, we performed transesophageal echography; however, no evidence of right heart dilatation was observed, indicating a low possibility of pulmonary embolism. Although her general condition was stabilized, surgery was canceled. Blood tests showed high serum histamine and tryptase levels, suggesting an Ig-E mediated allergic reaction. A skin test performed five weeks after anesthesia suggested that she had suffered from rocuronium-induced anaphylaxis. A skin test also showed cross-reactivity between rocuronium and vecuronium. Therefore, we did not use any neuromuscular agent for the subsequent surgery, which was completed uneventfully. Determining the drug responsible for anaphylaxis helps to prevent recurrence of anaphylaxis. PMID:27097513

  11. Treatment of the first known case of king cobra envenomation in the United Kingdom, complicated by severe anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veto, T; Price, R; Silsby, J F; Carter, J A

    2007-01-01

    We report the first known case of envenomation following snake bite by a king cobra in the UK. The patient required tracheal intubation and ventilation. Treatment with king cobra antivenom resulted in anaphylaxis (bronchospasm and hypotension), requiring adrenaline infusion. The patient's trachea was extubated 11 h after administration of antivenom. PMID:17156231

  12. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  13. Wave activated power generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.

    1983-08-09

    A wave activated power generation system of the float type is disclosed, comprising at least one piston-cylinder device having an anchored cylinder and a piston slidable in the cylinder and cooperating with the cylinder to form a pumping chamber above the piston and a low pressure chamber below the piston. The cylinder has an intake port and an exhaust port both formed at an upper port thereof to communicate with the pumping chamber and each provided with a check valve. A float is connected through a cable to the piston of the piston- cylinder device. A pair of fluid storages are connected to the intake port and the exhaust port of the pumping chamber, respectively. A waterwheel generator is driven by the fluid flowing from one of the fluid storages to another. A pressure regulating device is connected to the low pressure chamber so as to maintain the low pressure chamber at a pressure lower than the pressure in the pumping chamber, the difference in pressure ceaselessly applying a downward force on the piston to keep the cable in a tensed condition.

  14. Diagnostic utility of two case definitions for anaphylaxis: a comparison using a retrospective case notes analysis in the UK.

    PubMed

    Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, Michel; Dymond, Sandra; Slade, Ingrid; Mansfield, Helen L; Fish, Rosie; Jones, Owen; Benger, Jonathan R

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a clinical diagnosis with no gold-standard test. Recent case definitions have attempted to provide objective criteria for diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic concordance of the Brighton Collaboration case definition (the 'Brighton' case definition) to the consensus case definition from the Second Symposium on the Definition and Management of Anaphylaxis (the 'Symposium' definition). The study setting was a hospital-based emergency department in the UK. We identified cases of anaphylaxis by physicians' discharge diagnoses over a 2-year period from 2005 to 2006, and used randomly selected cases of allergic reaction, asthma and urticaria as a control group. Data was extracted by clinicians (who were unaware of the content of either case definition), and the two case definitions were applied by Boolean operators in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Concordance between the case definitions was measured using Cohen's kappa (kappa) statistic. We reviewed 128 sets of notes, with 47 cases of anaphylaxis. Brighton and Symposium definitions had sensitivities of 0.681 and 0.671, respectively, and specificities of 0.790 and 0.704, respectively. A discordant result was found in 36/128 cases (28.1%; kappa = 0.414 [95% CI 0.253, 0.574]), which represents a moderate level of agreement between case definitions. The Brighton case definition has a similar diagnostic concordance to the Symposium case definition. It does not seem to over- or underestimate cases and is sufficiently unique that the identification of an allergic trigger does not have to form part of the case definition. This will be important in the recognition of anaphylaxis resulting from the administration of drug and vaccines, where causality should be examined separately from case ascertainment. PMID:20000867

  15. What Is an Activity? Appropriating an Activity-Centric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Matthews, Tara; Moran, Thomas P.; Smith, Barton

    Activity-Centric Computing (ACC) systems seek to address the fragmentation of office work across tools and documents by allowing users to organize work around the computational construct of an Activity. Defining and structuring appropriate Activities within a system poses a challenge for users that must be overcome in order to benefit from ACC support. We know little about how knowledge workers appropriate the Activity construct. To address this, we studied users’ appropriation of a production-quality ACC system, Lotus Activities, for everyday work by employees in a large corporation. We contribute to a better understanding of how users articulate their individual and collaborative work in the system by providing empirical evidence of their patterns of appropriation. We conclude by discussing how our findings can inform the design of other ACC systems for the workplace.

  16. Anaphylaxis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  17. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need. PMID:26475526

  18. Anaphylaxis due to spontaneous rupture of primary isolated splenic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Fuat; Yesilkaya, Yakup; Peker, Onur; Yuksel, Murvet

    2013-04-01

    Echinococcosis is a helminthic zoonosis mainly caused by Echinococcus granulosus and commonly encountered in endemic areas. The liver and lung are the most frequently involved organs. A primary isolated hydatid cyst of spleen is an extremely rare disease even in endemic areas. Anaphylactic reaction is a known complication of cystic hydatid disease, a parasitic infestation caused by the larval/cyst stage of E. granulosus that usually occurs after trauma or during interventions. To the best of our knowledge, anaphylaxis with spontaneous rupture of primary isolated splenic hydatidoses had not been reported previously. The main purpose of this report is to highlight life-threatening complications such as anaphylactic shock that should be considered due to primary isolated splenic cyst hydatid rupture in especially endemic regions. PMID:23961460

  19. Mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A expression in body fluid and gastrointestinal tract associated with drug-related fatal anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiang-Jie; Wang, Ying-Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Yue; Jin, Qian-Qian; Gao, Cai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in drug-related fatal anaphylaxis. METHODS: The expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in 15 autopsy cases of drug-related fatal anaphylaxis and 20 normal autopsy cases were detected. First, the expression of mast cell tryptase was determined in stomach, jejunum, lung, heart, and larynx by immunofluorescence. Different tissues were removed and fixed in paraformaldehyde solution, then paraffin sections were prepared for immunofluorescence. Using specific mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A antibodies, the expression of tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in gastroenterology tract and other tissues were observed using fluorescent microscopy. The postmortem serum and pericardial fluid were collected from drug-related fatal anaphylaxis and normal autopsy cases. The level of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A in postmortem serum and pericardial fluid were measured using fluor enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (FEIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay. The expression of mast cell tryptase and carboxypeptidase A was analyzed in drug-related fatal anaphylaxis cases and compared to normal autopsy cases. RESULTS: The expression of carboxypeptidase A was less in the gastroenterology tract and other tissues from anaphylaxis-related death cadavers than normal controls. Immunofluorescence revealed that tryptase expression was significantly increased in multiple organs, especially the gastrointestinal tract, from anaphylaxis-related death cadavers compared to normal autopsy cases (46.67 ± 11.11 vs 4.88 ± 1.56 in stomach, 48.89 ± 11.02 vs 5.21 ± 1.34 in jejunum, 33.72 ± 5.76 vs 1.30 ± 1.02 in lung, 40.08 ± 7.56 vs 1.67 ± 1.03 in larynx, 7.11 ± 5.67 vs 1.10 ± 0.77 in heart, P < 0.05). Tryptase levels, as measured with FEIA, were significantly increased in both sera (43.50 ± 0.48 μg/L vs 5.40 ± 0.36 μg/L, P < 0.05) and pericardial fluid (28.64 ± 0

  20. The pholcodine Case. Cough Medicines, IgE-Sensitization, and Anaphylaxis: A Devious Connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian data on pholcodine (PHO) strongly indicates that there is a biological chain from PHO exposure through IgE-sensitization to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). PHO is probably one of the strongest inducer of an IgE antibody response known. Of individuals taking PHO in cough medicines, over-the-counter accessibility to large populations, as many as 20 to 25% may become IgE sensitized. Once sensitized, PHO re-exposure will booster IgE antibody levels and IgE by around 100-fold. PHO is monovalent for 2 non-cross-reacting epitopes the quaternary ammonium ion (QAI), the main allergenic epitope of NMBA, and a non-QAI epitope. Thus, PHO most unlikely would initiate an allergic inflammatory response. Consequently, IgE sensitization is not revealed by obvious clinical signs, neither through tests based on IgE-sensitized effector cells. Therefore, it will escape detection if not assayed serologically. However, when subjected to general anesthesia, and thus the IgE-sensitized individual is administered a bivalent NMBA intravenously, the unrecognized presence of serum IgE antibodies to QAI may increase the risk of anaphylaxis 200- to 300-fold. Severe damages to patient's health can result, and mortality rates of 3 to 10% are reported. The Scandinavian experience indicates that the chain of events can efficiently be avoided by stopping PHO exposure: Within 1 year, the prevalence of IgE sensitization to PHO and QAI decreases significantly, and after 2 to 3 years, the numbers of reported anaphylactic reactions decreases equally so. PMID:23283141

  1. The Pholcodine Case. Cough Medicines, IgE-Sensitization, and Anaphylaxis: A Devious Connection.

    PubMed

    Florvaag, E; Johansson, S G O

    2012-07-01

    : The Scandinavian data on pholcodine (PHO) strongly indicates that there is a biological chain from PHO exposure through IgE-sensitization to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). PHO is probably one of the strongest inducer of an IgE antibody response known. Of individuals taking PHO in cough medicines, over-the-counter accessibility to large populations, as many as 20 to 25% may become IgE sensitized. Once sensitized, PHO re-exposure will booster IgE antibody levels and IgE by around 100-fold. PHO is monovalent for 2 non-cross-reacting epitopes the quaternary ammonium ion (QAI), the main allergenic epitope of NMBA, and a non-QAI epitope. Thus, PHO most unlikely would initiate an allergic inflammatory response. Consequently, IgE sensitization is not revealed by obvious clinical signs, neither through tests based on IgE-sensitized effector cells. Therefore, it will escape detection if not assayed serologically. However, when subjected to general anesthesia, and thus the IgE-sensitized individual is administered a bivalent NMBA intravenously, the unrecognized presence of serum IgE antibodies to QAI may increase the risk of anaphylaxis 200- to 300-fold. Severe damages to patient's health can result, and mortality rates of 3 to 10% are reported. The Scandinavian experience indicates that the chain of events can efficiently be avoided by stopping PHO exposure: Within 1 year, the prevalence of IgE sensitization to PHO and QAI decreases significantly, and after 2 to 3 years, the numbers of reported anaphylactic reactions decreases equally so. PMID:23283141

  2. IgE Immunoadsorption Knocks Down the Risk of Food-Related Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Dahdah, Lamia; Ceccarelli, Stefano; Amendola, Silvia; Campagnano, Pietro; Cancrini, Caterina; Mazzina, Oscar; Fiocchi, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The effects of an immunoadsorption procedure, specifically designed to remove immunoglobulin E (IgE), on food-induced anaphylaxis have never been evaluated. We evaluate the effects of IgE removal on the allergic thresholds to foods. A 6-year-old boy with anaphylaxis to multiple foods and steroid-resistant unstable allergic asthma displayed serum IgE levels of 2800 to 3500 kU/L. To lower IgE serum concentrations, which could be overridden by a high dose of omalizumab, 1.5 plasma volumes were exchanged in 8 apheresis sessions. During the procedure, serum IgE levels fell to 309 kU/L. After the procedure, the threshold of reactivity to baked milk increased from 0.125 to 5 g of milk protein (full tolerance) after the first session, and the threshold of reactivity to hazelnut increased from 0.037 to 0.142 g of protein after the first session, 0.377 g after the eighth, and 1.067 g (full tolerance) after the first administration of omalizumab. Immediately after the sixth IgE immunoadsorption, we started omalizumab therapy. In the next 40 days, the threshold of reactivity to hazelnut increased to 7.730 (full tolerance). Asthma control was obtained, treatment with montelukast was stopped, and fluticasone was tapered from 500 to 175 μg/day. The boy became partially or fully tolerant to all the tested foods, and quality of life was improved. IgE immunoadsorption, used to establish the starting basis for omalizumab administration, is able to increase the tolerance threshold to foods. PMID:26620068

  3. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  4. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  5. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  6. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  7. High speed hybrid active system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Ignacio F.; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Qing, Peter X.; Kumar, Amrita; Zhang, David

    2005-05-01

    A novel piezoelectric/fiber-optic system is developed for long-term health monitoring of aerospace vehicles and structures. The hybrid diagnostic system uses the piezoelectric actuators to input a controlled excitation to the structure and the fiber optic sensors to capture the corresponding structural response. The aim of the system is to detect changes in structures such as those found in aerospace applications (damage, cracks, aging, etc.). This system involves the use of fiber Bragg gratings, which may be either bonded to the surface of the material or embedded within it in order to detect the linear strain component produced by the excitation waves generate by an arbitrary waveform generator. Interrogation of the Bragg gratings is carried out using a high speed fiber grating demodulation unit and a high speed data acquisition card to provide actuation input. With data collection and information processing; is able to determine the condition of the structure. The demands on a system suitable for detecting ultrasonic acoustic waves are different than for the more common strain and temperature systems. On the one hand, the frequency is much higher, with typical values for ultrasonic frequencies used in non-destructive testing ranging from 100 kHz up to several MHz. On the other hand, the related strain levels are much lower, normally in the μstrain range. Fiber-optic solutions for this problem do exist and are particularly attractive for ultrasonic sensing as the sensors offer broadband detection capability.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal stem cell therapy in advanced interstitial lung disease - Anaphylaxis and short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Mathews, Vikram; Srivastava, Alok

    2015-01-01

    There are limited treatment options for advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD). We describe a patient of ILD treated with mesenchymal stromal stem cell infusion. The index patient had end-stage ILD due to a combination of insults including treatment with radiotherapy and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor Erlotinib. He was oxygen-dependent and this was hampering his quality of life. He tolerated the first infusion stem cells without any problem. During the second infusion he developed anaphylactic shock, which was appropriately managed. At 6-months follow-up he had no improvement in oxygenation, pulmonary function or CT scan parameters. In view of anaphylaxis, further infusions of MSC were withheld. A longer follow-up may reveal long-term benefits or side effects, if any. However the occurrence of anaphylaxis is of concern suggesting that further trials should be conducted with intensive monitoring. PMID:26628765

  9. Centrally activated pipe snubbing system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    An electromechanical pipe snubbing system and an electromechanical pipe snubber. In the system, each pipe snubber, in a set of pipe snubbers, has an electromechanical mechanism to lock and unlock the snubber. A sensor, such as a seismometer, measures a quantity related to making a snubber locking or unlocking decision. A control device makes an electrical connection between a power supply and each snubber's electromechanical mechanism to simultaneously lock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber locking condition. The control device breaks the connection to simultaneously unlock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber unlocking condition. In the snubber, one end of the shaft slides within a bore in one end of a housing. The other end of the shaft is rotatably attached to a pipe; the other end of the housing is rotatively attached to a wall. The snubber's electromechanical mechanism locks the slidable end of the shaft to the housing and unlocks that end from the housing. The electromechanical mechanism permits remote testing and lockup status indication for each snubber.

  10. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition. PMID:25871116

  11. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  12. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  13. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  14. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  15. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  16. ASCIA guidelines for prevention of anaphylaxis in schools, pre-schools and childcare: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Vale, Sandra; Smith, Jill; Said, Maria; Mullins, Raymond James; Loh, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The aim of these guidelines is to assist staff in school and childcare settings to plan and implement appropriate risk minimisation strategies, taking into consideration the needs of the allergic child, the likely effectiveness of measures and the practicality of implementation. Although these guidelines include risk minimisation strategies for allergic reactions to insect stings or bites, latex and medication, the major focus relates to food allergy. This is due to the higher relative prevalence of food allergy in childhood (compared with other allergic triggers) and the higher likelihood of accidental exposure in these settings. Care of the allergic child in the school, pre-school or childcare settings requires accurate information obtained from parents and carers, staff training in the recognition and management of acute allergic reactions, planning for unexpected reactions (including in those not previously identified as being at risk), age appropriate education of children with severe allergies and their peers, and implementation of practical strategies to reduce the risk of accidental exposure to known allergic triggers. Strategy development also needs to take into account local or regional established legislative or procedural guidelines and the possibility that the first episode of anaphylaxis may occur outside the home. Food bans are not recommended as the primary risk minimisation strategy due to difficulties in implementation and lack of proven effectiveness. PMID:26428419

  17. [A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by ingestion of orange].

    PubMed

    Ono, Rintaro; Motomura, Chikako; Takamatsu, Nobue; Kondo, Yasuto; Akamine, Yuko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yoko; Amimoto, Yuko; Taba, Naohiko; Honjyo, Satoshi; Shibata, Rumiko; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a history of anaphylactic episodes on three occasions, that developed in association with exercise after she ate citrus fruit. She underwent tolerance tests, as food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) induced by citrus fruit was suspected. The result of the test for the combination of intake of oranges and exercise was negative. The patient presented with swollen eyelid and wheezing following combined intake of orange and aspirin, based on which she was diagnosed as having FDEIA. Many patients developing an allergic reaction to fruit are diagnosed as having oral allergy syndrome (OAS), and only few cases of FDEIA are reported. Immunoblot tests revealed antigens of 9 kDa, 39 kDa and 53 kDa in this patient, and an inhibition study with oranges revealed that the 39 kDa and 53 kDa antigens were probably antigen-specific allergens. Although the studied patient showed a strongly positive result for IgE antibodies specifically directed at cedar pollen, no common antigenicity with cedar pollen could be recognized. The final diagnosis was a type of FDEIA caused by 39 kDa and 53 kDa proteins, which are different from antigens previously identified in patients with citrus fruits allergy. It should be the first report of such a case. PMID:25924908

  18. Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuy-My; Knulst, André C; Röckmann, Heike

    2014-12-01

    Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis), blue-green microalgae, has high content in proteins, γ-linoleic acid and vitamins and therefore gained popularity as food supplement. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Spirulina is also an interesting alternative and sustainable protein source with the growing world population. We present a case of a 17-year-old male, who developed anaphylaxis the first time he ingested a Spirulina tablet. Skin prick test with diluted Spirulina tablet was positive. Further skin prick testing with separated ingredients (Spirulina platensis algae, silicon dioxide, inulin and magnesium stearate) was only positive for Spirulina platensis algae and negative in controls, confirming the allergy was caused by Spirulina and not by one of the additives. This case report shows that diagnosis of Spirulina allergy can safely be made by skin prick test with dilutions of the A. platensis or even more simple by skin prick test with the diluted tablet. Since Spirulina has gained popularity as food and nutritional supplement, it is important to realize the potential risk of this dietary supplement. Before Spirulina is produced and consumed on a wider scale, allergenicity risk assessment should be performed, including investigation of potential crossreactivity with well-known inhalant allergens and foods. PMID:25445756

  19. [A case of the latex-induced anaphylaxis by contact with barium enema catheter].

    PubMed

    Fujie, Sayuri; Yagami, Akiko; Suzuki, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2004-01-01

    The subject was a 34-year-old female with asthma and atopic dermatitis who had previously undergone a Cesarean section. In December 1995, the patient had an acute abdominal pain, so she underwent a barium enema examination. During the procedure, severe anaphylactic shock developed, and the examination was stopped. The patient responded well to appropriate emergency therapy, and her symptoms were resolved. However, the woman visited our outpatient clinic because the symptoms of her atopic dermatitis got worse. She indicated that she felt itchy when using rubber gloves. Also, at the age of thirty, she had urticaria and dyspnea after drinking a glass of fruit juice. Subsequently radioallergosorbent testing demonstrated the presence of specific IgEs against latex, banana, kiwi, grapefruit, and avocado. Skin prick tests were positive for banana, grapefruit, avocado, and latex extract at a dilution of 1:1000. A scratch test was positive to an extract of a balloon catheter which included 0.3 microg/g latex proteins by the LEAP method. In conclusion, the patient was diagnosed with an anaphylaxis to the latex contained in a balloon catheter used for the barium enema. PMID:14762330

  20. [Clinical courses of 18 cases with food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kano, H; Juji, F; Shibuya, N; Narita, M; Naritaka, S; Suko, M; Morita, Y; Iwata, T

    2000-06-01

    Eighteen cases (7 males and 11 females) of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis were observed for several years. The age of the patients at the first visit to our hospital ranged from 9 to 43 years (average 24.3 years). The offending foods were wheat in 9 cases, shrimp in 2 cases, shellfish in 1 case, fish in 1 case, and unknown foods in 5 cases. The inducing exercises were ball play games, running, riding a bicycle, swimming, kendo (Japanese fencing), walking, and so on. We advised these patients to avoid eating offending foods or taking exercises, or to take antiallergic medicine such as DSCG, and repirinast. We observed their clinical courses and laboratory data for 2 to 10 years. Only a few cases relapsed anaphylactoid reactions, but all cases have improved until now. In some cases, IgE RAST scores for wheat decreased. In other cases, the rate of histamine release on anti-IgE stimulation decreased after taking DSCG. PMID:10916885

  1. System for objective assessment of fetal activity.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K J; Kret, T; Czajkowski, K; Sieńko, J; Zmigrodzki, J

    2011-07-01

    Fetal activity is an important indicator of fetal well-being. It is proposed to assess this activity using the pulsed wave Doppler method to collect fetal activity data and dedicated software for on-line processing. The system, addressed to 3rd trimester pregnancies, provides information on presence of pseudobreathing, the heart rate trace, the fetal movement trace, the movement velocity spectrogram, histograms of the velocity and acceleration of both the body movements and pseudobreathing, parameters of these histograms (mean values, standard deviations, shape descriptors), and cumulative counts of the velocity histograms. These parameters form the feature vector of the fetal activity. The system was validated by simultaneous echographic and cardiotocographic recordings and during oxytocin challenge tests. Feature vectors obtained from 1h recordings in 61 pregnancies were submitted to multivariate analysis of variance. Activity patterns of physiological cases and "borderline pathologies" were discriminated using reduced feature vectors, containing cumulative counts of velocity histograms. PMID:21277248

  2. Delayed Anaphylaxis to Red Meat in Patients with IgE Specific for Galactose alpha-1,3-Galactose (alpha-gal)

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be rapidly progressing and fatal. In instances where the triggering allergen is not known, establishing the etiology of anaphylaxis is pivotal to long-term risk management. Our recent work has identified a novel IgE antibody (Ab) response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), that has been associated with two distinct forms of anaphylaxis: (1) immediate onset anaphylaxis during first exposure to intravenous cetuximab, and (2) delayed onset anaphylaxis 3–6 h after ingestion of mammalian food products (e.g., beef and pork). The results of our studies strongly suggest that tick bites are a cause, if not the only significant cause, of IgE Ab responses to alpha-gal in the southern, eastern and central United States. Patients with IgE Ab to alpha-gal continue to emerge and, increasingly, these cases involve children. This IgE Ab response cross-reacts with cat and dog but does not appear to pose a risk for asthma; however, it may impair diagnostic testing in some situations. PMID:23054628

  3. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  4. Protection of Active Distribution Systems with DGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, Abdelrahman Ahmed; Helal, Ahmed; Eldesouki, Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Distribution systems are traditionally designed as radial passive systems fed from a single source. Protection coordination of such systems has been easily established assuming the system radiality. Insertion of distributed generators (DGs) into distribution systems makes the distribution system to be more active which causes redistribution of fault currents magnitudes and directions. This causes negative impacts on the original protection system coordination, since the distribution system losses its radiality and passiveness. Recently protection coordination in the presence of distributed generation has been paid a great attention. Researchers proposed various solutions to solve the protection coordination problem caused by adding DG into the distribution network. In this paper, the proposed solutions for the protection coordination problem considering the DG insertion will be illustrated, classified, and criticized.

  5. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  6. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.B.; Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  7. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  8. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  9. Traveling and Resting Crystals in Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic field theory for crystallization in active systems is proposed which unifies the phase-field-crystal model of freezing with the Toner—Tu theory for self-propelled particles. A wealth of different active crystalline states are predicted and characterized. In particular, for increasing strength of self-propulsion, a transition from a resting crystal to a traveling crystalline state is found where the particles migrate collectively while keeping their crystalline order. Our predictions, which are verifiable in experiments and in particle-resolved computer simulations, provide a starting point for the design of new active materials.

  10. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  11. The dilemma of the negative skin test reactors with a history of venom anaphylaxis: will this always be the case?

    PubMed

    Bilò, M B; Brianzoni, F; Cinti, B; Napoli, G; Bonifazi, F

    2005-11-01

    The loss of sensitization over time, the involvement of a different pathogenetic mechanism and the poor sensitivity of diagnostic tests have been included among the causes of a non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis triggered by an insect sting. To provide further insight into this topic we describe the case of a patient suffering from urticaria pigmentosa, anaphylactic shock due to a Vespid sting and monosensitive to Polistes dominulus venom, who was previous diagnosed with non-IgE mediated insect sting anaphylaxis in subjects with urticaria pigmentosa. Therefore ultra-rush specific immunotherapy using an acqueous Polistes dominulus venom extract was performed over two mornings until a total dose of 100mcg was reached without any side effects. Presently the patient is undergoing maintenance therapy with a depot Polistes dominulus venom extract at 4-weekly intervals and is free of side effects. In conclusion, despite the high cross-reactivity among the venoms of the various species of Polistes, recent evidence of a selective specificity unique to European Polistes allergens raises the problem of the need to make the American Polistes venom as well as that of Polistes dominulus (a very common insect in Europe) available both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Besides the fact that the presence of urticaria pigmentosa alone could have explained the anaphylactic reaction to the aspecific stimulation triggered by the venom, this case history also demonstrates that omitting to perform skin tests for Polistes dominulus venom would have led to the same misdiagnosis of non IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and served only to further delay commencing specific immunotherapy. PMID:16453965

  12. Patients’ ability to treat anaphylaxis using adrenaline autoinjectors: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Umasunthar, T; Procktor, A; Hodes, M; Smith, J G; Gore, C; Cox, H E; Marrs, T; Hanna, H; Phillips, K; Pinto, C; Turner, P J; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown patients commonly misuse adrenaline autoinjectors (AAI). It is unclear whether this is due to inadequate training, or poor device design. We undertook a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate ability to administer adrenaline using different AAI devices. Methods We allocated mothers of food-allergic children prescribed an AAI for the first time to Anapen or EpiPen using a computer-generated randomization list, with optimal training according to manufacturer's instructions. After one year, participants were randomly allocated a new device (EpiPen, Anapen, new EpiPen, JEXT or Auvi-Q), without device-specific training. We assessed ability to deliver adrenaline using their AAI in a simulated anaphylaxis scenario six weeks and one year after initial training, and following device switch. Primary outcome was successful adrenaline administration at six weeks, assessed by an independent expert. Secondary outcomes were success at one year, success after switching device, and adverse events. Results We randomized 158 participants. At six weeks, 30 of 71 (42%) participants allocated to Anapen and 31 of 73 (43%) participants allocated to EpiPen were successful – RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.68–1.46). Success rates at one year were also similar, but digital injection was more common at one year with EpiPen (8/59, 14%) than Anapen (0/51, 0%, P = 0.007). When switched to a new device without specific training, success rates were higher with Auvi-Q (26/28, 93%) than other devices (39/80, 49%; P < 0.001). Conclusions AAI device design is a major determinant of successful adrenaline administration. Success rates were low with several devices, but were high using the audio-prompt device Auvi-Q. PMID:25850463

  13. Bee Pollen-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Hee; Jang, Young Sook; Oh, Jae Won; Kim, Cheol Hong; Hyun, In Gyu

    2015-09-01

    Bee pollen is pollen granules packed by honey bees and is widely consumed as natural healthy supplements. Bee pollen-induced anaphylaxis has rarely been reported, and its allergenic components have never been studied. A 40-year-old male came to the emergency room with generalized urticaria, facial edema, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea 1 hour after ingesting one tablespoon of bee pollen. Oxygen saturation was 91%. His symptoms resolved after injection of epinephrine, chlorpheniramine, and dexamethasone. He had seasonal allergic rhinitis in autumn. Microscopic examination of the bee pollen revealed Japanese hop, chrysanthemum, ragweed, and dandelion pollens. Skin-prick with bee pollen extracts showed positive reactions at 0.1 mg/mL (A/H ratio > 3+). Serum specific IgE to ragweed was 25.2, chrysanthemum 20.6, and dandelion 11.4 kU/L; however, Japanese hop, honey-bee venom and yellow-jacket venom were negative (UniCAP®, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed serum specific IgE to bee-pollen extracts, and an ELISA inhibition assay for evaluation of cross-allergenicity of bee pollen and other weed pollens showed more than 90% of inhibition with chrysanthemum and dandelion and ~40% inhibition with ragweed at a concentration of 1 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and IgE-immunoblot analysis revealed 9 protein bands (11, 14, 17, 28, 34, 45, 52, 72, and 90 kDa) and strong IgE binding at 28-34 kDa, 45 and 52 kDa. In conclusion, healthcare providers should be aware of the potential risk of severe allergic reactions upon ingestion of bee pollen, especially in patients with pollen allergy. PMID:25749764

  14. Anaphylaxis caused by stings from the Solenopsis invicta, lava-pés ant or red imported fire ant.

    PubMed

    Haddad Junior, Vidal; Larsson, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Ants are social insects with species of medical interest, such as the fire ants (Solenopsis sp.). The sting causes inflammation, vesicles and sterile pustules, which may cause allergic phenomena and even anaphylactic shock. We describe a patient who suffered a large number of stings and an episode of syncope with fall in blood pressure and complete regression of symptoms after resuscitation and medication for anaphylaxis. Considering the clinical manifestations and images of wheals and blisters on the patient's feet at the time of syncope, this report should serve as a warning for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition and even for counseling and prevention regarding patients exposed to this risk. PMID:26312665

  15. [Wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis possibly sensitized by the hydrolyzed wheat proteins in a facial cleansing soap].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Miwa; Okura, Risa; Yoshioka, Haruna; Hiromasa, Kana; Yoshioka, Manabu; Nakamura, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    There are increasing cases of wheat dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with transcutaneous or transmucosal sensitization. Hydrolyzed wheat included in a certain brand of soap was identified as a cause of sensitization. The useful clues to detect this disorder consist of the patient's past usage of a soap containing hydrolyzed wheat, the appearance of cutaneous or mucosal symptoms after the intake of wheat or washing with this soap, and a high level of specific IgE for wheat gluten. Because hydrolyzed wheat is used as an additive in a wide variety of cosmetics, we should pay careful attention to the ingredients of cosmetics when observing WDEIA. PMID:22428462

  16. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space system (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower earth orbit (BLEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular extravehicular activity system (MEVAS) that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs and define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs

  17. Active Annuloplasty System for Mitral Valve Insufficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Lafont, Pilar; Rada, Ignacio; Jiménez, Antonio; Hernández, José Luis; Lorenzo-Yustos, Héctor; Muñoz-García, Julio

    Active materials are capable of responding in a controlled way to different external physical or chemical stimuli by changing some of their properties. These materials can be used to design and develop sensors, actuators and multifunctional systems with a large number of applications for developing medical devices.

  18. METALS DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project developed models to predict the distribution of metals in activated sludge system process streams. The data used to develop the models were obtained through extended pilot studies from a previous project. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effects of wa...

  19. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  20. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  1. Targeted activation in deterministic and stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Bryan; Mezić, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Metastable escape is ubiquitous in many physical systems and is becoming a concern in engineering design as these designs (e.g., swarms of vehicles, coupled building energetics, nanoengineering, etc.) become more inspired by dynamics of biological, molecular and other natural systems. In light of this, we study a chain of coupled bistable oscillators which has two global conformations and we investigate how specialized or targeted disturbance is funneled in an inverse energy cascade and ultimately influences the transition process between the conformations. We derive a multiphase averaged approximation to these dynamics which illustrates the influence of actions in modal coordinates on the coarse behavior of this process. An activation condition that predicts how the disturbance influences the rate of transition is then derived. The prediction tools are derived for deterministic dynamics and we also present analogous behavior in the stochastic setting and show a divergence from Kramers activation behavior under targeted activation conditions.

  2. Green Bank Telescope active surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasse, Richard J.

    1998-05-01

    During the design phase of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), various means of providing an accurate surface on a large aperture paraboloid, were considered. Automated jacks supporting the primary reflector were selected as the appropriate technology since they promised greater performance and potentially lower costs than a homologous or carbon fiber design, and had certain advantages over an active secondary. The design of the active surface has presented many challenges. Since the actuators are mounted on a tipping structure, it was required that they support a significant side-load. Such devices were not readily available commercially so they had to be developed. Additional actuator requirements include low backlash, repeatable positioning, and an operational life of at least 230 years. Similarly, no control system capable of controlling the 2209 actuators was commercially available. Again a prime requirement was reliability. Maintaining was also a very important consideration. The system architecture is tree-like. An active surface 'master-computer' controls interaction with the telescope control system, and controls ancillary equipment such as power supplies and temperature monitors. Two slave computers interface with the master- computer, and each closes approximately 1100 position loops. For simplicity, the servo is an 'on/off' type, yet achieves a positioning resolution of 25 microns. Each slave computer interfaces with 4 VME I/O cards, which in turn communicate with 140 control modules. The control modules read out the positions of the actuators every 0.1 sec and control the actuators' DC motors. Initial control of the active surface will be based on an elevation dependant structural model. Later, the model will be improved by holographic observations.Surface accuracy will be improved further by using laser ranging system which will actively measure the surface figure. Several tests have been conducted to assure that the system will perform as desired when

  3. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  4. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  5. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  6. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  7. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  8. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  9. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  10. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  11. Active laser system for sea ice control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nickolay N.; Gaponov, Alexandr E.; Kuluba, Yury N.; Matous, Vladislav I.; Radominov, Oleg E.; Tuzikov, Vladimir Z.; Vargaftic, Vasiliy N.

    1997-01-01

    The airborne systems are used for complex investigations of coastline very successfully, for example it can be used to measure the depth of the sea, to discover the reefs and so on. Such information may be used in navigation too. The specific conditions of navigation in the North and Pole seas defines the necessity of exact knowledge about the ice cracks in order to find the possible direction of the ship movement. The active optical system, working in the near IR region, has many advantages before the passive one, especially if it is necessary to work during the polar night and at bad weather conditions. In this article we discuss the demands to the laser active airborne systems, that given the accurate picture of the ice with high resolution in the daytime and nighttime conditions. Such system based on the laser, mechanical scanner and avalanche photodiode is very compact, reliable and informative. The picture of the ice surface can be shown on the TV monitor, can be written to the memory and can be delivered to the processing center by the radiochannel. The experimental results are shown together with results of this system probing in the conditions of the North Pole Ocean.

  12. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  13. PERI-ANESTHESIA ANAPHYLAXIS (PAA): WE STILL HAVE NOT STARTED POST-PAA TESTING FOR INCITING ANESTHESIA-RELATED ALLERGENS.

    PubMed

    Alshaeri, Taghreed; Gupta, Deepak; Nagabhushana, Ananthamurthy

    2016-02-01

    Anaphylaxis during anesthesia is uncommon. Diagnosis of peri-anesthesia anaphylaxis (PAA) requires anesthesia providers' vigilance for prompt diagnosis and treatment. In this case report, we present a challenging case with suspected PAA including its perioperative management, intensive care unit (ICU) course, and post-discharge follow-up. A 44-year-old female (body mass index = 26) presented for elective abdominal panniculectomy. Post-intubation, severe bronchospasm occurred that was non-responsive to nebulized albuterol and intravenous epinephrine. Continuous infusion of epinephrine was initiated. After aborting surgical procedure, the patient was transferred to ICU on continuous intravenous infusion of epinephrine. Venous blood sampling showed elevated troponin level. Echocardiography revealed ejection fraction of 25% suspicious of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (mid cavitary variant). Tracheal extubation was only possible after three days. Subsequently, patient was discharged home with a cardiology follow-up appointment and a referral to an allergy specialist. Unfortunately at our institution (an academic university hospital in United States) along with neighboring institutions in near-by areas, the only allergy skin tests available are for local anesthetics and antibiotics, while neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) cannot be tested (the suspected anaphylactic agent in our case was presumably rocuronium). In summary, PAA requires and responds to emergent diagnosis and immediate treatment; however there is still a long way to go to ensure post-PAA testing for inciting anesthesia-related allergens. PMID:27382817

  14. Anaphylaxis management: the essential role of adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injectors. Should PHARMAC fund them in New Zealand?

    PubMed

    Fitzharris, Penny; Empson, Marianne; Ameratunga, Rohan; Sinclair, Jan; Crump, Vincent; Steele, Richard; Broom, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an important life-threatening medical emergency. There is extensive evidence supporting the early use of intramuscular adrenaline for first medical responders and for self-initiated treatment, in at-risk individuals. Major patient groups identified as at ongoing risk are children and adults with severe food allergy, patients with venom allergy who have not been desensitised, and those with idiopathic anaphylaxis. Individual anaphylactic events are largely unpredictable. The most effective and safe route of administration for adrenaline is intramuscular, but it is difficult for patients and carers to achieve accurate and timely self-administration using an ampoule, needle, and syringe. The adrenaline auto-injector device which is available in New Zealand (the EpiPen) is not funded by PHARMAC, and thus only available to patients and families who are able to afford the purchase cost. It is difficult to understand the continued unwillingness of PHARMAC to fund an adrenaline auto-injector device to at-risk individuals, given the large body of information supporting its efficacy and use. The Australian model, where authorisation from a relevant specialist is required, could be used. PMID:16680178

  15. Cardiac and pulmonary anaphylaxis in guinea pigs and rabbits induced by glycoprotein isolated from tobacco leaves and cigarette smoke condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, R.; Zavecz, J.H.; Burke, J.A.; Becker, C.G.

    1982-03-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for heart attack. The pathologic mechanisms responsible for this association are obscure. It has been reported that approximately one-third of human volunteers, smokers and nonsmokers, exhibit immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity to a glycoprotein antigen (TGP) purified from cured tobacco leaves and present in cigarette smoke. It is also known that the heart is a primary target organ for anaphylactic reaction in many animals, including primates. In experiments described herein anaphylaxis was induced in the isolated hearts and lungs of rabbits and guinea pigs previously sensitized by immunization with TGP and challenged with TGP isolated from either tobacco leaf or cigarette smoke condensate. Cardiac anaphylaxis was characterized by sinus tachycardia, decreased contractility, decreased coronary perfusion accompanied by hypoxic electrocardiographic changes, and a variety of rhythm disturbances, including idioventricular tachyarrhythmias. These observations suggest that allergic reactions to tobacco constituents may initiate cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death in some smokers and may, in part, underly the association between cigarette smoking and heart attack.

  16. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  17. Spontaneous activity in the developing auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity is a common feature of sensory systems during early development. This sensory-independent neuronal activity has been implicated in promoting their survival and maturation, as well as growth and refinement of their projections to yield circuits that can rapidly extract information about the external world. Periodic bursts of action potentials occur in auditory neurons of mammals before hearing onset. This activity is induced by inner hair cells (IHCs) within the developing cochlea, which establish functional connections with spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) several weeks before they are capable of detecting external sounds. During this pre-hearing period, IHCs fire periodic bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials that excite SGNs, triggering brief but intense periods of activity that pass through auditory centers of the brain. Although spontaneous activity requires input from IHCs, there is ongoing debate about whether IHCs are intrinsically active and their firing periodically interrupted by external inhibitory input (IHC-inhibition model), or are intrinsically silent and their firing periodically promoted by an external excitatory stimulus (IHC-excitation model). There is accumulating evidence that inner supporting cells in Kölliker's organ spontaneously release ATP during this time, which can induce bursts of Ca(2+) spikes in IHCs that recapitulate many features of auditory neuron activity observed in vivo. Nevertheless, the role of supporting cells in this process remains to be established in vivo. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating IHC activity in the developing cochlea will help reveal how these events contribute to the maturation of nascent auditory circuits. PMID:25296716

  18. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  19. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  20. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  1. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  2. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  3. Dislocation boundaries and active slip systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-11-01

    Part of the dislocations which have participated in the plastic deformation of a polycrystalline metal are stored in dislocation boundaries in a two- or three-dimensional arrangement. The dislocation in such boundaries can be analyzed by determining the misorientation between neighboring crystallites and the boundary orientation. Information about the dislocations in the boundaries can also be obtained by an analysis of active slip systems based on the crystallite orientation and the imposed stress or strain state in combination with appropriate constraint conditions. In the present paper an analysis of the boundary dislocation structure and of the slip systems has been conducted for pure aluminium cold-rolled to a von Mises strain of 0.41. The results show that a substantial majority of dislocations in different types of dislocation boundaries are from the primary and conjugate slip system in the adjoining crystallites. A basis is therefore provided for integrating deformation structure observations with plastic deformation behavior.

  4. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  5. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  6. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  7. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  8. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  9. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  10. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles.

  11. A Group Recommender System for Tourist Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Inma; Sebastia, Laura; Onaindia, Eva; Guzman, Cesar

    This paper introduces a method for giving recommendations of tourist activities to a group of users. This method makes recommendations based on the group tastes, their demographic classification and the places visited by the users in former trips. The group recommendation is computed from individual personal recommendations through the use of techniques such as aggregation, intersection or incremental intersection. This method is implemented as an extension of the e-Tourism tool, which is a user-adapted tourism and leisure application, whose main component is the Generalist Recommender System Kernel (GRSK), a domain-independent taxonomy-driven search engine that manages the group recommendation.

  12. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  13. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  14. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  15. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  16. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  17. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Spontaneous Oscillations in an Active Matter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert; Tsang, Boyce; Granick, Steve

    Active matter (which consumes energy to move about) can organize into dynamic structures more interesting than those possible at steady-state. Here we show spontaneous periodic self-assembly in a simple three-component system of water, oil phase, and surfactant at constant room temperature, with emphasis on one model system. Benchtop experiments show that liquid crystal oil droplets spontaneously and collectively oscillate like a `beating heart' for several hours; contract, relax, and subsequently re-contract in a petri dish at a rate of a few `beats' per minute. These oscillations, emergent from the cooperative interaction of the three components, are driven by the competition between positive and negative feedback processes. This illustration of feedback in action reveals a new way to program self-assembled structures to vary with time.

  19. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  20. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  1. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  2. Anti-Allergic Action of Aged Black Garlic Extract in RBL-2H3 Cells and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis Reaction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC50, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC50, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA2, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  3. Anti-allergic action of aged black garlic extract in RBL-2H3 cells and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2014-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used as a food as well as a component of traditional medicine. Aged black garlic (ABG) is known to have various bioactivities. However, the effect of ABG on allergic response is almost unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether ABG can inhibit immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic response in RBL-2H3 cells as well as in vivo passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). In in vitro tests, ethyl acetate extract (EBG) of ABG significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 1.53 mg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 0.98 mg/mL). Moreover, BG10, an active fraction of EBG, dramatically suppressed the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC₅₀, 53.60 μg/mL) and TNF-α (IC₅₀, 27.80 μg/mL). In addition, BG10 completely blocked the formation of prostaglandin E₂ and leukotriene B₄ at ≥25 μg/mL. When the effect of BG10 on FcɛRI receptor cascade was investigated, BG10 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not Lyn. Furthermore, BG10 dose dependently decreased the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Consistent with what has been mentioned earlier, BG10 also significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that ABG suppresses the allergic response, and the mechanism for its anti-allergic action may involve suppressions of Syk, cPLA₂, 5-LO, and COX-2. The anti-allergic actions of ABG, EBG, or BG10 suggest that they may be useful as functional foods for allergic diseases. PMID:24456359

  4. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  5. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. They are using a Schlumberger neutron generator for the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel, in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics for the detection of very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. They have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The results to data are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference.

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity. An operational definition.

    PubMed

    Liang, M H; Stern, S; Esdaile, J M

    1988-04-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment have reduced mortality from SLE and present us with an opportunity to consider SLE in finer distinctions than alive or dead. Although much has been learned about SLE without a gold standard of disease activity or a universally agreed-upon definition of SLE activity, standardization of one or more measures would greatly enhance our ability to compare results from different centers and to communicate more precisely. It is unlikely that any of the existing measures or any ones to be developed will completely satisfy everyone's needs but it is pointless to proliferate new ones without testing their metric properties. Some differences in concept are desirable, particularly for investigators who have specialized interests or insights, but each should meet criteria of reliability and validity and have explicit definitions of terms, rules for their ascertainment, and the time period covered. Moreover, agreement on minimum essential elements of any SLE activity measure and their operational definitions would be a boon. SLE activity is one dimension in the disease pathway of lupus and implies a continuous phenomena that is potentially reversible. Organ damage, another point in the path of causation, connotes irreversible disease. We recommend that minimum essential elements be based on their frequency of occurrence, biological sensibleness, and the likelihood that degrees of activity can be rated reliably to show a change in a clinical state. The rating should be independent of whether a therapy is employed. Since activity is always considered with severity, the two dimensions could be recognized in the scale. Severity can be used to expand a scale's gradations if a symptom or sign is present. Severity could be rated by the need to treat with immunosuppressive agents, the need to follow the patient more closely, or the functional or prognostic consequences of the manifestation. For every organ system clinical judgment should be used to decide

  7. Intraoperative anaphylaxis due to gelofusine in a patient undergoing intramedullary nailing of the femur: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although uncommon, anaphylaxis due to a colloid plasma expander can occur peri-operatively Case presentation We present a case of an intra-operative cardiac arrest in a 72 year old Caucasian male patient who underwent prophylactic intramedullary nailing for a proximal femoral metastasis from prostate cancer. The patient was resuscitated successfully and the procedure was completed uneventfully. Elevated serum tryptase levels confirmed the diagnosis of an anaphylactic reaction and positive allergy skin prick testing identified gelofusine as the causative agent. Conclusion A high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis and rapid institution of treatment are essential for a safe outcome following such reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of such a severe reaction to gelofusine infusion that occurs during an orthopaedic procedure. PMID:19126195

  8. Anaphylaxis caused by stings from the Solenopsis invicta, lava-pés ant or red imported fi re ant*

    PubMed Central

    Haddad Junior, Vidal; Larsson, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Ants are social insects with species of medical interest, such as the fi re ants (Solenopsis sp.). The sting causes inflammation, vesicles and sterile pustules, which may cause allergic phenomena and even anaphylactic shock. We describe a patient who suffered a large number of stings and an episode of syncope with fall in blood pressure and complete regression of symptoms after resuscitation and medication for anaphylaxis. Considering the clinical manifestations and images of wheals and blisters on the patient’s feet at the time of syncope, this report should serve as a warning for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition and even for counseling and prevention regarding patients exposed to this risk. PMID:26312665

  9. Spontaneous rupture of a splenic hydatid cyst with anaphylaxis in a patient with multi-organ hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Constantin, V; Popa, F; Socea, B; Carâp, A; Bălălău, C; Motofei, I; Banu, P; Costea, D

    2014-01-01

    Hidatid cysts of the spleen are a rare occurrence, the spleen being the third most common organ for the development of Echinococcus Granulosus. Splenic hydatid cysts are commonly part of multi-organ hydatid disease. Diagnosis is often established when investigating a splenomegaly or by chance during an unrelated consult. It can also be diagnosed after rupture, be it following trauma (the most common occurrence)or spontaneous. Splenic hydatid cyst rupture requires immediate action and is a life-threatening condition. It results, most often, in splenectomy. We present the case of a patient with multi-organ hydatid disease that presented with a ruptured splenic cyst and developed anaphylaxis. The case was resolved by splenectomy and recovered well. PMID:24956347

  10. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  11. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  12. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Susan L; Goss, Diana; Hollis, Kelly; Silvia, Suyapa; White, Martha V

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019). Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683) reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613) indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%). A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3,024/5,578) permitted only the school nurse and select staff to administer epinephrine, although percentages varied by region/state (range, 4%–100%). Conclusion Schools differed substantially in their preparedness to manage anaphylaxis, with significant disparities in staff training and permission to treat. Given

  13. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  14. The Bee Sting That Was Not: An Unusual Case of Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis Averted in a Patient Treated with Omalizumab for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case of hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis averted by omalizumab, a monoclonal antibody to IgE antibody. This case suggests a novel and unintentional effect of this therapy. Currently omalizumab is only FDA approved for the treatment of moderate-persistent allergic asthma. However case reports, such as ours have illustrated omalizumab's efficacy in the treatment of a myriad immunologic and allergic diseases. These outcomes have broadened the understanding of omalizumab's complex mechanism of action. PMID:25180038

  15. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  16. [A Case of Rocuronium Anaphylaxis in which Anesthesia was Safely Performed after Selection of an Alternative Drug after a Skin Test].

    PubMed

    Naruse, Satoshi; Iwata, Hiroki; Suzuki, Kota; Uraoka, Masahiro; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    We report our experience of a patient with a history of anaphylactic shock suspected to be caused by rocuronium who was scheduled to undergo hepatic tumor resection. The patient was a 17-year-old female (height : 166 cm, weight : 46 kg). During general anesthesia at another hospital several years ago, she had an anaphylactic shock, and rocuronium was suspected to be the offending drug. To collect information and search for the cause, skin tests were performed for rocuronium, vecuronium and suxamethonium. She was positive for rocuronium, and negative for other drugs. At anesthesia induction, we administered vecuronium and confirmed no development of anaphylaxis before commencement of surgery. In the perioperative period, she had no symptoms that indicated anaphylaxis. Since there is potential high cross-reactivity among muscle relaxants, it is important to perform a test for alternative drugs when a muscle relaxant may be a cause of anaphylaxis. Selection and administration of an alternative drug should be carefully performed, even when a skin test is negative for the alternative drug. PMID:27483667

  17. Immunological control of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract: the mechanism whereby intestinal anaphylaxis interferes with the intestinal absorption of bromthymol blue in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Utsumi, E; Sakane, T; Hamaura, T; Nakamura, J; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1986-05-01

    Rats were immunized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin and the disappearance of bromthymol blue (BTB) from the intestinal lumen, its accumulation in the tissue, and its net absorption were examined by means of an in-situ recirculation technique during local anaphylaxis. The disappearance of BTB from the intestinal lumen and its net absorption were significantly reduced, but there was no significant effect on its accumulation in the tissue. The pH value of the luminal solution and the perfusate volume were not influenced by intraluminal challenge with the antigen in ovalbumin-immunized rats. In addition, no significant effect was observed on intestinal permeability to BTB in the in-vitro everted sac technique. The intestinal blood flow, measured by a hydrogen clearance method, was not reduced significantly by the intraluminal exposure to antigen. There was enhanced Evans Blue leakage and mucus release in the perfusate after intraluminal challenge with ovalbumin in ovalbumin-immunized rats, but not in non-immunized rats. A significant increase of BTB binding with macromolecular substances in the perfusate was observed during the local anaphylaxis. These findings suggest that the decreased absorption of BTB is due to the interaction with the macromolecular substances in the perfusate during local anaphylaxis. PMID:2872311

  18. Activity Systems and Moral Reasoning: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardi, Eva; Helkama, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen social educator students were taught to analyze their work activity by means of a Vygotsky-inspired method, drawing on Engeström's notion of an activity system. The method aimed at increasing the consciousness of the students of the structure of work activity system. The participants wrote two accounts of their field-work practice…

  19. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  20. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  1. Student Activity Funds: Creating a System of Controls That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Although student-activity funds usually represent a small portion of school-system monies, their very nature makes them a high risk. Outlines three steps for maintaining an efficient and effective system of controls over student-activity funds: (1) identifying control issues; (2) designing a control system; and (3) using checks and balances.…

  2. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  4. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  5. Power System Considerations and Test Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential benefits of an IPACS system compared to NiCd and/or Regen Fuel Cell systems are summarized. The benefits are: (1) significant life cycle cost savings; (2) total weight to orbit savings (30 yrs) as much as 10 times; (3) end to end efficiency increase results in approximately 10 kW reduction in array size(6%); (4) motor/generator controller regulation during discharge simplifies distribution system; and (5) momentum stored for attitude control increased by 4 times.

  6. [Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis difficult to evoke symptoms by provocation test].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Sanada, Seiko; Hara, Takeshi; Hide, Michihiro

    2006-11-01

    We report two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), which were hardly induced by provocation test in the hospital. Case 1: A 28-years-old Japanese female suffers repeated episodes of sternutation, nasal discharge and edema of eyelids after wheat ingestion of wheat followed by exercise. Case 2: A 14-years-old Japanese male suffers repeated episodes of wheal formation on whole body and dyspnea after lunch containing apple followed by exercise. Both of them had never developed symptoms by either ingestion or exercise alone. Provocation tests were performed on admission by combinations of the ingestion of suspected foods, exercise, and aspirin, but no symptoms were reproduced by any combination of them. After discharge, case 1 reproduced symptoms during exercise after the ingestion of wheat under prostration and cold climate. Case 2 reproduced symptoms during exercise after ingestion of apple when he suffered from common cold. Warm and comfortable condition in admission may make it harder to evoke symptoms by the provocation test. Frigidity, cold, prostration, and stress should be reckoned with in the provocation test to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for FDEIA. PMID:17159435

  7. Chinese bellflower root anaphylaxis: IgE-binding components and cross-reactivity with mugwort and birch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2009-09-01

    A 56-year-old man who had suffered from seasonal rhinitis in spring and autumn experienced recurrent generalized urticaria and an oral burning sensation after eating several cooked herbs for 3 months. A skin-prick test showed positive responses to various pollens, celery, Chinese bellflower, and arrowroot. The Chinese bellflower-specific IgE ELISA OD value was 1.547. Oral challenge with unprocessed raw Chinese bellflower root provoked oral burning sensation, eyelid swelling, generalized urticaria, and hypotension. In an ELISA inhibition test, IgE binding to Chinese bellflower was significantly inhibited by Chinese bellflower, mugwort, and birch pollen extract. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot assay revealed nine IgE-binding components, and common protein bands were detected in the range of 40~55 kDa (Chinese bellflower-mugwort-birch) and 14 kDa (Chinese bellflower-birch). Chinese bellflower root can cause anaphylaxis and may have cross-reactivity with mugwort and birch. PMID:19721867

  8. Description of data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of the JPL Computing and Information Services Office is to develop and maintain a JPL plan for providing computing services to the JPL management and administrative community that will lead to improved productivity. The CISO plan to accomplish this objective has been titled 'Management and Administrative Support Systems' (MASS). The MASS plan is based on the continued use of JPL's IBM 3032 Computer system for administrative computing and for the MASS functions. The current candidate administrative Data Base Management Systems required to support the MASS include ADABASE, Cullinane IDMS and TOTAL. Previous uses of administrative Data Base Systems have been applied to specific local functions rather than in a centralized manner with elements common to the many user groups. Limited capacity data base systems have been installed in microprocessor based office automation systems in a few Project and Management Offices using Ashton-Tate dBASE II. These experiences plus some other localized in house DBMS uses have provided an excellent background for developing user and system requirements for a single DBMS to support the MASS program.

  9. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  10. Experimental acquisition system for impedance tomography with active electrode approach.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, B; Shi, Y; Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P

    1993-11-01

    An experimental system for impedance tomography has been constructed. The acquisition system uses 16 multifunctional active electrodes, each including a current source and a voltage buffer. Images of active and reactive parts of different target impedances in a phantom filled with liquid have been obtained. The system performance has been compared with those of other systems using either a mesh phantom or rods as point sources used for the determination of the modulation transfer function. PMID:8145585

  11. Practical engineering: control of active systems using the stagnation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lunde, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    Solar active systems with flat plate collectors are discussed with reference to the temperature at which the system should be activated. It is concluded that the system should be activated when the stagnation temperature (temperature under the absorber plate when no fluid is circulating) equals the temperature of the fluid in storage. A thermistor Wheatstone bridge control system is described which will eliminate pump relay chatter and the permissible control differential is calculated from the collector efficiency curve. To avoid dedication of an entire collector to house the control system, a method is described for determining the stagnation temperature using a portion of an active collector. For an active solar hot water system, a calculation is carried out to show that a 2/sup 0/F temperature differential (stagnation temperature-storage temperature) is satisfactory. (MJJ)

  12. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  13. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  14. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  15. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  16. Entry-Level Activities in System Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    System-level consultation or organizational development in schools is an area in great need of theoretical models and definitions. The three articles in this special issue provide a unique learning opportunity not only for consultation across borders but also for consultation within the same nation. In my commentary, I limit my remarks to a few…

  17. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 1: System functional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Systems engineering is examined in terms of functional activities that are performed in the conduct of a system definition/design, and system development is described in a parametric analysis that combines functions, performance, and design variables. Emphasis is placed on identification of activities performed by design organizations, design specialty groups, as well as a central systems engineering organizational element. Identification of specific roles and responsibilities for doing functions, and monitoring and controlling activities within the system development operation are also emphasized.

  18. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  19. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  20. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  1. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  2. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  3. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  4. Delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria after consumption of red meat in patients with IgE antibodies specific for galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Satinover, Shama M.; Hosen, Jacob; Mozena, Jonathan; Borish, Larry; Lewis, Barrett D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate moieties are frequently encountered in food and can elicit IgE responses, the clinical significance of which has been unclear. Recent work, however, has shown that IgE antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal), a carbohydrate commonly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins, are capable of eliciting serious, even fatal, reactions. Objective We sought to determine whether IgE antibodies to α-gal are present in sera from patients who report anaphylaxis or urticaria after eating beef, pork, or lamb. Methods Detailed histories were taken from patients presenting to the University of Virginia Allergy Clinic. Skin prick tests (SPTs), intradermal skin tests, and serum IgE antibody analysis were performed for common indoor, outdoor, and food allergens. Results Twenty-four patients with IgE antibodies to α-gal were identified. These patients described a similar history of anaphylaxis or urticaria 3 to 6 hours after the ingestion of meat and reported fewer or no episodes when following an avoidance diet. SPTs to mammalian meat produced wheals of usually less than 4 mm, whereas intradermal or fresh-food SPTs provided larger and more consistent wheal responses. CAP-RAST testing revealed specific IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cow’s milk, cat, and dog but not turkey, chicken, or fish. Absorption experiments indicated that this pattern of sensitivity was explained by an IgE antibody specific for α-gal. Conclusion We report a novel and severe food allergy related to IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope α-gal. These patients experience delayed symptoms of anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria associated with eating beef, pork, or lamb. PMID:19070355

  5. Active and intelligent packaging systems for a modern society.

    PubMed

    Realini, Carolina E; Marcos, Begonya

    2014-11-01

    Active and intelligent packaging systems are continuously evolving in response to growing challenges from a modern society. This article reviews: (1) the different categories of active and intelligent packaging concepts and currently available commercial applications, (2) latest packaging research trends and innovations, and (3) the growth perspectives of the active and intelligent packaging market. Active packaging aiming at extending shelf life or improving safety while maintaining quality is progressing towards the incorporation of natural active agents into more sustainable packaging materials. Intelligent packaging systems which monitor the condition of the packed food or its environment are progressing towards more cost-effective, convenient and integrated systems to provide innovative packaging solutions. Market growth is expected for active packaging with leading shares for moisture absorbers, oxygen scavengers, microwave susceptors and antimicrobial packaging. The market for intelligent packaging is also promising with strong gains for time-temperature indicator labels and advancements in the integration of intelligent concepts into packaging materials. PMID:25034453

  6. Galactose-α-1,3-Galactose–Specific IgE Is Associated with Anaphylaxis but Not Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Kelly, Libby A.; Rönmark, Eva; James, Hayley R.; Pochan, Shawna L.; Peters, Edward J.; Lundbäck, Bo; Nganga, Lucy W.; Cooper, Philip J.; Hoskins, Janelle M.; Eapen, Saju S.; Matos, Luis A.; McBride, Dane C.; Heymann, Peter W.; Woodfolk, Judith A.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) are common in the southeastern United States. These antibodies, which are induced by ectoparasitic ticks, can give rise to positive skin tests or serum assays with cat extract. Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between IgE antibodies to α-gal and asthma, and compare this with the relationship between asthma and IgE antibodies to Fel d 1 and other protein allergens. Methods: Patients being investigated for recurrent anaphylaxis, angioedema, or acute urticaria underwent spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, questionnaires, and serum IgE antibody assays. The results were compared with control subjects and cohorts from the emergency department in Virginia (n = 130), northern Sweden (n = 963), and rural Kenya (n = 131). Measurements and Main Results: Patients in Virginia with high-titer IgE antibodies to α-gal had normal lung function, low levels of exhaled nitric oxide, and low prevalence of asthma symptoms. Among patients in the emergency department and children in Kenya, there was no association between IgE antibodies to α-gal and asthma (odds ratios, 1.04 and 0.75, respectively). In Sweden, IgE antibodies to cat were closely correlated with IgE antibodies to Fel d 1 (r = 0.83) and to asthma (P < 0.001). Conclusions: These results provide a model of an ectoparasite-induced specific IgE response that can increase total serum IgE without creating a risk for asthma, and further evidence that the main allergens that are causally related to asthma are those that are inhaled. PMID:22281828

  7. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  8. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  9. NASA's UAS [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] Related Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    NASA continues to operate all sizes of UAS in all classes of airspace both domestically and internationally. Missions range from highly complex operations in coordination with piloted aircraft, ground, and space systems in support of science objectives to single aircraft operations in support of aeronautics research. One such example is a scaled commercial transport aircraft being used to study recovery techniques due to large upsets. NASA's efforts to support routine UAS operations continued on several fronts last year. At the national level in the United States (U.S.), NASA continued its support of the UAS Executive Committee (ExCom) comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. Recommendations were received on how to operate both manned and unmanned aircraft in class D airspace and plans are being developed to validate and implement those recommendations. In addition the UAS ExCom has begun developing recommendations for how to achieve routine operations in remote areas as well as for small UAS operations in class G airspace. As well as supporting the UAS ExCom, NASA is a participant in the recently formed Aviation Rule Making Committee for UAS. This committee, established by the FAA, is intended to propose regulatory guidance which would enable routine civil UAS operations. As that effort matures NASA stands ready to supply the necessary technical expertise to help that committee achieve its objectives. By supporting both the UAS ExCom and UAS ARC, NASA is positioned to provide its technical expertise across the full spectrum of UAS airspace access related topic areas. The UAS NAS Access Project got underway this past year under the leadership of NASA s Aeronautics

  10. Retinal waves coordinate patterned activity throughout the developing visual system

    PubMed Central

    Ackman, James B.; Burbridge, Timothy J.; Crair, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The morphologic and functional development of the vertebrate nervous system is initially governed by genetic factors and subsequently refined by neuronal activity. However, fundamental features of the nervous system emerge before sensory experience is possible. Thus, activity-dependent development occurring before the onset of experience must be driven by spontaneous activity, but the origin and nature of activity in vivo remains largely untested. Here we use optical methods to demonstrate in live neonatal mice that waves of spontaneous retinal activity are present and propagate throughout the entire visual system before eye opening. This patterned activity encompassed the visual field, relied on cholinergic neurotransmission, preferentially initiated in the binocular retina, and exhibited spatiotemporal correlations between the two hemispheres. Retinal waves were the primary source of activity in the midbrain and primary visual cortex, but only modulated ongoing activity in secondary visual areas. Thus, spontaneous retinal activity is transmitted through the entire visual system and carries patterned information capable of guiding the activity-dependent development of complex intra- and inter- hemispheric circuits before the onset of vision. PMID:23060192

  11. Active Venting System Offshore Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Shyam; Rise, Leif; Bellec, Valérie; Dolan, Margaret; Bøe, Reidulv; Thorsnes, Terje; Buhl-Mortensen, Pål; Buhl-Mortensen, Lene

    2008-07-01

    A combined sediment-sampling, high-resolution seismic, multiple echo sounder, and video survey was conducted offshore Vesterålen, northern Norway, in October 2007 as part of the ongoing Marine Area Database for Norwegian Coast and Oceanic Regions (MAREANO) program. MAREANO is a multidisciplinary seabed mapping program conducting physical, biological, and environmental mapping in the Lofoten/southern Barents Sea area. Data and analysis arising from this program will provide the basis for ecosystem-based management of Norway's coastal and offshore regions. The survey used multicorer, box corer, and grab samplers; a TOPAS parametric subbottom profiler; 18-, 38-, 70-, 120-, 200-, and 400-kilohertz echo sounders; and a CAMPOD camera system with two video cameras and lights mounted on an aluminum frame.

  12. Correlated Rotational Noise in Active Brownian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Caleb; Baskaran, Aparna

    We consider a system of self-propelled particles in a viscous medium for which the angle parametrizing the direction of particle propulsion is subject to correlated noise. The physics involved in the correlated noise is explored by deriving a modified Smoluchowski equation that governs the evolution of the probability distribution for particle positions and orientations. More precisely, given noise correlations that decay exponentially in time with decay constant ν, we give the modified Smoluchowski equation as a perturbative expansion in ν. While the physical origins of correlated noise may be diverse, we give one interpretation of the resulting dynamics in terms of inertial effects that are absent from the usual overdamped description of self-propelled particles in a viscous medium.

  13. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  14. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  15. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  16. [Activities of System Studies and Simulation, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Launch Vehicle Interface Work Performed: a. S3 provided to KSC the new launch inclination targets needed for the April '04 launch date. 2. Prelaunch operations work performed: a. S3 updated the staffing plan for MSFC on-console personnel\\during the Final Countdown prior to launch. 3. Software Assessment Work Performed: a. S3 evaluated and recommended approval for Program Control Board (PCB) proposed change 649 for ground software changes, as well as change 650 and 650A for Stored Program Commands. 4. Education and Public Outreach Work Performed: a. S3 continues to coordinate the effort for the design and fabrication of scale models of the GP-3 for use at the launch site, education forums, and management/technical briefings. S3 also prepared a Change Request for additional funds needed for fabrication of additional scale models. S3 drafted the planned uses of these models, including the possibility of participation in the Boston, MA showings of the traveling Einstein Exhibit. 5. Program Management Support Work Performed: a. S3 prepared the input for and closed three MSFC Centerwide Action Item Tracking Systems (CAITS) actions during this period.

  17. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  18. Space Activism as an Epiphanic Belief System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    Years of interaction with young people in the space industry and in space activists groups led to my observation that many such individuals can cite a quite specific life event that triggered a life-long interest in or commitment to creating a space future. I am particularly intrigued by parallels between such experiences and the phenomenon of epiphanic experiences among committed Christians. I see analogies between the puzzlement among space activists and among Christian groups as to the reasons for so many people being "unbelievers." At a small international meeting on lunar exploration in 2003, I heard two separate lunch speakers cite such personal experiences. At the beginning of a break in that meeting, I grabbed the microphone from the chairman and asked each person to write down on a pad by his chair whether or not he (or she) had experienced a specific event that led to their involvement in space. If the answer was positive, I asked for a brief narrative, for their age at the time, and for their current age. I received 53 submissions, 20% of which simply stated that their involvement in space exploration was happenstance. (Apollo astronaut John Young was among these.) The other 80% of the submissions had specific stories. The ages at the time of the epiphany ranged from 4 to 47; and their current ages ranged from 22 to 78. I will present a high-level characterization of these inputs. Interest in space exploration as a form of belief system is consistent with choosing NASA goals for the purpose of inspiration and with phenomena such as the "Overview Effect". More research might explore what form the transcendent experience takes and whether it might be associated with feelings of universal connection such as the noosphere or "The Force". From a pragmatic point of view, outreach strategies for exploration should focus on giving individuals access to personal, potentially transformational experiences as opposed to astronaut talks at civic clubs.

  19. Active Storage Processing in a Parallel File System

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Evan J.; Fox, Kevin M.; Regimbal, Kevin M.; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2006-01-01

    By creating a processing system within a parallel file system one can harness the power of unused processing power on servers that have very fast access to the disks they are serving. By inserting a module the Lustre file system the Active Storage Concept is able to perform processing with the file system architecture. Results of using this technology are presented as the results of the Supercomputing StorCloud Challenge Application are reviewed.

  20. IgE-Mediated Reaction to Metamizole: Evaluation of a Patient with Severe Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sevket; Ucar, Ramazan; Caliskaner, Ahmet Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Metamizole, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with weak anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic effects, is used as an analgesic and antipyretic agent. Many adverse reactions to metamizole, such as early or late-onset systemic reactions and bone marrow suppression, have been identified. In this report, we present a case of systemic reaction after the application of parenteral metamizole (Novalgin® ampoule; Sanofi Aventis, İstanbul, Turkey) and discuss the mechanism underlying the reaction. PMID:27551180

  1. Bactericidal activity of metal-mediated peroxide-ascorbate systems.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1974-11-01

    Model systems containing ascorbate, hydrogen peroxide, and divalent copper or cobalt have been shown to possess marked bactericidal activity. At equivalent concentrations, copper-containing systems were more bactericidal than the corresponding mixtures containing cobalt. Cobalt at concentrations below 10(-4) M did not appreciably augment microbicidal activity, whereas systems containing copper at concentrations as low as 5 x 10(-6) M were still capable of causing some bacterial death. Manganese was inactive. None of these systems was as potent as the well known myeloperoxidase-peroxide-halide system. The mechanisms of action of these systems are not as yet clear. The possibility that they function through the generation of superoxide (O(2) (-)), hydroxyl radical (OH.), or other free radicals was explored through the use of superoxide dismutase and several free radical scavengers. It seems likely at present that the two active metal-mediated systems function via separate mechanisms. The copper system acts with dehydroascorbate, whereas the cobalt system does not. Activity in the cobalt system appears to depend upon the generation of free radicals. PMID:16558093

  2. Complement profile and activation mechanisms by different LDL apheresis systems.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Enebakk, Terje; Christiansen, Dorte; Ludviksen, Judith Krey; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-07-01

    Extracorporeal removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by means of selective LDL apheresis is indicated in otherwise uncontrolled familial hypercholesterolemia. During blood-biomaterial interaction other constituents than the LDL particles are affected, including the complement system. We set up an ex vivo model in which human whole blood was passed through an LDL apheresis system with one of three different apheresis columns: whole blood adsorption, plasma adsorption and plasma filtration. The concentrations of complement activation products revealed distinctly different patterns of activation and adsorption by the different systems. Evaluated as the final common terminal complement complex (TCC) the whole blood system was inert, in contrast to the plasma systems, which generated substantial and equal amounts of TCC. Initial classical pathway activation was revealed equally for both plasma systems as increases in the C1rs-C1inh complex and C4d. Alternative pathway activation (Bb) was most pronounced for the plasma adsorption system. Although the anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) were equally generated by the two plasma separation systems, they were efficiently adsorbed to the plasma adsorption column before the "outlet", whereas they were left free in the plasma in the filtration system. Consequently, during blood-biomaterial interaction in LDL apheresis the complement system is modulated in different manners depending on the device composition. PMID:22373816

  3. Dual-Actuator Active Vibration-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Kiraly, Louis J.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Manchala, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Dual-actuator active vibration-control (DAAVC) system is developmental system of type described in "Active Vibration Dampers for Rotating Machinery" (LEW-15427). System features sensors and actuators positioned and oriented at bearings to measure and counteract vibrations of shaft along either of two axes perpendicular to axis of rotation. Effective in damping vibrations of helicopter-engine test stand, making it safer to operate engine at speeds near and above first resonance of engine/test-stand system. Opens new opportunities for engine designers to draw more power from engine, and concept applicable to other rotating machines.

  4. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  5. Active mirror alignment control system for the MACE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulgod, S. V.; Pious, Lizy; Chadda, V. K.; Kaul, S. R.; Yadav, K. K.; Koul, R.

    2002-03-01

    The conceptual design of an active mirror contol system for the MACE telescope, being set up by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Mt. Abu, is described. Preliminary results obtained from recent laboratory trials are also described.

  6. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  7. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  8. Activity Theory in Information Systems Research and Practice: Theoretical Underpinnings for an Information Systems Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursu, Anja; Luukkonen, Irmeli; Toivanen, Marika; Korpela, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of information systems is to facilitate work activities: here we consider how Activity Theory can be applied in information systems development. Method. The requirements for an analytical model for emancipatory, work-oriented information systems research and practice are specified. Previous research work in Activity…

  9. Overview of coupled bunch active damper systems at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Crisp, J.; Ma, Hengjie; Marriner, J.; McGinnis, D.

    1996-05-01

    Beam intensities in all of the accelerators at Fermilab will increase significantly when the Main Injector becomes operational and will cause unstable oscillations in transverse position and energy. Places where the coupled bunch oscillations could dilute emittances include the Booster, Main Injector, and Tevatron. This paper provides an overview of the active feedback system upgrades which will be used to counteract the problem. It will explain the similarities between all the systems and will also explain design differences between longitudinal and transverse systems, fast sweeping systems, and systems for partially filled machines. Results from operational systems will also be shown. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Overview of coupled-bunch active damper systems at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Crisp, J.; Ma, H.; Marriner, J.; McGinnis, D.

    1997-01-01

    Beam intensities in all of the accelerators at Fermilab will increase significantly when the Main Injector becomes operational and will cause unstable oscillations in transverse position and energy. Places where the coupled bunch oscillations could dilute emittances include the Booster, Main Injector, and Tevatron. This paper provides an overview of the active feedback system upgrades which will be used to counteract the problem. It will explain the similarities between all the systems and will also explain design differences between longitudinal and transverse systems, fast sweeping systems, and systems for partially filled machines. Results from operational systems will also be shown. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  12. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS ) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code.

  13. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    PubMed Central

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium. PMID:26956085

  14. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium.

  15. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  16. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  17. Human activity recognition based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose Antonio; Angelov, Plamen; Ledezma, Agapito; Sanchis, Araceli

    2010-10-01

    Environments equipped with intelligent sensors can be of much help if they can recognize the actions or activities of their users. If this activity recognition is done automatically, it can be very useful for different tasks such as future action prediction, remote health monitoring, or interventions. Although there are several approaches for recognizing activities, most of them do not consider the changes in how a human performs a specific activity. We present an automated approach to recognize daily activities from the sensor readings of an intelligent home environment. However, as the way to perform an activity is usually not fixed but it changes and evolves, we propose an activity recognition method based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems. PMID:20945515

  18. THE STATE TOBACCO ACTIVITIES TRACKING AND EVALUATION (STATE) SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System is an electronic data warehouse containing up-to-date and historical state-level data on tobacco use prevention and control. The STATE System is designed to integrate many data sources to provide comprehensive su...

  19. PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Step feed, plug flow and complete mix activated sludge systems were compared on a pilot plant scale under similar operating conditions with the same municipal wastewater. The process loading to each system was varied over a wide range during the course of the investigation. Exten...

  20. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  1. Activation of the reward system boosts innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shaanan, Tamar L; Azulay-Debby, Hilla; Dubovik, Tania; Starosvetsky, Elina; Korin, Ben; Schiller, Maya; Green, Nathaniel L; Admon, Yasmin; Hakim, Fahed; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Rolls, Asya

    2016-08-01

    Positive expectations contribute to the clinical benefits of the placebo effect. Such positive expectations are mediated by the brain's reward system; however, it remains unknown whether and how reward system activation affects the body's physiology and, specifically, immunity. Here we show that activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a key component of the reward system, strengthens immunological host defense. We used 'designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs' (DREADDs) to directly activate dopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA and characterized the subsequent immune response after exposure to bacteria (Escherichia coli), using time-of-flight mass cytometry (CyTOF) and functional assays. We found an increase in innate and adaptive immune responses that were manifested by enhanced antibacterial activity of monocytes and macrophages, reduced in vivo bacterial load and a heightened T cell response in the mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity. By chemically ablating the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), we showed that the reward system's effects on immunity are, at least partly, mediated by the SNS. Thus, our findings establish a causal relationship between the activity of the VTA and the immune response to bacterial infection. PMID:27376577

  2. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  3. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  4. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  5. Individual popularity and activity in online social systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibo; Han, Dingyi; Wang, Xiaofan

    2010-03-01

    We propose a stochastic model of web user behaviors in online social systems, and study the influence of the attraction kernel on the statistical property of user or item occurrence. Combining the different growth patterns of new entities and attraction patterns of old ones, different heavy-tailed distributions for popularity and activity which have been observed in real life, can be obtained. From a broader perspective, we explore the underlying principle governing the statistical feature of individual popularity and activity in online social systems and point out the potential simple mechanism underlying the complex dynamics of the systems.

  6. Vehicle dynamics control using an active third-axle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Amir; Goodarzi, Avesta; Hassan Shojaeefard, Mohammad; Khajepour, Amir

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces the active third-axle system as an innovative vehicle dynamic control method. This method can be applicable for different kinds of three-axle vehicles such as buses, trucks, or even three-axle passenger cars. In this system, an actuator on the middle axle actively applies an independent force on the suspension to improve the handling characteristics, and hence, its technology is similar to slow-active suspension systems. This system can change the inherent vehicle dynamic characteristics, such as under/over steering behaviour, in the linear handling region, as well as vehicle stability in the nonlinear, limit handling region. In this paper, our main focus is to show the potential capabilities of this method in enhancing vehicle dynamic performance. For this purpose, as the first step, the proposed method in both linear and nonlinear vehicle handling regions is studied mathematically. Next, a comprehensive, nonlinear, 10 degrees of freedom vehicle model with a fuzzy control strategy is used to evaluate the effectiveness of this system. The dynamic behaviour of a vehicle, when either uncontrolled or equipped with the active third axle is then compared. Simulation results show that this active system can be considered as an innovative method for vehicle dynamic control.

  7. Narrowband system activities in the NASA communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrani, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of NASA's narrowband system activities is to identify, develop, and test the technology needed for future commercial satellite-aided mobile communications systems. Desired characteristics include low service cost, efficient spectrum utilization, and compatibility with terrestrial systems. Ongoing effort includes system concept definition and market analysis. A typical system would need a large spaceborne antenna with 50 to 100 beams, each 0.5 to 0.7 degree wide, onboard switching and processing, linear solid-state amplifiers, and low-cost user terminals. The paper describes current studies and discusses future NASA plans in this field.

  8. Fault detection and isolation for an active wheelset control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzapour, Mohammad; Mei, T. X.; Xuesong, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Active control for railway wheelsets in the primary suspension has been shown to offer a number of performance gains, and especially it can be used to stabilise the wheelsets without compromising the vehicle's performance on curves. However, the use of actuators, sensors and data processors to replace the traditional passive suspension raises the issue of system safety in the event of a failure of the active control, which could result in the loss of stability (i.e. wheelset hunting), and in more severe cases, derailment. This paper studies the key issue of condition monitoring for an actively controlled railway system, with a focus on actuator failures to detect and isolate failure modes in such a system. It seeks to establish the necessary basis for fault detection to ensure system reliability in the event of malfunction in one of the two actuators. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  9. Activator-inhibitor systems on heterogeneous ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, C.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The consideration of activator-inhibitor systems as complex networks has broadened our knowledge of non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion processes in heterogeneous systems. For example, the Turing mechanism represents a classical model for the formation of self-organized spatial structures in non-equilibrium activator-inhibitor systems. The study of Turing patterns in networks with heterogeneous connectivity has revealed that, contrary to other models and systems, the segregation process takes place mainly in vertices of low degree. In this paper, we study the formation of vegetation patterns in semiarid ecosystems from the perspective of a heterogeneous interacting ecological network. The structure of ecological networks yields fundamental insight into the ecosystem self-organization. Using simple rules for the short-range activation and global inhibition, we reconstruct the observed power-law distribution of vegetation patch size that has been observed in semiarid ecosystems like the Kalahari transect.

  10. Assessment of the allergenic potential of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) with reduced levels of omega-5 gliadins, the major sensitizing allergen in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The omega-5 gliadins are the major sensitizing allergens in wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In this study, two-dimensional immunoblot analysis was used to assess the allergenic potential of two transgenic wheat lines in which omega-5 gliadin genes were silenced by RNA interfe...

  11. Adaptive control model of an active automobile suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Matthew; Wunsch, Donald C., II; Mitra, Sunanda

    1993-12-01

    The suspension system of a passenger car provides isolation between the occupants in the car and the road surface. The three goals of the suspension system are to provide ride isolation from vibration, limit suspension travel, and maintain road holding characteristics. Each of these three goals conflicts with the others. Thus, the controller must be designed to attain each goal to some extent. This paper proposes the use of a linear quadratic regulator and a fuzzy controller to maintain the ride isolation of a loosely sprung, lightly damped passive suspension while improving the handling characteristics of the vehicle. The suspension performance as pertains to ride isolation can be studied using a simple quarter car model of a suspension system. However, the handling characteristics and the coupling between each quarter of the suspension system must be studied using a full car model. Thus, this paper uses both a quarter car and a full car model to study the performance of suspension systems. The performance of the suspension systems is evaluated by running simulations of the systems subjected to both discrete and random road inputs. This paper shows that an active suspension using a linear full state feedback controller performs better than a passively suspended vehicle. The optimally controlled active suspension system is also compared to a fuzzy controlled active suspension system and the results are discussed.

  12. Macrophages require different nucleoside transport systems for proliferation and activation.

    PubMed

    Soler, C; García-Manteiga, J; Valdés, R; Xaus, J; Comalada, M; Casado, F J; Pastor-Anglada, M; Celada, A; Felipe, A

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms involved in macrophage proliferation and activation, we studied the regulation of the nucleoside transport systems. In murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, the nucleosides required for DNA and RNA synthesis are recruited from the extracellular medium. M-CSF induced macrophage proliferation and DNA and RNA synthesis, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) led to activation, blocked proliferation, and induced only RNA synthesis. Macrophages express at least the concentrative systems N1 and N2 (CNT2 and CNT1 genes, respectively) and the equilibrative systems es and ei (ENT1 and ENT2 genes, respectively). Incubation with M-CSF only up-regulated the equilibrative system es. Inhibition of this transport system blocked M-CSF-dependent proliferation. Treatment with IFN-gamma only induced the concentrative N1 and N2 systems. IFN-gamma also down-regulated the increased expression of the es equilibrative system induced by M-CSF. Thus, macrophage proliferation and activation require selective regulation of nucleoside transporters and may respond to specific requirements for DNA and RNA synthesis. This report also shows that the nucleoside transporters are critical for macrophage proliferation and activation. PMID:11532978

  13. Active infrared systems: possible roles in ballistic missile defense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleologue, A.

    2006-05-01

    Active Infra-Red (IR) systems developed in the past ten years are now available for missile defense applications. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the advantages an active IR system could offer to a ballistic missile defense (BMD). The active IR system considered in this paper is a LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) system. Historically, the Lincoln Laboratory in the USA began using lasers in the early 1960's. The initial applications included the development of a LIDAR system enabling the measurement of the distance between the earth and the moon in 1962. Satellite tracking using LIDAR began early in 1973. Today, technological developments, with the miniaturization of systems and increased performance levels, have enabled new ambitious projects such as the Discrimination Interceptor Technology Program (DITP) program started in 1998 and the use of LIDAR to help in the discrimination of future exo-atmospheric interceptors within the framework of BMD. The first part of this paper presents the possible contribution of LIDAR to BMD: the main roles, objectives, and strategic advantages. The second part gives a brief overview of the technological features of a generic LIDAR instrument, rapidly addressing laser sources, detectors, optics and electronics. Finally, a modeling of an IR LIDAR system, limited solely to direct detection, and an estimation of performance levels will be presented. A list of possible IR active discriminators will be then presented on the basis of the previous analysis and proposed as new constraints in the design of discrete objects.

  14. [Anaphylaxis as part of a clinical diagnosis of mastocytosi - case demonstration].

    PubMed

    Stobiecki, Marcin; Sacha, Małgorzata; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by excessive proliferation and accumulation of mast cells--in one or more organs. The number of symptoms and clinical prognosis vary depending on the disease. One of the most severe potential outcome of mastocytosis is anaphylactic shock. Early diagnosis and identification of triggers enables education and avoidance them. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with systemic mastocytosis (SM) without skin symptoms with multiple anaphylactic reactions, including two severe. Systemic mastocytosis was confirmed in bone marrow and genetic studies. We identify allergic triggers: latex and cefuroxime and also other non-immunological triggers as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The patient never had any allergic reaction after Hymenoptera stings. Only one result of serum tryptase was elevated. There was a need to determine the safety of antibiotic use and anesthetic drugs before cesarean. The moment when the disease was diagnosed and triggers were identifie, helped avoid further severe reactions. PMID:27024961

  15. THE EFFECT OF POWERED ACTIVATED CARBON IN A PETROLEUM REFINERY ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research program was to determine the effect of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to refinery activated sludge systems. Bench-scale and full-scale tests were performed. A wide range of PAC concentrations and sludge ages were evaluated. Bench-scal...

  16. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS UTILIZING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON ADDITION WITH WET AIR REGENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to activated sludge systems is a proven method of wastewater treatment. Of eleven POTWs in the U.S. that were designed for PAC use, ten included wet air regeneration (WAR) for the destruction of secondary sludge solids and recovery ...

  17. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems.

    PubMed

    Steimel, Joshua P; Aragones, Juan L; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-04-26

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  18. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  19. Anaphylaxis to subcutaneous neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin with simultaneous sensitization to protamine and insulin.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C; Castillo, R; Quiralte, J; Delgado, J; García, I; de Pablos, P; Carrillo, T

    1996-06-01

    We report an insulin-treated diabetic patient who suffered, in a 2-month period, three severe anaphylactic reactions immediately after self-administered subcutaneous injections of neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) human recombinant-DNA insulin. These reactions consisted of local and systemic symptoms, including dyspnea and hypotension. A simultaneous sensitization to human insulin and to protamine was demonstrated, both by skin tests and by the determination of serum specific IgE. Suspecting protamine allergy, we performed a test dose to human lente insulin with perfect tolerance. After a 1-year follow-up with lente-insulin treatment, no reactions have occurred, despite treatment interruptions. Therefore, protamine IgE-mediated allergy probably caused our patient's reactions. In conclusion, protamine sensitization should be ruled out in any patient with a history of reactions to subcutaneous protamine-containing insulins, even if insulin sensitization is present. PMID:8837667

  20. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  1. Fault analysis and detection in large active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Furber, Mark E.; Jordan, David C.; Blaszak, David D.

    1995-05-01

    Active optical systems are complex systems that may be expected to operate in hostile environments such as space. The ability of such a system either to tolerate failures of components or to reconfigure to accommodate failed components could significantly increase the useful lifetime of the system. Active optical systems often contain hundreds of actuators and sensor channels but have an inherent redundancy, i.e., more actuators or sensor channels than the minimum needed to achieve the required performance. A failure detection and isolation system can be used to find and accommodate failures. One type of failure is the failure of an actuator. The effect of actuator failure on the ability of a deformable mirror to correct aberrations is analyzed using a finite-element model of the deformable mirror, and a general analytical procedure for determining the effect of actuator failures on system performance is given. The application of model-based failure detection, isolation and identification algorithms to active optical systems is outlined.

  2. Active Sensing System with In Situ Adjustable Sensor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nurzaman, Surya G.; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. Methodology This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. Conclusions/Significance The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed. PMID:24416094

  3. Numerical evaluation of the performance of active noise control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, C. G.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized numerical technique for evaluating the optimal performance of active noise controllers. In this technique, the indirect BEM numerical procedures are used to derive the active noise controllers for optimal control of enclosed harmonic sound fields where the strength of the noise sources or the description of the enclosure boundary may not be known. The performance prediction for a single-input single-output system is presented, together with the analysis of the stability and observability of an active noise-control system employing detectors. The numerical procedures presented can be used for the design of both the physical configuration and the electronic components of the optimal active noise controller.

  4. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Espinola, Richard L; Jacobs, Eddie L; Halford, Carl E; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H

    2007-04-01

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown. PMID:19532626

  5. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown.

  6. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  7. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  8. Coincident Helminth Infection Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Immune Activation in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Sridhar, Rathinam; Hanna, Luke E.; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity) in TB is not known. Methodology We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB) with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB) with or without Ss infection. Principal Findings Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection. Conclusions Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease. PMID:25375117

  9. Activity Management System user reference manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, T.A.; Burdick, M.B.

    1994-09-22

    The Activity Management System (AMS) was developed in response to the need for a simple-to-use, low-cost, user interface system for collecting and logging Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project (HWVP) activities. This system needed to run on user workstations and provide common user access to a database stored on a local network file server. Most important, users wanted a system that provided a management tool that supported their individual process for completing activities. Existing system treated the performer as a tool of the system. All AMS data is maintained in encrypted format. Users can feel confident that any activities they have entered into the database are private and that, as the originator, they retain sole control over who can see them. Once entered into the AMS database, the activities cannot be accessed by anyone other than the originator, the designated agent, or by authorized viewers who have been explicitly granted the right to look at specific activities by the originator. This user guide is intended to assist new AMS users in learning how to use the application and, after the initial learning process, will serve as an ongoing reference for experienced users in performing infrequently used functions. Online help screens provide reference to some of the key information in this manual. Additional help screens, encompassing all the applicable material in this manual, will be incorporated into future AMS revisions. A third, and most important, source of help is the AMS administrator(s). This guide describes the initial production version of AMS, which has been designated Revision 1.0.

  10. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; Taylor, Shawn; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance ( 0.001 in. error).

  11. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance (0.001 in. error).

  12. Game-Based Virtual Worlds as Decentralized Virtual Activity Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scacchi, Walt

    There is widespread interest in the development and use of decentralized systems and virtual world environments as possible new places for engaging in collaborative work activities. Similarly, there is widespread interest in stimulating new technological innovations that enable people to come together through social networking, file/media sharing, and networked multi-player computer game play. A decentralized virtual activity system (DVAS) is a networked computer supported work/play system whose elements and social activities can be both virtual and decentralized (Scacchi et al. 2008b). Massively multi-player online games (MMOGs) such as World of Warcraft and online virtual worlds such as Second Life are each popular examples of a DVAS. Furthermore, these systems are beginning to be used for research, deve-lopment, and education activities in different science, technology, and engineering domains (Bainbridge 2007, Bohannon et al. 2009; Rieber 2005; Scacchi and Adams 2007; Shaffer 2006), which are also of interest here. This chapter explores two case studies of DVASs developed at the University of California at Irvine that employ game-based virtual worlds to support collaborative work/play activities in different settings. The settings include those that model and simulate practical or imaginative physical worlds in different domains of science, technology, or engineering through alternative virtual worlds where players/workers engage in different kinds of quests or quest-like workflows (Jakobsson 2006).

  13. Virial pressure in systems of spherical active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Roland G; Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    The pressure of suspensions of self-propelled objects is studied theoretically and by simulation of spherical active Brownian particles (ABPs). We show that for certain geometries, the mechanical pressure as force/area of confined systems can be equally expressed by bulk properties, which implies the existence of a nonequilibrium equation of state. Exploiting the virial theorem, we derive expressions for the pressure of ABPs confined by solid walls or exposed to periodic boundary conditions. In both cases, the pressure comprises three contributions: the ideal-gas pressure due to white-noise random forces, an activity-induced pressure ("swim pressure"), which can be expressed in terms of a product of the bare and a mean effective particle velocity, and the contribution by interparticle forces. We find that the pressure of spherical ABPs in confined systems explicitly depends on the presence of the confining walls and the particle-wall interactions, which has no correspondence in systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our simulations of three-dimensional ABPs in systems with periodic boundary conditions reveal a pressure-concentration dependence that becomes increasingly nonmonotonic with increasing activity. Above a critical activity and ABP concentration, a phase transition occurs, which is reflected in a rapid and steep change of the pressure. We present and discuss the pressure for various activities and analyse the contributions of the individual pressure components. PMID:26221908

  14. Retrofitting activated sludge systems to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, O; Artan, N; Orhon, D

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides the basis and the conceptual approach of applying process kinetics and modelling to the design of alternating activated sludge systems for retrofitting existing activated sludge plants to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal. It shows the significant role of the two specific parameters, namely, the aerated fraction and the cycle time ratio on process performance through model simulations and proposes a way to incorporate them into a design procedure using process stoichiometry and mass balance. It illustrates the effect of these parameters, together with the sludge age, in establishing the balance between the denitrification potential and the available nitrogen created in the anoxic/aerobic sequences of system operation. PMID:12420968

  15. Implementation study of wearable sensors for activity recognition systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Mona

    2015-01-01

    This Letter investigates and reports on a number of activity recognition methods for a wearable sensor system. The authors apply three methods for data transmission, namely ‘stream-based’, ‘feature-based’ and ‘threshold-based’ scenarios to study the accuracy against energy efficiency of transmission and processing power that affects the mote's battery lifetime. They also report on the impact of variation of sampling frequency and data transmission rate on energy consumption of motes for each method. This study leads us to propose a cross-layer optimisation of an activity recognition system for provisioning acceptable levels of accuracy and energy efficiency. PMID:26609413

  16. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  17. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  18. Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01

    A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

  19. Active imaging system performance model for target acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Teaney, Brian; Nguyen, Quang; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate has developed a laser-range-gated imaging system performance model for the detection, recognition, and identification of vehicle targets. The model is based on the established US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD sensor performance models of the human system response through an imaging system. The Java-based model, called NVLRG, accounts for the effect of active illumination, atmospheric attenuation, and turbulence effects relevant to LRG imagers, such as speckle and scintillation, and for the critical sensor and display components. This model can be used to assess the performance of recently proposed active SWIR systems through various trade studies. This paper will describe the NVLRG model in detail, discuss the validation of recent model components, present initial trade study results, and outline plans to validate and calibrate the end-to-end model with field data through human perception testing.

  20. Design and Implementation of an Active Video Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anindya; Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    2003-01-01

    The temporal ordering and the spatial viewpoints of video frames in conventional digital video content are completely determined at the time of authoring. Because of the lack of runtime navigation flexibility in the content, traditional video-on-demand systems have very limited navigation controls, such as fast-forward/rewind etc. In contrast, we have developed a new form of interactive video content called active video, which supports hyper-linking among related video sequences for temporal navigation and interpolation among stored video sequences, that simultaneously capture a dynamic scene, for spatial navigation. Thus active video enables the end user to choose the temporal frame sequencing and the viewing angle (even virtual ones) during playback. This additional navigation flexibility cannot be supported by traditional video distribution systems. The storage and playback of active video poses unique design challenges. Active video delivery requires computation support on the data path, between the storage and the playback application, to interpolate new views based on stored views. Since active video is only a specific instance of a broad class of interactive media, that require computation support on the server, the new distribution system designed for active video should also be programmable and extensible to store and perform runtime processing of other forms of interactive media. A software architecture of the shared programmable computation framework also needs to address performance and data isolation issues. We have designed and implemented a comprehensive active video authoring, compression, storage, and playback system called Memphis. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the storage and playback components which address the above design issues.

  1. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  2. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  3. The Solar System Ballet: A Kinesthetic Spatial Astronomy Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.; Astronomy, Center; Education ResearchCAPER, Physics

    2011-05-01

    The Solar System Ballet was developed in order for students of all ages to learn about the planets, their motions, their distances, and their individual characteristics. To teach people about the structure of our Solar System can be revealing and rewarding, for students and teachers. Little ones (and some bigger ones, too) often cannot yet grasp theoretical and spatial ideas purely with their minds. Showing a video is better, but being able to learn with their bodies, essentially being what they learn about, will help them understand and remember difficult concepts much more easily. There are three segments to this activity, which can be done together or separately, depending on time limits and age of the students. Part one involves a short introductory discussion about what students know about the planets. Then students will act out the orbital motions of the planets (and also moons for the older ones) while holding a physical model. During the second phase we look at the structure of the Solar System as well as the relative distances of the planets from the Sun, first by sketching it on paper, then by recreating a scaled version in the class room. Again the students act out the parts of the Solar System bodies with their models. The third segment concentrates on recreating historical measurements of Earth-Moon-Sun system. The Solar System Ballet activity is suitable for grades K-12+ as well as general public informal learning activities.

  4. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  5. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  6. The immune system as a regulator of thyroid hormone activity.

    PubMed

    Klein, John R

    2006-03-01

    It has been known for decades that the neuroendocrine system can both directly and indirectly influence the developmental and functional activity of the immune system. In contrast, far less is known about the extent to which the immune system collaborates in the regulation of endocrine activity. This is particularly true for immune-endocrine interactions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) can be produced by many types of extra-pituitary cells--including T cells, B cells, splenic dendritic cells, bone marrow hematopoietic cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and lymphocytes--the functional significance of those TSH pathways remains elusive and historically has been largely ignored from a research perspective. There is now, however, evidence linking cells of the immune system to the regulation of thyroid hormone activity in normal physiological conditions as well as during times of immunological stress. Although the mechanisms behind this are poorly understood, they appear to reflect a process of local intrathyroidal synthesis of TSH mediated by a population of bone marrow cells that traffic to the thyroid. This hitherto undescribed cell population has the potential to microregulate thyroid hormone secretion leading to critical alterations in metabolic activity independent of pituitary TSH output, and it has expansive implications for understanding mechanisms by which the immune system may act to modulate neuroendocrine function during times of host stress. In this article, the basic underpinnings of the hematopoietic-thyroid connection are described, and a model is presented in which the immune system participates in the regulation of thyroid hormone activity during acute infection. PMID:16514168

  7. Specification for installation of the crew activity planning system coaxial cable communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.; Roman, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    The specification used to install a broadband coaxial cable communication system to support remote terminal operations on the Crew Activity Planning system at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are reported. The system supports high speed communications between a Harris Slash 8 computer and one or more Sanders Graphic 7 displays.

  8. Electromechanical Simulation of Actively Controlled Rotordynamic Systems with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G.

    1991-01-01

    Theories and tests for incorporating piezoelectric pushers as actuator devices for active vibration control are discussed. It started from a simple model with the assumption of ideal pusher characteristics and progressed to electromechanical models with nonideal pushers. Effects on system stability due to the nonideal characteristics of piezoelectric pushers and other elements in the control loop were investigated.

  9. SAFETY ASPECTS OF OXYGEN AERATION ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was carried out to assess the impact of the use of oxygen and oxygen-enriched air for aeration of activated sludge systems on the safety of municipal waste-water treatment plants and their personnel. The tasks included (1) determination of oxygen combustion hazards f...

  10. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  11. Moodog: Tracking Student Activity in Online Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hangjin; Almeroth, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Many universities are currently using Course Management Systems (CMSes) to conduct online learning, for example, by distributing course materials or submitting homework assignments. However, most CMSes do not include comprehensive activity tracking and analysis capabilities. This paper describes a method to track students' online learning…

  12. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  13. Multi-carrier mobile TDMA system with active array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Hamamoto, Naokazu

    1990-01-01

    A multi-carrier time division multiple access (TDMA) is proposed for the future mobile satellite communications systems that include a multi-satellite system. This TDMA system employs the active array antenna in which the digital beam forming technique is adopted to control the antenna beam direction. The antenna beam forming is carried out at the base band frequency by using the digital signal processing technique. The time division duplex technique is applied for the TDM/TDMA burst format, in order not to overlap transmit and receive timing.

  14. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profile Patient Rating 4.9 out of 5 stars Make an Appointment Rafeul Alam, MD, PhD + × Rafeul ... Profile Patient Rating 4.8 out of 5 stars Make an Appointment Kanwaljit K. Brar, MD + × Kanwaljit ...

  15. Anaphylaxis: Tips to Remember

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  16. Anaphylaxis caused by banana.

    PubMed

    Savonius, B; Kanerva, L

    1993-04-01

    An anaphylactic reaction following ingestion of banana occurred in a 32-year-old female cook. The sensitization to banana occurred simultaneously with the development of occupational asthma caused by grain flour. The patient was sensitized to a wide range of airborne and ingestible proteins but not to rubber latex. PMID:8506993

  17. Intra-cardiac echocardiography-guided stent implantation into stenosed superior vena cava in a patient with a history of contrast anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Hironaga; Suda, Kenji; Kishimoto, Shintaro; Kudo, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 37-year-old patient, who suffered from a repeated superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome, was scheduled for stent implantation into SVC, but suffered from contrast anaphylaxis. To monitor the procedure, we used intra-cardiac echocardiography and successfully implanted a stent. Placing an intra-cardiac echocardiographic catheter in the main pulmonary artery and facing towards the right, we could readily visualize stenosis in the SVC and inflation of the stent. Also looking up from right atrium, we noted proximal obstruction of the stent and confirmed the relief of obstruction after additional balloon dilation. This report leads to new application of intra-cardiac echocardiography for intervention of structural and vascular diseases other than inter-atrial septum. PMID:25605657

  18. Mast cell–expressed orphan receptor CCRL2 binds chemerin and is required for optimal induction of IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, Brian A.; Nakae, Susumu; Zúñiga, Luis; Kim, Ji-Yun; Ohyama, Takao; Alt, Carsten; Pan, Junliang; Suto, Hajime; Soler, Dulce; Allen, Samantha J.; Handel, Tracy M.; Song, Chang Ho; Galli, Stephen J.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells contribute importantly to both protective and pathological IgE-dependent immune responses. We show that the mast cell–expressed orphan serpentine receptor mCCRL2 is not required for expression of IgE-mediated mast cell–dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis but can enhance the tissue swelling and leukocyte infiltrates associated with such reactions in mice. We further identify chemerin as a natural nonsignaling protein ligand for both human and mouse CCRL2. In contrast to other “silent” or professional chemokine interreceptors, chemerin binding does not trigger ligand internalization. Rather, CCRL2 is able to bind the chemoattractant and increase local concentrations of bioactive chemerin, thus providing a link between CCRL2 expression and inflammation via the cell-signaling chemerin receptor CMKLR1. PMID:18794339

  19. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Automated system for analyzing the activity of individual neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Johnson, Kenneth O.; Menkes, Alex M.; Diamond, Steve D.; Oshaughnessy, David M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a signal processing system that: (1) provides an efficient and reliable instrument for investigating the activity of neuronal assemblies in the brain; and (2) demonstrates the feasibility of generating the command signals of prostheses using the activity of relevant neurons in disabled subjects. The system operates online, in a fully automated manner and can recognize the transient waveforms of several neurons in extracellular neurophysiological recordings. Optimal algorithms for detection, classification, and resolution of overlapping waveforms are developed and evaluated. Full automation is made possible by an algorithm that can set appropriate decision thresholds and an algorithm that can generate templates on-line. The system is implemented with a fast IBM PC compatible processor board that allows on-line operation.

  1. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  3. Active control technique of fractional-order chaotic complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Mansour E.; Abed-Elhameed, Tarek M.

    2016-06-01

    Several kinds of synchronization of fractional-order chaotic complex systems are challenging research topics of current interest since they appear in many applications in applied sciences. Our main goal in this paper is to introduce the definition of modified projective combination-combination synchronization (MPCCS) of some fractional-order chaotic complex systems. We show that our systems are chaotic by calculating their Lyapunov exponents. The fractional Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic solutions of these systems is computed. A scheme is introduced to calculate MPCCS of four different (or identical) chaotic complex systems using the active control technique. Special cases of this type, which are projective and anti C-C synchronization, are discussed. Some figures are plotted to show that MPCCS is achieved and its errors approach zero.

  4. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  5. [The influence of aging on autonomic nervous system activity and gastric myoelectric activity in humans].

    PubMed

    Thor, P J; Kolasińska-Kloch, W; Pitala, A; Janik, A; Kopp, B; Sibiga, W

    1999-01-01

    The study was performed on 84 healthy volunteers (33 women, 52 men) of age 20-71 years with no history of the circulatory or gastrointestinal system disease. The gastric myoelectrical activity (EGG) was recorded with the cutaneous electrodes--electrogastrography Synectics (Sweden). The activity of the cardiac autonomic nervous system was measured by HRV (heart rate variability) recorded with EGG and computer assisted programme Proster (Poland). Subject were divided into 5 groups according to the decade of age (20-70). Percentage of basal electrical rhythm (BER) dysrhythmias increased (1.9 +/- 0.5% vs 21.1 +/- 3.2% in fasting and 2.4 +/- 1.2% vs 24.6 +/- 5% postprandially but decrease of the EGG amplitude after the meal was observed (270 +/- 20% vs 90 +/- 7%) in youngest and oldest group respectively. With the ageing the cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activity (LF and HF) decreased in first and last group respectively. In the forth decade in man and women the sympathetic activity system prevalence expressed by the LF/HF rate increased (1.09 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.14 +/- 0.5) (p < 0.05). The results of our study suggest the deleterious influence of the ageing on the of autonomic system activity as shown by changes in HRV and dysrhythmia of the gastric slow waves in EGG. PMID:10909474

  6. Symmetric Active/Active Metadata Service for High Availability Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Ou, Li; Engelmann, Christian; Chen, Xin; Scott, Stephen L

    2009-01-01

    High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data-driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability of distributed storage systems. Past research focused on the active/standby model, where each active service has at least one redundant idle backup. However, interruption of service and even some loss of service state may occur during a fail-over depending on the used replication technique. In addition, the replication overhead for multiple metadata services can be very high. The research in this paper targets the symmetric active/active replication model, which uses multiple redundant service nodes running in virtual synchrony. In this model, service node failures do not cause a fail-over to a backup and there is no disruption of service or loss of service state. We further discuss a fast delivery protocol to reduce the latency of the needed total order broadcast. Our prototype implementation shows that metadata service high availability can be achieved with an acceptable performance trade-off using our symmetric active/active metadata service solution.

  7. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  8. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  9. Streptococcal Surface Proteins Activate the Contact System and Control Its Antibacterial Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wollein Waldetoft, Kristofer; Svensson, Lisbeth; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Nitsche-Schmitz, D. Patric; Björck, Lars; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Group G streptococci (GGS) are important bacterial pathogens in humans. Here, we investigated the interactions between GGS and the contact system, a procoagulant and proinflammatory proteolytic cascade that, upon activation, also generates antibacterial peptides. Two surface proteins of GGS, protein FOG and protein G (PG), were found to bind contact system proteins. Experiments utilizing contact protein-deficient human plasma and isogenic GGS mutant strains lacking FOG or PG showed that FOG and PG both activate the procoagulant branch of the contact system. In contrast, only FOG induced cleavage of high molecular weight kininogen, generating the proinflammatory bradykinin peptide and additional high molecular weight kininogen fragments containing the antimicrobial peptide NAT-26. On the other hand, PG protected the bacteria against the antibacterial effect of NAT-26. These findings underline the significance of the contact system in innate immunity and demonstrate that GGS have evolved surface proteins to exploit and modulate its effects. PMID:22648411

  10. Inhibition of the central melanocortin system decreases brown adipose tissue activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Geerling, Janine J.; van de Pol, Vera; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Meurs, Illiana; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin system is an important regulator of energy balance, and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) deficiency is the most common monogenic cause of obesity. We investigated whether the relationship between melanocortin system activity and energy expenditure (EE) is mediated by brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. Therefore, female APOE*3-Leiden.CETP transgenic mice were fed a Western-type diet for 4 weeks and infused intracerebroventricularly with the melanocortin 3/4 receptor (MC3/4R) antagonist SHU9119 or vehicle for 2 weeks. SHU9119 increased food intake (+30%) and body fat (+50%) and decreased EE by reduction in fat oxidation (−42%). In addition, SHU9119 impaired the uptake of VLDL-TG by BAT. In line with this, SHU9119 decreased uncoupling protein-1 levels in BAT (−60%) and induced large intracellular lipid droplets, indicative of severely disturbed BAT activity. Finally, SHU9119-treated mice pair-fed to the vehicle-treated group still exhibited these effects, indicating that MC4R inhibition impairs BAT activity independent of food intake. These effects were not specific to the APOE*3-Leiden.CETP background as SHU9119 also inhibited BAT activity in wild-type mice. We conclude that inhibition of central MC3/4R signaling impairs BAT function, which is accompanied by reduced EE, thereby promoting adiposity. We anticipate that activation of MC4R is a promising strategy to combat obesity by increasing BAT activity. PMID:25016380

  11. Smart interactive electronic system for monitoring the electromagnetic activities of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Sorin G.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-08-01

    A novel electronic device capable of sensing and monitoring the myoelectric, polarization wave and electromagnetic activities of the biological systems and in particular the human body is presented. It is known that all the physical and chemical processes within biological systems are associated with polarization, depolarization waves from the brain, neural signals and myoelectric processes that manifest themselves in ionic and dipole motion. The technology developed in our laboratory is based on certain charge motion sensitive electronics. The electronic system developed is capable of sensing the electromagnetic activities of biological systems. The information obtained is then processed by specialized software in order to interpret it from physical and chemical point of view.

  12. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  13. Augmented reality to enhance an active telepresence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Alison; Pretlove, John R. G.; Parker, Graham A.

    1996-12-01

    Tasks carried out remotely via a telerobotic system are typically complex, occur in hazardous environments and require fine control of the robot's movements. Telepresence systems provide the teleoperator with a feeling of being physically present at the remote site. Stereoscopic video has been successfully applied to telepresence vision systems to increase the operator's perception of depth in the remote scene and this sense of presence can be further enhanced using computer generated stereo graphics to augment the visual information presented to the operator. The Mechatronic Systems and Robotics Research Group have over seven years developed a number of high performance active stereo vision systems culminating in the latest, a four degree-of-freedom stereohead. This carries two miniature color cameras and is controlled in real time by the motion of the operator's head, who views the stereoscopic video images on an immersive head mounted display or stereo monitor. The stereohead is mounted on a mobile robot, the movement of which is controlled by a joystick interface. This paper describes the active telepresence system and the development of a prototype augmented reality (AR) application to enhance the operator's sense of presence at the remote site. The initial enhancements are a virtual map and compass to aid navigation in degraded visual conditions and a virtual cursor that provides a means for the operator to interact with the remote environment. The results of preliminary experiments using the initial enhancements are presented.

  14. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  15. Biomining active cellulases from a mining bioremediation system.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Keith; Armstrong, Zachary; Song, Young C; Baldwin, Susan A; Withers, Stephen G; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-09-20

    Functional metagenomics has emerged as a powerful method for gene model validation and enzyme discovery from natural and human engineered ecosystems. Here we report development of a high-throughput functional metagenomic screen incorporating bioinformatic and biochemical analyses features. A fosmid library containing 6144 clones sourced from a mining bioremediation system was screened for cellulase activity using 2,4-dinitrophenyl β-cellobioside, a previously proven cellulose model substrate. Fifteen active clones were recovered and fully sequenced revealing 9 unique clones with the ability to hydrolyse 1,4-β-D-glucosidic linkages. Transposon mutagenesis identified genes belonging to glycoside hydrolase (GH) 1, 3, or 5 as necessary for mediating this activity. Reference trees for GH 1, 3, and 5 families were generated from sequences in the CAZy database for automated phylogenetic analysis of fosmid end and active clone sequences revealing known and novel cellulase encoding genes. Active cellulase genes recovered in functional screens were subcloned into inducible high copy plasmids, expressed and purified to determine enzymatic properties including thermostability, pH optima, and substrate specificity. The workflow described here provides a general paradigm for recovery and characterization of microbially derived genes and gene products based on genetic logic and contemporary screening technologies developed for model organismal systems. PMID:23906845

  16. Optically powered active sensing system for Internet Of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Jin; Yin, Long; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Wan, Hongdan

    2014-10-01

    Internet Of Things (IOT) drives a significant increase in the extent and type of sensing technology and equipment. Sensors, instrumentation, control electronics, data logging and transmission units comprising such sensing systems will all require to be powered. Conventionally, electrical powering is supplied by batteries or/and electric power cables. The power supply by batteries usually has a limited lifetime, while the electric power cables are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. In fact, the electromagnetic interference is the key issue limiting the power supply in the strong electromagnetic radiation area and other extreme environments. The novel alternative method of power supply is power over fiber (PoF) technique. As fibers are used as power supply lines instead, the delivery of the power is inherently immune to electromagnetic radiation, and avoids cumbersome shielding of power lines. Such a safer power supply mode would be a promising candidate for applications in IOT. In this work, we built up optically powered active sensing system, supplying uninterrupted power for the remote active sensors and communication modules. Also, we proposed a novel maximum power point tracking technique for photovoltaic power convertors. In our system, the actual output efficiency greater than 40% within 1W laser power. After 1km fiber transmission and opto-electric power conversion, a stable electric power of 210mW was obtained, which is sufficient for operating an active sensing system.

  17. Active other worlds in the Solar System and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, François

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, space exploration has moved planetology from the field of astronomy to the disciplines of geosciences. A fleet of spacecrafts have discovered and study tens of worlds in our solar system and beyond. Everywhere, we have been surprised by the diversity and the vigour of the geophysical activity, from volcanic eruptions to plasma waves... Every scientists present at EGU could -and should- be interested in the extraterrestrial processes that are discovered and analyzed elsewhere. In our solar system, a variety of clouds and fluid dynamical phenomena can be studied in six terrestrial atmospheres and on four giant planets. Active glaciers are found on Mars and Pluto. Rivers and lakes have sculpted the surface of Titan and Mars. Sometime, we can even study geophysical activity with no equivalent on our planet: ice caps made of frozen atmosphere that erupt in geysers, hazes formed by organic polymers which can completely shroud a moon, etc. We study these active worlds because we are curious and wish to understand our universe and our origins. However, more than ever, two specific motivations drive solar system geosciences in 2016: Firstly, as we become more and more familiar with the other worlds around us, we can use them to better understand our own planet. Throughout the solar system, we can access to data that are simply not available on the Earth, or study active processes that are subtle on Earth but of greater importance elsewhere, so that we can better understand them. Many geophysical concepts and tools developed for the Earth can also be tested on other planets. For instance the numerical Climate Models used to assess Earth's future climate change are applied to other planets. Much is learned from such experiments. Secondly, the time has come to generalize the fundamental lessons that we have learned from the examples in the solar system (including the Earth) to address the countless scientific questions that are -and will be- raised by

  18. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  19. Bilateral Activity-Dependent Interactions in the Developing Corticospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Kathleen M.; Martin, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent competition between the corticospinal (CS) systems in each hemisphere drives postnatal development of motor skills and stable CS tract connections with contralateral spinal motor circuits. Unilateral restriction of motor cortex (M1) activity during an early postnatal critical period impairs contralateral visually guided movements later in development and in maturity. Silenced M1 develops aberrant connections with the contralateral spinal cord whereas the initially active M1, in the other hemisphere, develops bilateral connections. In this study, we determined whether the aberrant pattern of CS tract terminations and motor impairments produced by early postnatal M1 activity restriction could be abrogated by reducing activity-dependent synaptic competition from the initially active M1 later in development. We first inactivated M1 unilaterally between postnatal weeks 5–7. We next inactivated M1 on the other side from weeks 7–11 (alternate inactivation), to reduce the competitive advantage that this side may have over the initially inactivated side. Alternate inactivation redirected aberrant contralateral CS tract terminations from the initially silenced M1 to their normal spinal territories and reduced the density of aberrant ipsilateral terminations from the initially active side. Normal movement endpoint control during visually guided locomotion was fully restored. This reorganization of CS terminals reveals an unsuspected late plasticity after the critical period for establishing the pattern of CS terminations in the spinal cord. Our findings show that robust bilateral interactions between the developing CS systems on each side are important for achieving balance between contralateral and ipsilateral CS tract connections and visuomotor control. PMID:17928450

  20. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study. Phase 2: Extravehicular activity at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Valerie; Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Schulze, Arthur E.

    1988-01-01

    The focus is on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems requirements definition for an advanced space mission: remote-from-main base EVA on the Moon. The lunar environment, biomedical considerations, appropriate hardware design criteria, hardware and interface requirements, and key technical issues for advanced lunar EVA were examined. Six remote EVA scenarios (three nominal operations and three contingency situations) were developed in considerable detail.