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Sample records for active targeting strategy

  1. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  2. A review of the ligands and related targeting strategies for active targeting of paclitaxel to tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Fengshan; Sun, Deqing; Wang, Rongmei

    2016-08-01

    It has been 30 years since the discovery of the anti-tumour property of paclitaxel (PTX), which has been successfully applied in clinic for the treatment of carcinomas of the lungs, breast and ovarian. However, PTX is poorly soluble in water and has no targeting and selectivity to tumour tissue. Recent advances in active tumour targeting of PTX delivery vehicles have addressed some of the issues related to lack of solubility in water and non-specific toxicities associated with PTX. These PTX delivery vehicles are designed for active targeting to specific cancer cells by the addition of ligands for recognition by specific receptors/antigens on cancer cells. This article will focus on various ligands and related targeting strategies serving as potential tools for active targeting of PTX to tumour tissues, illustrating their use in different tumour models. This review also highlights the need of further studies on the discovery of receptors in different cells of specific organ and ligands with binding efficiency to these specific receptors. PMID:26878228

  3. Strategies Targeting Telomerase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Li, Yuanyuan; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase plays a pivotal role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Its activity is normally not detectable in most somatic cells while it is reactivated in the vast majority of cancer cells. Therefore, inhibition of telomerase has been viewed as a promising anticancer approach due to its specificity for cancer cells. Studies so far have shown that telomerase inhibition can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells or cause apoptosis while it has no effect on most normal cells. Strategies currently being applied to induce telomerase inhibition target virtually all of the major components of the ribonucleoprotein holoenzyme and related cell signal pathways that regulate its activity. These strategies include inhibition of telomerase through targeting at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) catalytic subunit, the telomerase RNA (TR) component, and associated proteins. Other strategies have been developed to target the proteins associated with telomerase at the telomeric ends of chromosomes such as tankyrase. The specific mechanisms that mediate those inhibition effects include small molecules, antisense RNA, and ribozymes. Although the beneficial evidence of telomerase inhibition is obvious, limitations of strategies remain to be resolved to increase the feasibility of clinical application. This analysis will summarize recent developments of strategies in telomerase inhibition. PMID:18956258

  4. Therapeutic strategies for targeting excessive central sympathetic activation in human hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James P.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension and its mode of progression are complex, multifactoral and incompletely understood. However, there is accumulating evidence from humans and animal models of hypertension indicating that excessive central sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) plays a pathogenic role in triggering and sustaining the essential hypertensive state (the so-called “neuroadrenergic hypothesis”). Importantly, augmented central sympathetic outflow has also been implicated in the initiation and progression of a plethora of pathophysiological processes independent of any increase in blood pressure, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system constitutes an important putative drug target in hypertension. However, traditional pharmacological approaches for the management of essential hypertension appear ineffective in reducing central sympathetic outflow. Recently, several new and promising therapeutic strategies targeting neurogenic hypertension have been developed. The present report will provide a brief update of this topic with a particular emphasis on human studies examining the efficacy of novel pharmacological approaches (central sympatholytics, statins), lifestyle modification (aerobic exercise training, weight loss, stress reduction) and surgical intervention (renal denervation, chronic carotid baroreflex stimulation, deep brain stimulation) in reducing excessive central sympathetic activation in hypertension. PMID:20304932

  5. Rationale Behind Targeting Fibroblast Activation Protein–Expressing Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has emerged as a novel chemotherapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer. This is most clearly exemplified by the antiangiogenesis class of compounds. Therapeutic strategies that target fibroblasts within the tumor stroma offer another treatment option. However, despite promising data obtained in preclinical models, such strategies have not been widely used in the clinical setting, largely due to a lack of effective treatments that specifically target this population of cells. The identification of fibroblast activation protein α (FAP) as a target selectively expressed on fibroblasts within the tumor stroma or on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts led to intensive efforts to exploit this novel cellular target for clinical benefit. FAP is a membrane-bound serine protease of the prolyl oligopeptidase family with unique post-prolyl endopeptidase activity. Until recently, the majority of FAP-based therapeutic approaches focused on the development of small-molecule inhibitors of enzymatic activity. Evidence suggests, however, that FAP’s pathophysiological role in carcinogenesis may be highly contextual, depending on both the exact nature of the tumor microenvironment present and the cancer type in question to determine its tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype. As an alternative strategy, we are taking advantage of FAP’s restricted expression and unique substrate preferences to develop a FAP-activated prodrug to target the activation of a cytotoxic compound within the tumor stroma. Of note, this strategy would be effective independently of FAP’s role in tumor progression because its therapeutic benefit would rely on FAP’s localization and activity within the tumor microenvironment rather than strictly on inhibition of its function. PMID:22323494

  6. An Incremental Target-Adapted Strategy for Active Geometric Calibration of Projector-Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Chien, Hsiang-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The calibration of a projector-camera system is an essential step toward accurate 3-D measurement and environment-aware data projection applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper we present a two-stage easy-to-deploy strategy for robust calibration of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of a projector. Two key components of the system are the automatic generation of projected light patterns and the incremental calibration process. Based on the incremental strategy, the calibration process first establishes a set of initial parameters, and then it upgrades these parameters incrementally using the projection and captured images of dynamically-generated calibration patterns. The scene-driven light patterns allow the system to adapt itself to the pose of the calibration target, such that the difficulty in feature detection is greatly lowered. The strategy forms a closed-loop system that performs self-correction as more and more observations become available. Compared to the conventional method, which requires a time-consuming process for the acquisition of dense pixel correspondences, the proposed method deploys a homography-based coordinate computation, allowing the calibration time to be dramatically reduced. The experimental results indicate that an improvement of 70% in reprojection errors is achievable and 95% of the calibration time can be saved. PMID:23435056

  7. An incremental target-adapted strategy for active geometric calibration of projector-camera systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Chien, Hsiang-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The calibration of a projector-camera system is an essential step toward accurate 3-D measurement and environment-aware data projection applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper we present a two-stage easy-to-deploy strategy for robust calibration of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of a projector. Two key components of the system are the automatic generation of projected light patterns and the incremental calibration process. Based on the incremental strategy, the calibration process first establishes a set of initial parameters, and then it upgrades these parameters incrementally using the projection and captured images of dynamically-generated calibration patterns. The scene-driven light patterns allow the system to adapt itself to the pose of the calibration target, such that the difficulty in feature detection is greatly lowered. The strategy forms a closed-loop system that performs self-correction as more and more observations become available. Compared to the conventional method, which requires a time-consuming process for the acquisition of dense pixel correspondences, the proposed method deploys a homography-based coordinate computation, allowing the calibration time to be dramatically reduced. The experimental results indicate that an improvement of 70% in reprojection errors is achievable and 95% of the calibration time can be saved. PMID:23435056

  8. Synergistic retention strategy of RGD active targeting and radiofrequency-enhanced permeability for intensified RF & chemotherapy synergistic tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Pei; He, Yaping; Bo, Xiaowan; Li, Xiaolong; Li, Dandan; Chen, Hangrong; Xu, Huixiong

    2016-08-01

    Despite gaining increasing attention, chelation of multiple active targeting ligands greatly increase the formation probability of protein corona, disabling active targeting. To overcome it, a synergistic retention strategy of RGD-mediated active targeting and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field-enhanced permeability has been proposed here. It is validated that such a special synergistic retention strategy can promote more poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-based capsules encapsulating camptothecin (CPT) and solid DL-menthol (DLM) to enter and retain in tumor in vitro and in vivo upon exposure to RF irradiation, receiving an above 8 fold enhancement in HeLa retention. Moreover, the PLGA-based capsules can respond RF field to trigger the entrapped DLM to generate solid-liquid-gas (SLG) tri-phase transformation for enhancing RF ablation and CPT release. Therefore, depending on the enhanced RF ablation and released CPT and the validated synergistic retention effect, the inhibitory outcome for tumor growth has gained an over 10-fold improvement, realizing RF ablation & chemotherapy synergistic treatment against HeLa solid tumor, which indicates a significant promise in clinical RF ablation. PMID:27209261

  9. NF-κB pathway activators as potential ageing biomarkers: targets for new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a major biological mechanism underpinning biological ageing process and age-related diseases. Inflammation is also the key response of host defense against pathogens and tissue injury. Current opinion sustains that during evolution the host defense and ageing process have become linked together. Thus, the large array of defense factors and mechanisms linked to the NF-κB system seem to be involved in ageing process. This concept leads us in proposing inductors of NF-κB signaling pathway as potential ageing biomarkers. On the other hand, ageing biomarkers, represented by biological indicators and selected through apposite criteria, should help to characterize biological age and, since age is a major risk factor in many degenerative diseases, could be subsequently used to identify individuals at high risk of developing age-associated diseases or disabilities. In this report, some inflammatory biomarkers will be discussed for a better understanding of the concept of biological ageing, providing ideas on eventual working hypothesis about potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies and improving, as consequence, the quality of life of elderly population. PMID:23786653

  10. Target-detection strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2013-04-01

    Hundreds of simple target-detection algorithms were tested on mid- and long-wave forward-looking infrared images. Each algorithm is briefly described. Indications are given as to which performed well. Most of these simple algorithms are loosely derived from standard tests of the difference of two populations. For target detection, these are populations of pixel grayscale values or features derived from them. The statistical tests are implemented in the form of sliding triple window filters. Several more elaborate algorithms are also described with their relative performances noted. They utilize neural networks, deformable templates, and adaptive filtering. Algorithm design issues are broadened to cover system design issues and concepts of operation. Since target detection is such a fundamental problem, it is often used as a test case for developing technology. New technology leads to innovative approaches for attacking the problem. Eight inventive paradigms, each with deep philosophical underpinnings, are described in relation to their effect on target detector design.

  11. Bioengineering Strategies for Designing Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The goals of bioengineering strategies for targeted cancer therapies are (1) to deliver a high dose of an anticancer drug directly to a cancer tumor, (2) to enhance drug uptake by malignant cells, and (3) to minimize drug uptake by nonmalignant cells. Effective cancer-targeting therapies will require both passive- and active targeting strategies and a thorough understanding of physiologic barriers to targeted drug delivery. Designing a targeted therapy includes the selection and optimization of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle for passive accumulation in tumors, a targeting moiety for active receptor-mediated uptake, and stimuli-responsive polymers for control of drug release. The future direction of cancer targeting is a combinatorial approach, in which targeting therapies are designed to use multiple targeting strategies. The combinatorial approach will enable combination therapy for delivery of multiple drugs and dual ligand targeting to improve targeting specificity. Targeted cancer treatments in development and the new combinatorial approaches show promise for improving targeted anticancer drug delivery and improving treatment outcomes. PMID:23768509

  12. Strategies for targeting lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Szécsi, Judit; Cosset, Francois-Loîc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2008-12-01

    Vectors derived from retroviruses such as lentiviruses and onco-retroviruses are probably among the most suitable tools to achieve a long-term gene transfer since they allow stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses (MLV) since in contrast to the latter they can transduce non-proliferating target cells. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer approaches in vivo. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to upgrade lentiviral vectors for tissue or cell targeting and which have potential for in vivo gene delivery. In this overview we distinguish between three types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies (Fig 1): 1) targeting of vectors at the level of vector-cell entry through lentiviral vector surface modifications; 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue specific promoters into lentiviral vectors; 3) a novel microRNA technology that rather than targeting the 'right' cells will 'detarget' transgene expression from non-target cells while achieving high expression in the target-cell. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value for several gene therapy approaches but combining these three layers of transgene expression control will offer tools to really overcome several drawbacks in the field such as side-effect of off-target expression, clearance of transgene modified cells by immune response to the transgene and lack of biosecurity and efficiency in in vivo approaches. PMID:19075628

  13. Strategies for SETI target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Soderblom, David R.

    1993-08-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. In this paper we present a strategy for target selection and observing. The strategy has two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar- type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. For the main Targeted Search survey of approximately 1000 nearby solar-type stars, we argue that the selection criteria should be heavily biased by what we know about the origin and evolution of life here on earth. We propose that observations of stars with stellar companions orbiting near the habitable zone should be de-emphasized, because such companions would prevent the formation of habitable planets. We also propose that observations of stars younger than about three billion years should be de-emphasized in favor of older stars, because our own technical civilization took longer than three billion years to evolve here on earth.

  14. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  15. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Carin I M; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  16. Current strategies for targeted delivery of bio-active drug molecules in the treatment of brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Bhandari, Saurav; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most challenging diseases to treat. The major obstacle in the specific drug delivery to brain is blood-brain barrier (BBB). Mostly available anti-cancer drugs are large hydrophobic molecules which have limited permeability via BBB. Therefore, it is clear that the protective barriers confining the passage of the foreign particles into the brain are the main impediment for the brain drug delivery. Hence, the major challenge in drug development and delivery for the neurological diseases is to design non-invasive nanocarrier systems that can assist controlled and targeted drug delivery to the specific regions of the brain. In this review article, our major focus to treat brain tumor by study numerous strategies includes intracerebral implants, BBB disruption, intraventricular infusion, convection-enhanced delivery, intra-arterial drug delivery, intrathecal drug delivery, injection, catheters, pumps, microdialysis, RNA interference, antisense therapy, gene therapy, monoclonal/cationic antibodies conjugate, endogenous transporters, lipophilic analogues, prodrugs, efflux transporters, direct conjugation of antitumor drugs, direct targeting of liposomes, nanoparticles, solid-lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers and albumin-based drug carriers. PMID:25835469

  17. Target activated frame capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. Marlon; Fitzgerald, James; McCormack, Michael; Steadman, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances have enabled the use of increasingly intelligent systems for battlefield surveillance. These systems are triggered by a combination of external devices including acoustic and seismic sensors. Such products are mainly used to detect vehicles and personnel. These systems often use infra-red imagery to record environmental information, but Textron Defense Systems' Terrain Commander is one of a small number of systems which analyze these images for the presence of targets. The Terrain Commander combines acoustic, infrared, magnetic, seismic, and visible spectrum sensors to detect nearby targets in military scenarios. When targets are detected by these sensors, the cameras are triggered and images are captured in the infrared and visible spectrum. In this paper we discuss a method through which such systems can perform target tracking in order to record and transmit only the most pertinent surveillance images. This saves bandwidth which is crucial because these systems often use communication systems with throughputs below 2400bps. This method is expected to be executable on low-power processors at frame rates exceeding 10HZ. We accomplish this by applying target activated frame capture algorithms to infra-red video data. The target activated frame capture algorithms combine edge detection and motion detection to determine the best frames to be transmitted to the end user. This keeps power consumption and bandwidth requirements low. Finally, the results of the algorithm are analyzed.

  18. Evaluation of activity and combination strategies with the microtubule-targeting drug sagopilone in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Julia; Winsel, Sebastian; Hammer, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Mittelstaedt, Kevin; Drosch, Michael; Klar, Ulrich; Sachse, Christoph; Hannus, Michael; Seidel, Monika; Weiss, Bertram; Merz, Claudia; Siemeister, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Sagopilone, a fully synthetic epothilone, is a microtubule-stabilizing agent optimized for high in vitro and in vivo activity against a broad range of tumor models, including those resistant to paclitaxel and other systemic treatments. Sagopilone development is accompanied by translational research studies to evaluate the molecular mode of action, to recognize mechanisms leading to resistance, to identify predictive response biomarkers, and to establish a rationale for combination with different therapies. Here, we profiled sagopilone activity in breast cancer cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms of mitotic arrest and apoptosis and to identify additional targets and biomarkers, an siRNA-based RNAi drug modifier screen interrogating 300 genes was performed in four cancer cell lines. Defects of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) were identified to cause resistance against sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Potential biomarkers for resistance could therefore be functional defects like polymorphisms or mutations in the SAC, particularly in the central SAC kinase BUB1B. Moreover, chromosomal heterogeneity and polyploidy are also potential biomarkers of sagopilone resistance since they imply an increased tolerance for aberrant mitosis. RNAi screening further demonstrated that the sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest can be enhanced by concomitant inhibition of mitotic kinesins, thus suggesting a potential combination therapy of sagopilone with a KIF2C (MCAK) kinesin inhibitor. However, the combination of sagopilone and inhibition of the prophase kinesin KIF11 (EG5) is antagonistic, indicating that the kinesin inhibitor has to be highly specific to bring about the required therapeutic benefit. PMID:22649765

  19. Distinct trajectories of disease activity over the first year in early rheumatoid arthritis patients following a treat-to-target strategy.

    PubMed

    Siemons, Liseth; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Glas, Cees A W; Van de Laar, Mart a F J

    2014-04-01

    Objective: Although treat-to-target (T2T) strategies are effective in early RA patients, important individual variations exist in the course towards remission. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) provides more insight into this heterogeneity by identifying subgroups of patients with similar response patterns. This study aimed to identify distinct trajectories of disease activity in early RA patients following a T2T strategy, during their first year. Methods: Data on various clinical and patient-reported measures were collected from the DREAM remission induction cohort. GMM was applied to examine the impact of T2T on subgroups characterized by different types of growth trajectories, as measured with the Disease Activity Score for 28 joints. Results: Three distinct trajectories of disease activity were found. The normative trajectory contained most patients (82.6%), showing a quickly decreasing disease activity, stabilizing at remission after 9 months. This group performed best on clinical and patient-reported measures over time and were more likely to be men. A smaller group (14.1%) also approached remission, but demonstrated a slower response to treatment. Finally, a minority (3.3%) showed no improvement after 1 year, despite an initial quick decrease in disease activity during the first months of treatment. Conclusion: Disease activity in early RA patients during the first year of a T2T strategy does not follow a linear pattern, nor is a single developmental trajectory applicable to all patients. Future studies should attempt to identify more specific risk factors for poor outcome to enable early identification of patients in need of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:24106173

  20. Strategies for targeted antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sarika; Sallum, Ulysses; Zheng, Xiang; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    The photophysics and mechanisms of cell killing by photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been extensively studied in recent years, and PDT has received regulatory approval for the treatment of a number of diseases worldwide. As the application of this treatment modality expands with regard to both anatomical sites and diseases, it is important to develop strategies for enhancing PDT outcomes. Our group has focused on developing targeting strategies to enhance PDT for both cancerous as well as anti-microbial applications. In this article, we will discuss photosensitizer modification and conjugation strategies for targeted antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

  1. Targeted photodynamic therapy--a promising strategy of tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, Andrzej M

    2011-07-01

    Targeted therapy is a new promising therapeutic strategy, created to overcome growing problems of contemporary medicine, such as drug toxicity and drug resistance. An emerging modality of this approach is targeted photodynamic therapy (TPDT) with the main aim of improving delivery of photosensitizer to cancer tissue and at the same time enhancing specificity and efficiency of PDT. Depending on the mechanism of targeting, we can divide the strategies of TPDT into "passive", "active" and "activatable", where in the latter case the photosensitizer is activated only in the target tissue. In this review, contemporary strategies of TPDT are described, including new innovative concepts, such as targeting assisted by peptides and aptamers, multifunctional nanoplatforms with navigation by magnetic field or "photodynamic molecular beacons" activatable by enzymes and nucleic acid. The imperative of introducing a new paradigm of PDT, focused on the concepts of heterogeneity and dynamic state of tumor, is also called for. PMID:21547329

  2. Target identification strategies in plant chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Wim; Russinova, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The current needs to understand gene function in plant biology increasingly require more dynamic and conditional approaches opposed to classic genetic strategies. Gene redundancy and lethality can substantially complicate research, which might be solved by applying a chemical genetics approach. Now understood as the study of small molecules and their effect on biological systems with subsequent target identification, chemical genetics is a fast developing field with a strong history in pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In plant biology however, chemical genetics is still largely in the starting blocks, with most studies relying on forward genetics and phenotypic analysis for target identification, whereas studies including direct target identification are limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in chemical genetics in plant biology with a focus on target identification. Furthermore, we discuss different strategies for direct target identification and the possibilities and challenges for plant biology. PMID:25104953

  3. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  4. Nanomedical strategies for targeting skin microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Huang, Chun-Hsun; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles can be effective drug delivery systems for treating bacterial and fungal infections in the skin. The nanoparticles used for drug therapy give many advantages over conventional formulations, such as increased solubility and storage stability, improved permeability and bioavailability, prolonged half-life, tissue targeting, and minimal side effects. In recent years, the concept of using nanoparticles to treat skin-microbiomerelated diseases has attracted increasing attention. This review article aimed to introduce recent progress using nanomedical strategies for drug delivery. Various modalities of nanocarriers can be used for antimicrobial therapy of disease, including liposomes, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and polymeric nanoparticles. This review systematically describes the structures and physicochemical properties of different nanocarriers, emphasizing antibacterial activity of nanoparticles for inhibiting infection. Nanoparticles for treating appendageal bacteria have gained attention in recent years, in particular, nanomedical approaches for managing acne. Issues related to the treatment of non-appendageal bacteria and fungi are also discussed. Finally, current obstacles to using nanocarriers for delivering medicines aimed at inhibiting infection and future developments are addressed. PMID:26264194

  5. Target discrimination strategies in optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Jonsson, Per; Pettersson, Magnus

    2013-10-01

    Detection and localisation of optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or sniper rifle scopes has attracted interest for security and military applications. Typically a laser system is used to interrogate a scene of interest and the retro-reflected radiation is detected. Different system approaches for area coverage can be realised ranging from flood illumination to step-and-stare or continuous scanning schemes. Independently of the chosen approach target discrimination is a crucial issue, particularly if a complex scene such as in an urban environment and autonomous operation is considered. In this work target discrimination strategies in optics detection are discussed. Typical parameters affecting the reflected laser radiation from the target are the wavelength, polarisation properties, temporal effects and the range resolution. Knowledge about the target characteristics is important to predict the target discrimination capability. Two different systems were used to investigate polarisation properties and range resolution information from targets including e.g. road signs, optical reflexes, rifle sights and optical references. The experimental results and implications on target discrimination will be discussed. If autonomous operation is required target discrimination becomes critical in order to reduce the number of false alarms.

  6. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  7. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  8. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  9. Targeting GPVI as a novel antithrombotic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Robert K; Arthur, Jane F; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2014-01-01

    While platelet activation is essential to maintain blood vessel patency and minimize loss of blood upon injury, untimely or excessive activity can lead to unwanted platelet activation and aggregation. Resultant thrombosis has the potential to block blood vessels, causing myocardial infarction or stroke. To tackle this major cause of mortality, clinical therapies that target platelet responsiveness (antiplatelet therapy) can successfully reduce cardiovascular events, especially in people at higher risk; however, all current antiplatelet therapies carry an increased probability of bleeding. This review will evaluate new and emerging targets for antithrombotics, focusing particularly on platelet glycoprotein VI, as blockade or depletion of this platelet-specific receptor conveys benefits in experimental models of thrombosis and thromboinflammation without causing major bleeding complications. PMID:24899824

  10. Strategy as active waiting.

    PubMed

    Sull, Donald N

    2005-09-01

    Successful executives who cut their teeth in stable industries or in developed countries often stumble when they face more volatile markets. They falter, in part, because they assume they can gaze deep into the future and develop a long-term strategy that will confer a sustainable competitive advantage. But visibility into the future of volatile markets is sharply limited because so many different variables are in play. Factors such as technological innovation, customers' evolving needs, government policy, and changes in the capital markets interact with one another to create unexpected outcomes. Over the past six years, Donald Sull, an associate professor at London Business School, has led a research project examining some of the world's most volatile markets, from national markets like China and Brazil to industries like enterprise software, telecommunications, and airlines. One of the most striking findings from this research is the importance of taking action during comparative lulls in the storm. Huge business opportunities are relatively rare; they come along only once or twice in a decade. And, for the most part, companies can't manufacture those opportunities; changes in the external environment converge to make them happen. What managers can do is prepare for these golden opportunities by managing smart during the comparative calm of business as usual. During these periods of active waiting, leaders must probe the future and remain alert to anomalies that signal potential threats or opportunities; exercise restraint to preserve their war chests; and maintain discipline to keep the troops battle ready. When a golden opportunity or"sudden death"threat emerges, managers must have the courage to declare the main effort and concentrate resources to seize the moment. PMID:16171216

  11. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  12. Cancer-Induced Alterations of NK-Mediated Target Recognition: Current and Investigational Pharmacological Strategies Aiming at Restoring NK-Mediated Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Le Roy, Aude; Vey, Norbert; Prebet, Thomas; Blaise, Didier; Fauriat, Cyril; Olive, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence of cancer immune-surveillance, which plays a key role in tumor rejection, cancer cells can escape immune recognition through different mechanisms. Thus, evasion to Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated anti-tumor activity is commonly described and is mediated by various mechanisms, mainly cancer cell-induced down-regulation of NK-activating receptors (NCRs, NKG2D, DNAM-1, and CD16) as well as up-regulation of inhibitory receptors (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, KIRs, NKG2A). Alterations of NK cells lead to an impaired recognition of tumor cells as well as a decreased ability to interact with immune cells. Alternatively, cancer cells downregulate expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors and up-regulate expression of the ligands for inhibitory receptors. A better knowledge of the extent and the mechanisms of these defects will allow developing pharmacological strategies to restore NK cell ability to recognize and lyse tumor cells. Combining conventional chemotherapy and immune modulation is a promising approach likely to improve clinical outcome in diverse neoplastic malignancies. Here, we overview experimental approaches as well as strategies already available in the clinics that restore NK cell functionality. Yet successful cancer therapies based on the manipulation of NK cell already have shown efficacy in the context of hematologic malignancies. Additionally, the ability of cytotoxic agents to increase susceptibility of tumors to NK cell lysis has been studied and may require improvement to maximize this effect. More recently, new strategies were developed to specifically restore NK cell phenotype or to stimulate NK cell functions. Overall, pharmacological immune modulation trends to be integrated in therapeutic strategies and should improve anti-tumor effects of conventional cancer therapy. PMID:24715892

  13. Detection and analysis on versatile coding strategies of high frequency active Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser for irradiance of different targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; Talaat, Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    We report an active Q-switching with different coded schemes generated in the high power diode end pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (DEPSS) using two different techniques of special combination of optical choppers and acousto-optic modulator (AOM) at higher repetition rates of 100 kHz for the first time to the best of our knowledge in any practical laser target designation (LTD) systems. The highest peak power of 95.4 kW with the lowest pulse repetition frequency of 222 Hz and pulse width of 46 ns at FWHM with the pulse-to-pulse stability of ~95% was measured at certain regime of operation. Special modulation and coding of high stable, high peak power Nd:YVO4 laser pulses at 1064 nm using the combination of different optical chopper blades were achieved. A high peak power of more than 4.84 kW with the shortest pulse width of 25 ns at FWHM has been obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as an active Q-switched. The pulse-to-pulse stability was measured and improved to be ~97% at high repetition rate ranges from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The correlation between the coded laser irradiation (transmitted) and the scattered (received) laser signals for three different targets materials of sand, wood and metal using this laser designation system are examined and discussed.

  14. Fibrous Papule of the Face, Similar to Tuberous Sclerosis Complex-Associated Angiofibroma, Shows Activation of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathway: Evidence for a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jung-Yi Lisa; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Fang, Chia-Lang; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous papules of the face are hamartomas characterized by stellate-shaped stromal cells, multinucleated giant cells, and proliferative blood vessels in the dermis. The pathogenesis of fibrous papules remains unclear. There is a striking microscopic resemblance between fibrous papules and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-associated angiofibromas. A germline mutation of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, leading to activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, accounts for the pathogenesis of TSC-associated angiofibromas. Activated mTOR subsequently activates p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal protein S6 (S6) by phosphorylation. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, is effective in treating TSC-associated angiofibromas. The aim of this study was to understand whether the mTOR pathway is activated in fibrous papules. We studied immunoexpressions of phosphorylated (p-) mTOR effectors in fibrous papules, TSC-associated angiofibromas, and normal skin controls. P-mTOR, p-p70S6K and p-S6 were highly expressed in dermal stromal cells and epidermal keratinocytes in fibrous papules and TSC-associated angiofibromas but not in fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes of normal skin controls (p<0.001). The results suggest topical rapamycin may be a novel treatment option for fibrous papules. PMID:24558502

  15. Cancer Treatment Strategies Targeting Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate are related sphingolipid metabolites that can be generated through a de novo biosynthetic route or derived from the recycling of membrane sphingomyelin. Both these lipids regulate cellular responses to stress, with generally opposing effects. Sphingosine-1-phosphate functions as a growth and survival factor, acting as a ligand for a family of G protein-coupled receptors, whereas ceramide activates intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways through receptor-independent mechanisms. A growing body of evidence has implicated ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and the genes involved in their synthesis, catabolism and signaling in various aspects of oncogenesis, cancer progression and drug- and radiation resistance. This may be explained in part by the finding that both lipids impinge upon the PI3K/AKT pathway, which represses apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, sphingolipids influence cell cycle progression, telomerase function, cell migration and stem cell biology. Considering the central role of ceramide in mediating physiological as well as pharmacologically stimulated apoptosis, ceramide can be considered a tumor-suppressor lipid. In contrast, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be considered a tumor-promoting lipid, and the enzyme responsible for its synthesis functions as an oncogene. Not surprisingly, genetic mutations that result in reduced ceramide generation, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis or which reduce steady state ceramide levels and increase sphingosine-1-phosphate levels have been identified as mechanisms of tumor progression and drug resistance in cancer cells. Pharmacological tools for modulating sphingolipid pathways are being developed and represent novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:20919655

  16. Metacognitive Strategy Teaching in the ESL Oral Classroom: Ripple Effect on Non-Target Strategy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Wendy Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    While strategy instruction research generally focuses on the effect of the teaching on learners' use of the strategies targeted for instruction, the present study examines the "wash over" effect on learners' use of pre-existing, non-target strategies. The study involved a treatment class and a comparison class in the ESL oral classroom in Hong…

  17. Strategies for universalistic and targeted HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Padian, N

    1997-10-01

    The controversy over "targeted" versus "universalistic" programs for HIV prevention has persisted throughout the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and in some European countries. Building on previous analyses, we outline methods for integrating universalistic and targeted HIV prevention programming. The outline considers possible synergy between targeted and universalistic programs, rather than a forced choice between the two. Components within this framework include a continuum of the intensity of targeted programs, specification of local risk behavior populations, categories of risk behavior, and HIV seroprevalence within local risk-behavior populations. Given the scarce resources currently available, preventing all new HIV infections is not a realistic public health goal, but with better use of current scientific knowledge, it should be possible to greatly reduce the rate of new HIV infections. PMID:9358108

  18. Paramyxovirus evasion of innate immunity: Diverse strategies for common targets.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Michelle D; Moseley, Gregory W

    2013-05-12

    The paramyxoviruses are a family of > 30 viruses that variously infect humans, other mammals and fish to cause diverse outcomes, ranging from asymptomatic to lethal disease, with the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah and Hendra showing up to 70% case-fatality rate in humans. The capacity to evade host immunity is central to viral infection, and paramyxoviruses have evolved multiple strategies to overcome the host interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immune response through the activity of their IFN-antagonist proteins. Although paramyxovirus IFN antagonists generally target common factors of the IFN system, including melanoma differentiation associated factor 5, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I, signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1 and STAT2, and IFN regulatory factor 3, the mechanisms of antagonism show remarkable diversity between different genera and even individual members of the same genus; the reasons for this diversity, however, are not currently understood. Here, we review the IFN antagonism strategies of paramyxoviruses, highlighting mechanistic differences observed between individual species and genera. We also discuss potential sources of this diversity, including biological differences in the host and/or tissue specificity of different paramyxoviruses, and potential effects of experimental approaches that have largely relied on in vitro systems. Importantly, recent studies using recombinant virus systems and animal infection models are beginning to clarify the importance of certain mechanisms of IFN antagonism to in vivo infections, providing important indications not only of their critical importance to virulence, but also of their potential targeting for new therapeutic/vaccine approaches. PMID:24175230

  19. Student Target Marketing Strategies for Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewison, Dale M.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2007-01-01

    As colleges and universities adopt marketing orientations to an ever-increasing extent, the relative merits of mass marketing and target marketing must also be explored. Researchers identify buyer types as potential students focused on quality, value or economy. On the other axis, learner types are described as those who focus on career,…

  20. Space based lidar shot pattern targeting strategies for small targets such as streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the effectiveness of four different types of lidar shot distribution is conducted to determine which is best for concentrating shots in a given location. A simple preemptive targeting strategy is found to work as adequately as a more involved dynamic strategy for most target sizes considered.

  1. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  2. Functionally Active HIV-Specific T Cells that Target Gag and Nef Can Be Expanded from Virus-Naïve Donors and Target a Range of Viral Epitopes: Implications for a Cure Strategy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Lam, Sharon; Cruz, Conrad Russell; Wright, Kaylor; Cochran, Christina; Ambinder, Richard F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can potentially cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by eliminating infected recipient cells, particularly in the context of technologies that may confer HIV resistance to these stem cells. But, to date, the Berlin patient remains the only case of HIV cure despite multiple attempts to eradicate infection with HSCT. One approach to improve this is to administer virus-specific T cells, a strategy that has proven success in preventing other infections after transplantation. Although we have reported that broadly HIV-specific T cells can be expanded from HIV+ patients, allogeneic transplantations only contain virus-naïve T cells. Modifying this approach for the allogeneic setting requires a robust, reproducible platform that can expand HIV-specific cells from the naïve pool. Hence, we hypothesized that HIV-specific T cells could be primed ex vivo from seronegative individuals to effectively target HIV. Here, we show that ex vivo-primed and expanded HIV-specific T cells released IFNγ in response to HIV antigens and that these cells have enhanced ability to suppress replication in vitro. This is the first demonstration of ex vivo priming and expansion of functional, multi-HIV antigen-specific T cells from HIV-negative donors, which has implications for use of allogeneic HSCT as a functional HIV cure. PMID:26721209

  3. Targeting dendritic cells: a promising strategy to improve vaccine effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Dumont, Claire; Johnston, Angus PR; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) targeting is a novel strategy to enhance vaccination efficacy. This approach is based on the in situ delivery of antigen via antibodies that are specific for endocytic receptors expressed at the surface of DCs. Here we review the complexity of the DC subsets and the antigen presentation pathways that need to be considered in the settings of DC targeting. We also summarize current knowledge about antigen delivery to DCs via DEC-205, Clec9A and Clec12A, receptor targets that strongly enhance cellular and humoral immune responses. Finally, we discuss the intracellular trafficking criteria of the targeted receptors that may impact their effectiveness as DC targets. PMID:27217957

  4. Macrophage Targeted Theranostics as Personalized Nanomedicine Strategies for Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan Kumar; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory disease management poses challenges due to the complexity of inflammation and inherent patient variability, thereby necessitating patient-specific therapeutic interventions. Theranostics, which integrate therapeutic and imaging functionalities, can be used for simultaneous imaging and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Theranostics could facilitate assessment of safety, toxicity and real-time therapeutic efficacy leading to personalized treatment strategies. Macrophages are an important cellular component of inflammatory diseases, participating in varied roles of disease exacerbation and resolution. The inherent phagocytic nature, abundance and disease homing properties of macrophages can be targeted for imaging and therapeutic purposes. This review discusses the utility of theranostics in macrophage ablation, phenotype modulation and inhibition of their inflammatory activity leading to resolution of inflammation in several diseases. PMID:25553105

  5. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  6. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  7. Efficient target strategies for contagion in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wenqi; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Zengrong; Jin, Wei

    2005-08-01

    Organizations or individuals often have an incentive to target a certain number of agents to launch a contagion process effectively and efficiently, for example, sampling consumers in the diffusion of new products. We present an effective strategy for contagion in scale-free networks. The proposed strategy, hub strategy, calls for targeting mostly the highly connected nodes. The biased level implemented in this strategy characterizes its ability to identify hub nodes. We demonstrate that hub strategy can improve the contagion effects evidently. We find that biased level increases first with heterogeneity level of contagion network but decreases with that after a certain value, and decreases with initial adopter rate all the time. Moreover, degree correlations in contagion networks may reduce biased level.

  8. Evolving Strategies for Target Selection for Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Damelin, Marc; Zhong, Wenyan; Myers, Jeremy; Sapra, Puja

    2015-11-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) represent a promising modality for the treatment of cancer. The therapeutic strategy is to deliver a potent drug preferentially to the tumor and not normal tissues by attaching the drug to an antibody that recognizes a tumor antigen. The selection of antigen targets is critical to enabling a therapeutic window for the ADC and has proven to be surprisingly complex. We surveyed the tumor and normal tissue expression profiles of the targets of ADCs currently in clinical development. Our analysis demonstrates a surprisingly broad range of expression profiles and the inability to formalize any optimal parameters for an ADC target. In this context, we discuss additional considerations for ADC target selection, including interdependencies among biophysical properties of the drug, biological functions of the target and strategies for clinical development. The TPBG (5T4) oncofetal antigen and the anti-TPBG ADC A1-mcMMAF are highlighted to demonstrate the relevance of the target's biological function. Emerging platform technologies and novel biological insights are expanding ADC target space and transforming strategies for target selection. PMID:25585957

  9. A novel prostate cancer therapeutic strategy using icaritin-activated arylhydrocarbon-receptor to co-target androgen receptor and its splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Indran, Inthrani R.; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, M.H.Eileen; Li, Yu; Lim, Z.L.Ryan; Hua, Rui; Yang, Chong; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Jun; Xu, H.Eric; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling is the key driving force behind progression and development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In many patients, AR COOH-terminal truncated splice variants (ARvs) play a critical role in contributing to the resistance against androgen depletion therapy. Unfortunately, clinically used antiandrogens like bicalutamide (BIC) and enzalutamide (MDV), which target the ligand binding domain, have failed to suppress these AR variants. Here, we report for the first time that a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), can co-target both persistent AR and ARvs. ICT was found to inhibit transcription of key AR-regulated genes, such as KLK3 [prostate-specific antigen (PSA)] and ARvs-regulated genes, such as UBE2C and induce apoptosis in AR-positive prostate cancer (PC) cells. Mechanistically, ICT promoted the degradation of both AR and ARvs by binding to arylhydrocarbon-receptor (AhR) to mediate ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Therefore, ICT impaired AR transactivation in PC cells. Knockdown of AhR gene restored AR stability and partially prevented ICT-induced growth suppression. In clinically relevant murine models orthotopically implanted with androgen-sensitive and CRPC cells, ICT was able to target AR and ARvs, to inhibit AR signaling and tumor growth with no apparent toxicity. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for the development of ICT, as a novel lead compound for AR-positive PC therapeutics, especially for those bearing AR splice variants. PMID:25908644

  10. The Expression of a Xylanase Targeted to ER-Protein Bodies Provides a Simple Strategy to Produce Active Insoluble Enzyme Polymers in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Ortiz, Miriam; Torrent, Margarita; Ludevid, M. Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylanases deserve particular attention due to their potential application in the feed, pulp bleaching and paper industries. We have developed here an efficient system for the production of an active xylanase in tobacco plants fused to a proline-rich domain (Zera) of the maize storage protein γ-zein. Zera is a self-assembling domain able to form protein aggregates in vivo packed in newly formed endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles known as protein bodies (PBs). Methodology/Principal Findings Tobacco leaves were transiently transformed with a binary vector containing the Zera-xylanase coding region, which was optimized for plant expression, under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter. The fusion protein was efficiently expressed and stored in dense PBs, resulting in yields of up to 9% of total protein. Zera-xylanase was post-translationally modified with high-mannose-type glycans. Xylanase fused to Zera was biologically active not only when solubilized from PBs but also in its insoluble form. The resistance of insoluble Zera-xylanase to trypsin digestion demonstrated that the correct folding of xylanase in PBs was not impaired by Zera oligomerization. The activity of insoluble Zera-xylanase was enhanced when substrate accessibility was facilitated by physical treatments such as ultrasound. Moreover, we found that the thermostability of the enzyme was improved when Zera was fused to the C-terminus of xylanase. Conclusion/Significance In the present work we have successfully produced an active insoluble aggregate of xylanase fused to Zera in plants. Zera-xylanase chimeric protein accumulates within ER-derived protein bodies as active aggregates that can easily be recovered by a simple density-based downstream process. The production of insoluble active Zera-xylanase protein in tobacco outlines the potential of Zera as a fusion partner for producing enzymes of biotechnological relevance. Zera-PBs could thus become efficient and low-cost bioreactors for

  11. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  12. Target for optically activated seekers and trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakin, C. T.; Willett, N. F.

    1984-05-01

    This abstract discloses a target for optically activated seekers and trackers (TOAST) which provides for calibrated and variable target characteristics such as size, intensity, spatial position, color and interfering background. The TOAST has a first ilumination system providing a target light beam through an adjustable iris which controls image size. The target beam passes through a collimator lens which focuses the light at infinity. With the target beam focused at infinity, the motion of an elevation plate lengthens or shortens the distance from the collimator lens to a one motion mirror. The target beam is attenuated by a variable filter driven by a servo-motor, and a color selection process is provided by passing the beam through spectral filters. A background light beam with background imagery is provided to the beamsplitter mirror and mixed with the target image so as to simulate the target environment encountered by an operating optically activated seeker and tracker.

  13. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  14. Targeting Strategies for Multifunctional Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Kyung; Park, Jinho; Jon, Sangyong

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticles harboring various functions including targeting, imaging, therapy, and etc have been intensively studied aiming to overcome limitations associated with conventional cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of various nanoparticles, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with superparamagnetic property have shown potential as multifunctional nanoparticles for clinical translation because they have been used asmagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constrast agents in clinic and their features could be easily tailored by including targeting moieties, fluorescence dyes, or therapeutic agents. This review summarizes targeting strategies for construction of multifunctional nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles-based theranostic systems, and the various surface engineering strategies of nanoparticles for in vivo applications. PMID:22272217

  15. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  16. Strategies for urgent reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Estella M; Uhlmeyer, Erin M; Schmidt, David P; Schardt, Greg L

    2014-12-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban and apixaban are US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) that have emerged onto the market for use in some indications similar to those for warfarin; in addition, edoxaban is seeking FDA approval. Similar indications include reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation for all 3 agents, for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis that may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing hip or knee surgery for rivaroxaban and apixaban, and for the treatment and prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. As anticoagulants, they are all associated with a risk of bleeding, and, unfortunately, there are no approved antidotes for reversal of these agents. A number of small studies in human subjects and in human/animal models exposed to TSOACs have evaluated the use of activated charcoal, hemodialysis for dabigatran, or clotting factor concentrates for their ability to neutralize the anticoagulant effects or reduce drug concentrations of TSOACs. Clotting factor concentrates that have been used include prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant factor VII. This review examines studies and case reports evaluating these strategies for expedited or emergent reversal of TSOACs. PMID:25485923

  17. Cancer active targeting by nanoparticles: a comprehensive review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bazak, Remon; Houri, Mohamad; Achy, Samar El; Kamel, Serag

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cancer is one of the leading causes of death, and thus, the scientific community has but great efforts to improve cancer management. Among the major challenges in cancer management is development of agents that can be used for early diagnosis and effective therapy. Conventional cancer management frequently lacks accurate tools for detection of early tumors and has an associated risk of serious side effects of chemotherapeutics. The need to optimize therapeutic ratio as the difference with which a treatment affects cancer cells versus healthy tissues lead to idea that it is needful to have a treatment that could act a the “magic bullet”—recognize cancer cells only. Nanoparticle platforms offer a variety of potentially efficient solutions for development of targeted agents that can be exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. There are two ways by which targeting of nanoparticles can be achieved, namely passive and active targeting. Passive targeting allows for the efficient localization of nanoparticles within the tumor microenvironment. Active targeting facilitates the active uptake of nanoparticles by the tumor cells themselves. Methods Relevant English electronic databases and scientifically published original articles and reviews were systematically searched for the purpose of this review. Results In this report, we present a comprehensive review of literatures focusing on the active targeting of nanoparticles to cancer cells, including antibody and antibody fragment-based targeting, antigen-based targeting, aptamer-based targeting, as well as ligand-based targeting. Conclusion To date, the optimum targeting strategy has not yet been announced, each has its own advantages and disadvantages even though a number of them have found their way for clinical application. Perhaps, a combination of strategies can be employed to improve the precision of drug delivery, paving the way for a more effective personalized therapy. PMID:25005786

  18. Stakeholder analysis and mapping as targeted communication strategy.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author highlights the importance of stakeholder theory and discusses how to apply the theory to conduct a stakeholder analysis. This article also provides an explanation of how to use related stakeholder mapping techniques with targeted communication strategies. PMID:22922747

  19. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  20. Tau-targeted treatment strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Götz, Jürgen; Ittner, Arne; Ittner, Lars M

    2012-03-01

    With populations ageing worldwide, the need for treating and preventing diseases associated with high age is pertinent. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is reaching epidemic proportions, yet the currently available therapies are limited to a symptomatic relief, without halting the degenerative process that characterizes the AD brain. As in AD cholinergic neurons are lost at high numbers, the initial strategies were limited to the development of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and more recently the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in counteracting excitotoxicity. With the identification of the protein tau in intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ) in extracellular amyloid plaques in the AD brain, and a better understanding of their role in disease, newer strategies are emerging, which aim at either preventing their formation and deposition or at accelerating their clearance. Interestingly, what is well established to combat viral diseases in peripheral organs - vaccination - seems to work for the brain as well. Accordingly, immunization strategies targeting Aβ show efficacy in mice and to some degree also in humans. Even more surprising is the finding in mice that immunization strategies targeting tau, a protein that forms aggregates in nerve cells, ameliorates the tau-associated pathology. We are reviewing the literature and discuss what can be expected regarding the translation into clinical practice and how the findings can be extended to other neurodegenerative diseases with protein aggregation in brain. PMID:22044248

  1. Targeting protein-protein interactions as an anticancer strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei A.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and convergence of cancer genomics, targeted therapies, and network oncology have significantly expanded the landscape of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in cancer for therapeutic discovery. Extensive biological and clinical investigations have led to the identification of protein interaction hubs and nodes that are critical for the acquisition and maintaining characteristics of cancer essential for cell transformation. Such cancer enabling PPIs have become promising therapeutic targets. With technological advances in PPI modulator discovery and validation of PPI-targeting agents in clinical settings, targeting PPI interfaces as an anticancer strategy has become a reality. Future research directed at genomics-based PPI target discovery, PPI interface characterization, PPI-focused chemical library design, and patient-genomic subpopulation-driven clinical studies is expected to accelerate the development of the next generation of PPI-based anticancer agents for personalized precision medicine. Here we briefly review prominent PPIs that mediate cancer-acquired properties, highlight recognized challenges and promising clinical results in targeting PPIs, and outline emerging opportunities. PMID:23725674

  2. Target activation by regulatory RNAs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Vanderpool, Carin K.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are commonly known to repress gene expression by base pairing to target mRNAs. In many cases, sRNAs base pair with and sequester mRNA ribosome-binding sites, resulting in translational repression and accelerated transcript decay. In contrast, a growing number of examples of translational activation and mRNA stabilization by sRNAs have now been documented. A given sRNA often employs a conserved region to interact with and regulate both repressed and activated targets. However, the mechanisms underlying activation differ substantially from repression. Base pairing resulting in target activation can involve sRNA interactions with the 5′ untranslated region (UTR), the coding sequence or the 3′ UTR of the target mRNAs. Frequently, the activities of protein factors such as cellular ribonucleases and the RNA chaperone Hfq are required for activation. Bacterial sRNAs, including those that function as activators, frequently control stress response pathways or virulence-associated functions required for immediate responses to changing environments. This review aims to summarize recent advances in knowledge regarding target mRNA activation by bacterial sRNAs, highlighting the molecular mechanisms and biological relevance of regulation. PMID:25934124

  3. Strategies for targeting primate neural circuits with viral vectors.

    PubMed

    El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Ni, Amy M; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how the brain works requires understanding how different types of neurons contribute to circuit function and organism behavior. Progress on this front has been accelerated by optogenetics and chemogenetics, which provide an unprecedented level of control over distinct neuronal types in small animals. In primates, however, targeting specific types of neurons with these tools remains challenging. In this review, we discuss existing and emerging strategies for directing genetic manipulations to targeted neurons in the adult primate central nervous system. We review the literature on viral vectors for gene delivery to neurons, focusing on adeno-associated viral vectors and lentiviral vectors, their tropism for different cell types, and prospects for new variants with improved efficacy and selectivity. We discuss two projection targeting approaches for probing neural circuits: anterograde projection targeting and retrograde transport of viral vectors. We conclude with an analysis of cell type-specific promoters and other nucleotide sequences that can be used in viral vectors to target neuronal types at the transcriptional level. PMID:27052579

  4. New strategy for monitoring targeted therapy: molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fei-Fei; Meng, Xue; Sun, Xin-Dong; Yu, Jin-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapy is becoming an increasingly important component in the treatment of cancer. How to accurately monitor targeted therapy has been crucial in clinical practice. The traditional approach to monitor treatment through imaging has relied on assessing the change of tumor size by refined World Health Organization criteria, or more recently, by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. However, these criteria, which are based on the change of tumor size, show some limitations for evaluating targeted therapy. Currently, genetic alterations are identified with prognostic as well as predictive potential concerning the use of molecularly targeted drugs. Conversely, considering the limitations of invasiveness and the issue of expression heterogeneity, molecular imaging is better able to assay in vivo biologic processes noninvasively and quantitatively, and has been a particularly attractive tool for monitoring treatment in clinical cancer practice. This review focuses on the applications of different kinds of molecular imaging including positron emission tomography-, magnetic resonance imaging-, ultrasonography-, and computed tomography-based imaging strategies on monitoring targeted therapy. In addition, the key challenges of molecular imaging are addressed to successfully translate these promising techniques in the future. PMID:24124361

  5. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-07-28

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority.

  6. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority.

  7. Molecular strategies targeting the host component of cancer to enhance tumor response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Wook; Huamani, Jessica; Fu, Allie; Hallahan, Dennis E. . E-mail: dennis.hallahan@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, in particular, the tumor vasculature, as an important target for the cytotoxic effects of radiation therapy is an established paradigm for cancer therapy. We review the evidence that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is activated in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) and is a molecular target for the development of novel radiation sensitizing agents. On the basis of this premise, several promising preclinical studies that targeted the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt activation as a potential method of sensitizing the tumor vasculature to the cytotoxic effects of IR have been conducted. An innovative strategy to guide cytotoxic therapy in tumors treated with radiation and PI3K/Akt inhibitors is presented. The evidence supports a need for further investigation of combined-modality therapy that involves radiation therapy and inhibitors of PI3K/Akt pathway as a promising strategy for improving the treatment of patients with cancer.

  8. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  9. Post-coupling strategy enables true receptor-targeted nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmeizi; Jorgensen, Michael R; Thanou, Maya; Miller, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    A key goal of our research is the targeted delivery of functional biopharmaceutical agents of interest, such as small interfering RNA (siRNA), to selected cells by means of receptor-mediated nanoparticle technologies. Recently, we described how pH-triggered, PEGylated siRNA-nanoparticles (pH triggered siRNA-ABC nanoparticles) were able to mediate the passive targeting of siRNA to liver cells in vivo. In addition, PEGylated siRNA nanoparticles enabled for long-term circulation (LTC siRNA-ABC nanoparticles, LEsiRNA nanoparticles) were shown to do the same to tumour cells in vivo. Further gains in the efficiency of siRNA delivery are expected to require active targeting with nanoparticles targeted for delivery and cellular uptake by means of attached biological ligands. Here we report on the development of a new synthetic chemistry and a bioconjugation methodology that allows for the controlled formulation of PEGylated nanoparticles which surface-present integrin-targeting peptides unambiguously and so enable integrin receptor-mediated cellular uptake. Furthermore, we present delivery data that provide a clear preliminary demonstration of physical principles that we propose should underpin successful, bonefide receptor-mediated targeted delivery of therapeutic and/or imaging agents to cells. PMID:22091319

  10. Video Guidance Sensors Using Remotely Activated Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Four updated video guidance sensor (VGS) systems have been proposed. As described in a previous NASA Tech Briefs article, a VGS system is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. The VGS provides relative position and attitude (6-DOF) information between the VGS and its target. In the original intended application, the two vehicles would be spacecraft, but the basic principles of design and operation of the system are applicable to aircraft, robots, objects maneuvered by cranes, or other objects that may be required to be aligned and brought together automatically or under remote control. In the first two of the four VGS systems as now proposed, the tracked vehicle would include active targets that would light up on command from the tracking vehicle, and a video camera on the tracking vehicle would be synchronized with, and would acquire images of, the active targets. The video camera would also acquire background images during the periods between target illuminations. The images would be digitized and the background images would be subtracted from the illuminated-target images. Then the position and orientation of the tracked vehicle relative to the tracking vehicle would be computed from the known geometric relationships among the positions of the targets in the image, the positions of the targets relative to each other and to the rest of the tracked vehicle, and the position and orientation of the video camera relative to the rest of the tracking vehicle. The major difference between the first two proposed systems and prior active-target VGS systems lies in the techniques for synchronizing the flashing of the active targets with the digitization and processing of image data. In the prior active-target VGS systems, synchronization was effected, variously, by use of either a wire connection or the Global Positioning System (GPS). In three of the proposed VGS systems, the synchronizing signal would be generated on, and

  11. Mass Media Strategies Targeting High Sensation Seekers: What Works and Why

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To examine strategies for using the mass media effectively in drug prevention campaigns targeting high sensation seekers. Methods: Both experimental lab and field studies were used to develop a comprehensive audience segmentation strategy targeting high sensation seekers. Results: A 4-pronged targeting strategy employed in an…

  12. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  13. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  14. Molecularly targeted therapies for malignant glioma: rationale for combinatorial strategies

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Nikhil G; Pollack, Ian F

    2010-01-01

    Median survival of patients with malignant glioma (MG) from time of diagnosis is approximately 1 year, despite surgery, irradiation and conventional chemotherapy. Improving patient outcome relies on our ability to develop more effective therapies that are directed against the unique molecular aberrations within a patient’s tumor. Such molecularly targeted therapies may provide novel treatments that are more effective than conventional chemotherapeutics. Recently developed therapeutic strategies have focused on targeting several core glioma signaling pathways, including pathways mediated by growth-factors, PI3K/Akt/PTEN/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK and other vital pathways. However, given the molecular diversity, heterogeneity and diverging and converging signaling pathways associated with MG, it is unlikely that any single agent will have efficacy in more than a subset of tumors. Overcoming these therapeutic barriers will require multiple agents that can simultaneously inhibit these processes, providing a rationale for combination therapies. This review summarizes the currently implemented single-agent and combination molecularly targeted therapies for MG. PMID:19951140

  15. Active Targets for Experiments with Rare Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the active-target technique in the ANASEN detector, which was developed by researchers from Louisiana State University and Florida State University. ANASEN was used in a number of stable and rare iosotope experiments in α- and proton scattering, as well as (α , p) and (d , p) reactions at FSU's in-flight radioactive beam facility RESOLUT. ANASEN also was used to perform the first experiment, proton scattering off a 37K beam at the ReA3 facility. Another active-target detector with a very different approach is found in the Active Target Time-Projection Chamber, which was developed by a collaboration between researchers from MSU, the University of Notre Dame, Western Michigan University, LLNL, LBNL, and St. Mary's University (Canada). First experiments with an AT-TPC prototype have been reported. The talk will summarize the results from the first experiments with these systems, describe further development and future research projects. Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the

  16. Strategies for the Discovery of Target-Specific or Isoform-Selective Modulators.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Itoh, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-10-01

    Currently, the creation of class- and isoform-selective modulators of biologically important targets is a particularly challenging problem because different isoforms within a protein family often show striking similarity in spatial quaternary structure, especially at the catalytic sites or binding pockets. Therefore, an understanding of both the precise three-dimensional structure of the target protein and the mechanisms of action of modulators is important for developing more effective and selective agents. In this Perspective, we discuss currently available rational design strategies for obtaining class- and isoform-selective inhibitors and we illustrate these strategies with the aid of specific examples from the recent literature. The strategies covered include: (1) target-derived (-dependent) de novo drug discovery methodologies, and (2) follow-on derivatization approaches from initially identified active molecules (hit-to-lead and lead-to-candidate efforts). We also comment on prospects for further development and integration of strategies to achieve target-specific or isoform-selective inhibition. PMID:26086931

  17. Targeted activation in deterministic and stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Bryan; Mezić, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Metastable escape is ubiquitous in many physical systems and is becoming a concern in engineering design as these designs (e.g., swarms of vehicles, coupled building energetics, nanoengineering, etc.) become more inspired by dynamics of biological, molecular and other natural systems. In light of this, we study a chain of coupled bistable oscillators which has two global conformations and we investigate how specialized or targeted disturbance is funneled in an inverse energy cascade and ultimately influences the transition process between the conformations. We derive a multiphase averaged approximation to these dynamics which illustrates the influence of actions in modal coordinates on the coarse behavior of this process. An activation condition that predicts how the disturbance influences the rate of transition is then derived. The prediction tools are derived for deterministic dynamics and we also present analogous behavior in the stochastic setting and show a divergence from Kramers activation behavior under targeted activation conditions.

  18. Targeting ischemic penumbra: part I - from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Levine, Steven R.; Winn, H. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Penumbra is the viable tissue around the irreversibly damaged ischemic core. The purpose of acute stroke treatment is to salvage penumbral tissue and to improve brain function. However, the majority of acute stroke patients who have treatable penumbra are left untreated. Therefore, developing an effective non-recanalizational therapeutics, such as neuroprotective agents, has significant clinical applications. Part I of this serial review on “targeting penumbra” puts special emphases on penumbral pathophysiology and the development of therapeutic strategies. Bioenergetic intervention by massive metabolic suppression and direct energy delivery would be a promising future direction. An effective drug delivery system for this purpose should be able to penetrate BBB and achieve high local tissue drug levels while non-ischemic region being largely unaffected. Selective drug delivery to ischemic stroke penumbra is feasible and deserves intensive research. PMID:20607107

  19. Selective targeting of the stress chaperome as a therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Taldone, Tony; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Patel, Pallav D.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Normal cellular function is maintained by coordinated proteome machinery that performs a vast array of activities. Helping the proteome in such roles is the chaperome, a network of molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. The stressed cell contains, at any time, a complex mixture of chaperome complexes; a majority performs “housekeeping functions” similarly to non-stressed, normal cells, but a finely-tuned fraction buffers the proteome altered by chronic stress. The stress chaperome is epigenetically distinct from its normal, housekeeping counterpart, providing a basis for its selective targeting by small molecules. Here we discuss development of chaperome inhibitors, and how agents targeting chaperome members in stressed cells are in fact being directed towards chaperome complexes and their effect is therefore determined by their ability to sample and engage such complexes. A new approach is needed to target and implement chaperome modulators in the investigation of diseases, and we propose that the classical thinking in drug discovery needs adjustment when developing chaperome-targeting drugs. PMID:25262919

  20. Biased and unbiased strategies to identify biologically active small molecules.

    PubMed

    Abet, Valentina; Mariani, Angelica; Truscott, Fiona R; Britton, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2014-08-15

    Small molecules are central players in chemical biology studies. They promote the perturbation of cellular processes underlying diseases and enable the identification of biological targets that can be validated for therapeutic intervention. Small molecules have been shown to accurately tune a single function of pluripotent proteins in a reversible manner with exceptional temporal resolution. The identification of molecular probes and drugs remains a worthy challenge that can be addressed by the use of biased and unbiased strategies. Hypothesis-driven methodologies employs a known biological target to synthesize complementary hits while discovery-driven strategies offer the additional means of identifying previously unanticipated biological targets. This review article provides a general overview of recent synthetic frameworks that gave rise to an impressive arsenal of biologically active small molecules with unprecedented cellular mechanisms. PMID:24811300

  1. Anti-tumour strategies aiming to target tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Mo, Chunfen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wei, Dandan; Xiao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a predominant population of inflammatory cells that present in solid tumours. TAMs are mostly characterized as alternatively activated M2-like macrophages and are known to orchestrate nearly all stages of tumour progression. Experimental investigations indicate that TAMs contribute to drug-resistance and radio-protective effects, and clinical evidence shows that an elevated number of TAMs and their M2 profile are correlated with therapy failure and poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, many studies on TAM-targeted strategies have made significant progress and some pilot works have achieved encouraging results. Among these, connections between some anti-tumour drugs and their influence on TAMs have been suggested. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in TAM-targeted strategies for tumour therapy. Based on the proposed mechanisms, those strategies are grouped into four categories: (i) inhibiting macrophage recruitment; (ii) suppressing TAM survival; (iii) enhancing M1-like tumoricidal activity of TAMs; (iv) blocking M2-like tumour-promoting activity of TAMs. It is desired that further attention be drawn to this research field and more effort be made to promote TAM-targeted tumour therapy. PMID:23113570

  2. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging

  3. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  4. Strategies targeting the IL-4/IL-13 axes in disease.

    PubMed

    May, Richard D; Fung, Michael

    2015-09-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 are pleiotropic Th2 cytokines produced by a wide variety of different cell types and responsible for a broad range of biology and functions. Physiologically, Th2 cytokines are known to mediate host defense against parasites but they can also trigger disease if their activities are dysregulated. In this review we discuss the rationale for targeting the IL-4/IL-13 axes in asthma, atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, COPD, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune disease and fibrotic disease as well as evaluating the associated clinical data derived from blocking IL-4, IL-13 or IL-4 and IL-13 together. PMID:26255210

  5. Designing an Active Target Test Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, James; Tan Ahn Collaboration, Dr.; Nicolas Dixneuf Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The development of instrumentation in nuclear physics is crucial for advancing our ability to measure the properties of exotic nuclei. One limitation of the use of exotic nuclei in experiment is their very low production intensities. Recently, detectors, called active-target dectectors, have been developed to address this issue. Active-target detectors use a gas medium to image charged-particle tracks that are emitted in nuclear reactions. Last semester, I designed a vacuum chamber to be used in developing Micro-Pattern Gas detectors that will upgrade the capabilities of an active-target detector called the Prototype AT-TPC. With the exterior of the chamber complete, I have now been using an electric field modeling program, Garfield, developed by CERN to design a field cage to be placed within the vacuum chamber. The field cage will be a box-like apparatus consisting of two parallel metal plates connected with a resistor chain and attached to wires wrapped between them. The cage will provide a uniform electric field within the chamber to drift electrons from nuclear reactions down to the detector in the bottom of the chamber. These signals are then amplified by a proportional counter, and the data is sent to a computer. For the long term, we would like to incorporate a Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors in the interior of the chamber and eventually use the AT-TPC to examine various nuclei. Dr. Ahn is my advising professor.

  6. Active Learning Strategies to Promote Critical Thinking

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To provide a brief introduction to the definition and disposition to think critically along with active learning strategies to promote critical thinking. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE and Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) from 1933 to 2002 for literature related to critical thinking, the disposition to think critically, questioning, and various critical-thinking pedagogic techniques. Data Synthesis: The development of critical thinking has been the topic of many educational articles recently. Numerous instructional methods exist to promote thought and active learning in the classroom, including case studies, discussion methods, written exercises, questioning techniques, and debates. Three methods—questioning, written exercises, and discussion and debates—are highlighted. Conclusions/Recommendations: The definition of critical thinking, the disposition to think critically, and different teaching strategies are featured. Although not appropriate for all subject matter and classes, these learning strategies can be used and adapted to facilitate critical thinking and active participation. PMID:16558680

  7. Application of support vector machine-based ranking strategies to search for target-selective compounds.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Geppert, Hanna; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM)-based selectivity searching has recently been introduced to identify compounds in virtual screening libraries that are not only active for a target protein, but also selective for this target over a closely related member of the same protein family. In simulated virtual screening calculations, SVM-based strategies termed preference ranking and one-versus-all ranking were successfully applied to rank a database and enrich high-ranking positions with selective compounds while removing nonselective molecules from high ranks. In contrast to the original SVM approach developed for binary classification, these strategies enable learning from more than two classes, considering that distinguishing between selective, promiscuously active, and inactive compounds gives rise to a three-class prediction problem. In this chapter, we describe the extension of the one-versus-all strategy to four training classes. Furthermore, we present an adaptation of the preference ranking strategy that leads to higher recall of selective compounds than previously investigated approaches and is applicable in situations where the removal of nonselective compounds from high-ranking positions is not required. PMID:20838983

  8. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  9. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  10. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  11. Active Learning Strategies and Vocabulary Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative method of data collection, this research explored the question: Do active learning strategies used in grades 5 and 6 affect student vocabulary achievement in a positive or negative direction? In their research, Wolfe (2001), Headley, et al., (1995), Freiberg, et al., (1992), and Brunner (2009) emphasize the importance of…

  12. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  13. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  14. Enhancement of DNA vaccine efficacy by intracellular targeting strategies.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Elisabete Borges; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Fevereiro, Miguel; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel; Monteiro, Gabriel Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Immune response against an encoded antigenic protein can be elicited by including targeting sequences to DNA vaccines that promote protein sorting to processing pathways, related with antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complexes (MHC). Candidate DNA vaccines coding for neuraminidase 3 of the avian influenza virus were designed to encode different sequences that direct the protein to specific cellular compartments such as endoplasmic reticulum (i.e., adenovirus E1A), lysosomes (i.e., LAMP), and the combination of protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome (i.e., E1A-LAMP). The DNA vaccine prototypes were engineered by biomolecular techniques and subsequently produced in E. coli cells. The biological activity of the vaccines was tested firstly in vitro, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, through flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Then, an essential in vivo study was performed in chickens, in order to evaluate the efficacy of DNA prototype vaccines, by measuring the antibody production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:24715281

  15. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  16. Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, M.; Magette, W.L.

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Previous research indicates that targeted strategies designed for specific areas should lead to improved diversion. > Survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting. > Then logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific management intervention strategies. > Waste management initiatives can be tailored to specific needs of areas rather than one size fits all means currently used. - Abstract: Urgent transformation is required in Ireland to divert biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill and prevent increases in overall waste generation. When BMW is optimally managed, it becomes a resource with value instead of an unwanted by-product requiring disposal. An analysis of survey responses from commercial and residential sectors for the Dublin region in previous research by the authors proved that attitudes towards and behaviour regarding municipal solid waste is spatially variable. This finding indicates that targeted intervention strategies designed for specific geographic areas should lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. In the research described in this paper, survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting, after which logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific waste management intervention strategies. The main strategies devised include (a) roll out of the Brown Bin (Organics) Collection and Community Workshops in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown, (b) initiation of a Community Composting Project in Dublin City (c) implementation of a Waste Promotion and Motivation Scheme in South Dublin (d) development and distribution of a Waste Booklet to promote waste reduction activities in Fingal (e) region wide distribution of a Waste Booklet to the commercial sector and (f) Greening Irish Pubs Initiative. Each of these

  17. Azo-reductase activated budesodine prodrugs for colon targeting.

    PubMed

    Marquez Ruiz, Juan F; Kedziora, Kinga; O'Reilly, Mary; Maguire, Jacqueline; Keogh, Brian; Windle, Henry; Kelleher, Dermot P; Gilmer, John F

    2012-12-15

    Budesodine is a synthetic glurocorticoid that undergoes substantial first pass metabolism, limiting systemic exposure. Its use in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease would benefit from a targeting strategy that could lead to a local topical effect, improving safety and increasing anti-inflammatory efficacy. A two-step prodrug strategy involving azoreduction/cyclization that we developed previously for prednisolone is here applied with some variations to budesonide. The budesodine prodrugs were tested using an in vitro azoreductase assay simulating human colonic microflora. The kinetics of amino steroid ester cyclization and its pH dependence was also evaluated. The stability of the prodrugs systems in simulated human duodenal and gastric fluid was evaluated to determine the likelihood of intact intestinal transit. The propionic acid derived prodrug 3 undergoes rapid activation by Clostridium perfingens and its putative reduction product cyclizes with acceptable rapidity when synthesized independently. These properties of 3 suggest that it has potential in management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23122819

  18. Active Debris Removal of Multiple Priority Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Flegel, Sven Kevin; Vörsmann, Peter; Wiedemann, Carsten; Gelhaus, Johannes; Moeckel, Marek; Kebschull, Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 kilometers with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome. Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any future launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target. In this paper several systems, e.g. chemical and electrical engines are analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The service satellite has to undock from the previously de-orbited target in order to start the rendezvous and docking phase for a subsequent target. The targets are chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission

  19. Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, Iason Titos

    Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of

  20. Bioinspired Gold Nanorod Functionalization Strategies for MUC1-Targeted Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelasko-Leon, Daria Cecylia

    . Together, these findings indicate that these may be clinically useful candidate therapeutics for photothermal therapy of epithelial cancers overexpressing MUC1. The stepwise AuNR modification strategy utilizing a polyphenolic adhesive primer for bioconjugation is approachable, practical, and highly adaptable to the use of alternative agents for adhesion, stabilization, and targeting, expanding the range of applications. Given the mounting body of literature describing the anticancer activities of plant polyphenols, the results establish the potential therapeutic use of tannic acid coatings for targeted cancer nanomedicine. Importantly, the modular design afforded by this strategy offers many opportunities to explore the influence of biointerfacially optimized targeting and therapy, underscoring a major novelty of this work.

  1. Targeting transcription factors by small compounds-Current strategies and future implications.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription factors are central regulators of gene expression and critically steer development, differentiation and death. Except for ligand-activated nuclear receptors, direct modulation of transcription factor function by small molecules is still widely regarded as "impossible". This "un-druggability" of non-ligand transcription factors is due to the fact that the interacting surface between transcription factor and DNA is huge and subject to significant changes during DNA-binding. Besides some "success studies" with compounds that directly interfere with DNA binding, drug targeting approaches mostly address protein-protein interfaces with essential co-factors, transcription factor dimerization partners, chaperone proteins or proteins that regulate subcellular shuttling. An alternative strategy represent DNA-intercalating, alkylating or DNA-groove-binding compounds that either block transcription factor-binding or change the 3D-conformation of the consensus DNA-strand. Recently, much interest has been focused on chromatin reader proteins that steer the recruitment and activity of transcription factors to a gene transcription start site. Several small compounds demonstrate that these epigenetic reader proteins are exciting new drug targets for inhibiting lineage-specific transcription in cancer therapy. In this research update we will discuss recent advances in targeting transcription factors with small compounds, the challenges that are related to the complex function and regulation of these proteins and also the possible future directions and applications of transcription factor drug targeting. PMID:26686579

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  3. Highly sensitive and specific colorimetric detection of cancer cells via dual-aptamer target binding strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2015-11-15

    Simple, rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cancer cells is of great importance for early and accurate cancer diagnostics and therapy. By coupling nanotechnology and dual-aptamer target binding strategies, we developed a colorimetric assay for visually detecting cancer cells with high sensitivity and specificity. The nanotechnology including high catalytic activity of PtAuNP and magnetic separation & concentration plays a vital role on the signal amplification and improvement of detection sensitivity. The color change caused by small amount of target cancer cells (10 cells/mL) can be clearly distinguished by naked eyes. The dual-aptamer target binding strategy guarantees the detection specificity that large amount of non-cancer cells and different cancer cells (10(4) cells/mL) cannot cause obvious color change. A detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL with detection linear range from 10 to 10(5) cells/mL was reached according to the experimental detections in phosphate buffer solution as well as serum sample. The developed enzyme-free and cost effective colorimetric assay is simple and no need of instrument while still provides excellent sensitivity, specificity and repeatability, having potential application on point-of-care cancer diagnosis. PMID:26042871

  4. Drugs or diet? – Developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting the free fatty acid family of GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Dranse, H J; Kelly, M E M; Hudson, B D

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are metabolic intermediates that may be obtained through the diet, synthesized endogenously, or produced via fermentation of carbohydrates by gut microbiota. In addition to serving as an important source of energy, FFAs are known to produce a variety of both beneficial and detrimental effects on metabolic and inflammatory processes. While historically, FFAs were believed to produce these effects only through intracellular targets such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, it has now become clear that FFAs are also agonists for several GPCRs, including a family of four receptors now termed FFA1-4. Increasing evidence suggests that FFA1-4 mediate many of the beneficial properties of FFAs and not surprisingly, this has generated significant interest in the potential of these receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of a variety of metabolic and inflammatory disorders. In addition to the traditional strategy of developing small-molecule therapeutics targeting these receptors, there has also been some consideration given to alternate therapeutic approaches, specifically by manipulating endogenous FFA concentrations through alteration of either dietary intake, or production by gut microbiota. In this review, the current state of knowledge for FFA1-4 will be discussed, together with their potential as therapeutic targets in the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disorders. In particular, the evidence in support of small molecule versus dietary and microbiota-based therapeutic approaches will be considered to provide insight into the development of novel multifaceted strategies targeting the FFA receptors for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disorders. PMID:23937426

  5. Experimental strategies for microRNA target identification

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel W.; Bracken, Cameron P.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of eukaryotic gene expression in most biological processes. They act by guiding the RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC) to partially complementary sequences in target mRNAs to suppress gene expression by a combination of translation inhibition and mRNA decay. The commonly accepted mechanism of miRNA targeting in animals involves an interaction between the 5′-end of the miRNA called the ‘seed region’ and the 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the mRNA. Many target prediction algorithms are based around such a model, though increasing evidence demonstrates that targeting can also be mediated through sites other than the 3′-UTR and that seed region base pairing is not always required. The power and validity of such in silico data can be therefore hindered by the simplified rules used to represent targeting interactions. Experimentation is essential to identify genuine miRNA targets, however many experimental modalities exist and their limitations need to be understood. This review summarizes and critiques the existing experimental techniques for miRNA target identification. PMID:21652644

  6. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-04-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), that will perform effectively in all possible future cases. Strategies that cannot perform effectively, because of this uncertainty, risk either not achieving their intended purpose, or becoming a hindrance to the efforts of spacecraft manufactures and operators to address the challenges posed by space debris. One method to tackle this uncertainty is to create a strategy that can adapt and respond to the space debris population. This work explores the concept of an adaptive strategy, in terms of the number of objects required to be removed by ADR, to prevent the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population from growing in size. This was demonstrated by utilising the University of Southampton’s Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) tool to investigate ADR rates (number of removals per year) that change over time in response to the current space environment, with the requirement of achieving zero growth of the LEO population. DAMAGE was used to generate multiple Monte Carlo projections of the future LEO debris environment. Within each future projection, the debris removal rate was derived at five-year intervals, by a new statistical debris evolutionary model called the Computational Adaptive Strategy to Control Accurately the Debris Environment (CASCADE) model. CASCADE predicted the long-term evolution of the current DAMAGE population with a variety of different ADR rates in order to identify a removal rate that produced a zero net

  7. Changing strategies for target therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a worldwide decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer, this malignancy still remains one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Great efforts have been made to improve treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and the introduction of trastuzumab has greatly improved the overall survival. The trastuzumab treatment took its first step in opening the era of molecular targeted therapy, however several issues still need to be resolved to increase the efficacy of targeted therapy. Firstly, many patients with metastatic gastric cancer who receive trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapeutic agents develop resistance to the targeted therapy. Secondly, many clinical trials testing novel molecular targeted agents with demonstrated efficacy in other malignancies have failed to show benefit in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, suggesting the importance of the selection of appropriate indications according to molecular characteristics in application of targeted agents. Herein, we review the molecular targeted agents currently approved and in use, and clinical trials in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and demonstrate the limitations and future direction in treatment of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26811656

  8. Characterizing Types of Human Mobility to Inform Differential and Targeted Malaria Elimination Strategies in Northeast Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Peeters Grietens, Koen; Gryseels, Charlotte; Dierickx, Susan; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Trienekens, Suzan; Uk, Sambunny; Phoeuk, Pisen; Suon, Sokha; Set, Srun; Gerrets, René; Hoibak, Sarah; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Tho, Sochantha; Durnez, Lies; Sluydts, Vincent; d’Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Human population movements currently challenge malaria elimination in low transmission foci in the Greater Mekong Subregion. Using a mixed-methods design, combining ethnography (n = 410 interviews), malariometric data (n = 4996) and population surveys (n = 824 indigenous populations; n = 704 Khmer migrants) malaria vulnerability among different types of mobile populations was researched in the remote province of Ratanakiri, Cambodia. Different structural types of human mobility were identified, showing differential risk and vulnerability. Among local indigenous populations, access to malaria testing and treatment through the VMW-system and LLIN coverage was high but control strategies failed to account for forest farmers’ prolonged stays at forest farms/fields (61% during rainy season), increasing their exposure (p = 0.002). The Khmer migrants, with low acquired immunity, active on plantations and mines, represented a fundamentally different group not reached by LLIN-distribution campaigns since they were largely unregistered (79%) and unaware of the local VMW-system (95%) due to poor social integration. Khmer migrants therefore require control strategies including active detection, registration and immediate access to malaria prevention and control tools from which they are currently excluded. In conclusion, different types of mobility require different malaria elimination strategies. Targeting mobility without an in-depth understanding of malaria risk in each group challenges further progress towards elimination. PMID:26593245

  9. Characterizing Types of Human Mobility to Inform Differential and Targeted Malaria Elimination Strategies in Northeast Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Peeters Grietens, Koen; Gryseels, Charlotte; Dierickx, Susan; Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Trienekens, Suzan; Uk, Sambunny; Phoeuk, Pisen; Suon, Sokha; Set, Srun; Gerrets, René; Hoibak, Sarah; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Tho, Sochantha; Durnez, Lies; Sluydts, Vincent; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Human population movements currently challenge malaria elimination in low transmission foci in the Greater Mekong Subregion. Using a mixed-methods design, combining ethnography (n = 410 interviews), malariometric data (n = 4996) and population surveys (n = 824 indigenous populations; n = 704 Khmer migrants) malaria vulnerability among different types of mobile populations was researched in the remote province of Ratanakiri, Cambodia. Different structural types of human mobility were identified, showing differential risk and vulnerability. Among local indigenous populations, access to malaria testing and treatment through the VMW-system and LLIN coverage was high but control strategies failed to account for forest farmers' prolonged stays at forest farms/fields (61% during rainy season), increasing their exposure (p = 0.002). The Khmer migrants, with low acquired immunity, active on plantations and mines, represented a fundamentally different group not reached by LLIN-distribution campaigns since they were largely unregistered (79%) and unaware of the local VMW-system (95%) due to poor social integration. Khmer migrants therefore require control strategies including active detection, registration and immediate access to malaria prevention and control tools from which they are currently excluded. In conclusion, different types of mobility require different malaria elimination strategies. Targeting mobility without an in-depth understanding of malaria risk in each group challenges further progress towards elimination. PMID:26593245

  10. Resonant activation: a strategy against bacterial persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan; Zhu, Meng; Xing, Jianhua

    2010-03-01

    A bacterial colony may develop a small number of cells genetically identical to, but phenotypically different from, other normally growing bacteria. These so-called persister cells keep themselves in a dormant state and thus are insensitive to antibiotic treatment, resulting in serious problems of drug resistance. In this paper, we proposed a novel strategy to 'kill' persister cells by triggering them to switch, in a fast and synchronized way, into normally growing cells that are susceptible to antibiotics. The strategy is based on resonant activation (RA), a well-studied phenomenon in physics where the internal noise of a system can constructively facilitate fast and synchronized barrier crossings. Through stochastic Gilliespie simulation with a generic toggle switch model, we demonstrated that RA exists in the phenotypic switching of a single bacterium. Further, by coupling single cell level and population level simulations, we showed that with RA, one can greatly reduce the time and total amount of antibiotics needed to sterilize a bacterial population. We suggest that resonant activation is a general phenomenon in phenotypic transition, and can find other applications such as cancer therapy.

  11. Emerging therapeutic targets and strategies in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Federica; Fiorino, Gionata; Allocca, Mariangela; Gilardi, Daniela; Danese, Silvio

    2016-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an immune-mediated inflammatory bowel disease, in which inflammation is driven by a complex interaction between the microbiota, immune cells, genes and mediators. New mechanisms of action and several cytokines have been identified as factors involved in the inflammatory process in CD, and many new molecules have been developed to treat this complex disease. New agents have been developed that target leukocyte trafficking, block or adhesion molecules for example, as well as the development of antibodies against classic inflammatory cytokines or therapies directed against IL-12/23 and Janus kinases. The development of selective mechanisms of action and targeting of different cytokines or inflammatory mediators for each patient presents the biggest challenge for the future in CD therapy. Such agents are currently at different phases of development. We aim to review the current literature data on a targeted approach in CD, which could be promising alternative approach for CD patients in the near future. PMID:26766496

  12. Targeting Millennials: Social Media Strategies within Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessa, Whitney L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative survey method with an online questionnaire as the data collection tool, the author surveyed 189 social media managers working at American Higher Education institutions to identify forms of social media in use, along with the most popular strategies that colleges and universities use with Facebook.

  13. Learning to Create Ad Strategies for "Different" Target Audiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treise, Debbie; Wagner, Elaine

    1999-01-01

    Describes a focus group exercise used with advertising creative- and strategy-development students that was designed to cultivate awareness of the ethnic consumers' purchase-decision process. Offers an overview of the project's stages, describes the assignment, and notes that members of the original-product focus group also reviewed students'…

  14. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  15. Iron-binding drugs targeted to lysosomes: a potential strategy to treat inflammatory lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Persson, H Lennart; Richardson, Des R

    2005-08-01

    In many inflammatory lung disorders, an abnormal assimilation of redox-active iron will exacerbate oxidative tissue damage. It may be that the most important cellular pool of redox-active iron exists within lysosomes, making these organelles vulnerable to oxidative stress. In experiments employing respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages, the chelation of intra-lysosomal iron efficiently prevented lysosomal rupture and the ensuing cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide, ionising radiation or silica particles. Furthermore, cell-permeable iron-binding agents (weak bases) that accumulate within lysosomes due to proton trapping were much more efficient for cytoprotection than the chelator, desferrioxamine. On a molar basis, the weak base alpha-lipoic acid plus was 5000 times more effective than desferrioxamine at preventing lysosomal rupture and apoptotic cell death in cell cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, iron-chelating therapy that targets the lysosome might be a future treatment strategy for inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:16050792

  16. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  17. Test Information Targeting Strategies for Adaptive Multistage Testing Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Burgin, William

    Adaptive multistage testlet (MST) designs appear to be gaining popularity for many large-scale computer-based testing programs. These adaptive MST designs use a modularized configuration of preconstructed testlets and embedded score-routing schemes to prepackage different forms of an adaptive test. The conditional information targeting (CIT)…

  18. How targets select activation or repression in response to Wnt.

    PubMed

    Murgan, Sabrina; Bertrand, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of binary decisions during development. During this process different sets of target genes are activated in cells where the Wnt pathway is active (classic target genes) versus cells where the pathway is inactive (opposite target genes). While the mechanism of transcriptional activation is well understood for classic target genes, how opposite target genes are activated in the absence of Wnt remains poorly characterized. Here we discuss how the key transcriptional mediator of the Wnt pathway, the TCF family member POP-1, regulates opposite target genes during C. elegans development. We examine recent findings suggesting that the direction of the transcriptional output (activation or repression) can be determined by the way TCF is recruited and physically interacts with its target gene. PMID:27123368

  19. Biomaterial-mediated strategies targeting vascularization for bone repair.

    PubMed

    García, José R; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Repair of non-healing bone defects through tissue engineering strategies remains a challenging feat in the clinic due to the aversive microenvironment surrounding the injured tissue. The vascular damage that occurs following a bone injury causes extreme ischemia and a loss of circulating cells that contribute to regeneration. Tissue-engineered constructs aimed at regenerating the injured bone suffer from complications based on the slow progression of endogenous vascular repair and often fail at bridging the bone defect. To that end, various strategies have been explored to increase blood vessel regeneration within defects to facilitate both tissue-engineered and natural repair processes. Developments that induce robust vascularization will need to consolidate various parameters including optimization of embedded therapeutics, scaffold characteristics, and successful integration between the construct and the biological tissue. This review provides an overview of current strategies as well as new developments in engineering biomaterials to induce reparation of a functional vascular supply in the context of bone repair. PMID:26014967

  20. An active target concept for the electronuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Grebyonkin, K.F.; Shzerebzov, A.L.; Kandiev, Ya.Z.; Maloyaroslavtsev, A.N.; Modin, V.N.; Orlov, A.I.; Peschkov, I.A.; Scherbakov, A.P.

    1995-12-31

    Preliminary identification of the components and efficiency estimations for the proposed (by Chelyabinsk-70) concept of active target for electronuclear reactor are goals of this work. (The electronuclear reactor comprises a high-energy proton acclerator, a high-atomic-number target (lead, tungsten) which produces neutrons from the protons, and a subcritical blanket.) Results of preliminary neutron and thermal-hydraulic simulations of the target are represented in the paper and preliminary detailing of the active target components is performed. It is shown that the use of active target can lead to an essential reduction of the requirements to the accelerator power without deterioration of the safety of the system.

  1. Multi-target siRNA: Therapeutic Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiejun; Xue, Yuwen; Wang, Guilan; Gu, Tingting; Li, Yunlong; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Multiple targets RNAi strategy is a preferred way to treat multigenic diseases, especially cancers. In the study, multi-target siRNAs were designed to inhibit NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. And multi-target siRNAs showed better silencing effects on NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF, compared with single target siRNA. Moreover, multi-target siRNA showed greater suppression effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. The results suggested that multi-target siRNA might be a preferred strategy for cancer therapy and NET-1, EMS1 and VEGF could be effective targets for HCC treatments. PMID:27390607

  2. CD22ΔE12 as a molecular target for corrective repair using a RNA trans-splicing strategy: Anti-leukemic activity of a rationally designed RNA trans-splicing molecule

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Qazi, Sanjive; Ma, Hong; Reaman, Gregory H.; Mitchell, Lloyd G.

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that the CD22 exon 12 deletion (CD22ΔE12) is a characteristic genetic defect of therapy-refractory clones in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) and implicated the CD22ΔE12 genetic defect in the aggressive biology of relapsed or therapy-refractory pediatric BPL. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the biologic significance of the CD22ΔE12 molecular lesion and determine if it could serve as a molecular target for corrective repair using RNA trans-splicing therapy. We show that both pediatric and adult B-lineage lymphoid malignancies are characterized by a very high incidence of the CD22ΔE12 genetic defect. We provide experimental evidence that the correction of the CD22ΔE12 genetic defect in human CD22ΔE12+ BPL cells using a rationally designed CD22 RNA trans-splicing molecule (RTM) caused a pronounced reduction of their clonogenicity. The RTM-mediated correction replaced the downstream mutation-rich segment of Intron 12 and remaining segments of the mutant CD22 pre-mRNA with wildtype CD22 Exons 10-14, thereby preventing the generation of the cis-spliced aberrant CD22ΔE12 product. The anti-leukemic activity of this RTM against BPL xenograft clones derived from CD22ΔE12+ leukemia patients provides the preclinical proof-of-concept that correcting the CD22ΔE12 defect with rationally designed CD22 RTMs may provide the foundation for therapeutic innovations that are needed for successful treatment of high-risk and relapsed BPL patients. PMID:25567759

  3. Strategies to Detect Endogenous Ubiquitination of a Target Mammalian Protein.

    PubMed

    Sigismund, Sara; Polo, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Different biochemical techniques are well established to investigate target's ubiquitination in mammals without overexpressing a tagged version of ubiquitin (Ub). The simplest and more direct approach is to immunoprecipitate (IP) your target protein from cell lysate (stimulated and/or properly treated), followed by western blot analysis utilizing specific antibodies against Ub (see Subheading 3.1). This approach requires a good antibody against the target working in IP; alternatively, one could express a tagged version of the protein, possibly at the endogenous level. Another approach consists in IP ubiquitinated proteins from total cell lysate followed by detection with the antibody against the protein of interest. This second method relies on the availability of specific and very efficient antibodies against Ub (see Subheading 3.2). A more quantitative approach is the DELFIA assay (Perkin Elmer), an ELISA-based assay, which allows comparing more samples and conditions (see Subheading 3.3). Cross-validation with more than one approach is usually recommended in order to prove that your protein is modified by ubiquitin.Here we will use the EGFR as model system but protocols can be easily modified according to the protein of interest. PMID:27613032

  4. Nature Inspired Target Reacquisition Strategies for Autonomous Vehicles in a Search Role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Alec; Vincent, Jonathan

    Previous research by the authors has investigated the application of nature inspired search strategies and particle swarm optimisation to the guidance of autonomous vehicles in search roles. Findings suggest that nature inspired search strategies are beneficial under a wide range of search conditions. However, that research did not consider the potential for reacquisition of lost targets, which is especially of interest where the targets are travelling faster than the searching agents or in environments that allow for some means of visual or other sensory occlusion. This work investigates whether behaviours observed in nature can be applied to scenarios where target detection is lost. Through employing a variety of reacquisition strategies against a range of target movement types it is demonstrated that the overall effectiveness of the system can be improved in a variety of scenarios by incorporating nature inspired reacquisition strategies.

  5. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy, General Preventive Strategies, and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Safi, Sher Zaman; Kumar, Selva; Ismail, Ikram Shah Bin

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of people with diabetes worldwide suggests that diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) will continue to be sight threatening factors. The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is a widespread cause of visual impairment in the world and a range of hyperglycemia-linked pathways have been implicated in the initiation and progression of this condition. Despite understanding the polyol pathway flux, activation of protein kinase C (KPC) isoforms, increased hexosamine pathway flux, and increased advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, pathogenic mechanisms underlying diabetes induced vision loss are not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to review molecular mechanisms that regulate cell survival and apoptosis of retinal cells and discuss new and exciting therapeutic targets with comparison to the old and inefficient preventive strategies. This review highlights the recent advancements in understanding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical and molecular alterations, systemic metabolic factors, and aberrant activation of signaling cascades that ultimately lead to activation of a number of transcription factors causing functional and structural damage to retinal cells. It also reviews the established interventions and emerging molecular targets to avert diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. PMID:25105142

  7. Targeting MIF in Cancer: Therapeutic Strategies, Current Developments, and Future Opportunities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Ciaran; Doroudian, Mohammad; Mawhinney, Leona; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2016-04-01

    Strong evidence has been presented linking chronic inflammation to the onset and pathogenesis of cancer. The multifunctional pro-inflammatory protein macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) occupies a central role in the inflammatory pathway and has been implicated in the tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis of many cancer phenotypes. This review highlights the current state of the art, which presents MIF, and the second member of the MIF structural superfamily, d-DT (MIF2), as significant mediators in the inflammatory-cancer axis. Although the mechanism by which MIF asserts its biological activity has yet to be fully understood, it has become clear in recent years that for certain phenotypes of cancer, MIF represents a valid therapeutic target. Current research efforts have focused on small molecule approaches that target MIF's unique tautomerase active site and neutralization of MIF with anti-MIF antibodies. These approaches have yielded promising results in a number of preclinical murine cancer models and have helped to increase our understanding of MIF biological activity. More recently, MIF's involvement in a number of key protein-protein interactions, such as with CD74 and HSP90, has been highlighted and provides a novel platform for the development of anti-MIF chemotherapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26777977

  8. Molecular mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy, general preventive strategies, and novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Safi, Sher Zaman; Qvist, Rajes; Kumar, Selva; Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Ismail, Ikram Shah Bin

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of people with diabetes worldwide suggests that diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) will continue to be sight threatening factors. The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is a widespread cause of visual impairment in the world and a range of hyperglycemia-linked pathways have been implicated in the initiation and progression of this condition. Despite understanding the polyol pathway flux, activation of protein kinase C (KPC) isoforms, increased hexosamine pathway flux, and increased advanced glycation end-product (AGE) formation, pathogenic mechanisms underlying diabetes induced vision loss are not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to review molecular mechanisms that regulate cell survival and apoptosis of retinal cells and discuss new and exciting therapeutic targets with comparison to the old and inefficient preventive strategies. This review highlights the recent advancements in understanding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical and molecular alterations, systemic metabolic factors, and aberrant activation of signaling cascades that ultimately lead to activation of a number of transcription factors causing functional and structural damage to retinal cells. It also reviews the established interventions and emerging molecular targets to avert diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. PMID:25105142

  9. Strategies for active alignment of lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Wilde, Chrisitan; Hahne, Felix; Lüerß, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Today's optical systems require up-to-date assembly and joining technology. The trend of keeping dimensions as small as possible while maintaining or increasing optical imaging performance leaves little to no room for mechanical lens adjustment equipment that may remain in the final product. In this context active alignment of optical elements opens up possibilities for the fast and cost-economic manufacturing of lenses and lens assemblies with highest optical performance. Active alignment for lens manufacturing is the precise alignment of the optical axis of a lens with respect to an optical or mechanical reference axis (e.g. housing) including subsequent fixation by glue. In this contribution we will describe different approaches for active alignment and outline strengths and limitations of the different methods. Using the SmartAlign principle, highest quality cemented lenses can be manufactured without the need for high precision prealignment, while the reduction to a single alignment step greatly reduces the cycle time. The same strategies can also be applied to bonding processes. Lenses and lens groups can be aligned to both mechanical and optical axes to maximize the optical performance of a given assembly. In hybrid assemblies using both mechanical tolerances and active alignment, SmartAlign can be used to align critical lens elements anywhere inside the system for optimized total performance. Since all geometrical parameters are re-measured before each alignment, this process is especially suited for complex and time-consuming production processes where the stability of the reference axis would otherwise be critical. For highest performance, lenses can be actively aligned using up to five degrees of freedom. In this way, SmartAlign enables the production of ultra-precise mounted lenses with an alignment precision below 1 μm.

  10. Emerging strategies to effectively target autophagy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rebecca, VW; Amaravadi, RK

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy serves a dichotomous role in cancer and recent advances have helped delineate the appropriate settings where inhibiting or promoting autophagy may confer therapeutic efficacy in patients. Our evolving understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for the tightly controlled regulation of this homeostatic mechanism has begun to bear fruit in the way of autophagy-oriented clinical trials and promising lead compounds to modulate autophagy for therapeutic benefit. In this manuscript we review the recent preclinical and clinical therapeutic strategies that involve autophagy modulation in cancer. PMID:25893285

  11. Emerging strategies to effectively target autophagy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rebecca, V W; Amaravadi, R K

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy serves a dichotomous role in cancer and recent advances have helped delineate the appropriate settings where inhibiting or promoting autophagy may confer therapeutic efficacy in patients. Our evolving understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for the tightly controlled regulation of this homeostatic mechanism has begun to bear fruit in the way of autophagy-oriented clinical trials and promising lead compounds to modulate autophagy for therapeutic benefit. In this manuscript we review the recent preclinical and clinical therapeutic strategies that involve autophagy modulation in cancer. PMID:25893285

  12. Targeting histone deacetylases: A novel therapeutic strategy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lkhagva, Baigalmaa; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia associated with high mortality and morbidity. Current treatments of AF have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play critical roles in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and contribute to the genesis of AF. Therefore, HDAC inhibition may prove a novel therapeutic strategy for AF through upstream therapy and modifications of AF electrical and structural remodeling. In this review, we provide an update of the knowledge of the effects of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors on AF, and dissect potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:27089819

  13. Bypassing Protein Corona Issue on Active Targeting: Zwitterionic Coatings Dictate Specific Interactions of Targeting Moieties and Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Sohi, Reihaneh; Maghari, Shokoofeh; Raoufi, Mohammad; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Hajipour, Mohammad J; Ghassempour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    Surface functionalization strategies for targeting nanoparticles (NP) to specific organs, cells, or organelles, is the foundation for new applications of nanomedicine to drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Interaction of NPs with biological media leads to the formation of a biomolecular layer at the surface of NPs so-called as "protein corona". This corona layer can shield active molecules at the surface of NPs and cause mistargeting or unintended scavenging by the liver, kidney, or spleen. To overcome this corona issue, we have designed biotin-cysteine conjugated silica NPs (biotin was employed as a targeting molecule and cysteine was used as a zwitterionic ligand) to inhibit corona-induced mistargeting and thus significantly enhance the active targeting capability of NPs in complex biological media. To probe the targeting yield of our engineered NPs, we employed both modified silicon wafer substrates with streptavidin (i.e., biotin receptor) to simulate a target and a cell-based model platform using tumor cell lines that overexpress biotin receptors. In both cases, after incubation with human plasma (thus forming a protein corona), cellular uptake/substrate attachment of the targeted NPs with zwitterionic coatings were significantly higher than the same NPs without zwitterionic coating. Our results demonstrated that NPs with a zwitterionic surface can considerably facilitate targeting yield of NPs and provide a promising new type of nanocarriers in biological applications. PMID:27526263

  14. Current management strategies and therapeutic targets in chronic constipation

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Constipated patients who are refractory to simple lifestyle interventions will usually resort to laxatives, whether prescribed or over the counter. Clinical trial evidence is scarce for older medications such as laxatives, especially with a condition as chronic and subjective as constipation. Newer polyethylene glycol-based laxatives have been investigated under rigorous clinical trial settings, but comparisons between different laxatives are not available. Newer prokinetic agents, targeting peristalsis, intestinal secretion and the colonic flora, have been developed for laxative refractory constipation. This review focuses on the evidence for each of these agents, and the relative indications for each of them. PMID:21317993

  15. A Plethora of Virulence Strategies Hidden Behind Nuclear Targeting of Microbial Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Susana; Genin, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Plant immune responses depend on the ability to couple rapid recognition of the invading microbe to an efficient response. During evolution, plant pathogens have acquired the ability to deliver effector molecules inside host cells in order to manipulate cellular and molecular processes and establish pathogenicity. Following translocation into plant cells, microbial effectors may be addressed to different subcellular compartments. Intriguingly, a significant number of effector proteins from different pathogenic microorganisms, including viruses, oomycetes, fungi, nematodes, and bacteria, is targeted to the nucleus of host cells. In agreement with this observation, increasing evidence highlights the crucial role played by nuclear dynamics, and nucleocytoplasmic protein trafficking during a great variety of analyzed plant–pathogen interactions. Once in the nucleus, effector proteins are able to manipulate host transcription or directly subvert essential host components to promote virulence. Along these lines, it has been suggested that some effectors may affect histone packing and, thereby, chromatin configuration. In addition, microbial effectors may either directly activate transcription or target host transcription factors to alter their regular molecular functions. Alternatively, nuclear translocation of effectors may affect subcellular localization of their cognate resistance proteins in a process that is essential for resistance protein-mediated plant immunity. Here, we review recent progress in our field on the identification of microbial effectors that are targeted to the nucleus of host plant cells. In addition, we discuss different virulence strategies deployed by microbes, which have been uncovered through examination of the mechanisms that guide nuclear localization of effector proteins. PMID:22639625

  16. Prodrug Strategy for PSMA-targeted Delivery of TGX-221 to Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunqi; Duan, Shaofeng; Zeng, Xing; Liu, Chunjing; Davies, Neal M.; Li, Benyi; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-01-01

    TGX-221 is a potent, selective, and cell membrane permeable inhibitor of the PI3K p110β catalytic subunit. Recent studies showed that TGX-221 has anti-proliferative activity against PTEN-deficient tumor cell lines including prostate cancers. The objective of this study was to develop an encapsulation system for parenterally delivering TGX-221 to the target tissue through a prostate-specific membrane aptamer (PSMAa10) with little or no side effects. In this study, PEG-PCL micelles were formulated to encapsulate the drug, and a prodrug strategy was pursued to improve the stability of the carrier system. Fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the cellular uptake of both drug and nanoparticles were significantly improved by targeted micelles in a PSMA positive cell line. The area under the plasma concentration time curve of the micelle formulation in nude mice was 2.27-fold greater than the naked drug, and the drug clearance rate was 17.5-fold slower. These findings suggest a novel formulation approach for improving site-specific drug delivery of a molecular-targeted prostate cancer treatment. PMID:22494444

  17. Nrf2 as molecular target for polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Barber, Alistair J; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of diabetes that is considered one of the leading causes of blindness among adults. More than 4.4 million people suffer from this disorder throughout the world. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox sensitive transcription factor, plays an essential protective role in regulating the physiological response to oxidative and electrophilic stress via regulation of multiple genes encoding antioxidant proteins and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Many studies suggest that dozens of natural compounds, including polyphenols, can supress oxidative stress and inflammation through targeting Nrf2 and consequently activating the antioxidant response element-related cytoprotective genes. Therefore, Nrf2 may provide a new therapeutic target for treatment of diabetic retinopathy. In the present article, we will focus on the role of Nrf2 in diabetic retinopathy and the ability of polyphenols to target Nrf2 as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26926494

  18. Understanding L2 French Teaching Strategies in a Non-Target Language Classroom Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Peijian; Yuan, Rui; Teng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This research explored the congruence and disparity between teachers' and students' attitudes towards French as a second language (L2) teaching strategies in a non-target language classroom context in the USA. The findings suggest students' and teachers' attitudes towards the direct and indirect teaching strategies were generally consistent, but…

  19. Targeting Nucleophosmin 1 Represents a Rational Strategy for Radiation Sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Benamar, Mouadh; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Sasi, Soumya; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Hann, Stephen R.; Geng, Ling; Balusu, Ramesh; Abbas, Tarek; Freeman, Michael L.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that small molecule targeting of nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) represents a rational approach for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Wilde-type and NPM1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were used to determine whether radiosensitization produced by the small molecule YTR107 was NPM1 dependent. The stress response to ionizing radiation was assessed by quantifying pNPM1, γH2AX, and Rad51 foci, neutral comet tail moment, and colony formation. NPM1 levels in a human-derived non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue microarray (TMA) were determined by immunohistochemistry. YTR107-mediated radiosensitization was assessed in NSCLC cell lines and xenografts. Results: Use of NPM1-null MEFs demonstrated that NPM1 is critical for DNA double- strand break (DSB) repair, that loss of NPM1 increases radiation sensitivity, and that YTR107-mediated radiosensitization is NPM1 dependent. YTR107 was shown to inhibit NPM1 oligomerization and impair formation of pNPM1 irradiation-induced foci that colocalized with γH2AX foci. Analysis of the TMA demonstrated that NPM1 is overexpressed in subsets of NSCLC. YTR107 inhibited DNA DSB repair and radiosensitized NSCLC lines and xenografts. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that YTR107-mediated targeting of NPM1 impairs DNA DSB repair, an event that increases radiation sensitivity.

  20. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles. PMID:26033767

  1. Nanomedicine strategies for molecular targets with MRI and optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D; Chen, Junjie; Winter, Patrick M; SenPan, Angana; Schmieder, Anne H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    The science of ‘theranostics’ plays a crucial role in personalized medicine, which represents the future of patient management. Over the last decade an increasing research effort has focused on the development of nanoparticle-based molecular-imaging and drug-delivery approaches, emerging as a multidisciplinary field that shows promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The potential of nanometer-sized agents for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases is extraordinary. They have found applications in almost all clinically relevant biomedical imaging modality. In this review, a number of these approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on MRI and optical imaging-based techniques. We have discussed both established molecular-imaging approaches and recently developed innovative strategies, highlighting the seminal studies and a number of successful examples of theranostic nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cardiovascular and cancer therapy. PMID:20485473

  2. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  3. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD's co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small-molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration, and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. PMID:26592798

  4. Nanocarriers for spleen targeting: anatomo-physiological considerations, formulation strategies and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Anil B

    2016-10-01

    There are several clinical advantages of spleen targeting of nanocarriers. For example, enhanced splenic concentration of active agents could provide therapeutic benefits in spleen resident infections and hematological disorders including malaria, hairy cell leukemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Furthermore, spleen delivery of immunosuppressant agents using splenotropic carriers may reduce the chances of allograft rejection in organ transplantation. Enhanced concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the spleen may improve visualization of the organ, which could provide benefit in the diagnosis of splenic disorders. Unique anatomical features of the spleen including specialized microvasculature environment and slow blood circulation rate enable it an ideal drug delivery site. Because there is a difference in blood flow between spleen and liver, splenic delivery is inversely proportional to the hepatic uptake. It is therefore desirable engineering of nanocarriers, which, upon intravenous administration, can avoid uptake by hepatic Kupffer cells to enhance splenic localization. Stealth and non-spherical nanocarriers have shown enhanced splenic delivery of active agents by avoiding hepatic uptake. The present review details the research in the field of splenotropy. Formulation strategies to design splenotropic drug delivery systems are discussed. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of spleen targeting of nanocarriers and application in diagnostics. PMID:27334277

  5. Effectiveness of intervention strategies exclusively targeting reductions in children's sedentary time: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Altenburg, Teatske M; Kist-van Holthe, Joana; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of interventions targeting sedentary behaviour in children have emerged in recent years. Recently published reviews included sedentary behaviour and physical activity interventions. This review critically summarizes evidence on the effectiveness of intervention strategies that exclusively targeted reducing sedentary time in children and adolescents. We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library through November 2015. Two independent reviewers selected eligible studies, extracted relevant data and rated the methodological quality using the assessment tool for quantitative studies. We included 21 intervention studies, of which 8 studies scored moderate on methodological quality and 13 studies scored weak. Four out of eight moderate quality studies reported significant beneficial intervention effects.Although descriptions of intervention strategies were not always clearly reported, we identified encouragement of a TV turnoff week and implementing standing desks in classrooms as promising strategies. Due to a lack of high quality studies and inconsistent findings, we found no convincing evidence for the effectiveness of existing interventions targeting solely sedentary behaviour. We recommend that future studies apply mediation analyses to explore which strategies are most effective. Furthermore, to increase the effectiveness of interventions, knowledge of children's motives to engage in sedentary behavior is required, as well as their opinion on potentially effective intervention strategies. PMID:27276873

  6. Tracking strategies for laser ranging to multiple satellite targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, J. W.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1994-01-01

    By the middle of the decade, several new Laser Geodynamic Satellites will be launched to join the current constellation comprised of the laser geodynamic satellite (LAGEOS) (US), Starlette (France), Ajisai (Japan), and Etalon I and II (USSR). The satellites to be launched, LAGEOS II and III (US & Italy), and Stella (France), will be injected into orbits that differ from the existing constellation so that geodetic and gravimetric quantities are sampled to enhance their resolution and accuracy. An examination of various possible tracking strategies adopted by the network of laser tracking stations has revealed that the recovery of precise geodetic parameters can be obtained over shorter intervals than is currently obtainable with the present constellation of satellites. This is particularly important in the planning of mobile laser tracking operations, given a network of permanently operating tracking sites. Through simulations, it is shown that laser tracking of certain satellite passes, pre-selected to provide optimal sky-coverage, provides the means to acquire a sufficient amount of data to allow the recovery of 1 cm station positions.

  7. Targeting cancer’s weaknesses (not its strengths): Therapeutic strategies suggested by the atavistic model

    PubMed Central

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Davies, Paul C.W.; Vincent, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    In the atavistic model of cancer progression, tumor cell dedifferentiation is interpreted as a reversion to phylogenetically earlier capabilities. The more recently evolved capabilities are compromised first during cancer progression. This suggests a therapeutic strategy for targeting cancer: design challenges to cancer that can only be met by the recently evolved capabilities no longer functional in cancer cells. We describe several examples of this target-the-weakness strategy. Our most detailed example involves the immune system. The absence of adaptive immunity in immunosuppressed tumor environments is an irreversible weakness of cancer that can be exploited by creating a challenge that only the presence of adaptive immunity can meet. This leaves tumor cells more vulnerable than healthy tissue to pathogenic attack. Such a target-the-weakness therapeutic strategy has broad applications, and contrasts with current therapies that target the main strength of cancer: cell proliferation. PMID:25043755

  8. Targeting of eEF1A with Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyrils as a strategy to combat melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Van Goietsenoven, Gwendoline; Hutton, Jenna; Becker, Jean-Paul; Lallemand, Benjamin; Robert, Francis; Lefranc, Florence; Pirker, Christine; Vandenbussche, Guy; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Evidente, Antonio; Berger, Walter; Prévost, Martine; Pelletier, Jerry; Kiss, Robert; Goss Kinzy, Terri; Kornienko, Alexander; Mathieu, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    Melanomas display poor response rates to adjuvant therapies because of their intrinsic resistance to proapoptotic stimuli. This study indicates that such resistance can be overcome, at least partly, through the targeting of eEF1A elongation factor with narciclasine, an Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril controlling plant growth. Narciclasine displays IC50 growth inhibitory values between 30–100 nM in melanoma cell lines, irrespective of their levels of resistance to proapoptotic stimuli. Normal noncancerous cell lines are much less affected. At nontoxic doses, narciclasine also significantly improves (P=0.004) the survival of mice bearing metastatic apoptosis-resistant melanoma xenografts in their brain. The eEF1A targeting with narciclasine (50 nM) leads to 1) marked actin cytoskeleton disorganization, resulting in cytokinesis impairment, and 2) protein synthesis impairment (elongation and initiation steps), whereas apoptosis is induced at higher doses only (≥200 nM). In addition to molecular docking validation and identification of potential binding sites, we biochemically confirmed that narciclasine directly binds to human recombinant and yeast-purified eEF1A in a nanomolar range, but not to actin or elongation factor 2, and that 5 nM narciclasine is sufficient to impair eEF1A-related actin bundling activity. eEF1A is thus a potential target to combat melanomas regardless of their apoptosis-sensitivity, and this finding reconciles the pleiotropic cytostatic of narciclasine.—Van Goietsenoven, G., Hutton, J., Becker, J.-P., Lallemand, B., Robert, F., Lefranc, F., Pirker, C., Vandenbussche, G., Van Antwerpen, P., Evidente, A., Berger, W., Prévost, M., Pelletier, J., Kiss, R., Goss Kinzy, T., Kornienko, A., Mathieu, V. Targeting of eEF1A with Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyrils as a strategy to combat melanomas. PMID:20643906

  9. Novel strategies for targeting innate immune responses to influenza.

    PubMed

    Shirey, K A; Lai, W; Patel, M C; Pletneva, L M; Pang, C; Kurt-Jones, E; Lipsky, M; Roger, T; Calandra, T; Tracey, K J; Al-Abed, Y; Bowie, A G; Fasano, A; Dinarello, C A; Gusovsky, F; Blanco, J C G; Vogel, S N

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that TLR4(-/-) mice are refractory to mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 (PR8) influenza-induced lethality and that therapeutic administration of the TLR4 antagonist Eritoran blocked PR8-induced lethality and acute lung injury (ALI) when given starting 2 days post infection. Herein we extend these findings: anti-TLR4- or -TLR2-specific IgG therapy also conferred significant protection of wild-type (WT) mice from lethal PR8 infection. If treatment is initiated 3 h before PR8 infection and continued daily for 4 days, Eritoran failed to protect WT and TLR4(-/-) mice, implying that Eritoran must block a virus-induced, non-TLR4 signal that is required for protection. Mechanistically, we determined that (i) Eritoran blocks high-mobility group B1 (HMGB1)-mediated, TLR4-dependent signaling in vitro and circulating HMGB1 in vivo, and an HMGB1 inhibitor protects against PR8; (ii) Eritoran inhibits pulmonary lung edema associated with ALI; (iii) interleukin (IL)-1β contributes significantly to PR8-induced lethality, as evidenced by partial protection by IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) therapy. Synergistic protection against PR8-induced lethality was achieved when Eritoran and the antiviral drug oseltamivir were administered starting 4 days post infection. Eritoran treatment does not prevent development of an adaptive immune response to subsequent PR8 challenge. Overall, our data support the potential of a host-targeted therapeutic approach to influenza infection. PMID:26813341

  10. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  11. Camera calibration approach based on adaptive active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yalin; Zhou, Fuqiang; Deng, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Aiming at calibrating camera on site, where the lighting condition is hardly controlled and the quality of target images would be declined when the angle between camera and target changes, an adaptive active target is designed and the camera calibration approach based on the target is proposed. The active adaptive target in which LEDs are embedded is flat, providing active feature point. Therefore the brightness of the feature point can be modified via adjusting the electricity, judging from the threshold of image feature criteria. In order to extract features of the image accurately, the concept of subpixel-precise thresholding is also proposed. It converts the discrete representation of the digital image to continuous function by bilinear interpolation, and the sub-pixel contours are acquired by the intersection of the continuous function and the appropriate selection of threshold. According to analysis of the relationship between the features of the image and the brightness of the target, the area ratio of convex hulls and the grey value variance are adopted as the criteria. Result of experiments revealed that the adaptive active target accommodates well to the changing of the illumination in the environment, the camera calibration approach based on adaptive active target can obtain high level of accuracy and fit perfectly for image targeting in various industrial sites.

  12. Minimising time to treatment: targeted strategies to minimise time to thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tai, Y J; Yan, B

    2013-11-01

    Time to thrombolysis is a critical determinant of favourable outcomes in acute ischaemic stroke. It is not infrequent that patient outcomes are compromised due to out-of-hospital and in-hospital time delays. On the other hand, time delays could be minimised through the identification of barriers and the implementation of targeted solutions. This review outlines the different strategies in minimising treatment delays and offers recommendations. Literature search in PubMed, Medline and EBSCO Host was conducted to identify studies that are relevant to reduction of time to treatment from January 1995 to December 2012. Strategies to reduce time to thrombolysis are categorised into pre-hospital strategies, in-hospital strategies and post-treatment decision strategies. Proposed pre-hospital strategies include public education on stroke symptoms awareness, prioritising stroke by emergency medical services, increasing ease of access to medical records, pre-hospital notification, and mobile computed tomography scanning. In-hospital strategies include a streamlined code stroke system, computed tomography scanner co-location with emergency department, 24/7 availability of stroke physicians, point-of-care laboratory testing and access to expert neuroimaging interpretation. Post-decision strategies include increasing availability of intravenous thrombolysis and simplification of informed consent procurement. Time to thrombolysis delays is multifactorial. Effective reduction of time delays for acute ischaemic stroke requires the correct identification of and targeted strategies to overcome time barriers. PMID:23734983

  13. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits. PMID:26134708

  14. Journey to the Center of the Cell: Current Nanocarrier Design Strategies Targeting Biopharmaceuticals to the Cytoplasm and Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Munsell, Erik V; Ross, Nikki L; Sullivan, Millicent O

    2016-01-01

    New biopharmaceutical molecules, potentially able to provide more personalized and effective treatments, are being identified through the advent of advanced synthetic biology strategies, sophisticated chemical synthesis approaches, and new analytical methods to assess biological potency. However, translation of many of these structures has been significantly limited due to the need for more efficient strategies to deliver macromolecular therapeutics to desirable intracellular sites of action. Engineered nanocarriers that encapsulate peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids are generally internalized into target cells via one of several endocytic pathways. These nanostructures, entrapped within endosomes, must navigate the intracellular milieu to orchestrate delivery to the intended destination, typically the cytoplasm or nucleus. For therapeutics active in the cytoplasm, endosomal escape continues to represent a limiting step to effective treatment, since a majority of nanocarriers trapped within endosomes are ultimately marked for enzymatic degradation in lysosomes. Therapeutics active in the nucleus have the added challenges of reaching and penetrating the nuclear envelope, and nuclear delivery remains a preeminent challenge preventing clinical translation of gene therapy applications. Herein, we review cutting-edge peptide- and polymer-based design strategies with the potential to enable significant improvements in biopharmaceutical efficacy through improved intracellular targeting. These strategies often mimic the activities of pathogens, which have developed innate and highly effective mechanisms to penetrate plasma membranes and enter the nucleus of host cells. Understanding these mechanisms has enabled advances in synthetic peptide and polymer design that may ultimately improve intracellular trafficking and bioavailability, leading to increased access to new classes of biotherapeutics. PMID:26675220

  15. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  16. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens*

    PubMed Central

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections. PMID:21816822

  17. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  18. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  19. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  20. Fighting Cancer with Transition Metal Complexes: From Naked DNA to Protein and Chromatin Targeting Strategies.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Magistrato, Alessandra; Riedel, Tina; von Erlach, Thibaud; Davey, Curt A; Dyson, Paul J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2016-06-20

    Many transition metal complexes have unique physicochemical properties that can be efficiently exploited in medicinal chemistry for cancer treatment. Traditionally, double-stranded DNA has been assumed to be the main binding target; however, recent studies have shown that nucleosomal DNA as well as proteins can act as dominant molecular binding partners. This has raised new questions about the molecular determinants that govern DNA versus protein binding selectivity, and has offered new ways to rationalize their biological activity and possible side effects. To address these questions, molecular simulations at an atomistic level of detail have been used to complement, support, and rationalize experimental data. Herein we review some relevant studies-focused on platinum and ruthenium compounds-to illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular simulation techniques and to demonstrate how the interplay between molecular simulations and experiments can make important contributions to elucidating the target preferences of some promising transition metal anticancer agents. This contribution aims at providing relevant information that may help in the rational design of novel drug-discovery strategies. PMID:26634638

  1. Targeting hydrogen sulfide as a promising therapeutic strategy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suowen; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-03-15

    Physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) have multiple protective effects in the cardiovascular system. Recent studies have implicated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a new member of vasculoprotective gasotransmitter family, behaving similarly to NO and CO. H2S has been demonstrated to inhibit multiple key aspects of atherosclerosis, including atherogenic modification of LDL, monocytes adhesion to the endothelial cells, macrophage-derived foam cell formation and inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, neointimal hyperplasia, vascular calcification, and thrombogenesis. H2S also decreases plasma homocysteine levels in experimental animal models. In the human body, H2S production is predominantly catalyzed by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). CSE is the primary H2S-producing enzyme in the vasculature. Growing evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is associated with vascular CSE/H2S deficiency and that H2S supplementation by exogenous H2S donors (such as NaHS and GYY4137) attenuates, and H2S synthesis suppression by inhibitors (such as D, L-propargylglycine) aggravates the development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, it remains elusive whether CSE deficiency plays a causative role in atherosclerosis. A recent study (Circulation. 2013; 127: 2523-2534) demonstrates that decreased endogenous H2S production by CSE genetic deletion accelerates atherosclerosis in athero-prone ApoE-/- mice, pinpointing that endogenously produced H2S by CSE activation may be of benefit in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. This study will facilitate the development of H2S-based pharmaceuticals with therapeutic applications in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24491853

  2. Utilizing G2/M retention effect to enhance tumor accumulation of active targeting nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanlian; Cun, Xingli; Ruan, Shaobo; Shi, Kairong; Wang, Yang; Kuang, Qifang; Hu, Chuan; Xiao, Wei; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, active targeting strategies by ligand modification have emerged to enhance tumor accumulation of NP, but their clinical application was strictly restricted due to the complex preparation procedures, poor stability and serious toxicity. An effective and clinical translational strategy is required to satisfy the current problems. Interestingly, the internalization of NP is intimately related with cell cycle and the expression of receptors is not only related with cancer types but also cell cycle progression. So the cellular uptake of ligand modified NP may be related with cell cycle. However, few investigations were reported about the relationship between cell cycle and the internalization of ligand modified NP. Herein, cellular uptake of folic acid (FA) modified NP after utilizing chemotherapeutic to retain the tumor cells in G2/M phase was studied and a novel strategy was designed to enhance the active targeting effect. In our study, docetaxel (DTX) notably synchronized cells in G2/M phase and pretreatment with DTX highly improved in vitro and in vivo tumor cell targeting effect of FA decorated NP (FANP). Since FA was a most common used tumor active targeting ligand, we believe that this strategy possesses broader prospects in clinical application for its simplicity and effectiveness. PMID:27273770

  3. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-05-13

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu(98)-Leu(115)). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser(62) Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser(10) In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. PMID:27002159

  4. Activation of p53 Facilitates the Target Search in DNA by Enhancing the Target Recognition Probability.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuji; Murata, Agato; Sakamoto, Seiji; Nanatani, Kei; Wada, Takehiko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kamagata, Kiyoto

    2016-07-17

    Tumor suppressor p53 binds to the target in a genome and regulates the expression of downstream genes. p53 searches for the target by combining three-dimensional diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA. To examine the regulation mechanism of the target binding, we constructed the pseudo-wild type (pseudo-WT), activated (S392E), and inactive (R248Q) mutants of p53 and observed their target binding in long DNA using single-molecule fluorescence imaging. The pseudo-WT sliding along the DNA showed many pass events over the target and possessed target recognition probability (TRP) of 7±2%. The TRP increased to 18±2% for the activated mutant but decreased to 0% for the inactive mutant. Furthermore, the fraction of the target binding by the one-dimensional sliding among the total binding events increased from 63±9% for the pseudo-WT to 87±2% for the activated mutant. Control of TRP upon activation, as demonstrated here for p53, might be a general activation mechanism of transcription factors. PMID:27291286

  5. Optimal marker-strategy clinical trial design to detect predictive markers for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In developing targeted therapy, the marker-strategy design (MSD) provides an important approach to evaluate the predictive marker effect. This design first randomizes patients into non-marker-based or marker-based strategies. Patients allocated to the non-marker-based strategy are then further randomized to receive either the standard or targeted treatments, while patients allocated to the marker-based strategy receive treatments based on their marker statuses. Little research has been done on the statistical properties of the MSD, which has led to some widespread misconceptions and placed clinical researchers at high risk of using inefficient designs. In this article, we show that the commonly used between-strategy comparison has low power to detect the predictive effect and is valid only under a restrictive condition that the randomization ratio within the non-marker-based strategy matches the marker prevalence. We propose a Wald test that is generally valid and also uniformly more powerful than the between-strategy comparison. Based on that, we derive an optimal MSD that maximizes the power to detect the predictive marker effect by choosing the optimal randomization ratios between the two strategies and treatments. Our numerical study shows that using the proposed optimal designs can substantially improve the power of the MSD to detect the predictive marker effect. We use a lung cancer trial to illustrate the proposed optimal designs. PMID:26951724

  6. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  7. A dual active-restrictive approach to incorporating environmental flow targets into existing reservoir operation rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Environmental flow schemes may be implemented through active or restrictive strategies. The former may be applied via reservoir releases, and the latter can be executed by reducing water demands. We present a dual active-restrictive approach to devising the optimal reservoir operation rules that aim to secure off-stream water supplies while maximizing environmental benefits. For the active part, a multicomponent environmental flow target (including the minimum and monthly flows) is incorporated in the operation rules. For the restrictive counterpart, we use a novel demands partitioning and prioritizing (DPP) approach to reallocating the demands of various sectors. The DPP approach partitions the existing off-stream demand and newly incorporated environmental demand and reassembles the two as the first- and second-priority demands. Water is reallocated to each demand according to the ratios derived from the prioritized demands. The proposed approach is coupled with a multicriteria optimization framework to seek the optimal operation rules for the existing Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) under various scenarios. The best overall performance is achieved by an optimal dual strategy whose operational parameters are all determined by optimization. The optimal environmental flow target may well be a top-priority constant base flow rather than the variable quantities. The active strategy would outperform the restrictive one. For the former, a top-priority base flow target is essential; for the latter, the off-stream demand can become vanishingly small in compensation for the eliminated base flow target, thus promoting the monthly flow target as nearly the top-priority demand. For either the active or restrictive strategy, a prioritized environmental flow demand would provide a path toward the optimal overall performance. A significantly improved overall performance over the existing operation rules is unlikely if the active and restrictive parameters are both favorable

  8. Towards Targeted Delivery Systems: Ligand Conjugation Strategies for mRNA Nanoparticle Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles encapsulating messenger RNA (mRNA) as a vaccine has recently attracted much attention because of encouraging results achieved in many nonviral genetic antitumor vaccination studies. Notably, in all of these studies, mRNA nanoparticles are passively targeted to dendritic cells (DCs) through careful selection of vaccination sites. Hence, DC-targeted mRNA nanoparticle vaccines may be an imminent next step forward. In this brief report, we will discuss established conjugation strategies that have been successfully applied to both polymeric and liposomal gene delivery systems. We will also briefly describe promising DC surface receptors amenable for targeting mRNA nanoparticles. Practicable conjugation strategies and receptors reviewed in this paper will provide a convenient reference to facilitate future development of targeted mRNA nanoparticle vaccine. PMID:26819957

  9. Performance and strategy comparisons of human listeners and logistic regression in discriminating underwater targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixue; Chen, Kean

    2015-11-01

    To improve the design of underwater target recognition systems based on auditory perception, this study compared human listeners with automatic classifiers. Performances measures and strategies in three discrimination experiments, including discriminations between man-made and natural targets, between ships and submarines, and among three types of ships, were used. In the experiments, the subjects were asked to assign a score to each sound based on how confident they were about the category to which it belonged, and logistic regression, which represents linear discriminative models, also completed three similar tasks by utilizing many auditory features. The results indicated that the performances of logistic regression improved as the ratio between inter- and intra-class differences became larger, whereas the performances of the human subjects were limited by their unfamiliarity with the targets. Logistic regression performed better than the human subjects in all tasks but the discrimination between man-made and natural targets, and the strategies employed by excellent human subjects were similar to that of logistic regression. Logistic regression and several human subjects demonstrated similar performances when discriminating man-made and natural targets, but in this case, their strategies were not similar. An appropriate fusion of their strategies led to further improvement in recognition accuracy. PMID:26627787

  10. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  11. Pre-target oscillatory brain activity and the attentional blink.

    PubMed

    Petro, Nathan M; Keil, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Reporting the second of two targets within a stream of distracting words during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) is impaired when the targets are separated by a single distractor word, a deficit in temporal attention that has been referred to as the attentional blink (AB). Recent conceptual and empirical work has pointed to pre-target brain states as potential mediators of the AB effect. The current study examined differences in pre-target electrophysiology between correctly and incorrectly reported trials, considering amplitude and phase measures of alpha oscillations as well as the steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP) evoked by the RSVP stream. For incorrectly reported trials, relatively lower alpha-band power and greater ssVEP inter-trial phase locking were observed during extended time periods preceding presentation of the first target. These results suggest that facilitated processing of the pre-target distracter stream indexed by reduced alpha and heightened phase locking characterizes a dynamic brain state that predicts lower accuracy in terms of reporting the second target under strict temporal constraints. Findings align with hypotheses in which the AB effect is attributed to neurocognitive factors such as fluctuations in pre-target attention or to cognitive strategies applied at the trial level. PMID:26341931

  12. Efficient in vitro gene therapy with PEG siRNA lipid nanocapsules for passive targeting strategy in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Resnier, Pauline; LeQuinio, Pierre; Lautram, Nolwenn; André, Emilie; Gaillard, Cédric; Bastiat, Guillaume; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene therapy is a promising strategy to temporarily inhibit the expression of proteins implicated in carcinogenesis or chemotherapy resistance. Although intra-tumoral administration can be envisaged, studies currently focus on formulating nanomedicines for intravenous injection to target tumor sites as well as metastases. The development of synthetic nanoparticles and liposomes has advanced greatly during the last decade. The objective of this work consists in formulating and optimizing the encapsulation of siRNA into lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) for efficient gene therapy to target melanoma cells. SiRNA LNCs were prepared from DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes, and the siRNA amount and lipid/siRNA charge ratio were assayed to improve the stability and the encapsulation yield. Cryo-TEM imaging of the siRNA lipoplexes and LNC morphology revealed specific organization of the siRNA DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes as well as specific lipid microstructures that can be eliminated by purification. No cytotoxicity of the siRNA LNCs against the melanoma SK-Mel28 cell line was observed at concentrations of up to 500 ng/mL siRNA. In vitro siRNA transfection experiments, compared to Oligofectamine™, demonstrated interesting targeted gene silencing effects. Finally, complement activation assays confirmed the feasibility of the PEGylation of siRNA LNCs as part of a passive targeting strategy for future in vivo melanoma- and metastasis-targeting experiments. PMID:25262914

  13. Cytokine-Modulating Strategies and Newer Cytokine Targets for Arthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are the key mediators of inflammation in the course of autoimmune arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases. Uncontrolled production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17 can promote autoimmune pathology, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4, IL-10, and IL-27 can help control inflammation and tissue damage. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are the prime targets of the strategies to control rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For example, the neutralization of TNFα, either by engineered anti-cytokine antibodies or by soluble cytokine receptors as decoys, has proven successful in the treatment of RA. The activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines can also be downregulated either by using specific siRNA to inhibit the expression of a particular cytokine or by using small molecule inhibitors of cytokine signaling. Furthermore, the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines or cytokine antagonists delivered via gene therapy has proven to be an effective approach to regulate autoimmunity. Unexpectedly, under certain conditions, TNFα, IFN-γ, and few other cytokines can display anti-inflammatory activities. Increasing awareness of this phenomenon might help develop appropriate regimens to harness or avoid this effect. Furthermore, the relatively newer cytokines such as IL-32, IL-34 and IL-35 are being investigated for their potential role in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:25561237

  14. Comparing Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Strategies: Targeted and Routine Testing in Washington, DC

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Amanda D.; Choi, Sungwoog; Dor, Avi; Skillicorn, Jennifer; Peterson, James; Rocha, Nestor; Kharfen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine HIV testing is an essential approach to identifying undiagnosed infections, linking people to care and treatment, and preventing new infections. In Washington, DC, where HIV prevalence is 2.4%, a combination of routine and targeted testing approaches has been implemented since 2006. Methods We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the District of Columbia (DC) Department of Health’s routine and targeted HIV testing implementation strategies. We collected HIV testing data from 3 types of DC Department of Health-funded testing sites (clinics, hospitals, and community-based organizations); collected testing and labor costs; and calculated effectiveness measures including cost per new diagnosis and cost per averted transmission. Results Compared to routine testing, targeted testing resulted in higher positivity rates (1.33% vs. 0.44%). Routine testing averted 34.30 transmissions per year compared to targeted testing at 17.78. The cost per new diagnosis was lower for targeted testing ($2,467 vs. $7,753 per new diagnosis) as was the cost per transmission averted ($33,160 vs. $104,205). When stratified by testing site, both testing approaches were most cost effective in averting new transmissions when conducted by community based organizations ($25,037 routine; $33,123 targeted) compared to hospitals or clinics. Conclusions While routine testing identified more newly diagnosed infections and averted more infections than targeted testing, targeted testing is more cost effective per diagnosis and per transmission averted overall. Given the high HIV prevalence in DC, the DC Department of Health’s implementation strategy should continue to encourage routine testing implementation with emphasis on a combined testing strategy among community-based organizations. PMID:26465771

  15. Prefrontal Cortex Activity Related to Abstract Response Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Genovesio, Aldo; Brasted, Peter J.; Mitz, Andrew R.; Wise, Steven P.

    2005-01-01

    Overview In monkeys, foraging strategies depend not only on a context established by spatial or symbolic cues, but also on the relations among cues. Genovesio et al. recorded the activity of prefrontal cortex neurons while monkeys chose a strategy based on the relation between consecutive symbolic cues. For the same cues and actions, the monkeys also learned fixed responses to the same symbols. Many neurons had activity selective for a given strategy, others for whether the monkeys’ response choice depended on a symbol or the relation between symbols. These findings indicate that the primate prefrontal cortex contributes to implementing abstract strategies. PMID:16039571

  16. Delivery strategies and potential targets for siRNA in major cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has gained attention as a potential therapeutic reagent due to its ability to inhibit specific genes in many genetic diseases. For many years, studies of siRNA have progressively advanced toward novel treatment strategies against cancer. Cancer is caused by various mutations in hundreds of genes including both proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In order to develop siRNAs as therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, delivery strategies for siRNA must be carefully designed and potential gene targets carefully selected for optimal anti-cancer effects. In this review, various modifications and delivery strategies for siRNA delivery are discussed. In addition, we present current thinking on target gene selection in major tumor types. PMID:27259398

  17. [Development of the Saxon Health Target "Active aging - aging in health, autonomy, and participation"].

    PubMed

    Brockow, T; Schulze, J; Fürst, F; Sawatzki, R; Wegge, J; Kliegel, M; Zwingenberger, W; Thönges, B; Eberhard, C; Resch, K-L

    2009-07-01

    In Saxony, the consequences of demographic aging are observable already today. To manage the implications on the health sector, the Saxon Health Targets Steering Committee decided in March 2008 to develop a health target "Active Aging - Aging in Health, Autonomy, and Participation". Target development was based on a 7-level approach (fields of action, main goals, target areas, targets, strategies, intervention measures, indicators for evaluation). A quantitative content analysis was used to reveal 10 potential relevant fields of action, three of which were selected for target development. Targets were developed by 53 stakeholders in multiprofessional working groups. Criteria-based analyses were performed to assure appropriate scientific evidence and feasibility of targets and intervention measures. Over a period of 9 months, 24 targets were defined referring to the main goals "needs-based health care structures", "multiprofessional qualification", "self-rated health" and "intergenerational solidarity". Thirteen targets were developed into recommendations for specific intervention measures. Most of the proposed interventions aim to modify health-related structures or psychosocial determinants of health in the elderly. The best recommendations for intervention measures shall be implemented in cooperation with interested decision-makers. PMID:19565198

  18. Discovering Thiamine Transporters as Targets of Chloroquine Using a Novel Functional Genomics Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Zhang, Jianhuai; Chen, Kaifu; Li, Yongxiang; Li, Wei; Quiocho, Florante A.; Pan, Xuewen

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL), gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL), and dosage suppression (DS) screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7T287N) was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3) expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets. PMID:23209439

  19. A strategy to objectively evaluate the necessity of correcting detected target deviations in image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Narra, Venkat; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2007-11-15

    Image guided radiotherapy technologies are being increasingly utilized in the treatment of various cancers. These technologies have enhanced the ability to detect temporal and spatial deviations of the target volume relative to planned radiation beams. Correcting these detected deviations may, in principle, improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the target. However, in many situations, a clinical decision has to be made as to whether it is necessary to correct some of the deviations since the relevant dosimetric impact may or may not be significant, and the corresponding corrective action may be either impractical or time consuming. Ideally this decision should be based on objective and reproducible criteria rather than subjective judgment. In this study, a strategy is proposed for the objective evaluation of the necessity of deviation correction during the treatment verification process. At the treatment stage, without any alteration from the planned beams, the treatment beams should provide the desired dose coverage to the geometric volume identical to the planning target volume (PTV). Given this fact, the planned dose distribution and PTV geometry were used to compute the dose coverage and PTV enclosure of the clinical target volume (CTV) that was detected from imaging during the treatment setup verification. The spatial differences between the detected CTV and the planning CTV are essentially the target deviations. The extent of the PTV enclosure of the detected CTV as well as its dose coverage were used as criteria to evaluate the necessity of correcting any of the target deviations. This strategy, in principle, should be applicable to any type of target deviations, including both target deformable and positional changes and should be independent of how the deviations are detected. The proposed strategy was used on two clinical prostate cancer cases. In both cases, gold markers were implanted inside the prostate for the purpose of treatment setup

  20. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  1. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a condom promotion program targeting sexually active adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alstead, M; Campsmith, M; Halley, C S; Hartfield, K; Goldbaum, G; Wood, R W

    1999-12-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Condom Campaign, a 1995 HIV prevention program promoting condom use among sexually active adolescents in three King County, Washington, urban communities. This program employed three main strategies: (a) mobilizing all levels of the target communities to support and guide program development and implementation; (b) creating and implementing a mass media campaign targeting sexually active teenagers that promoted correct condom use and favorable attitudes toward condoms; and (c) recruiting public agencies, community organizations, and businesses to distribute condoms from bins and vending machines. We evaluated the program through a series of cross-sectional interviews conducted in the three communities chosen for their elevated levels of adolescent sexual risk behavior. Overall, 73% of target youth reported exposure to the Condom Campaign; exposure did not differ by age, gender, race, or level of sexual experience. Levels of sexual activity remained stable throughout the media campaign. PMID:10693646

  2. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment. PMID:20879980

  3. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  4. An active target for the accelerator-based transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Grebyonkin, K. F.

    1995-09-15

    Consideration is given to the possibility of radical reduction in power requirements to the proton accelerator of the electronuclear reactor due to neutron multiplication both in the blanket and the target of an active material. The target is supposed to have the fast-neutron spectrum, and the blanket--the thermal one. The blanket and the target are separated by the thermal neutrons absorber, which is responsible for the neutron decoupling of the active target and blanket. Also made are preliminary estimations which illustrate that the realization of the idea under consideration can lead to significant reduction in power requirements to the proton beam and, hence considerably improve economic characteristics of the electronuclear reactor.

  5. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  6. Physical Activity and Self-Regulation Strategy Use in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, James; Moran, Aidan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the degree to which the use of selected theoretically derived self-regulation strategies (eg, goal setting) could predict adolescents' self-reported leisure-time physical activity behavior. Method: Two hundred thirty-three (M age = 15.88) high school students completed measures assessing their self-regulation strategy use and…

  7. Notetaking Activity as a Logical Classroom Learning Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William; And Others

    The impact on learning performance of a notetaking strategy called the Directed Overt Activity Strategy (DOA) was evaluated on three types of instructional tasks: spatial learning, simple concept learning, and complex concept learning. One hundred volunteer freshman psychology students from Ohio State University used either the DOA or their own…

  8. Optimal Strategies for Controlling Riverine Tsetse Flies Using Targets: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Glyn A.; Hargrove, John W.; Lehane, Michael J.; Solano, Philippe; Torr, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies occur in much of sub-Saharan Africa where they transmit the trypanosomes that cause the diseases of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. One of the most economical and effective methods of tsetse control is the use of insecticide-treated screens, called targets, that simulate hosts. Targets have been ~1m2, but recently it was shown that those tsetse that occupy riverine situations, and which are the main vectors of sleeping sickness, respond well to targets only ~0.06m2. The cheapness of these tiny targets suggests the need to reconsider what intensity and duration of target deployments comprise the most cost-effective strategy in various riverine habitats. Methodology/Principal Findings A deterministic model, written in Excel spreadsheets and managed by Visual Basic for Applications, simulated the births, deaths and movement of tsetse confined to a strip of riverine vegetation composed of segments of habitat in which the tsetse population was either self-sustaining, or not sustainable unless supplemented by immigrants. Results suggested that in many situations the use of tiny targets at high density for just a few months per year would be the most cost-effective strategy for rapidly reducing tsetse densities by the ~90% expected to have a great impact on the incidence of sleeping sickness. Local elimination of tsetse becomes feasible when targets are deployed in isolated situations, or where the only invasion occurs from populations that are not self-sustaining. Conclusion/Significance Seasonal use of tiny targets deserves field trials. The ability to recognise habitat that contains tsetse populations which are not self-sustaining could improve the planning of all methods of tsetse control, against any species, in riverine, savannah or forest situations. Criteria to assist such recognition are suggested. PMID:25803871

  9. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2, and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25483888

  10. Understanding the fate of chlorogenic acids in coffee roasting using mass spectrometry based targeted and non-targeted analytical strategies.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Matei, Marius F; Golon, Agnieszka; Witt, Matthias; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-09-01

    Coffee is one of mankind's most popular beverages obtained from green coffee beans by roasting. Much effort has been expended towards the chemical characterisation of the components of the roasted coffee bean, frequently termed melanoidines, which are dominated byproducts formed from its most relevant secondary metabolites - chlorogenic acids. However, impeded by a lack of suitable authentic reference standards and analytical techniques sufficiently powerful for providing insight into an extraordinarily complex enigmatic material, unsurprisingly little structural and mechanistic information about the products of coffee roasting is available. Here we report on the characterisation of low molecular weight melanoidine fractions of roasted coffee using a conceptually novel combination of targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometrical techniques. We provide an unprecedented account of the chemical composition of roasted coffee beans. Using a targeted analytical approach we show for the first time, by comparison to authentic reference standards obtained by chemical synthesis, that chlorogenic acids follow four distinct reaction pathways including epimerization, acyl migration, lactonisation and dehydration. The analytical strategy employed in a non-targeted approach uses high resolution mass spectrometry to identify the most abundant molecular formulas present in roasted coffee samples and model roasts followed by van Krevelen and homologous series analysis. We identified the molecular formulas formed from reactions of chlorogenic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, both between classes of compounds and within same classes of compounds. Furthermore, we identified two new classes of compounds formed from chlorogenic acids during roasting, chlorogenic acid acetates and O-phenolic quinoyl and shikimoyl esters of chlorogenic acids. PMID:22833076

  11. Promoting Physical Activity through Goal Setting Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Physical educators are used to setting specific goals for students within a given unit. Here, the author emphasizes that they should also encourage students to set their own goals. Goal setting engages students in the learning process and allows them to develop the skills that support an active lifestyle. The author presents goal setting…

  12. Active Learning Strategies in Physics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamustafaoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine physics teachers' opinions about student-centered activities applicable in physics teaching and learning in context. A case study approach was used in this research. First, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 6 physics teachers. Then, a questionnaire was developed based on the data obtained…

  13. A new strategy for gene targeting and functional proteomics using the DT40 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Orlowska, Kinga P.; Klosowska, Kamila; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    DT40 cells derived from chicken B lymphocytes exhibit exceptionally high homologous recombination rates. Therefore, they can be used as a convenient tool and model for gene targeting experiments. However, lack of efficient cloning strategies, protein purification protocols and a well annotated protein database limits the utility of these cells for proteomic studies. Here we describe a fast and inexpensive experimental pipeline for protein localization, quantification and mass spectrometry–based interaction studies using DT40 cells. Our newly designed set of pQuant vectors and a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) strategy allow for simple and efficient generation of gene targeting constructs, facilitating homologous-recombination–based protein tagging on a multi-gene scale. We also report proof of principle results using the key proteins involved in RNA decay, namely EXOSC8, EXOSC9, CNOT7 and UPF1. PMID:23892402

  14. Targeting G-quadruplexes in gene promoters: a novel anticancer strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Shankar; Hurley, Laurence H.; Neidle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded DNA structures that are over-represented in gene promoter regions and are viewed as emerging therapeutic targets in oncology, as transcriptional repression of oncogenes through stabilization of these structures could be a novel anticancer strategy. Many gene promoter G-quadruplexes have physicochemical properties and structural characteristics that might make them druggable, and their structural diversity suggests that a high degree of selectivity might be possible. Here, we describe the evidence for G-quadruplexes in gene promoters and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets, as well as progress in the development of strategies to harness this potential through intervention with small-molecule ligands. PMID:21455236

  15. [Improvement in zinc nutrition due to zinc transporter-targeting strategy].

    PubMed

    Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-01

    Adequate intake of zinc from the daily diet is indispensable to maintain health. However, the dietary zinc content often fails to fulfill the recommended daily intake, leading to zinc deficiency and also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases, particularly in elderly individuals. Therefore, increased attention is required to overcome zinc deficiency and it is important to improve zinc nutrition in daily life. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter, ZIP4, functions as a component that is essential for zinc absorption. In this manuscript, we present a brief overview regarding zinc deficiency. Moreover, we review a novel strategy, called "ZIP4-targeting", which has the potential to enable efficient zinc absorption from the diet. ZIP4-targeting strategy is possibly a major step in preventing zinc deficiency and improving human health. PMID:27455817

  16. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R. M.; Adler, Jan-Olof; Akkurt, Iskender; Buchanan, Emma; Brudvik, Jason; Fissum, Kevin; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Livingston, Kenneth; Lundin, Magnus; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; MacRae, Roderick; Middleton, Duncan G.; Reiter, Andreas J. H.; Rosner, Günther; Schröder, Bent; Sjögren, Johan; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm3 at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N2 to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in 4He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  17. Acoustic gaze adjustments during active target selection in echolocating porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-12-15

    Visually dominant animals use gaze adjustments to organize perceptual inputs for cognitive processing. Thereby they manage the massive sensory load from complex and noisy scenes. Echolocation, as an active sensory system, may provide more opportunities to control such information flow by adjusting the properties of the sound source. However, most studies of toothed whale echolocation have involved stationed animals in static auditory scenes for which dynamic information control is unnecessary. To mimic conditions in the wild, we designed an experiment with captive, free-swimming harbor porpoises tasked with discriminating between two hydrophone-equipped targets and closing in on the selected target; this allowed us to gain insight into how porpoises adjust their acoustic gaze in a multi-target dynamic scene. By means of synchronized cameras, an acoustic tag and on-target hydrophone recordings we demonstrate that porpoises employ both beam direction control and range-dependent changes in output levels and pulse intervals to accommodate their changing spatial relationship with objects of immediate interest. We further show that, when switching attention to another target, porpoises can set their depth of gaze accurately for the new target location. In combination, these observations imply that porpoises exert precise vocal-motor control that is tied to spatial perception akin to visual accommodation. Finally, we demonstrate that at short target ranges porpoises narrow their depth of gaze dramatically by adjusting their output so as to focus on a single target. This suggests that echolocating porpoises switch from a deliberative mode of sensorimotor operation to a reactive mode when they are close to a target. PMID:23175527

  18. Effect of target probability on pre-stimulus brain activity.

    PubMed

    Lucci, G; Berchicci, M; Perri, R L; Spinelli, D; Di Russo, F

    2016-05-13

    Studies on perceptual decision-making showed that manipulating the proportion of target and non-target stimuli affects the behavioral performance. Tasks with high frequency of targets are associated to faster response times (RTs) conjunctively to higher number of errors (reflecting a response bias characterized by speed/accuracy trade-off) when compared to conditions with low frequency of targets. Electroencephalographic studies well described modulations of post-stimulus event-related potentials as effect of the stimulus probability; in contrast, in the present study we focused on the pre-stimulus preparatory activities subtending the response bias. Two versions of a Go/No-go task characterized by different proportion of Go stimuli (88% vs. 12%) were adopted. In the task with frequent go trials, we observed a strong enhancement in the motor preparation as indexed by the Bereitschaftspotential (BP, previously associated with activity within the supplementary motor area), faster RTs, and larger commission error rate than in the task with rare go trials. Contemporarily with the BP, a right lateralized prefrontal negativity (lateral pN, previously associated with activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) was larger in the task with rare go trial. In the post-stimulus processing stage, we confirmed that the N2 and the P3 components were larger for rare trials, irrespective of the Go/No-go stimulus category. The increase of activities recorded in the preparatory phase related to frequency of targets is consistent with the view proposed in accumulation models of perceptual decision for which target frequency affects the subjective baseline, reducing the distance between the starting-point and the response boundary, which determines the response speed. PMID:26912279

  19. Effects of Epstein's TARGET on Adolescents' Intentions to Be Physically Active and Leisure-Time Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecchini, Jose A.; Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Mendez-Gimenez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Epstein's TARGET strategies on adolescents' intentions to be physically active and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) levels. A total of 447 secondary education students (193 females and 254 males), range age 12-17 years, were divided in two groups: control (N = 224) and experimental…

  20. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  1. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  2. Strategies and Advancement in Antibody-Drug Conjugate Optimization for Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee G.; Kim, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates utilize the antibody as a delivery vehicle for highly potent cytotoxic molecules with specificity for tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Critical parameters that govern successful antibody-drug conjugate development for clinical use include the selection of the tumor target antigen, the antibody against the target, the cytotoxic molecule, the linker bridging the cytotoxic molecule and the antibody, and the conjugation chemistry used for the attachment of the cytotoxic molecule to the antibody. Advancements in these core antibody-drug conjugate technology are reflected by recent approval of Adectris® (anti-CD30-drug conjugate) and Kadcyla® (anti-HER2 drug conjugate). The potential approval of an anti-CD22 conjugate and promising new clinical data for anti-CD19 and anti-CD33 conjugates are additional advancements. Enrichment of antibody-drug conjugates with newly developed potent cytotoxic molecules and linkers are also in the pipeline for various tumor targets. However, the complexity of antibody-drug conjugate components, conjugation methods, and off-target toxicities still pose challenges for the strategic design of antibody-drug conjugates to achieve their fullest therapeutic potential. This review will discuss the emergence of clinical antibody-drug conjugates, current trends in optimization strategies, and recent study results for antibody-drug conjugates that have incorporated the latest optimization strategies. Future challenges and perspectives toward making antibody-drug conjugates more amendable for broader disease indications are also discussed. PMID:26535074

  3. The unfolded protein response selectively targets active smoothened mutants.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Stewart, Daniel P; Bodeen, William J; Han, Young-Goo; Ogden, Stacey K

    2013-06-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway, an essential regulator of developmental patterning, has been implicated in playing causative and survival roles in a range of human cancers. The signal-transducing component of the pathway, Smoothened, has revealed itself to be an efficacious therapeutic target in combating oncogenic signaling. However, therapeutic challenges remain in cases where tumors acquire resistance to Smoothened antagonists, and also in cases where signaling is driven by active Smoothened mutants that exhibit reduced sensitivity to these compounds. We previously demonstrated that active Smoothened mutants are subjected to prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, likely due to their mutations triggering conformation shifts that are detected by ER quality control. We attempted to exploit this biology and demonstrate that deregulated Hedgehog signaling driven by active Smoothened mutants is specifically attenuated by ER stressors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). Upon UPR induction, active Smoothened mutants are targeted by ER-associated degradation, resulting in attenuation of inappropriate pathway activity. Accordingly, we found that the UPR agonist thapsigargin attenuated mutant Smoothened-induced phenotypes in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type Smoothened and physiological Hedgehog patterning were not affected, suggesting that UPR modulation may provide a novel therapeutic window to be evaluated for targeting active Smoothened mutants in disease. PMID:23572559

  4. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  5. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  6. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  7. How to Target Activated Ras Proteins: Direct Inhibition vs. Induced Mislocalization.

    PubMed

    Brock, Ethan J; Ji, Kyungmin; Reiners, John J; Mattingly, Raymond R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras proteins are a driving force in a significant set of human cancers and wildtype, unmutated Ras proteins likely contribute to the malignant phenotype of many more. The overall challenge of targeting activated Ras proteins has great promise to treat cancer, but this goal has yet to be achieved. Significant efforts and resources have been committed to inhibiting Ras, but these energies have so far made little impact in the clinic. Direct attempts to target activated Ras proteins have faced many obstacles, including the fundamental nature of the gain-of-function oncogenic activity being produced by a loss-of-function at the biochemical level. Nevertheless, there has been very promising recent pre-clinical progress. The major strategy that has so far reached the clinic aimed to inhibit activated Ras indirectly through blocking its post-translational modification and inducing its mislocalization. While these efforts to indirectly target Ras through inhibition of farnesyl transferase (FTase) were rationally designed, this strategy suffered from insufficient attention to the distinctions between the isoforms of Ras. This led to subsequent failures in large-scale clinical trials targeting K-Ras driven lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers. Despite these setbacks, efforts to indirectly target activated Ras through inducing its mislocalization have persisted. It is plausible that FTase inhibitors may still have some utility in the clinic, perhaps in combination with statins or other agents. Alternative approaches for inducing mislocalization of Ras through disruption of its palmitoylation cycle or interaction with chaperone proteins are in early stages of development. PMID:26423696

  8. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated

  9. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  10. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Meg; Annand, John; Hornidge, David; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  11. Reversible, activity-dependent targeting of profilin to neuronal nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Birbach, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.birbach@lbicr.lbg.ac.at; Verkuyl, J. Martin; Matus, Andrew . E-mail: aim@fmi.ch

    2006-07-15

    The actin cytoskeleton in pyramidal neurons plays a major role in activity-dependent processes underlying neuronal plasticity. The small actin-binding protein profilin shows NMDA receptor-dependent accumulation in dendritic spines, which is correlated with suppression of actin dynamics and long-term stabilization of synaptic morphology. Here we show that following NMDA receptor activation profilin also accumulates in the nucleus of hippocampal neurons via a process involving rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. This simultaneous targeting to dendritic spines and the cell nucleus suggests a novel mechanism of neuronal plasticity in which profilin both tags activated synapses and influences nuclear events.

  12. Modulating antibiotic activity towards respiratory bacterial pathogens by co-medications: a multi-target approach.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Nathalie M; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2016-07-01

    Non-antibiotic drugs can modulate bacterial physiology and/or antibiotic activity, opening perspectives for innovative therapeutic strategies. Focusing on respiratory pathogens and considering in vitro, in vivo, and clinical data, here we examine the effect of these drugs on the expression of resistance mechanisms, biofilm formation, and intracellular survival, as well as their influence on the activity of antibiotics on bacteria. Beyond the description of the effects observed, we also comment on concentrations that are active and discuss the mechanisms of drug-drug or drug-target interactions. This discussion should be helpful in defining useful targets for adjuvant therapy and establishing the corresponding pharmacophores for further drug fine-tuning. PMID:27094105

  13. Targeting strategies on miRNA-21 and PDCD4 for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Jun Jie; Tang, Hong Ming; To, Shing Shun Tony

    2015-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are often deregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Downregulation of microRNA-21 (miR-21), especially in GBM, is responsible for increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation and invasion, increased G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and reduced chemotherapeutic resistance to doxorubicin. Furthermore, it is a critical regulator of multiple downstream genes and signaling pathways involved in gliomagenesis. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is critical in mediating apoptosis in GBM, and is downregulated by miR-21, which may mediate the resistance of glioblastoma cells against chemotherapy or radiation via its target genes PDCD4. Evidence is mounting that how alterations of these miRNAs transcription factors provide initiation, maintenance, or progression of tumors. This review will focus on the roles of miRNAs family members (particularly miR-21 and its target gene PDCD4) in tumors like glioblastoma and new targeting strategies, as examples some new targeting therapeutic methods and molecular mechanisms of signal pathways in glioblastoma therapeutics, to give the reader the current trends of approach to target regulation of these miRNA and genes for future glioma therapies. PMID:26142886

  14. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  15. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  16. Buoyancy-Activated Cell Sorting Using Targeted Biotinylated Albumin Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including florescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4°C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44+) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44–), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our targeted

  17. Strategies for systemic radiotherapy of micrometastases using antibody-targeted 131I.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, T E; O'Donoghue, J A; Hilditch, T E; Barrett, A

    1988-02-01

    A simple analysis is developed to evaluate the likely effectiveness of treatment of micrometastases by antibody-targeted 131I. Account is taken of the low levels of tumour uptake of antibody-conjugated 131I presently achievable and of the "energy wastage" in targeting microscopic tumours with a radionuclide whose disintegration energy is widely dissipated. The analysis shows that only modest doses can be delivered to micrometastases when total body dose is restricted to levels which allow recovery of bone marrow. Much higher doses could be delivered to micrometastases when bone marrow rescue is used. A rationale is presented for targeted systemic radiotherapy used in combination with external beam total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow rescue. This has some practical advantages. The effect of the targeted component is to impose a biological non-uniformity on the total body dose distribution with regions of high tumour cell density receiving higher doses. Where targeting results in high doses to particular normal organs (e.g. liver, kidney) the total dose to these organs could be kept within tolerable limits by appropriate shielding of the external beam radiation component of the treatment. Greater levels of tumour cell kill should be achievable by the combination regime without any increase in normal tissue damage over that inflicted by conventional TBI. The predicted superiority of the combination regime is especially marked for tumours just below the threshold for detectability (e.g. approximately 1 mm-1 cm diameter). This approach has the advantage that targeted radiotherapy provides only a proportion of the total body dose, most of which is given by a familiar technique. The proportion of dose given by the targeted component could be increased as experience is gained. The predicted superiority of the combination strategy should be experimentally testable using laboratory animals. Clinical applications should be cautiously approached, with due regard to

  18. Active radar guides missile to its target: receptor-based targeted treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by nanoparticulate systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jun; Liao, Jia-Zhi; Lin, Ju-Sheng; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually present at advanced stages and do not benefit from surgical resection, so drug therapy should deserve a prominent place in unresectable HCC treatment. But chemotherapy agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel, frequently encounter important problems such as low specificity and non-selective biodistribution. Recently, the development of nanotechnology led to significant breakthroughs to overcome these problems. Decorating the surfaces of nanoparticulate-based drug carriers with homing devices has demonstrated its potential in concentrating chemotherapy agents specifically to HCC cells. In this paper, we reviewed the current status of active targeting strategies for nanoparticulate systems based on various receptors such as asialoglycoprotein receptor, transferrin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, integrin, and CD44, which are abundantly expressed on the surfaces of hepatocytes or liver cancer cells. Furthermore, we pointed out their merits and defects and provided theoretical references for further research. PMID:25424700

  19. Tumor Initiating Cells and Chemoresistance: Which Is the Best Strategy to Target Colon Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Paldino, Emanuela; Tesori, Valentina; Casalbore, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence that chemoresistance and minimal residual disease result from selective resistance of a cell subpopulation from the original tumor that is molecularly and phenotypically distinct. These cells are called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs). In this review, we analyze the potential targeting strategies for eradicating CSCs specifically in order to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic colon cancer. These include induction of terminal epithelial differentiation of CSCs or targeting some genes expressed only in CSCs and involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Ideal targets could be cell regulators that simultaneously control the stemness and the resistance of CSCs. Another important aspect of cancer biology, which can also be harnessed to create novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents, is the Warburg effect, also known as aerobic glycolysis. Actually, little is yet known with regard to the metabolism of CSCs population, leaving an exciting unstudied avenue in the dawn of the emerging field of metabolomics. PMID:24527460

  20. Novel p53-dependent anticancer strategy by targeting iron signaling and BNIP3L-induced mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wilfinger, Nastasia; Austin, Shane; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Berger, Walter; Reipert, Siegfried; Praschberger, Monika; Paur, Jakob; Trondl, Robert; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Nowikovsky, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies BNIP3L as the key regulator of p53-dependent cell death mechanism in colon cancer cells targeted by the novel gallium based anticancer drug, KP46. KP46 specifically accumulated into mitochondria where it caused p53-dependent morphological and functional damage impairing mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics. Furthermore, competing with iron for cellular uptake, KP46 lowered the intracellular labile iron pools and intracellular heme. Accordingly, p53 accumulated in the nucleus where it activated its transcriptional target BNIP3L, a BH3 only domain protein with functions in apoptosis and mitophagy. Upregulated BNIP3L sensitized the mitochondrial permeability transition and strongly induced PARKIN-mediated mitochondrial clearance and cellular vacuolization. Downregulation of BNIP3L entirely rescued cell viability caused by exposure of KP46 for 24 hours, confirming that early induced cell death was regulated by BNIP3L. Altogether, targeting BNIP3L in wild-type p53 colon cancer cells is a novel anticancer strategy activating iron depletion signaling and the mitophagy-related cell death pathway. PMID:26517689

  1. Expression, characterization, and evaluation of a RANK-binding single chain fraction variable: an osteoclast targeting drug delivery strategy.

    PubMed

    Newa, Madhuri; Lam, Michael; Bhandari, Krishna Hari; Xu, Biwen; Doschak, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    A single chain Fraction variable (scFv) employs antibody-like target recognition specificity. Osteoclasts, responsible for bone resorption, express Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor Kappa B (RANK) receptors. This study aimed to express, characterize, and evaluate scFv against RANK receptors that may serve as a platform to target osteoclasts. Using phage display technology, scFv against RANK receptor was expressed and characterized by DNA sequencing, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The potential for cytotoxicity was evaluated using an MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay, and its cross reactivity was evaluated using ELISA. Osteoclast-like cells were generated from RAW 264.7 cells, and the osteoclast targeting ability of scFv was evaluated using immunocytochemistry. ScFv's antiresorptive efficacy was studied using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and resorption assay. Anti-RANK scFv was successfully expressed and characterized. No cross reactivity with other tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) members and no cytotoxic effect on a non-RANK bearing cell line were observed. It showed specificity toward a RANK receptor and an inhibitory effect on osteoclast activity. With the increase in development trends for biologics as therapeutics and growing knowledge on the importance of osteoclast targeted therapy, this study may provide a drug delivery strategy to target osteoclasts, thereby leading to a promising therapy for resorptive bone diseases. PMID:24171467

  2. Behavioral activation: a strategy to enhance treatment response.

    PubMed

    Sudak, Donna M; Majeed, Muhammad H; Youngman, Branden

    2014-07-01

    Behavioral activation is an empirically validated treatment for depression pioneered in 1973 by Ferster, based on B.F. Skinner's behavioral principles. After publication of Beck's work on cognitive therapy, the boundaries of behavioral and cognitive therapies were blurred and the two now overlap substantially. Behavioral activation is also used as a stand-alone treatment and can also be effective in conjunction with antidepressant medication. Case conceptualization in behavioral activation entails an assessment of the behaviors that the patient has stopped that produce pleasure or are of importance, as well as behaviors essential to self-care. Activity monitoring, which provides treatment targets and leads to the case conceptualization in behavioral activation, consists of using charts, forms, or other prompts to track the relationship between activities and other variables (e.g., mood, enjoyment). That technique is also used to target rumination, procrastination, and avoidance and may also be helpful for patients with psychosis. PMID:25036582

  3. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25018645

  4. The Platin-X series: activation, targeting, and delivery.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer platinum (Pt) complexes have long been considered to be one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Yet there remains the hunt for the "magic bullet" which can satisfy the requirements of an effective chemotherapeutic drug formulation. Pt(iv) complexes are kinetically more inert than the Pt(ii) congeners and offer the opportunity to append additional functional groups/ligands for prodrug activation, tumor targeting, or drug delivery. The ultimate aim of functionalization is to enhance the tumor selective action and attenuate systemic toxicity of the drugs. Moreover, an increase in cellular accumulation to surmount the resistance of the tumor against the drugs is also of paramount importance in drug development and discovery. In this review, we will address the attempts made in our lab to develop Pt(iv) prodrugs that can be activated and delivered using targeted nanotechnology-based delivery platforms. PMID:27493131

  5. Feasibility study of an active target for the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, A.; Cavoto, G.; Ripiccini, E.

    2014-03-01

    We consider the possibility to have an active target for the upgrade of the MEG experiment (MEG II). The active target should work as (1) a beam monitoring, to continuously measure the muon stopping rate and therefore provide a direct evaluation of the detector acceptance (or an absolute normalization of the stopped muon); and as (2) an auxiliary device for the spectrometer, to improve the determination of the muon decay vertex and consequently to achieve a better positron momentum and angular resolutions, detecting the positron from the muon decay. In this work we studied the feasibility of detecting minimum ionizing particle with a single layer of 250 μm fiber and the capability to discriminate between the signal induced by either a muon or a positron.

  6. ROS-activated anticancer prodrugs: a new strategy for tumor-specific damage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaohua; Gandhi, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    Targeting tumor cells is an important strategy to improve the selectivity of cancer therapies. With the advanced studies in cancer biology, we know that cancer cells are usually under increased oxidative stress. The high level of reactive oxygen species in cancer cells has been exploited for developing novel therapeutic strategies to preferentially kill cancer cells. Our group, amongst others, have used boronic acids/esters as triggers for developing ROS-activated anticancer prodrugs that target cancer cells. The selectivity was achieved by combining a specific reaction between boronates and H2O2 with the efficient masking of drug toxicity in the prodrug via boronates. Prodrugs activated via ferrocene-mediated oxidation have also been developed to improve the selectivity of anticancer drugs. We describe how the strategies of ROS-activation can be used for further development of new ROS-targeting prodrugs, eventually leading to novel approaches and/or combined technology for more efficient and selective treatment of cancers. PMID:22900465

  7. Need for Optimisation of Immunisation Strategies Targeting Invasive Meningococcal Disease in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Bousema, Josefien Cornelie Minthe; Ruitenberg, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a severe bacterial infectious disease with high mortality and morbidity rates worldwide. In recent years, industrialised countries have implemented vaccines targeting IMD in their National Immunisation Programmes (NIPs). In 2002, the Netherlands successfully implemented a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months and performed a single catch-up for children ≤18 years of age. Since then the disease disappeared in vaccinated individuals. Furthermore, herd protection was induced, leading to a significant IMD reduction in non-vaccinated individuals. However, previous studies revealed that the current programmatic immunisation strategy was insufficient to protect the population in the foreseeable future. In addition, vaccines that provide protection against additional serogroups are now available. This paper describes to what extent the current strategy to prevent IMD in the Netherlands is still sufficient, taking into account the burden of disease and the latest scientific knowledge related to IMD and its prevention. In particular, primary MenC immunisation seems not to provide long-term protection, indicating a risk for possible recurrence of the disease. This can be combatted by implementing a MenC or MenACWY adolescent booster vaccine. Additional health benefits can be achieved by replacing the primary MenC by a MenACWY vaccine. By implementation of a recently licensed MenB vaccine for infants in the NIP, the greatest burden of disease would be targeted. This paper shows that optimisation of the immunisation strategy targeting IMD in the Netherlands should be considered and contributes to create awareness concerning prevention optimisation in other countries. PMID:26673336

  8. Genetic and pharmacologic evidence that mTOR targeting outweighs mTORC1 inhibition as an antimyeloma strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Ocio, Enrique M; Paiva, Bruno; Mortensen, Deborah S; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Chopra, Rajesh; Miguel, Jesús San; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and cell survival, and plays those roles by forming two functionally distinct multiprotein complexes: mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Deregulation of the mTOR pathway has been found in different cancers, including multiple myeloma. Agents acting on mTORC1, such as rapamycin and derivatives, are being explored as antitumoral strategies. However, whether targeting mTOR would be a more effective antimyeloma strategy than exclusively acting on the mTORC1 branch remains to be established. In this report, we explored the activation status of mTOR routes in malignant plasma cells, and analyzed the contribution of mTOR and its two signaling branches to the proliferation of myeloma cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated deregulation of mTOR pathway-related genes in myeloma plasma cells from patients. Activation of the mTOR pathway in myelomatous plasma cells was corroborated by flow cytometric analyses. RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicated that mTORC1 predominated over mTORC2 in the control of myeloma cell proliferation. However, mTOR knockdown had a superior antiproliferative effect than acting only on mTORC1 or mTORC2. Pharmacologic studies corroborated that the neutralization of mTOR has a stronger antimyeloma effect than the individual inhibition of mTORC1 or mTORC2. Together, our data support the clinical development of agents that widely target mTOR, instead of agents, such as rapamycin or its derivatives, that solely act on mTORC1. PMID:24431075

  9. An isoform-selective, small-molecule inhibitor targets the autoregulatory mechanism of p21-activated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Sean W.; Beeser, Alexander; Fukui, Jami A.; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E. E.; Myers, Cynthia; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoregulatory domains found within kinases may provide more unique targets for chemical inhibitors than the conserved ATP-binding pocket targeted by most inhibitors. The kinase Pak1 contains an autoinhibitory domain that suppresses the catalytic activity of its kinase domain. Pak1 activators relieve this autoinhibition and initiate conformational rearrangements and autophosphorylation events leading to kinase activation. We developed a screen for allosteric inhibitors targeting Pak1 activation and identified the inhibitor IPA-3. Remarkably, pre-activated Pak1 is resistant to IPA-3. IPA-3 also inhibits activation of related Pak isoforms regulated by autoinhibition, but not more distantly related Paks, nor >200 other kinases tested. Pak1 inhibition by IPA-3 in live cells supports a critical role for Pak in PDGF-stimulated Erk activation. These studies illustrate a novel strategy for kinase inhibition and introduce a highly selective, cell-permeable chemical inhibitor of Pak. PMID:18420139

  10. Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Targeting or Beyond β-Amyloid: Insights from Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiutian; Qing, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with two hallmarks: β-amyloid plagues and neurofibrillary tangles. It is one of the most alarming illnesses to elderly people. No effective drugs and therapies have been developed, while mechanism-based explorations of therapeutic approaches have been intensively investigated. Outcomes of clinical trials suggested several pitfalls in the choice of biomarkers, development of drug candidates, and interaction of drug-targeted molecules; however, they also aroused concerns on the potential deficiency in our understanding of pathogenesis of AD, and ultimately stimulated the advent of novel drug targets tests. The anticipated increase of AD patients in next few decades makes development of better therapy an urgent issue. Here we attempt to summarize and compare putative therapeutic strategies that have completed clinical trials or are currently being tested from various perspectives to provide insights for treatments of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25136630

  11. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: toward a new strategy for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Masoud; Shimoda, Masayuki; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Laurent, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique with an immense target-specific gene delivery potential deep inside the human body. The potential of this technique has recently been confirmed for diabetic patients. This technology allows the genes to transfer specifically into the inefficient pancreas using ultrasound energy without viral vector utilization. It has been speculated that this idea and the advent of modern gene therapy techniques could result in significant future advances. Undoubtedly, this strategy needs further investigation and many critical questions have to be answered before it can be successfully advanced. Herein, we introduce the salient features of this approach, the hurdles that must be overcome, the hopes associated with it and practical constraints to develop this method for diabetes treatment. PMID:26646254

  12. Mitochondria in traumatic brain injury and mitochondrial-targeted multipotential therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Kong, Rong-hua; Zhang, Lei-ming; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socioeconomic problem throughout the world. It is a complicated pathological process that consists of primary insults and a secondary insult characterized by a set of biochemical cascades. The imbalance between a higher energy demand for repair of cell damage and decreased energy production led by mitochondrial dysfunction aggravates cell damage. At the cellular level, the main cause of the secondary deleterious cascades is cell damage that is centred in the mitochondria. Excitotoxicity, Ca2+ overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), Bcl-2 family, caspases and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) are the main participants in mitochondria-centred cell damage following TBI. Some preclinical and clinical results of mitochondria-targeted therapy show promise. Mitochondria- targeted multipotential therapeutic strategies offer new hope for the successful treatment of TBI and other acute brain injuries. PMID:23003569

  13. Active multispectral near-IR detection of small surface targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Winkel, Hans; Roos, Marco J. J.

    2001-10-01

    The detection and identification of small surface targets with Electro-Optical sensors is seriously hampered by ground clutter, leading to false alarms and reduced detection probabilities. Active ground illumination can improve the detection performance of EO sensors compared to passive skylight illumination because of the knowledge of the illumination level and of its temporal stability. Sun and sky cannot provide this due to the weather variability. In addition multispectral sensors with carefully chosen spectral bands ranging from the visual into the near IR from 400-2500 nm wavelength can take benefit of a variety of cheap active light sources, ranging from lasers to Xenon or halogen lamps. Results are presented, obtained with a two- color laser scanner with one wavelength in the chlorophyll absorption dip. Another active scanner is described operating at 4 wavebands between 1400 and 2300 nm, using tungsten halogen lamps. Finally a simple TV camera was used with either a ste of narrow band spectral filters or polarization filters in front of the lamps. The targets consisted of an array of mixed objects, most of them real mines. The results how great promise in enhancing the detection and identification probabilities of EO sensors against small surface targets.

  14. Target system of IFMIF/EVEDA in Japanese activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, M.; Fukada, S.; Furukawa, T.; Hirakawa, Y.; Horiike, H.; Kanemura, T.; Kondo, H.; Miyashita, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sigiura, H.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.; Tsuji, Y.; Ushimaru, H.; Watanabe, K.; Yagi, J.

    2011-10-01

    The Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been started. As Japanese activities for the target system, the EVEDA Lithium (Li) Test Loop to simulate hydraulic and impurity conditions of the IFMIF Li loop is under design. The feasibility of the thermo-mechanical structure of the target assembly and the replaceable back-plate made of F82H and 316L stainless steel is a key research subject. Toward final validation at the EVEDA loop, diagnostics systems applicable to the high-speed free-surface Li flow and hot traps to control nitrogen and hydrogen in Li loop have been investigated. In the remote handling subject of target assemblies and the replaceable back-plates activated by irradiation up to 50 dpa/y, lip welds on 316L-316L by laser and dissimilar metal welds on F82H-316L are necessary. Water experiments and hydraulic/thermo-mechanical analyses of the back-plate are underway.

  15. Brain activation underlying threat detection to targets of different races.

    PubMed

    Senholzi, Keith B; Depue, Brendan E; Correll, Joshua; Banich, Marie T; Ito, Tiffany A

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined blood oxygen level-dependent signal underlying racial differences in threat detection. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants determined whether pictures of Black or White individuals held weapons. They were instructed to make shoot responses when the picture showed armed individuals but don't shoot responses to unarmed individuals, with the cost of not shooting armed individuals being greater than that of shooting unarmed individuals. Participants were faster to shoot armed Blacks than Whites, but faster in making don't shoot responses to unarmed Whites than Blacks. Brain activity differed to armed versus unarmed targets depending on target race, suggesting different mechanisms underlying threat versus safety decisions. Anterior cingulate cortex was preferentially engaged for unarmed Whites than Blacks. Parietal and visual cortical regions exhibited greater activity for armed Blacks than Whites. Seed-based functional connectivity of the amygdala revealed greater coherence with parietal and visual cortices for armed Blacks than Whites. Furthermore, greater implicit Black-danger associations were associated with increased amygdala activation to armed Blacks, compared to armed Whites. Our results suggest that different neural mechanisms may underlie racial differences in responses to armed versus unarmed targets. PMID:26357911

  16. Advances in HSP27 and HSP90-targeting strategies for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    van Ommeren, Randy; Staudt, Michael D; Xu, Hu; Hebb, Matthew O

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor in adults. There is a critical need for novel strategies to abolish the molecular mechanisms that support GBM growth, invasion and treatment resistance. The heat shock proteins, HSP27 and HSP90, serve these pivotal roles in tumor cells and have been identified as effective targets for developing therapeutics. Natural and synthetic inhibitors have been evaluated in clinical trials for several forms of systemic cancer but none as yet for GBM. This topic review summarizes the current preclinical evidence and rationale to define the potential of HSP27 and HSP90 inhibitors in GBM management. PMID:26842818

  17. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... following a reasonable marketing strategy, to attain the targeted dollar levels of non-8(a) revenue..., business development, financing, marketing, accounting, or proposal preparation. (5) SBA may...

  18. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... following a reasonable marketing strategy, to attain the targeted dollar levels of non-8(a) revenue..., business development, financing, marketing, accounting, or proposal preparation. (5) SBA may...

  19. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reasonable marketing strategy, to attain the targeted dollar levels of non-8(a) revenue established in its..., business development, financing, marketing, accounting, or proposal preparation. (5) SBA may...

  20. Minireview: Targeting GPCR Activated ERK Pathways for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Eishingdrelo, Haifeng; Kongsamut, Sathapana

    2013-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that multiple signal transduction pathways are employed upon GPCR activation. One of the major cellular effectors activated by GPCRs is extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Both G-protein and β-arrestin mediated signaling pathways can lead to ERK activation. However, depending on activation pathway, the subcellular destination of activated ERK1/2 may be different. G-protein -dependent ERK activation results in the translocation of active ERK to the nucleus, whereas ERK activated via an arrestin-dependent mechanism remains largely in the cytoplasm. The subcellular location of activated ERK1/2 determines the downstream signaling cascade. Many substrates of ERK1/2 are found in the nucleus: nuclear transcription factors that participate in gene transcription, cell proliferation and differentiation. ERK1/2 substrates are also found in cytosol and other cellular organelles: they may play roles in translation, mitosis, apoptosis and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Therefore, determining specific subcellular locations of activated ERK1/2 mediated by GPCR ligands would be important in correlating signaling pathways with cellular physiological functions. While GPCR-stimulated selective ERK pathway activation has been studied in several receptor systems, exploitation of these different signaling cascades for therapeutics has not yet been seriously pursued. Many old drug candidates were identified from screens based on G-protein signaling assays, and their activity on β-arrestin signaling pathways being mostly unknown, especially regarding their subcellular ERK pathways. With today’s knowledge of complicated GPCR signaling pathways, drug discovery can no longer rely on single-pathway approaches. Since ERK activation is an important signaling pathway and associated with many physiological functions, targeting the ERK pathway, especially specific subcellular activation pathways should provide new avenues for GPCR drug

  1. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Results Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Conclusions Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions. PMID:22691539

  2. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  3. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  4. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  5. Light-controlled endosomal escape of the novel CD133-targeting immunotoxin AC133-saporin by photochemical internalization - A minimally invasive cancer stem cell-targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Bostad, Monica; Olsen, Cathrine Elisabeth; Peng, Qian; Berg, Kristian; Høgset, Anders; Selbo, Pål Kristian

    2015-05-28

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 is an attractive target to improve antitumor therapy. We have used photochemical internalization (PCI) for the endosomal escape of the novel CD133-targeting immunotoxin AC133-saporin (PCIAC133-saporin). PCI employs an endocytic vesicle-localizing photosensitizer, which generates reactive oxygen species upon light-activation causing a rupture of the vesicle membranes and endosomal escape of entrapped drugs. Here we show that AC133-saporin co-localizes with the PCI-photosensitizer TPCS2a, which upon light exposure induces cytosolic release of AC133-saporin. PCI of picomolar levels of AC133-saporin in colorectal adenocarcinoma WiDr cells blocked cell proliferation and induced 100% inhibition of cell viability and colony forming ability at the highest light doses, whereas no cytotoxicity was obtained in the absence of light. Efficient PCI-based CD133-targeting was in addition demonstrated in the stem-cell-like, triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and in the aggressive malignant melanoma cell line FEMX-1, whereas no enhanced targeting was obtained in the CD133-negative breast cancer cell line MCF-7. PCIAC133-saporin induced mainly necrosis and a minimal apoptotic response based on assessing cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, and the TUNEL assay. PCIAC133-saporin resulted in S phase arrest and reduced LC3-II conversion compared to control treatments. Notably, co-treatment with Bafilomycin A1 and PCIAC133-saporin blocked LC3-II conversion, indicating a termination of the autophagic flux in WiDr cells. For the first time, we demonstrate laser-controlled targeting of CD133 in vivo. After only one systemic injection of AC133-saporin and TPCS2a, a strong anti-tumor response was observed after PCIAC133-saporin. The present PCI-based endosomal escape technology represents a minimally invasive strategy for spatio-temporal, light-controlled targeting of CD133+ cells in localized primary tumors or metastasis. PMID:25758331

  6. Activity, assay and target data curation and quality in the ChEMBL database.

    PubMed

    Papadatos, George; Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P

    2015-09-01

    The emergence of a number of publicly available bioactivity databases, such as ChEMBL, PubChem BioAssay and BindingDB, has raised awareness about the topics of data curation, quality and integrity. Here we provide an overview and discussion of the current and future approaches to activity, assay and target data curation of the ChEMBL database. This curation process involves several manual and automated steps and aims to: (1) maximise data accessibility and comparability; (2) improve data integrity and flag outliers, ambiguities and potential errors; and (3) add further curated annotations and mappings thus increasing the usefulness and accuracy of the ChEMBL data for all users and modellers in particular. Issues related to activity, assay and target data curation and integrity along with their potential impact for users of the data are discussed, alongside robust selection and filter strategies in order to avoid or minimise these, depending on the desired application. PMID:26201396

  7. Active Anti-erosion Protection Strategy in Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-01-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind–sand erosion. PMID:24305989

  8. Active Anti-erosion Protection Strategy in Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-12-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind-sand erosion.

  9. Active anti-erosion protection strategy in tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla).

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-01-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind-sand erosion. PMID:24305989

  10. Active targets for the study of nuclei far from stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro-Novo, S.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Mittig, W.

    2015-09-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron-to-proton ratios are used to understand the properties of these systems. Radioactive beams with energies from below the Coulomb barrier up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon are now available, and with these beams, a broad variety of studies of nuclei near the drip-line can be performed. To compensate for the low intensity of secondary beams as compared to primary beams, thick targets and high efficiency detection is necessary. In this context, a new generation of detectors was developed, called active target detectors: the detector gas is used as target, and the determination of the reaction vertex in three dimensions allows for good resolution even with thick targets. The reaction products can be measured over essentially 4 π. The physics explored with these detectors together with the technology developed will be described.

  11. Using Active Learning Strategies in Psychology Classes: Illustrative Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Judith A.; Eison, James

    This bibliography was designed to assist psychology instructors in incorporating active learning strategies into their courses. The document contains articles that describe specific techniques that should help students to become more involved in learning about psychology than traditional lecture methods allow. The bibliography was prepared by…

  12. Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Emerson; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Public health actions endorsed by the federal government, for instance, health promotion initiatives, usually have greater impact at population level compared to other types of initiatives. This commentary aims to instigate debate on the importance and necessity of producing federally endorsed brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion. PMID:25210830

  13. Using Active Learning Strategies to Present Bloodborne Pathogen Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Leslie; Weaver, Mary G.

    2003-01-01

    Every year, school nurses have the responsibility for developing and presenting a bloodborne pathogen presentation to the education and clerical staff of their buildings. Although the information is similar from year to year, the manner in which the information is presented can be altered. Teachers are using active learning strategies in a variety…

  14. Perceived Strategies and Activities for Successful Later Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holahan, Carole K.; Velasquez, Katherine S.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated perceived strategies and activities for successful later aging. Participants were 242 members of the Terman Study of the Gifted who responded to an open-ended question concerning how they make the most of their aging years. Data were collected in 1996 and 1999, when the participants were average ages of 84 and 86.…

  15. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  16. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-09-21

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs. PMID:23893008

  17. A numerically optimized active shield for improved TMS targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Hall, Timothy; Gomez, Luis; Michielssen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices suffer of poor targeting and penetration depth. A new approach to designing TMS coils is introduced in order to improve the focus of the stimulation region through the use of actively shielded probes. Iterative optimization techniques were used to design different active shielding coils for TMS probes. The new approach aims to increase the amount of energy deposited in a thin cylindrical region below the probe relative to the energy deposited elsewhere in the region (“sharpness”), while simultaneously increase the induced electric field deep in the target region relative to the surface (“penetration”). After convergence, the resulting designs showed that there is a clear tradeoff between sharpness and penetration that can be controlled by the choice of a tuning parameter. The resulting designs were tested on a realistic human head conductivity model, taking the contribution from surface charges into account. The design of choice reduced penetration depths by 16.7%. The activated surface area was reduced by 24.1 % and the volume of the activation was reduced from 42.6% by the shield. Restoring the lost penetration could be achieved by increasing the total power to the coil by 16.3%, but in that case, the stimulated volume reduction was only 13.1% and there was a slight increase in the stimulated surface area (2.9 %) PMID:20965451

  18. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  19. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Shyam M.; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M.; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of colorectal cancer patients. Introduction of the HER2 mutations, S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M, into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutations are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors, neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) WT colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX’s) identified 4 PDX’s with HER2 mutations. HER2 targeted therapies were tested on two PDX’s. Treatment with a single HER2 targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2 targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2 mutated PDX’s. PMID:26243863

  20. Confirming target engagement for reversible inhibitors in vivo by kinetically tuned activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Tsuboi, Katsunori; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Speers, Anna E; Brown, Steven J; Spicer, Timothy; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Ferguson, Jill; Hodder, Peter S; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-06-27

    The development of small-molecule inhibitors for perturbing enzyme function requires assays to confirm that the inhibitors interact with their enzymatic targets in vivo. Determining target engagement in vivo can be particularly challenging for poorly characterized enzymes that lack known biomarkers (e.g., endogenous substrates and products) to report on their inhibition. Here, we describe a competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) method for measuring the binding of reversible inhibitors to enzymes in animal models. Key to the success of this approach is the use of activity-based probes that show tempered rates of reactivity with enzymes, such that competition for target engagement with reversible inhibitors can be measured in vivo. We apply the competitive ABPP strategy to evaluate a newly described class of piperazine amide reversible inhibitors for the serine hydrolases LYPLA1 and LYPLA2, two enzymes for which selective, in vivo active inhibitors are lacking. Competitive ABPP identified individual piperazine amides that selectively inhibit LYPLA1 or LYPLA2 in mice. In summary, competitive ABPP adapted to operate with moderately reactive probes can assess the target engagement of reversible inhibitors in animal models to facilitate the discovery of small-molecule probes for characterizing enzyme function in vivo. PMID:22690931

  1. Confirming Target Engagement for Reversible Inhibitors In Vivo by Kinetically Tuned Activity-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R.; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Tsuboi, Katsunori; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Speers, Anna E.; Brown, Steven J.; Spicer, Timothy; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Ferguson, Jill; Hodder, Peter S.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    The development of small-molecule inhibitors for perturbing enzyme function requires assays to confirm that the inhibitors interact with their enzymatic targets in vivo. Determining target engagement in vivo can be particularly challenging for poorly characterized enzymes that lack known biomarkers (e.g., endogenous substrates and products) to report on their inhibition. Here, we describe a competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) method for measuring the binding of reversible inhibitors to enzymes in animal models. Key to the success of this approach is the use of activity-based probes that show tempered rates of reactivity with enzymes, such that competition for target engagement with reversible inhibitors can be measured in vivo. We apply the competitive ABPP strategy to evaluate a newly described class of piperazine amide reversible inhibitors for the serine hydrolases LYPAL1 and LYPLA2, two enzymes for which selective, in vivo-active inhibitors are lacking. Competitive ABPP identified individual piperazine amides that selectively inhibit LYPLA1 or LYPLA2 in mice. In summary, competitive ABPP adapted to operate with moderately reactive probes can assess the target engagement of reversible inhibitors in animal models to facilitate the discovery of small-molecule probes for characterizing enzyme function in vivo. PMID:22690931

  2. Combining Untargeted and Targeted Proteomic Strategies for Discrimination and Quantification of Cashmere Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jihua; Yang, Yunfei; Miao, Chen; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Cao, Qichen; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere is regarded as a specialty and luxury fiber due to its scarcity and high economic value. For fiber quality assessment, it is technically very challenging to distinguish and quantify the cashmere fiber from yak or wool fibers because of their highly similar physical appearance and substantial protein sequence homology. To address this issue, we propose a workflow combining untargeted and targeted proteomics strategies for selecting, verifying and quantifying biomarkers for cashmere textile authentication. Untargeted proteomic surveys were first applied to identify 174, 157, and 156 proteins from cashmere, wool and yak fibers, respectively. After marker selection at different levels, peptides turned out to afford much higher selectivity than proteins for fiber species discrimination. Subsequently, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) methods were developed for ten selected peptide markers. The PRM-based targeted analysis of peptide markers enabled accurate determination of fiber species and cashmere percentages in different fiber mixtures. Furthermore, collective use of these peptide makers allowed us to discriminate and quantify cashmere fibers in commercial finished fabrics that have undergone heavy chemical treatments. Cashmere proportion measurement in fabric samples using our proteomic approach was in good agreement with results from traditional light microscopy, yet our method can be more readily standardized to become an objective and robust assay for assessing authenticity of fibers and textiles. We anticipate that the proteomic strategies presented in our study could be further implicated in discovery of quality trait markers for other products containing highly homologous proteomes. PMID:26789629

  3. Combining Untargeted and Targeted Proteomic Strategies for Discrimination and Quantification of Cashmere Fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jihua; Yang, Yunfei; Miao, Chen; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Cao, Qichen; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere is regarded as a specialty and luxury fiber due to its scarcity and high economic value. For fiber quality assessment, it is technically very challenging to distinguish and quantify the cashmere fiber from yak or wool fibers because of their highly similar physical appearance and substantial protein sequence homology. To address this issue, we propose a workflow combining untargeted and targeted proteomics strategies for selecting, verifying and quantifying biomarkers for cashmere textile authentication. Untargeted proteomic surveys were first applied to identify 174, 157, and 156 proteins from cashmere, wool and yak fibers, respectively. After marker selection at different levels, peptides turned out to afford much higher selectivity than proteins for fiber species discrimination. Subsequently, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) methods were developed for ten selected peptide markers. The PRM-based targeted analysis of peptide markers enabled accurate determination of fiber species and cashmere percentages in different fiber mixtures. Furthermore, collective use of these peptide makers allowed us to discriminate and quantify cashmere fibers in commercial finished fabrics that have undergone heavy chemical treatments. Cashmere proportion measurement in fabric samples using our proteomic approach was in good agreement with results from traditional light microscopy, yet our method can be more readily standardized to become an objective and robust assay for assessing authenticity of fibers and textiles. We anticipate that the proteomic strategies presented in our study could be further implicated in discovery of quality trait markers for other products containing highly homologous proteomes. PMID:26789629

  4. The microenvironment in mature B-cell malignancies: a target for new treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Despite major therapeutic advances, most mature B-cell malignancies remain incurable. Compelling evidence suggests that crosstalk with accessory stromal cells in specialized tissue microenvironments, such as the bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs, favors disease progression by promoting malignant B-cell growth and drug resistance. Therefore, disrupting the crosstalk between malignant B cells and their milieu is an attractive novel strategy for treating selected mature B-cell malignancies. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular interactions between neoplastic B lymphocytes and accessory cells that shape a supportive microenvironment, and the potential therapeutic targets that are emerging, together with the new problems they raise. We discuss clinically relevant aspects and provide an outlook into future biologically oriented therapeutic strategies. We anticipate a paradigm shift in the treatment of selected B-cell malignancies, moving from targeting primarily the malignant cells toward combining cytotoxic drugs with agents that interfere with the microenvironment's proactive role. Such approaches hopefully will help eliminating residual disease, thereby improving our current therapeutic efforts. PMID:19636060

  5. Potent and Targeted Activation of Latent HIV-1 Using the CRISPR/dCas9 Activator Complex

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena M; Lazar, Daniel C; Scott, Tristan A; Hart, Jonathan R; Takahashi, Mayumi; Burnett, John C; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V; Weinberg, Marc S

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 provirus integration results in a persistent latently infected reservoir that is recalcitrant to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with lifelong treatment being the only option. The “shock and kill” strategy aims to eradicate latent HIV by reactivating proviral gene expression in the context of cART treatment. Gene-specific transcriptional activation can be achieved using the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system comprising single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) with a nuclease-deficient Cas9 mutant (dCas9) fused to the VP64 transactivation domain (dCas9-VP64). We engineered this system to target 23 sites within the long terminal repeat promoter of HIV-1 and identified a “hotspot” for activation within the viral enhancer sequence. Activating sgRNAs transcriptionally modulated the latent proviral genome across multiple different in vitro latency cell models including T cells comprising a clonally integrated mCherry-IRES-Tat (LChIT) latency system. We detected consistent and effective activation of latent virus mediated by activator sgRNAs, whereas latency reversal agents produced variable activation responses. Transcriptomic analysis revealed dCas9-VP64/sgRNAs to be highly specific, while the well-characterized chemical activator TNFα induced widespread gene dysregulation. CRISPR-mediated gene activation represents a novel system which provides enhanced efficiency and specificity in a targeted latency reactivation strategy and represents a promising approach to a “functional cure” of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26581162

  6. Development of AN Active 238UF6 Gas Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, C.; Enders, J.; Freudenberger, M.; Göök, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    2014-09-01

    Detailed studies of the fission process, e.g., the search for parity nonconservation (PNC) effects, the energy dependence of fission modes or the population of fission isomers, depend on high quality data, therefore requiring high luminosities. An active gas target containing uranium may overcome the deterioration of energy and angular resolution caused by large solid target thicknesses. A single Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been built to test a mixture of standard counting gases (e.g., argon) with depleted uranium hexafluoride (238UF6), utilizing a triple alpha source to evaluate signal quality and drift velocity. For mass fractions of up to 4 percent of 238U the drift velocity increases with rising UF6 content, while a good signal quality and energy resolution is preserved.

  7. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C Y; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S W; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  8. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C. Y.; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  9. The Relationship between the Use of Communication Strategies and Aspects of Target Language Proficiencies - A Study of ESL Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paribakht, Tahereh

    Four hypotheses are addressed concerning the relationship of the types and proportion of strategies adopted by the subject groups to the proficiency levels, and the subjects' rate of success and effective use of communication strategies for conveying intended meaning as they relate to proficiency level in the target language. The subjects were 40…

  10. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Espinola, Richard L; Jacobs, Eddie L; Halford, Carl E; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H

    2007-04-01

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown. PMID:19532626

  11. Modeling the target acquisition performance of active imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    Recent development of active imaging system technology in the defense and security community have driven the need for a theoretical understanding of its operation and performance in military applications such as target acquisition. In this paper, the modeling of active imaging systems, developed at the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate, is presented with particular emphasis on the impact of coherent effects such as speckle and atmospheric scintillation. Experimental results from human perception tests are in good agreement with the model results, validating the modeling of coherent effects as additional noise sources. Example trade studies on the design of a conceptual active imaging system to mitigate deleterious coherent effects are shown.

  12. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  13. Targeted therapies in CLL: mechanisms of resistance and strategies for management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    The therapy of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has changed dramatically in the past year with the regulatory approval of idelalisib and ibrutinib, with other therapeutic small molecules likely to become widely available in the next few years. Although durable remissions are being seen in many patients with these agents, it is becoming apparent that some patients with high genomic risk disease will relapse. Next-generation sequencing in patients as well as in vitro models is affording us the opportunity to understand the biology behind these relapses, which is the first step to designing rational therapies to prevent and treat targeted therapy-resistant CLL. These strategies are critical, as these relapses can be very difficult to manage, and a coordinated effort to put these patients on clinical trials will be required to efficiently determine the optimal therapies for these patients. In this review, we will describe mechanisms of resistance, both proven and hypothesized, for idelalisib, ibrutinib, and venetoclax, describe patterns of resistance that have been described with ibrutinib, and discuss potential strategies for management of disease resistant to these drugs as well as potential strategies to prevent resistance. PMID:26065659

  14. IdealKnock: A framework for efficiently identifying knockout strategies leading to targeted overproduction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Deqing; Zhang, Cheng; Zhou, Shengguo; Wei, Liujing; Hua, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, computer aided redesigning methods based on genome-scale metabolic network models (GEMs) have played important roles in metabolic engineering studies; however, most of these methods are hindered by intractable computing times. In particular, methods that predict knockout strategies leading to overproduction of desired biochemical are generally unable to do high level prediction because the computational time will increase exponentially. In this study, we propose a new framework named IdealKnock, which is able to efficiently evaluate potentials of the production for different biochemical in a system by merely knocking out pathways. In addition, it is also capable of searching knockout strategies when combined with the OptKnock or OptGene framework. Furthermore, unlike other methods, IdealKnock suggests a series of mutants with targeted overproduction, which enables researchers to select the one of greatest interest for experimental validation. By testing the overproduction of a large number of native metabolites, IdealKnock showed its advantage in successfully breaking through the limitation of maximum knockout number in reasonable time and suggesting knockout strategies with better performance than other methods. In addition, gene-reaction relationship is well considered in the proposed framework. PMID:26948338

  15. Targeted therapies in CLL: mechanisms of resistance and strategies for management.

    PubMed

    Woyach, Jennifer A; Johnson, Amy J

    2015-07-23

    The therapy of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has changed dramatically in the past year with the regulatory approval of idelalisib and ibrutinib, with other therapeutic small molecules likely to become widely available in the next few years. Although durable remissions are being seen in many patients with these agents, it is becoming apparent that some patients with high genomic risk disease will relapse. Next-generation sequencing in patients as well as in vitro models is affording us the opportunity to understand the biology behind these relapses, which is the first step to designing rational therapies to prevent and treat targeted therapy-resistant CLL. These strategies are critical, as these relapses can be very difficult to manage, and a coordinated effort to put these patients on clinical trials will be required to efficiently determine the optimal therapies for these patients. In this review, we will describe mechanisms of resistance, both proven and hypothesized, for idelalisib, ibrutinib, and venetoclax, describe patterns of resistance that have been described with ibrutinib, and discuss potential strategies for management of disease resistant to these drugs as well as potential strategies to prevent resistance. PMID:26065659

  16. Tumor-Targeting of EGFR Inhibitors by Hypoxia-Mediated Activation**

    PubMed Central

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pichler, Verena; Roller, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Kowol, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) was a major step forward in cancer treatment. However, the therapy with TKIs is limited by strong side effects and drug resistance. The aim of this study was the design of novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors that are specifically activated in malignant tissue. Thus, a CoIII-based prodrug strategy for the targeted release of an EGFR inhibitor triggered by hypoxia in the solid tumor was used. New inhibitors with chelating moieties were prepared and tested for their EGFR-inhibitory potential. The most promising candidate was coupled to CoIII and the biological activity tested in cell culture. Indeed, hypoxic activation and subsequent EGFR inhibition was proven. Finally, the compound was tested in vivo, also revealing potent anticancer activity. PMID:25079700

  17. Target-triggered triple isothermal cascade amplification strategy for ultrasensitive microRNA-21 detection at sub-attomole level.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang-Fang; Jiang, Nan; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Hu, Lihui; Chen, Xiaojun; Jiang, Li-Ping; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-11-15

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is a promising diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer screening and disease progression, thus the method for the sensitive and selective detection of miR-21 is vital to its clinical diagnosis. Herein, we develop a novel method to quantify miR-21 levels as low as attomolar sensitivity by a target-triggered triple isothermal cascade amplification (3TICA) strategy. An ingenious unimolecular DNA template with three functional parts has been designed: 5'-fragment as the miR-21 recognition unit, middle fragment as the miR-21 analogue amplification unit, and 3'-fragment as the 8-17 DNAzyme production unit. Triggered by miR-21 and accompanied by polymerase-nicking enzyme cascade, new miR-21 analogues autonomously generated for the successive re-triggering and cleavage process. Simultaneously, the 8-17 DNAzyme-contained sequence could be exponentially released and activated for the second cyclic cleavage toward a specific ribonucleotide (rA)-contained substrate, inducing a remarkably amplified generation of HRP-mimicking DNAzyme in the presence of hemin. Finally, the amperometric technique was used to record the catalytic reduction current of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. The increase in the steady-state current was proportional with the increase of the miR-21 concentration from 1 aM to 100 pM. An ultra-low detection limit of 0.5 aM with an excellent selectivity for even discriminating differences between 1-base mismatched target and miR-21 was achieved. This simple and cost-effective 3TICA strategy is promising for the detection of any short oligonucleotides, simply by altering the target recognition unit in the template sequence. PMID:27311114

  18. Progress in new diagnosis and therapeutic strategy for gastrointestinal malignancy: focus on new molecular-targeted treatments.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    The core symposiums of the Japanese Gastroenterological Association (JGA) annual scientific meetings focus on similar topics from year to year. The main topics of these symposiums for the last 3 years were centered on progress in new diagnostics and therapeutic strategies for gastrointestinal malignancy, with a special focus on new molecular-targeted treatments for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and other gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, including malignant lymphoma, for which new molecular-targeted treatments are now being commonly used. The 8th annual meeting of the JGA was held in 2012 and 8 excellent papers were presented on progress in new diagnostics and therapy for GIST. The 9th annual meeting of the JGA was held in 2013 and 7 excellent papers were presented on new molecular-targeted treatments for colorectal carcinomas and GI lymphoma. At the 10th annual meeting of the JGA, which was held in 2014, novel concepts of and therapeutic strategies for GI cancers, NET and GIST were discussed. In 2010, the WHO proposed a new classification system in which NET was classified into three categories - NET-G1, NET-G2 and NEC - dependent on proliferative activity, and the term 'carcinoid' was deleted. Regarding GIST, several management guidelines have already been published: by NCCN in 2004, by ESMO in 2005, and in Japan in 2006. The Japanese guidelines have recently been revised. In addition to the summaries of the annual meetings from 2012 to 2014, the major points of the recently revised Japanese guidelines for the diagnosis and management of GIST are described in this review. PMID:25632910

  19. Organising a Fair Go. Fair Participation in Vocational Education and Training and the Victorian Negotiated Targets Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, David; Cleary, Mitch

    The Victorian Negotiated Targets Strategy (NTS) was evaluated against the background of comparable practices in other Australian states and territories to evaluate its effectiveness as a means of increasing participation of targeted groups in accredited Technical and Further Education (TAFE) vocational education and training programs in Victoria…

  20. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  1. Polyamine catabolism: target for antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants.

    PubMed

    Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra; Federico, Rodolfo; Tempera, Giampiero; Viceconte, Nikenza; Saccoccio, Stefania; Battaglia, Valentina; Toninello, Antonio; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2012-02-01

    Metabolism of polyamines spermidine and spermine, and their diamine precursor, putrescine, has been a target for antineoplastic therapy since these naturally occurring alkyl amines were found essential for normal mammalian cell growth. Intracellular polyamine concentrations are maintained at a cell type-specific set point through the coordinated and highly regulated interplay between biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism. A correlation between regulation of cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism is described. In particular, polyamine catabolism involves copper-containing amine oxidases and FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases. Several studies showed an important role of these enzymes in several developmental and disease-related processes in both animals and plants through a control on polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment, environmental and/or cellular stressors. The production of toxic aldehydes and reactive oxygen species, H(2)O(2) in particular, by these oxidases using extracellular and intracellular polyamines as substrates, suggests a mechanism by which the oxidases can be exploited as antineoplastic drug targets. This minireview summarizes recent advances on the physiological roles of polyamine catabolism in animals and plants in an attempt to highlight differences and similarities that may contribute to determine in detail the underlined mechanisms involved. This information could be useful in evaluating the possibility of this metabolic pathway as a target for new antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants. PMID:21874532

  2. A Combined Shotgun and Targeted Mass Spectrometry Strategy for Breast Cancer Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Martin; Ossola, Reto; Breslin, Thomas; Rinner, Oliver; Malmström, Lars; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Johan; Niméus, Emma

    2015-07-01

    It is of highest importance to find proteins responsible for breast cancer dissemination, for use as biomarkers or treatment targets. We established and performed a combined nontargeted LC-MS/MS and a targeted LC-SRM workflow for discovery and validation of protein biomarkers. Eighty breast tumors, stratified for estrogen receptor status and development of distant recurrence (DR ± ), were collected. After enrichment of N-glycosylated peptides, label-free LC-MS/MS was performed on each individual tumor in triplicate. In total, 1515 glycopeptides from 778 proteins were identified and used to create a map of the breast cancer N-glycosylated proteome. Based on this specific proteome map, we constructed a 92-plex targeted label-free LC-SRM panel. These proteins were quantified across samples by LC-SRM, resulting in 10 proteins consistently differentially regulated between DR+/DR- tumors. Five proteins were further validated in a separate cohort as prognostic biomarkers at the gene expression level. We also compared the LC-SRM results to clinically reported HER2 status, demonstrating its clinical accuracy. In conclusion, we demonstrate a combined mass spectrometry strategy, at large scale on clinical samples, leading to the identification and validation of five proteins as potential biomarkers for breast cancer recurrence. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange and PASSEL with identifiers PXD001685 and PASS00643. PMID:25944384

  3. Revealing potential molecular targets bridging colitis and colorectal cancer based on multidimensional integration strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Xishan; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation may play a vital role in the pathogenesis of inflammation-associated tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms bridging ulcerative colitis (UC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unclear. Here, we integrated multidimensional interaction resources, including gene expression profiling, protein-protein interactions (PPIs), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation data, and virus-host interactions, to tentatively explore potential molecular targets that functionally link UC and CRC at a systematic level. In this work, by deciphering the overlapping genes, crosstalking genes and pivotal regulators of both UC- and CRC-associated functional module pairs, we revealed a variety of genes (including FOS and DUSP1, etc.), transcription factors (including SMAD3 and ETS1, etc.) and miRNAs (including miR-155 and miR-196b, etc.) that may have the potential to complete the connections between UC and CRC. Interestingly, further analyses of the virus-host interaction network demonstrated that several virus proteins (including EBNA-LP of EBV and protein E7 of HPV) frequently inter-connected to UC- and CRC-associated module pairs with their validated targets significantly enriched in both modules of the host. Together, our results suggested that multidimensional integration strategy provides a novel approach to discover potential molecular targets that bridge the connections between UC and CRC, which could also be extensively applied to studies on other inflammation-related cancers. PMID:26461477

  4. Host target modification as a strategy to counter pathogen hijacking of the jasmonate hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yao, Jian; Withers, John; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Banerjee, Rahul; Fariduddin, Qazi; Nakamura, Yoko; Nomura, Kinya; Howe, Gregg A; Boland, Wilhelm; Yan, Honggao; He, Sheng Yang

    2015-11-17

    In the past decade, characterization of the host targets of pathogen virulence factors took a center stage in the study of pathogenesis and disease susceptibility in plants and humans. However, the impressive knowledge of host targets has not been broadly exploited to inhibit pathogen infection. Here, we show that host target modification could be a promising new approach to "protect" the disease-vulnerable components of plants. In particular, recent studies have identified the plant hormone jasmonate (JA) receptor as one of the common targets of virulence factors from highly evolved biotrophic/hemibiotrophic pathogens. Strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, for example, produce proteinaceous effectors, as well as a JA-mimicking toxin, coronatine (COR), to activate JA signaling as a mechanism to promote disease susceptibility. Guided by the crystal structure of the JA receptor and evolutionary clues, we succeeded in modifying the JA receptor to allow for sufficient endogenous JA signaling but greatly reduced sensitivity to COR. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing this modified receptor not only are fertile and maintain a high level of insect defense, but also gain the ability to resist COR-producing pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and P. syringae pv. maculicola. Our results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that host target modification can be a promising new approach to prevent the virulence action of highly evolved pathogens. PMID:26578782

  5. Host target modification as a strategy to counter pathogen hijacking of the jasmonate hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Yao, Jian; Withers, John; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Banerjee, Rahul; Fariduddin, Qazi; Nakamura, Yoko; Nomura, Kinya; Howe, Gregg A.; Boland, Wilhelm; Yan, Honggao; He, Sheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, characterization of the host targets of pathogen virulence factors took a center stage in the study of pathogenesis and disease susceptibility in plants and humans. However, the impressive knowledge of host targets has not been broadly exploited to inhibit pathogen infection. Here, we show that host target modification could be a promising new approach to “protect” the disease-vulnerable components of plants. In particular, recent studies have identified the plant hormone jasmonate (JA) receptor as one of the common targets of virulence factors from highly evolved biotrophic/hemibiotrophic pathogens. Strains of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, for example, produce proteinaceous effectors, as well as a JA-mimicking toxin, coronatine (COR), to activate JA signaling as a mechanism to promote disease susceptibility. Guided by the crystal structure of the JA receptor and evolutionary clues, we succeeded in modifying the JA receptor to allow for sufficient endogenous JA signaling but greatly reduced sensitivity to COR. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing this modified receptor not only are fertile and maintain a high level of insect defense, but also gain the ability to resist COR-producing pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and P. syringae pv. maculicola. Our results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that host target modification can be a promising new approach to prevent the virulence action of highly evolved pathogens. PMID:26578782

  6. Development of sample extraction and clean-up strategies for target and non-target analysis of environmental contaminants in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Baduel, Christine; Mueller, Jochen F; Tsai, Henghang; Gomez Ramos, Maria Jose

    2015-12-24

    Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards multi-targeted analysis and non-target screening methods as a means to increase the number of monitored analytes. Previous studies have developed biomonitoring methods which specifically focus on only a small number of analytes with similar physico-chemical properties. In this paper, we present a simple and rapid multi-residue method for simultaneous extraction of polar and non-polar organic chemicals from biological matrices, containing up to 5% lipid content. Our method combines targeted multi-residue analysis using gas chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) and a multi-targeted analysis complemented with non-target screening using liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). The optimization of the chemical extraction procedure and the effectiveness of different clean-up methods were evaluated for two biological matrices: fish muscle (lipid content ∼2%) and breast milk (∼4%). To extract a wide range of chemicals, the partition/extraction procedure used for the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was tested as the initial step for the extraction of 77 target compounds covering a broad compound domain. All the target analytes have different physico-chemical properties (log Kow ranges from -0.3 to 10) and cover a broad activity spectrum; from polar pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) to highly lipophilic chemicals such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochloride pesticides (OCPs). A number of options were explored for the clean-up of lipids, proteins and other impurities present in the matrix. Zirconium dioxide-based sorbents as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) and protein-lipid removal filter cartridges (Captiva ND Lipids) provided the best results for GC-MS and LC-MS analysis

  7. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show that promoter control of E1A facilitates highly selective expression of transgenes inserted into the late transcription unit. This, however, required multistep optimization of late transgene expression. Transgene insertion via internal ribosome entry site (IRES), splice acceptor (SA), or viral 2A sequences resulted in replication-dependent expression. Unexpectedly, analyses in appropriate substrates and with matching control viruses revealed that IRES and SA, but not 2A, facilitated indirect transgene targeting via tyrosinase promoter control of E1A. Transgene expression via SA was more selective (up to 1,500-fold) but less effective than via IRES. Notably, we also revealed transgene-dependent interference with splicing. Hence, the prodrug convertase FCU1 (a cytosine deaminase–uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion protein) was expressed only after optimizing the sequence surrounding the SA site and mutating a cryptic splice site within the transgene. The resulting tyrosinase promoter-regulated and FCU1-encoding adenovirus combined effective oncolysis with targeted prodrug activation therapy of melanoma. Thus, prodrug activation showed potent bystander killing and increased cytotoxicity of the virus up to 10-fold. We conclude that armed oncolytic viruses can be improved substantially by comparing and optimizing strategies for targeted transgene expression, thereby implementing selective and multimodal cancer therapies. PMID:20939692

  8. Energy Monitoring and Targeting as diagnosis; Applying work analysis to adapt a statistical change detection strategy using representation aiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, Antony

    Energy Monitoring and Targeting is a well-established business process that develops information about utility energy consumption in a business or institution. While M&T has persisted as a worthwhile energy conservation support activity, it has not been widely adopted. This dissertation explains M&T challenges in terms of diagnosing and controlling energy consumption, informed by a naturalistic field study of M&T work. A Cognitive Work Analysis of M&T identifies structures that diagnosis can search, information flows un-supported in canonical support tools, and opportunities to extend the most popular tool for MM&T: Cumulative Sum of Residuals (CUSUM) charts. A design application outlines how CUSUM charts were augmented with a more contemporary statistical change detection strategy, Recursive Parameter Estimates, modified to better suit the M&T task using Representation Aiding principles. The design was experimentally evaluated in a controlled M&T synthetic task, and was shown to significantly improve diagnosis performance.

  9. Targeting of Mutant p53 and the Cellular Redox Balance by APR-246 as a Strategy for Efficient Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bykov, Vladimir J. N.; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Meiqiongzi; Ceder, Sophia; Abrahmsen, Lars; Wiman, Klas G.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. The p53 protein activates transcription of genes that promote cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, or regulate cell metabolism, and other processes. Missense mutations in TP53 abolish specific DNA binding of p53 and allow evasion of apoptosis and accelerated tumor progression. Mutant p53 often accumulates at high levels in tumor cells. Pharmacological reactivation of mutant p53 has emerged as a promising strategy for improved cancer therapy. Small molecules that restore wild type activity of mutant p53 have been identified using various approaches. One of these molecules, APR-246, is a prodrug that is converted to the Michael acceptor methylene quinuclidinone (MQ) that binds covalently to cysteines in p53, leading to refolding and restoration of wild type p53 function. MQ also targets the cellular redox balance by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) and depleting glutathione. This dual mechanism of action may account for the striking synergy between APR-246 and platinum compounds. APR-246 is the only mutant p53-targeting compound in clinical development. A phase I/IIa clinical trial in hematological malignancies and prostate cancer showed good safety profile and clinical effects in some patients. APR-246 is currently tested in a phase Ib/II trial in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26870698

  10. A three-step strategy for targeting drug carriers to human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z; McQuarrie, S A; Suresh, M R; Mercer, J R; Gupta, S; Miller, G G

    2002-03-28

    To improve tumor-to-tissue ratios of anticancer agents in radioimmunotherapy, a three-step targeting approach was used to deliver biotinylated liposomes to human ovarian cancer cells (NIH:OVCAR-3, SK-OV-3) in vitro. Targeting was based upon the use of two antibodies specific for the CA-125 antigen that is highly expressed on NIH:OVCAR-3 cells but not expressed on SK-OV-3 cells. Briefly, the approach consists of prelabeling target cells with biotinylated anti-CA-125 antibody and FITC-labeled streptavidin (SAv) prior to administration of biotinylated liposomes containing a marker dye for visualization by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In addition, the two anti-CA-125 antibodies (B27.1 and B43.13) were labeled with FITC and incubated with ovarian cancer cells at 37 degrees C from 30 min to 24 h to study binding and uptake kinetics. Shedding kinetics of bound antibody from tumor cells was performed using radiolabeled B27.1. Results demonstrated that both B27.1 and B43.13 specifically bound to the cell surface of OVCAR-3 cells but not to SK-OV-3 cells. Biotinylation, FITC-labeling and radiolabeling of the antibodies did not compromise immunoreactivity. Less than 6% of the bound B27.1 was shed from tumor cells by 4 h following incubation, and the antibody-antigen complex resided predominantly on the cell surface by 4 h at 37 degrees C with slow internalization by 12-24 h. Biotinylated, conventional liposomes were specifically and effectively delivered to OVCAR-3 cells prelabeled with biotinylated B27.1 and SAv. The slow internalization and shedding properties of these antibodies are useful for multistep pretargeting methods. Thus, a modified targeting strategy, utilizing a bispecific antibody and liposomes, may be feasible for radioimmunoliposomal therapy of ovarian cancer. PMID:11796170

  11. Engineering of hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles for remarkably enhanced tumor active targeting efficacy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Shi, Sixiang; Goel, Shreya; Valdovinos, Hector F; Hernandez, Reinier; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticle (HMSN) has recently gained increasing interests due to their tremendous potential as an attractive nano-platform for cancer imaging and therapy. However, possibly due to the lack of efficient in vivo targeting strategy and well-developed surface engineering techniques, engineering of HMSN for in vivo active tumor targeting, quantitative tumor uptake assessment, multimodality imaging, biodistribution and enhanced drug delivery have not been achieved to date. Here, we report the in vivo tumor targeted positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dual-modality imaging and enhanced drug delivery of HMSN using a generally applicable surface engineering technique. Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, tumor targeting efficacy and specificity, biodistribution and drug delivery capability of well-functionalized HMSN nano-conjugates. The highest uptake of TRC105 (which binds to CD105 on tumor neovasculature) conjugated HMSN in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model was ~10%ID/g, 3 times higher than that of the non-targeted group, making surface engineered HMSN a highly attractive drug delivery nano-platform for future cancer theranostics. PMID:24875656

  12. Engineering of Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Remarkably Enhanced Tumor Active Targeting Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Shi, Sixiang; Goel, Shreya; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticle (HMSN) has recently gained increasing interests due to their tremendous potential as an attractive nano-platform for cancer imaging and therapy. However, possibly due to the lack of efficient in vivo targeting strategy and well-developed surface engineering techniques, engineering of HMSN for in vivo active tumor targeting, quantitative tumor uptake assessment, multimodality imaging, biodistribution and enhanced drug delivery have not been achieved to date. Here, we report the in vivo tumor targeted positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dual-modality imaging and enhanced drug delivery of HMSN using a generally applicable surface engineering technique. Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, tumor targeting efficacy and specificity, biodistribution and drug delivery capability of well-functionalized HMSN nano-conjugates. The highest uptake of TRC105 (which binds to CD105 on tumor neovasculature) conjugated HMSN in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model was ~10%ID/g, 3 times higher than that of the non-targeted group, making surface engineered HMSN a highly attractive drug delivery nano-platform for future cancer theranostics. PMID:24875656

  13. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the

  14. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  15. Active imaging system performance model for target acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Teaney, Brian; Nguyen, Quang; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Halford, Carl E.; Tofsted, David H.

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate has developed a laser-range-gated imaging system performance model for the detection, recognition, and identification of vehicle targets. The model is based on the established US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD sensor performance models of the human system response through an imaging system. The Java-based model, called NVLRG, accounts for the effect of active illumination, atmospheric attenuation, and turbulence effects relevant to LRG imagers, such as speckle and scintillation, and for the critical sensor and display components. This model can be used to assess the performance of recently proposed active SWIR systems through various trade studies. This paper will describe the NVLRG model in detail, discuss the validation of recent model components, present initial trade study results, and outline plans to validate and calibrate the end-to-end model with field data through human perception testing.

  16. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Tzvetan G.; Carolus, Almut; Schubring, David; Popova, Petia; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ). Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19), similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19), or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19). Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b). Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects. PMID:26082889

  17. Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, Siddhartha; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Boehm, Jannic

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined by the concurrence of accumulation of abnormal aggregates composed of two proteins: Amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau, and of cellular changes including neurite degeneration and loss of neurons and cognitive functions. Based on their strong association with disease, genetically and pathologically, it is not surprising that there has been a focus towards developing therapies against the aggregated structures. Unfortunately, current therapies have but mild benefit. With this in mind we will focus on the relationship of synaptic plasticity with Aβ and tau protein and their role as potential targets for the development of therapeutic drugs. Finally, we will provide perspectives in developing a multifactorial strategy for AD treatment. PMID:22482074

  18. Size controlled protein nanoemulsions for active targeting of folate receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Eugénia; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Abreu, Ana S; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Guebitz, Georg; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Preto, Ana; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization with a tri-block copolymer (Poloxamer 407), which presents a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (PPO) and two identical lateral hydrophilic chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG). We observed a linear correlation between tri-block copolymer concentration and size - the use of 5mg/mL of Poloxamer 407 yields nanoemulsions smaller than 100nm. Molecular dynamics and fluorescent tagging of the tri-block copolymer highlight their mechanistic role on the size of emulsions. This novel method enables the fabrication of highly stable albumin emulsions in the nano-size range, highly desirable for controlled drug delivery. Folic Acid (FA)-tagged protein nanoemulsions were shown to promote specific folate receptor (FR)-mediated targeting in FR positive cells. The novel strategy presented here enables the construction of size controlled, functionalized protein-based nanoemulsions with excellent characteristics for active targeting in cancer therapy. PMID:26241920

  19. Novel strategies to target the ubiquitin proteasome system in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lub, Susanne; Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). The success of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of MM highlights the importance of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in this particular cancer. Despite the prolonged survival of MM patients, a significant amount of patients relapse or become resistant to therapy. This underlines the importance of the development and investigation of novel targets to improve MM therapy. The UPS plays an important role in different cellular processes by targeted destruction of proteins. The ubiquitination process consists of enzymes that transfer ubiquitin to proteins targeting them for proteasomal degradation. An emerging and promising approach is to target more disease specific components of the UPS to reduce side effects and overcome resistance. In this review, we will focus on different components of the UPS such as the ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, the E3 ubiquitin ligases, the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and the proteasome. We will discuss their role in MM and the implications in drug discovery for the treatment of MM. PMID:26695547

  20. A target-triggered dual amplification strategy for sensitive detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weifeng; Zhao, Jiamin; Situ, Bo; Li, Bo; Ma, Wen; Liu, Jumei; Wu, Zixian; Wang, Wen; Yan, Xiaohui; Zheng, Lei

    2016-09-15

    The accurate and quantitative analysis of microRNA (miRNA) expression is critical for biomedical research and clinical theranostics. In this study, we report a novel sensor for the sensitive detection of miRNA based on a duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted dual signal amplification strategy. A chimeric probe (DNA/2-OMe-RNA) that consists of a miRNA recognition DNA sequence and a Taqman probe hybridization RNA sequence (2'-O-methyl RNA) was designed and synthesized. One molecule of target miRNA can trigger cyclical cleavage of the chimeric probes to produce 2'-O-methyl RNA by DSN in the first round of amplification. The 2'-O-methyl RNA molecules can subsequently hybridize with Taqman probes and initiate the second round of cyclical amplification to generate detectable fluorescence by DSN. The proposed strategy exhibits high specificity in discriminating cognate miRNAs, and the dual signal transduction process enables the detection of miRNA concentrations as low as 7.3fM. We further applied this assay to miRNA quantification in cancer cells to confirm its applicability. The present study provides a sensitive, specific and simple method for miRNA detection and holds great potential for further application in biomedical research and in the clinical laboratory. PMID:27131998

  1. Targeting O⁶-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase with specific inhibitors as a strategy in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaina, Bernd; Margison, Geoffrey P; Christmann, Markus

    2010-11-01

    O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) repairs the cancer chemotherapy-relevant DNA adducts, O (6)-methylguanine and O (6)-chloroethylguanine, induced by methylating and chloroethylating anticancer drugs, respectively. These adducts are cytotoxic, and given the overwhelming evidence that MGMT is a key factor in resistance, strategies for inactivating MGMT have been pursued. A number of drugs have been shown to inactivate MGMT in cells, human tumour models and cancer patients, and O (6)-benzylguanine and O (6)-[4-bromothenyl]guanine have been used in clinical trials. While these agents show no side effects per se, they also inactivate MGMT in normal tissues and hence exacerbate the toxic side effects of the alkylating drugs, requiring dose reduction. This might explain why, in any of the reported trials, the outcome has not been improved by their inclusion. It is, however, anticipated that, with the availability of tumour targeting strategies and hematopoetic stem cell protection, MGMT inactivators hold promise for enhancing the effectiveness of alkylating agent chemotherapy. PMID:20717836

  2. Gene Capture Coupled to High-Throughput Sequencing as a Strategy for Targeted Metagenome Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Denonfoux, Jérémie; Parisot, Nicolas; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Morgavi, Diego P.; Le Paslier, Denis; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows faster acquisition of metagenomic data, but complete exploration of complex ecosystems is hindered by the extraordinary diversity of microorganisms. To reduce the environmental complexity, we created an innovative solution hybrid selection (SHS) method that is combined with NGS to characterize large DNA fragments harbouring biomarkers of interest. The quality of enrichment was evaluated after fragments containing the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A gene (mcrA), the biomarker of methanogenesis, were captured from a Methanosarcina strain and a metagenomic sample from a meromictic lake. The methanogen diversity was compared with direct metagenome and mcrA-based amplicon pyrosequencing strategies. The SHS approach resulted in the capture of DNA fragments up to 2.5 kb with an enrichment efficiency between 41 and 100%, depending on the sample complexity. Compared with direct metagenome and amplicons sequencing, SHS detected broader mcrA diversity, and it allowed efficient sampling of the rare biosphere and unknown sequences. In contrast to amplicon-based strategies, SHS is less biased and GC independent, and it recovered complete biomarker sequences in addition to conserved regions. Because this method can also isolate the regions flanking the target sequences, it could facilitate operon reconstructions. PMID:23364577

  3. Strategies to Address Common Challenges When Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Christina I.; Gorman, Kristen S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides practical strategies for addressing common challenges that arise for teachers in active learning classrooms. Our strategies come from instructors with experience teaching in these environments.

  4. Final Report for Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    This report records the work and contributions of the NITRD-funded Bio-Inspired Approaches to Moving-Target Defense Strategies project performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under the technical guidance of the National Security Agency’s R6 division. The project has incorporated a number of bio-inspired cyber defensive technologies within an elastic framework provided by the Digital Ants. This project has created the first scalable, real-world prototype of the Digital Ants Framework (DAF)[11] and integrated five technologies into this flexible, decentralized framework: (1) Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD), (2) Behavioral Indicators, (3) Bioinformatic Clas- sification, (4) Moving-Target Reconfiguration, and (5) Ambient Collaboration. The DAF can be used operationally to decentralize many such data intensive applications that normally rely on collection of large amounts of data in a central repository. In this work, we have shown how these component applications may be decentralized and may perform analysis at the edge. Operationally, this will enable analytics to scale far beyond current limitations while not suffering from the bandwidth or computational limitations of centralized analysis. This effort has advanced the R6 Cyber Security research program to secure digital infrastructures by developing a dynamic means to adaptively defend complex cyber systems. We hope that this work will benefit both our client’s efforts in system behavior modeling and cyber security to the overall benefit of the nation.

  5. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  6. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  7. Inhibiting Drivers of Non-mutational Drug Tolerance Is a Salvage Strategy for Targeted Melanoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael P.; Brunton, Holly; Rowling, Emily J.; Ferguson, Jennifer; Arozarena, Imanol; Miskolczi, Zsofia; Lee, Jessica L.; Girotti, Maria R.; Marais, Richard; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Dummer, Reinhard; Frederick, Dennie T.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Once melanomas have progressed with acquired resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-targeted therapy, mutational heterogeneity presents a major challenge. We therefore examined the therapy phase before acquired resistance had developed and discovered the melanoma survival oncogene MITF as a driver of an early non-mutational and reversible drug-tolerance state, which is induced by PAX3-mediated upregulation of MITF. A drug-repositioning screen identified the HIV1-protease inhibitor nelfinavir as potent suppressor of PAX3 and MITF expression. Nelfinavir profoundly sensitizes BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells to MAPK-pathway inhibitors. Moreover, nelfinavir is effective in BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells isolated from patients progressed on MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapy and in BRAF/NRAS/PTEN mutant tumors. We demonstrate that inhibiting a driver of MAPKi-induced drug tolerance could improve current approaches of targeted melanoma therapy. PMID:26977879

  8. A strategy for combating melanoma with oncogenic c-Myc inhibitors and targeted nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Hu, Grace; Gupta, Deepti Sood; Senpan, Angana; Yang, Xiaoxia; Schmieder, Anne; Swain, Corban; Wickline, Samuel A; Tomasson, Michael H; Lanza, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    Aims The activity of the transcription factor c-Myc is dependent upon heterodimerization with Max to control target gene transcription. Small-molecule inhibitors of c-Myc–Max have exhibited low potency and poor water solubility and are therefore unsuitable for in vivo application. We hypothesized that a nanomedicine approach incorporating a cryptic c-Myc inhibitor prodrug could be delivered and enzymatically released in order to effectively inhibit melanoma. Materials & methods An Sn-2 lipase-labile Myc inhibitor prodrug was synthesized and included in two αvβ3-targeted nanoparticle platforms (20 and 200 nm). The inherent antiproliferate potency was compared with the lipid-free compound using human and mouse melanoma cell lines. Results & conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time a successful nanodelivery of c-Myc inhibitors and their potential use to prevent melanoma. PMID:25600969

  9. Nanomedicine for drug targeting: strategies beyond the enhanced permeability and retention effect

    PubMed Central

    Nehoff, Hayley; Parayath, Neha N; Domanovitch, Laura; Taurin, Sebastien; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The growing research interest in nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory-related pathologies is yielding encouraging results. Unfortunately, enthusiasm is tempered by the limited specificity of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Factors such as lack of cellular specificity, low vascular density, and early release of active agents prior to reaching their target contribute to the limitations of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, improved nanomedicine designs are creating opportunities to overcome these problems. In this review, we present examples of the advances made in this field and endeavor to highlight the potential of these emerging technologies to improve targeting of nanomedicine to specific pathological cells and tissues. PMID:24904213

  10. Inhibiting Drivers of Non-mutational Drug Tolerance Is a Salvage Strategy for Targeted Melanoma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael P; Brunton, Holly; Rowling, Emily J; Ferguson, Jennifer; Arozarena, Imanol; Miskolczi, Zsofia; Lee, Jessica L; Girotti, Maria R; Marais, Richard; Levesque, Mitchell P; Dummer, Reinhard; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; Cooper, Zachary A; Wargo, Jennifer A; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2016-03-14

    Once melanomas have progressed with acquired resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-targeted therapy, mutational heterogeneity presents a major challenge. We therefore examined the therapy phase before acquired resistance had developed and discovered the melanoma survival oncogene MITF as a driver of an early non-mutational and reversible drug-tolerance state, which is induced by PAX3-mediated upregulation of MITF. A drug-repositioning screen identified the HIV1-protease inhibitor nelfinavir as potent suppressor of PAX3 and MITF expression. Nelfinavir profoundly sensitizes BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells to MAPK-pathway inhibitors. Moreover, nelfinavir is effective in BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells isolated from patients progressed on MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapy and in BRAF/NRAS/PTEN mutant tumors. We demonstrate that inhibiting a driver of MAPKi-induced drug tolerance could improve current approaches of targeted melanoma therapy. PMID:26977879

  11. Cancer Stem Cells: The Potential Targets of Chinese Medicines and Their Active Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Tan, Hor Yue; Li, Sha; Cheung, Fan; Wang, Ning; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and progression of malignancies has been rigorously validated, and the specific methods for identifying and isolating the CSCs from the parental cancer population have also been rapidly developed in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of recent research progress of Chinese medicines (CMs) and their active compounds in inhibiting tumor progression by targeting CSCs. A great deal of CMs and their active compounds, such as Antrodia camphorate, berberine, resveratrol, and curcumin have been shown to regress CSCs, in terms of reversing drug resistance, inducing cell death and inhibiting cell proliferation as well as metastasis. Furthermore, one of the active compounds in coptis, berbamine may inhibit tumor progression by modulating microRNAs to regulate CSCs. The underlying molecular mechanisms and related signaling pathways involved in these processes were also discussed and concluded in this paper. Overall, the use of CMs and their active compounds may be a promising therapeutic strategy to eradicate cancer by targeting CSCs. However, further studies are needed to clarify the potential of clinical application of CMs and their active compounds as complementary and alternative therapy in this field. PMID:27338343

  12. Cancer Stem Cells: The Potential Targets of Chinese Medicines and Their Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming; Tan, Hor Yue; Li, Sha; Cheung, Fan; Wang, Ning; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and progression of malignancies has been rigorously validated, and the specific methods for identifying and isolating the CSCs from the parental cancer population have also been rapidly developed in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of recent research progress of Chinese medicines (CMs) and their active compounds in inhibiting tumor progression by targeting CSCs. A great deal of CMs and their active compounds, such as Antrodia camphorate, berberine, resveratrol, and curcumin have been shown to regress CSCs, in terms of reversing drug resistance, inducing cell death and inhibiting cell proliferation as well as metastasis. Furthermore, one of the active compounds in coptis, berbamine may inhibit tumor progression by modulating microRNAs to regulate CSCs. The underlying molecular mechanisms and related signaling pathways involved in these processes were also discussed and concluded in this paper. Overall, the use of CMs and their active compounds may be a promising therapeutic strategy to eradicate cancer by targeting CSCs. However, further studies are needed to clarify the potential of clinical application of CMs and their active compounds as complementary and alternative therapy in this field. PMID:27338343

  13. Linking Objects to Actions: Encoding of Target Object and Grasping Strategy in Primate Ventral Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Franquemont, Lachlan; Black, Michael J.; Donoghue, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity in ventral premotor cortex (PMv) has been associated with the process of matching perceived objects with the motor commands needed to grasp them. It remains unclear how PMv networks can flexibly link percepts of objects affording multiple grasp options into a final desired hand action. Here, we use a relational encoding approach to track the functional state of PMv neuronal ensembles in macaque monkeys through the process of passive viewing, grip planning, and grasping movement execution. We used objects affording multiple possible grip strategies. The task included separate instructed delay periods for object presentation and grip instruction. This approach allowed us to distinguish responses elicited by the visual presentation of the objects from those associated with selecting a given motor plan for grasping. We show that PMv continuously incorporates information related to object shape and grip strategy as it becomes available, revealing a transition from a set of ensemble states initially most closely related to objects, to a new set of ensemble patterns reflecting unique object-grip combinations. These results suggest that PMv dynamically combines percepts, gradually navigating toward activity patterns associated with specific volitional actions, rather than directly mapping perceptual object properties onto categorical grip representations. Our results support the idea that PMv is part of a network that dynamically computes motor plans from perceptual information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present work demonstrates that the activity of groups of neurons in primate ventral premotor cortex reflects information related to visually presented objects, as well as the motor strategy used to grasp them, linking individual objects to multiple possible grips. PMv could provide useful control signals for neuroprosthetic assistive devices designed to interact with objects in a flexible way. PMID:26224870

  14. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  15. Sensitive SERS detection of DNA methyltransferase by target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Chuanfeng; Han, Huixia; Zhao, Caisheng; Zhang, Xiaoru

    2016-07-15

    A novel and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method is proposed for the assay of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and evaluation of inhibitors by developing a target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy. By using of a duplex substrate for Dam MTase, two hairpin templates and a Raman probe, multiple signal amplification mode is achieved. Once recognized by Dam MTase, the duplex substrate can be cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease and two primers are released for triggering the multiple signal amplification reaction. Consequently, a wide dynamic range and remarkably high sensitivity are obtained under isothermal conditions. The detection limit is 2.57×10(-4)UmL(-1). This assay exhibits an excellent selectivity and is successfully applied in the screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. In addition, this novel sensing system is potentially universal as the recognition element can be conveniently designed for other target analytes by changing the substrate of DNA MTase. PMID:26926592

  16. Acylpeptide Hydrolase Inhibition as Targeted Strategy to Induce Proteasomal Down-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Luini, Alberto; Ruvo, Menotti; Gogliettino, Marta; Langella, Emma; Saviano, Michele; Hegde, Ramanath N.; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Rossi, Mose

    2011-01-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APEH), one of the four members of the prolyl oligopeptidase class, catalyses the removal of N-acylated amino acids from acetylated peptides and it has been postulated to play a key role in protein degradation machinery. Disruption of protein turnover has been established as an effective strategy to down-regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and as a promising approach in anticancer therapy. Here, we illustrate a new pathway modulating UPS and proteasome activity through inhibition of APEH. To find novel molecules able to down-regulate APEH activity, we screened a set of synthetic peptides, reproducing the reactive-site loop of a known archaeal inhibitor of APEH (SsCEI), and the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers. A 12-mer SsCEI peptide and the trans10-cis12 isomer of CLA, were identified as specific APEH inhibitors and their effects on cell-based assays were paralleled by a dose-dependent reduction of proteasome activity and the activation of the pro-apoptotic caspase cascade. Moreover, cell treatment with the individual compounds increased the cytoplasm levels of several classic hallmarks of proteasome inhibition, such as NFkappaB, p21, and misfolded or polyubiquitinylated proteins, and additive effects were observed in cells exposed to a combination of both inhibitors without any cytotoxicity. Remarkably, transfection of human bronchial epithelial cells with APEH siRNA, promoted a marked accumulation of a mutant of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), herein used as a model of misfolded protein typically degraded by UPS. Finally, molecular modeling studies, to gain insights into the APEH inhibition by the trans10-cis12 CLA isomer, were performed. Our study supports a previously unrecognized role of APEH as a negative effector of proteasome activity by an unknown mechanism and opens new perspectives for the development of strategies aimed at modulation of cancer progression. PMID:22016782

  17. Development of an Active 238UF6 Gas Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, C.; Enders, J.; Freudenberger, M.; Gook, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    At the superconducting 130 MeV Darmstadt electron linac S-DALINAC a new source of spin-polarized electrons using a GaAs cathode has been installed, opening the path for experiments with polarized electron and photon beams for nuclear structure studies at low momentum transfers, e.g., the search for forward-backward asymmetries originating from parity non-conservation (PNC) in the photon-induced fission process of 238U.Detailed studies of different properties, e.g., the energy dependence of fission modes, the population of fission isomers, or the search for (PNC) effects in the photon-induced fission process of 238U, depends on high quality data, therefore needing high luminosities. An active gas target containing uranium may overcome the problem that large solid target thicknesses cause poor energy and angular resolution.A single Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been built to test a mixture of standard counting gases (e.g., argon) with depleted uraniumhexafluoride (238UF6) using a triple alpha source, evaluating signal quality and drift velocity. For mass fractions up to 2 percent of 238U in the counting gas. The drift velocity increases with rising UF6 content, while a good signal quality and energy resolution is preserved.

  18. Drugging PI3K in cancer: refining targets and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Bjerke, Lynn; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is one of the most frequently activated pathogenic signalling routes in human cancers, making it a rational and important target for innovative anticancer drug development and precision medicine. The three main classes of PI3K inhibitors currently in clinical testing comprise dual pan-Class I PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, pan-Class I PI3K inhibitors lacking significant mTOR activity and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors. A major step forward in recent years is the progression of over 30 small molecule PI3K inhibitors into clinical trials and the first regulatory approval of the PI3Kδ inhibitor idelalisib for multiple B-cell malignancies. This review article focuses on the progress made in the discovery and development of novel PI3K inhibitors, with an emphasis on antitumour activity and tolerability profiles for agents that have entered clinical trials. We also discuss the key issues of drug resistance, patient selection approaches and rational targeted combinations. Finally, we envision the future development and use of PI3K inhibitors for the treatment of patients with a range of malignancies. PMID:26117819

  19. Drugging PI3K in cancer: refining targets and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Timothy A; Bjerke, Lynn; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is one of the most frequently activated pathogenic signalling routes in human cancers, making it a rational and important target for innovative anticancer drug development and precision medicine. The three main classes of PI3K inhibitors currently in clinical testing comprise dual pan-Class I PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, pan-Class I PI3K inhibitors lacking significant mTOR activity and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors. A major step forward in recent years is the progression of over 30 small molecule PI3K inhibitors into clinical trials and the first regulatory approval of the PI3Kδ inhibitor idelalisib for multiple B-cell malignancies. This review article focuses on the progress made in the discovery and development of novel PI3K inhibitors, with an emphasis on antitumour activity and tolerability profiles for agents that have entered clinical trials. We also discuss the key issues of drug resistance, patient selection approaches and rational targeted combinations. Finally, we envision the future development and use of PI3K inhibitors for the treatment of patients with a range of malignancies. PMID:26117819

  20. Targeting mechanisms at sites of complement activation for imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in many acute injury states as well as chronic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Localized complement activation and alternative pathway-mediated amplification on diverse target surfaces promote local recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells and elaboration of other mediators. Despite a general understanding of the architecture of the system, though, many of the mechanisms that underlie site-specific complement activation and amplification in vivo are incompletely understood. In addition, there is no capability yet to measure the level of local tissue site-specific complement activation in patients without performing biopsies to detect products using immunohistochemical techniques. Herein is reviewed emerging evidence obtained through clinical research studies of human rheumatoid arthritis along with translational studies of its disease models which demonstrate that several parallel mechanisms are involved in site-specific amplification of activation of the complement system in vivo. Among these processes are de-regulation of the alternative pathway, effector pathway-catalyzed amplification of proximal complement activation, recognition of injury-associated ligands by components of the lectin pathway, and engagement of pathogenic natural antibodies that recognize a limited set of injury-associated neoepitopes. Studies suggest that each of these inter-related processes can play key roles in amplification of complement-dependent injury on self-tissues in vivo. These findings, in addition to development of an imaging strategy described herein designed to quantitatively measure local complement C3 fixation, have relevance to therapeutic and diagnostic strategies targeting the complement system. PMID:25979851

  1. Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Southam, Anna C; Kuo, Yi-Ling; Lee, Ya-Yun; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-04-13

    It has been proposed that strengthening and skill training of gluteus maximus (GM) may be beneficial in treating various knee injuries. Given the redundancy of the hip musculature and the small representational area of GM in the primary motor cortex (M1), learning to activate this muscle before prescribing strength exercises and modifying movement strategy would appear to be important. This study aimed to determine whether a short-term activation training program targeting the GM results in neuroplastic changes in M1. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were obtained in 12 healthy individuals at different stimulation intensities while they performed a double-leg bridge. Participants then completed a home exercise program for ∼1 h/day for 6 days that consisted of a single exercise designed to selectively target the GM. Baseline and post-training input-output curves (IOCs) were generated by graphing average MEP amplitudes and cortical silent period durations against corresponding stimulation intensities. Following the GM activation training, the linear slope of both the MEP IOC and cortical silent period IOC increased significantly. Short-term GM activation training resulted in a significant increase in corticomotor excitability as well as changes in inhibitory processes of the GM. We propose that the observed corticomotor plasticity will enable better utilization of the GM in the more advanced stages of a rehabilitation/training program. PMID:26981714

  2. Thymosin beta4 targeting impairs tumorigenic activity of colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Mollinari, Cristiana; di Martino, Simona; Biffoni, Mauro; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Pagliuca, Alfredo; de Stefano, Maria Chiara; Circo, Rita; Merlo, Daniela; De Maria, Ruggero; Garaci, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is an actin-binding peptide overexpressed in several tumors, including colon carcinomas. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 in promoting the tumorigenic properties of colorectal cancer stem cells (CR-CSCs), which are responsible for tumor initiation and growth. We first found that CR-CSCs from different patients have higher Tβ4 levels than normal epithelial cells. Then, we used a lentiviral strategy to down-regulate Tβ4 expression in CR-CSCs and analyzed the effects of such modulation on proliferation, survival, and tumorigenic activity of CR-CSCs. Empty vector-transduced CR-CSCs were used as a control. Targeting of the Tβ4 produced CR-CSCs with a lower capacity to grow and migrate in culture and, interestingly, reduced tumor size and aggressiveness of CR-CSC-based xenografts in mice. Moreover, such loss in tumorigenic activity was accompanied by a significant increase of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and a concomitant reduction of the integrin-linked kinase (ILK) expression, which resulted in a decreased activation of protein kinase B (Akt). Accordingly, exogenous expression of an active form of Akt rescued all the protumoral features lost after Tβ4 targeting in CR-CSCs. In conclusion, Tβ4 may have important implications for therapeutic intervention for treatment of human colon carcinoma. PMID:20566622

  3. Natural Killer Cell Immunomodulation: Targeting Activating, Inhibitory, and Co-stimulatory Receptor Signaling for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Cariad; Fritsch, Katherine; Kohrt, Holbrook E.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in the recognition and eradication of tumors. Efforts at using NK cells as antitumor agents began over two decades ago, but recent advances in elucidating NK cell biology have accelerated the development of NK cell-targeting therapeutics. NK cell activation and the triggering of effector functions is governed by a complex set of activating and inhibitory receptors. In the early phases of cancer immune surveillance, NK cells directly identify and lyse cancer cells. Nascent transformed cells elicit NK cell activation and are eliminated. However, as tumors progress, cancerous cells develop immunosuppressive mechanisms that circumvent NK cell-mediated killing, allowing for tumor escape and proliferation. Therapeutic intervention aims to reverse tumor-induced NK cell suppression and sustain NK cells’ tumorlytic capacities. Here, we review tumor–NK cell interactions, discuss the mechanisms by which NK cells generate an antitumor immune response, and discuss NK cell-based therapeutic strategies targeting activating, inhibitory, and co-stimulatory receptors. PMID:26697006

  4. Targeting Mast Cells Tryptase in Tumor Microenvironment: A Potential Antiangiogenetic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Leporini, Christian; Marech, Ilaria; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Scognamillo, Giovanni; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process finely regulated by the balance between angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors. As a result of proangiogenic factors overexpression, it plays a crucial role in cancer development. Although initially mast cells (MCs) role has been defined in hypersensitivity reactions and in immunity, it has been discovered that MCs have a crucial interplay on the regulatory function between inflammatory and tumor cells through the release of classical proangiogenic factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor) and nonclassical proangiogenic mediators granule-associated (mainly tryptase). In fact, in several animal and human malignancies, MCs density is highly correlated with tumor angiogenesis. In particular, tryptase, an agonist of the proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), represents one of the most powerful angiogenic mediators released by human MCs after c-Kit receptor activation. This protease, acting on PAR-2 by its proteolytic activity, has angiogenic activity stimulating both human vascular endothelial and tumor cell proliferation in paracrine manner, helping tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Based on literature data it is shown that tryptase may represent a promising target in cancer treatment due to its proangiogenic activity. Here we focused on molecular mechanisms of three tryptase inhibitors (gabexate mesylate, nafamostat mesylate, and tranilast) in order to consider their prospective role in cancer therapy. PMID:25295247

  5. Novel strategy for a bispecific antibody: induction of dual target internalization and degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Lee, S H; Hwang, J-W; Oh, S J; Kim, B; Jung, S; Shim, S-H; Lin, P W; Lee, S B; Cho, M-Y; Koh, Y J; Kim, S Y; Ahn, S; Lee, J; Kim, K-M; Cheong, K H; Choi, J; Kim, K-A

    2016-08-25

    Activation of the extensive cross-talk among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), particularly ErbB family-Met cross-talk, has emerged as a likely source of drug resistance. Notwithstanding brilliant successes were attained while using small-molecule inhibitors or antibody therapeutics against specific RTKs in multiple cancers over recent decades, a high recurrence rate remains unsolved in patients treated with these targeted inhibitors. It is well aligned with multifaceted properties of cancer and cross-talk and convergence of signaling pathways of RTKs. Thereby many therapeutic interventions have been actively developed to overcome inherent or acquired resistance. To date, no bispecific antibody (BsAb) showed complete depletion of dual RTKs from the plasma membrane and efficient dual degradation. In this manuscript, we report the first findings of a target-specific dual internalization and degradation of membrane RTKs induced by designed BsAbs based on the internalizing monoclonal antibodies and the therapeutic values of these BsAbs. Leveraging the anti-Met mAb able to internalize and degrade by a unique mechanism, we generated the BsAbs for Met/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Met/HER2 to induce an efficient EGFR or HER2 internalization and degradation in the presence of Met that is frequently overexpressed in the invasive tumors and involved in the resistance against EGFR- or HER2-targeted therapies. We found that Met/EGFR BsAb ME22S induces dissociation of the Met-EGFR complex from Hsp90, followed by significant degradation of Met and EGFR. By employing patient-derived tumor models we demonstrate therapeutic potential of the BsAb-mediated dual degradation in various cancers. PMID:26853467

  6. New Strategies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Targeting the Genetic and Metabolic Basis of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Sourbier, Carole; Linehan, W. Marston

    2016-01-01

    The development of new forms of treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma over the past two decades has been primarily focused on targeting the VHL/HIF pathway. The recent identification of mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), of genomic heterogeneity and of a Warburg-like metabolic phenotype in advanced disease has had a profound effect on our understanding of the evolution of clear cell RCC and on potential approaches to personalized therapy. Early approaches to therapy for patients with advanced type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma that have centered around the MET/HGF pathway will expand as more genomic information becomes available. Sporadic and familial Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma are characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis and share an antioxidant response phenotype. In fumarate hydratase-deficient RCC, fumarate-induced succination of KEAP1 activates Nrf2 signaling. CUL3 and Nrf2 mutations as well as an Nrf2 activation phenotype are found in sporadic type 2 papillary RCC. Therapeutic approaches designed to target the Nrf2 pathway as well as to impair blood flow and glucose delivery in these cancers that are highly dependent on a robust tumor vasculature and on ready availability of glucose for energy production and glycolysis are in development. PMID:25564569

  7. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV as a Potential Target for Selective Prodrug Activation and Chemotherapeutic Action in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is often offset by severe side effects attributable to poor selectivity and toxicity to normal cells. Recently, the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) was considered as a potential target for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting chemotherapeutic drugs to DPPIV as a strategy to enhance their specificity. The expression profile of DPPIV was obtained for seven cancer cell lines using DNA microarray data from the DTP database, and was validated by RT-PCR. A prodrug was then synthesized by linking the cytotoxic drug melphalan to a proline-glycine dipeptide moiety, followed by hydrolysis studies in the seven cell lines with a standard substrate, as well as the glycyl-prolyl-melphalan (GP-Mel). Lastly, cell proliferation studies were carried out to demonstrate enzyme-dependent activation of the candidate prodrug. The relative RT-PCR expression levels of DPPIV in the cancer cell lines exhibited linear correlation with U95Av2 Affymetrix data (r2 = 0.94), and with specific activity of a standard substrate, glycine-proline-p-nitroanilide (r2 = 0.96). The significantly higher antiproliferative activity of GP-Mel in Caco-2 cells (GI50 = 261 μM) compared to that in SK-MEL-5 cells (GI50 = 807 μM) was consistent with the 9-fold higher specific activity of the prodrug in Caco-2 cells (5.14 pmol/min/μg protein) compared to SK-MEL-5 cells (0.68 pmol/min/μg protein) and with DPPIV expression levels in these cells. Our results demonstrate the great potential to exploit DPPIV as a prodrug activating enzyme for efficient chemotherapeutic drug targeting. PMID:25365774

  8. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of −20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of −0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  9. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed 'green technique'. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  10. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  11. p53 activated by AND gate genetic circuit under radiation and hypoxia for targeted cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Li, Rong; He, Rong; Wang, Xingyong; Yi, Qijian; Wang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Radio-activated gene therapy has been developed as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer; however, expression of therapeutic gene in peritumoral tissues will result in unacceptable toxicity to normal cells. To restrict gene expression in targeted tumor mass, we used hypoxia and radiation tolerance features of tumor cells to develop a synthetic AND gate genetic circuit through connecting radiation sensitivity promoter cArG6, heat shock response elements SNF1, HSF1 and HSE4 with retroviral vector plxsn. Their construction and dynamic activity process were identified through downstream enhanced green fluorescent protein and wtp53 expression in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and in a nude mice model. The result showed that AND gate genetic circuit could be activated by lower required radiation dose (6 Gy) and after activated, AND gate could induce significant apoptosis effects and growth inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The radiation- and hypoxia-activated AND gate genetic circuit, which could lead to more powerful target tumoricidal activity represented a promising strategy for both targeted and effective gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma and low dose activation character of the AND gate genetic circuit implied that this model could be further exploited to decrease side-effects of clinical radiation therapy. PMID:26177264

  12. Targeting macrophage activation for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections†

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Mark L.; Heim, Cortney E.; Angle, Amanda; Sanderson, Sam D.; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm infections often lead to significant morbidity due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotics. We have demonstrated that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms can evade macrophage antibacterial effector mechanisms by skewing macrophages towards an alternatively activated M2 phenotype. To overcome this immune evasion, we have utilized two complementary approaches. In the first, a proinflammatory milieu was elicited by local administration of classically-activated M1 macrophages and second, by treatment with the C5a receptor (CD88) agonist EP67, which invokes macrophage proinflammatory activity. Early administration of M1-activated macrophages or EP67 significantly attenuated biofilm formation in a mouse model of MRSA catheter-associated infection. Several proinflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in biofilm infected tissues from macrophage- and EP67-treated animals, revealing effective reprogramming of the biofilm environment to a proinflammatory milieu. A requirement for macrophage proinflammatory activity was demonstrated by the fact that transfer of MyD88-deficient macrophages had minimal impact on biofilm growth. Likewise, neutrophil administration had no effect on biofilm formation. Treatment of established biofilm infections with M1-activated macrophages also significantly reduced catheter-associated biofilm burdens compared to antibiotic treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate that targeting macrophage proinflammatory activity can overcome the local immune inhibitory environment created during biofilm infections and represents a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:23365077

  13. Targeting Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 as a promising strategy for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, Irene; Bagella, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins represent a global silencing system involved in development regulation. In specific, they regulate the transition from proliferation to differentiation, contributing to stem-cell maintenance and inhibiting an inappropriate activation of differentiation programs. Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2, which induces transcriptional inhibition through the tri-methylation of histone H3, an epigenetic change associated with gene silencing. EZH2 expression is high in precursor cells while its level decreases in differentiated cells. EZH2 is upregulated in various cancers with high levels associated with metastatic cancer and poor prognosis. Indeed, aberrant expression of EZH2 causes the inhibition of several tumor suppressors and differentiation genes, resulting in an uncontrolled proliferation and tumor formation. This editorial explores the role of Polycomb repressive complex 2 in cancer, focusing in particular on EZH2. The canonical function of EZH2 in gene silencing, the non-canonical activities as the methylation of other proteins and the role in gene transcriptional activation, were summarized. Moreover, mutations of EZH2, responsible for an increased methyltransferase activity in cancer, were recapitulated. Finally, various drugs able to inhibit EZH2 with different mechanism were described, specifically underscoring the effects in several cancers, in order to clarify the role of EZH2 and understand if EZH2 blockade could be a new strategy for developing specific therapies or a way to increase sensitivity of cancer cells to standard therapies. PMID:27081636

  14. Targeting notch pathway enhances rapamycin antitumor activity in pancreas cancers through PTEN phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreas cancer is one of most aggressive human cancers with the survival rate for patients with metastatic pancreas cancer at 5-6 months. The poor survival demonstrates a clear need for better target identification, drug development and new therapeutic strategies. Recent discoveries have shown that the role for Notch pathway is important in both development and cancer. Its contribution to oncogenesis also involves crosstalks with other growth factor pathways, such as Akt and its modulator, PTEN. The mounting evidence supporting a role for Notch in cancer promotion and survival suggests that targeting this pathway alone or in combination with other therapeutics represents a promising therapeutic strategy. Results Using a pancreas cancer tissue microarray, we noted that Jagged1, Notch3 and Notch4 are overexpressed in pancreas tumors (26%, 84% and 31% respectively), whereas Notch1 is expressed in blood vessels. While there was no correlation between Notch receptor expression and survival, stage or tumor grade, Notch3 was associated with Jagged1 and EGFR expression, suggesting a unique relationship between Notch3 and Jagged1. Inhibition of the Notch pathway genetically and with gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) resulted in tumor suppression and enhanced cell death. The observed anti-tumor activity appeared to be through Akt and modulation of PTEN phosphorylation. We discovered that transcriptional regulation of RhoA by Notch is important for PTEN phosphorylation. Finally, the mTOR inhibitor Rapamycin enhanced the effect of GSI on RhoA expression, resulting in down regulation of phospho-Akt and increased in vitro tumor cytotoxity. Conclusions Notch pathway plays an important role in maintaining pancreas tumor phenotype. Targeting this pathway represents a reasonable strategy for the treatment of pancreas cancers. Notch modulates the Akt pathway through regulation of PTEN phosphorylation, an observation that has not been made previously. Furthermore, we

  15. A PCR-free fluorescence strategy for detecting telomerase activity via double amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiafei; Cheng, Rui; Shi, Zhilu; Jin, Yan

    2016-01-15

    As a universal tumor biomarker, research on the activity and inhibition of telomerase is of great importance for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Although the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) has served as a powerful assay for detecting telomerase activity, its application has been significantly limited by amplification related errors and time-consuming procedure. To address the limitations of PCR-based protocol, a dual amplification fluorescence assay was developed for PCR-free detecting telomerase activity. Briefly, we designed an arch-structure DNA probe to specifically control strand displacement reaction and subsequent enzyme-aided amplification. Telomerase substrate (TS) primer was extended by telomerase to form long elongation products which contain several TTAGGG repeat units. So, one elongation product can release more than one trigger DNA (t-DNA) via strand displacement reaction to realize first amplification. Subsequently, t-DNA specifically opened molecular beacon (MB) to restore the fluorescence of MB. Meanwhile, t-DNA was recycled by the aid of nicking endonuclease to continuously open more and more MBs, leading to a second amplification. Owing to the double amplification strategy, the proposed method allowed the measurement of telomerase activity in crude cell extracts equivalent to 5 HeLa cells and 10 CCRF-CEM cells without PCR amplification. Besides, the influence of telomere-binding ligands on the telomerase activity demonstrated that the proposed method holds the potential to evaluate the inhibition efficiency of telomerase inhibitors. PMID:26299822

  16. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-sha; Li, Lan-ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  17. Combined strategies of apomorphine diester prodrugs and nanostructured lipid carriers for efficient brain targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Sung, K. C.; Ku, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2012-03-01

    Our aim is to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for loading the apomorphine diester prodrugs, diacetyl apomorphine (DAA) and diisobutyryl apomorphine (DIA), into the brain. NLCs were prepared using sesame oil/cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrices. Experiments were performed with the objective of evaluating the physicochemical characteristics, drug release, safety and brain-targeting efficacy of the NLCs. The size of regular NLCs (N-NLCs) was 214 nm. The addition of Forestall (FE) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the NLCs (P-NLCs) increased the particle diameter to 250 nm. The zeta potentials of N-NLCs and P-NLCs were respectively shown to be - 21 and 48 mV. Diester prodrugs were more lipophilic and more chemically stable than the parent apomorphine. The hydrolysis study indicated that the prodrugs underwent bioconversion in plasma and brain extract, with DAA exhibiting faster degradation than DIA. Sustained release was achieved through the synergistic effect of integrating strategies of prodrugs and NLCs, with the longer carbon chain showing the slower release (DIA < DAA). None of the NLCs tested here exhibited a toxicity problem according to the examination of neutrophil lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and hemolysis. Results of a bioimaging study in mice showed that P-NLCs largely accumulated in the brain. The distribution duration of the fluorescent dye in the brain region was also prolonged by the nanocarriers.

  18. Targeting MCM2 function as a novel strategy for the treatment of highly malignant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shinya; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kurata, Morito; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Highly malignant tumors express high levels of the minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) protein, which is associated with advanced tumor grade, advanced stage, and poor prognosis. In a previous study, we showed that Friend leukemia virus (FLV) envelope protein gp70 bound MCM2, impaired its nuclear translocation, and enhanced DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in FLV-infected hematopoietic cells when the cells expressed high levels of MCM2. Here, we show that MCM2 is highly expressed in clinical samples of invasive carcinoma of the breast, especially triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and in cancer stem cell (CSC) marker-positive breast cancer cells. To generate a cancer therapy model using gp70, we introduced the gp70 protein into the cytoplasm of murine breast cancer cells that express high levels of MCM2 by conjugating the protein transduction domain (PTD) of Hph-1 to gp70 (Hph- 1-gp70). Hph-1-gp70 was successfully transduced into the cytoplasm of breast cancer cells. The transduced protein enhanced the DNA damage-induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, an MCM2-targeted strategy using Hph-1-gp70 treatment to induce DNA damage might be a successful therapy for highly malignant breast cancers such as TNBC and for the eradication of CSC-like cells from breast cancer tissue. PMID:26430873

  19. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Sha; Li, Lan-Ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-Ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  20. Targeted Removal of Bioavailable Metal as a Detoxification Strategy for Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyuan; Guo, Lin; Morris, Daniel; Kane, Agnes B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for toxicity and/or carcinogenicity upon inhalation of pure transition metals in fine particulate form. Carbon nanotube catalyst residues may trigger similar metal-mediated toxicity, but only if the metal is bioavailable and not fully encapsulated within fluid-protective carbon shells. Recent studies have documented the presence of bioavailable iron and nickel in a variety of commercial as-produced and vendor “purified” nanotubes, and the present article examines techniques to avoid or remove this bioavailable metal. First, data are presented on the mechanisms potentially responsible for free metal in “purified” samples, including kinetic limitations during metal dissolution, the re-deposition or adsorption of metal on nanotube outer surfaces, and carbon shell damage during last-step oxidation or one-pot purification. Optimized acid treatment protocols are presented for targeting the free metal, considering the effects of acid strength, composition, time, and conditions for post-treatment water washing. Finally, after optimized acid treatment, it is shown that the remaining, non-bioavailable (encapsulated) metal persists in a stable and biologically unavailable form up to two months in an in vitro biopersistence assay, suggesting that simple removal of bioavailable (free) metal is a promising strategy for reducing nanotube health risks. PMID:19255622

  1. Targeting TCTP as a New Therapeutic Strategy in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baylot, Virginie; Katsogiannou, Maria; Andrieu, Claudia; Taieb, David; Acunzo, Julie; Giusiano, Sophie; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Garrido, Carmen; Rocchi, Palma

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is highly overexpressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and an antisense inhibitor (OGX-427) is currently in phase II clinical trials. In order to understand mechanisms of action of Hsp27 and find new therapeutic targets specific of CRPC, we screened for Hsp27 client proteins. Here, we report that translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a new Hsp27 client protein involved in Hsp27 cytoprotection. We found that TCTP expression is absent or weak in normal prostate cells, moderately expressed in 18.5% of treatment naive PC, and becomes uniformly and strongly expressed in 75% of CRPC. To define TCTP function, we developed and worldwide patented a TCTP antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Interestingly, we found that CRPC progression correlates with TCTP overexpression and loss of P53. TCTP knockdown restored P53 expression and function, suggesting that castration-sensitivity is directly linked to P53 expression. Collectively, these findings provide a new Hsp27 cytoprotection mechanism in CRPC, and preclinical proof-of-concept that combining ASO-mediated TCTP knockdown with castration and/or docetaxel therapy could serve as a novel strategy to treat CRPC, with no or little toxicity for normal prostate cells. PMID:22893039

  2. Active control strategy on a catenary-pantograph validated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Rebollo, C.; Jimenez-Octavio, J. R.; Carnicero, A.

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic simulation methods have become essential in the design process and control of the catenary-pantograph system, overall since high-speed trains and interoperability criteria are getting very trendy. This paper presents an original hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) strategy aimed at integrating a multicriteria active control within the catenary-pantograph dynamic interaction. The relevance of HIL control systems applied in the frame of the pantograph is undoubtedly increasing due to the recent and more demanding requirements for high-speed railway systems. Since the loss of contact between the catenary and the pantograph leads to arcing and electrical wear, and too high contact forces cause mechanical wear of both the catenary wires and the strips of the pantograph, not only prescribed but also economic and performance criteria ratify such a relevance. Different configurations of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller are proposed and applied to two different plant systems. Since this paper is mainly focused on the control strategy, both plant systems are simulation models though the methodology is suitable for a laboratory bench. The strategy of control involves a multicriteria optimisation of the contact force and the consumption of the energy supplied by the control force, a genetic algorithm has been applied for this purpose. Thus, the PID controller is fitted according to these conflicting objectives and tested within a nonlinear lumped model and a nonlinear finite element model, being the last one validated against the European Standard EN 50318. Finally, certain tests have been accomplished in order to analyse the robustness of the control strategy. Particularly, the relevance or the plant simulation, the running speed and the instrumentation time delay are studied in this paper.

  3. Targeted recruitment of adults with type 2 diabetes for a physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Niles, Barbara L; Mori, DeAnna L

    2015-05-01

    Recruiting sufficient numbers of participants for physical activity trials for individuals with diabetes can be difficult because there are often many behavioral demands for participants, and inclusion and exclusion criteria can be extensive. This study examined the recruitment strategies used for a randomized, controlled trial designed to investigate the efficacy of an automated telephone intervention to promote physical activity in adults with type 2 diabetes in an urban Veterans Administration health care system. Traditional recruitment approaches of posting flyers and obtaining referrals from clinicians did not yield sufficient numbers of interested patients. Using the electronic medical record system to identify patients with uncontrolled diabetes allowed staff to send targeted mailings to participants, and 77% of participants were recruited using this method. The targeted mailing approach elicited a positive response rate of 12% (328 of 2,764 potential participants identified) and appeared to produce a more representative and appropriate sample than other recruitment methods used. Lessons learned in this study may be helpful to researchers in future trials who attempt to recruit participants with diabetes for physical activity protocols. PMID:25987808

  4. A National Strategy for Promoting Physical Activity in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Ruth; Owen, Neville; Eakin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic disease in Oman is a public health challenge. Available evidence in Oman on physical inactivity, the fourth leading risk factor for chronic disease, calls for urgent action to reduce physical inactivity as part of a key strategy to address chronic disease in Oman. The public health implications of this evidence for Oman are considered in light of recommendations outlined in the Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. The charter provides a systematic approach of physical activity and outlines an action plan that could be adapted to the Omani context. Urgent intersectoral action focusing on a shared goal and a more deliberate public health response addressing physical inactivity is required. Further research is needed on the determinants of physical inactivity and culturally appropriate interventions in order to guide future public health actions. PMID:24790738

  5. Bi-objective optimization of a multiple-target active debris removal mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérend, Nicolas; Olive, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of space debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) raises the question of future Active Debris Removal (ADR) operations. Typical ADR scenarios rely on an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) using one of the two following disposal strategies: the first one consists in attaching a deorbiting kit, such as a solid rocket booster, to the debris after rendezvous; with the second one, the OTV captures the debris and moves it to a low-perigee disposal orbit. For multiple-target ADR scenarios, the design of such a mission is very complex, as it involves two optimization levels: one for the space debris sequence, and a second one for the "elementary" orbit transfer strategy from a released debris to the next one in the sequence. This problem can be seen as a Time-Dependant Traveling Salesman Problem (TDTSP) with two objective functions to minimize: the total mission duration and the total propellant consumption. In order to efficiently solve this problem, ONERA has designed, under CNES contract, TOPAS (Tool for Optimal Planning of ADR Sequence), a tool that implements a Branch & Bound method developed in previous work together with a dedicated algorithm for optimizing the "elementary" orbit transfer. A single run of this tool yields an estimation of the Pareto front of the problem, which exhibits the trade-off between mission duration and propellant consumption. We first detail our solution to cope with the combinatorial explosion of complex ADR scenarios with 10 debris. The key point of this approach is to define the orbit transfer strategy through a small set of parameters, allowing an acceptable compromise between the quality of the optimum solution and the calculation cost. Then we present optimization results obtained for various 10 debris removal scenarios involving a 15-ton OTV, using either the deorbiting kit or the disposal orbit strategy. We show that the advantage of one strategy upon the other depends on the propellant margin, the maximum duration allowed

  6. What might work? Exploring the perceived feasibility of strategies to promote physical activity among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Verity; Ball, Kylie

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate preferences for, perceived feasibility of and barriers to uptake of hypothetical physical activity promotion strategies among women from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 purposively recruited women (18-45 years) living in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia. Participants indicated the most and least appealing of nine hypothetical strategies, strategies most likely to use and strategies most likely to increase physical activity. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic and interpretive content analyses were used to identify emergent common and contrasting themes. A community centre-based program with free childcare, the provision of a cleaner while physical activity is undertaken and a neighbourhood-based program were the three most popular strategies. Mobile-telephone-delivered text messages, an online interactive diary and subsidized gym memberships were considered least useful. Irrespective of the strategy, components of importance commonly identified were social support; being accountable to someone; having the option of a structured or flexible attendance design; integration of multiple strategies and financial considerations. Issues around trust and privacy and weight loss also emerged as important. The findings provide important insights for the development of physical activity programs targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged women. PMID:22987863

  7. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  8. Children's Age-Related Speed--Accuracy Strategies in Intercepting Moving Targets in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg-Cunningham, Alek; Newell, Karl M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the age-related speed--accuracy strategies of children, adolescents, and adults in performing a rapid striking task that allowed the self-selection of the interception position in a virtual, two-dimensional environment. Method: The moving target had curvilinear trajectories that were determined by combinations of…

  9. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid. PMID:22869926

  10. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  11. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21st century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:26259964

  12. MET-targeted therapy for gastric cancer: the importance of a biomarker-based strategy.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hisato; Okamoto, Isamu

    2016-07-01

    The MET protooncogene encodes the receptor tyrosine kinase c-MET (MET). Aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced malignancies, including gastric cancer, and promotes tumor cell growth, survival, migration, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis, suggesting its potential importance as a therapeutic target. MET can be activated by two distinct pathways that are dependent on or independent of its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), with the latter pathway having been attributed mostly to MET amplification in gastric cancer. Preclinical evidence has suggested that interruption of the HGF-MET axis either with antibodies to HGF or with MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has antitumor effects in gastric cancer cells. Overexpression of MET occurs frequently in gastric cancer and has been proposed as a potential predictive biomarker for anti-MET therapy. However, several factors can trigger such MET upregulation in a manner independent of HGF, suggesting that gastric tumors with MET overexpression are not necessarily MET driven. On the other hand, gastric cancer cells with MET amplification are dependent on MET signaling for their survival and are thus vulnerable to MET TKI treatment. Given the low prevalence of MET amplification in gastric cancer (approximately 8 %), testing for this genetic change would substantially narrow the target population but it might constitute a better biomarker than MET overexpression for MET TKI therapy. We compare aberrant MET signaling dependent on the HGF-MET axis or on MET amplification as well as address clinical issues and challenges associated with the identification of appropriate biomarkers for MET-driven tumors. PMID:26690587

  13. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activity targets and are expressed as a percentage of total revenue. The targets call for an increase in... obtain non-8(a) revenues. (e) Waiver of sole source prohibition. (1) The AA/BD, or his or her designee... activity targets? 124.509 Section 124.509 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION...

  14. Efficient strategy for the molecular diagnosis of intellectual disability using targeted high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Redin, Claire; Gérard, Bénédicte; Lauer, Julia; Herenger, Yvan; Muller, Jean; Quartier, Angélique; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Willems, Marjolaine; Lesca, Gaétan; El-Chehadeh, Salima; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Vicaire, Serge; Philipps, Muriel; Dumas, Michaël; Geoffroy, Véronique; Feger, Claire; Haumesser, Nicolas; Alembik, Yves; Barth, Magalie; Bonneau, Dominique; Colin, Estelle; Dollfus, Hélène; Doray, Bérénice; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Flori, Elisabeth; Fradin, Mélanie; Francannet, Christine; Goldenberg, Alice; Lumbroso, Serge; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Lacombe, Didier; Morin, Gilles; Polge, Anne; Sukno, Sylvie; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Thevenon, Julien; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Genevieve, David; Sarda, Pierre; Edery, Patrick; Isidor, Bertrand; Jost, Bernard; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Piton, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) is characterised by an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Several hundred genes have been associated to monogenic forms of ID, considerably complicating molecular diagnostics. Trio-exome sequencing was recently proposed as a diagnostic approach, yet remains costly for a general implementation. Methods We report the alternative strategy of targeted high-throughput sequencing of 217 genes in which mutations had been reported in patients with ID or autism as the major clinical concern. We analysed 106 patients with ID of unknown aetiology following array-CGH analysis and other genetic investigations. Ninety per cent of these patients were males, and 75% sporadic cases. Results We identified 26 causative mutations: 16 in X-linked genes (ATRX, CUL4B, DMD, FMR1, HCFC1, IL1RAPL1, IQSEC2, KDM5C, MAOA, MECP2, SLC9A6, SLC16A2, PHF8) and 10 de novo in autosomal-dominant genes (DYRK1A, GRIN1, MED13L, TCF4, RAI1, SHANK3, SLC2A1, SYNGAP1). We also detected four possibly causative mutations (eg, in NLGN3) requiring further investigations. We present detailed reasoning for assigning causality for each mutation, and associated patients’ clinical information. Some genes were hit more than once in our cohort, suggesting they correspond to more frequent ID-associated conditions (KDM5C, MECP2, DYRK1A, TCF4). We highlight some unexpected genotype to phenotype correlations, with causative mutations being identified in genes associated to defined syndromes in patients deviating from the classic phenotype (DMD, TCF4, MECP2). We also bring additional supportive (HCFC1, MED13L) or unsupportive (SHROOM4, SRPX2) evidences for the implication of previous candidate genes or mutations in cognitive disorders. Conclusions With a diagnostic yield of 25% targeted sequencing appears relevant as a first intention test for the diagnosis of ID, but importantly will also contribute to a better understanding regarding the specific contribution of the many genes

  15. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  16. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  17. A novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to reduce the non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Sugeun; Ma, Xuehua; Li, Zihou; Tan, Mingqian; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-11-01

    One big challenge with active targeting of nanocarriers is non-specific binding between targeting molecules and non-target moieties expressed on non-cancerous cells, which leads to non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells. Here, we propose a novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to hide or expose the targeting molecules of nanocarriers on-demand. The non-specific uptake by non-cancerous cells can be reduced because the targeting molecules are hidden in hydrophilic polymers. The nanocarriers are still actively targetable to cancer cells because the targeting molecules can be exposed on-demand at tumor regions. Typically, Fe3O4 nanocrystals (FN) as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were encapsulated into albumin nanoparticles (AN), and then folic acid (FA) and pH-sensitive polymers (PP) were grafted onto the surface of AN-FN to construct PP-FA-AN-FN nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results confirm successful construction of PP-FA-AN-FN. According to difference of nanoparticle-cellular uptake between pH 7.4 and 5.5, the weight ratio of conjugated PP to nanoparticle FA-AN-FN (i.e. graft density) and the molecular weight of PP (i.e. graft length) are optimized to be 1.32 and 5.7 kDa, respectively. In vitro studies confirm that the PP can hide ligand FA to prevent it from binding to cells with FRα at pH 7.4 and shrink to expose FA at pH 5.5. In vivo studies demonstrate that our Trojan-horse targeting strategy can reduce the non-specific uptake of the PP-FA-AN-FN by non-cancerous cells. Therefore, our PP-FA-AN-FN might be used as an accurately targeted MRI contrast agent. PMID:26295434

  18. Targeting the proteolytic processing of the viral glycoprotein precursor is a promising novel antiviral strategy against arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rojek, Jillian M; Pasqual, Giulia; Sanchez, Ana B; Nguyen, Ngoc-Thao; de la Torre, Juan-Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    A crucial step in the arenavirus life cycle is the biosynthesis of the viral envelope glycoprotein (GP) responsible for virus attachment and entry. Processing of the GP precursor (GPC) by the cellular proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P), also known as subtilisin-kexin-isozyme 1 (SKI-1), is crucial for cell-to-cell propagation of infection and production of infectious virus. Here, we sought to evaluate arenavirus GPC processing by S1P as a target for antiviral therapy using a recently developed peptide-based S1P inhibitor, decanoyl (dec)-RRLL-chloromethylketone (CMK), and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). To control for off-target effects of dec-RRLL-CMK, we employed arenavirus reverse genetics to introduce a furin recognition site into the GPC of LCMV. The rescued mutant virus grew to normal titers, and the processing of its GPC critically depended on cellular furin, but not S1P. Treatment with the S1P inhibitor dec-RRLL-CMK resulted in specific blocking of viral spread and virus production of LCMV. Combination of the protease inhibitor with ribavirin, currently used clinically for treatment of human arenavirus infections, resulted in additive drug effects. In cells deficient in S1P, the furin-dependent LCMV variant established persistent infection, whereas wild-type LCMV underwent extinction without the emergence of S1P-independent escape variants. Together, the potent antiviral activity of an inhibitor of S1P-dependent GPC cleavage, the additive antiviral effect with ribavirin, and the low probability of emergence of S1P-independent viral escape variants make S1P-mediated GPC processing by peptide-derived inhibitors a promising strategy for the development of novel antiarenaviral drugs. PMID:19846507

  19. Targeting the cell cycle and the PI3K pathway: a possible universal strategy to reactivate innate tumor suppressor programmes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    David-Pfeuty, Thérèse; Legraverend, Michel; Ludwig, Odile; Grierson, David S

    2010-04-01

    Corruption of the Rb and p53 pathways occurs in virtually all human cancers. This could be because it lends oncogene-bearing cells a surfeit of Cdk activity and growth, enabling them to elaborate strategies to evade tumor-suppressive mechanisms and divide inappropriately. Targeting both Cdk activities and the PI3K pathway might be therefore a potentially universal means to palliate their deficiency in cancer cells. We showed that the killing efficacy of roscovitine and 16 other purines and potentiation of roscovitine-induced apoptosis by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, decreased with increasing corruption of the Rb and p53 pathways. Further, we showed that purines differing by a single substitution, which exerted little lethal effect on distant cell types in rich medium, could display widely-differing cytotoxicity profiles toward the same cell types in poor medium. Thus, closely-related compounds targeting similar Cdks may interact with different targets that could compete for their interaction with therapeutically-relevant Cdk targets. In the perspective of clinical development in association with the PI3K pathway inhibitors, it might thus be advisable to select tumor cell type-specific Cdk inhibitors on the basis of their toxicity in cell-culture-based assays performed at a limiting serum concentration sufficient to suppress their interaction with undesirable crossreacting targets whose range and concentration would depend on the cell genotype. PMID:20198331

  20. Engineering of plasminogen activators for targeting to thrombus and heightening thrombolytic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Absar, S; Gupta, N; Nahar, K; Ahsan, F

    2015-09-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the coronary artery, which triggers acute myocardial infarction, is one of the major causes of death in the USA. Currently, arterial occlusions are treated with intravenous plasminogen activators (PAs), which dissolve the clot by activating plasminogen. However, PAs indiscriminately generate plasmin, which depletes critical clotting factors (fibrinogen, factor V, and factor VIII), precipitates a lytic state in the blood, and produces bleeding complications in a large patient population. PAs have been extensively investigated to achieve thrombus specificity, to attenuate the bleeding risk, and to widen their clinical applications. In this review, we discuss various strategies that have been pursued since the beginning of thrombolytic therapy. We review the biotechnological approaches that have been used to develop mutant and chimeric PAs for thrombus selectivity, including the use of specific antibodies for targeting thrombi. We discuss particulate carrier-based systems and triggered-release concepts. We propose new hypotheses and strategies to spur future studies in this research arena. Overall, we describe the approaches and accomplishments in the development of patient-friendly and workable delivery systems for thrombolytic drugs. PMID:26074048

  1. 78 FR 35612 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... collection of information from Chief State School Officers to support and document the request for teacher... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas Nationwide... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Targeted Teacher...

  2. Emerging gene editing strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy targeting stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The progressive loss of muscle mass characteristic of many muscular dystrophies impairs the efficacy of most of the gene and molecular therapies currently being pursued for the treatment of those disorders. It is becoming increasingly evident that a therapeutic application, to be effective, needs to target not only mature myofibers, but also muscle progenitors cells or muscle stem cells able to form new muscle tissue and to restore myofibers lost as the result of the diseases or during normal homeostasis so as to guarantee effective and lost lasting effects. Correction of the genetic defect using oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) or engineered nucleases holds great potential for the treatment of many of the musculoskeletal disorders. The encouraging results obtained by studying in vitro systems and model organisms have set the groundwork for what is likely to become an emerging field in the area of molecular and regenerative medicine. Furthermore, the ability to isolate and expand from patients various types of muscle progenitor cells capable of committing to the myogenic lineage provides the opportunity to establish cell lines that can be used for transplantation following ex vivo manipulation and expansion. The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on approaches aimed at correcting the genetic defect using gene editing strategies and currently under development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most sever of the neuromuscular disorders. Emphasis will be placed on describing the potential of using the patient own stem cell as source of transplantation and the challenges that gene editing technologies face in the field of regenerative biology. PMID:24795643

  3. Targeting inflammation as a therapeutic strategy for drug-resistant epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero; Mahmood, Fahad; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Falsaperla, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of literature data suggests that inflammation, and in particular neuroinflammation, is involved in the pathophysiology of particular forms of epilepsy and convulsive disorders. Animal models have been used to identify inflammatory triggers in epileptogenesis and inflammation has recently been shown to enhance seizures. For example, pharmacological blockade of the IL-1beta/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis during epileptogenesis has been demonstrated to provide neuroprotection in temporal lobe epilepsy. Furthermore, experimental models have suggested that neural damage and the onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures are modulated via complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity. However, it has also been suggested that inflammation can occur as a result of epilepsy, since animal models have also shown that seizure activity can induce neuroinflammation, and that recurrent seizures maintain chronic inflammation, thereby perpetuating seizures. On the basis of these observations, it has been suggested that immune-mediated therapeutic strategies may be beneficial for treating some drug resistant epilepsies with an underlying demonstrable inflammatory process. Although the potential mechanisms of immunotherapeutic strategies in drug-resistant seizures have been extensively discussed, evidence on the efficacy of such therapy is limited. However, recent research efforts have been directed toward utilizing the potential therapeutic benefits of anti-inflammatory agents in neurological disease and these are now considered prime candidates in the ongoing search for novel anti-epileptic drugs. The objective of our review is to highlight the immunological features of the pathogenesis of seizures and to analyze possible immunotherapeutic approaches for drug resistant epilepsies that can alter the immune-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:24609096

  4. Targeting Large Kinase Active Site with Rigid, Bulky Octahedral Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska, Jasna; Feng, Li; Harms, Klaus; Yi, Chunling; Kissil, Joseph; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meggers, Eric

    2009-09-02

    A strategy for targeting protein kinases with large ATP-binding sites by using bulky and rigid octahedral ruthenium complexes as structural scaffolds is presented. A highly potent and selective GSK3 and Pim1 half-sandwich complex NP309 was successfully converted into a PAK1 inhibitor by making use of the large octahedral compounds {Lambda}-FL172 and {Lambda}-FL411 in which the cyclopentadienyl moiety of NP309 is replaced by a chloride and sterically demanding diimine ligands. A 1.65 {angstrom}cocrystal structure of PAK1 with {Lambda}-FL172 reveals how the large coordination sphere of the ruthenium complex matches the size of the active site and serves as a yardstick to discriminate between otherwise closely related binding sites.

  5. An active control strategy for achieving weak radiator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, K. . Acoustics and Radar Technology Lab.); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration)

    1994-01-01

    A general control strategy is presented for active suppression of total radiated sound power from harmonically excited structures based on the measurement of their response. Using the measured response of the structure together with knowledge of its structural mobility, and equivalent primary excitation force is found at discrete points along the structure. Using this equivalent primary force and performing a quadratic optimization of the power radiated form the structure, a set of control forces is found at selected points on the structure that results in minimum radiated sound power. A numerical example of this strategy is presented for a simply supported beam in a rigid baffle excited by a harmonic plane wave incident at an oblique angle. A comparison of the response of the beam with and without control forces shows a large reduction in the controlled response displacement magnitude. In addition, as the result of the action of the control forces, the magnitude of the wave number spectrum of the beam's response in the supersonic region is decreased substantially. The effect of the number and location of the actuators on reductions in sound power level is also studied. The actuators located at the anti-nodes of structural modes within the supersonic region together with those located near boundaries are found to be the most effective in controlling the radiation of sound from a structure.

  6. Multimodality PET/MRI agents targeted to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuqiao; Ng, Thomas S C; Jacobs, Russell E; Louie, Angelique Y

    2014-02-01

    The recent emergence of multimodality imaging, particularly the combination of PET and MRI, has led to excitement over the prospect of improving detection of disease. Iron oxide nanoparticles have become a popular platform for the fabrication of PET/MRI probes owing to their advantages of high MRI detection sensitivity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In this article, we report the synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIO) labeled with the positron emitter (64)Cu to generate a PET/MRI probe, and modified with maleic anhydride to increase the negative surface charge. The modified nanoparticulate PET/MRI probe (MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA) bears repetitive anionic charges on the surface that facilitate recognition by scavenger receptor type A (SR-A), a ligand receptor found on activated macrophages but not on normal vessel walls. MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA has an average iron oxide core size of 7-8 nm, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 62.7 nm, an r1 relaxivity of 16.8 mM(-1) s(-1), and an r 2 relaxivity of 83.9 mM(-1) s(-1) (37 °C, 1.4 T). Cell studies confirmed that the probe was nontoxic and was specifically taken up by macrophages via SR-A. In comparison with the nonmodified analog, the accumulation of MDIO in macrophages was substantially improved. These characteristics demonstrate the promise of MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA for identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques via the targeting of macrophages. PMID:24166283

  7. Selective targeting of TGF-β activation to treat fibroinflammatory airway disease.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J; Erle, David J; Reichardt, Louis F; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2014-06-18

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  8. Selective Targeting of TGF-β Activation to Treat Fibroinflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I.; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J.; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J.; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J.; Erle, David J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  9. Magnetoresponsive squalenoyl gemcitabine composite nanoparticles for cancer active targeting.

    PubMed

    Arias, José L; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Couvreur, Patrick

    2008-07-15

    heterogeneous structure of these nanoparticles could confer them both magnetic field responsiveness and potential applicability as a drug carrier for active targeting to solid tumors. PMID:18540685

  10. Premature Activation of the Paramyxovirus Fusion Protein before Target Cell Attachment with Corruption of the Viral Fusion Machinery*

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Palermo, Laura M.; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents. PMID:21799008

  11. Utilizing the folate receptor for active targeting of cancer nanotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zwicke, Grant L.; Mansoori, G. Ali; Jeffery, Constance J.

    2012-01-01

    The development of specialized nanoparticles for use in the detection and treatment of cancer is increasing. Methods are being proposed and tested that could target treatments more directly to cancer cells, which could lead to higher efficacy and reduced toxicity, possibly even eliminating the adverse effects of damage to the immune system and the loss of quick replicating cells. In this mini-review we focus on recent studies that employ folate nanoconjugates to target the folate receptor. Folate receptors are highly overexpressed on the surface of many tumor types. This expression can be exploited to target imaging molecules and therapeutic compounds directly to cancerous tissues. PMID:23240070

  12. Target Assembly to Check Boresight Alignment of Active Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Riris, Haris; Cavanaugh, John; Liiva, Peter; Rodriguez, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A compact and portable target assembly (Fig. 1) has been developed to measure the boresite alignment of LRO's Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument at the spacecraft level. The concept for this target assembly has evolved over many years with earlier versions used to test the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA), the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) space-based instruments.

  13. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  14. Targeting glutaminolysis has antileukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia and synergizes with BCL-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Nathalie; Ronchetti, Anne Marie; Larrue, Clément; Meunier, Godelieve; Birsen, Rudy; Willems, Lise; Saland, Estelle; Decroocq, Justine; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Lambert, Mireille; Poulain, Laury; Hospital, Marie Anne; Sujobert, Pierre; Joseph, Laure; Chapuis, Nicolas; Lacombe, Catherine; Moura, Ivan Cruz; Demo, Susan; Sarry, Jean Emmanuel; Recher, Christian; Mayeux, Patrick; Tamburini, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells require glutamine to adapt to increased biosynthetic activity. The limiting step in intracellular glutamine catabolism involves its conversion to glutamate by glutaminase (GA). Different GA isoforms are encoded by the genes GLS1 and GLS2 in humans. Herein, we show that glutamine levels control mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Glutaminase C (GAC) is the GA isoform that is most abundantly expressed in AML. Both knockdown of GLS1 expression and pharmacologic GLS1 inhibition by the drug CB-839 can reduce OXPHOS, leading to leukemic cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis without causing cytotoxic activity against normal human CD34+ progenitors. Strikingly, GLS1 knockdown dramatically inhibited AML development in NSG mice. The antileukemic activity of CB-839 was abrogated by both the expression of a hyperactive GACK320A allele and the addition of the tricarboxyclic acid cycle product α-ketoglutarate, indicating the critical function of GLS1 in AML cell survival. Finally, glutaminolysis inhibition activated mitochondrial apoptosis and synergistically sensitized leukemic cells to priming with the BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199. These findings show that targeting glutamine addiction via GLS1 inhibition offers a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26186940

  15. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  16. The novel strategy of glucocorticoid drug development via targeting nongenomic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Lei; Liu, Lei; Li, Zhen; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used in clinical practice as potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Unfortunately, they can also produce numerous and potentially serious side effects that limit their usage. This problem represents the driving force for the intensive search for novel GCs with a better benefit-risk ratio compared to conventional GCs. GCs are believed to take effects mainly through classical genomic mechanisms, which are also largely responsible for GCs' side effects. However, in addition to these genomic effects, GCs also demonstrate rapid genomic-independent activities. It has become increasingly evident that some of the anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, anti-allergic and anti-shock effects of GCs could be mediated through nongenomic mechanisms. Thus, theoretically, trying to use nongenomic mechanisms of GCs more intensively may represent a novel strategy for development of GCs with low side effect profile. The new GCs' drugs will take clinical effects mainly via nongenomic mechanisms and do not execute the classical genomic mechanism to reduce side effects. PMID:26122209

  17. Targeting survivin with YM155 (Sepantronium Bromide): a novel therapeutic strategy for paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda M; Little, Erica B; Zivanovic, Andjelija; Hong, Priscilla; Liu, Alfred K S; Burow, Rachel; Stinson, Caedyn; Hallahan, Andrew R; Moore, Andrew S

    2015-04-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy, approximately one-third of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) relapse. More effective treatments are urgently needed. Survivin is an inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein with key roles in regulating cell division, proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, high expression of Survivin has been associated with poor clinical outcome in AML. The survivin suppressant YM155 (Sepantronium Bromide) has pre-clinical activity against a range of solid cancers and leukemias, although data in AML is limited. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive pre-clinical evaluation of YM155 in paediatric AML. YM155 potently inhibited cell viability in a diverse panel of AML cell lines. All paediatric cell lines were particularly sensitive, with a median IC50 of 0.038 μM. Cell cycle analyses demonstrated concentration-dependent increases in a sub-G1 population with YM155 treatment, suggestive of apoptosis that was subsequently confirmed by an increase in annexin-V positivity. YM155-mediated apoptosis was confirmed across a panel of 8 diagnostic bone marrow samples from children with AML. Consistent with the proposed mechanism of action, YM155 treatment was associated with down-regulation of survivin mRNA and protein expression and induction of DNA damage. These data suggest that YM155-mediated inhibition of survivin is a potentially beneficial therapeutic strategy for AML, particularly paediatric disease, and warrants further evaluation. PMID:25659731

  18. Targeting an antimicrobial effector function in insect immunity as a pest control strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, Mark S.; Bachelet, Ido; Raman, Rahul; Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-01-01

    Insect pests such as termites cause damages to crops and man-made structures estimated at over $30 billion per year, imposing a global challenge for the human economy. Here, we report a strategy for compromising insect immunity that might lead to the development of nontoxic, sustainable pest control methods. Gram-negative bacteria binding proteins (GNBPs) are critical for sensing pathogenic infection and triggering effector responses. We report that termite GNBP-2 (tGNBP-2) shows β(1,3)-glucanase effector activity previously unknown in animal immunity and is a pleiotropic pattern recognition receptor and an antimicrobial effector protein. Termites incorporate this protein into the nest building material, where it functions as a nest-embedded sensor that cleaves and releases pathogenic components, priming termites for improved antimicrobial defense. By means of rational design, we present an inexpensive, nontoxic small molecule glycomimetic that blocks tGNBP-2, thus exposing termites in vivo to accelerated infection and death from specific and opportunistic pathogens. Such a molecule, introduced into building materials and agricultural methods, could protect valuable assets from insect pests. PMID:19506247

  19. The grain of spatially referenced economic cost and biodiversity benefit data and the effectiveness of a cost targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Sutton, N J; Armsworth, P R

    2014-12-01

    Facing tight resource constraints, conservation organizations must allocate funds available for habitat protection as effectively as possible. Often, they combine spatially referenced economic and biodiversity data to prioritize land for protection. We tested how sensitive these prioritizations could be to differences in the spatial grain of these data by demonstrating how the conclusion of a classic debate in conservation planning between cost and benefit targeting was altered based on the available information. As a case study, we determined parcel-level acquisition costs and biodiversity benefits of land transactions recently undertaken by a nonprofit conservation organization that seeks to protect forests in the eastern United States. Then, we used hypothetical conservation plans to simulate the types of ex ante priorities that an organization could use to prioritize areas for protection. We found the apparent effectiveness of cost and benefit targeting depended on the spatial grain of the data used when prioritizing parcels based on local species richness. However, when accounting for complementarity, benefit targeting consistently was more efficient than a cost targeting strategy regardless of the spatial grain of the data involved. More pertinently for other studies, we found that combining data collected over different spatial grains inflated the apparent effectiveness of a cost targeting strategy and led to overestimation of the efficiency gain offered by adopting a more integrative return-on-investment approach. PMID:25381868

  20. Effective, Active Learning Strategies for the Oceanography Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmochowski, J. E.; Marinov, I.

    2014-12-01

    A decline in enrollment in STEM fields at the university level has prompted extensive research on alternative ways of teaching and learning science. Inquiry-based learning as well as the related "flipped" or "active" lectures, and similar teaching methods and philosophies have been proposed as more effective ways to disseminate knowledge in science classes than the traditional lecture. We will provide a synopsis of our experiences in implementing some of these practices into our Introductory Oceanography, Global Climate Change, and Ocean Atmosphere Dynamics undergraduate courses at the University of Pennsylvania, with both smaller and larger enrollments. By implementing tools such as at-home modules; computer labs; incorporation of current research; pre- and post-lecture quizzes; reflective, qualitative writing assignments; peer review; and a variety of in-class learning strategies, we aim to increase the science literacy of the student population and help students gain a more comprehensive knowledge of the topic, enhance their critical thinking skills, and correct misconceptions. While implementing these teaching techniques with college students is not without complications, we argue that a blended class that flexibly and creatively accounts for class size and science level improves the learning experience and the acquired knowledge. We will present examples of student assignments and activities as well as describe the lessons we have learned, and propose ideas for moving forward to best utilize innovative teaching tools in order to increase science literacy in oceanography and other climate-related courses.

  1. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  2. [Flipped classroom as a strategy to enhance active learning].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews the introduction of a flipped class for fourth grade dentistry students, and analyzes the characteristics of the learning method. In fiscal 2013 and 2014, a series of ten three-hour units for removable partial prosthodontics were completed with the flipped class method; a lecture video of approximately 60 minutes was made by the teacher (author) and uploaded to the university's e-learning website one week before each class. Students were instructed to prepare for the class by watching the streaming video on their PC, tablet, or smartphone. In the flipped class, students were not given a lecture, but were asked to solve short questions displayed on screen, to make a short presentation about a part of the video lecture, and to discuss a critical question related to the main subject of the day. An additional team-based learning (TBL) session with individual and group answers was implemented. The average individual scores were considerably higher in the last two years, when the flipped method was implemented, than in the three previous years when conventional lectures were used. The following learning concepts were discussed: the role of the flipped method as an active learning strategy, the efficacy of lecture videos and short questions, students' participation in the class discussion, present-day value of the method, cooperation with TBL, the significance of active learning in relation with the students' learning ability, and the potential increase in the preparation time and workload for students. PMID:26043555

  3. Canadian Network for International Surgery: development activities and strategies.

    PubMed

    Lett, R

    2000-10-01

    The Canadian Network for International Surgery (CNIS) is a surgical development and research organization, whose objective is to reduce death and disability from surgical disorders in low income countries. The organization has 4 main activities: (1) the Essential Surgical Skills (ESS) program teaches surgery to general practitioners and is predicated on the assumption that there will not be enough surgeons in Africa in the foreseeable future and therefore nonsurgeons must do surgery; (2) the injury control program, which is predicated on the conclusion that the incidence of injury in Africa is unacceptably high, therefore injury prevention is an imperative surgical strategy; (3) the library project, which sends new and recent books and journals to the surgical libraries of our African partners; and (4) the members' projects, which encourage individual or organization members to use their own creativity in meeting CNIS objectives. The CNIS has direct activity in 4 African countries and presents its project check list as a means to help others succeed. Canadian surgical and allied specialists can help in the reduction of needless suffering by supporting the CNIS. PMID:11045098

  4. Targeting SphK1 as a New Strategy against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Takabe, Kazuaki; Kapitonov, Dmitri; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites have emerged as critical players in a number of fundamental biological processes. Among them, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes cell survival and proliferation, in contrast to ceramide and sphingosine, which induce cell growth arrest and apoptosis. These sphingolipids with opposing functions are interconvertible inside cells, suggesting that a finely tuned balance between them can determine cell fate. Sphingosine kinases (SphKs), which catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to S1P, are critical regulators of this balance. Of the two identified SphKs, sphingosine kinase type 1 (SphK1) has been shown to regulate various processes important for cancer progression and will be the focus of this review, since much less is known of biological functions of SphK2, especially in cancer. SphK1 is overexpressed in various types of cancers and upregulation of SphK1 has been associated with tumor angiogenesis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Many growth factors, through their tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), stimulate SphK1 leading to a rapid increase in S1P. This S1P in turn can activate S1P receptors and their downstream signaling. Conversely, activation of S1P receptors can induce transactivation of various RTKs. Thus, SphK1 may play important roles in S1P receptor RTK amplification loops. Here we review the role of SphK1 in tumorigenesis, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy resistance, and as a prognostic marker. We will also review studies on the effects of SphK inhibitors in cells in vitro and in animals in vivo and in some clinical trials and highlight the potential of SphK1 as a new target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:18691013

  5. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available. PMID:25931211

  6. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  7. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Sung Won; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:26006249

  8. Mutation testing for directing upfront targeted therapy and post-progression combination therapy strategies in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Advances in the biology of non-small-cell lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, reveal multiple molecular subtypes driving oncogenesis. Accordingly, individualized targeted therapeutics are based on mutational diagnostics. Areas covered: Advances in strategies and techniques for individualized treatment, particularly of adenocarcinoma, are described through literature review. Approved therapies are established for some molecular subsets, with new driver mutations emerging that represent increasing proportions of patients. Actionable mutations are de novo oncogenic drivers or acquired resistance mediators, and mutational profiling is important for directing therapy. Patients should be monitored for emerging actionable resistance mutations. Liquid biopsy and associated multiplex diagnostics will be important means to monitor patients during treatment. Expert commentary: Outcomes with targeted agents may be improved by integrating mutation screens during treatment to optimize subsequent therapy. In order for this to be translated into impactful patient benefit, appropriate platforms and strategies need to be optimized and then implemented universally. PMID:27139190

  9. A Group Contingency Plus Self-Management Intervention Targeting At-Risk Secondary Students’ Class-Work and Active Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Trevino-Maack, Sylvia I.; Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to show that an independent group contingency (GC) combined with self-management strategies and randomized-reinforcer components can increase the amount of written work and active classroom responding in high school students. Three remedial reading classes and a total of 15 students participated in this study. Students used self-management strategies during independent reading time to increase the amount of writing in their reading logs. They used self-monitoring strategies to record whether or not they performed expected behaviors in class. A token economy using points and tickets was included in the GC to provide positive reinforcement for target responses. The results were analyzed through visual inspection of graphs and effect size computations and showed that the intervention increased the total amount of written words in the students’ reading logs and overall classroom and individual student academic engagement. PMID:26617432

  10. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes. PMID:19570618

  11. Activation of Mammalian target of rapamycin in canine mammary carcinomas: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, L; Gärtner, F; Dias Pereira, P

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival. Activation of mTOR has been reported in various tumour types, including human breast cancer; however, the expression of mTOR in canine mammary tumours has not been examined. In the present study, expression of the activated form of mTOR (phospho-mTOR [p-mTOR]) was examined immunohistochemically in five normal canine mammary glands, 45 canine mammary carcinomas and their corresponding metastatic lesions (n = 15). Phospho-mTOR was not expressed in normal canine mammary tissue, but cytoplasmic labelling was observed in 78% of canine mammary carcinomas. Two carcinomas had both cytoplasmic and nuclear labelling. No significant relationship was found between p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression and histological type or grading of carcinomas, degree of tubular formation, anisokaryosis, mitotic activity or lymph node metastasis. In all except one case, the expression pattern of p-mTOR in lymph node metastases was similar or decreased when compared with the primary lesion. The findings suggest that p-mTOR is involved in mammary carcinogenesis in dogs. However, p-mTOR cytoplasmic expression does not appear to be a prognostic indicator in canine mammary carcinomas, which may be related to its subcellular location in the neoplastic cells. Canine mammary tumours may provide a model for the development of innovative medical strategies involving mTOR inhibitors in human breast cancer. PMID:25670666

  12. Selective activity of deguelin identifies therapeutic targets for androgen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Cai, Shengxin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are aggressive malignancies with no effective targeted therapies. Recent gene expression profiling of these heterogeneous cancers and the classification of cell line models now allows for the identification of compounds with selective activities against molecular subtypes of TNBC. The natural product deguelin was found to have selective activity against MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cell lines, which both model the luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype of TNBC. Deguelin potently inhibited proliferation of these cells with GI50 values of 30 and 61 nM, in MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cells, respectively. Deguelin had exceptionally high selectivity, 197 to 566-fold, for these cell lines compared to cell lines representing other TNBC subtypes. Deguelin's mechanisms of action were investigated to determine how it produced these potent and selective effects. Our results show that deguelin has dual activities, inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, and decreasing androgen receptor levels and nuclear localization. Based on these data, we hypothesized that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and the antiandrogen enzalutamide would have efficacy in LAR models. Rapamycin and enzalutamide showed additive effects in MDA-MB-453 cells, and both drugs had potent antitumor efficacy in a LAR xenograft model. These results suggest that the combination of antiandrogens and mTOR inhibitors might be an effective strategy for the treatment of androgen receptor-expressing TNBC. PMID:27255535

  13. More than Just Finding Color: Strategy in Global Visual Search Is Shaped by Learned Target Probabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carrick C.; Pollatsek, Alexander; Cave, Kyle R.; Stroud, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    In 2 experiments, eye movements were examined during searches in which elements were grouped into four 9-item clusters. The target (a red or blue "T") was known in advance, and each cluster contained different numbers of target-color elements. Rather than color composition of a cluster invariantly guiding the order of search though clusters, the…

  14. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans. PMID:26385990

  15. Targeting the parasite's DNA with methyltriazenyl purine analogs is a safe, selective, and efficacious antitrypanosomal strategy.

    PubMed

    Rodenko, Boris; Wanner, Martin J; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A M; Ebiloma, Godwin U; Barnes, Rebecca L; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; de Koning, Harry P

    2015-11-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2(-/-)) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  16. Targeting the Parasite's DNA with Methyltriazenyl Purine Analogs Is a Safe, Selective, and Efficacious Antitrypanosomal Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Martin J.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2−/−) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  17. Enhancing the Function of CD34+ Cells by Targeting Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Sugata; Stepps, Valerie; Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Caballero, Sergio; Boulton, Michael E.; Higgins, Paul J.; Nikonova, Elena V.; Pepine, Carl J.; Thut, Catherine; Finney, Eva M.; Stone, David J.; Bartelmez, Stephen H.; Grant, Maria B.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we showed that transient inhibition of TGF- β1 resulted in correction of key aspects of diabetes-induced CD34+ cell dysfunction. In this report, we examine the effect of transient inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major gene target of TGF-β1 activation. Using gene array studies, we examined CD34+ cells isolated from a cohort of longstanding diabetic individuals, free of microvascular complications despite suboptimal glycemic control, and found that the cells exhibited reduced transcripts of both TGF-β1 and PAI-1 compared to age, sex, and degree of glycemic control-matched diabetic individuals with microvascular complications. CD34+ cells from diabetic subjects with microvascular complications consistently exhibited higher PAI-1 mRNA than age-matched non-diabetic controls. TGF- β1 phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligo (PMO) reduced PAI-1 mRNA in diabetic (p<0.01) and non-diabetic (p=0.05) CD34+ cells. To reduce PAI-1 in human CD34+ cells, we utilized PAI-1 siRNA, lentivirus expressing PAI-1 shRNA or PAI-1 PMO. We found that inhibition of PAI-1 promoted CD34+ cell proliferation and migration in vitro, likely through increased PI3(K) activity and increased cGMP production. Using a retinal ischemia reperfusion injury model in mice, we observed that recruitment of diabetic CD34+ cells to injured acellular retinal capillaries was greater after PAI-1-PMO treatment compared with control PMO-treated cells. Targeting PAI-1 offers a promising therapeutic strategy for restoring vascular reparative function in defective diabetic progenitors. PMID:24223881

  18. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 μM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl− and the decreased HCO3− concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na–K–2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl−/HCO3− anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  19. Sphaeropsidin A shows promising activity against drug-resistant cancer cells by targeting regulatory volume increase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Véronique; Chantôme, Aurélie; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Miklos, Walter; Paulitschke, Verena; Mohr, Thomas; Maddau, Lucia; Kornienko, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Vandier, Christophe; Evidente, Antonio; Delpire, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Despite the recent advances in the treatment of tumors with intrinsic chemotherapy resistance, such as melanoma and renal cancers, their prognosis remains poor and new chemical agents with promising activity against these cancers are urgently needed. Sphaeropsidin A, a fungal metabolite whose anticancer potential had previously received little attention, was isolated from Diplodia cupressi and found to display specific anticancer activity in vitro against melanoma and kidney cancer subpanels in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60-cell line screen. The NCI data revealed a mean LC50 of ca. 10 µM and a cellular sensitivity profile that did not match that of any other agent in the 765,000 compound database. Subsequent mechanistic studies in melanoma and other multidrug-resistant in vitro cancer models showed that sphaeropsidin A can overcome apoptosis as well as multidrug resistance by inducing a marked and rapid cellular shrinkage related to the loss of intracellular Cl(-) and the decreased HCO3 (-) concentration in the culture supernatant. These changes in ion homeostasis and the absence of effects on the plasma membrane potential were attributed to the sphaeropsidin A-induced impairment of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Preliminary results also indicate that depending on the type of cancer, the sphaeropsidin A effects on RVI could be related to Na-K-2Cl electroneutral cotransporter or Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) anion exchanger(s) targeting. This study underscores the modulation of ion-transporter activity as a promising therapeutic strategy to combat drug-resistant cancers and identifies the fungal metabolite, sphaeropsidin A, as a lead to develop anticancer agents targeting RVI in cancer cells. PMID:25868554

  20. Comparison of active and passive sampling strategies for the monitoring of pesticide contamination in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoumani, Azziz; Margoum, Christelle; Guillemain, Céline; Coquery, Marina

    2014-05-01

    constants (Rs). Each constant links the mass of the a target contaminant accumulated in the sampler to its concentration in water. At the end of the field application, the Rs are used to calculate the TWA concentration of each target contaminant with the final mass of the contaminants accumulated in the sampler. Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE) is a solvent free sample preparation technique dedicated to the analysis of moderately hydrophobic to hydrophobic compounds in liquid and gas samples. It is composed of a magnet enclosed in a glass tube coated with a thick film of polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). We recently developed the in situ application of SBSE as a passive sampling technique (herein named "Passive SBSE") for the monitoring of agricultural pesticides. The aim of this study is to perform the calibration of the passive SBSE in the laboratory, and to apply and compare this technique to active sampling strategies for the monitoring of 16 relatively hydrophobic to hydrophobic pesticides in streams, during 2 1-month sampling campaigns. Time-weighted averaged concentrations of the target pesticides obtained from passive SBSE were compared to the target pesticide concentrations of grab samples, and time-related and flow-dependent samples of the streams. Results showed passive SBSE as an efficient alternative to conventional active sampling strategies.

  1. Novel therapeutic strategy targeting the Hedgehog signalling and mTOR pathways in biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, M; Rashid, A; Churi, C; Vauthey, J-N; Chang, P; Li, Y; Hung, M-C; Li, D; Javle, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activation of the PI3K/mTOR and Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathways occurs frequently in biliary tract cancer (BTC). Crosstalk between these pathways occurs in other gastrointestinal cancers. The respective signalling inhibitors rapamycin and vismodegib may inhibit BTC synergistically and suppress cancer stem cells (CSCs). Methods: Gene expression profiling for p70S6k and Gli1 was performed with BTC cell lines. Tumour and pathway inhibitory effects of rapamycin and vismodegib were investigated in BTC preclinical models and CSCs. Results: Rapamycin and vismodegib synergistically reduced BTC cell viability and proliferation. This drug combination arrested BTC Mz-ChA-1 cells in the G1 phase but had no significant effect on the cell cycle of BTC Sk-ChA-1 cells. Combined treatment inhibited the proliferation of CSCs and ALDH-positive cells. Nanog and Oct-4 expression in CSCs was decreased by the combination treatment. Western blotting results showed the p-p70S6K, p-Gli1, p-mTOR, and p-AKT protein expression were inhibited by the combination treatment in BTC cells. In an Mz-ChA-1 xenograft model, combination treatment resulted in 80% inhibition of tumour growth and prolonged tumour doubling time. In 4 of 10 human BTC specimens, tumour p-p70S6K and Gli1 protein expression levels were decreased with the combination treatment. Conclusions: Targeted inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR and Hhpathways indicates a new avenue for BTC treatment with combination therapy. PMID:25742482

  2. Strategies for Profiling Single Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Targeted Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, W.; Box, A.; Staehling, K.; Wang, F.; Li, L.; Zueckert-Gaudenz, K.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted gene expression profiling of single cells permits the study of heterogeneity in cell populations. Here, a pool of mouse intestinal crypt-base CD44+/GRP78- cells was collected by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Aliquots were either loaded onto Fluidigm's C1 System for microfluidic cell capture and cDNA synthesis in nanoliter volumes, or flow-sorted directly into individual PCR plate wells for cDNA synthesis in microliter volumes. The pre-amplified cDNAs were transferred to the BioMark System for EvaGreen real-time PCR. The two sample preparation methods were compared by expression analysis of 86 genes, using Fluidigm's SINGuLAR R-scripts. After outlier identification, gene expression values from 42% of the “C1” and 92% of the “flow” wells were retained. For 55 of the genes, expression was measured in both the “C1” and “flow” cells. Genes with a high variance in expression likely stemming from the sample preparation method and/or unspecific amplification were removed. Hierarchical clustering on the remaining data revealed gene clusters that contributed to the expected Lgr5hi and Lgr5lo intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations as well as a small population of differentiated cells. The subpopulations could be defined by either method. However, as ISCs quickly undergo apoptosis at room temperature, the use of the C1 System provided no clear advantage over the direct sorting of the fragile cells into lysis/RT reaction buffer. Specifically, the C1 quality control step to verify the number of captured cells and cell viability was omitted to accelerate processing.

  3. Preparation and In Vitro Evaluation of Antitumor Activity of TGFαL3-SEB as a Ligand-Targeted Superantigen.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Forough; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Aslani, Mohammad Mehdi; Amani, Jafar; Rad, Hamid Sedighian; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-targeted superantigens (TTSs) have been used to treat a variety of tumors in preclinical studies. The TTS utilizes the powerful T-cell activation strategy by means of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) as superantigens (Sags) to target tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies and tumor-related ligands have been used as targeting molecules of Sag. In this study, we assessed the antitumor potency of tumor-targeted superantigen (TTS) strategy to design and produce fusion protein as a new antitumor candidate. The third loop (L3) of transforming growth factor α (TGF-α) was genetically conjugated to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (TGFαL3-SEB), and its in vitro antitumor activity against murine breast cancer cells (A431 cell line) was evaluated. We designed and prepared TGFαL3-SEB chimeric protein and evaluated superantigenic activity, binding property to cancer cells, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and in vitro antitumor activities. Cloning of tgfαl3-seb was confirmed by colony-polymerase chain reaction, enzymatic digestion, and sequencing. The recombinant TGFαL3-SEB fusion protein with molecular weight of 31 kDa was expressed and confirmed by anti-His Western-blot analysis. The TGFαL3-SEB fusion protein attached to A431 cell line with proper affinity and induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity against EGFR-expressing cancer cells in vitro. The TGFαL3-SEB chimeric protein exhibited potent in vitro antitumor activity. Our findings indicated that TGFαL3-SEB may be a promising anticancer candidate in cancer immunotherapy, and further studies are required to explore its potential in vivo therapeutic applications. PMID:25759426

  4. Targeting MT1-MMP as an ImmunoPET-Based Strategy for Imaging Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, M.; Romero, E.; Cámara, J. A.; de Martino, A.; Arroyo, A. G.; Morcillo, M. Á.; Squatrito, M.; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J. L.; Mulero, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A critical challenge in the management of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) tumors is the accurate diagnosis and assessment of tumor progression in a noninvasive manner. We have identified Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) as an attractive biomarker for GBM imaging since this protein is actively involved in tumor growth and progression, correlates with tumor grade and is closely associated with poor prognosis in GBM patients. Here, we report the development of an immunoPET tracer for effective detection of MT1-MMP in GBM models. Methods An anti-human MT1-MMP monoclonal antibody (mAb), LEM2/15, was conjugated to p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-desferrioxamine (DFO-NCS) for 89Zr labeling. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in xenograft mice bearing human GBM cells (U251) expressing MT1-MMP and non-expressing breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) as negative control. Two orthotopic brain GBM models, patient-derived neurospheres (TS543) and U251 cells, with different degrees of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption were also used for PET imaging experiments. Results 89Zr labeling of DFO-LEM2/15 was achieved with high yield (>90%) and specific activity (78.5 MBq/mg). Biodistribution experiments indicated that 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 showed excellent potential as a radiotracer for detection of MT1-MMP positive GBM tumors. PET imaging also indicated a specific and prominent 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 uptake in MT1-MMP+ U251 GBM tumors compared to MT1-MMP- MCF-7 breast tumors. Results obtained in orthotopic brain GBM models revealed a high dependence of a disrupted BBB for tracer penetrance into tumors. 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 showed much higher accumulation in TS543 tumors with a highly disrupted BBB than in U251 orthotopic model in which the BBB permeability was only partially increased. Histological analysis confirmed the specificity of the immunoconjugate in all GBM models. Conclusion A new anti MT1-MMP-mAb tracer, 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15, was synthesized efficiently. In

  5. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  6. Targeting the schizophrenia genome: a fast track strategy from GWAS to clinic.

    PubMed

    Lencz, T; Malhotra, A K

    2015-07-01

    The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium-Schizophrenia Workgroup (PGC-SCZ) has recently published a genomewide association study (GWAS) identifying >100 genetic loci, encompassing a total of 341 protein-coding genes, attaining genomewide significance for susceptibility to schizophrenia. Given the extremely long time (12-15 years) and expense (>$1 billion) associated with the development of novel drug targets, repurposing of drugs with known and validated targets may be the most expeditious path toward deriving clinical utility from these GWAS findings. In the present study, we examined all genes within loci implicated by the PGC-SCZ GWAS against databases of targets of both approved and registered pharmaceutical compounds. We identified 20 potential schizophrenia susceptibility genes that encode proteins that are the targets of approved drugs. Of these, we prioritized genes/targets that are of clear neuropsychiatric interest and that are also sole members of the linkage disequilibrium block surrounding a PGC-SCZ GWAS hit. In addition to DRD2, 5 genes meet these criteria: CACNA1C, CACNB2, CACNA1I, GRIN2A and HCN1. An additional 20 genes coding for proteins that are the targets of drugs in registered clinical trials, but without approved indications, were also identified. Although considerable work is still required to fully explicate the biological implications of the PGC-SCZ GWAS results, pathways related to these known, druggable targets may represent a promising starting point. PMID:25869805

  7. Quantitative proteomic strategies for the identification of microRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Chongyang; Xiong, Qian; Zhang, Jia; Ge, Feng; Bi, Li-Jun

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, approximately 22 nucleotides in length, found in diverse organisms. They have emerged in recent years as key regulators of a broad spectrum of cellular functions. miRNAs regulate biological processes by inducing translational inhibition and degradation of their target mRNAs through base pairing to partially or fully complementary sites. In the field of miRNA research, the identification of the targets of individual miRNAs is of utmost importance. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which individual miRNAs modulate cellular functions will remain incomplete until a full set of miRNA targets is identified and validated. Since a miRNA may regulate many of its targets at the translational level without affecting mRNA abundance, proteomic methods are best suited for revealing the full spectrum of miRNA targets. Quantitative proteomics is emerging as a powerful toolbox for identifying miRNA targets and for quantifying the contribution of translational repression by miRNAs. In this review, the authors summarize the quantitative proteomic approaches that have been employed for identification of miRNA targets and discuss current challenges as well as possible ways of overcoming them. PMID:23194271

  8. An efficient strategy for heterologous expression and purification of active peptide hainantoxin-IV.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Peng-Fei; Meng, Er; Li, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Lu; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Wu, Lei; Li, Meng-Jie; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Hainantoxin-IV (HNTX-IV) from the venom of the spider Selenocosmia hainana is a potent antagonist that specifically inhibits the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels. The toxin peptide consists of 35 amino acids and adopts a typical inhibitory cystine knot (ICK) motif. To obtain adequate HNTX-IV peptides for further insight into the structure-activity relationships of the toxin, a novel strategy including cloning, expression and purification was developed in an E. coli expression system. For this purpose, a seamless restriction-free (RF) cloning method was employed for the construction of an expression vector to avoid introducing unwanted sequences into the target gene. Furthermore, the solubility of recombinant HNTX-IV could be promoted efficiently by the combination of a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) tag. Finally, an affinity-chromatography-free purification strategy was developed by cut-off dialysis tubing combined with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) extraction. Further HPLC purification yielded recombinant, tag-free HNTX-IV with high yield and purity. The molecular weight of recombinant HNTX-IV (rHNTX-IV) is identical to its theoretical value according to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption / Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis. The recombinant toxin has similar activity (IC50 value of 120 nM) on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to native toxins. In the report, an efficient and cost-effective strategy for producing rHNTX-IV was developed, which paved the way for the further study of structure-activity relationships of rHNTX-IV and its pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25647561

  9. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  10. Small Molecule Sequential Dual-Targeting Theragnostic Strategy (SMSDTTS): from Preclinical Experiments towards Possible Clinical Anticancer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hitting the evasive tumor cells proves challenging in targeted cancer therapies. A general and unconventional anticancer approach namely small molecule sequential dual-targeting theragnostic strategy (SMSDTTS) has recently been introduced with the aims to target and debulk the tumor mass, wipe out the residual tumor cells, and meanwhile enable cancer detectability. This dual targeting approach works in two steps for systemic delivery of two naturally derived drugs. First, an anti-tubulin vascular disrupting agent, e.g., combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), is injected to selectively cut off tumor blood supply and to cause massive necrosis, which nevertheless always leaves peripheral tumor residues. Secondly, a necrosis-avid radiopharmaceutical, namely 131I-hypericin (131I-Hyp), is administered the next day, which accumulates in intratumoral necrosis and irradiates the residual cancer cells with beta particles. Theoretically, this complementary targeted approach may biologically and radioactively ablate solid tumors and reduce the risk of local recurrence, remote metastases, and thus cancer mortality. Meanwhile, the emitted gamma rays facilitate radio-scintigraphy to detect tumors and follow up the therapy, hence a simultaneous theragnostic approach. SMSDTTS has now shown promise from multicenter animal experiments and may demonstrate unique anticancer efficacy in upcoming preliminary clinical trials. In this short review article, information about the two involved agents, the rationale of SMSDTTS, its preclinical antitumor efficacy, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theragnostic property, and toxicities of the dose regimens are summarized. Meanwhile, possible drawbacks, practical challenges and future improvement with SMSDTTS are discussed, which hopefully may help to push forward this strategy from preclinical experiments towards possible clinical applications. PMID:23412554

  11. Nonimaging active system determination of target shape through turbulent medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.

    2001-01-01

    Image reconstruction techniques for atmospheric applications often work best with an initial estimate of the object support. This paper examines the ability of a non-imaging laser pointing system to obtain an estimate of target size and shape based on the statistics of the return signal. Fundamental limits on system pointing, such as the tracking errors, corrupt a simple raster scan that would provide gross object shape form the convolution of the far-field pattern with the target. Using techniques developed previously for the estimation of pointing performance, it is possible to distinguish between simple shapes such as bars, circles and T's based on the statistics of the received time signal. Simulated space objects, such as those illuminated during field experiments, may also be distinguished.

  12. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  13. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... obtain non-8(a) revenues. (e) Waiver of sole source prohibition. (1) The AA/BD, or his or her designee... activity targets? 124.509 Section 124.509 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a... Contractual Assistance § 124.509 What are non-8(a) business activity targets? (a) General. (1) To ensure...

  14. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  15. Comparing demographic, health status and psychosocial strategies of audience segmentation to promote physical activity.

    PubMed

    Boslaugh, Sarah E; Kreuter, Matthew W; Nicholson, Robert A; Naleid, Kimberly

    2005-08-01

    The goal of audience segmentation is to identify population subgroups that are homogeneous with respect to certain variables associated with a given outcome or behavior. When such groups are identified and understood, targeted intervention strategies can be developed to address their unique characteristics and needs. This study compares the results of audience segmentation for physical activity that is based on either demographic, health status or psychosocial variables alone, or a combination of all three types of variables. Participants were 1090 African-American and White adults from two public health centers in St Louis, MO. Using a classification-tree algorithm to form homogeneous groups, analyses showed that more segments with greater variability in physical activity were created using psychosocial versus health status or demographic variables and that a combination of the three outperformed any individual set of variables. Simple segmentation strategies such as those relying on demographic variables alone provided little improvement over no segmentation at all. Audience segmentation appears to yield more homogeneous subgroups when psychosocial and health status factors are combined with demographic variables. PMID:15572439

  16. An Active-Learning Strategies Primer for Achieving Ability-Based Educational Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Brenda L.; Peeters, Michael J.; Resman-Targoff, Beth H.; Karr, Samantha; McBane, Sarah; Kelley, Kristi; Thomas, Tyan

    2011-01-01

    Active learning is an important component of pharmacy education. By engaging students in the learning process, they are better able to apply the knowledge they gain. This paper describes evidence supporting the use of active-learning strategies in pharmacy education and also offers strategies for implementing active learning in pharmacy curricula in the classroom and during pharmacy practice experiences. PMID:22171114

  17. Past Strategies and Future Directions for Identifying AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sinnett, Sarah E.; Brenman, Jay E.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a promising therapeutic target for cancer, type II diabetes, and other illnesses characterized by abnormal energy utilization. During the last decade, numerous labs have published a range of methods for identifying novel AMPK modulators. The current understanding of AMPK structure and regulation, however, has propelled a paradigm shift in which many researchers now consider ADP to be an additional regulatory nucleotide of AMPK. How can the AMPK community apply this new understanding of AMPK signaling to translational research? Recent insights into AMPK structure, regulation, and holoenzyme-sensitive signaling may provide the hindsight needed to clearly evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of past AMPK drug discovery efforts. Improving future strategies for AMPK drug discovery will require pairing the current understanding of AMPK signaling with improved experimental designs. PMID:24583089

  18. Versatile strategy for isolating transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated knockout mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Takuma; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Ohtani, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genome editing using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems has recently emerged as a potentially powerful method for creating locus-specific mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans. Due to the low mutation frequencies, one of the crucial steps in using these technologies is screening animals that harbor a targeted mutation. In previous studies, identifying targeted mutations in C. elegans usually depended on observations of fluorescent markers such as a green fluorescent protein or visible phenotypes such as dumpy and uncoordinated phenotypes. However, this strategy is limited in practice because the phenotypes caused by targeted mutations such as defects in sensory behaviors are often apparently invisible. Here, we describe a versatile strategy for isolating C. elegans knockout mutants by TALEN-mediated genome editing and a heteroduplex mobility assay. We applied TALENs to engineer the locus of the neural gene glr-1, which is a C. elegans AMPA-type receptor orthologue that is known to have crucial roles in various sensory behaviors. Knockout mutations in the glr-1 locus, which caused defective mechanosensory behaviors, were efficiently identified by the heteroduplex mobility assay. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of a TALEN-based knockout strategy for creating C. elegans with mutations that cause invisible phenotypes. PMID:24409999

  19. An Ultrasound Contrast Agent targeted to P-selectin detects Activated Platelets at Supra-arterial Shear Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Felix; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Ferrante, Elisa A.; Grundmann, Sebastian; Bode, Christoph; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate targeting of a microbubble contrast agent to platelets under high shear flow using the natural selectin ligand sialyl Lewisa. Materials and Methods Biotinylated polyacrylamide Sialyl Lewisa or biotinylated carbohydrate-free polymer (used as a control) were attached to biotinylated microbubbles via a streptavidin linker. Activated human platelets were isolated and attached to fibrinogen-coated culture dishes. Fibrinogen-coated dishes without platelets or platelet dishes blocked by an anti-P-selectin antibody served as negative control substrates. Dishes coated by recombinant P-selectin served as a positive control substrate. Microbubble adhesion was assessed by microscopy in an inverted parallel plate flow chamber, with wall shear stress values of 40, 30, 20, 10 and 5 dynes/cm2. The ratio of binding and passing microbubbles was defined as capture efficiency. Results There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the number of microbubbles in the fluid flow at each shear rate. Sialyl Lewisa-targeted microbubbles were binding and slowly rolling on the surface of activated platelets and P-selectin-coated dishes at all the flow conditions including 40 dynes/cm2. Capture efficiency of targeted microbubbles to activated platelets and recombinant P-selectin decreased with increasing shear flow: at 5 dynes/cm2, capture efficiency was 16.11% on activated platelets vs. 21.83 % on P-selectin, and, at 40 dynes/cm2, adhesion efficiency was still 3.4 % in both groups. There was neither significant adhesion of Sialyl Lewisa-targeted microbubbles to control substrates, nor adhesion of control microbubbles to activated platelets or to recombinant P-selectin. Conclusions Microbubble targeting using sialyl Lewisa, a fast-binding ligand to P-selectin, is a promising strategy for the design of ultrasound contrast binding to activated platelets under high shear stress conditions. PMID:20808239

  20. A novel signal-on electrochemical DNA sensor based on target catalyzed hairpin assembly strategy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Tang, Daoquan; Du, Lili; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhang, Lixian; Gao, Fenglei

    2015-02-15

    We describe a novel signal-on electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensing platform based on target-catalyzed hairpin assembly. The thiolated modified molecular beacon 1 (MB1) was first immobilized onto the Au electrode (GE) surface and then target DNA hybridized to the MB1, the opened MB1 assembled with the ferrocene (Fc)-labeled molecular beacon 2 to displace the target DNA, which became available for the next cycle of MB1-target hybridization. Moreover, Fc was confined close to the GE surface for efficient electron transfer, resulting in a current signal. Eventually, each target strand went through many cycles, resulting in numerous Fcs confining close to the GE, which leaded to the current of Fc dramatically increase. The observed signal gain was sufficient to achieve a demonstrated detection limit of 0.74 fM, with a wide linear dynamic range from 10(-15) to 10(-10)M and discriminated mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with a high selectivity. Thus, the proposed E-DNA sensor would have a wide range of sensor applications because it is enzyme-free and simple to perform. PMID:25218101

  1. HER2-mediated anticancer drug delivery: strategies to prepare targeting ligands highly specific for the receptor.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Monfregola, Luca; Saviano, Michele; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    HER2 receptor, for its involvement in tumorigenesis, has been largely studied as topic in cancer research. In particular, the employment of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 antibody, showed several clinical benefits in the therapy against the breast cancer. Moreover, for its accessible extracellular domain, this receptor is considered an ideal target to deliver anticancer drugs for the receptormediated anticancer therapy. By now, monoclonal antibody and its fragments, affibody, and some peptides have been employed as targeting agents in order to deliver various drugs to HER2 positive tumor cells. In particular, the ability to perform a fast and reliable screening of a large number of peptide molecules would make possible the selection of highly specific compounds to the receptor target. In this regard, the availability of preparing a simplified synthetic model which is a good mimetic of the receptor target and can be used in a reliable screening method of ligands would be of a strategic importance for the development of selective HER2-targeting peptide molecules. Herein, we illustrate the importance of HER2-targeted anticancer therapies. We also report on a synthetic and effective mimetic of the receptor, which revealed to be a useful tool for the selection of specific HER2 ligands. PMID:25994863

  2. A new disaster victim identification management strategy targeting "near identification-threshold" cases: Experiences from the Boxing Day tsunami.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kirsty; Mundorff, Amy; Chaseling, Janet; Forrest, Alexander; Maguire, Christopher; Crane, Denis I

    2015-05-01

    The international disaster victim identification (DVI) response to the Boxing Day tsunami, led by the Royal Thai Police in Phuket, Thailand, was one of the largest and most complex in DVI history. Referred to as the Thai Tsunami Victim Identification operation, the group comprised a multi-national, multi-agency, and multi-disciplinary team. The traditional DVI approach proved successful in identifying a large number of victims quickly. However, the team struggled to identify certain victims due to incomplete or poor quality ante-mortem and post-mortem data. In response to these challenges, a new 'near-threshold' DVI management strategy was implemented to target presumptive identifications and improve operational efficiency. The strategy was implemented by the DNA Team, therefore DNA kinship matches that just failed to reach the reporting threshold of 99.9% were prioritized, however the same approach could be taken by targeting, for example, cases with partial fingerprint matches. The presumptive DNA identifications were progressively filtered through the Investigation, Dental and Fingerprint Teams to add additional information necessary to either strengthen or conclusively exclude the identification. Over a five-month period 111 victims from ten countries were identified using this targeted approach. The new identifications comprised 87 adults, 24 children and included 97 Thai locals. New data from the Fingerprint Team established nearly 60% of the total near-threshold identifications and the combined DNA/Physical method was responsible for over 30%. Implementing the new strategy, targeting near-threshold cases, had positive management implications. The process initiated additional ante-mortem information collections, and established a much-needed, distinct "end-point" for unresolved cases. PMID:25828381

  3. Targeting Survivin Inhibits Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression and Enhances the Activity of Temsirolimus.

    PubMed

    Carew, Jennifer S; Espitia, Claudia M; Zhao, Weiguo; Mita, Monica M; Mita, Alain C; Nawrocki, Steffan T

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of the antiapoptotic factor survivin has been implicated in cancer cell survival and disease progression. However, its specific contribution to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis is not well defined. We investigated the roles of survivin in RCC tumor progression, resistance to mTOR inhibitors, and evaluated the therapeutic activity of the survivin suppressant YM155 in RCC models. Here, we report that survivin expression levels were significantly higher in RCC cell lines compared with normal renal cells. Stable targeted knockdown of survivin completely abrogated the ability of 786-O RCC tumors to grow in mice, thus demonstrating its importance as a regulator of RCC tumorigenesis. We next explored multiple strategies to therapeutically inhibit survivin function in RCC. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus partially diminished survivin levels and this effect was augmented by the addition of YM155. Further analyses revealed that, in accordance with their combined anti-survivin effects, YM155 significantly improved the anticancer activity of temsirolimus in a panel of RCC cell lines in vitro and in xenograft models in vivo. Similar to pharmacologic inhibition of survivin, shRNA-mediated silencing of survivin expression not only inhibited RCC tumor growth, but also significantly sensitized RCC cells to temsirolimus therapy. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of this dual survivin/mTOR inhibition strategy was mediated by a potent decrease in survivin levels and corresponding induction of apoptosis. Our findings establish survivin inhibition as a novel approach to improve RCC therapy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25808836

  4. Abnormal Ventral and Dorsal Attention Network Activity during Single and Dual Target Detection in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Amy M.; Lee, Junghee; Wynn, Jonathan K.; Cohen, Mark S.; Engel, Stephen A.; Glahn, David C.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Reavis, Eric A.; Green, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Early visual perception and attention are impaired in schizophrenia, and these deficits can be observed on target detection tasks. These tasks activate distinct ventral and dorsal brain networks which support stimulus-driven and goal-directed attention, respectively. We used single and dual target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) tasks during fMRI with an ROI approach to examine regions within these networks associated with target detection and the attentional blink (AB) in 21 schizophrenia outpatients and 25 healthy controls. In both tasks, letters were targets and numbers were distractors. For the dual target task, the second target (T2) was presented at three different lags after the first target (T1) (lag1 = 100 ms, lag3 = 300 ms, lag7 = 700ms). For both single and dual target tasks, patients identified fewer targets than controls. For the dual target task, both groups showed the expected AB effect with poorer performance at lag 3 than at lags 1 or 7, and there was no group by lag interaction. During the single target task, patients showed abnormally increased deactivation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), a key region of the ventral network. When attention demands were increased during the dual target task, patients showed overactivation of the posterior intraparietal cortex, a key dorsal network region, along with failure to deactivate TPJ. Results suggest inefficient and faulty suppression of salience-oriented processing regions, resulting in increased sensitivity to stimuli in general, and difficulty distinguishing targets from non-targets. PMID:27014135

  5. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  6. Activated hedgehog pathway is a potential target for pharmacological intervention in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiesslich, Tobias; Mayr, Christian; Wachter, Julia; Bach, Doris; Fuereder, Julia; Wagner, Andrej; Alinger, Beate; Pichler, Martin; Di Fazio, Pietro; Ocker, Matthias; Berr, Frieder; Neureiter, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling contributes to carcinogenesis and represents a valid druggable target in human cancers, possibly also in biliary tract cancer (BTC). We analysed the expression of Hh components in BTC using eight heterogeneously differentiated cell lines, xenograft tumours and a human tissue microarray. The dose-, time- and cell line-dependent effects of two Hh inhibitors (cyclopamine and Gant-61) were analysed in vitro for survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and possible synergism with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. In human BTC samples, the sonic Hh ligand and the Gli1 transcription factor showed increased expression in tumours compared to normal adjacent tissue and were significantly associated with high tumour grade and positive lymph node status. In BTC cell lines, we could confirm the Hh component expression at varying extent within the employed cell lines in vitro and in vivo indicating non-canonical signalling. Both Hh inhibitors showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity above 5 µM with a stronger effect for Gant-61 inducing apoptosis whereas cyclopamine rather inhibited proliferation. Cytotoxicity was associated with low cytokeratin expression and higher mesenchymal marker expression such as vimentin. Additionally, drug combinations of Gant-61 with conventional chemotherapy (cisplatin) exerted synergistic effects. In conclusion, Hh pathway is significantly activated in human BTC tissue compared to normal adjacent tissue. The current data demonstrate for the first time an effective anticancer activity of especially Gant-61 in BTC and suggest second generation Hh pathway inhibitors as a potential novel treatment strategy in BTC. PMID:25064451

  7. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ) and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ), indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations. Effective

  8. Novel Strategy for Non-Targeted Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics by Means of Metabolic Turnover and Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yasumune; Tamada, Yoshihiro; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Isotope-labeling is a useful technique for understanding cellular metabolism. Recent advances in metabolomics have extended the capability of isotope-assisted studies to reveal global metabolism. For instance, isotope-assisted metabolomics technology has enabled the mapping of a global metabolic network, estimation of flux at branch points of metabolic pathways, and assignment of elemental formulas to unknown metabolites. Furthermore, some data processing tools have been developed to apply these techniques to a non-targeted approach, which plays an important role in revealing unknown or unexpected metabolism. However, data collection and integration strategies for non-targeted isotope-assisted metabolomics have not been established. Therefore, a systematic approach is proposed to elucidate metabolic dynamics without targeting pathways by means of time-resolved isotope tracking, i.e., “metabolic turnover analysis”, as well as multivariate analysis. We applied this approach to study the metabolic dynamics in amino acid perturbation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In metabolic turnover analysis, 69 peaks including 35 unidentified peaks were investigated. Multivariate analysis of metabolic turnover successfully detected a pathway known to be inhibited by amino acid perturbation. In addition, our strategy enabled identification of unknown peaks putatively related to the perturbation. PMID:25257997

  9. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many complicated nucleic acid structures have been determined, providing new insights into the molecular functions and interactions of nucleic acids, especially DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands. Thus, opportunities have been created to further discover nucleic acid-targeting drugs for disease treatments. This review focuses on the structure studies of DNAs complexed with small molecule ligands for discovering lead compounds, drug candidates, and/or therapeutics. PMID:23633219

  10. Pharmacological targeting of PI3K isoforms as a therapeutic strategy in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, Matthew D.; Steele, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    PI3Kδ inhibitors such as idelalisib are providing improved therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). However under certain conditions, inhibition of a single PI3K isoform can be compensated by the other PI3K isoforms, therefore PI3K inhibitors which target multiple PI3K isoforms may provide greater efficacy. The development of compounds targeting multiple PI3K isoforms (α, β, δ, and γ) in CLL cells, in vitro, resulted in sustained inhibition of BCR signalling but with enhanced cytotoxicity and the potential for improve clinical responses. This review summarises the progress of PI3K inhibitor development and describes the rationale and potential for targeting multiple PI3K isoforms. PMID:26500849

  11. An update on the strategies in multicomponent activity monitoring within the phytopharmaceutical field

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To-date modern drug research has focused on the discovery and synthesis of single active substances. However, multicomponent preparations are gaining increasing importance in the phytopharmaceutical field by demonstrating beneficial properties with respect to efficacy and toxicity. Discussion In contrast to single drug combinations, a botanical multicomponent therapeutic possesses a complex repertoire of chemicals that belong to a variety of substance classes. This may explain the frequently observed pleiotropic bioactivity spectra of these compounds, which may also suggest that they possess novel therapeutic opportunities. Interestingly, considerable bioactivity properties are exhibited not only by remedies that contain high doses of phytochemicals with prominent pharmaceutical efficacy, but also preparations that lack a sole active principle component. Despite that each individual substance within these multicomponents has a low molar fraction, the therapeutic activity of these substances is established via a potentialization of their effects through combined and simultaneous attacks on multiple molecular targets. Although beneficial properties may emerge from such a broad range of perturbations on cellular machinery, validation and/or prediction of their activity profiles is accompanied with a variety of difficulties in generic risk-benefit assessments. Thus, it is recommended that a comprehensive strategy is implemented to cover the entirety of multicomponent-multitarget effects, so as to address the limitations of conventional approaches. Summary An integration of standard toxicological methods with selected pathway-focused bioassays and unbiased data acquisition strategies (such as gene expression analysis) would be advantageous in building an interaction network model to consider all of the effects, whether they were intended or adverse reactions. PMID:22417247

  12. Labelling of endogenous target protein via N-S acyl transfer-mediated activation of N-sulfanylethylanilide.

    PubMed

    Denda, Masaya; Morisaki, Takuya; Kohiki, Taiki; Yamamoto, Jun; Sato, Kohei; Sagawa, Ikuko; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Sato, Youichi; Yamauchi, Aiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Otaka, Akira

    2016-07-14

    The ligand-dependent incorporation of a reporter molecule (e.g., fluorescence dye or biotin) onto a endogenous target protein has emerged as an important strategy for elucidating protein function using various affinity-based labelling reagents consisting of reporter, ligand and reactive units. Conventional labelling reagents generally use a weakly activated reactive unit, which can result in the non-specific labelling of proteins in a ligand-independent manner. In this context, the activation of a labelling reagent through a targeted protein-ligand interaction could potentially overcome the problems associated with conventional affinity-based labelling reagents. We hypothesized that this type of protein-ligand-interaction-mediated activation could be accomplished using N-sulfanylethylanilide (SEAlide) as the reactive unit in the labelling reagent. Electrophilically unreactive amide-type SEAlide can be activated by its conversion to the corresponding active thioester in the presence of a phosphate salt, which can act as an acid-base catalyst. It has been suggested that protein surfaces consisting of hydrophilic residues such as amino, carboxyl and imidazole groups could function as acid-base catalysts. We therefore envisioned that a SEAlide-based labelling reagent (SEAL) bearing SEAlide as a reactive unit could be activated through the binding of the SEAL with a target protein. Several SEALs were readily prepared in this study using standard 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-based solid-phase protocols. These SEAL systems were subsequently applied to the ligand-dependent labelling of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) and cyclooxyganese 1. Although we have not yet obtained any direct evidence for the target protein-mediated activation of the SEAlide unit, our results for the reaction of these SEALs with hCA1 or butylamine indirectly support our hypothesis. The SEALs reported in this study represent valuable new entries to the field of affinity-based labelling reagents

  13. Applied Mathematics: Targets for Learning. Strategies for Preparing Successful Problem Solvers in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides resources that teachers and trainers can use to help learners improve their ability to apply mathematical problem-solving skills in the workplace. The instructional strategies and practice problems in the guide are patterned after those of the American College Testing (ACT) Work Keys System. Gains in skill levels can…

  14. 78 FR 14121 - Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications for Strategies Targeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... grants will include an integrated strategy of recruitment and assessment, empowerment and self... . The Web sites provide application information, eligibility requirements, review and selection... than 4:00:00 p.m. Eastern Time. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise Roach, 200 Constitution...

  15. Comparison of Irradiation and Wolbachia Based Approaches for Sterile-Male Strategies Targeting Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Atyame, Célestine M.; Labbé, Pierrick; Lebon, Cyrille; Weill, Mylène; Moretti, Riccardo; Marini, Francesca; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Calvitti, Maurizio; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The global expansion of Aedes albopictus together with the absence of vaccines for most of the arboviruses transmitted by this mosquito has stimulated the development of sterile-male strategies aiming at controlling disease transmission through the suppression of natural vector populations. In this context, two environmentally friendly control strategies, namely the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and the Wolbachia-based Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT) are currently being developed in several laboratories worldwide. So far however, there is a lack of comparative assessment of these strategies under the same controlled conditions. Here, we compared the mating capacities, i.e. insemination capacity, sterilization capacity and mating competitiveness of irradiated (35 Gy) and incompatible Ae. albopictus males at different ages and ratios under laboratory controlled conditions. Our data show that there was no significant difference in insemination capacity of irradiated and incompatible males, both male types showing lower capacities than untreated males at 1 day but recovering full capacity within 5 days following emergence. Regarding mating competitiveness trials, a global observed trend is that incompatible males tend to induce a lower hatching rate than irradiated males in cage controlled confrontations. More specifically, incompatible males were found more competitive than irradiated males in 5:1 ratio regardless of age, while irradiated males were only found more competitive than incompatible males in the 1:1 ratio at 10 days old. Overall, under the tested conditions, IIT seemed to be slightly more effective than SIT. However, considering that a single strategy will likely not be adapted to all environments, our data stimulates the need for comparative assessments of distinct strategies in up-scaled conditions in order to identify the most suitable and safe sterilizing technology to be implemented in a specific environmental setting and to identify the

  16. Comparison of Irradiation and Wolbachia Based Approaches for Sterile-Male Strategies Targeting Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Atyame, Célestine M; Labbé, Pierrick; Lebon, Cyrille; Weill, Mylène; Moretti, Riccardo; Marini, Francesca; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Calvitti, Maurizio; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The global expansion of Aedes albopictus together with the absence of vaccines for most of the arboviruses transmitted by this mosquito has stimulated the development of sterile-male strategies aiming at controlling disease transmission through the suppression of natural vector populations. In this context, two environmentally friendly control strategies, namely the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and the Wolbachia-based Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT) are currently being developed in several laboratories worldwide. So far however, there is a lack of comparative assessment of these strategies under the same controlled conditions. Here, we compared the mating capacities, i.e. insemination capacity, sterilization capacity and mating competitiveness of irradiated (35 Gy) and incompatible Ae. albopictus males at different ages and ratios under laboratory controlled conditions. Our data show that there was no significant difference in insemination capacity of irradiated and incompatible males, both male types showing lower capacities than untreated males at 1 day but recovering full capacity within 5 days following emergence. Regarding mating competitiveness trials, a global observed trend is that incompatible males tend to induce a lower hatching rate than irradiated males in cage controlled confrontations. More specifically, incompatible males were found more competitive than irradiated males in 5:1 ratio regardless of age, while irradiated males were only found more competitive than incompatible males in the 1:1 ratio at 10 days old. Overall, under the tested conditions, IIT seemed to be slightly more effective than SIT. However, considering that a single strategy will likely not be adapted to all environments, our data stimulates the need for comparative assessments of distinct strategies in up-scaled conditions in order to identify the most suitable and safe sterilizing technology to be implemented in a specific environmental setting and to identify the

  17. A new approach for determination of neuropathy target esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Sigolaeva, L V; Eremenko, A V; Makower, A; Makhaeva, G F; Malygin, V V; Kurochkin, I N

    1999-05-14

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) was shown to be an excellent biochemical marker for screening of organophosphates (OPs) with respect to their ability to result in organophosphate induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). This paper describes a new biosensor approach to the analysis of NTE and its inhibitors. The method is based on the combination of NTE enzymatic hydrolysis of phenyl valerate (PV) with phenol detection by the Clark-type oxygen electrode modified by immobilized tyrosinase. The validity of this biosensor method is confirmed by the facts that the calibration curves for NTE obtained by colorimetric and flow-through electrochemical methods were nearly identical and the titration of NTE by test inhibitor mipafox was shown to yield the same pI50 values. The developed electrochemical methods can be considered as a promising approach both for serial express NTE analysis and for kinetic characteristics of NTE. PMID:10421495

  18. Targeting cell death signaling in colorectal cancer: Current strategies and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Bruno Christian; Jäger, Dirk; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The evasion from controlled cell death induction has been considered as one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. Defects in cell death signaling are a fundamental phenomenon in colorectal cancer. Nearly any non-invasive cancer treatment finally aims to induce cell death. However, apoptosis resistance is the major cause for insufficient therapeutic success and disease relapse in gastrointestinal oncology. Various compounds have been developed and evaluated with the aim to meet with this obstacle by triggering cell death in cancer cells. The aim of this review is to illustrate current approaches and future directions in targeting cell death signaling in colorectal cancer. The complex signaling network of apoptosis will be demonstrated and the “druggability” of targets will be identified. In detail, proteins regulating mitochondrial cell death in colorectal cancer, such as Bcl-2 and survivin, will be discussed with respect to potential therapeutic exploitation. Death receptor signaling and targeting in colorectal cancer will be outlined. Encouraging clinical trials including cell death based targeted therapies for colorectal cancer are under way and will be demonstrated. Our conceptual understanding of cell death in cancer is rapidly emerging and new types of controlled cellular death have been identified. To meet this progress in cell death research, the implication of autophagy and necroptosis for colorectal carcinogenesis and therapeutic approaches will also be depicted. The main focus of this topic highlight will be on the revelation of the complex cell death concepts in colorectal cancer and the bridging from basic research to clinical use. PMID:24587670

  19. The Relationship between Retailers' Targeting and E-Commerce Strategies: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Neil F.; Ellis-Chadwick, Fiona E.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of senior marketing executives in the United Kingdom's largest retail organizations investigated the extent to which the adoption of e-commerce is influenced by the socio-demographic characteristics of their target customers. Results demonstrate that organizations are most likely to adopt the Internet if their typical customer is male,…

  20. Strategies for oral delivery and mitochondrial targeting of CoQ10.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Noha M

    2016-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone, is a powerful, endogenously produced, intracellularly existing lipophilic antioxidant. It combats reactive oxygen species (ROS) known to be responsible for a variety of human pathological conditions. Its target site is the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) of each cell. In case of deficiency and/or aging, CoQ10 oral supplementation is warranted. However, CoQ10 has low oral bioavailability due to its lipophilic nature, large molecular weight, regional differences in its gastrointestinal permeability and involvement of multitransporters. Intracellular delivery and mitochondrial target ability issues pose additional hurdles. To maximize CoQ10 delivery to its biopharmaceutical target, numerous approaches have been undertaken. The review summaries the current research on CoQ10 bioavailability and highlights the headways to obtain a satisfactory intracellular and targeted mitochondrial delivery. Unresolved questions and research gaps were identified to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for treatment of different pathologies. PMID:25544601

  1. Herbal and polymeric approaches for liver-targeting drug delivery: novel strategies and their significance.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Raman; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-06-01

    The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates, which performs many functions including detoxification, protein synthesis and production of various bio-chemicals which are very important for digestion. A large number of serious liver disorders affect millions of people worldwide which are very difficult to treat properly despite many efforts. There are several factors which are responsible for liver injuries, include plants (Crotalaria Senecio Heliotropium Symphytum officinale), drugs (analgesic and antibiotics), industrial toxins (mercury and lead), water, alcohol and so on. Herbal medicinal preparations can be used for the treatment of a large number of human liver disorders like cirrhosis, hepatitis, carcinomas, etc. Indian Medicinal Practitioner's Co-operative pharmacy and Stores (IMPCPS) approved herbal-based systems (Unani, Siddha and Ayurveda) for the treatment of various chronic liver disorders. Different types of the receptors are found on the surface of hepatocytes, Kupffer cell, hepatic stellate cell and sinusoidal endothelial cells, etc., which can be used for achieving liver targeting. These receptors bind to different types of ligands (galactosylated, lactobionic acid, asialofetuin, etc.) which can be used in the formulation to achieve targeted delivery of the drug. Various novel particulate approaches (liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, nanosuspensions, etc.) can be used to enhance the targeting efficiency of systems to receptors found on the surface of different cells present in the liver. In this review, we focused on the status of liver targeting via herbal and nanotechnology inspired formulation approaches. PMID:25101832

  2. Using intervention mapping for the development of a targeted secure web-based outreach strategy named SafeFriend, for Chlamydia trachomatis testing in young people at risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many young people at high risk for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) are not reached by current sexual health care systems, such as general practitioners and public sexual health care centres (sexually transmitted infection clinics).Ct is the most frequently diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among sexually active people and in particular young heterosexuals. Innovative screening strategies are needed to interrupt the transmission of Ct among young people and connect the hidden cases to care. Methods Intervention Mapping (IM), a systematic approach to develop theory- and evidence-based interventions, was used to develop a strategy to target Ct testing towards young people who are currently hidden to care in The Netherlands. Both clinical users (i.e. sexual health care nurses) and public users (i.e., young people at risk for Ct) were closely involved in the IM process. A needs assessment study was carried out using semi-structured interviews among users (N = 21), a literature search and by taking lessons learned from existing screening programmes. Theoretical methods and practical applications to reach high risk young people and influence testing were selected and translated into specific programme components. Results The IM approach resulted in the development of a secure and web-based outreach Ct screening strategy, named SafeFriend. It is developed to target groups of high-risk young people who are currently hidden to care. Key methods include web-based Respondent Driven Sampling, starting from young Ct positive sexual health care centre clients, to reach and motivate peers (i.e., sex partners and friends) to get tested for Ct. Testing and the motivation of peers were proposed as the desired behavioural outcomes and the Precaution Adoption Process Model was chosen as theoretical framework. End users, i.e., young people and sexual health care nurses were interviewed and included in the development process to increase the success of

  3. Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2006-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based system research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analysis approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-savings goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

  4. Is there a role for neoadjuvant targeted therapy to downsize primary tumors for organ sparing strategies in renal cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Bex, A; Kroon, B K; de Bruijn, R

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of small renal masses being diagnosed organ-preserving treatment strategies such as nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) or radiofrequency and cryoablation are gaining importance. There is evidence that preserving renal function reduces the risk of death of any cause, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. Some patients have unfavourable tumor locations or large tumors unsuitable for NSS or ablation which is a clinical problem especially in those with imperative indications to preserve renal function. These patients may benefit from downsizing primary tumors by targeted therapy. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence, safety, controversies, and ongoing trials. PMID:22778936

  5. Active search strategies and the SETI protocols - Is there a conflict?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A.; Tarter, Donald E.

    1993-10-01

    The widely approved Declaration of Principles Concerning Activities following the Detection of Extraterrestrial Intelligence and the Proposed Protocol for Sending of Communications to Extraterrestrial Intelligence are examined with respect to how they apply to active as opposed to passive search strategies by radio astronomers. This article maintains that the existing protocols do not and should not impede active search strategies. An active search strategy based on the transmission of an interstellar terrestrial message using the synchronization of the SN 1987A hyperboloid is described. A brief discussion is made concerning the social 'pros' and 'cons' of an active search for humanity.

  6. A computational strategy to select optimized protein targets for drug development toward the control of cancer diseases.

    PubMed

    Carels, Nicolas; Tilli, Tatiana; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a strategy for the optimized selection of protein targets suitable for drug development against neoplastic diseases taking the particular case of breast cancer as an example. We combined human interactome and transcriptome data from malignant and control cell lines because highly connected proteins that are up-regulated in malignant cell lines are expected to be suitable protein targets for chemotherapy with a lower rate of undesirable side effects. We normalized transcriptome data and applied a statistic treatment to objectively extract the sub-networks of down- and up-regulated genes whose proteins effectively interact. We chose the most connected ones that act as protein hubs, most being in the signaling network. We show that the protein targets effectively identified by the combination of protein connectivity and differential expression are known as suitable targets for the successful chemotherapy of breast cancer. Interestingly, we found additional proteins, not generally targeted by drug treatments, which might justify the extension of existing formulation by addition of inhibitors designed against these proteins with the consequence of improving therapeutic outcomes. The molecular alterations observed in breast cancer cell lines represent either driver events and/or driver pathways that are necessary for breast cancer development or progression. However, it is clear that signaling mechanisms of the luminal A, B and triple negative subtypes are different. Furthermore, the up- and down-regulated networks predicted subtype-specific drug targets and possible compensation circuits between up- and down-regulated genes. We believe these results may have significant clinical implications in the personalized treatment of cancer patients allowing an objective approach to the recycling of the arsenal of available drugs to the specific case of each breast cancer given their distinct qualitative and quantitative molecular traits. PMID:25625699

  7. A Computational Strategy to Select Optimized Protein Targets for Drug Development toward the Control of Cancer Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Nicolas; Tilli, Tatiana; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a strategy for the optimized selection of protein targets suitable for drug development against neoplastic diseases taking the particular case of breast cancer as an example. We combined human interactome and transcriptome data from malignant and control cell lines because highly connected proteins that are up-regulated in malignant cell lines are expected to be suitable protein targets for chemotherapy with a lower rate of undesirable side effects. We normalized transcriptome data and applied a statistic treatment to objectively extract the sub-networks of down- and up-regulated genes whose proteins effectively interact. We chose the most connected ones that act as protein hubs, most being in the signaling network. We show that the protein targets effectively identified by the combination of protein connectivity and differential expression are known as suitable targets for the successful chemotherapy of breast cancer. Interestingly, we found additional proteins, not generally targeted by drug treatments, which might justify the extension of existing formulation by addition of inhibitors designed against these proteins with the consequence of improving therapeutic outcomes. The molecular alterations observed in breast cancer cell lines represent either driver events and/or driver pathways that are necessary for breast cancer development or progression. However, it is clear that signaling mechanisms of the luminal A, B and triple negative subtypes are different. Furthermore, the up- and down-regulated networks predicted subtype-specific drug targets and possible compensation circuits between up- and down-regulated genes. We believe these results may have significant clinical implications in the personalized treatment of cancer patients allowing an objective approach to the recycling of the arsenal of available drugs to the specific case of each breast cancer given their distinct qualitative and quantitative molecular traits. PMID:25625699

  8. Lab-scale experimental strategy for determining micropollutant partition coefficient and biodegradation constants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J M; Wisniewski, C; Miège, C; Budzinski, H; Coquery, M

    2015-03-01

    The nitrifying/denitrifying activated sludge process removes several micropollutants from wastewater by sorption onto sludge and/or biodegradation. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate a lab-scale experimental strategy for the determination of partition coefficient and biodegradation constant for micropollutant with an objective of modelling their removal. Four pharmaceutical compounds (ibuprofen, atenolol, diclofenac and fluoxetine) covering a wide hydrophobicity range (log Kow from 0.16 to 4.51) were chosen. Dissolved and particulate concentrations were monitored for 4 days, inside two reactors working under aerobic and anoxic conditions, and under different substrate feed conditions (biodegradable carbon and nitrogen). We determined the mechanisms responsible for the removal of the target compounds: (i) ibuprofen was biodegraded, mainly under aerobic conditions by cometabolism with biodegradable carbon, whereas anoxic conditions suppressed biodegradation; (ii) atenolol was biodegraded under both aerobic and anoxic conditions (with a higher biodegradation rate under aerobic conditions), and cometabolism with biodegradable carbon was the main mechanism; (iii) diclofenac and fluoxetine were removed by sorption only. Finally, the abilities of our strategy were evaluated by testing the suitability of the parameters for simulating effluent concentrations and removal efficiency at a full-scale plant. PMID:25300180

  9. On 'polypharmacy' and multi-target agents, complementary strategies for improving the treatment of depression: a comparative appraisal.

    PubMed

    Millan, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    Major depression is a heterogeneous disorder, both in terms of symptoms, ranging from anhedonia to cognitive impairment, and in terms of pathogenesis, with many interacting genetic, epigenetic, developmental and environmental causes. Accordingly, it seems unlikely that depressive states could be fully controlled by a drug possessing one discrete mechanism of action and, in the wake of disappointing results with several classes of highly selective agent, multi-modal treatment concepts are attracting attention. As concerns pharmacotherapy, there are essentially two core strategies. First, multi-target antidepressants that act via two or more complementary mechanisms and, second, polypharmacy, which refers to co-administration of two distinct drugs, usually in separate pills. Both multi-target agents and polypharmacy ideally couple a therapeutically unexploited action to a clinically established mechanism in order to enhance efficacy, moderate side-effects, accelerate onset of action and treat a broader range of symptoms. The melatonin MT1/MT2 agonist and 5-HT(2C) antagonist, agomelatine, which is effective in the short- and long-term treatment of depression, exemplifies the former approach, while evidence-based polypharmacy is illustrated by the adjunctive use of second-generation antipsychotics with serotonin reuptake inhibitors for treatment of resistant depression. Histone acetylation and methylation, ghrelin signalling, inflammatory modulators, metabotropic glutamate-7 receptors and trace amine-associated-1 receptors comprise attractive substrates for new multi-target and polypharmaceutical strategies. The present article outlines the rationale underpinning multi-modal approaches for treating depression, and critically compares and contrasts the pros and cons of established and potentially novel multi-target vs. polypharmaceutical treatments. On balance, the former appear the most promising for the elaboration, development and clinical implementation of

  10. A corner-free truncation strategy for FDTD method in target scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxian; Feng, Naixing; Zheng, Henry Hongxing; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the corner-free truncation (CFT) strategy is proposed to terminate the circular boundary out of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) region. Using the principle of reflection-free optimal thin film, the permittivity ε and the permeability μ have been extended to the complex field. The electric conductivity σe and the equivalent magnetic loss σm relate to the complex value and are suitable for the impedance-matched condition (IMC). The propagation wave can be absorbed well at the circular boundary. Moreover, computational efficiency has been much enhanced when those useless square-corners have been eliminated by using the proposed method. In TMz wave, the sinusoidal wave is set near the circular boundary. Applying the CFT strategy, the Ez amplitudes and phases show the concentric circles in the different timesteps. Compared with the square PML, numerical experiments in near- and far-field have come to the fulfillment. At the same numerical example, the CFT strategy has higher accuracy than the conformal PML. These results have fully verified the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MR imaging of pancreatic cancer: Potential for early diagnosis through targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongjie; Yan, Yuzhong; Zou, Qi; Chen, Jie; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-based magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive tool in biomedical imaging. The recent embedding of SPIO in nanoencapsulations that had different controllable surface properties has now made it possible to use SPIO in the imaging of metabolic processes. The two major issues to realize maximized and selective SPIO cancer targeting are the minimization of macrophage uptake and the preferential binding to cancerous cells over healthy neighbor cells. The utility of SPIO has been shown in clinical applications using a series of marketed SPION-based contrast agents. Applications have ranged from detecting inflammatory diseases to the specific identification of cell surface markers expressed on tumors. This review focuses on iron-oxide-based nanoparticles, to include the physiochemical properties of SPION surface engineering and its synthetic methods as well as SPIO imaging applications and specifically targeted SPIO conjugates (e.g. targeted probes) for labeling cancerous, cell-surface molecules. As a specific application of this technology, we discuss its use in the imaging of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma in addition to its potential for use in early diagnosis through targeted strategies. PMID:26663873

  12. Isothiocyanate synthetic analogs: biological activities, structure-activity relationships and synthetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Milelli, Andrea; Fimognari, Carmela; Ticchi, Nicole; Neviani, Paolo; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a natural product that is constantly under biological investigation for its unique biological properties. This naturally occurring isothiocyanate (ITC) and its analogs are the main components of cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, watercress, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, widely used as chemopreventive agents. Due to their interesting biological profiles, natural ITCs have been exploited as starting point to develop new synthetic analogs. The present mini-review briefly highlights the most important biological actions of selected new synthetic ITCs focusing on their structure-activity relationships and related synthetic strategies. PMID:25373847

  13. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL

    PubMed Central

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:25649856

  14. Far-Red and Near-IR AIE-Active Fluorescent Organic Nanoprobes with Enhanced Tumor-Targeting Efficacy: Shape-Specific Effects.

    PubMed

    Shao, Andong; Xie, Yongshu; Zhu, Shaojia; Guo, Zhiqian; Zhu, Shiqin; Guo, Jin; Shi, Ping; James, Tony D; Tian, He; Zhu, Wei-Hong

    2015-06-15

    The rational design of high-performance fluorescent materials for cancer targeting in vivo is still challenging. A unique molecular design strategy is presented that involves tailoring aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active organic molecules to realize preferable far-red and NIR fluorescence, well-controlled morphology (from rod-like to spherical), and also tumor-targeted bioimaging. The shape-tailored organic quinoline-malononitrile (QM) nanoprobes are biocompatible and highly desirable for cell-tracking applications. Impressively, the spherical shape of QM-5 nanoaggregates exhibits excellent tumor-targeted bioimaging performance after intravenously injection into mice, but not the rod-like aggregates of QM-2. PMID:25950152

  15. Ampicillin/penicillin-binding protein interactions as a model drug-target system to optimize affinity pull-down and mass spectrometric strategies for target and pathway identification.

    PubMed

    von Rechenberg, Moritz; Blake, Brian Kelly; Ho, Yew-Seng J; Zhen, Yuejun; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Richardson, Bonnie E; Xu, Nafei; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of active compounds identified in cell-based assays is an important step in preclinical drug development. New analytical approaches that combine drug affinity pull-down assays with mass spectrometry (MS) could lead to the identification of new targets and druggable pathways. In this work, we investigate a drug-target system consisting of ampicillin- and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) to evaluate and compare different amino-reactive resins for the immobilization of the affinity compound and mass spectrometric methods to identify proteins from drug affinity pull-down assays. First, ampicillin was immobilized onto various amino-reactive resins, which were compared in the ampicillin-PBP model with respect to their nonspecific binding of proteins from an Escherichia coli membrane extract. Dynal M-270 magnetic beads were chosen to further study the system as a model for capturing and identifying the targets of ampicillin, PBPs that were specifically and covalently bound to the immobilized ampicillin. The PBPs were identified, after in situ digestion of proteins bound to ampicillin directly on the beads, by using either one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) liquid chromatography (LC) separation techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Alternatively, an elution with N-lauroylsarcosine (sarcosyl) from the ampicillin beads followed by in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis identified proteins potentially interacting noncovalently with the PBPs or the ampicillin. The in situ approach required only little time, resources, and sample for the analysis. The combination of drug affinity pull-down assays with in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis is a useful tool in obtaining complex information about a primary drug target as well as its protein interactors. PMID:15761956

  16. Strategies for Supporting the Online Publishing Activities of Adults with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Jane K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that explored the online publishing activities of adults with learning difficulties, the strategies that carers and professionals have used to support these activities and the implications these strategies may have for empowerment and self-advocacy. Content analysis of 15 home pages revealed that despite having a…

  17. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles. PMID:26222406

  18. Strategies for the expression of SUMO-modified target proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Hisato; Uwada, Junsuke; Azusa, Kawasaki

    2009-01-01

    We previously described the establishment of a binary vector system that allows co-expression of SUMO conjugation enzymes and a target protein of interest, leading to efficient SUMO modification and the production of a large amount of recombinant SUMO-modified proteins in Escherichia coli. The advantages of this E. coli expression/modification approach include scalability of experiments, low cost, fast growth, and a lack of proteases that cleave the isopeptide linkage between SUMO and the target protein. Thus, this E. coli method provides a useful alternative to authentic SUMO modification assays, such as in vitro SUMO conjugation and in vivo SUMO modification using baculovirus or mammalian cell culture, that are usually complicated, time-consuming and expensive. PMID:19107420

  19. Multi-Target Strategy and Experimental Studies of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Cui-cui

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial complex disease. The pathogenesis of AD is very complicated, and involves the β-amyloid (Aβ) cascade, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced levels of neurotrophic factors, and damage and loss of synapses as well as cholinergic neurons. The multi-target characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be advantageous over single-target drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. These drugs have therefore attracted more attention in the research and development of AD therapies. This review describes advances made in experimental studies of TCM for AD treatment. It discusses research, from our group and other laboratories, on TCM compound drugs (Shenwu capsule) and approximately 10 Chinese medicinal herb extracts (tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, epimedium flavonoid, icariin, cornel iridoid glycoside, ginsenoside, puerarin, clausenamide, huperzine A, and timosaponins). PMID:26268330

  20. A cell-targeted photodynamic nanomedicine strategy for head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Master, Alyssa; Malamas, Anthony; Solanki, Rachna; Clausen, Dana M; Eiseman, Julie L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) holds great promise for the treatment of head and neck (H&N) carcinomas where repeated loco-regional therapy often becomes necessary due to the highly aggressive and recurrent nature of the cancers. While interstitial light delivery technologies are being refined for PDT of H&N and other cancers, a parallel clinically relevant research area is the formulation of photosensitizers in nanovehicles that allow systemic administration yet preferential enhanced uptake in the tumor. This approach can render dual-selectivity of PDT, by harnessing both the drug and the light delivery within the tumor. To this end, we report on a cell-targeted nanomedicine approach for the photosensitizer silicon phthalocyanine-4 (Pc 4), by packaging it within polymeric micelles that are surface-decorated with GE11-peptides to promote enhanced cell-selective binding and receptor-mediated internalization in EGFR-overexpressing H&N cancer cells. Using fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate in vitro that the EGFR-targeted Pc 4-nanoformulation undergoes faster and higher uptake in EGFR-overexpressing H&N SCC-15 cells. We further demonstrate that this enhanced Pc 4 uptake results in significant cell-killing and drastically reduced post-PDT clonogenicity. Building on this in vitro data, we demonstrate that the EGFR-targeted Pc 4-nanoformulation results in significant intratumoral drug uptake and subsequent enhanced PDT response, in vivo, in SCC-15 xenografts in mice. Altogether our results show significant promise toward a cell-targeted photodynamic nanomedicine for effective treatment of H&N carcinomas. PMID:23531079

  1. NAIMA: target amplification strategy allowing quantitative on-chip detection of GMOs.

    PubMed

    Morisset, Dany; Dobnik, David; Hamels, Sandrine; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a novel multiplex quantitative DNA-based target amplification method suitable for sensitive, specific and quantitative detection on microarray. This new method named NASBA Implemented Microarray Analysis (NAIMA) was applied to GMO detection in food and feed, but its application can be extended to all fields of biology requiring simultaneous detection of low copy number DNA targets. In a first step, the use of tailed primers allows the multiplex synthesis of template DNAs in a primer extension reaction. A second step of the procedure consists of transcription-based amplification using universal primers. The cRNA product is further on directly ligated to fluorescent dyes labelled 3DNA dendrimers allowing signal amplification and hybridized without further purification on an oligonucleotide probe-based microarray for multiplex detection. Two triplex systems have been applied to test maize samples containing several transgenic lines, and NAIMA has shown to be sensitive down to two target copies and to provide quantitative data on the transgenic contents in a range of 0.1-25%. Performances of NAIMA are comparable to singleplex quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, NAIMA amplification is faster since 20 min are sufficient to achieve full amplification. PMID:18710880

  2. Targeted therapeutics in SLE: emerging strategies to modulate the interferon pathway

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Shereen; Wilson, Nicholas J; Wicks, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by impaired immune tolerance, resulting in the generation of pathogenic autoantibodies and immune complexes. Although autoreactive B lymphocytes have been the first targets for biologic therapies in SLE, the importance of the innate immune system, and in particular, pathways involved in interferon (IFN) signaling, has emerged. There are now data supporting a central role for a plasmacytoid dendritic cell-derived type I IFN pathway in SLE, with a number of biologic therapeutics and small-molecule inhibitors undergoing clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies targeting IFN-α have completed phase II clinical trials, and an antibody against the type I IFN receptor is entering a phase III trial. However, other IFNs, such as IFN gamma, and the more recently discovered type III IFNs, are also emerging as targets in SLE; and blockade of upstream components of the IFN signaling pathway may enable inhibition of more than one IFN subtype. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of IFNs in SLE, focusing on emerging therapies. PMID:27350879

  3. Molecular and Cellular Pathobiology of Ehrlichia Infection: Targets for New Therapeutics and Immunomodulation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Jere W.; Walker, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Ehrlichia are small gram-negative obligately intracellular bacteria in the order Rickettsiales that are transmitted by ticks and associated with emerging life-threatening human zoonoses. Vaccines are not available for human ehrlichiosis, and therapeutic options are limited to a single antibiotic class. Ehrlichia are able to subvert both innate and adaptive host defenses, and advances in understanding molecular Ehrlichia-eukaryotic host cell interactions and the cellular and immunologic basis of disease are important for developing effective next generation therapies. New technologies for exploring host-pathogen interactions have yielded recent advances in understanding the molecular interactions between these intracellular pathogens and host cell components and identified new targets for therapeutic and vaccine development including those that target pathogen virulence mechanisms or disrupt the processes associated with ehrlichial effector proteins. Animal models have also provided insight into immunopathologic mechanisms that contribute significantly to understanding severe disease manifestations that will lead to the development of immunomodulatory approaches for treating patients nearing or experiencing severe disease states. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of molecular and cellular pathobiology and the immunobiology of Ehrlichia infection. We identify new molecular host-pathogen interactions that can be targets of new therapeutics and prospects for treating immunologic dysregulation that occurs during acute infection leading to life-threatening complications. PMID:21276277

  4. Revising the high-density lipoprotein targeting strategies - insights from human and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Nesan, Dinushan; Ng, Dominic S

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis has been challenged. Several completed randomized clinical trials continue to fall short in demonstrating HDL, or at least HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, as being a consistent target in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, population studies and findings in lipid modifying trials continue to strongly support HDL-C as a superb risk predictor. It is increasingly evident that the complexity of HDL metabolism confounds the use of HDL-C concentration as a unified target. However, important insights continue to emerge from the post hoc analyses of recently completed (i) fibrate-based FIELD and ACCORD trials, including the unexpected beneficial effect of fibrates in microvascular diseases, (ii) the niacin-based AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE studies, (iii) recombinant HDL-based as well as (iv) the completed CETP inhibitor-based trials. These together with on-going mechanistic studies on novel pathways, which include the unique roles of microRNAs, post-translational remodeling of HDL and novel pathways related to HDL modulators will provide valuable insights to guide how best to refocus and redesign the conceptual framework for selecting HDL-based targets. PMID:25115413

  5. Pravastatin chitosan nanogels-loaded erythrocytes as a new delivery strategy for targeting liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I.; Badran, Mohamed M.; AlQahtani, Saeed A.; Alanazi, Fars K.; Attia, Sabry M.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanogels (CNG) are developed as one of the most promising carriers for cancer targeting. However, these carriers are rapidly eliminated from circulation by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which limits their application. Therefore, erythrocytes (ER) loaded CNG as multifunctional carrier may overcome the massive elimination of nanocarriers by RES. In this study, erythrocytes loaded pravastatin–chitosan nanogels (PR–CNG–ER) were utilized as a novel drug carrier to target liver cancer. Thus, PR–CNG formula was developed in nanosize, with good entrapment efficiency, drug loading and sustained release over 48 h. Then, PR–CNG loaded into ER were prepared by hypotonic preswelling technique. The resulting PR–CNG–ER showed 36.85% of entrapment efficiency, 66.82% of cell recovery and release consistent to that of hemoglobin over 48 h. Moreover, PR–CNG–ER exhibited negative zeta potential, increasing of hemolysis percent, marked phosphatidylserine exposure and stomatocytes shape compared to control unloaded erythrocytes. PR–CNG–ER reduced cells viability of HepG2 cells line by 28% compared to unloaded erythrocytes (UER). These results concluded that PR–CNG–ER are promising drug carriers to target liver cancer. PMID:26903771

  6. Pravastatin chitosan nanogels-loaded erythrocytes as a new delivery strategy for targeting liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Badran, Mohamed M; AlQahtani, Saeed A; Alanazi, Fars K; Attia, Sabry M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan nanogels (CNG) are developed as one of the most promising carriers for cancer targeting. However, these carriers are rapidly eliminated from circulation by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which limits their application. Therefore, erythrocytes (ER) loaded CNG as multifunctional carrier may overcome the massive elimination of nanocarriers by RES. In this study, erythrocytes loaded pravastatin-chitosan nanogels (PR-CNG-ER) were utilized as a novel drug carrier to target liver cancer. Thus, PR-CNG formula was developed in nanosize, with good entrapment efficiency, drug loading and sustained release over 48 h. Then, PR-CNG loaded into ER were prepared by hypotonic preswelling technique. The resulting PR-CNG-ER showed 36.85% of entrapment efficiency, 66.82% of cell recovery and release consistent to that of hemoglobin over 48 h. Moreover, PR-CNG-ER exhibited negative zeta potential, increasing of hemolysis percent, marked phosphatidylserine exposure and stomatocytes shape compared to control unloaded erythrocytes. PR-CNG-ER reduced cells viability of HepG2 cells line by 28% compared to unloaded erythrocytes (UER). These results concluded that PR-CNG-ER are promising drug carriers to target liver cancer. PMID:26903771

  7. Genetic and chemical knockdown: a complementary strategy for evaluating an anti-infective target.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Singh, Ragini; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Mohapatra, Subrat; Khandelwal, Swati; Patel, Sanjana; Datta, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    The equity of a drug target is principally evaluated by its genetic vulnerability with tools ranging from antisense- and microRNA-driven knockdowns to induced expression of the target protein. In order to upgrade the process of antibacterial target identification and discern its most effective type of inhibition, an in silico toolbox that evaluates its genetic and chemical vulnerability leading either to stasis or cidal outcome was constructed and validated. By precise simulation and careful experimentation using enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase and its specific inhibitor glyphosate, it was shown that genetic knockdown is distinct from chemical knockdown. It was also observed that depending on the particular mechanism of inhibition, viz competitive, uncompetitive, and noncompetitive, the antimicrobial potency of an inhibitor could be orders of magnitude different. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to glyphosate and the lack of it in Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be predicted by the in silico platform. Finally, as predicted and simulated in the in silico platform, the translation of growth inhibition to a cidal effect was able to be demonstrated experimentally by altering the carbon source from sorbitol to glucose. PMID:23413046

  8. NAIMA: target amplification strategy allowing quantitative on-chip detection of GMOs

    PubMed Central

    Morisset, Dany; Dobnik, David; Hamels, Sandrine; Žel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel multiplex quantitative DNA-based target amplification method suitable for sensitive, specific and quantitative detection on microarray. This new method named NASBA Implemented Microarray Analysis (NAIMA) was applied to GMO detection in food and feed, but its application can be extended to all fields of biology requiring simultaneous detection of low copy number DNA targets. In a first step, the use of tailed primers allows the multiplex synthesis of template DNAs in a primer extension reaction. A second step of the procedure consists of transcription-based amplification using universal primers. The cRNA product is further on directly ligated to fluorescent dyes labelled 3DNA dendrimers allowing signal amplification and hybridized without further purification on an oligonucleotide probe-based microarray for multiplex detection. Two triplex systems have been applied to test maize samples containing several transgenic lines, and NAIMA has shown to be sensitive down to two target copies and to provide quantitative data on the transgenic contents in a range of 0.1–25%. Performances of NAIMA are comparable to singleplex quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, NAIMA amplification is faster since 20 min are sufficient to achieve full amplification. PMID:18710880

  9. Strategies to Increase After-School Program Staff Skills to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Standards targeting children's healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) in after-school programs call for staff to display or refrain from HEPA-promoting or -discouraging behaviors that are linked to children's HEPA. This study evaluated strategies to align staff behaviors with HEPA Standards. Staff at four after-school programs serving approximately 500 children participated in professional development training from January 2012 to May 2013. Site leaders also attended workshops and received technical support during the same time frame. Changes in staff behaviors were evaluated using the System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition in a pre- (fall 2011) multiple-post (spring 2012, fall 2012, and spring 2013), no-control group study design. A total of 8,949 scans were completed across the four measurement periods. Of the 19 behaviors measured, 14 changed in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaging in physical activity with children increased from 27% to 40% of scans and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 56% to 14% of days. Ongoing training and technical assistance can have a measureable impact on staff behaviors linked to child-level HEPA outcomes. Future research should explore the feasibility of disseminating ongoing trainings to after-school program staff on a large scale. PMID:26055462

  10. An NGR-integrated and enediyne-energized apoprotein shows CD13-targeting antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Shang, Bo-Yang; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2013-03-01

    Targeting and inhibiting angiogenesis is a promising strategy for treatment of cancer. NGR peptide motif is a tumor-homing peptide, which could bind with CD13 expressed on tumor blood vessels. Lidamycin is a highly potent antitumor antibiotic, which is composed of an apoprotein (LDP) and an active enediyne chromophore (AE). Here, an NGR-integrated and enediyne-energized apoprotein composed of cyclic NGR peptide and lidamycin was developed by a two-step procedure. Firstly, we prepared the fusion protein composed of NGR peptide and LDP by recombinant DNA technology. Then, AE was reloaded to the fusion protein to get NGR-LDP-AE. Our experiments showed that NGR-LDP could bind to CD13-expressing HT-1080 cells, whereas the recombinant LDP (rLDP) showed weak binding. NGR-LDP-AE exerted highly potent cytotoxicity to cultured tumor cells in vitro. In vivo antitumor activity was evaluated in murine hepatoma 22 (H22) model and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 model. At the tolerable dose, NGR-LDP-AE and lidamycin inhibited H22 tumor growth by 94.8 and 66.9%, and the median survival time of the mice was 62 and 37 days, respectively. In the HT-1080 model, NGR-LDP-AE inhibited tumor growth by 88.6%, which was statistically different from that of lidamycin (74.5%). Immunohistochemical study showed that NGR-LDP could bind to tumor blood vessels. Conclusively, these results demonstrate that fusion of LDP with CNGRC peptide delivers AE to tumor blood vessels and improves its antitumor activity. PMID:23206754

  11. Nrf2 activation as target to implement therapeutic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health. PMID:25699252

  12. NRF2 Activation as Target to Implement Therapeutic Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health.

  13. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  14. Targeting DXP synthase in human pathogens: enzyme inhibition and antimicrobial activity of butylacetylphosphonate

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica M.; Warrington, Nicole V.; Vierling, Ryan J.; Kuhn, Misty L.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Koppisch, Andrew T.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2013-01-01

    The unique methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential in most bacterial pathogens. The first enzyme in this pathway, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase, catalyzes a distinct thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent reaction to form DXP from D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (D-GAP) and pyruvate and represents a potential anti-infective drug target. We have previously demonstrated that the unnatural bisubstrate analog, butylacetylphosphonate (BAP), exhibits selective inhibition of Escherichia coli DXP synthase over mammalian ThDP-dependent enzymes. Here, we report the selective inhibition by BAP against recombinant DXP synthase homologs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We also demonstrate antimicrobial activity of BAP against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains (including E. coli, S. enterica, Bacillus anthracis), and several clinically isolated pathogens. Our results suggest a mechanism of action involving inhibition of DXP synthase and show that BAP acts synergistically with established antimicrobial agents, highlighting a potential strategy to combat emerging resistance in bacterial pathogens. PMID:24169798

  15. Interpersonal stroking touch is targeted to C tactile afferent activation.

    PubMed

    Croy, I; Luong, A; Triscoli, C; Hofmann, E; Olausson, H; Sailer, U

    2016-01-15

    C tactile fibers are a specialized group of fibers innervating the non-glabrous skin that are tuned to light gentle stroking applied with velocities between 1 and 10 cm/s. Those fibers add to the sensation of interpersonal caressing and pleasant touch. It is unclear whether people spontaneously apply touch that is tuned to optimally activate those fibers. This was investigated in three studies. In study one, 45 participants (21.8 ± 2.3 years, 24 women) were asked to stroke an artificial arm. In study two, 32 participants (28.3 ± 8.7 years, 16 women) were asked to stroke their partner. In study three, 11 parents (29.4 ± 5.7 years, 6 women) were asked to stroke their babies. Stroking velocity was tracked in all conditions. Stroking velocities were significantly slower in the partner touch and baby touch condition than in the artificial arm condition and all of the participants stroking their partner or baby used velocities that can activate C tactile fibers. We conclude that human social stroking is optimized for C tactile stimulation. PMID:26433145

  16. Bingo for Beginners: A Game Strategy for Facilitating Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, Angela; Woodward, Ian; Shaw, Kirstyn; Cody, Alex; Lupton, Gillian; Peake, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Describes a bingo game that focuses on sociology of the body in which students answer questions with either a yes or no as opposed to the traditional way the game is played. Explains how to construct the game and addresses practical strategies to use after the game. (CMK)

  17. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface.

  18. Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

  19. Neural activity promotes long-distance, target-specific regeneration of adult retinal axons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Hwan A; Stafford, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Phong L; Lien, Brian V; Wang, Chen; Zukor, Katherine; He, Zhigang; Huberman, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    Axons in the mammalian CNS fail to regenerate after injury. Here we show that if the activity of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is increased by visual stimulation or using chemogenetics, their axons regenerate. We also show that if enhancement of neural activity is combined with elevation of the cell-growth-promoting pathway involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), RGC axons regenerate long distances and re-innervate the brain. Analysis of genetically labeled RGCs revealed that this regrowth can be target specific: RGC axons navigated back to their correct visual targets and avoided targets incorrect for their function. Moreover, these regenerated connections were successful in partially rescuing a subset of visual behaviors. Our findings indicate that combining neural activity with activation of mTOR can serve as powerful tool for enhancing axon regeneration, and they highlight the remarkable capacity of CNS neurons to re-establish accurate circuit connections in adulthood. PMID:27399843

  20. A dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on strand displacement amplification and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanling; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in many biological processes and has been regarded as a predictive cancer biomarker and a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential for early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Here, we developed a dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity based on strand displacement amplification (SDA) and DNAzyme amplification. A trifunctional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe was designed including a methylation site for DNA MTase recognition, a complementary sequence of 8-17 DNAzyme for synthesizing DNAzyme, and a nicking site for nicking enzyme cleavage. Firstly, the trifunctional dsDNA probe was methylated by DNA MTase to form the methylated dsDNA. Subsequently, HpaII restriction endonuclease specifically cleaved the residue of unmethylated dsDNA. Next, under the action of polymerase and nicking enzyme, the methylared dsDNA initiated SDA, releasing numbers of 8-17 DNAzymes. Finally, the released 8-17 DNAzymes triggered DNAzyme amplification reaction to induce a significant fluorescence enhancement. This strategy could detect DNA MTase activity as low as 0.0082U/mL. Additionally, the strategy was successfully applied for evaluating the inhibitions of DNA MTase using two anticancer drugs, 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The results indicate the proposed strategy has a potential application in early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:26492469

  1. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle encapsulated tarenflurbil: A potential brain targeting strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Dhommati, Raju; Jain, Anjali; Challa, Venu Gopala Swami; Shaheen, M; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-20

    Poor brain penetration of tarenflurbil (TFB) was one of the major reasons for its failure in phase III clinical trials conducted on Alzheimer's patients. Thus there is a tremendous need of developing efficient delivery systems for TFB. This study was designed with the aim of improving drug delivery to brain through intranasally delivered nanocarriers. TFB was loaded into two different nanocarriers i.e., poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (TFB-NPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (TFB-SLNs). Particle size of both the nanocarriers (<200nm) as determined by dynamic light scattering technique and transmission electron microscopy, assured transcellular transport across olfactory axons whose diameter was ≈200nm and then paving a direct path to brain. TFB-NPs and TFB-SLNs resulted in 64.11±2.21% and 57.81±5.32% entrapment efficiencies respectively which again asserted protection of drug from chemical and biological degradation in nasal cavity. In vitro release studies proved the sustained release of TFB from TFB-NPs and TFB-SLNs in comparison with pure drug, indicating prolonged residence times of drug at targeting site. Pharmacokinetics suggested improved circulation behavior of nanoparticles and the absolute bioavailabilities followed this order: TFB-NPs (i.n.)>TFB-SLNs (i.n.)>TFB solution (i.n.)>TFB suspension (oral). Brain targeting efficiency was determined in terms of %drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and drug transport percentage (DTP). The higher %DTE (287.24) and DTP (65.18) were observed for TFB-NPs followed by TFB-SLNs (%DTE: 183.15 and DTP: 45.41) among all other tested groups. These encouraging results proved that therapeutic concentrations of TFB could be transported directly to brain via olfactory pathway after intranasal administration of polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. PMID:27185298

  2. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  3. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of the GASC1 Oncogene with Active Tumor-Targeted siRNA-Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Movassaghian, Sara; Xie, Yuran; Hildebrandt, Claudia; Rosati, Rayna; Li, Ying; Kim, Na Hyung; Conti, Denise S; da Rocha, Sandro R P; Yang, Zeng-Quan; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-08-01

    Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) accounts for the most aggressive types of breast cancer, marked by high rates of relapse and poor prognoses and with no effective clinical therapy yet. Therefore, investigation of new targets and treatment strategies is more than necessary. Here, we identified a receptor that can be targeted in BLBC for efficient and specific siRNA mediated gene knockdown of therapeutically relevant genes such as the histone demethylase GASC1, which is involved in multiple signaling pathways leading to tumorigenesis. Breast cancer and healthy breast cell lines were compared regarding transferrin receptor (TfR) expression via flow cytometry and transferrin binding assays. Nanobioconjugates made of low molecular weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) and transferrin (Tf) were synthesized to contain a bioreducible disulfide bond. siRNA complexation was characterized by condensation assays and dynamic light scattering. Cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, and the targeting specificity of the conjugates were investigated in TfR positive and negative healthy breast and breast cancer cell lines by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, RT-PCR, and Western blot. Breast cancer cell lines revealed a significantly higher TfR expression than healthy breast cells. The conjugates efficiently condensed siRNA into particles with 45 nm size at low polymer concentrations, showed no apparent toxicity on different breast cancer cell lines, and had significantly greater transfection and gene knockdown activity on mRNA and protein levels than PEI/siRNA leading to targeted and therapeutic growth inhibition post GASC1 knockdown. The synthesized nanobioconjugates improved the efficiency of gene transfer and targeting specificity in transferrin receptor positive cells but not in cells with basal receptor expression. Therefore, these materials in combination with our newly identified siRNA sequences are promising candidates for therapeutic targeting of hard-to-treat BLBC and are