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Sample records for active tectonic zone

  1. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  2. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  4. An Integrated Geospatial System for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.

    2015-10-01

    With the development of space-based technologies to measure surface geophysical parameters and deformation at the boundaries of tectonic plates and large faults, earthquake science has entered a new era. Using time series satellite data for earthquake prediction, it is possible to pursue the behaviors of earthquake precursors in the future and to announce early warnings when the differences between the predicted value and the observed value exceed the pre-define threshold value. Starting with almost one week prior to a moderate or strong earthquake a transient thermal infrared rise in LST of several Celsius degrees (oC) and the increased OLR values higher than the normal have been recorded around epicentral areas, function of the magnitude and focal depth, which disappeared after the main shock. Also are recorded associated geomagnetic and ionospheric distrurbances. Vrancea tectonic active zone in Romania is characterized by a high seismic hazard in European- Mediterranean region, being responsible of strong or moderate intermediate depth and normal earthquakes generation on a confined epicentral area. Based on recorded geophysical parameters anomalies was developed an integrated geospatial system for earthquake precursors assessment in Vrancea active seismic zone. This system integrates derived from time series MODIS Terra/Aqua, NOAA-AVHRR, ASTER, Landsat TM/ETM satellite data multi geophysical parameters (land surface temperature -LST, outgoing long-wave radiation- OLR, and mean air temperature- AT as well as geomagnetic and ionospheric data in synergy with in-situ data for surveillance and forecasting of seismic events.

  5. An attempt to monitor tectonic forces in the Vrancea active geodynamic zone: The Baspunar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Zlagnean, Luminita; Plopeanu, Marin

    2013-04-01

    (sparsely) run in the area, have provided inconsistent results on the PCF current dynamics. The Baspunar Geodynamic Observatory (BGO) has been designed and implemented by the Solid Earth Dynamics Department in the Institute of Geodynamics of the Romanian Academy in order to reveal and monitor eventual motions along PCF in the attempt to correlate variations in the slip rate with changes in the seismicity released within Vrancea zone. The first BGO records were strongly affected by changes in the atmospheric parameters. Consequently, technical measures and special corrections for the removal or at least mitigation of the effects created by changes in temperature, air pressure and humidity have been applied to the observations. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio, some mathematical filters have been applied too. The paper is aimed at revealing results of the geodetic observations along with preliminary geodynamic considerations. On the overall, after about two years of monitoring, PCF appears as an active tectonic contact. It mainly behaves as a left-lateral fault, but some short episodes with a reverse slip (dextral) were also pointed out. Correlations with crustal and intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in both cases within the bending zone of East Carpathians are illustrated and discussed.

  6. Discrimination and Assessment of Induced Seismicity in Active Tectonic Zones: A Case Study from Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Lindsey, N.; Foxall, W.; Robertson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes induced by human activity have become a matter of heightened public concern during recent years. Of particular concern is seismicity associated with wastewater injection, which has included events having magnitudes greater than 5. The causes of the induced events are primarily changes in pore-pressure, fluid volume and perhaps temperature due to injection. Recent research in the US has focused on mid-continental regions having low rates of naturally-occurring seismicity, where induced events can be identified by relatively straightforward spatial and temporal correlation of seismicity with high-volume injection activities. Recent examples include events correlated with injection of wastewater in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas and Ohio, and long-term brine injection in the Paradox Valley in Colorado. Even in some of the cases where there appears at first sight to be a clear spatial correlation between seismicity and injection, it has been difficult to establish causality definitively. Here, we discuss methods to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. We concentrate our study on Southern California, where large numbers of wastewater injection wells are located in oil-producing basins that experience moderate to high rates of naturally-occurring seismicity. Using the catalog of high-precision CISN relocations produced by Hauksson et al. (BSSA, 2012), we aim to discriminate induced from natural events based on spatio-temporal patterns of seismicity occurrence characteristics and their relationships to injection activities, known active faults and other faults favorably oriented for slip under the tectonic stress field. Since the vast majority of induced earthquakes are very small, it is crucial to include all events above the detection threshold of the CISN in each area studied. In addition to exploring the correlation of seismicity to injection activities in time and space, we analyze variations in frequency-magnitude distributions, which can

  7. Progressive failure during the 1596 Keicho earthquakes on the Median Tectonic Line active fault zone, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Toda, S.; Nishizaka, N.; Onishi, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rupture patterns of a long fault system are controlled by spatial heterogeneity of fault strength and stress associated with geometrical characteristics and stress perturbation history. Mechanical process for sequential ruptures and multiple simultaneous ruptures, one of the characteristics of a long fault such as the North Anatolian fault, governs the size and frequency of large earthquakes. Here we introduce one of the cases in southwest Japan and explore what controls rupture initiation, sequential ruptures and fault branching on a long fault system. The Median Tectonic Line active fault zone (hereinafter MTL) is the longest and most active fault in Japan. Based on historical accounts, a series of M ≥ 7 earthquakes occurred on at least a 300-km-long portion of the MTL in 1596. On September 1, the first event occurred on the Kawakami fault segment, in Central Shikoku, and the subsequent events occurred further west. Then on September 5, another rupture initiated from the Central to East Shikoku and then propagated toward the Rokko-Awaji fault zone to Kobe, a northern branch of the MTL, instead of the eastern main extent of the MTL. Another rupture eventually extended to near Kyoto. To reproduce this progressive failure, we applied two numerical models: one is a coulomb stress transfer; the other is a slip-tendency analysis under the tectonic stress. We found that Coulomb stress imparted from historical ruptures have triggered the subsequent ruptures nearby. However, stress transfer does not explain beginning of the sequence and rupture directivities. Instead, calculated slip-tendency values show highly variable along the MTL: high and low seismic potential in West and East Shikoku. The initiation point of the 1596 progressive failure locates near the boundary in the slip-tendency values. Furthermore, the slip-tendency on the Rokko-Awaji fault zone is far higher than that of the MTL in Wakayama, which may explain the rupture directivity toward Kobe-Kyoto.

  8. Tectonic Activity and Processes Preceding the Formation of the Dead Sea Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.; Pilchin, A. N.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of geological-geophysical data indicates that at the end of the Proterozoic, blocks of the Arabian Shield (AS) were thrust to the north-west onto the crust of the proto-Mediterranean (PM). This was caused by the pushing of oceanic crust from the south-east forming the Najd faults system (NF). This thrusting took place between 630 and 590 Ma, and is confirmed by the offsets between the Yanbu suture of the AS and Allaqi-Sol Hamid suture of the Nubian Shield (NS), the Bi'r Umq suture of AS and Nakasib suture of NS, and parts of the Yanbu and Nabitah sutures of AS. This caused the separation of AS from NS, and AS from the continental crust to north-east of it with its north-western displacement, resulting in opening of the Persian Gulf. This caused the start of deposition of huge amounts of Vendian-Cambrian evaporites in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Persian Gulf, Zagros, central Iran and other regions. The fact of the formation and preservation of the evaporites, and the common similarities in Vendian-Triassic sedimentary cover of Central Iran, Zagros, Taurus, and Arabian Plate (AP) and common Late Proterozoic-Early Paleozioc magmatic activity, show that these regions did not change their position significantly since then. Results of the DESERT project show that the lowermost part of the crust is present east of the Dead Sea Fault Zone (DSFZ), but it is absent west of it. This could be explained by detachment of the bottom part of the crust west of DSFZ during AP thrusting onto the crust of PM. The lithospheric slice discovered by seismic data between Moho and depth of about 55 km in S. Israel could be a remnant of that crust. During the thrusting, the AP overrode the detached slice. The slice was later remelted during formation of the postorogenic magmatic rocks of 590-530 Ma widespread in Jordan. The formation of three dyke swarms in S. Israel (600-540 Ma), widespread dykes in Sinai (590-530 Ma) and AP (590-530 Ma), as well as high-T-low-P metamorphism between 600

  9. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  10. Active Deformation in the Zagros-Makran Transition Zone Inferred From GPS, Tectonic and Seismological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Yaminifard, F.; Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Doerflinger, E.; Peyret, M.; Daignières, M.; Bellier, O.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2002-12-01

    The present-day N-S convergence between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is accommodated in Southern Iran along the Zagros fold and thrust belt (with a shortening of ~8 mm/yr)and by the subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Makran (with a rate of 18mm/yr). The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. In this area, the strain is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE trending reverse right lateral Minab-Zendan-Palami faults and along the N-S trending faults of Sarduiyeh, Jiroft and Sabzevaran. We used GPS network measurements (carried out in 2000 and 2002) to better understand how the deformation is distributed between between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. The analysis of the velocities (together with the measurements of the global network of Iran) leads to the following conclusions : - The rate of shortening in the Eastern Zagros is < 8mm/yr. It is < 5 mm/yr between the coast and the Main Zagros Thrust. - The horizontal residual velocities of the coastal sites in Zagros relative to Musandan are < 3mm/yr, evidencing for a small deformation in the Persian Gulf. - Across the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system GPS measurements are consistent with a N-S trending reverse right lateral motion at rate of ~ 10 mm/yr. - West of the Lut block at the latitude of Khanuj, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a 2 mm/yr right strike slip motion. Local seismicity is located at an unusual depth down to 35 km. Little is associated with the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults strike slip faults. They rather suggest that they are associated with a complex transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran subduction. Times delays also suggest a large heterogeneity in the crust across the fault system. These measurements support the model that the convergence from the collision to the subduction is

  11. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  12. Hidden faults in the Gobi Desert (Inner Mongolia, China) - evidence for fault activity in a previously tectonically stable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudersdorf, Andreas; Haedke, Hanna; Reicherter, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    The Gaxun Nur Basin (GNB, also Ejina Basin, Hei River Basin, Ruoshui Basin) north of the Tibetan Plateau and the Hexi Corridor is an endorheic basin bounded by the Bei Shan ranges in the west, the Gobi Altai mountains in the north and the Badain Jaran sand desert in the east. The basin is fed from the south by the braided drainage system of the Hei He (Hei River) and its tributaries, which originate in the Qilian Shan; terminal lakes like the dried Gaxun Nur and Sogo Nur are and have been temporal. The sedimentary succession of up to 300 m comprises intercalations of not only alluvial deposits but also lake sediments and playa evaporites. The basin has been regarded as tectonically inactive by earlier authors; however, the dating of sediments from an earlier drill core in the basin center provided some implications for tectonic activity. Subsequent remote sensing efforts revealed large lineaments throughout the basin which are now considered as possible fault line fingerprints. We investigated well preserved Yardangs (clay terraces) in the northeastern part of the GNB, in the vicinity of the Juyanze (paleo) lake, and found evidence for Holocene active tectonics (seismites). We present a lithological analysis of the relevant sequences and conclusions on the recent tectonic activity within the study area.

  13. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  14. Implications for the tectonic transition zone of active orogeny in Hoping drainage basin, by landscape evolution at the multi-temporal timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Q.; Chen, R. F.; Lin, W.; Hsieh, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    In an actively orogeny the landscape are transient state of disequilibrium in response to climatic and tectonic inputs. At the catchment scale, sensitivity of river systems plays an important role in landscape evolution. Hoping drainage basin is located at the tectonic transition zone in the north-eastern Taiwan, where the behavior of Philippine Sea plate switches from overriding above the east-dipping Eurasian Continental plate to northward subducting under the Ryukyu arc. However, extensive deep-seated landslides, debris flow, and numerous large alluvial terraces can be observed, suggesting strong surface processes in this watershed. This effect on regional climate fundamentally changed the landscape by reconfiguring drainage patterns and creating a vast influx of sediments into the basin. In this study we review the morphological evidence from multi-temporal timescale, including in-situ cosmogenic nuclides denudation rate and suspension load data, coupled with the analysis of the longitudinal profiles. The main goal of this study is to compare Holocene erosion rates with thermochronology and radiometric dating of river terraces to investigate the erosion history of Hoping area. The result shows that short-term erosion rate is around twice as large as the long-term denudation rate, which might due to the climate-driven erosion events such as typhoon-induced landslide. We've also mapped detail morphological features by using the high-resolution LiDAR image, which help us to identify not only the landslide but also tectonic features such as lineation, fault scarps, and fracture zones. The tectonic surface features and field investigation results show that the drainage basin is highly fractured, suggesting that even though the vertical tectonic activity rate is small, the horizontal shortening influenced by both southward opening of the back-arc Okinawa trough and the north-western collision in this area is significant. This might cause the reducing in rock strength

  15. Upper plate deformation and seismic barrier in front of Nazca subduction zone: The Chololo Fault System and active tectonics along the Coastal Cordillera, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Lacan, Pierre; Tavera, Hernando; Bondoux, Francis

    2008-11-01

    The South America plate boundary is one of the most active subduction zone. The recent Mw = 8.4 Arequipa 2001 earthquake ruptured the subduction plane toward the south over 400 km and stopped abruptly on the Ilo Peninsula. In this exact region, the subduction seismic crisis induced the reactivation of continental fault systems in the coastal area. We studied the main reactivated fault system that trends perpendicular to the trench by detailed mapping of fault related-geomorphic features. Also, at a longer time scale, a recurrent Quaternary transtensive tectonic activity of the CFS is expressed by offset river gullies and alluvial fans. The presence of such extensional fault systems trending orthogonal to the trench along the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru is interpreted to reflect a strong coupling between the two plates. In this particular case, stress transfer to the upper plate, at least along the coastal fringe, appears to have induced crustal seismic events that were initiated mainly during and after the 2001 earthquake. The seafloor roughness of the subducting plate is usually thought to be a cause of segmentation along subduction zones. However, after comparing and discussing the role of inherited structures within the upper plate to the subduction zone segmentation in southern Peru, we suggest that the continental structure itself may exert some feedback control on the segmentation of the subduction zone and thus participate to define the rupture pattern of major subduction earthquakes along the southern Peru continental margin.

  16. Geometry and faults tectonic activity of the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Evidence from magnetotelluric and electrical resistivity tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufford, Kelsey Mosley; Atekwana, Estella A.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Shemang, Elijah; Atekwana, Eliot A.; Mickus, Kevin; Moidaki, Moikwathai; Modisi, Motsoptse P.; Molwalefhe, Loago

    2012-04-01

    We used Magnetotelluric (MT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to investigate the geometry and nature of faults activity of the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in Botswana, an incipient rift at the southern tip of the Southwestern Branch of the East African Rift System. The ORZ forms a subtle topographic depression filled with Quaternary lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments and is bounded by NE-trending normal faults that are more prominent in the southeastern portion of the rift basin. An MT model from a regional (˜140 km) NW-SE trending MT transect shows that much of the rift basin is underlain by a broad asymmetrical low resistivity anomaly that slopes gently (˜1°) from NW to SE reaching a depth of ˜300 m. This anomaly suggests that faults in the southeastern part of the rift form a NW-dipping border fault zone and that the lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments contain brackish to saline water filling the broad half-graben structure. Furthermore, MT and ERT models from detailed (4-13 km long) MT transects and resistivity profiles show that one border fault (Thamalakane) and two within-basin faults (Lecha and Tsau) in the southeastern part of the ORZ are characterized by a localized high conductivity anomaly while another border fault (Kunyere) lacks such an anomaly. These localized anomalies are attributed to channelized fresh surface water and saline groundwater percolating through these faults forming "fault zone conductors" and suggest actively displacing faults. The lack of a "fault zone conductor" in the Kunyere fault is interpreted as indicating diminishing displacement on this fault, and that strain was transferred to the Thamalakane fault further to the east. The fluids provide lubricant for the ORZ faults, hence preventing infrequent large magnitude earthquakes, but favoring frequent micro-seismicity.

  17. Magnetic Data Interpretation for the Source-Edge Locations in Parts of the Tectonically Active Transition Zone of the Narmada-Son Lineament in Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    The study has been carried out in the transition zone of the Narmada-Son lineament (NSL) which is seismically active with various geological complexities, upwarp movement of the mantle material into the crust through fault, fractures lamination and upwelling. NSL is one of the most prominent lineaments in central India after the Himalaya in the Indian geology. The area of investigation extends from longitude 80.25°E to 81.50°E and latitude 23.50°N to 24.37°N in the central part of the Indian continent. Different types of subsurface geological formations viz. alluvial, Gondwana, Deccan traps, Vindhyan, Mahakoshal, Granite and Gneisses groups exist in this area with varying geological ages. In this study area tectonic movement and crustal variation have been taken place during the past time and which might be reason for the variation of magnetic field. Magnetic anomaly suggests that the area has been highly disturbed which causes the Narmada-Son lineament trending in the ENE-WSW direction. Magnetic anomaly variation has been taken place due to the lithological variations subject to the changes in the geological contacts like thrusts and faults in this area. Shallow and deeper sources have been distinguished using frequency domain analysis by applying different filters. To enhance the magnetic data, various types of derivatives to identify the source-edge locations of the causative source bodies. The present study carried out the interpretation using total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative, horizontal tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative map to get source-edge locations. The results derived from various derivatives of magnetic data have been compared with the basement depth solutions calculated from 3D Euler deconvolution. It is suggested that total horizontal derivative, tilt angle derivative and Cos (θ) derivative are the most useful tools for identifying the multiple source edge locations of the causative bodies in this tectonically active

  18. Tectonic creep in the Hayward fault zone, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, Dorothy H.; Bonilla, M.G.

    1966-01-01

    Tectonic creep is slight apparently continuous movement along a fault. Evidence of creep has been noted at several places within the Hayward fault zone--a zone trending northwestward near the western front of the hills bordering the east side of San Francisco Bay. D. H. Radbruch of the Geological Survey and B. J. Lennert, consulting engineer, confirmed a reported cracking of a culvert under the University of California stadium. F. B. Blanchard and C. L. Laverty of the East Bay Municipal Utility District of Oakland studied cracks in the Claremont water tunnel in Berkeley. M. G. Bonilla of the Geological Survey noted deformation of railroad tracks in the Niles district of Fremont. Six sets of tracks have been bent and shifted. L. S. Cluff of Woodward-Clyde-Sherard and Associates and K. V. Steinbrugge of the Pacific Fire Rating Bureau noted that the concrete walls of a warehouse in the Irvington district of Fremont have been bent and broken, and the columns forced out of line. All the deformations noted have been right lateral and range from about 2 inches in the Claremont tunnel to about 8 inches on the railroad tracks. Tectonic creep almost certainly will continue to damage buildings, tunnels, and other structures that cross the narrow bands of active movement within the Hayward fault zone.

  19. New evidence for global tectonic zones on Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozak, R.C.; Schaber, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Venera 15 and 16 spacecraft images show clear evidence of major crustal disruptions on Venus which have been interpreted to indicate crustal divergence. Complementary to the divergent zones are mountain belts that border the continent-like high terrains. The requisite transcurrent motions appear to be manifested as diffuse shear zones. The rift zones form an interconnected transpolar system which ties in with previously recognized equatorial disruption zones, suggesting a global tectonic network. Several independent lines of evidence suggest that the tectonism may be geologically young. -Authors

  20. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  1. Identifying active structures in the Kayak Island and Pamplona Zones: Implications for offshore tectonics of the Yakutat Microplate, Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Lindsay L.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Pavlis, Terry L.

    Within the northern Gulf of Alaska, the Yakutat (YAK) microplate obliquely collides with and subducts beneath the North American (NA) continent at near-Pacific plate velocities. We investigate the extent that thin-skinned deformation on offshore structures located within the western portion of the unsubducted YAK block accommodates YAK-NA convergence. We compare faulting and folding observed on high-resolution and basin-scale multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data with earthquake locations and surface ruptures observed on high-resolution bathymetric data. Holocene sediments overlying the Kayak Island fault zone (KIZ), previously interpreted as a region of active contraction, are relatively flat-lying, suggesting that active convergence within the KIZ is waning. Seismic reflection profiles east of KIZ show up to ˜200 m of undisturbed sediments overlying older folds in the Bering Trough, indicating that this area has been tectonically inactive since at least the last ˜1.3 Ma. Farther east, MCS profiles image active deformation in surface sediments along the eastern edge of the Pamplona zone (PZ) fold-and-thrust belt, that are collocated with a concentration of earthquake events that continues southwest to Khitrov Ridge and onshore through Icy Bay. These observations suggest that during the late Quaternary offshore shallow deformation style changed from distributed across the western Yakutat block to localized at the eastern edge of the PZ with extrusion of sediments southwest through the Khitrov Ridge area to the Aleutian Trench. This shallow deformation is interpreted as deformation of an accretionary complex above a shallow decollement.

  2. Preliminary results on the tectonic activity of the Ovacık Fault (Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone, Turkey): Implications of the morphometric analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazıcı, Müge; Zabci, Cengiz; Sançar, Taylan; Sunal, Gürsel; Natalin, Boris A.

    2016-04-01

    The Anatolian 'plate' is being extruded westward relative to the Eurasia along two major tectonic structures, the North Anatolian and the East Anatolian shear zones, respectively making its northern and eastern boundaries. Although the main deformation is localized along these two structures, there is remarkable intra-plate deformation within Anatolia, especially which are characterized by NE-striking sinistral and NW-striking dextral strike-slip faults (Şengör et al. 1985). The Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone (MOFZ) and its northeastern member, the Ovacık Fault (OF), is a one of the NE-striking sinistral strike slip faults in the central 'ova' neotectonic province of Anatolia, located close to its eastern boundary. Although this fault zone is claimed to be an inactive structure in some studies, the recent GPS measurements (Aktuǧ et al., 2013) and microseismic activity (AFAD, 2013) strongly suggest the opposite. In order to understand rates and patterns of vertical ground motions along the OF, we studied the certain morphometric analyses such as hypsometric curves and integrals, longitudinal channel profiles, and asymmetry of drainage basins. The Karasu (Euphrates) and Munzur rivers form the main drainage systems of the study area. We extracted all drainage network from SRTM-based Digital Elevation Model with 30 m ground pixel resolution and totally identified 40 sub-drainage basins, which are inhomogeneously distributed to the north and to the south of the OF. Most of these basins show strong asymmetry, which are mainly tilted to SW. The asymmetry relatively decreases from NE to SW in general. The only exception is at the margins of the Ovacık Basin (OB), where almost the highest asymmetry values were calculated. On the other hand, the characteristics of hypsometric curves and the calculated hypsometric integrals do not show the similar systematic spatial pattern. The hypsometric curves with convex-shaped geometry, naturally indicating relatively young morphology

  3. Tectonic zoning of Wrangel Island, Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, S. D.; Tuchkova, M. I.; Moiseev, A. V.; Verzhbitskii, V. E.; Malyshev, N. A.; Gushchina, M. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The Northern, Central, and Southern zones are distinguished by stratigraphic, lithologic, and structural features. The Northern Zone is characterized by Upper Silurian-Lower Devonian sedimentary rocks, which are not known in other zones. They have been deformed into near-meridional folds, which formed under settings of near-latitudinal shortening during the Ellesmere phase of deformation. In the Central Zone, mafic and felsic volcanic rocks that had been earlier referred to Carboniferous are actually Neoproterozoic and probably Early Cambrian in age. Together with folded Devonian-Lower Carboniferous rocks, they make up basement of the Central Zone, which is overlain with a angular unconformity by slightly deformed Lower (?) and Middle Carboniferous-Permian rocks. The Southern Zone comprises the Neoproterozoic metamorphic basement and the Devonian-Triassic sedimentary cover. North-vergent fold-thrust structures were formed at the end of the Early Cretaceous during the Chukchi (Late Kimmerian) deformation phase.

  4. GPS and seismological constraints on active tectonics and arc-continent collision in Papua New Guinea: Implications for mechanics of microplate rotations in a plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Stevens, Colleen; Silver, Eli; McCaffrey, Rob; Loratung, Wesley; Hasiata, Suvenia; Stanaway, Richard; Curley, Robert; Rosa, Robert; Taugaloidi, Jones

    2004-05-01

    The island of New Guinea is located within the deforming zone between the Pacific and Australian plates that converge obliquely at ˜110 mm/yr. New Guinea has been fragmented into a complex array of microplates, some of which rotate rapidly about nearby vertical axes. We present velocities from a network of 38 Global Positioning System (GPS) sites spanning much of the nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG). The GPS-derived velocities are used to explain the kinematics of major tectonic blocks in the region and the nature of strain accumulation on major faults in PNG. We simultaneously invert GPS velocities, earthquake slip vectors on faults, and transform orientations in the Woodlark Basin for the poles of rotation of the tectonic blocks and the degree of elastic strain accumulation on faults in the region. The data are best explained by six distinct tectonic blocks: the Australian, Pacific, South Bismarck, North Bismarck, and Woodlark plates and a previously unrecognized New Guinea Highlands Block. Significant portions of the Ramu-Markham Fault appear to be locked, which has implications for seismic hazard determination in the Markham Valley region. We also propose that rapid clockwise rotation of the South Bismarck plate is controlled by edge forces initiated by the collision between the Finisterre arc and the New Guinea Highlands.

  5. Some aspects of the tectonics of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubouin, Jean

    1989-03-01

    The main structures of a subduction zone are as follows. (1) On the outer wall: faults, formed either by reactivation of the structural grain of the oceanic plate, when the latter is slightly oblique to the trench, or by a new fault network parallel to the trench, or both. The width of the faulted zone is about 50 miles. (2) On the inner wall: either an accretionary prism or an extensional fault network, or both; collapsed structures and slumps are often associated, sometimes creating confusion with the accretionary structures. (3) The overall structure of the trench itself is determined by the shape of the edge of the continental crust or of the island arc. Its detailed structure, however, is related to the oceanic plate, namely when the structural grain of the latter is slightly oblique to the trench, which then takes an "en echelon" form. Collapsed units can fill up the trench which is, in that case, restricted to an irregular narrow depression; the tectonic framework of the trench can be buried under a sedimentary blanket when the sedimentation rate is high and the trench bottom is a large, flat area. Two extreme types of active margins can be distinguished: convergent compressive margins, when the accretionary mechanism is strongly active; and convergent extensional margins where the accretionary mechanism is absent or only weakly active. The status of a given margin between these two extreme types is related to the convergence rate of the plates, the dip of the subduction zone, the sedimentation activity and the presence of a continental obstacle, because oceanic seamounts and aseismic ridges are easily subducted. Examples are taken from the Barbados, Middle America, Peru, Kuril, Japan, Nankai, Marianna, Manila, New Hebredes and Tonga trenches.

  6. Vertical tectonics at an active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Direct observations of vertical movements of the earth's surface are now possible with space-based GPS networks, and have applications to resources, hazards and tectonics. Here we present data on vertical movements of the Earth's surface in New Zealand, computed from the processing of GPS data collected between 2000 and 2015 by 189 permanent GPS stations. We map the geographical variation in vertical rates and show how these variations are explicable within a tectonic framework of subduction, volcanic activity and slow slip earthquakes. Subsidence of >3 mm/yr is observed along southeastern North Island and is interpreted to be due to the locked segment of the Hikurangi subduction zone. Uplift of 1-3 mm/yr further north along the margin of the eastern North Island is interpreted as being due to the plate interface being unlocked and underplating of sediment on the subduction thrust. The Volcanic Plateau of the central North Island is being uplifted at about 1 mm/yr, which can be explained by basaltic melts being injected in the active mantle-wedge at a rate of ∼6 mm/yr. Within the Central Volcanic Region there is a 250 km2 area that subsided between 2005 and 2012 at a rate of up to 14 mm/yr. Time series from the stations located within and near the zone of subsidence show a strong link between subsidence, adjacent uplift and local earthquake swarms.

  7. Tectonic evolution of the Palmyra zone, Syria

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, F.X.; Sengor, A.M.C. )

    1988-08-01

    The Palmyra foldbelt extends approximately 350 km northeast from its intersection with the Dead Sea transform near Damascus. The surface expression of this feature is a southeast-verging fold-and-thrust belt that brings rocks as old as Triassic to the surface in fault contact with Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks. The palmyra region is first recognized as a subsiding trough from at least Triassic and possibly Permian time through middle Tertiary. This subsidence increases south-westward, reaching a reported maximum of 6 km of sediment north of Damascus, and is related to right-lateral motion along the eastern margin of the opening southern branch of the Neotethys sea as the Cimmerian continent moved northward away from northeast AFrica during Permian-Triassic time. Extension and subsidence continued through the Jurassic and Cretaceous, interrupted by uplift and erosion from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous in the northeastern part of the zone. Compression and inversion of the Palmyra zone begin during Miocene time with the initiation of left-lateral displacement on the Dead Sea transform system related to the continued opening of the Red Sea and the failure of the Gulf of Suez rift system. Approximately 105 km of offset are reported for the Dead Sea transform along the Jordan-Israel border segment, while 60 km are reported in Syria north of Lebanon. The Palmyra foldbelt accommodates this discrepancy through oblique shortening, possibly utilizing pre-existing extensional fault systems.

  8. A global tectonic activity map with orbital photographic supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A three part map showing equatorial and polar regions was compiled showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the past one million years, including the present. Features shown include actively spreading ridges, spreading rates, major active faults, subduction zones, well defined plates, and volcanic areas active within the past one million years. Activity within this period was inferred from seismicity (instrumental and historic), physiography, and published literature. The tectonic activity map was used for planning global geodetic programs of satellite laser ranging and very long base line interferometry and for geologic education.

  9. Geophysical Limitations on the Habitable Zone: Volcanism and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Planets are typically classified as potentially life-bearing planets (i.e. habitable planets) if they are rocky planets and if a liquid (e.g. water) could exist at the surface. The latter depends on several factors, like for example the amount of available solar energy, greenhouse effects in the atmosphere and an efficient CO2-cycle. However, the definition of the habitable zone should be updated to include possible geophysical constraints, that could potentially influence the CO2-cycle. Planets like Mars without plate tectonics and no or only limited volcanic events can only be considered to be habitable at the inner boundary of the habitable zone, since the greenhouse effect needed to ensure liquid surface water farther away from the sun is strongly reduced. We investigate if the planet mass as well as the interior structure can set constraints on the occurrence of plate tectonics and outgassing, and therefore affect the habitable zone, using both parameterized evolution models [1] and mantle convection simulations [1,2]. We find that plate tectonics, if it occurs, always leads to sufficient volcanic outgassing and therefore greenhouse effect needed for the outer boundary of the habitable zone (several tens of bar CO2), see also [3]. One-plate planets, however, may suffer strong volcanic limitations. The existence of a dense-enough CO2 atmosphere allowing for the carbon-silicate cycle and release of carbon at the outer boundary of the habitable zone may be strongly limited for planets: 1) without plate tectonics, 2) with a large planet mass, and/or 3) a high iron content. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office through the Planet Topers alliance, and results within the collaboration of the COST Action TD 1308. References Noack, L., Rivoldini, A., and Van Hoolst, T.: CHIC - Coupling Habitability, Interior and Crust, INFOCOMP 2015, ISSN 2308-3484, ISBN 978

  10. Anelastic properties beneath the Niigata-Kobe Tectonic Zone, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Toru

    2017-02-01

    We estimate the three-dimensional (3D) P-wave attenuation structure beneath the Niigata-Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ), central Japan, using high-quality waveform data from a large number of stations. The obtained results confirm the segmentation of the NKTZ into three regions, as suggested by 3D seismic velocity models, and reveal characteristic structures related to surface deformation, shallow subduction of the Philippine Sea slab, and magmatism. The lower crust beneath the NKTZ west of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) is overall characterized by distinct high attenuation, whereas the upper crust shows marked high attenuation to the east of the ISTL. Differences in the depths of anelastically weakened parts of the crust probably result in a first-order spatial variation in surface deformation, forming wide (width of 100 km) and narrow (width of 25-40 km) deformation zones on the western and eastern sides of the ISTL, respectively. Many M ≥ 6.5 earthquakes occur in the upper crust where seismic attenuation in the underlying lower crust varies sharply, suggesting that spatial variations in rates of anelastic deformation in the lower crust result in stress concentration in the overlying brittle crust. We interpret a moderate- to low-attenuation zone located in the lower crust at the northeast of Biwa Lake to reflect low-temperature conditions that are developed locally as a result of shallow subduction of the cold Philippine Sea slab.

  11. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Aswa Shear Zone (ASZ) is a major NW-SE trending structure of over 1000 km length in East Africa. In Uganda, the ASZ is a steeply NE-dipping, up to 11 km wide mylonitic shear zone that shows multiple stage brittle reactivation. On outcrop-scale, the fabric in the ASZ is characterized by a well-developed NW-SE striking and subvertical or steeply NE or SW dipping mylonitic foliation and a subhorizontal to moderately NW- or SE-plunging stretching lineation. Sinistral kinematics and fabric are very consistent along strike. The strain is heterogeneously distributed and partitioned into lens-shaped lower strain zones dominated by folding and characterized by pure shear, which are surrounded by high strain zones, some of them thick ultramylonites, with intense simple shear combined with flattening and strong transposition of pre-existing fabrics. Ductile shearing occurred during bulk E-W shortening, commenced at amphibolite facies conditions and continued with similar kinematics at greenschist and even lower grade conditions. A number of (sub-)parallel shear zones occur to the NE and SW of the main zone at a distance of up to 20-45 km. They show similar fabrics and kinematics and are thus related to activity along ASZ reflecting strain partitioning into simple shear and pure shear domains on a regional scale. Samples of mylonitic gneisses from the shear zone have been analyzed with U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS and show Neoarchaean crystallisation ages between 2.66 and 2.61 Ga. Timing of ductile sinistral shearing is poorly constrained by lower intercept ages of 686 ± 62 and 640 ± 44 Ma. The fabric and structural relationship of the ca. 660 Ma Adjumani Granite exposed in the northern segment of ASZ suggest that the age of shear activity can be further limited to ca. 685 and 655 Ma. The Aswa Shear Zone is interpreted as an intra-cratonic, crustal-scale structure close to the northeastern margin of the Congo Craton, possibly inherited from previous continental extension. Early Aswa

  12. Tectonic architecture of the Hongseong collision zone in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-04-01

    The Hongseong collision zone in the Korean Peninsula is tectonically correlated to the Chinese Qinling-Dabie-Sulu belt, and it preserves evidence of breakup-subduction-collision prior to final amalgamation of NE Asia. This study presents the tectonic domains of the Hongseong collision zone, divided primarily based on protolith age, origin, and metamorphic and structural characteristics of the constituent rock units, and their tectonic significances. Domain 1, the eastern-most part of the Hongseong collision zone, consists mainly of Paleoproterozoic basement gneiss, which was mainly affected by Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic mafic magmatic activities. Part of the Neoproterozoic metabasite preserves evidence of eclogite-facies metamorphism. Domain 2 mainly records Neoproterozoic arc magmatism, as well as Paleozoic volcanism and sedimentation that occurred in an arc-forearc setting. The volcano-sedimentary sequence contains evidence of Paleozoic high-grade metamorphism. Many serpentinite lenses are present in domain 2, including suprasubduction zone peridotite that was serpentinized during the Late Paleozoic. Domain 3 is a broad exposure of Late Paleozoic turbidite, interpreted to be a flysch derived from uplifted sedimentary or metasedimentary rock. Greenschist-facies metamorphism occurred in this domain. Geological age decreases from domain 1 to domain 3, which may indicate that the continental crust grew westward prior to the Late Paleozoic in the Hongseong area. This interpretation is concordant with the westward sequential change from basement through suprasubduction zone to flysch.

  13. Tectonics, Fluids, and the Seismogenic Zone: Four Decades of Drilling at Convergent Margins (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; All Dsdp, Odp,; Iodp Convergent Margin Scientific Parties

    2010-12-01

    Investigations of Tectonics, Fluids, and the Seismogenic Zone are three disciplines that have driven convergent margin drilling. Each of these major themes sequentially evolved as centerpieces of drilling as the intellectual framework and the requisite technologies developed. Each remains active today. In the 1970s and early 1980s, initial results from testing plate tectonic theory defined the nature of progressive accretion, and conversely, tectonic erosion at convergent margins. With the more robust D/V JOIDES Resolution, investigation of fluid pressure, compositions, migration paths, and sediment/rock permeability became possible. 3D seismic data, first available in the early 1990s, detailed fluid migration paths inferred from porewater geochemical anomalies, emphasizing the importance of faults as fluid conduits. 3D seismic volumes also resulted in extraordinary insights on the structure and tectonics of convergent margins. In the mid 1990s packer testing and long-term monitoring of fault zones provided the first estimates of in situ fluid pressures, permeabilities, and variation of the latter with effective stress. Experimental studies, and hydrological and geomechanical modeling have provided critical perspectives on the observational data. During the late 1990s and 2000s the convergent margin community focused on earthquake processes in the Seismogenic Zone Experiment (SEIZE). Understanding of tectonics and fluids, plus monitoring, 3D seismic imaging, Logging While Drilling technology, and D/V Chikyu riser drilling capability have all contributed to emergent accomplishments of SEIZE. Some key results of this program include 1) estimates of material flux into the seismogenic zone, 2) measurement of stress orientation and magnitude across the margin of SW Japan, 3) recognition of high velocity fault slip at shallow depths, 4) correlation of monitored variations in fluid pressure and composition with seismic events, and 5) the initiation of a deep riser hole

  14. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  15. About independent tectonic position of diatreme fields and zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanovitch-Wulff, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Geologists repeatedly made attempts to determine the structural position of diatreme (D) fields on platforms, and in conjunction them with the regional tectonic zones, rifts, aulacogens, deep faults, zones of fracturing, domed structures, etc. However, the options presented such position clearly inconsistent, do not correspond to each other and are the result of extreme subjective interpretation in low volume of geological and geophysical data. Despite ongoing attempts to link D-fields and zones to any tectonic structures, it is clear that these do not have to accommodate of D no relationship (although coincidences are possible). It was established that: - D-fields are not sharply defined geological boundaries, which would be reflected in the structure of the cover or foundation; - localization of D-fields not related to regional faults, nor with their intersection nodes; - D-zones have independent structural position and also not associated with fault zones; - zones of fracturing imposed in some D-fields are due to the formation of D-pipes, not the cause of their location; - formation D-pipes and dome-shaped structures is a single process associated with the intrude force of D-melt; domed structures, corresponding D-fields, formed as a result of simultaneous ("battery") introduction of magmatic melt. This is supported by the fact that these structures do not have deep roots and flatten with the depth (Kaminski et al, 1995) As a result of the analysis and comprehension of these data, the author has developed the following affirmation: the main pattern in the distribution of K-fields and zones lies in their lack of universal spatial relationships with older crustal structures, in their independent ("indifferent") position on these structures. Established pattern can be easily explained from the standpoint of "Bolide model" of the diatremes (including kimberlite) origin, whereby D are result of electrical discharges in the upper horizons of the crust; cause such

  16. Types and Evolution of Gas Hydrate System along the Tectonically Active Zones of the Western Pacific: Nankai Trough vs. Eastern Margin of Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Tomaru, H.; Takeuchi, L.; Hiruta, A.; Ishizaki, O.; Aoyama, C.; Machiyama, H.; Goto, T.

    2007-12-01

    are widely distributed throughout the area, while no double BSRs are observed. BSRs within gas chimneys are very strong and often exhibit pull-up structure. A number of piston corers have recovered chunks of massive gas hydrate from the mounds. ROV dives observed gas hydrates exposed atop the mounds. Furthermore, electric ocean floor survey has revealed that sediments below the pockmark-mound zones were not conductive. These lines of evidence suggest that the mounds are more-or-less composed of or at least contain significant amounts of methane. Sea-level fall during the last glacial, 120 m in Japan Sea, should have caused instability of gas hydrate, in particular, those within pockmarks. Pull-up structures within the chimney seem to support the model that the mounds are gas hydrate dome and the pockmark, probably a relic hydrate mound. Glacial sea level fall should have caused massive dissociation of subsurface methane hydrate as in case of the Nankai trough. However the methane from the dissociation of massive hydrate in the chimney should escape to seawater to form a crater-like depression pockmarks. Considering active venting, gigantic plumes, inferred violent venting and perhaps floating of massive gas hydrates, gas hydrate deposits are to be formed during warmer, high-sea level periods, and episodic dissociation and massive emission of methane to ocean/atmosphere system.

  17. Tectonic stress within the New Madrid seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana, Jeffrey P.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1996-03-01

    Refraction data indicate a significant high-density rift pillow beneath the New Madrid seismic zone. We present results of linear and nonlinear viscoelastic finite element modeling to determine whether support of the rift pillow may contribute significantly to the total present-day stress field, and we consider the implications for intraplate seismicity. These models were run for a loading time of 100 m.y. to account for relaxation and transfer of stress since the last reactivation of the rift in the mid-Mesozoic. Results indicate that the nonlinear viscoelastic model with rheological stratification based on composition and temperature agrees well with the observed deformation within the seismic zone and with estimates of regional stress magnitudes. The model predicts a maximum compression of 30-40 MPa above the rift pillow in the center of the rift axis. If the magnitude of local compression predicted by the nonlinear model produces the inferred clockwise rotation of the order of 10°-30° in the direction of SHmax (maximum horizontal compression) near the rift axis, the magnitude of regional compression is a factor of 1 to 2 times the magnitude of local compression and consistent with an origin due to ridge push forces. The addition of the local stress associated with the rift pillow, however, results in an approximately 30% reduction in the resolved maximum horizontal shear stress. Thus, while the stress associated with the rift pillow can rotate the stress field into an orientation favorable for failure, reduction in the resolved shear stress requires a separate mechanism for strength reduction. Results of the modeling indicate that stresses from the load of the rift pillow may still be present in the upper crust even after 100 m.y. and may still play a role in present-day deformation and seismicity of the New Madrid seismic zone. Local stress fields of significant tectonic magnitudes may also occur around other ancient rift pillows and help explain the

  18. Seismic structure and tectonics of the Shackleton Fracture Zone (Drake Passage, Scotia Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geletti, Riccardo; Lodolo, Emanuele; Schreider, Anatoly A.; Polonia, Alina

    2005-03-01

    The structural framework of the southern part of the Shackleton Fracture Zone has been investigated through the analysis of a 130-km-long multichannel seismic reflection profile acquired orthogonally to the fracture zone near 60° S. The Shackleton Fracture Zone is a 800-km-long, mostly rectilinear and pronounced bathymetric lineation joining the westernmost South Scotia Ridge to southern South America south of Cape Horn, separating the western Scotia Sea plate from the Antarctic plate. Conventional processing applied to the seismic data outlines the main structures of the Shackleton Fracture Zone, but only the use of enhanced techniques, such as accurate velocity analyses and pre-stack depth migration, provides a good definition of the acoustic basement and the architecture of the sedimentary sequences. In particular, a strong and mostly continuous reflector found at about 8.0 s two-way traveltime is very clear across the entire section and is interpreted as the Moho discontinuity. Data show a complex system of troughs developed along the eastern flank of the crustal ridge, containing tilted and rotated blocks, and the presence of a prominent listric normal fault developed within the oceanic crust. Positive flower structures developed within the oceanic basement indicate strike-slip tectonism and partial reactivation of pre-existing faults. Present-day tectonic activity is found mostly in correspondence to the relief, whereas fault-induced deformation is negligible across the entire trough system. This indicates that the E W-directed stress regime present in the Drake Passage region is mainly dissipated along a narrow zone within the Shackleton Ridge axis. A reappraisal of all available magnetic anomaly identifications in the western Scotia Sea and in the former Phoenix plate, in conjunction with new magnetic profiles acquired to the east of the Shackleton Fracture Zone off the Tierra del Fuego continental margin, has allowed us to propose a simple reconstruction

  19. Active tectonics coupled to fluvial erosion in the NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannay, J.-C.; Grasemann, B.; Rahn, M.; Frank, W.; Carter, A.

    2003-04-01

    Both syntaxial extremities of the Himalaya show a spatial correlation between active exhumation of deep crustal rocks and the presence of powerful rivers, the Indus and the Tsangpo-Brahmaputra, cutting across the range two of the deepest gorges on Earth. These features strongly suggests that vigorous fluvial erosion can locally enhance isostatic and tectonic uplift, which in turn contributes to heat advection and weakening of the crust, as well as to maintain steep topographic gradients [Zeitler et al., 2001]. In order to test this positive feedback model, we combined structural and geochronological data to constrain the tectono-thermal evolution along the Sutlej (NW India), the third largest river cross-cutting entirely the Himalaya. The Himalayan crystalline core zone exposed along the Sutlej Valley is composed of two gneiss sheets, that were successively underthrusted and tectonically extruded as a consequence of the foreland-directed propagation of deformation in the Indian plate margin. During Early to Middle Miocene, combined thrusting along the Main Central Thrust (MCT) and extension along the Sangla Detachment induced the rapid exhumation and cooling of the amphibolite facies to migmatitic High Himalayan Crystalline Sequence [Vannay &Grasemann, 2001]. Underthrusting beneath the MCT led to the creation of the amphibolite facies Lesser Himalayan Crystalline Sequence (LHCS). The LHCS cooled rapidly from Late Miocene to Pleistocene, as a consequence of tectonic extrusion controlled by thrusting along the Munsiari Thrust, and extension in the MCT hanging wall. This phase is still active, as indicated by: (1) cooling rates in excess of 100^oC/Myr during the past ˜3 Myr in the LHCS; (2) Holocene neo-tectonic activity; (3) present-day hydrothermal activity testifying to elevated near-surface geothermal gradients; and (4) seismic activity along the Munsiari Thrust. Modelling of fluvial erosion in the Himalaya indicate that the Sutlej Valley corresponds to the main

  20. Tectonic history of the northern Nabitah fault zone, Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, J.E.; Bosch, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the presence of similar lithologies, similar structure, and analogous tectonic setting, the Mother Lode District in California is reviewed as a model for gold occurrences near the Nabitah fault zone in this report.

  1. Mantle convection and crustal tectonics in the Tethyan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, L.; Sternai, P.; Menant, A.; Faccenna, C.; Becker, T. W.; Burov, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Mantle convection drives plate tectonics and the size, number and thermotectonic age of plates codetermines the convection pattern. However, the degree of coupling of surface deformation and mantle flow is unclear. The use of SKS waves seismic anisotropy shows a coherence of mantle and surface deformation, but significant examples depart from this scenario. We review geological observations and present kinematic reconstructions of the Aegean and Middle East and 3D numerical models to discuss the role of asthenospheric flow in crustal deformation. At the scale of the Mediterranean backarcs, lithosphere-mantle coupling is effective below the most extended regions as shown by the alignment of SKS fast orientations and stretching directions in MCCs. In the Aegean, the directions of mantle flow, crustal stretching and GPS velocities are almost parallel, while, below the main part of the Anatolian plate, SKS fast orientations are oblique to GPS velocities. When considering the long-term geological history of the Tethyan convergent, one can conclude that asthenospheric flow has been an important player. The case of Himalaya and Tibet strongly supports a major contribution of a northward asthenospheric push, with no persistent slab that could drive India after collision, large thrust planes being then decoupling zones between deep convection and surface tectonics. The African plate repeatedly fragmented during its migration, with rifting of large pieces of continents that had then been moving northward faster than Africa (Apulia, Arabia). This also suggests a dominant role of an underlying flow at large scale, dragging and mechanically eroding plates and breaking them into fragments, then passively carried. Mantle flow thus seems to be able to carry plates toward subduction zones, break-away pieces of plates, and deform backarc upper crust where the lithosphere is the thinnest. Most numerical models of lithospheric deformation are designed such that strain is a consequence

  2. Areas of Active Tectonic Uplift Are Sensitive to Small Changes in Fold Orientations within a Broad Zone of Left-lateral Transpression and Shearing, Dominican Republic and Haiti (Hispaniola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosius, I.; Mann, P.

    2014-12-01

    Previous GPS studies have shown that the island of Hispaniola is a 250 km-wide zone of active, east-west, left-lateral shearing along two major strike-slip zones: the Septentrional-Oriente fault zone through the northern part of the island and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) through the southern part of the island. The total interplate rate distributed on both faults is 21 mm/yr. Using a high-resolution DEM, we constructed fluvial channel profiles across transpression-related folds of late Miocene to recent age in the area of central and southern Dominican Republic and Haiti to determine controls of areas of relatively high, moderate, and slow uplift inferred from fluvial channel profiles. Fold axes in this area extend for 50-150 km and exhibit two different trends: 1) folds that occupy the area of the Sierra de Neiba-Chaine des Matheux north of the Enriquillo-Cul-de-Sac Valley and EPGFZ and folds that occupy the area of the Sierra de Bahoruco-Massif de la Selle all exhibit more east-west fold axes trending 110; 2) folds that occupy the area northwest of the EPGFZ in the western Chaine des Matheux and Sierra de Neiba all exhibit fold axes with more northwest trends of 125. River channel profiles show that the second group of more northwesterly-trending fold axes show relatively higher rates of tectonic uplift based on their convex-upward river profiles. Our interpretation for regional variations in river profiles and inferred uplift is that uplift is more pronounced on fold axes trending 15 degrees more to the northwest because their axes are more oblique to the interplate direction of east-west shearing. Longterm uplift rates previously measured from a stairstep of late Quaternary coral terraces at the plunging nose of the westernmost Chaine des Matheux have been previously shown to be occurring at a rate of 0.19 mm/yr. Onland exposures of Holocene corals are found only on one locality within the southern area of folds 30 km west of the epicenter

  3. Shear zones developed between extensional and compressional tectonic regimes: recent deformation of the Burdur Fethiye Shear Zone as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk; Aktuǧ, Bahadır

    2016-04-01

    The southwestern Turkey is one of the most tectonically active areas of the eastern Mediterranean and therefore is a controversial region from the geodynamic point of view. This complex tectonic regime is dominated by the westward escape of Anatolia related to North Anatolian Fault, Aegean back-arc extension regime due to roll-back of Hellenic Arc, the subduction transform edge propagator (STEP) fault zone related to the motion of Hellenic and Cyprus arcs and compressional regime of Tauride Mountains. In addition to that, an active subduction and seamounts moving towards the north determine the tectonic frame of the Eastern Mediterranean. Many researchers suggest either the existence of a single left lateral fault or the nonexistence of a fault zone between Western Anatolia and Western Taurides. According to the integration of digital elevation data, non-commercial GoogleEarth satellite images and field studies, a 300 km-long 75-90 km-wide NE-SW-trending left lateral shear zone, the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, is located among these tectonic structures. By using GPS velocities and focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes, it is understood that most of the previous studies turn a blind eye to the hundreds of faults related to a left-lateral shear zone which will have an important role in the Mediterrenean tectonics. The Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone is like a zipper driven by the relative velocity differences due to the Aegean back-arc extensional system and Western Taurides compressional region and presents a high seismic activity. The GPS vectors reflect remarkable velocity differences on land and relatedly the significant topographic differences can be clearly observed. According to the GPS vectors, the Aegean region moves 4-12 mm/yr faster than the wesward escape of the Anatolia towards southwest and the velocities are low in the Western Taurides. The left-lateral differential motion across the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone varies from 3-4 mm/yr in the north side to 8

  4. Tectonic deformation zones across the Himalaya of northwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, R. C.; Faruhn, J.; Robert, X.; Dey, S.; Nennewitz, M.; Jain, V.; Stübner, K.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the large-scale tectonic features of the Himalayan wedge are now thought to be understood, e.g. spatio-temporal distribution of deformation across the orogen is still unknown. For instance, it has been favored that crustal shortening dominantly accommodates along the toe of the wedge and that the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) forms the direct surface expression of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). The oblique convergence of NW-Himalaya, provides a unique opportunity to detect important differences in deformation patter compared to the arc-perpendicular convergence in Nepal and further east. The following observation provide a key for understanding the location of the main decoupling horizon and where strain is accommodated between the under thrusting India and the Himalayan wedge. (a) In the NW-Himalaya segments of the MFT grow arc-parallel in contrast to the strongly undulating trend of the MBT resulting in a strongly curved topographic front. (b) Majority of Holocene shorting is accommodated along the out-of-sequence thrust, e.g. Jwalamukhi-Thrust, that is located in the center of the Sub-Himalaya and probably only minor parts of the total shortening is accommodated along the MFT. (c) We observed top-to-west thrust ramps that are uplifting early tertiary Subathu and Dhramsala formation within the footwall of the here north-south trending segment of the MBT. This pattern of deformation strongly suggest that the Sub-Himalaya is more strongly connected and effected by the under-thrusting of India rather than triggered by deformation of the Himalayan Wedge, behaving here as regit indentor. (d) Low temperature thermochronology transects across the Dhauladar Rangeindicate continuous uplift and fault displacement with rates in the range of 1-2 mm/yr along the MBT-fault zone hanging wall since the late Miocene. In summary these deformation pattern demonstrates that MBT and MFT developed independently from each other and that deformation within Sub-Himalaya is

  5. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  6. Mobilization of evaporites in tectonically active terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiros, Stathis C.

    2015-04-01

    The role of evaporites, mostly halite, during seismic sequences is investigated using evidence from certain earthquakes with magnitude between approximately 6.0 and 7.2 which occurred in the last 60 years in the Zagros Mts. (Iran) and the Ionian Sea (Greece); i.e. two seismically active areas, characterized by evaporite-associated decollements and more shallow decollements combined with mature, along-thrusts intrusions. Studied earthquakes produced either large scale surface deformation, or were covered by high-resolution and accuracy GPS and INSAR data, permitting to fully recognize the deformation pattern. In all cases an "atypical", tectonic deformation pattern was observed, ranging from apparently "impossible" patterns (thrust and normal faults, sub-parallel and homothetic; 1953 Cephalonia earthquake, Greece) to rather diffuse tectonic patterns, even to "phantom" earthquakes (Zagros). Careful analysis and modeling of the surface deformation data, in combination with the available geological, geophysical and seismological data permits to recognize, and even to quantify differences between deformation observed, and that expected in ordinary environments. In particular, it was found that during earthquakes evaporites were mobilized, and this led either to a secondary deformation of the overburden, fully detached from the basement, or to significant aseismic (post-seismic) deformation. Anomalies in the distribution of seismic intensities due to evaporitic intrusions along faults were also observed. Apart from seismological implications (unpredictable post-seismic deformation, possibly also in the far-field), these results deriving from regions at different levels of evaporitic evolution, may prove useful to understand patterns of mobilization of evaporites during periods of tectonic activity.

  7. Areas of Unsolved Problems in Caribbean Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    I review some unsolved problems in Caribbean active tectonics. At the regional and plate scale: 1) confirm the existence of intraplate deformation zones of the central Caribbean plate that are within the margin of error of ongoing GPS measurements; 2) carry out field studies to evaluate block models versus models for distributed fault shear on the densely populated islands of Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands; 3) carry out paleoseismological research of key plate boundary faults that may have accumulated large strains but have not been previously studied in detail; 4) determine the age of onset and far-field effects of the Cocos ridge and the Central America forearc sliver; 4) investigate the origin and earthquake-potential of obliquely-sheared rift basins along the northern coast of Venezuela; 5) determine the age of onset and regional active, tectonic effects of the Panama-South America collision including the continued activation of the Maracaibo block; and 6) validate longterm rates on active subduction zones with improving, tomographic maps of subducted slabs. At the individual fault scale: 1) determine the mode of termination of large and active strike -slip faults and application of the STEP model (Septentrional, Polochic, El Pilar, Bocono, Santa Marta-Bucaramanaga); 2) improve the understanding of the earthquake potential on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone given "off-fault" events such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake; how widespread is this behavior?; and 3) estimate size of future tsunamis from studies of historic or prehistoric slump scars and mass transport deposits; what potential runups can be predicted from this information?; and 4) devise ways to keep rapidly growing, circum-Caribbean urban populations better informed and safer in the face of inevitable and future, large earthquakes.

  8. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  9. The role of space-based observation in understanding and responding to active tectonics and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Walters, R. J.; Wright, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The quantity and quality of satellite-geodetic measurements of tectonic deformation have increased dramatically over the past two decades improving our ability to observe active tectonic processes. We now routinely respond to earthquakes using satellites, mapping surface ruptures and estimating the distribution of slip on faults at depth for most continental earthquakes. Studies directly link earthquakes to their causative faults allowing us to calculate how resulting changes in crustal stress can influence future seismic hazard. This revolution in space-based observation is driving advances in models that can explain the time-dependent surface deformation and the long-term evolution of fault zones and tectonic landscapes.

  10. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  11. Active Tectonics and Seismic Potential of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Wesson, Robert L.; Ekström, Göran

    This multidisciplinary monograph provides the first modern integrative summary focused on the most spectacular active tectonic systems in North America. Encompassing seismology, tectonics, geology, and geodesy, it includes papers that summarize the state of knowledge, including background material for those unfamiliar with the region; address global hypotheses using data from Alaska; and test important global hypotheses using data from this region. It is organized around four major themes: • subduction and great earthquakes at the Aleutian Arc, • the transition from strike slip to accretion and subduction of the Yakutat microplate, • the Denali fault and related structures and their role in accommodating permanent deformation of the overriding plate, and • regional integration and large-scale models and the use of data from Alaska to address important global questions and hypotheses. The book's publication near the beginning of the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project makes it especially timely because Alaska is perhaps the least understood area within the EarthScope footprint, and interest in the region can be expected to rise with time as more EarthScope data become available.

  12. Modeling the Philippine Mobile Belt: Tectonic blocks in a deforming plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; McCaffrey, R.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Aurelio, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Philippine Mobile Belt, a seismically active, rapidly deforming plate boundary zone situated along the convergent Philippine Sea/Eurasian plate boundary, is examined using geodetic and seismological data. Oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian plate is accommodated by nearly orthogonal subduction along the Philippine Trench and the Manila Trench, as well as by strike-slip faulting along the Philippine Fault system. We develop a model of active plate boundary deformation in this region, using elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, published GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions. We then present an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation, based on the best-fit model that minimizes the misfit between observed and predicted geodetic vectors and earthquake slip vectors. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~22 - 36 mm/yr in the Central Visayas and about 10 to 40 mm/yr in Luzon, trending almost parallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Negros Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. On the eastern side of Central Visayas, sinistral strike-slip faulting occurs along the NNW-SSE-trending Philippine Fault. Mindanao Island in southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning (strike- slip faulting with west-verging subduction) in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench, respectively. Oblique active sinistral strike slip faults in Central and Eastern Mindanao that were hypothesized to be responsible for basin formation are obvious boundaries for tectonic blocks. Located south of Mindanao Island we define an adjoining oceanic block defined by the N-S trending complex dual subduction zone of Sangihe and Halmahera

  13. Lithosphere structure of the Longmenshan tectonic zone and main factors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, F.; Wang, X.; Qing, Z.; Bai, D.; Meixing, H.; Jingqi, L.; Gang, Z.; Yongzhen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We analysis the lithosphere structure of the Longmenshan tectonic zone and main factors of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake from the results of magnetotelluric sounding, gravity and magnetic detection. The comprehensive geophysical profiles were detected across Songpan-Ganzi folded zone, Longmenshan tectonic zone and Western Sichuan foreland basin. Two-dimensional electrical structure shows that the major tectonic units have different electrical characteristics. The Western Sichuan foreland basin is a typical craton model which has higher resistivity and thinner layers of the lithosphere than the Songpan-Ganzi folded zone, low resistivity anomaly zones only exist in horizontal direction on upper crust, the middle lower crust and upper mantle performance for high resistance characteristics, the vertical stratification is not obvious in the Western Sichuan foreland basin . The Songpan-Ganzi folded zone is a typical thickening crust model , which has large-scale low resistivity anomaly layers in the middle and lower crust, and high resistivity abnormal layers in the upper crust. Density detection results shows that the density of the local high resistance body under the Longmenshan Caopo country is relatively high (3.0 g/cm3) , which is likely to be the mantle-derived basic substances from the invasion of the upper crust. Longmenshan tectonic zone has two sets of fault system: one is a shallow fault system mainly consist of brittle shear zone from the surface layer of the earth's crust, another is a deep fault system mainly consist of ductile shear zone cutting the Moho or crust-mantle transition zone. Shallow and deep tectonic action indicates that the tectonism of these areas are different, which is probably caused by the earth's crust and mantle medium motion decoupling. The main source of 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake located in the footwall of Yingxiu fault, however, the earthquake fracture which induced the 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake is not Yingxiu fault but maybe a

  14. Overview of Recent Coastal Tectonic Deformation in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Herrera, M. Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    2011-08-01

    Holocene and Pleistocene tectonic deformation of the coast in the Mexico subudction margin is recorded by geomorphic and stratigraphic markers. We document the spatial and temporal variability of active deformation on the coastal Mexican subduction margin. Pleistocene uplift rates are estimated using wave-cut platforms at ca. 0.7-0.9 m/ka on the Jalisco block coast, Rivera-North America tectonic plate boundary. We examine reported measurements from marine notches and shoreline angle elevations in conjunction with their radiocarbon ages that indicate surface uplift rates increasing during the Holocene up to ca. 3 ± 0.5 m/ka. In contrast, steady rates of uplift (ca. 0.5-1.0 m/ka) in the Pleistocene and Holocene characterize the Michoacan coastal sector, south of El Gordo graben and north of the Orozco Fracture Zone (OFZ), incorporated within the Cocos-North America plate boundary. Significantly higher rates of surface uplift (ca. 7 m/ka) across the OFZ subduction may reflect the roughness of subducting plate. Absence of preserved marine terraces on the coastal sector across El Gordo graben likely reflects slow uplift or coastal subsidence. Stratigraphic markers and their radiocarbon ages show late Holocene (ca. last 6 ka bp) coastal subsidence on the Guerrero gap sector in agreement with a landscape barren of marine terraces and with archeological evidence of coastal subsidence. Temporal and spatial variability in recent deformation rates on the Mexican Pacific coast may be due to differences in tectonic regimes and to localized processes related to subduction, such as crustal faults, subduction erosion and underplating of subducted materials under the southern Mexico continental margin.

  15. b values and ω−γ seismic source models: Implications for tectonic stress variations along active crustal fault zones and the estimation of high-frequency strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    In this study the tectonic stress along active crustal fault zones is taken to be of the form , where  is the average tectonic stress at depth y and Δσp(x, y) is a seismologically observable, essentially random function of both fault plane coordinates; the stress differences arising in the course of crustal faulting are derived from Δσp(x, y). Empirically known frequency of occurrence statistics, moment-magnitude relationships, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops may be used to infer that the number of earthquakes N of dimension ≥r is of the form N ∼ 1/r2 and that the spectral composition of Δσp(x, y) is of the form , where  is the two-dimensional Fourier transform of Δσp(x, y) expressed in radial wave number k. The γ = 2 model of the far-field shear wave displacement spectrum is consistent with the spectral composition , provided that the number of contributions to the spectral representation of the radiated field at frequency ƒ goes as (k/k0)2, consistent with the quasi-static frequency of occurrence relation N ∼ 1/r2;k0 is a reference wave number associated with the reciprocal source dimension. Separately, a variety of seismologic observations suggests that the γ = 2 model is the one generally, although certainly not always, applicable to the high-frequency spectral decay of the far-field radiation of earthquakes. In this framework, then, b values near 1, the general validity of the γ = 2 model, and the constancy of earthquake stress drops independent of size are all related to the average spectral composition of. Should one of these change as a result of premonitory effects leading to failure, as has been specifically proposed for b values, it seems likely that one or all of the other characteristics will change as well from their normative values. Irrespective of these associations, the far-field, high-frequency shear radiation for the γ = 2 model in the presence of anelastic attenuation may be interpreted as

  16. Crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of the Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, T. R. K.; Yellappa, T.; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Cauvery suture zone (CSZ) in southern India has witnessed multiple deformations associated with multiple subduction-collision history, with incorporation of the related accretionary belts sequentially into the southern continental margin of the Archaean Dharwar craton since Neoarchean to Neoproterozoic. The accreted tectonic elements include suprasubduction complexes of arc magmatic sequences, high-grade supracrustals, thrust duplexes, ophiolites, and younger intrusions that are dispersed along the suture. The intra-oceanic Neoarchean-Neoproterozoic arc assemblages are well exposed in the form of tectonic mélanges dominantly towards the eastern sector of the CSZ and are typically subjected to complex and multiple deformation events. Multi-scale analysis of structural elements with detailed geological mapping of the sub-regions and their structural cross sections, geochemical and geochronological data and integrated geophysical observations suggest that the CSZ is an important zone that preserves the imprints of multiple cycles of Precambrian plate tectonic regimes.

  17. Streak Tectonics associated with the Irregular Slab Topography at Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the physical features of streak tectonics (or abrasion tectonics) associated with the irregular surface topography, such as local convex rise or seamount(s), on the downgoing slab at subduction zones. Marine surveys such as sophisticated multichannel seismic experiments have revealed the detailed vertical structure of the overriding lithosphere as well as the upper-most part of downgoing slab at the fore-arc zone from the trench axis through the inclined plate interface zone at a depth of 10 - 15km. As previously, some researchers (e.g., Eguchi, 1979, 1996; Hilde, 1983; Suzan, 2010) demonstrated the influence of the surface irregular topography of the slab on the occurrence regime of greater interplate seismic events with the low-angle underthrusting slip. However, the earlier studies didn't incorporate any effects due to the spherical buckling of oceanic lithosphere with the age-dependent elastic thickness at subduction zones. In the case of a subduction zone where the slab age has gradually been decreasing or increasing, the spherical buckling of elastic shell (e.g., Eguchi, 2012) suggests that the interplate mechanical coupling strength varies with time and space. Next, we argue some tectonic features of strain-rate dependent deformation at areas surrounding an isolated-seamount on the downgoing slab, such as the quasi-static fluid lubrication, boundary lubrication or plastic deformation. We then discuss how to represent mathematically the streak process during a larger interplate seismic event at the non-uniform plate interface zone.

  18. Tectonic significance of the Valera Fault Zone, Northwestern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, J.; Bueno, E.; Ostos, M. )

    1993-02-01

    A detailed structural study was performed at the southern end of the north-south to north-northwest Valera fault zone. The area is particularly interesting, since it lies close to the triple point were the Maracaibo and Lara blocks meet the South American plate. The fault zone is associated with an anticlinorium with the following structural features: (a) conic folds with hinges oriented N26-35E; (b) a main, left-lateral, north-northwest to north-south fault population; (c) a secondary set of dextral west-northwest faults; and (d) two secondary sets of left-lateral northwest and northeast faults. The structural pattern and the dynamic analysis of the faults, which indicated a N 46-50 W shortening, is compatible with the spatial arrangement of structures associated with a north-south to north-northwest sinistral strike-slip fault. A regional interpretation based on seismic sections tied to wells suggests a continuous and complex structural evolution including: (a) early Eocene northwesterly trending normal faulting, at the forebulge developed during the emplacement of the Lara nappes; (b) Early Neogene NW reverse faulting and inversion of early normal faults, at the transpressive zone that bounded the Maracaibo and Lara blocks; (c) Late Neogene development of the sinistral Valera fault zone to accomodate the tangential component of the relative movement between the two blocks.

  19. Suture Zones, Seismic Wave Propagation and Tectonics of Central Asia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-10

    prominent strike-slip faults in the Eurasian hinter- lands of the frontal fold and thrust belt (e.g., the Chaman and Herat faults) have shown only...with dextral shear (associated with crustal shortening) in the Quetta-Sibi syntaxial region and sinistral shear along the Chaman fault. Similar zones

  20. Electrical resistivity structure of the Great Slave Lake shear zone, northwest Canada: implications for tectonic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yaotian; Unsworth, Martyn; Liddell, Mitch; Pana, Dinu; Craven, James A.

    2014-10-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) profiles in northwestern Canada cross the central and western segments of Great Slave Lake shear zone (GSLsz), a continental scale strike-slip structure active during the Slave-Rae collision in the Proterozoic. Dimensionality analysis indicates that (i) the resistivity structure is approximately 2-D with a geoelectric strike direction close to the dominant geological strike of N45°E and that (ii) electrical anisotropy may be present in the crust beneath the two southernmost profiles. Isotropic and anisotropic 2-D inversion and isotropic 3-D inversions show different resistivity structures on different segments of the shear zone. The GSLsz is imaged as a high resistivity zone (>5000 Ω m) that is at least 20 km wide and extends to a depth of at least 50 km on the northern profile. On the southern two profiles, the resistive zone is confined to the upper crust and pierces an east-dipping crustal conductor. Inversions show that this dipping conductor may be anisotropic, likely caused by conductive materials filling a network of fractures with a preferred spatial orientation. These conductive regions would have been disrupted by strike-slip, ductile deformation on the GSLsz that formed granulite to greenschist facies mylonite belts. The pre-dominantly granulite facies mylonites are resistive and explain why the GSLsz appears as a resistive structure piercing the east-dipping anisotropic layer. The absence of a dipping anisotropic/conductive layer on the northern MT profile, located on the central segment of the GSLsz, is consistent with the lack of subduction at this location as predicted by geological and tectonic models.

  1. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  2. Active tectonics of central-western Caucasus, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N.; Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Gventsadse, A.; Enukidze, O.; Varazanashvili, O.; Müller, B. I. R.

    2016-11-01

    This work contributes to a better knowledge of potentially seismogenic faults of the Georgia Greater and Lesser Caucasus by evaluating the distribution of earthquake foci, active tectonic stress field, kinematics and geometry of main fault planes. We consider all the information coming from field structural geology, geomorphology, seismological data from historical and instrumental catalogues, seismic reflection sections, as well as new focal mechanism solutions. These data enable recognizing some active ENE-WSW reverse faults in the core of the Greater Caucasus that are parallel to the mountain range. At the southernmost front of the Greater Caucasus, a series of main thrusts dipping towards NNE are active, with up to hundreds-km-long segments; along this thrust zone, a potentially locked segment is present, about 90 km long. The studied section of the Lesser Caucasus has active structures along the northern front given by south-dipping thrusts, as well as in the central core where strike-slip and oblique faults coexist. The Transcaucasian depression between the two mountain ranges shows an ongoing inversion tectonics of the central part of the Rioni Basin where active N- to NE-dipping reverse faults are present, accompanied by clear evidence of uplift of a wide area. The data are coherent with a N-S to NNE-SSW contraction of the central-western Greater Caucasus and Lesser Caucasus. Although in general the seismicity decreases westward in terms of number of earthquakes and magnitude, seismological and geological structural data in the Rioni Basin indicate here a Quaternary propagation of deformation towards the west.

  3. The influence of regional extensional tectonic stress on the eruptive behaviour of subduction-zone volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, M.; Cronin, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Regional tectonic stress is considered a trigger mechanism for explosive volcanic activity, but the related mechanisms at depth are not well understood. The unique geological setting of Ruapehu, New Zealand, allows investigation on the effect of enhanced regional extensional crustal tension on the eruptive behaviour of subduction-zone volcanoes. The composite cone is located at the southwestern terminus of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, one of the most active silicic magma systems on Earth, which extends through the central part of New Zealand's North Island. Rhyolitic caldera eruptions are limited to its central part where crustal extension is highest, whereas lower extension and additional dextral shear dominate in the southwestern and northeastern segments characterized by andesitic volcanism. South of Ruapehu, the intra-arc rift zone traverses into a compressional geological setting with updoming marine sequences dissected by reverse and normal faults. The current eruptive behaviour of Ruapehu is dominated by small-scaled vulcanian eruptions, but our studies indicate that subplinian to plinian eruptions have frequently occurred since ≥340 ka and were usually preceded by major rhyolitic caldera unrest in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Pre-existing structures related to the NNW-SSE trending subduction-zone setting are thought to extend at depth and create preferred pathways for the silicic magma bodies, which may facilitate the development of large (>100 km3) dyke-like upper-crustal storage systems prior to major caldera activity. This may cause enhanced extensional stress throughout the entire intra-arc setting, including the Ruapehu area. During periods of caldera dormancy, the thick crust underlying the volcano and the enhanced dextral share rate likely impede ascent of larger andesitic magma bodies, and storage of andesitic melts dominantly occurs within small-scaled magma bodies at middle- to lower-crustal levels. During episodes of major caldera unrest, ascent and

  4. Anatomy of an escape tectonic zone: Western Irian Jaya (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, Manuel; Ego, Frédéric

    2002-07-01

    The western fold-and-thrust belt of New Guinea in Irian Jaya is presently a complex boundary, dominated by the Bird's Head block escape from the collision between the Australian plate and the remnants of volcanic belts carried by the Pacific plate. The escape rate given by geodetic measurements is of the order of 7 cm/yr, and movement is accommodated by a broad shear zone. We analyze this shear pattern using fault slip analyses performed in the field from 1992 to 1996, combined with focal mechanism inversions, moment tensors summations, and surface trace of structures inferred from radar and multispectral satellite images. Time control of the deformation is attained by isotope dating of the recent syntectonic intrusives. The geometry of the macro and microstructures occurred in two stages from the early Pliocene to the Present. The first stage (5 to 2 Ma) is marked by flat-and-ramps structures guided by N60°E lateral ramps associated with a N60°E cleavage, affecting the whole of western Irian Jaya. The second stage (2 Ma to Present) shows the collapse of the western fold-and-thrust belt and the escape of the Bird's Head and the Lengguru belts along N60°E transtensile faults. In the latter stage, the strike-slip offset is distributed on the N60°E schistosity zone along which some fracture planes are reactivated as left-lateral transtensile faults. Shallow earthquakes moment tensors have been inverted for stress and summed to get strain rates to define contrasting structural provinces. The spatial variations in both stress and strain fields from earthquakes and microtectonics show that (1) they are consistent and are assumed to be coeval, (2) they reveal that oblique convergence is partitioned, and (3) they are influenced by the existence of a free boundary. We see no significant rotation of stress axes laterally along the escape zone. Instead, stresses change according to the different orientations of basement structures and thus undergo rapid spatial variations

  5. Variscan tectonics in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, South Portuguese Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, C.; Casas, J. M.

    2002-10-01

    This paper aims to discuss the structural evolution of the Iberian Pyrite Belt during the Variscan Orogeny. It provides new structural data, maps and cross sections from the eastern part of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Regional geology of the South Portuguese Zone and lithostratigraphy of the Iberian Pyrite Belt are first briefly summarised. Three roughly homoaxial deformation phases are distinguished, and are mainly characterised by south-verging multi-order folds, axial planar cleavages and thrusts. Three structural units are distinguished: the La Puebla de Guzmán and Valverde del Camino antiforms are rooted units related to the propagation of southward-directed thrust systems that may branch onto the lower décollement level of the South Portuguese Zone; El Cerro de Andévalo is a structurally higher unit, mainly composed of allochthonous D1 thrust nappes. No evidence of sinistral transpression has been found in the transected cleavage and the strike of S3 with respect to S2. Better evidence of transpression is the moderately to steeply westerly plunging folds that show S-type asymmetry in down-plunge view. Variscan deformation in the Iberian Pyrite Belt is defined as the combination of a dominant southwards shear and a sinistral E-shear caused by oblique continental collision between the South Portuguese plate and the Iberian Massif.

  6. Evolution of the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan, during exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigematsu, Norio; Kametaka, Masao; Inada, Noriyuki; Miyawaki, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Ayumu; Kameda, Jun; Togo, Tetsuhiro; Fujimoto, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Like many crustal-scale fault zones, the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) fault zone in Japan preserves fault rocks that formed across a broad range of physical conditions. We examined the architecture of the MTL at a large new outcrop in order to understand fault behaviours under different crustal levels. The MTL here strikes almost E-W, dips to the north, and juxtaposes the Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks to the south against the Izumi Group sediments to the north. The fault core consists mainly of Sanbagawa-derived fault gouges. The fault zone can be divided into several structural units, including two slip zones (upper and lower slip zones), where the lower slip zone is more conspicuous. Crosscutting relationships among structures and kinematics indicate that the fault zone records four stages of deformation. Microstructures and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that the four stages of deformation occurred under different temperature conditions. The oldest deformation (stage 1) was widely distributed, and had a top-to-the-east (dextral) sense of slip at deep levels of the seismogenic zone. Deformation with the same sense of slip, then became localised in the lower slip zone (stage 2). Subsequently, the slip direction in the lower slip zone changed to top-to-the-west (sinistral-normal) (stage 3). The final stage of deformation (stage 4) involved top-to-the-north normal faulting along the two slip zones within the shallow crust (near the surface). The widely distributed stage 1 damage zone characterises the deeper part of the seismogenic zone, while the sets of localised principal slip zones and branching faults of stage 4 characterise shallow depths. The fault zone architecture described in this paper leads us to suggest that fault zones display different behaviours at different crustal levels.

  7. Seismic Wave Attenuation Estimated from Tectonic Tremor and Radiated Energy in Tremor for Various Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Baltay, A.; Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground motion prediction is an essential component of earthquake hazard assessment. Seismic wave attenuation with distance is an important, yet difficult to constrain, factor for such estimation. Using the empirical method of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), seismic wave attenuation with distance, which includes both the effect of anelastic attenuation and scattering, can be estimated from the distance decay of peak ground velocity (PGV) or peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ordinary earthquakes; however, in some regions where plate-boundary earthquakes are infrequent, such as Cascadia and Nankai, there are fewer data with which to constrain the empirical parameters. In both of those subduction zones, tectonic tremor occurs often. In this study, we use tectonic tremor to estimate the seismic wave attenuation with distance, and in turn use the attenuation results to estimate the radiated seismic energy of tremor. Our primary interest is in the variations among subduction zones. Ground motion attenuation and the distribution of released seismic energy from tremors are two important subduction zone characteristics. Therefore, it is very interesting to see whether there are variations of these parameters in different subduction zones, or regionally within the same subduction zone. It is also useful to estimate how much energy is released by tectonic tremor from accumulated energy to help understand subduction dynamics and the difference between ordinary earthquakes and tremor. We use the tectonic tremor catalog of Ide (2012) in Nankai, Cascadia, Mexico and southern Chile. We measured PGV and PGA of individual tremor bursts at each station. We assume a simple GMPE relationship and estimate seismic attenuation and relative site amplification factors from the data. In the Nankai subduction zone, there are almost no earthquakes on the plate interface, but intra-slab earthquakes occur frequently. Both the seismic wave attenuation with distance and the site

  8. Hydrothermal and tectonic activity in northern Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Pierce, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is the site of one of the world's largest calderas. The abundance of geothermal and tectonic activity in and around the caldera, including historic uplift and subsidence, makes it necessary to understand active geologic processes and their associated hazards. To that end, we here use an extensive grid of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (???450 km) to document hydrothermal and tectonic features and deposits in northern Yellowstone Lake. Sublacustrine geothermal features in northern Yellowstone Lake include two of the largest known hydrothermal explosion craters, Mary Bay and Elliott's. Mary Bay explosion breccia is distributed uniformly around the crater, whereas Elliott's crater breccia has an asymmetric distribution and forms a distinctive, ???2-km-long, hummocky lobe on the lake floor. Hydrothermal vents and low-relief domes are abundant on the lake floor; their greatest abundance is in and near explosion craters and along linear fissures. Domed areas on the lake floor that are relatively unbreached (by vents) are considered the most likely sites of future large hydrothermal explosions. Four submerged shoreline terraces along the margins of northern Yellowstone Lake add to the Holocene record or postglacial lake-level fluctuations attributed to "heavy breathing" of the Yellowstone magma reservoir and associated geothermal system. The Lake Hotel fault cuts through northwestern Yellowstone Lake and represents part of a 25-km-long distributed extensional deformation zone. Three postglacial ruptures indicate a slip rate of ???0.27 to 0.34 mm/yr. The largest (3.0 m slip) and most recent event occurred in the past ???2100 yr. Although high heat flow in the crust limits the rupture area of this fault zone, future earthquakes of magnitude ???5.3 to 6.5 are possible. Earthquakes and hydrothermal explosions have probably triggered landslides, common features around the lake margins. Few high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have

  9. Recurrent intraplate tectonism in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Hamilton, R M; Crone, A J; Russ, D P; McKeown, F A; Brockman, S R

    1980-08-29

    For the first time, New Madrid seismicity can be linked to specific structural features that have been reactivated through geologic time. Extensive seismic reflection profiling reveals major faults coincident with the main earthquake trends in the area and with structural deformation apparently caused by repeated episodes of igneous activity.

  10. Recurrent intraplate tectonism in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Zoback, M.D.; Hamilton, R.M.; Crone, A.J.; Russ, D.P.; McKeown, F.A.; Brockman, S.R.

    1980-08-29

    For the first time, New Madrid seismicity can be linked to specific structural features that have been reactivated through geologic time. Extensive seismic reflection profiling reveals major faults coincident with the main earthquake trends in the area and with structural deformation apparently caused by repeated episodes of igneous activity.

  11. Unraveling the geodynamic evolution and tectonic history of the Guatemala Suture Zone: a world-class natural laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, K. E.; Brocard, G. Y.; Harlow, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Guatemala Suture Zone (GSZ) is the fault-bound region in central Guatemala that contains the present North American-Caribbean plate boundary. It is bounded by the Maya Block to the north and by the Chortís Block to the south. This major composite geotectonic unit contains a variety of ophiolites, serpentinite mélanges, and metavolcano-sedimentary sequences along with high-grade schist, gneisses, low-grade metasediments and metagranites thrusted north and south of the active Motagua fault system (MFS). This modern plate boundary has accommodated at least ~1100 km of left-lateral strike-slip motion over the Cenozoic and brings into contact the geological provinces described above. Classically, the GSZ has been interpreted as the result of a single progressive collision of a Chortís Block-related island arc with the passive margin of the Maya Block. This model was based on geochemical signatures of basaltic rocks in oceanic crust sequences both north and south of the MFS. However, results from our research challenge this single collision hypothesis. Oceanic and continental high-pressure-low-temperature (HP-LT) rocks astride the MFS have recorded multiple tectonic events revealed by their multiple metamorphic ages (Sm-Nd, U-Pb and Ar-Ar) and distinct PT paths. These tectonic events differ in age north and south of the MFS. Moreover, the continental and oceanic sequences across the MFS are geochemically and stratigraphically distinct, suggesting different tectonic origins. The southern margin of the Maya Block and the northern section of the GSZ can be clearly interpreted as a Cretaceous-Paleocene flexural passive margin tectonically overridden by ultramafic rocks and a Cretaceous island arc sequence. In contrast, the southern section of the GSZ is composed of a Carboniferous-Jurassic active margin tectonically imbricated with ultramafic rocks and a circum-Pacific Jurassic MORB and IAT metavolcano-sedimentary sequence. Thus, based on these results, we identify at

  12. Periodic Vesicle Formation in Tectonic Fault Zones--an Ideal Scenario for Molecular Evolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich; Dávila, María J

    2015-06-01

    Tectonic fault systems in the continental crust offer huge networks of interconnected channels and cavities. Filled mainly with water and carbon dioxide (CO2), containing a wide variety of hydrothermal chemistry and numerous catalytic surfaces, they may offer ideal reaction conditions for prebiotic chemistry. In these systems, an accumulation zone for organic compounds will develop at a depth of approximately 1 km where CO2 turns sub-critical and dissolved components precipitate. At this point, periodic pressure changes caused for example by tidal influences or geyser activity may generate a cyclic process involving repeated phase transitions of carbon dioxide. In the presence of amphiphilic compounds, this will necessarily lead to the transient formation of coated water droplets in the gas phase and corresponding vesicular structures in the aqueous environment. During this process, the concentration of organic components inside the droplets and vesicles would be drastically increased, allowing for favorable reaction conditions and, in case of the vesicles generated, large trans-membrane concentration gradients. Altogether, the process of periodic formation and destruction of vesicles could offer a perfect environment for molecular evolution in small compartments and for the generation of protocells. The basic process of vesicle formation is reproduced experimentally with a lipid in a water/CO2 system.

  13. Tidal sensitivity of tectonic tremors in Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Suguru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Houston, Heidi; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Tectonic tremors in subduction zones, which result from slip at the deep plate interface, are known to exhibit a 12.4 h periodicity in their activity, due to tidal influence. Because tidal stress can be calculated quantitatively, the response of the plate interface can yield quantitative information about its frictional property. The relation between tremor rate and tidal stress is investigated, and an exponential relation is widely confirmed, as observed by previous studies. This study particularly focuses on spatial variations of tidal sensitivity, which are compared with spatial variations of tremor duration and amplitude. The sensitivity is quantitatively defined by the exponent of the exponential relation, which can be related to the parameter aσ, or (a - b)σ in the rate-and-state friction law, where σ is effective normal stress. On the shallower tremor zone, short-duration and large-amplitude tremors occur followed by more sensitive tremors. Meanwhile, deeper tremors with longer duration and smaller amplitude show lower sensitivity, although along-strike variation also exists. Typical and maximum sensitivities estimated here imply values for aσ or (a - b)σ of about 3 and 1 kPa, respectively. These correlations are consistent with a model in which the plate interface consists of a velocity-strengthening background with embedded velocity-weakening regions. The frictional heterogeneity may be statistically characterized by cluster size and density of the velocity-weakening regions and controls the overall slip behavior. The observed depth dependency of tremor duration, amplitude, and sensitivity implies that frictional heterogeneity is controlled by physical quantities varying with depth, such as temperature or fluid amount.

  14. Linking geological evidence from the Eurasian suture zones to a regional Indian Ocean plate tectonic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, A.; Aitchison, J.; Müller, R.; Whittaker, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a revised regional plate tectonic model for the Indian Ocean from the Late Jurassic to present, which assimilates both marine geophysical data constraining the seafloor spreading history as well as a variety of geological observations from the Eurasian collision zone. This model includes relative motion between Greater India, Sri Lanka, West Australia, East Antarctica, East Madagascar, the Seychelles and Argoland, a continental sliver which began migrating towards Eurasia in the Late Jurassic, forming the northern margins of Greater India and western Australia. Recently collected data offshore northwest Australia suggest that the majority of Greater India reached only halfway along the West Australian margin in an Early Mesozoic reconstruction, bounded by the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. The revised geometries and relative motion histories redefine the timing and nature of collisional events, as well as the history of back-arc basins and intra-oceanic arcs, such as the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc in northwest India and Pakistan. Abundant ophiolites have been identified throughout the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone, between the Indian-Himalaya and Tibet, several have boninitic compositions and almost all date to either the Mid Jurassic or late Early Cretaceous. Further evidence suggests that an intra-oceanic arc collided with Greater India before colliding with Eurasia. Our model features a transform boundary running north of East Africa, which initiated an oceanic arc following short-lived compression between the western and central Mesotethys in the Late Jurassic, coinciding with the initial motion of Argoland. The arc developed through extension and ophiolite generation until at least the mid-Cretaceous and consumed a narrow thinned sliver of West Argoland between ~120-65 Ma. The arc remained active in the same position until its eventual collision with Greater India ~55 Ma. The eastern portion of the intra-oceanic arc accreted to eastern Eurasia

  15. Tectonic tremor and slow slip along the northwestern section of the Mexico subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, Michael R.; Schlanser, Kristen M.; Kelly, Nicholas J.; DeMets, Charles; Grand, Stephen P.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    The southwestern coast of Mexico is marked by active subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates, producing megathrust earthquakes that tend to recur every 50-100 yr. Herein, we use seismic and GPS data from this region to investigate the potential relationship between earthquakes, tectonic (non-volcanic) tremor, and transient slip along the westernmost 200 km of the Mexico subduction zone. Visual examination of seismograms and spectrograms throughout the 18-month-long MARS seismic experiment reveals clear evidence for frequent small episodes of tremor along the Rivera and Cocos subduction zones beneath the states of Jalisco, Colima, and Michoacán. Using a semi-automated process that identifies prominent energy bursts in envelope waveforms of this new data, analyst-refined relative arrival times are inverted for source locations using a 1-D velocity model. The resulting northwest-southeast trending linear band of tremor is located downdip from the rupture zones of the 1995 Mw 8.0 Colima-Jalisco and 2003 Mw 7.2 Tecoman subduction-thrust earthquakes and just below the regions of afterslip triggered by these earthquakes. Despite the close proximity between tremor and megathrust events, there is no evidence that the time since the last great earthquake influences the spatial or temporal pattern of tremor. A well-defined gap in the tremor beneath the western Colima Graben appears to mark a separation along the subducted Rivera-Cocos plate boundary. From the position time series of 19 continuous GPS sites in western Mexico, we present the first evidence that slow slip events occur on the Rivera plate subduction interface. Unlike the widely-recorded, large-amplitude, slow slip events on the nearly horizontal Cocos plate subduction interface below southern Mexico, slow slip events below western Mexico have small amplitudes and are recorded at relatively few, mostly coastal stations. The smaller slow slip beneath western Mexico may be due to the steeper dip, causing a

  16. Midcontinent U.S. fault and fold zones: A legacy of Proterozoic intracratonic extensional tectonism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, Stephen; Paulsen, Timothy

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. continental interior (midcontinent) contains numerous fault and fold zones. Seismic and drilling data indicate that some of these zones first formed as Proterozoic-Eocambrian rift faults, but the origin of most remains enigmatic. We propose that the enigmatic fault and fold zones also began as Proterozoic-Eocambrian normal faults. We base our hypothesis on the following: (1) enigmatic zones parallel known rifts, (2) the structural style of enigmatic zones mirrors the structural style of known rifts, (3) the map pattern of some enigmatic zones (e.g., the La Salle deformation belt of Illinois) resembles the map pattern of contemporary rifts, and (4) it is easier to rupture an intact craton by normal faulting than by reverse or strike-slip faulting. These zones, along with known rifts, represent the legacy of widespread extensional tectonism that brittlely broke up the craton into fault-bounded blocks prior to deposition of Phanerozoic platform cover. Once formed, midcontinent fault and fold zones remained weak, allowing cratonic blocks to jostle relative to one another during the Phanerozoic, thereby inverting faults (and creating transpressional or transtensional structural assemblages), localizing seismicity, and channeling (or releasing) ore-generating fluids.

  17. Detrital Thermochronology of the Indus-Yarlung suture zone and implications for the tectonic and surface evolution of southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrapa, B.; Hassim, F.; Kapp, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital thermochronology has the unique potential to resolve the timing of source cooling associated with magmatic, tectonic and surface processes. Correct interpretation of the detrital signature requires a multi-dating approach involving chronometers sensitive to different temperatures and processes. A multi-dating study of modern river sands from southern Tibet reveals distinct cooling signals that provide significant information about tectonic and erosional evolution of the Indus-Yarlung suture (IYS) after the India-Asia collision with implications for the Cenozoic topographic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau. Modern sands from tributaries of the Yarlung River provide an opportunity to broadly sample source rocks exposed within the suture zone, including the Gangdese batholith, Xigaze forearc, Cenozoic basins, and Tethyan Himalayan rocks, and to investigate their regional geochemical signatures. Samples from rivers along the IYS in southern Tibet, between Xigaze and Mt. Kailas, were analyzed for detrital geochronology and low-temperature thermochronology. Comparison between ages recorded in the source and the detrital signature indicates that both the ages and their proportions directly reflect the ages and relative areas of source rocks in the catchment basins. Apatite fission track ages show two main cooling signals at 22-18 Ma and 12 Ma, which are consistent with accelerated exhumation of the Gangdese batholith and Oligo-Miocene Kailas basin and indicate significant regional exhumation of the IYS during the Miocene. Regional exhumation recorded throughout the IYS is likely the combined product of active Miocene tectonics and erosion of a paleo-Yarlung River. Efficient incision and evacuation of material from the IYS zone by a paleo-Yarlung River during the Miocene suggests a significantly different paleoenvironment than that which exists today. Miocene capture of the Yarlung River by the Brahmaputra River may have enhanced erosion in the IYS zone.

  18. Morphostructural Analysis of an Escape Tectonic Zone : the North-Western Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, D.; Backe, G.; Hervouet, Y.; Niviere, B.

    2004-12-01

    Lateral motions in active collisional areas have been mainly described in the Asian and European belts. The most common view is that part of the intracontinental convergence between to plates is accommodated by major strike-slip faults bounding a lithospheric block that laterally moves away. This process, privileging horizontal compressional forces at boundaries of the moving block corresponds to an extrusion or escape of the continental landmass. Diffuse extensional deformation within the block implies that buoyancy forces, leading eventually to an extensional collapse, must be taken into account. Escape of the block is perpendicular to the convergence direction of the orogen and can only occur if a free lateral boundary exists. Our study concerns the analysis of the deformation in the northwestern part of the Venezuelan Andes, located in the northern part of South America. It is based on analysis of satellite and Digital Elevation Model imagery, complemented by field structural observations. We shall describe new tectonic features advocating that part of the belt is subjected to lateral escape tectonics during the Plio-Quaternary. The zone displays major active faults forming crustal blocks having a triangular shape pattern, and which are moving toward the north-east. The triangular corners are composed of smaller pluri-kilometre size crustal blocks bounded by normal faults. A major result is that in an area characterized by on-going intracontinental convergence, extension and strike-slip deformations predominate. In order to better constrain the depth of the deformation, we have generated a 3-D geologic model displaying the seismicity the area showing that the earthquakes are mainly restricted to the crust. The type and distribution of the deformation are not consitent with the behaviour of a simple rigid extrusion. The Venezuelan Andes are rather composed of crustal blocks that are tilted and move relative to each others. This is consistent with extensional

  19. Tectonic control on denudation across the eastern Tibetan Plateau from the Longriba fault zone to the Longmen Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansberque, C.; Godard, V.; Bellier, O.; Ren, Z.; Xu, X.; Liu, J.; Li, Y.; De Sigoyer, J.; Bourles, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The deformation distribution across the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is still highly debated. Whereas a major part of the present strain appears to be focused at the Longmen Shan front range, recently discovered active faults such as the Longriba fault zone suggest a wider deformation accommodation area and complex partitioning mechanisms. 10Be-derived denudation rates have recently demonstrated their utility to unravel the deformation pattern and distribution of uplift rates in tectonically active areas (e.g. Cyr et al., 2010; Gudmundsdottir et al., 2013), and applying this approach across the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin can provide key insights on eventual uplift gradients. Here, we present 10Be-derived denudation rates for 20 small basins across this area. We observe a clear denudation gradient with rates ranging from 0.04mm/yr to 0.14mm/yr, west of the Longriba fault zone and increasing up to 0.4mm/yr towards the Longmen Shan front range. We do not observe any significant relationship between rainfall and denudation rates, while relief and denudation appears to be correlated, suggesting a non climatic control on denudation distribution in the study domain. We use an empirical power law relationship between average hillslope angles (below the critical domain) and denudation rates to predict denudation. The results further support the idea of a slowly increasing denudation gradient from the Longriba fault zone to the Longmen Shan front suggesting progressive rock uplift across the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin, as suggested by previous authors on the basis of stream profile analysis (Kirby et al., 2003). Our study suggests that the Longriba fault zone is an important tectonic boundary for the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin. It probably marks the western boundary of the actively deforming domain.

  20. Mantle convection, tectonics and the evolution of the Tethyan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Sternai, Pietro; Menant, Armel; Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten; Burov, Evguenii

    2014-05-01

    Mantle convection drives plate tectonics and the size, number and thermotectonic age of plates codetermines the convection pattern. However, the degree of coupling of surface deformation and mantle flow is unclear. Most numerical models of lithospheric deformation are designed such that strain is a consequence of kinematic boundary conditions, and rarely account for basal stresses due to mantle flow. On the other hand, convection models often treat the lithosphere as a single-layer stagnant lid with vertically undeformable surface. There is thus a gap between convection models and lithospheric-scale geodynamic models. The transmission of stresses from the flowing mantle to the crust is a complex process. The presence of a ductile lower crust inhibits the upward transmission of stresses but a highly extended crust in a hot environment such as a backarc domain, with no lithospheric mantle and a ductile lower crust in direct contact with asthenosphere, will be more prone to follow the mantle flow than a thick and stratified lithosphere. We review geological observations and present reconstructions of the Aegean and Middle East and discuss the possible role played by basal drag in governing lithospheric deformation. In Mediterranean backarc regions, lithosphere-mantle coupling is effective on geological time scale as shown by the consistency of SKS fast orientations in the mantle with stretching directions in the crust. The long-term geological history of the Tethyan convergent zone suggests that asthenospheric flow has been an important player. The case of Himalaya and Tibet strongly supports a major contribution of a northward asthenospheric push, with no persistent slab that could drive India after collision, large thrust planes being then decoupling zones between deep convection and surface tectonics. The African plate repeatedly fragmented during its northward migration with the separation of Apulia and Arabia. Indeed, extension has been active on the northern

  1. Fracture zone traces across the north Pacific cretaceous quiet zone and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Tanya; Sclater, John; Sandwell, David; Severinghaus, Jeff; Marlow, Michael S.

    We present a new, more complete mapping of the fracture zones as they cross the Cretaceous Quiet Zone in the central north Pacific. We compile and combine observations of lineations from three distinct data bases: deflection-of-the-vertical profiles from GEOSAT altimetry measurements, magnetic and topographic profiles collected on closely spaced north-south ship tracks by the Pioneer survey, and magnetic and Gloria side-scan records from the concentrated Exclusive Economic Zone surveys around the Hawaiian chain and Johnston Island. We adopt and emphasize a northern relocation of the Quiet Zone portion of the Mendocino fracture zone. We find that all the fracture zones from the Surveyor to the Clarion reflect the same plate history; they were all formed on the Pacific-Farallon spreading system by relatively smooth spreading. One or more major ridge jumps are required to explain geometric differences in the Quiet Zone edges; we argue that these occurred early in the Superchron. Most of the fracture zones are seen to consist of groups of multiple strands that widen and narrow appropriately following changing plate motion directions. We contend that the shape of the Mendocino contra-indicates the existence of a Chinook plate in the late Superchron. We explored the fitting of Euler stage poles to our fracture zone shapes and to other Quiet Zone features. We conclude that the youngest Superchron stage pole must lie very near the spin axis. Stage poles for earlier stages of the Superchron probably lie at lower latitudes in the south Pacific but their locations are poorly constrained by the data presently in hand.

  2. Tectonic framework of the Parkfield-Cholame area, central San Andreas fault zone, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.D.; Ross, D.C.; Irwin, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping of the NW-trending San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ) in the southern Diablo Range reveals details of this structurally complex region. Movement on the fault juxtaposes dissimilar tectonic terranes. The region on the NE side is characterized by complexly folded and faulted rocks of the Franciscan assemblage, the Coast Range ophiolite, and sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley sequence and younger formations. The region on the SW side is characterized by crystalline basement rocks of the Salinia terrane overlain by slightly deformed Pliocene and Pleistocene gravel and Miocene and Pliocene sedimentary rocks. The active trace of the SAFZ is along the SW side of a belt of melange that separates the Salinia terrane from the terranes to the NE. The active main trace is notable for a right step over of about 1 km in the southern part of the area and a 5/sup 0/ left bend in the northern part of the area. The melange consists of highly sheared and deformed rocks of late Cenozoic units, and exotic blocks of granite, gabbro, and marble. Deformation of Late Cretaceous and younger rocks east of the SAFZ varies with their age as follows: 1) Late Cretaceous rocks are strongly deformed and overlain by late Cenozoic rocks with angular unconformity, 2) early(.) and middle Miocene rocks are the most complexly folded, 3) late Miocene and early Pliocene strata are less complexly deformed, and 4) Pliocene and Pleistocene rocks the least deformed. Folding resulted from north-south compression across the SAFZ since early (.) Miocene time.

  3. Tectonic controls on the genesis of ignimbrites from the Campanian Volcanic Zone, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolandi, G.; Bellucci, F.; Heizler, M.T.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Campanian Plain is an 80 x 30 km region of southern Italy, bordered by the Apennine Chain, that has experienced subsidence during the Quaternary. This region, volcanologically active in the last 600 ka, has been identified as the Campanian Volcanic Zone (CVZ). The products of three periods of trachytic ignimbrite volcanism (289-246 ka, 157 ka and 106 ka) have been identified in the Apennine area in the last 300 ka. These deposits probably represent distal ash flow units of ignimbrite eruptions which occurred throughout the CVZ. The resulting deposits are interstratified with marine sediments indicating that periods of repeated volcano-tectonic emergence and subsidence may have occurred in the past. The eruption, defined as the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI), with the largest volume (310 km3), occurred in the CVZ 39 ka ago. The products of the CI eruption consist of two units (unit-1 and unit-2) formed from a single compositionally zoned magma body. Slightly different in composition, three trachytic melts constitute the two units. Unit-1 type A is an acid trachyte, type B is a trachyte and type C of unit-2 is a mafic trachyte. The CI, vented from pre-existing neotectonic faults, formed during the Apennine uplift, Initially the venting of volatile-rich type A magma deposited the products to the N-NE of the CVZ. During the eruption, the Acerra graben already affected by a NE-SW fault system, was transected by E-W faults, forming a cross-graben that extended to the gulf of Naples. E-W faults were then further dislocated by NE-SW transcurrent movements. This additional collapse significantly influenced the deposition of the B-type magma of unit-1, and the C-type magma of unit-2 toward the E-SE and S, in the Bay of Naples. The pumice fall deposit underlying the CI deposits, until now thought to be associated with the CI eruption, is not a strict transition from plinian to CI-forming activity. It is derived instead from an independent source probably located near the

  4. Salts as indicators of tectonic activity along Nesson anticline, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Lefever, J.A.; Lefever, R.D.; Anderson, S.B.

    1988-07-01

    The Nesson anticline is the major north-south-trending structure in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The trace of the anticline is marked by nearly continuous production for 110 mi (175 km) from the Canadian border south to Dunn County; production is from 13 different stratigraphic zones. Previous studies have shown that the central and southern parts of the anticline, from Beaver Lodge field south to Rattlesnake Point field, consist of at least nine structurally independent areas, each of which has an individual tectonic history. Isopach patterns indicate that most of the areas underwent their greatest tectonic activity during the Devonian and Early Mississippian, although a few areas were active during the early Mesozoic as well. Ten traceable salts are present along the anticline in the Prairie (Devonian), Charles (Mississippian), Opeche (Permian), Spearfish (Triassic), and Pipe Formations (Jurassic). The isopach patterns of the individual salts indicate contemporaneous tectonic activity through thickening or thinning of the salt. Postdepositional activity is indicated by the absence of a salt; the timing of the activity may be estimated from the presence of compensating section above the level of the salt. Their results indicate that, in addition to the times given above, significant tectonic activity took place along the anticline during the Late Mississippian, late Jurassic, and Early Cretaceous.

  5. Drainage response to active tectonics and evolution of tectonic geomorphology across the Himalayan Frontal Thrust, Kumaun Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luirei, Khayingshing; Bhakuni, Surendra S.; Kothyari, Girish Ch.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of integrated studies of geomorphic indices of drainage networks and landforms developed across the mountain front along the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) between the Dabka and Baur rivers, Kumaun Himalaya. The HFT is a morphogenic structure in nature, creating a 100-m-high E-W trending escarpment that extends ~ 21 km. Geomorphological evidence indicates ~ 10.5 km westward migration of the Dabka River and ~ 5.2 km eastward migration of the Baur River. These migrations are a result of uplift of the hanging wall along the HFT. The HFT is offset by a transverse fault, which suggests that the latter postdates the reactivation of the HFT between 500 and 100 ka. Presence of different levels of strath terraces along the mountain front suggests the active nature of the HFT. To assess the relative tectonic activity, morphometric indices such as stream-gradient (SL) index, mountain front sinuosity (Smf) index, and ratio of valley floor width to valley height (Vf) have been analyzed. Results of the former two are consistent with the tectonic landforms developed in thrust zones. Paleochannels of the Dabka and Baur rivers are characterized by high Vf values while other valleys show low Vf values. Quaternary alluvial sediments have been deformed along the Pawalgarth Thrust, a splay of the HFT. Deformation has resulted in the formation of the Pawalgarh Anticline, a thrust-related asymmetric fold.

  6. Tectonic history of subduction zones inferred from retrograde blueschist P-T paths

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G. )

    1988-12-01

    Many Phanerozoic convergent plate junctions are marked by discontinuous blueschist belts, reflecting relatively high-pressure (P) prograde trajectories. Common blueschist paragneisses, such as those of the western Alps, exhibit widespread overprinting by greenschist and/or epidote-amphibolite facies assemblages. For this type of high-P belt, retrograde metamorphism involved fairly rapid, nearly isothermal decompression; some terranes underwent continued heating during early stages of pressure release. Uplift probably occurred as a consequence of the entrance of an island arc, oceanic plateau, or segment of continental crust into the subduction zone (collision), resulting in marked deceleration or cessation of underflow and buoyant, approximately adiabatic rise of the stranded, recrystallized subduction complex. Other high-P belts, such as the Franciscan of western California, preserve metamorphic aragonite and lack a low-P overprint; retrogression approximately retraced the prograde P-T (temperature) path, or for early formed high-grade blocks, occurred at even higher P/T ratios. Parts of this type of metamorphic belt evidently migrated slowly back up the subduction zone in response to isostatic forces during continued plate descent and refrigeration. Upward motion took place as tectonically imbricated slices, as laminar return flow in melange zones, and perhaps partly a lateral spreading/extension of the underplated accretionary prism. Retrograde P-T trajectories of high-P belts therefore provide important constraints on the tectonic evolution of convergent plate junctions.

  7. Abrupt along-strike change in tectonic style: San Andreas fault zone, San Francisco Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Olson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismicity and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to define an abrupt change from compressional to extensional tectonism within a 10- to 15-km-wide zone along the San Andreas fault on the San Francisco Peninsula and offshore from the Golden Gate. This 100-km-long section of the San Andreas fault includes the hypocenter of the Mw = 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake as well as the highest level of persistent microseismicity along that ???470-km-long rupture. We define two distinct zones of deformation along this stretch of the fault using well-constrained relocations of all post-1969 earthquakes based a joint one-dimensional velocity/hypocenter inversion and a redetermination of focal mechanisms. The southern zone is characterized by thrust- and reverse-faulting focal mechanisms with NE trending P axes that indicate "fault-normal" compression in 7- to 10-km-wide zones of deformation on both sides of the San Andreas fault. A 1- to 2-km-wide vertical zone beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas is characterized by its almost complete lack of seismicity. The compressional deformation is consistent with the young, high topography of the Santa Cruz Mountains/Coast Ranges as the San Andreas fault makes a broad restraining left bend (???10??) through the southernmost peninsula. A zone of seismic quiescence ???15 km long separates this compressional zone to the south from a zone of combined normal-faulting and strike-slip-faulting focal mechanisms (including a ML = 5.3 earthquake in 1957) on the northernmost peninsula and offshore on the Golden Gate platform. Both linear pseudo-gravity gradients, calculated from the aeromagnetic data, and seismic reflection data indicate that the San Andreas fault makes an abrupt ???3-km right step less than 5 km offshore in this northern zone. A similar right-stepping (dilatational) geometry is also observed for the subparallel San Gregorio fault offshore. Persistent seismicity and extensional tectonism occur within the San

  8. CHARACTER AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GREAT FALLS TECTONIC ZONE, EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO AND WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Lopez, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The Great Falls tectonic zone, here named, is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can be traced from the Idaho batholith in the Cordilleran miogeocline, across thrust-belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwestern-most Saskatchewan, Canada. Geologic mapping in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana has outlined a continuous zone of high-angle faults and shear zones. Recurrent fault movement in this zone and strong structural control over igneous intrusion suggest a fundamental tectonic feature that has influenced the tectonic development of the Idaho-Montana area from a least middle Proterozoic time to the present. Refs.

  9. Evaluating influence of active tectonics on spatial distribution pattern of floods along eastern Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, R.; Ramasamy, SM.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding is a naturally recurrent phenomenon that causes severe damage to lives and property. Predictions on flood-prone zones are made based on intensity-duration of rainfall, carrying capacity of drainage, and natural or man-made obstructions. Particularly, the lower part of the drainage system and its adjacent geomorphic landforms like floodplains and deltaic plains are considered for analysis, but stagnation in parts of basins that are far away from major riverine systems is less unveiled. Similarly, uncharacteristic flooding in the upper and middle parts of drainage, especially in zones of an anomalous drainage pattern, is also least understood. Even though topographic differences are attributed for such anomalous spatial occurrence of floods, its genetic cause has to be identified for effective management practice. Added to structural and lithological variations, tectonic movements too impart micro-scale terrain undulations. Because active tectonic movements are slow-occurring, long-term geological processes, its resultant topographical variations and drainage anomalies are least correlated with floods. The recent floods of Tamil Nadu also exhibit a unique distribution pattern emphasizing the role of tectonics over it. Hence a detailed geoinformatics-based analysis was carried out to envisage the relationship between spatial distribution of flood and active tectonic elements such as regional arches and deeps, block faults, and graben and drainage anomalies such as deflected drainage, compressed meander, and eyed drainages. The analysis reveals that micro-scale topographic highs and lows imparted by active tectonic movements and its further induced drainage anomalies have substantially controlled the distribution pattern of flood.

  10. The Mid-Hungarian line: a zone of repeated tectonic inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csontos, László; Nagymarosy, András

    1998-11-01

    The Mid-Hungarian line is a major tectonic feature of the Intra-Carpathian area separating two terranes of different origin and tectonic structure. Although this tectonic line was known from borehole records, it has not been described in seismic sections. The study presents interpreted seismic lines crossing the supposed trace of the Mid-Hungarian line. These seismic sections show north-dipping normal faults and thrust faults as well as cross-cutting young strike-slip faults. A complex tectonic history is deduced, including intra-Oligocene-Early Miocene thrusting, Middle Miocene extension, local Late Miocene inversion and Late Miocene-Pliocene normal faulting and left-lateral wrenching. In the light of our seismic study we think that the best candidate for the Mid-Hungarian line is a north-dipping detachment fault beneath large masses of Neogene volcanics. The auxiliary structures to the north seen on seismic sections suggest that it moved as a south-vergent thrust fault during the Palaeogene-Early Miocene which later was reactivated as a set of normal faults. The northern Alcapa unit overrode the southern Tisza-Dacia unit along this fault zone. The same relative positions are observed in the northern termination of the line. Other structures along the supposed trace of the line are north-dipping normal- or strike-slip faults which frequently were reactivated as smaller thrust faults during the late Neogene. Palaeogene-Early Miocene thrusting along the line might be the result of the opposite Tertiary rotations of the two major units, as suggested by palaeomagnetic measurements and earlier models.

  11. Relations between tectonic zones of the Albanides on the basis of results of geophysical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Frasheri, A. )

    1993-09-01

    The Ablanides are located between the Dinarides of Yugoslavia and the Hellenides of Greece, which together form the southern branch of the Mediterranean Alpine Belt. Our analysis of the Albanides and their extension into the Adriatic Sea integrates surface geological observations, well data, and results of seismological, reflection-seismic, gravity, magnetic, and geoelectric surveys. Evolution of the Albandies began with the Triassic subsidence of their Hercynian substratum under a tensional regime, culminating in crustal separation and opening of the Hellenic-Dinaride oceanic basin. The internal Albanides (IA) formed part of the oceanic Hellenic-Dinaride Basin, whereas the external Albanides (EA) developed out of the westward adjacent passive margin and continental shelf of the Adriatic plate. This was accompanied by the development of a synorogenic foredeep basin. During the tectonic, tarditectonic, and neotectonic phases, progressive westward shift of the foredeep basin axis to its present location in the Adriatic. The EA evolved out of a shelf and continental margin sedimentary prism and a superimposed foredeep wedge, which together form the Alpine-deformed hydrocarbon-bearing Albanian Sedimentary Basin. Reflection-seismic and gravity surveys done in the EA and the Adriatic Sea define distinct structural belts related to different tectonic zones of the Albanian Sedimentary Basin. The most important oil and gas accumulations are found in the Jonian zone and in the Periadriatic depression. The carbonate-dominated Late Triassic to Late Cretaceous series of the lonian, Kruja, and Krasta-Cukali zones contains several rich source rock intervals. In the lonian zone, Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene carbonates and oligocene-Miocene flysch-type sandstones form the reservoirs of the main oil and gas accumulations. The Tortonian-Pliocene Molasse-type clastics of the Periadriatic depression also contain source rocks and stratigraphically trapped gas accumulations.

  12. Relief Evolution in Tectonically Active Mountain Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Kelin X.

    2004-01-01

    The overall aims of this 3-yr project, as originally proposed were to: (1) investigate quantitatively the roles of fluvial and glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions, and (2) test rigorously the quality and accuracy of SRTM topographic data in areas of rugged relief - both the most challenging and of greatest interest to geomorphic, neotectonic, and hazards applications. Natural laboratories in both the western US and the Southern Alps of New Zealand were identified as most promising. The project has been both successful and productive, despite the fact that no SRTM data for our primary field sites in New Zealand were released on the time frame of the work effort. Given the delayed release of SRTM data, we pursued the scientific questions of the roles of fluvial and, especially, glacial erosion in the evolution of relief in mountainous regions using available digital elevation models (DEMs) for the Southern Alps of New Zealand (available at both 25m and 50m pixel sizes), and USGS 10m and 30m DEMs within the Western US. As emphasized in the original proposal, we chose the emphasis on the role of glacial modification of topographic relief because there has been little quantitative investigation of glacial erosion processes at landscape scale. This is particularly surprising considering the dramatic sculpting of most mid- and high-latitude mountain ranges, the prodigious quantities of glacially-derived sediment in terrestrial and marine basins, and the current cross-disciplinary interest in the role of denudational processes in orogenesis and the evolution of topography in general. Moreover, the evolution of glaciated landscapes is not only a fundamental problem in geomorphology in its own right, but also is at the heart of the debate over Late Cenozoic linkages between climate and tectonics.

  13. Fluid chemistry and evolution of hydrothermal fluids in an Archaean transcrustal fault zone network: The case of the Cadillac Tectonic Zone, Abitibi greenstone belt, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neumayr, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Banks, D.A.; Yardley, B.W.D.; Couture, J.-F.; Landis, G.P.; Rye, R.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed fluid geochemistry studies on hydrothermal quartz veins from the Rouyn-Noranda and Val-d'Or areas along the transcrustal Cadillac Tectonic Zone (CTZ) indicate that unmineralized (with respect to gold) sections of the CTZ contained a distinct CO2-dominated, H2S-poor hydrothermal fluid. In contrast, both gold mineralized sections of the CTZ (e.g., at Orenada #2) and associated higher order shear zones have a H2O-CO2 ?? CH4-NaCl hydrothermal fluid. Their CO2/H2S ratios indicate H2S-rich compositions. The Br/Cl compositions in fluid inclusions trapped in these veins indicate that hydrothermal fluids have been equilibrated with the crust. Oxygen isotope ratios from hydrothermal quartz veins in the CTZ are consistently 2??? more enriched than those of associated higher order shear zones, which are interpreted to be a function of greater fluid/rock ratios in the CTZ and lower fluid/rock ratios, and more efficient equilibration of the hydrothermal fluid with the wall rock, in higher order shear zones. An implication from this study is that the lower metal endowment of the transcrustal CTZ, when compared with the higher metal endowment in higher order shear zones (ratio of about 1 : 1000), may be the result of the lack of significant amounts of H2O-H2S rich fluids in most of the CTZ. In contrast, gold mineralization in the higher order shear zones appear to be controlled by the high H2S activity of the aqueous fluids, because gold was likely transported in a bisulfide complex and was deposited during sulfidation reactions in the wall rock and phase separation in the quartz veins. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  14. Gridino melange zone of the Belomorian eclogite province: Succession of tectonic events and structural position of mafic dyke swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babarina, I. I.; Sibelev, O. S.; Stepanova, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    Based on relationships between Paleoproterozoic mafic dykes, lithotectonic complexes, and tectonic structures of the Gridino Zone in the Belomorian eclogite province of the Fennoscandian Shield, deformations have been divided into groups differing in age and the succession of tectonic events has been reconstructed. The formation of Neoarchean eclogite-bearing melange was related to disintegration of large eclogite sheets in the course of near-horizontal ductile flow accompanied by syntectonic granitoid magmatism, multiple migmatization, and granulite-to amphibolite-facies metamorphism. The exotic blocks, including eclogites, were incorporated into TTG gneisses as sheets and lenses up to a few hundreds of meters in thickness and oriented conformably with gneissic banding. As a result of ductile flow, the lithotectonic complexes were transported at the level of discrete brittle-ductile deformations expressed as strike-slip faults and associated folds. Under conditions of a relatively rigid medium, individual structural elements underwent rotation approximately through 90° in plan view. Under the extension regime in the Early Paleoproterozoic, several swarms of mafic dykes were injected into the already cold framework rocks, as is evident from dyke morphology. The dykes crosscut all predated structures, included turned blocks, and are therefore important reference points for subdivision of Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic processes. The Svecofennian postdyke tectonic activity was accompanied by local shearing and boudinage of metabasic rocks, development of quartz and pegmatite veins along tension cracks, disharmonic folding, and discrete retrograde metamorphism up to amphibolite-facies conditions. The postdyke deformations did not exert a substantial effect on the previously formed regional structure.

  15. Seismic‐wave attenuation determined from tectonic tremor in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabe, Suguru; Baltay, Annemarie S.; Ide, Satoshi; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Tectonic tremor provides a new source of observations that can be used to constrain the seismic attenuation parameter for ground‐motion prediction and hazard mapping. Traditionally, recorded earthquakes of magnitude ∼3–8 are used to develop ground‐motion prediction equations; however, typical earthquake records may be sparse in areas of high hazard. In this study, we constrain the distance decay of seismic waves using measurements of the amplitude decay of tectonic tremor, which is plentiful in some regions. Tectonic tremor occurs in the frequency band of interest for ground‐motion prediction (i.e., ∼2–8  Hz) and is located on the subducting plate interface, at the lower boundary of where future large earthquakes are expected. We empirically fit the distance decay of peak ground velocity from tremor to determine the attenuation parameter in four subduction zones: Nankai, Japan; Cascadia, United States–Canada; Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Chile. With the large amount of data available from tremor, we show that in the upper plate, the lower crust is less attenuating than the upper crust. We apply the same analysis to intraslab events in Nankai and show the possibility that waves traveling from deeper intraslab events experience more attenuation than those from the shallower tremor due to ray paths that pass through the subducting and highly attenuating oceanic crust. This suggests that high pore‐fluid pressure is present in the tremor source region. These differences imply that the attenuation parameter determined from intraslab earthquakes may underestimate ground motion for future large earthquakes on the plate interface.

  16. The Black Mountain tectonic zone--a reactivated northeast-trending crustal shear zone in the Yukon-Tanana Upland of east-central Alaska: Chapter D in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Day, Warren C.; Alienikoff, John N.; Saltus, Richard W.; Gough, Larry P.; Day, Warren C.

    2007-01-01

    The Black Mountain tectonic zone in the YukonTanana terrane of east-central Alaska is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can been traced across Black Mountain in the southeast corner of the Big Delta 1°×3° degree quadrangle. Geologic mapping in the larger scale B1 quadrangle of the Big Delta quadrangle, in which Black Mountain is the principal physiographic feature, has revealed a continuous zone of normal and left-lateral strikeslip high-angle faults and shear zones, some of which have late Tertiary to Quaternary displacement histories. The tectonic zone includes complexly intruded wall rocks and intermingled apophyses of the contiguous mid-Cretaceous Goodpaster and Mount Harper granodioritic plutons, mafic to intermediate composite dike swarms, precious metal mineralization, early Tertiary volcanic activity and Quaternary fault scarps. These structures define a zone as much as 6 to 13 kilometers (km) wide and more than 40 km long that can be traced diagonally across the B1 quadrangle into the adjacent Eagle 1°×3° quadrangle to the east. Recurrent activity along the tectonic zone, from at least mid-Cretaceous to Quaternary, suggests the presence of a buried, fundamental tectonic feature beneath the zone that has influenced the tectonic development of this part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The tectonic zone, centered on Black Mountain, lies directly above a profound northeast-trending aeromagnetic anomaly between the Denali and Tintina fault systems. The anomaly separates moderate to strongly magnetic terrane on the northwest from a huge, weakly magnetic terrane on the southeast. The tectonic zone is parallel to the similarly oriented left-lateral, strike-slip Shaw Creek fault zone 85 km to the west.

  17. Polyphase neotectonic movements in the Gavilgarh Fault Zone, central Indian craton: evidences from geomorpho-tectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Dipanjan; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Jain, Vikrant

    2014-05-01

    The central part of Indian craton is believed to be a stable continental region with low strain build-up and long earthquake recurrence periods. It comprises two major Archean cratonic fragments (i.e. the Bundelkhand and the Bastar Cratons) and a Proterozoic mobile belt called Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ), along which the cratonic fragments were amalgamated in the Proterozoic. Gavilgarh Fault Zone (GFZ) is an important component of CITZ and is represented by a >250 km long, ENE-WSW trending fault line which demarcates the southern boundary of the Satpura mountains. Although the eastern part of the lineament shows evidences of polyphase tectonic movements in the Meso-Neoproterozic (Chattopadhyay and Khasdeo, 2011), there is no focussed analysis of neotectonic activity in this fault zone although a number of earthquakes have been recorded within the CITZ in last 100 years or so. The present study comprises structural mapping and geomorphological analysis of a 200 km long stretch of the GFZ lineament. GFZ shows evidences of reverse fault-slip movements that possibly resulted in an uplift of the northern side, as deeper level rocks (e.g. Paleozoic Gondwana sandstones) are juxtaposed against the overlying Deccan Trap basalts of Mesozoic age along the fault line. Crushing of basalts along the lineament, asymmetric folds within Gondwana sandstone, inclination of Anisotropic Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) axes etc. provide evidences for fault-drag folding related to the post-Deccan reverse faulting. Drainages crosscutting the lineament adjusted with the tectonic uplift either by incising their own sediments and bed rock or by increasing their sinuosity, only in the northern side, as seen in the satellite images. Hypsometric Integral values suggest that the immature/in-equilibrated drainage basins were restricted in the north while mature/equilibrated basins developed in the south of the lineament. Longitudinal profiles and S-L Index of the river profiles, prepared

  18. Expression of Active Tectonics in Erosional Landscapes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, K. X.; McDermott, J. A.; Adams, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Landform analysis has become a standard tool in neotectonic studies. Most commonly the offset, tilting, and warping of abandoned depositional landforms is used to infer deformation rates and patterns. The timescales recorded in deformed landforms importantly bridge the gap between geodetic and geologic methods. Whereas such analyses of static landforms has become well developed, complementary approaches to extract quantitative information about tectonics from erosional landscapes are relatively new, rapidly evolving, and can provide powerful insight. Over the last decade, some useful general rules about the expression of rock uplift rate in erosional landscapes have been developed that can guide and augment studies of the spatial distribution of active rock uplift. At catchment scale, the relationship between landscape form and rock uplift is dictated largely by the response of stream profiles to rock uplift (particularly in rocky landscapes where uplift exceeds soil production), which is largely one of changing channel steepness (gradient adjusted for drainage area). Changes in channel steepness along stream can be either abrupt (discrete slope-break knickpoints) or gradual (expressed as zones of enhanced or reduced river profile concavity) depending on the deformation pattern. Landforms can record information about both spatial and temporal patterns in rock uplift rate. Landscapes in various parts of the Himalaya exemplify both spatial and temporal influences. The Siwalik Hills in the Himalayan foreland are a type locality for the topographic expression of spatial patterns in rock uplift rate. Here an independently known pattern of rock uplift rate over a fault-bend fold affords an opportunity to study landscape response and test landscape evolution models. Once calibrated, such models can be used to evaluate along-strike variability in the rate and pattern of rock uplift far more effectively and efficiently than can be achieved with other methods. Applying these

  19. Superposition of tectonic structures leading elongated intramontane basin: the Alhabia basin (Internal Zones, Betic Cordillera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Martos, Manuel; Galindo-Zaldivar, Jesús; Martínez-Moreno, Francisco José; Calvo-Rayo, Raquel; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The relief of the Betic Cordillera was formed since the late Serravallian inducing the development of intramontane basins. The Alhabia basin, situated in the central part of the Internal Zones, is located at the intersection of the Alpujarran Corridor, the Tabernas basin, both trending E-W, and the NW-SE oriented Gádor-Almería basin. The geometry of the basin has been constrained by new gravity data. The basin is limited to the North by the Sierra de Filabres and Sierra Nevada antiforms that started to develop in Serravallian times under N-S shortening and to the south by Sierra Alhamilla and Sierra de Gádor antiforms. Plate convergence in the region rotated counter-clockwise in Tortonian times favouring the formation of E-W dextral faults. In this setting, NE-SW extension, orthogonal to the shortening direction, was accommodated by normal faults on the SW edge of Sierra Alhamilla. The Alhabia basin shows a cross-shaped depocentre in the zone of synform and fault intersection. This field example serves to constrain recent counter-clockwise stress rotation during the latest stages of Neogene-Quaternary basin evolution in the Betic Cordillera Internal Zones and underlines the importance of studying the basins' deep structure and its relation with the tectonic structures interactions.

  20. Metamorphism of tectonic terranes in the eastern marginal zone of the Appalachian orogen, New England

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, J.C.; Olszewski, W.J.; Guidotti, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    Southeastern New England is subdivided into three major fault bounded tectonic terranes, each with a distinctive metamorphic history. The easternmost, the Avalon Terrane, has generally been metamorphosed no higher than the lower greenschist facies. Evidence for pre-Alleghanian metamorphism includes a Proterozoic Z(.) event, contact metamorphism adjacent to Ord.-Dev. alkaline plutons, and granulite facies crustal xenoliths in Mesozoic dikes. To the west the Nashoba Terrane has been deformed and polymetamorphosed to the sill. and 2nd sill. zones between approximately 415 and 450 m.y., based on ages of associated granitic and migmatitic rocks. 730 m.y. assumed basement gneisses (fish Brook) have likely experienced Late PC metamorphism. In the Merrimack Trough, here including the Massabesic Gneiss, the metamorphic grade ranges from the greenschist facies on the east to the 2nd sillimanite zones on the west toward the Massabesic. The two metamorphic events present here must predate the intrusion of the Exeter Diorite (473 m.y .), indicating one or both may be PC. To the east, the fault bounded Rye Formation has also experienced two pre- 470 m.y. metamorphisms (and -sill.) However, the terrane east of the Turtle Head Fault Zone (THFZ) has many similarities to the Boston Platform including general (Late PC.) lower greenschist metamorphism. Also, the area between the Norumbega FZ and the THFZ has experienced high grade metamorphism of probable Silurian age and thus may be similar to the Nashoba Terrane.

  1. Global systematics of formation conditions of subduction zone magmas and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, I.; Ozawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction zone magmatism plays an important role in material recycling of the earth’s interior, and it is imperative to understand melt generation mechanisms in the wedge mantle. The subduction zone is more complicated and diverse as a magma generation site than that of mid-ocean ridge or hot spot mostly because of the more significant and variable contribution of H2O-rich fluid expelled from the subducting slab, and because of the complexity of thermal and flow structures in the wedge mantle. The spatial variations of compositions of primary magmas in subduction zones have been recognized (e.g., Kuno, 1966; Sakuyama and Nesbitt, 1986), and are attributed to the diversity of melt segregation depth, degree of melting, or involvement of hydrous fluids with peculiar geochemical signature. It is particularly critical if melting at subduction zone is controlled mostly by the addition of H2O-rich fluid (Tatsumi, 1986; Iwamori, 1998) or by thermal and flow structure in the wedge mantle (Plank and Langmuir, 1993; Schmidt and Poli, 1998). In order to address this issue, quantitative estimation of melting conditions with clarification of the critical tectonic factors controlling magma generation is requisite and has been attempted in many studies with limited success. In this study, melting conditions of frontal volcanoes of world subduction zones are quantitatively estimated on the basis of major element composition of volcanic rocks. For quantitative estimation of melting conditions, we adopted appropriate models not only for mantle melting but also for fractional crystallization in the crust, simultaneous determination of both of which ensures the consistency of estimation procedure (Ogitsu and Ozawa, in prep.). Unknown parameters are optimized by least-squares method with input from a major element data of volcanic rocks. This approach is applicable to more differentiated rocks, which are not suitable for olivine addition methods widely used in estimation of primary

  2. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  3. Northeast Basin and Range province active tectonics: An alternative view

    SciTech Connect

    Westaway, R. )

    1989-09-01

    Slip rates and slip vector azimuths on major active oblique normal faults are used to investigate whether circulation associated with the Yellowstone upwelling plume is driving tectonic deformation in the northeast Basin and Range province. Observed deformation is consistent with this suggestion; the plume is sheared to the southwest by motion of the North American plate. Testable predictions are made for structure and evolution of the region.

  4. Active tectonic studies in the United States, 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, R.J., II )

    1991-01-01

    The techniques and instrumentation used in active tectonic studies are discussed, and recent results are reviewed. It is suggested that a critical mass of data on several particular regions has been accumulated, making possible critical debates and attempts to assess earthquake hazards. Particular attention is given to studies of the Pacific Northwest region, basin and range deformation studies, and distributed deformation and hidden earthquake sources. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  5. Tectonic reconstruction and geophysical investigations of IOCG occurrences: Great Bear magmatic zone, NT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, N.; Corriveau, L.; Enkin, R. J.; Montreuil, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada's (GSC) Geomapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM) Program is developing and applying new techniques to iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) mineral exploration. The Great Bear magmatic zone (GBmz) is the remnants of a Paleoproterozoic continental magmatic arc (~1.872-1.843 Ga), which hosts IOCG mineralisation, including the Au-Co-Bi-Cu NICO deposit. The arc, which was built upon the Hottah terrane during eastward subduction prior to accretion of the Fort Simpson terrane (Hoffman 1980; Hoffman and Bowring 1984; Hildebrand et al. 1987), is dominated by granodiorites with mafic and volcaniclastic rocks towards the margins. Rapakivi and coarse grained biotite granites (ca. 1.866 - 1.856 Ga, Bowring 1984; Gandhi et al. 2001) mark the final plutonic event (Hildebrand et al. 1987), which was followed by extensive NE-striking brittle conjugate faulting (Tirrul 1984), related to final accretion (Hildebrand at al. 2009; Cook 2011). A tectonic reconstruction of the GBmz, which resets major fault offsets associated with final accretion, is based on the interpretation of a new compilation of high-resolution aeromagnetic data (Hayward and Oneschuk 2011) and geological maps (e.g., Hildebrand 2011; Jackson 2008; Jackson and Ootes 2011). The reconstruction provides a snapshot of the geometry of the GBmz at the time of mineralisation (~1.873 - >1.866 Ga, Davis et al. 2011) and a tectonic model for the late-stage setting and evolution of the arc, important in understanding the context of the mineralisation. The model suggests that the NE-striking faults were preceded by extension, perhaps driven by shifting tectonic motions and slab-rollback (Dewey 1980), and associated with NNE-striking faults. Geophysical models developed for the NICO area, which integrate proprietary high-resolution magnetic and gravity data with GSC physical property data, extracted from 872 samples collected from NICO and other sites across the GBmz, clearly delineate the main ore zone

  6. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  7. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Alvarado, Alexandra; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Lagreulet, Sarah; Segovia, Monica; Font, Yvonne; Yepes, Hugo; Mothes, Patricia; Rolandone, Frédérique; Jarrin, Pierre; Quidelleur, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) is an intraplate reverse fault zone, that extend over 60km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies coherently support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the NS segmented, en-echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited NS direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected, at depth, to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS dataset indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4mm/yr, wich decreases northwards along the fold system as it connects to the strike slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely-populated Quito region underlines the need of additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  8. Mesozoic metamorphism and its tectonic implication along the Solonker suture zone in central Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinrui; Wei, Chunjing; Chu, Hang; Chen, Yaping

    2016-09-01

    The Xing'an-Inner Mongolia Orogenic Belt (XIMOB) exposed in the eastern section of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is generally thought to have resulted from closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. However, disputations still exist on the age and detailed tectonic processes involved in its final amalgamation. The Solonker suture zone in the central Inner Mongolia, once recognized as the major paleo-plate boundary recording the terminal collision of the XIMOB, is characterized by extensive regional low-temperature metamorphism of greenschist to epidote-amphibolite facies with local presence of blueschists, which lacks systematic study. Four metabasite and garnet-mica schist samples were studied for determination of metamorphic P-T evolution using pseudosection and conventional thermobarometry. The two metabasite samples from Wulangou and Daqing Pasture contain actinolite, albite, epidote, chlorite and hornblende (in Daqing Pasture) and are estimated to have peak P-T conditions of 5.2-5.9 kbar/415-450 °C in Wulangou and 7.0-7.9 kbar/470-475 °C in Daqing Pasture. Two garnet-mica schist samples from Shuangjing (or Shuangjing schist) contain garnet porphyroblasts, muscovite, quartz, plagioclase, chlorite with or without potassium feldspar, biotite, and calcite, and are modeled to record prograde P-T vectors respectively of 3.0 kbar/482 °C-3.3 kbar/495 °C and 4.2 kbar/478 °C-4.8 kbar/483 °C, followed by near-isothermal decompression. The zircon U-Pb dating analyses suggest that the metamorphism probably occurred soon afterwards in the Early Mesozoic. The peak P-T conditions for the metabasite and garnet-mica schist samples yield thermal gradients respectively of 18-22 °C/km and 26-33 °C/km, being intermediate and low P/T series, and the metamorphic evolution in these rocks characteristic of clockwise P-T paths may correspond to tectonic thickening and thinning processes. The extensive low-temperature metamorphism of intermediate to low P/T types along the

  9. A Digital Tectonic Activity Map of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul; Masuoka, Penny; Montgomery, Brian; OLeary, Jay; Salisbury, Demetra; Yates, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The subject of neotectonics, covering the structures and structural activity of the last 5 million years (i.e., post-Miocene) is a well-recognized field, including "active tectonics," focussed on the last 500,000 years in a 1986 National Research Council report of that title. However, there is a cartographic gap between tectonic maps, generally showing all features regardless of age, and maps of current seismic or volcanic activity. We have compiled a map intended to bridge this gap, using modern data bases and computer-aided cartographic techniques. The maps presented here are conceptually descended from an earlier map showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the last one million years. Drawn by hand with the National Geographic Society's 1975 "The Physical World" map as a base, the 1981 map in various revisions has been widely reproduced in textbooks and various technical publications. However, two decades of progress call for a completely new map that can take advantage of new knowledge and cartographic techniques. The digital tectonic activity map (DTM), presented in shaded relief (Fig. 1) and schematic (Fig. 2) versions, is the result. The DTM is intended to show tectonism and volcanism of the last one million years, a period long enough to be representative of global activity, but short enough that features such as fault scarps and volcanos are still geomorphically recognizable. Data Sources and Cartographic Methods The DTM is based on a wide range of sources, summarized in Table 1. The most important is the digital elevation model, used to construct a shaded relief map. The bathymetry is largely from satellite altimetry, specifically the marine gravity compilations by Smith and Sandwell (1996). The shaded relief map was designed to match the new National Geographic Society world physical map (1992), although drawn independently, from the digital elevation model. The Robinson Projection is used instead of the earlier Van der Grinten one. Although neither

  10. Comparing the New Madrid Seismic Zone with the Osning Thrust: implications for GIA-induced intraplate tectonics in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Tanner, David; Winsemann, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Continental intraplate tectonics is a widespread phenomenon that causes significant earthquakes. These earthquakes even occur in areas that are characterized by low strain rates and there are often long intervals between the individual seismic events (Gangopadhyay & Talwani, 2003) that result in a hazard potential. To better understand the controlling factors of intraplate plate earthquakes in northern Germany, we compare the Osning Thrust with the intensively-studied New Madrid Seismic Zone in the Midwest USA. Both areas share major similarities such as a failed rift-basin setting, the presence of intrusive magmatic bodies in the subsurface, tectonic reactivation during the Late Cretaceous, paleo- and historic seismicity and comparable fault parameters. In addition, both areas have a very similar Late Pleistocene deglaciation history. New Madrid was c. 340 km south of the Laurentide ice sheet and ice retreat started around 21 ka and was completed by 8.5 ka (Grollimund & Zoback, 2001). The Osning Thrust was c. 310 km south of the Scandinavian ice sheet and deglaciation began at 24 ka. Both areas show historic seismicity in a similar time frame (New Madrid Seismic Zone: 1811-1812, Johnston & Schweig, 1996); Osning Thrust: 1612 and 1767, Grünthal & Bosse, 1997). We use numerical simulations to identify the timing of potentially GIA-induced fault activity, which are based on the fault stability margin concept of Wu & Hasegawa (1996). From our modelling results it is evident that the fault stability margin changed to negative between 16 and 13 ka for the Osning Thrust, which matches the OSL data of fault-related growth strata (Brandes et al., 2012). For the New Madrid Seismic Zone, the fault stability margin becomes zero between 2.5 ka BP (before 1812) to about 2 ka after the 1812 event, depending on the parameters of the model. This indicates that for both seismic zones, seismicity due to deglaciation was and still is very likely. From this study it can be derived

  11. Tectonic history of the central Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran: Potentially Permian to Mesozoic polymetamorphism and implications for tectonics of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Masoudi, Fariborz; Mehrabi, Behzad; Monfaredi, Behzad; Friedl, Gertrude

    2015-04-01

    The determination of metamorphic conditions and of its age is critical to the understanding of the mountain belt formation as metamorphism is an expression of subduction or plate collision. In this study, we report the metamorphic evolution, preliminary Ar-Ar mineral ages and structures from two amphibolite-grade metamorphic units of the Dorud-Azna region in the central part of Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone and discuss the tectonic implications. The Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone is nearly parallel to the Main Zagros Reverse Fault and is located above the Neotethyan ophiolitic suture. Structural studies and our previous U-Pb zircon dating work demonstrated that the area comprise three metamorphosed tectonic units, which are from footwall to hangingwall: (1) The Triassic June complex is metamorphosed within greenschist facies conditions, overlain by (2) the amphibolite-grade metamorphic Panafrican Galeh-Doz orthogneiss, which is intruded by some mafic dykes, and (3) the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit with Carboniferous metagabbro bodies. To the East, the Darijune gabbro intruded within the Permian Kuh-e-June Marble and the mentioned two other metamorphic units. The granitic Galeh-Doz orthogneiss displays two different P-T conditions. The best average estimates for the magmatic mineral assemblage (plagioclase core + amphibole core + K-feldspar + quartz) range between 675 and 710 °C and 3.7 and 4.2 kbar, whilst the temperature of 530 and 625 °C and pressure of 0.7 to 2.8 kbar is consistent with the first metamorphic mineral assemblage. Ar-Ar amphibole ages from the Galeh-Doz orthogneiss give plateau-like steps between 260 and 270 Ma. We interpret this age as the cooling age after an amphibolite facies-grade metamorphism. An amphibole from relatively well preserved dyke within the Galeh-Doz orthogneiss gives staircase pattern with an age of 261 ± 3 Ma in the first step considered similarly as a metamorphic overprint in metamorphic rocks, whereas plateau-like steps

  12. On the feedback between forearc tectonics and megathrust earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, M.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    An increasing number of observations suggest an intrinsic relationship between short- and long-term, elastic and plastic deformation processes in subduction zones. These include the global correlation between megathrust earthquake slip patterns with morphotectonic forearc features and the historical predominance of giant earthquakes (M > 9) along accretionary margins (e.g., Chile, Alaska, Cascadia, Sumatra). Here we explore experimentally the feedback between forearc tectonics and megathrust earthquakes. We use compressive granular wedges overlying a rate-and-state dependent frictional interface as analog models of subduction zone forearcs. We simulate and analyze seismotectonic deformation time-series with respect to the accumulation of permanent strain and the evolution of the frequency-size distributions of associated megathrust earthquakes. Over multiple seismic cycles deformation in the overriding plate localizes at the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone in form of a backthrust. A shallow velocity strengthening interface sustains strain localization near the wedge tip. This results in a structural segmentation of the wedge with an elastic domain overlying the seismogenic zone enclosed by plastically shortened domains corresponding to the accretionary wedge/outer arc high and coastal high in nature. Along with the evolution of the wedges from internally deforming wedges to segmented wedges the analog megathrust seismicity develops from random, Gutenberg-Richter like distributed events towards deterministic, periodic events. Accordingly, the frequency distribution of earthquakes becomes narrower as the models evolve from plastic to elastic. Because the width of the frequency distribution controls the length of the time window during which an event can be triggered by a nearby event, this indicates that the probability of synchronous failure of neighboring segments in a single giant event is generally higher along plastically deforming margins than along

  13. Inversion tectonics in the Anayet Permian basin (Axial Zone, Central Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    During Permian times the Pyrenees were characterized by extensional tectonics that opened subsident basins with pull-apart geometries. The Anayet Permian basin crops out in the western Spanish Axial Zone between the Aragon and Tena valleys. It is WNW-trending and it is filled by a continental Permian succession that represents the first post-variscan deposits in the area. Permian deposits rest discordantly over Devonian to Carboniferous limestones, sandstones and slates. In the Anayet basin, Permian deposits have been classically divided in four main detrital groups, mainly composed of sandstones and conglomerates, with three basic volcanic episodes interbedded (Gisbert, 1984, Bixel, 1987). Due to the lithological characteristics of the Permian rocks in this region, there are almost no accurate age constraints for these units. A detailed structural study of the area, including mapping and balanced cross-sections, shows increasingly older rocks to the west of the Anayet basin. Moreover, it can be deduced a mean slope of around 11 % to the west for the basin. These data confirm that the basin depocenter was located to the west and that the Anayet basin was partitioned by N10 °E-trending normal faults. Although the contacts between the Permian and the Devono-Carboniferous rocks are covered by quaternary deposits in most of its extent, a fault contact can also be recognized. The fault contact is a 3 m thick shear zone oriented N120 ° E and dipping 60° to the North. It develops breccias, fault gouges and sigmoidal S-C tectonites indicating a reverse motion. The contact places Permian slates and sandstones over Carboniferous limestones and is almost parallel to the alpine cleavage deforming Permian rocks. The slope of the contact together with the presence of younger rocks in the hangingwall of the reverse fault points out that the original contact was a normal fault reactivated as a high-angle reverse fault during the positive inversion tectonics induced by the

  14. Water-rock interactions in the Median Tectonic Line fault zone, SW Japan revealed by core sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Tanaka, N.; Shigematsu, N.

    2012-12-01

    Alteration minerals along the fault zone of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), the Japan's largest onshore fault, are characterized to understand the crustal faulting at various depth conditions by describing a borehole penetrating the MTL. The borehole was drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan, AIST (GSJ, AIST) to predict the forthcoming Nankai-Tonankai Earthquake at Matsusaka-Iitaka (ITA), SW Japan. The drilling length is 600m. It penetrates the MTL at the depth of 473.9m. The fault plane has an almost E-W strike and dips at 56° to the north. Hangingwall of the MTL consists of Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite and footwall of the MTL consists of fractured rocks derived from Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks. Ryoke-derived tonalitic mylonite in the hangingwall suffered more or less later cataclastic deformations. X-ray diffraction patterns of powdered samples derived from ITA borehole were obtained to identify alteration mineral assemblages and estimate alteration conditions. Chlorite, laumontite, white-mica, prehnite and calcite are main alteration minerals in the Ryoke belt above 400m depth, while analcine and stilbite occur as zeolite minerals instead of laumontite between 400m and 473.9m depth. Laumontite is preferentially occurred in the cataclastically deformed zones and calcite often fills fractures and cavities. The fault plane and fractures in the fault zone provide fluid conduit. The presence of laumontite and prehnite indicates that the alteration temperature was more than 200°C, while analcime and stilbite formed at lower temperature than laumontite. These suggest that the zone of hydrothermal alteration less than 200°C was restricted below 400m depth in the ITA borehole. We also applied chlorite geothermometry (Inoue et al., 2009), which yeileds temperatures of about 300°C for mylonitic rocks and those of about 200°C for cataclastic rocks. Immediately beneath the MTL, approximately 40m thick fractured rocks form the major strand of the MTL fault zone

  15. Geological evidence and future detection of active tectonics on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rossi, Angelo; Hauber, Ernst; Spagnuolo, Mauro; Fueten, Frank; Pondrelli, Monica; Breuer, Doris; Grott, Matthias; Knapmeyer, Martin; Quantin Nataf, Cathy; Unnithan, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that recent tectonic deformation affected discrete areas on Mars (e.g. Spagnuolo et al., 2011; Roberts et al., 2012): Steep scarps cut bedrock and unconsolidated deposits, including mass wasting and eolian materials. The crater size frequency-based age estimate for some of these scarps, e.g. in Aureum Chaos is a few Myr only. The case for recent or very recent volcanism is sound on Mars (e.g. Hauber et al., 2011; Neukum et al., 2004), but comparably young tectonics on Mars had not been discovered until recently. Areas with linear or curvilinear, steep fault-like scarps (e.g., in Aureum or Aram Chaos) are relatively far from large volcanic edifices and provinces with recent effusive activity. Hence, a direct volcano-tectonic link, e.g., with Tharsis, seems unlikely. On the other hand, late collapses and subsidence in ~Hesperian or younger chaos/chasma areas could be responsible for the local deformation, which appears to be mainly extensional. Reactivation of older structures is also a possibility. Regardless the actual mechanism and geodynamic setting, present tectonic activity on Mars is a very real possibility, and it would open a range of opportunities for research such as geodynamics, hazards for future exploration, resources and exobiological potential: present faulting in chasmata and chaotic terrains could offer pathways for subsurface fluids to reach the surface or near subsurface, including potential degassing. Future missions such as InSight (NASA) and potentially Mars Network Science Mission (MNSM, ESA) could detect the first signs of Mars's tectonic activity. In addition, ESA ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter could also investigate any potential outgassing in the vicinity of recently faulted candidate areas. References: Hauber et al. (2011) GLR, 38, 10, 1944-8007, doi:10.1029/2011GL047310 Neukum et al. (2004) Nature, 432, 971-979, doi:10.1038/nature03231 Roberts, G. P., et al. (2012), JGR, 117, E02009, doi:10.1029/2011JE003816

  16. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ˜90 to ˜87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70-60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85-80 Ma and 55-45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ˜65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55-45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene-early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene-recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  17. Tectonic evolution of the Perth Abyssal Plain's Quiet Zone, Southeast Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Zohar Louis; Granot, Roi; Williams, Simon E.

    2013-04-01

    During the Late Jurassic period, the Greater-Indian plate was torn away from Australia, dissociating East Gondwanaland. The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP) is the southernmost rift segment along the western Australian margin, and has an onset age of ~136 Ma. New marine magnetic and swath bathymetry data, crossing the entire PAP, were acquired recently on geophysical cruise ss2011v06 aboard the R/V Southern Surveyor. These have lead to the outline of conjugate Indian and Australian M-series isochrons in the east and west PAP, respectively [1]. Yet, most of the PAP was created during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS, 121-83 Ma), a period of no geomagnetic field reversals, hence no comprehensive tectonic model for the PAP exists . Here we present preliminary findings of an analytic bathymetric and magnetic investigation aimed at elucidating the PAP's quiet zone. Recent discoveries regarding the evolution of the geomagnetic field during the CNS [2] provide new time markers that can be utilized to date the oceanic crust. The magnetic anomaly data exhibit the Q2 anomaly marker (~108 Ma), further constraining the spreading history of the PAP. Together with the ridgelet transform method [3] for automated abyssal hill delineation, we present new constraints on the development of crustal construction processes (spreading location, direction and rates) that took place along the PAP spreading center. References: [1] S.E. Williams, J.M. Whittaker, R. Granot, R.D. Muller (in preparation), New constraints on the seafloor spreading history in the Perth Abyssal Plain. [2] Granot, R., J. Dyment, and Y. Gallet (2012), Geomagnetic field variability during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron, Nature Geoscience, 5(3), 220-223. [3] Downey, N. J. and R. W. Clayton (2007), A ridgelet transform method for constraining tectonic models via abyssal-hill morphology, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 8, Q03004, doi: 10.1029/2006GC001440.

  18. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  19. Simulation of active tectonic processes for a convecting mantle with moving continents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.; Kaban, M.; Mooney, W.; Reigber, C.; Schwintzer, P.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical models are presented that simulate several active tectonic processes. These models include a continent that is thermally and mechanically coupled with viscous mantle flow. The assumption of rigid continents allows use of solid body equations to describe the continents' motion and to calculate their velocities. The starting point is a quasi-steady state model of mantle convection with temperature/ pressure-dependent viscosity. After placing a continent on top of the mantle, the convection pattern changes. The mantle flow subsequently passes through several stages, eventually resembling the mantle structure under present-day continents: (a) Extension tectonics and marginal basins form on boundary of a continent approaching to subduction zone, roll back of subduction takes place in front of moving continent; (b) The continent reaches the subduction zone, the extension regime at the continental edge is replaced by strong compression. The roll back of the subduction zone still continues after closure of the marginal basin and the continent moves towards the upwelling. As a result the ocean becomes non-symmetric and (c) The continent overrides the upwelling and subduction in its classical form stops. The third stage appears only in the upper mantle model with localized upwellings. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  20. New Insights into the Active Tectonics of Eastern Indonesia from GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, S.; Koulali Idrissi, A.; McClusky, S.; Meilano, I.; Cummins, P. R.; Tregoning, P.; Syafii, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian archipelago encompasses a wide range of tectonic environments, including island arc volcanism, subduction zones, and arc-continent collision. Many of the details of this tectonic activity are still poorly understood, especially where the Australian continent collides with Indonesia, separating the Sunda Arc in west from that at the Banda Arc in the east. While it seems clear that the Australian plate is subducted under both the Sunda and Banda Arcs, it is not clear what happens along the 1000 km -long stretch in between. The question of just where the plate motion is accommodated is of major importance to assessments of earthquake and tsunami hazard in the region. To help resolve these questions the Geospatial Information Agency of Indonesia has collaborated with the Australian National University and the Bandung Institute of Technology in a GPS campaign spanning much of eastern Indonesia, from Lombok in the west to Alor in the east. We have combined these data with those from previous campaigns, resulting in over 27 campaign and 18 continuous GPS sites being used in the analysis. The improvement in site density allowed us to develop of a more complete description of tectonic activity in this region than has been obtained in previous studies. Our preliminary results suggests that there is a relatively simple transition from subduction at the Java Trench off east Java, to a partitioned convergence along both the Timor Trough and the Flores Thrust in the Nusa Tenggara region.

  1. Structural analysis and tectonic implications of a shallow layer-parallel shear zone in the central Apennines (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, S.; Cifelli, F.

    2009-04-01

    The central Apennines is a Neogenic NE verging fold-and-thrust belt, characterized by inherited lower Liassic structures and by different paleogeographic domains (with different rheological behaviours), which played a first order role in the tectonic evolution of the belt. The N-S trending Olevano-Antrodoco, one of the major thrusts of this area, is commonly interpreted as an oblique out-of-sequence structure, along which the Sabina slope domain (to the west) overthrusted the Latium-Abruzzi carbonate platform domain (to the East), reactivating the original Liassic to Miocenic boundary. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the Sabina domain and the Latium-Abruzzi domain were characterized by the occurrence of opposite vertical-axis rotations, clockwise and counterclockwise, respectively, in the two domains, suggesting a different tectonic evolution of these sectors. However, paleomagnetic data can provide only partial information on the kinematic evolution of this area because rocks suitable for paleomagnetic analysis are not widespread in the Latium-Abruzzi domain. Moreover, rocks exposed in the two domains do not allow performing analyses on sediments of the same ages. In this work, in order to provide additional kinematic and geometric constraints to the tectonic evolution of this part of Central Apennines, a mesostructural study was carried out in a decollement level, exposed in both Sabina and Latium-Abruzzi domains and located at the top of the meso-cenozoic carbonatic sequence. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) analysis was integrated with the structural analysis, representing an additional rock fabric indicator used to unravel the deformational history of the studied rocks. The analysed decollement was active in the early stages of the belt evolution and consists of a thick shear zone dominated by pressure solution cleavage oblique to bedding. The widespread exposition of this level, allows using the pressure solution cleavage as a regional

  2. Tectonic geomorphology of the New Madrid seismic zone based on imaging of digital topographic data

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Topographic analysis using digital elevation data of the New Madrid region focuses on topographic features that occur at several spatial scales and can be used to delineate distinct anomalies. In this region, topographic anomalies occur as domal or elongate uplifts and bowl-shaped depressions approximately 1--10 km in size, topographic lineaments, and differences in topographic blocking across 50 km long boundaries. In order to fully explain these topographic anomalies, tectonic processes may be required. Imaging is based on digital topographic data from USGS 30 arc-second, 3 arc-second, and 30 m resolutions. Imaging of these data uses standard imaging processing techniques to examine topography within the contexts of geomorphological hypothesis testing. A good example is the use of thresholding to highlight areas of unusually high elevation given the hypothesis of fluvial landscape architecture. Thresholding delineates topographic features such as the Tiptonville dome which is strongly believed to be tectonic in origin. To determine the pattern of topographic blocking, defined as a pattern that topography assumes when constrained by active forces other than erosion alone, low frequency passing spatial convolutions are used as filters and the resulting data are sliced into blocks according to pseudoelevations that produce a stable block pattern. The resultant blocks are analyzed according to its structural pattern of block size and block orientation. This analysis suggests that a topographic boundary cuts across the Mississippi embayment from near the Newport pluton on the west, to the area south of Memphis on east.

  3. Geochronology of the Baie Verte Peninsula, Newfoundland: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Humber and Dunnage Zones of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.; Hibbard, J.

    1984-09-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from the Burlington Granodiorite suggest intrusion at c. 460-465 Ma. Hornblende and biotite from central portions of the pluton record markedly younger /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar plateau dates (410-420 Ma) which are interpreted to date contact metamorphic effects associated with the widespread emplacement of Silurian-Devonian igneous suites. Northern portions of the Burlington Granodiorite are polydeformed and regionally metamorphosed. Hornblende and biotite from this terrane yield /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar plateau ages of 345-350 Ma. U-Pb analyses of zircon from the Dunamagon Granite indicate emplacement at c. 440-460 Ma, thereby providing an upper limit for tectonic juxtapositioning of the Humber and Dunnage Zones along the Baie Verte Line. Similar ages are also recorded by hornblende and biotite throughout northerly portions of the Mings Bight (Humber Zone) and Pacquet Harbour (Dunnage Zone) Groups. These results indicate that the tectonic evolution of the Baie Verte Line as polygenetic, and involved: (1) regionally significant tectonothermal activity prior to the Middle Ordovician and (2) Middle to Late Paleozoic tectonothermal activity centered along easterly segments of the Baie Verte Line. The regional metamorphism associated with this orogenic activity altered primary U-Pb and Rb-Sr isotopic systems within various igneous suites exposed in northeastern portions of the Burlington Peninsula, which may explain some inconsistent geochronological results previously obtained. 54 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  4. Paleomagnetic evidence for proterozoic tectonism in the Kapuskasing Structural Zone, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, D. T. A.; Vandall, T. A.

    1990-11-01

    The Kapuskasing Structural Zone (KSZ) in the Superior Province of north-central Ontario is thought to be an oblique cross-section through Middle Archean crust. Samples from 30 sites in granulite gneisses and anorthosites of the KSZ have been analyzed using alternating field and thermal demagnetization methods. Three remanent magnetization components were found with mean directions of: D = 23°, I = 50° (k =52, α95 = 11°, N = 5 sites) for the A component; D = 73°, I = -68° (k = 50, α95 = 5°, N = 18) for the B component; and D = 332°, I = -59° (k = 53, α95 = 17°, N = 3) for the C component. V. Constanzo-Alvarez and D. J. Dunlop found similar A and B components in less metamorphosed rocks from the same units to the immediate west. They attributed the A component to uplift at 2.55 Ga with subsequent 15° to 30° WNW tilt and the B component to thermochemical overprinting at 1.1 Ga as the KSZ was reactivated during Keweenawan rifting and volcanism. We also attribute the A component to uplift during the 2.55 Ga Kenoran Orogeny with concomitant 10°±5° WNW downward tilting before intrusion of the 2.45 Ga Matachewan dikes, to give its present paleopole of 33°E, 67° (dp = 6°, dm = 9°, N = 13) using data from both studies. We attribute acquisition of the B component to uplift at about 1.88 Ga, as suggested by recent thermal modeling and tectonic syntheses, to give a paleopole of 124°W, 30°N (dp = 7°, dm = 8°, N = 20). The C component is found in only three sites and may be either an hybrid of a 1.1 Ga Keweenawan CRM with the B component or a fault-block tilted B component near the Ivanhoe Lake cataclastic zone.

  5. Block and shear-zone architecture of the Minnesota River Valley subprovince: Implications for late Archean accretionary tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southwick, D.L.; Chandler, V.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Minnesota River Valley subprovince of the Superior Province is an Archean gneiss terrane composed internally of four crustal blocks bounded by three zones of east-northeast-trending linear geophysical anomalies. Two of the block-bounding zones are verified regional-scale shears. The geological nature of the third boundary has not been established. Potential-field geophysical models portray the boundary zones as moderately north-dipping surfaces or thin slabs similar in strike and dip to the Morris fault segment of the Great Lakes tectonic zone at the north margin of the subprovince. The central two blocks of the subprovince (Morton and Montevideo) are predominantly high-grade quartzofeldspathic gneiss, some as old as 3.6 Ga, and late-tectonic granite. The northern and southern blocks (Benson and Jeffers, respectively) are judged to contain less gneiss than the central blocks and a larger diversity of syntectonic and late-tectonic plutons. A belt of moderately metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks having some attributes of a dismembered ophiolite is partly within the boundary zone between the Morton and Montevideo blocks. This and the other block boundaries are interpreted as late Archean structures that were reactivated in the Early Proterozoic. The Minnesota River Valley subprovince is interpreted as a late accretionary addition to the Superior Province. Because it was continental crust, it was not subductible when it impinged on the convergent southern margin of the Superior Craton in late Archean time, and it may have accommodated to convergent-margin stresses by dividing into blocks and shear zones capable of independent movement.

  6. Interactions between extensional shear zones and syn-tectonic granitic intrusions: the example of Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Valentin; Beaudoin, Alexandre; Jolivet, Laurent; Arbaret, Laurent; Augier, Romain; Rabillard, Aurelien

    2014-05-01

    The Aegean domain is an ideal place to investigate the development of Metamorphic Core Complex (MCC) and to study the role of syn-tectonic granites on their development. MCCs of the Aegean domain are dynamically associated with a few major detachments, especially the North Cycladic Detachment System (NCDS) and the West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS), which have accommodated a large part of the crustal thinning during the Oligocene and Miocene. The NCDS extends toward the East within the Simav Detachment that has exhumed the northern high-temperature part of the Menderes massif. The transition between the NCDS and the Simav Detachments is located above a major tear in the Aegean slab whose effects on lithospheric deformation are far from understood. The Aegean granitoids were emplaced during the Middle Miocene within a zone of high-temperature during the episode of slab tearing and recorded increments of extensional tectonics within this complex zone. Ikaria Island (Cyclades, Greece) is a metamorphic dome intruded by three Miocene granitoid plutons (one I-type intrusion, two S-type ones) including the largest pluton of the Aegean domain. However, geometry, structures and kinematics are still debated with several recent yet conflicting studies. We have reconsidered the geology of Ikaria to settle the geological and structural context of these plutons. The intrusion depth of the Raches granite has been estimated at 10-15 km by the Al-in-hornblende barometer. Our field study has led to the identification of two major structures: the Gialiskari and Kalamos detachments, which we interpret as belonging to the NCDS. A study of deformation in the granites has highlighted a continuum during cooling that can be described in three stages: i) magmatic deformation, ii) high-temperature ductile deformation from late magmatic stage until complete crystallization of the granite, iii) low-temperature brittle deformation. Throughout this evolution, the same top-to-the-NE shearing

  7. Large historical earthquakes and tsunamis in a very active tectonic rift: the Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2014-05-01

    The Gulf of Corinth is an active tectonic rift controlled by E-W trending normal faults with an uplifted footwall in the south and a subsiding hangingwall with antithetic faulting in the north. Regional geodetic extension rates up to about 1.5 cm/yr have been measured, which is one of the highest for tectonic rifts in the entire Earth, while seismic slip rates up to about 1 cm/yr were estimated. Large earthquakes with magnitudes, M, up to about 7 were historically documented and instrumentally recorded. In this paper we have compiled historical documentation of earthquake and tsunami events occurring in the Corinth Gulf from the antiquity up to the present. The completeness of the events reported improves with time particularly after the 15th century. The majority of tsunamis were caused by earthquake activity although the aseismic landsliding is a relatively frequent agent for tsunami generation in Corinth Gulf. We focus to better understand the process of tsunami generation from earthquakes. To this aim we have considered the elliptical rupture zones of all the strong (M≥ 6.0) historical and instrumental earthquakes known in the Corinth Gulf. We have taken into account rupture zones determined by previous authors. However, magnitudes, M, of historical earthquakes were recalculated from a set of empirical relationships between M and seismic intensity established for earthquakes occurring in Greece during the instrumental era of seismicity. For this application the macroseismic field of each one of the earthquakes was identified and seismic intensities were assigned. Another set of empirical relationships M/L and M/W for instrumentally recorded earthquakes in the Mediterranean region was applied to calculate rupture zone dimensions; where L=rupture zone length, W=rupture zone width. The rupture zones positions were decided on the basis of the localities of the highest seismic intensities and co-seismic ground failures, if any, while the orientation of the maximum

  8. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    buttress occurs under the North Cascades region of Washington and under southern Vancouver Island. We find that regional faults zones such as the Devils Mt. and Darrington zones follow the margin of this buttress and the Olympic-Wallowa lineament forms its southern boundary east of the Puget Lowland. Thick, high-velocity, lower-crustal rocks are interpreted to be a mafic/ultramafic wedge occuring just above the subduction thrust. This mafic wedge appears to be jointly deformed with the arch, suggesting strong coupling between the subducting plate and upper plate crust in the Puget Sound region at depths >30 km. Such tectonic coupling is possible if brittle-ductile transition temperatures for mafic/ultramafic rocks on both sides of the thrust are assumed. The deformation models show that dominant north-south compression in the coast ranges of Washington and Oregon is controlled by a highly mafic crust and low heat flow, allowing efficient transmission of margin-parallel shear from Pacific plate interaction with North America. Complex stress patterns which curve around the Puget Sound region require a concentration of northwest-directed shear in the North Cascades of Washington. The preferred model shows that greatest horizontal shortening occurs across the Devils Mt. fault zone and the east end of the Seattle fault.

  9. Mapping Active Faults and Tectonic Geomorphology offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hart, P. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, and July 2009, the USGS conducted two high-resolution, marine, seismic-reflection surveys across the continental shelf and upper slope between Piedras Blancas and Point Sal, central California, in order to better characterize regional earthquake sources. More than 1,300 km of single-channel seismic data were acquired aboard the USGS R/V Parke Snavely using a 500-joule mini-sparker source fired at a 0.5-second shot interval and recorded with a 15-meter streamer. Most tracklines were run perpendicular to the coast at 800-meter spacing, extending from the nearshore (~ 10-15 m water depth) to as far as 20 km offshore. Sub-bottom imaging varies with substrate, ranging from outstanding (100 to 150 m of penetration) in inferred Quaternary shallow marine, shelf and upper slope deposits to poor (0 to 10 m) in the Mesozoic basement rocks. Marine magnetic data were collected simultaneously on this survey, and both data sets are being integrated with new aeromagnetic data, publicly available industry seismic-reflection data, onshore geology, seismicity, and high-resolution bathymetry. Goals of the study are to map geology, structure, and sediment distribution; to document fault location, length, segmentation, shallow geometry and structure; and to identify possible sampling targets for constraining fault slip rates, earthquake recurrence, and tsunami hazard potential. The structure and tectonic geomorphology of the >100-km-long, right-lateral, Hosgri fault zone and its connections to the Los Osos, Pecho, Oceano and other northwest-trending inboard faults are the focus of this ongoing work. The Hosgri fault forms the eastern margin of the offshore Santa Maria basin and coincides in places with the outer edge of the narrow (5- to 15-km-wide), structurally complex continental shelf. The Hosgri is imaged as a relatively continuous, vertical fault zone that extends upward to the seafloor; varies significantly and rapidly along strike; and incorporates numerous

  10. Active landsliding and landscape denudation in response to transient tectonic uplift, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Miller, S. R.; Kirby, E.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Californian Coast ranges present a unique area to study landscape response to transient tectonic uplift. Studies have shown that an increase in uplift may be balanced by the rate of landsliding in settings of steady uplift. However, the landsliding response to transient tectonic uplift remains to be elucidated. The Californian Coast ranges are shaped by the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), which geodynamic modeling suggests produces a transient double-humped uplift field. A major research question is whether we can detect a signature of this transient tectonic uplift in landslide activity and document how the channel network communicates this signal to hillslopes. Using air photos and Worldview imagery, we manually mapped more than 2000 earthflows and debris slides in the Eel and surrounding catchments that span the ~400 km-long region. The velocities of active earthflows were estimated by visually tracking features between images spanning 1993 to 2013. We mapped channel steepness from 10m NED DEMs in Topotoolbox 2 and developed a new tool to automatically define knickpoints along the channel network. Earthflows occur almost exclusively in a band of Franciscan mélange oriented along the MTJ transect whilst debris slides are more evenly distributed by lithology. Both earthflows and debris slides are clustered in the Eel catchment around the proposed uplift peaks and are largely absent outside of these zones. Within these areas of high landslide densities, we observe peaks in active earthflows adjacent to peaks in dormant earthflows to the south, suggesting that the signature of earthflow activity remains for a period of time once the uplift peak has passed. Landslide density, mean landslide area, and earthflow velocity all increase rapidly above threshold values of channel steepness and local relief. In the Eel catchment, where the zone of rapid uplift is commencing, landslides, particularly earth flows, are concentrated

  11. Paleoseismic and geomorphologic evidence of recent tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A.; Pérez-López, R.; Garduño-Monroy, V.H.; Giner-Robles, J.L.; Silva, P.G.; Perucha-Atienza, M.A.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.M.; Bischoff, J.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental and historical seismicity in the Albacete province (External Prebetic Zone) has been scarcely recorded. However, major strike-slip faults showing NW-SE trending provide geomorphologic and paleoseismic evidence of recent tectonic activity (Late Pleistocene to Present). Moreover, these faults are consistently well oriented under the present stress tensor and therefore, they can trigger earthquakes of magnitude greater than M6, according to the lengths of surface ruptures and active segments recognized in fieldwork. Present landscape nearby the village of Hellin (SE of Albacete) is determined by the recent activity of the Pozohondo Fault (FPH), a NW-SE right-lateral fault with 90 km in length. In this study, we have calculated the Late Quaternary tectonic sliprate of the FPH from geomorphological, sedimentological, archaeoseimological, and paleoseismological approaches. All of these data suggest that the FPH runs with a minimum slip-rate of 0.1 mm/yr during the last 100 kyrs (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene). In addition, we have recognized the last two major paleoearthquakes associated to this fault. Magnitudes of these paleoearthquakes were gretarer than M6 and their recurrence intervals ranged from 6600 to 8600 yrs for the seismic cycle of FPH. The last earthquake was dated between the 1st and 6th centuries, though two earthquakes could be interpreted in this wide time interval, one at the FPH and other from a far field source. Results obtained here, suggest an increasing of the tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault during the last 10,000 yrs.

  12. Topographyc metrics in the southern sector of the Marche foothills: implication for active tectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materazzi, Marco; Aringoli, Domenico; Carducci, Tamara; Cavitolo, Paolo; Farabollini, Piero; Giacopetti, Marco; Pambianchi, Gilberto; Tondi, Emanuele; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative geomorphic analysis can be provided a useful contribution to the study of recent tectonics. Some parameters, that quantify the channels morphology, as the Stream Length-Gradient (SL) Index (Hack, 1973) and the Steepness (Ks) Index (Flint, 1974), are generally used to detect anomalies on the expected concave-up equilibrium stream-profile, which can result in local abrupt changes in stream gradient (i.e., knickpoints) and/or broad convexities on stream long-profiles extending for tens of kilometres (i.e., knickzones). The main goal of this work is the study of the morphological and morphometrical features in the southern sector of the Marche Region, with the aim to gain new knowledge on the influences of rock resistance and rock uplift on the fluvial and topographic system. The investigated area is situated in central Italy and it extends from the axial zone of the Umbria-Marche Apennines to the Adriatic Sea, including the southern sector of the Marche Region and belongs to the foredeep domain of the Apennines orogenic system, which has affected by tectonic activity up to very recent times. The rheology of outcropping deposits doesn't allow the strain to be easily recorded at the outcrop scale. The analyses have been aimed at to test the sensitivity of both SL and Ks for evaluating active crustal deformations, acting at different wavelengths on land surface, within a low tectonically active thrust-and-fold belt. Additional purpose was the understanding of the pattern of regional differential crustal activity in the topographic arrangement of the study area In this research project two sets of analysis were conducted. References Hack J.T. 1973. Stream-profile analysis and stream-gradient index. Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1, 421-429. Flint J.J. 1974. Stream gradient as a function of order, magnitude and discharge. Water Resources Research, 10, 969-973.

  13. New insights on the tectonics along the New Hebrides subduction zone based on GPS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmant, StéPhane; Pelletier, Bernard; Lebellegard, Pierre; Bevis, Michael; Taylor, Frederick W.; Phillips, David A.

    2003-06-01

    At the New Hebrides (NH) subduction zone, ridges born by the subducting Australia plate enter the trench and collide with the overriding margin. Results from GPS surveys conducted on both sides of the trench and new bathymetry maps of the NH archipelago bring new light on the complex tectonics of this area. Convergence vectors present large variations that are not explained by Australia/Pacific (A/P) poles and that define four segments. Vectors remain mostly perpendicular to the trench and parallel to the earthquake slip vectors. Slow convergence (i.e., 30-40 mm/yr) is found at the central segment facing the D'Entrecasteaux Ridge. The southern segment moves faster than A/P motion predicts (89 to 124 mm/yr). Relatively to a western North Fiji basin (WNFB) reference, the northern and southern segments rotate in opposite directions, consistently with the extension observed in the troughs east of both segments. Both rotations combine in Central Vanuatu into an eastward translation that "bulldozes" the central segment into the WNFB at ˜55 mm/yr. That model suggests that the motion of the central segment, forced by the subduction/collision of the D'Entrecasteaux ridge, influences the motion of the adjoining segments. The New Caledonia archipelago is motionless with respect to the rest of the Australia plate despite the incipient interaction between the Loyalty ridge and the NH margin. Southeast of the interaction area, convergence is partitioned into a ˜50 mm/yr trench-normal component accommodated at the trench and a ˜90 mm/yr trench-parallel component, close to the A/P convergence, and presumably accommodated by a transform boundary at the rear of the NH arc.

  14. Hazard analysis of active tectonics through geomorphometric parameters to cultural heritage conservation: the case of Paphos in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, A. V.; Sarris, A.; Alexakis, D.; Agapiou, A.; Themistocleous, K.; Lysandrou, V.; Hadjimitsis, D.

    2014-08-01

    Natural hazards, such as earthquakes, can have a large destructive effect on cultural heritage sites conservation. This study aims to assess from a geospatial perspective the risk from natural hazards for the archaeological sites and monuments and evaluate the potential tectonic activity impact on the cultural and historic heritage. Geomorphometric data derivatives that can be extracted from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) provide information relevant with active tectonics. The specific extracted tectonic information when being used on the basis of analytical hierarchy process and weighted linear combination approach can offer an important robust approach. The ranking of the derived information relatively to specific criteria of weights can enhance the interrelationships and assemblages over neotectonics aspects. The outcomes of that methodological framework can propose an assessment approach for the spatial distribution of neotectonic activity and can become a useful tool to assessing seismic hazard for disaster risk reduction. The risk assessment aspects of such a hazard are being interlinked with the archaeological sites in order to highlight and examine those that are exposed on ongoing tectonic activity and seismic hazard. Paphos area in Cyprus has been used as the test bed for the particular analysis. The results show an important number of archaeological sites being located within zones of high degree of neotectonic activity.

  15. Evidence for Deep Tectonic Tremor in the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. R.; Prejean, S. G.; Beroza, G. C.; Gomberg, J. S.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    We search for, characterize, and locate tremor not associated with volcanoes along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone using continuous seismic data recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and Alaska Earthquake Information Center from 2005 to the present. Visual inspection of waveform spectra and time series reveal dozens of 10 to 20-minute bursts of tremor throughout the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone (Peterson, 2009). Using autocorrelation methods, we show that these tremor signals are composed of hundreds of repeating low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) as has been found in other circum-Pacific subduction zones. We infer deep sources based on phase arrival move-out times of less than 4 seconds across multiple monitoring networks (max. inter-station distances of 50 km), which are designed to monitor individual volcanoes. We find tremor activity is localized in 7 segments: Cook Inlet, Shelikof Strait, Alaska Peninsula, King Cove, Unalaska-Dutch Harbor, Andreanof Islands, and the Rat Islands. Locations along the Cook Inlet, Shelikof Straight and Alaska Peninsula are well constrained due to adequate station coverage. LFE hypocenters in these regions are located on the plate interface and form a sharp edge near the down-dip limit of the 1964 M 9.2 rupture area. Although the geometry, age, thermal structure, frictional and other relevant properties of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction are poorly known, it is likely these characteristics differ along its entire length, and also differ from other subduction zones where tremor has been found. LFE hypocenters in the remaining areas are also located down-dip of the most recent M 8+ megathrust earthquakes, between 60-75 km depth and almost directly under the volcanic arc. Although these locations are less well constrained, our preliminary results suggest LFE/tremor activity marks the down-dip rupture limit for megathrust earthquakes in this subduction zone. Also, we cannot rule out the possibility that our observations could

  16. Hydrothermal fluids circulation and travertine deposition in an active tectonic setting: Insights from the Kamara geothermal area (western Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea; Alçiçek, M. Cihat; Yalçıner, Cahit Çağlar; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Liotta, Domenico; Meccheri, Marco; Rimondi, Valentina; Ruggieri, Giovanni; Gandin, Anna; Boschi, Chiara; Büyüksaraç, Aydin; Alçiçek, Hülya; Bülbül, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Coexistence of thermal springs, travertine deposits and tectonic activity is a recurring feature for most geothermal areas. Although such a certainty, their relationships are debated mainly addressing on the role of the tectonic activity in triggering and controlling fluids flow and travertine deposition. In this paper, we present the results of an integrated study carried out in a geothermal area located in western Anatolia (Turkey), nearby the well-known Pamukkale area (Denizli Basin). Our study focused on the relationships among hydrothermal fluids circulation, travertine deposition and tectonic activity, with particular emphasis on the role of faults in controlling fluids upwelling, thermal springs location and deposition of travertine masses. New field mapping and structural/kinematics analyses allowed us to recognize two main faults systems (NW- and NE-trending), framed in the Neogene-Quaternary extensional tectonic evolution of western Anatolia. A geo-radar (GPR) prospection was also provided in a key-area, permitting us to reconstruct a buried fault zone and its relationships with the development of a fissure-ridge travertine deposit (Kamara fissure-ridge). The integration among structural and geophysical studies, fluids inclusion, geochemical, isotopic data and 230 Th/238 U radiometric age determination on travertine deposits, depict the characteristics of the geothermal fluids and their pathway, up to the surface. Hydrological and seismological data have been also taken in account to investigate the relation between local seismicity and fluid upwelling. As a main conclusion we found strict relationships among tectonic activity, earthquakes occurrence, and variation of the physical/chemical features of the hydrothermal fluids, presently exploited at depth, or flowing out in thermal springs. In the same way, we underline the tectonic role in controlling the travertine deposition, making travertine (mainly banded travertine) a useful proxy to reconstruct the

  17. Quaternary active tectonic structures in the offshore Bajo Segura basin (SE Iberian Peninsula - Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, H.; Gràcia, E.; Alfaro, P.; Bartolomé, R.; Lo Iacono, C.; Moreno, X.; Masana, E.; Event-Shelf Team

    2012-10-01

    The Bajo Segura fault zone (BSFZ) is the northern terminal splay of the Eastern Betic shear zone (EBSZ), a large left-lateral strike-slip fault system of sigmoid geometry stretching more than 450 km from Alicante to Almería. The BSFZ extends from the onshore Bajo Segura basin further into the Mediterranean Sea and shows a moderate instrumental seismic activity characterized by small earthquakes. Nevertheless, the zone was affected by large historical earthquakes of which the largest was the 1829 Torrevieja earthquake (IEMS98 X). The onshore area of the BSFZ is marked by active transpressive structures (faults and folds), whereas the offshore area has been scarcely explored from the tectonic point of view. During the EVENT-SHELF cruise, a total of 10 high-resolution single-channel seismic sparker profiles were obtained along and across the offshore Bajo Segura basin. Analysis of these profiles resulted in (a) the identification of 6 Quaternary seismo-stratigraphic units bounded by five horizons corresponding to regional erosional surfaces related to global sea level lowstands; and (b) the mapping of the active sub-seafloor structures and their correlation with those described onshore. Moreover, the results suggest that the Bajo Segura blind thrust fault or the Torrevieja left-lateral strike-slip fault, with prolongation offshore, could be considered as the source of the 1829 Torrevieja earthquake. These data improve our understanding of present deformation along the BSFZ and provide new insights into the seismic hazard in the area.

  18. Relationship between observed upper mantle structures and recent tectonic activity across the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. Berk; Wagner, Lara S.; Fischer, Karen M.; Hawman, Robert B.

    2016-05-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Southeastern United States is a product of earlier episodes of continental collision and breakup. The region is located in the interior of the North American Plate, away from active plate margins. However, there is ongoing tectonism in the region with multiple zones of seismicity, uplifting arches, and Cenozoic intraplate volcanism. The mechanisms controlling this activity and the state of stress remain enigmatic. Two important factors are plate strength and preexisting, inherited structures. Here we present new tomographic images of the upper mantle beneath the Southeastern United States, revealing large-scale structural variations in the upper mantle. Examples include the relatively thick lithospheric mantle of stable North America that abruptly thins beneath the Paleozoic Appalachian orogeny, and the slow upper mantle of the Proterozoic Reelfoot rift. Our results also indicate fast seismic velocity patterns that can be interpreted as ongoing lithospheric foundering. This provides a viable explanation for seismicity, uplifting, and young intraplate volcanism. We postulate that not only tectonic inheritance but also continuing lithospheric foundering may control the ongoing activity of the region long after it became a passive margin. Based on distinct variations in the geometry and thickness of the lithospheric mantle and foundered lithosphere, we propose that piecemeal delamination has occurred beneath the region throughout the Cenozoic, removing a significant amount of reworked/deformed mantle lithosphere. Ongoing lithospheric foundering beneath the eastern margin of stable North America explains significant variations in thickness of lithospheric mantle across the former Grenville deformation front.

  19. The impact of salt tectonics on supra-salt (Lago Mare?) deposits and on the structural evolution of the Cyprus-Eratosthenes collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Sönke; Hübscher, Christian; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Averagely 1.5 km thick Messinian evaporites laterally continue from the Levant Basin, easternmost Mediterranean Sea, into the collision zone between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount where incipient continent-continent-collision is believed to occur. In this study, the impact of Messinian evaporites on the structural evolution of the collision zone is investigated for the first time based on a comprehensive set of seismic reflection profiles. Results show that the collision zone may be subdivided into an eastern and a western domain. In the eastern part, bordered by Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise, compressionally thickened autochthonous salt is observed. Sub- and supra-salt deposits within this area appear to be in the stage of active accretion. Further west, between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount strongly deformed allochthonous salt has evidently started to advance across sediments of post-Messinian age. In this domain, previously active sediment accretion at the Cyprus margin has now become inactive and shortening is largely accommodated at the leading edge of the allochthonous salt sheet. Such observations bear important implications for the structural interrelation between salt tectonics and the evolution of a young collision zone. On top of highly deformed mobile Messinian evaporites, up to 700 m thick late Messinian supra-salt deposits are mapped within the western part of the Cyprus - Eratosthenes collision zone. Their uppermost 200 m were drilled in the course of ODP Leg 160 (Site 968) and interpreted as Lago Mare sediments, deposited during the final stage of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Robertson, 1998). These sediments occupy small sub-basins flanked by salt diapirs, indicating a salt-tectonic control on late Messinian sediment deposition. Distribution of these sediments may have further been controlled by sea-level, inferred from rapid eastward thinning and pinchout of Messinian supra-salt deposits towards the Levant Basin

  20. Geomorphic signature of active tectonics in the southern Abruzzi Periadriatic hilly belt (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racano, Simone; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Centamore, Ernesto; Dramis, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The geo-structural setting of the southern Abruzzi hilly belt that stretches from the northeastern front of the Maiella Massif to the Adriatic coast is characterized by deep-seated northeast verging thrusts masked by a thick cover of Late Pliocene-Middle Pleistocene marine deposits. Most authors consider this area tectonically inactive while only few of them support the hypothesis of its recent activity from the analysis of the river network pattern. Geological and geomorphological investigations carried out in the area have clearly shown the occurrence of surface deformations resulting from the continued activity of compressive tectonics up to recent times. The analysis of the study area by of a 10 m resolution DTM (using the open-source QGIS software) confirmed and supplemented field observations. Particularly significant in this context is the topographic setting of the alluvial strath terraces in the river valleys that develop transversally to the buried thrusts. In correspondence of these structures, topographic highs have grown up displacing the middle-Pleistocene planation surface developed on top of the hilly belt, from the Maiella piedmont to the coastal zone, and diverting laterally the river courses uphill. In the same places, as along the Alento and Foro rivers that cross by antecedence the grown up topographic highs, the long profiles of terraces bend eastward and the height difference between the terrace orders, essentially related all around the area to the Quaternary regional uplift, strongly increases. In some cases, surficial faults have lowered the terraces into graben troughs or have displaced them until assuming an uphill trend. This recent tectonic activity should be taken in account in assessing the seismic hazard of the study area.

  1. Mechanisms for tectonic erosion of an accretionary complex in the d'Entrecasteaux Zone-New Hebrides Island arc collision zone

    SciTech Connect

    Collot, J.Y. ); Fisher, M.A. )

    1990-06-01

    In the southwest Pacific Ocean the d'Entrecasteaux Zone (DEZ) is an arcuate submarine mountain chain that collides with the central part of the New Hebrides island arc. The collision zone moves slowly (2.5 cm/yr) northward along the trench, owing to the small oblique angle between the DEZ and the azimuth of convergence. Extensive Seabeam bathymetry as well as single- and multichannel seismic reflection data were collected over both the collision zone and the accretionary wedge that lies south of this zone. These data indicate that the accretionary complex underwent considerable tectonic erosion in response to oblique subduction of the DEZ during the past 8 Ma. Simplified calculation indicates that the mean erosional rate of this complex is 800-900 km{sup 3}/Ma. The main mechanisms for tectonic erosion of the accretionary complex involve mass wasting and extensional tectonics. First, mobilization and mass wasting of accreted rocks result in overlapping slump masses that blanket the arc slope. Second, block sliding along an extensional detachment within accreted rocks strips off the upper (about 1 km) part of the accretionary complex. Third, as the DEZ moves northward, the accreted rocks in the wake of the DEZ lose support and collapse along large normal faults that trend oblique to the arc slope. An additional errosive mechanism involves the formation of a deep subcircular reentrant into the accretionary complex; the reentrant is believed to be a scar caused by the collision and subduction of a seamount. The reentrant cuts downward through the accreted rocks almost to the depth of the abyssal oceanic plain.

  2. Glacial reorganization of topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Byron; Ehlers, Todd

    2016-04-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns, and not tectonic rock uplift rates. Alpine glaciers drastically altered the relief structure of the Olympic Mountains. The details of these relief changes are recorded in channel profiles as overdeepenings, reduced slopes, and associated knickpoints. We find the position of these relief changes within the orogen is dependent on the position of the Pleistocene ELA. While alpine glaciers overdeepened valleys in regions near the Pleistocene ELA (which has a tendency to increase relief), headward erosion of west and north flowing glacier systems captured significant area from opposing systems and caused drainage divide lowering. This divide lowering reduced relief throughout the range. We demonstrate similar topographic effects recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on

  3. Molybdenite tricks with titanite give history of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Pandit, Manoj K.; Mohanty, Saradaprasad; Corfu, Fernando; Zimmerman, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    The time that the cratonic blocks joined to form peninsular India creating the E-W-trending Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is important for tectonic reconstructions and Paleoproterozoic glaciations, and fundamental to understanding how sutures behave through time. An abundance of recent literature highlights ~1.0 Ga as the time of suturing. This late 1.0 Ga meeting of the two cratons, however, is increasingly difficult to reconcile. One of the well-studied and well-mapped terranes in the southern part of the CITZ is the Sausar Belt [1]. The metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks comprising the extensive Paleoproterozoic Sausar Group are multiply deformed. To examine the history of the Sausar Belt from a new vantage, we employed Re-Os dating of molybdenite, a sulfide that serves faithfully as a single-mineral radiometric clock in both magmatic and metamorphic environments [2]. Molybdenite is rare in the Sausar belt. Samples containing a 1-cm molybdenite patch and coarse-grained, euhedral, clear brown titanite were acquired from two different varieties of calc-silicate rocks near the village of Umri in central India. The molybdenite occurs in a calcite-quartz vein that clearly cross-cuts a strongly deformed calc-silicate host with quartz-biotite and quartz bands at the cm scale. This vein, metamorphic in character, is about 1-cm-wide and slightly deformed. The molybdenite was contained wholly within the vein. To check for possible Re-Os decoupling [2], we split the molybdenite patch into seven subsamples, analyzing each fraction separately; in sum, these seven fractions account for the entire molybdenite crystal. We obtained extremely disparate ages for the individual fractions, ranging from 1.4 to 3.1 Ga. These data were recombined on an atomic basis to calculate the Re-Os age for the entire crystal, a trick we employed after affirming there was no additional sulfide and no additional molybdenite that might compete for Re and Os in our hand-sample of 10 x 15 cm

  4. Climate dominated topography in a tectonically active mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. A.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tests of the interactions between tectonic and climate forcing on Earth's topography often focus on the concept of steady-state whereby processes of rock deformation and erosion are opposing and equal. However, when conditions change such as the climate or tectonic rock uplift, then surface processes act to restore the balance between rock deformation and erosion by adjusting topography. Most examples of canonical steady-state mountain ranges lie within the northern hemisphere, which underwent a radical change in the Quaternary due to the onset of widespread glaciation. The activity of glaciers changed erosion rates and topography in many of these mountain ranges, which likely violates steady-state assumptions. With new topographic analysis, and existing patterns of climate and rock uplift, we explore a mountain range previously considered to be in steady-state, the Olympic Mountains, USA. The broad spatial trend in channel steepness values suggests that the locus of high rock uplift rates is coincident with the rugged range core, in a similar position as high temperature and pressure lithologies, but not in the low lying foothills as has been previously suggested by low-temperature thermochronometry. The details of our analysis suggest the dominant topographic signal in the Olympic Mountains is a spatial, and likely temporal, variation in erosional efficiency dictated by orographic precipitation, and Pleistocene glacier ELA patterns. We demonstrate the same topographic effects are recorded in the basin hypsometries of other Cenozoic mountain ranges around the world. The significant glacial overprint on topography makes the argument of mountain range steadiness untenable in significantly glaciated settings. Furthermore, our results suggest that most glaciated Cenozoic ranges are likely still in a mode of readjustment as fluvial systems change topography and erosion rates to equilibrate with rock uplift rates.

  5. Crustal structure and tectonic evolution of the Hecataeus Rise near the Cyprus-Eratosthenes Seamount collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Sönke; Welford, Kim; Hübscher, Christian; Hall, Jeremy

    2015-04-01

    The Hecataeus Rise represents a plateau-like structure, adjacent to the southern Cyprus margin and directly next to the Cyprus - Eratosthenes Seamount convergence zone, where incipient continent- continent-collision is believed to occur. Newly acquired wide-angle seismic profiles together with a dense grid of seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetric data provide insight into the crustal structure and Miocene-Quaternary structural evolution of this yet underexplored sector along the African-Anatolian plate boundary. Refraction seismic modeling suggests that the Hecataeus Rise is composed of a thick sedimentary cover underlain by an intermediate crust of presumably continental origin. Velocity models show significant lateral velocity variations along the African-Anatolian plate boundary, directly south of the Hecataeus Rise. High-velocity basement blocks coincide with highs in the magnetic field and appear to extend parallel to the margin of the Hecataeus Rise. We relate these high-velocity blocks to the presence of remnant Tethyan oceanic crust along a transform margin. Seismic reflection interpretation suggests that a Miocene period of tectonic compression has significantly deformed the western and southern part of the plateau area. Onshore Cyprus, structural lineaments were presumably active at the same time (Robertson, 1998) and can be traced offshore across the Hecataeus Rise. Post-Messinian convergence was accommodated along the southeastern flank of the Hecataeus Rise, where NE-SW trending anticlinal structures experienced reactivation and significant growth. A prominent intra-Pliocene-Quaternary unconformity in the northwestern part of the plateau area may correlate with the Plio-Pleistocene transition and indicates the near synchronous occurrence of several tectonostratigraphic events. We suggest that these events represent a chain of structural and depositional changes initiated by incipient collision of Eratosthenes Seamount with Cyprus and the

  6. Kinematics of the Torcal Shear Zone: transpressional tectonics shaping orogenic curves in the northern Gibraltar Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos, Leticia; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Expósito, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    zones as well as normal faults accommodating fold axis parallel extension. iiii) The Sierra de las Cabras-Camorolos sector, located at the E-end of the TSZ, is divided into two structural domains: a western domain, dominated by N120ºE dextral strike-slip faults, and an eastern domain structured by a WSW-ENE thrust system and normal faults with extension subparallel to the direction of the shortening structures. TSZ displacement at the lateral tip of this sector seems to be mainly accommodated by NNE trending thrusts in the northern TSZ block. The TSZ induces the near vertical extrusion of paleomargin rock units within the deformation band and the dextral deflection of the structural trend shaping the lateral end of the WGA salient. Our results suggest the TSZ started in the Upper Miocene and is still active. Moreover, the TSZ trends oblique to regional transport direction assessed both by field data and modelling. The estimated WNW-ESE far-field velocity vector in the TAM and the SVA points to the importance of the westward drift of the Internal Zones relative to the external wedge and fits well with the overall WGA kinematic frame. Nor the WGA salient neither the TSZ can be fully explained by the single Europe-Africa plate convergence.

  7. Impact of the Yakutat indentor corner on present-day tectonics and fault activity in SE Alaska - SW Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Ritz, J. F.; Ferry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an active tectonic model of the SE Alaska - SW Yukon region based principally on the integration of recent GPS velocity data and new fault-slip rates derived from geomorphology. In this region, the Yakutat collision results in complex tectonics with patterns of strain localization and strain partitioning that strongly vary across the various mountain ranges and active faults. We propose that deformation and fault activity in the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains are primarily controlled by the eastern syntaxis of the Yakutat collision, which produces a semi-radial tectonic pattern: Velocities, principal horizontal shortening rates, and maximum horizontal stress orientations rotate by 60 - 80 ° around the syntaxis, from roughly parallel to the relative Pacific - North America motion at the front of the collision to roughly orthogonal southeast of the syntaxis. The interaction between this strain pattern and major inherited tectonic structures inland of the collision zone (i.e., Denali and Duke River Faults) results in various reactivation modes of these structures. Specifically, the Denali Fault shows a very pronounced lateral variations of activity from ~12 mm/a of dextral slip rate in its central section to ~1 mm/a of mostly shortening slip rate along its southern section. This marked change of activity is associated with a possible relay system where the Duke River and Totschunda Faults accommodate a major part (8 - 12 mm/a) of the inland strain transfer directly in front of the syntaxis. This new tectonic model retains some questions, in particular regarding the mechanisms of deformation and strain transfer (1) from the syntaxis to the Duke River - Totschunda system and (2) at the junction between Totschunda and Denali Faults. Numerical models of present-day deformation may help address these issues and provide information about relative strength of the various crustal and inherited fault elements of this system.

  8. Earthquakes in the Orozco transform zone: seismicity, source mechanisms, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, a network of ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones was deployed in order to determine the seismic characteristics of the Orozco transform fault in the central eastern Pacific. We present hypocentral locations and source mechanisms for 70 earthquakes recorded by this network. All epicenters are within the transform region of the Orozco Fracture Zone and clearly delineate the active plate boundary. About half of the epicenters define a narrow line of activity parallel to the spreading direction and situated along a deep topographic trough that forms the northern boundary of the transform zone (region 1). Most focal depths for these events are very shallow, within 4 km of the seafloor; several well-determined focal depths, however, are as great as 7 km. No shallowing of seismic activity is observed as the rise-transform intersection is approached; to the contrary, the deepest events are within 10 km of the intersection. First motion polarities for most of the earthquakes in region 1 are compatible with right-lateral strike slip faulting along a nearly vertical plane, striking parallel to the spreading direction. Another zone of activity is observed in the central part of the transform (region 2). The apparent horizontal and vertical distribution of activity in this region is more scattered than in the first, and the first motion radiation patterns of these events do not appear to be compatible with any known fault mechanism. Pronounced lateral variations in crustal velocity structure are indicated for the transform region from refraction data and measurements of wave propagation directions. The effect of this lateral heterogeneity on hypocenters and fault plane solutions is evaluated by tracing rays through a three-dimensional velocity grid. While findings for events in region 1 are not significantly affected, in region 2, epicentral mislocations of up to 10 km and azimuthal deflections of up to 45° may result from

  9. Buried Rift Zones and Seamounts in Hawaii: Implications for Volcano Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Morgan, J. K.; Zelt, C. A.; Okubo, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    below sea level), the high velocities are sharply truncated to the south. However, at greater depths, the anomalously high velocities extend another 20 km into the submarine flank, distinguishing this feature as a once extensive rift zone. The presence of dense, coherent intrusive rock may have anchored Mauna Loa's southeastern flank, such that much of the volcano's recent deformation has occurred along the west flank of Mauna Loa. This massive rift zone may also impede the propagation of Kilauea's southwest rift zone, accounting for its lesser development relative to Kilauea's east rift zone. The velocity highs beneath Kilauea's submarine flank likely represent buried seamounts that might obstruct the seaward migration of volcano's south flank, causing the bench uplift at the toe of flank. These new observations lead us to propose that previously unrecognized intrusive complexes within Mauna Loa and Kilauea have significantly affected the past evolution of these volcanoes in the Island of Hawaii, and are likely responsible for the present patterns of deformation on these active volcanoes.

  10. Quantifying submarine landslide processes driven by active tectonic forcing: Cook Strait submarine canyon, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, J. J.; Barnes, P. M.; Pettinga, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    The Cook Strait submarine canyon system is a multi-branched, deeply incised and highly sinuous feature of New Zealand's active margin, covering some 1500km2 of sea floor between the North and South Islands and spanning water depths of between 50 and 2700m. The canyon occurs at the transition from the westward dipping oblique subduction zone adjacent to the SE North Island and the zone of continental transpression in NE South Island. The recent acquisition of high resolution (5-10m) SIMRAD EM300 bathymetric data allows active tectonic and geomorphic processes to be assessed and quantified at a level of detail previously not possible. While multiple active submarine fault traces have been identified in the Cook Strait by previous studies, quantitative information on their activity has been limited. Cook Strait is structurally characterized by westward dipping thrust faults and E-W trending dextral strike slip faults. The multiple large magnitude high frequency earthquake sources define zones of very high ground shaking expected to contribute to triggering of extensive submarine slope failures. Landslide activity within the canyon system is widespread and represents the dominant mass movement process affecting canyon heads and walls, redistributing material into valley fills. Complexes of large (km3) multi-stepped, deep-seated (100m) translational bedding plane failures represented by gently sloping (<3°) evacuated slide-scar areas with associated blocky valley fill deposits are numerous. Steep catchment heads, channel walls and the leading edges of asymmetric thrust-fault driven anticlines are dominated by gulley and rill systems with associated eroded and/or incipient slump features. Large (107m3+) slide blocks are recognized in discrete failures with quantifiable displacement vectors. Tsunamigenic landslides in this environment are inevitable. This study will provide quantification of landslide models including triggering mechanisms, discrete geometries and

  11. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  12. Tectonic activity on Pluto after the Charon-forming impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Collins, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The Pluto-Charon system, likely formed from an impact, has reached the endpoint of its tidal evolution. During its evolution into the dual-synchronous state, the equilibrium tidal figures of Pluto and Charon would have also evolved as angular momentum was transferred from Pluto's spin to Charon's orbit. The rate of tidal evolution is controlled by Pluto's interior physical and thermal state. We examine three interior models for Pluto: an undifferentiated rock/ice mixture, differentiated with ice above rock, and differentiated with an ocean. For the undifferentiated case without an ocean, the Pluto-Charon binary does not evolve to its current state unless its internal temperature Ti > 200K , which would likely lead to strong tidal heating, melting, and differentiation. Without an ocean, Pluto's interior temperature must be higher than 240 K for Charon to evolve on a time scale less than the age of the Solar System. Further tidal heating would likely create an ocean. If New Horizons finds evidence of ancient tidally-driven tectonic activity on either body, the most likely explanation is that Pluto had an internal ocean during Charon's orbital evolution.

  13. GeoBioScience: Red Wood Ants as Bioindicators for Active Tectonic Fault Systems in the West Eifel (Germany)

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Gabriele; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, approx. 3,000 Red Wood Ant (RWA; Formica rufa-group) mounds had been identified and correlated with tectonically active gas-permeable faults, mostly strike-slip faults. Linear alignment of RWA mounds and soil gas anomalies distinctly indicate the course of these faults, while clusters of mounds indicate crosscut zones of fault systems, which can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. This demonstrates that RWA are bioindicators for identifying active fault systems and useful where information on the active regime is incomplete or the resolution by technical means is insufficient. Abstract In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, a comprehensive investigation established the correlation between red wood ant mound (RWA; Formica rufa-group) sites and active tectonic faults. The current stress field with a NW-SE-trending main stress direction opens pathways for geogenic gases and potential magmas following the same orientation. At the same time, Variscan and Mesozoic fault zones are reactivated. The results showed linear alignments and clusters of approx. 3,000 RWA mounds. While linear mound distribution correlate with strike-slip fault systems documented by quartz and ore veins and fault planes with slickensides, the clusters represent crosscut zones of dominant fault systems. Latter can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. Gas analyses from soil air, mineral springs and mofettes (CO2, Helium, Radon and H2S) reveal limiting concentrations for the spatial distribution of mounds and colonization. Striking is further the almost complete absence of RWA mounds in the core area of the Quaternary volcanic field. A possible cause can be found in occasionally occurring H2S in the fault systems, which is toxic at miniscule concentrations to the ants. Viewed overall, there is a strong relationship between RWA mounds and active tectonics in the West Eifel

  14. Magma-tectonic interactions in Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone in 2006 through coupled geodetic/seismological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, C.; Roman, D. C.; Poland, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    For much of the first 20 years of Kīlauea's 1983-present Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption, deformation was characterized by subsidence at the volcano's summit and along both the East Rift Zone (ERZ) and Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). At the end of 2003, however, Kīlauea's summit began a 4-year period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, the SWRZ also experienced atypical inflation, which was last observed in 1981-82 during a series of dike intrusions. To investigate the active magma sources and their interactions with faulting in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes and Coulomb stress modeling. According to the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, two distinct periods can be defined, spanning January to 15 March 2006 (period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (period 2). Geodetic models suggest that, during period 1, deformation, due to pressurization of magma in a vertical prolate-spheroidal conduit, in the south caldera area. In addition, a major seismic swarm occurred in both the SWRZ and ERZ. Our preliminary results also suggest that, during period 2, magma was still overpressurizing the same prolate-spheroid but a subhorizontal sill also intruded further to the southwest in the seismic SWRZ (SSWRZ). The beginning of period 2 also corresponds to a switch from subsidence to inflation of the SWRZ. Faulting in the upper ERZ is primarily strike-slip, with no obvious change in FPS orientation between periods 1 and 2. In contrast, faulting in the upper SSWRZ occurs as dip-slip motion on near-vertical faults. SSWRZ FPS show a mix of orientations including NW- and NE-striking faults, which along with relative earthquake locations, suggest a series of right-stepping fault segments, particularly during period 2. Calculated Coulomb stress changes indicate that faulting in the upper SSWRZ may result from stresses produced by

  15. The geometry of the Wadati-Benioff zone under southern Central America and its tectonic significance: results from a high-resolution local seismographic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protti, Marino; Gu¨ndel, Federico; McNally, Karen

    1994-07-01

    We present here a detailed geometry of the Wadati-Benioff zone under Costa Rica, obtained from seismicity recorded by a dense local seismographic network jointly operated by the Costa Rica Volcanological and Seismological Observatory, National University, and the Charles F. Richter Seismological Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz. Underneath the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border the Wadati-Benioff zone smoothly contorts (from steep to shallow dip angles, NW to SE), but does not show evidence of a brittle tear, as postulated by others. However, further to the SE, NE of Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica, the Wadati-Benioff zone does show a segmentation (the Quesada Sharp Contortion) at intermediate depths ( h > 70km). NW of this sharp contortion the deepest portion of the seismically active slab dips at about 80° and reaches maximum depths ranging from 200 km, near the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border, to 135 km under Ciudad Quesada. To the SE the deeper portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone dips at about 60° and the seismicity does not extend below depths ranging from 125 km, behind the volcanic arc, to 50 km, east of Quepos. In southern Costa Rica, east of 83°55'W, we find no evidence of the Wadati-Benioff zone deeper than 50 km. The obtained geometry and other known tectonic features related to the subduction of the Cocos plate under the Caribbean plate along the southern terminus of the Middle America Trench (Nicaragua and Costa Rica) correlate well with along-trench variations in age of the subducted Cocos plate. Some of these tectonic features are: (1) the shallowing of Middle America Trench bathymetry from NW to SE; (2) variations in the energy release within the subducted slab; (3) differences in coupling between Cocos and Caribbean plates; (4) the termination of the Central America Volcanic Chain in central Costa Rica; (5) distinct stress field variations on the overriding Caribbean plate. The subduction of the Cocos Ridge under southern Costa Rica is partially

  16. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  17. Active Tectonics in crossroads of an evolving orogen and morphological consequences: Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Hayrettin

    2016-04-01

    Anatolia lies in a curved setting of the active Alpine Mountain Range and is located in crossroads of the European and Asian terrains. It is one of the fastest deforming land in the world, manifested by seismicity, characteristic landforms and GPS measurements. Active tectonics in Anatolia provides not only a comparable geological model for the past orogens, but also a laboratory case for morphological consequences of an orogenic processes. Anatolia comprise different tectonic subsettings with its own characteristics. Northern part is influenced by tectonic characteristics of the Black Sea Basin, the Pontides and the Caucasian Range; northwestern part by the Balkanides; eastern-southeastern part by the Bitlis-Zagros suture; and south-southwestern part by the eastern Mediterranean subduction setting. Much of its present tectonic complexity was inherited from the convergence dominant plate tectonic setting of the platelets prior to the Middle-Neogene. Beginning about 11 Ma ago, the deformed and uplifted landmass unable to accommodate further deformation in Anatolia and ongoing tectonic activity gave rise to rearrangement of tectonic forces and westerly translational movements. Formation of major strike-slip faults in Anatolia including the North and East Anatolian Faults and a new platelet called the Anatolian Plate are the consequences of this episode. Such change in the tectonic regime has led to modification of previously-formed landscape, modification and sometimes termination of previously-formed basins. Evidence is present in the Plio-Quaternary stratigraphy, tectonic characteristics and morphology of the well-studied areas. This presentation will discuss active tectonic features of the northwestern, southwestern and eastern Anatolian subsettings and their influence on morphology that is closely related to sites of pre-historical human settlement.

  18. Anisotropy in the subducted oceanic crust and the overlying continental crust explain the existence of a double tectonic tremor zone in the flat portion of the Mexican subduction zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, A. L.; Castillo, J. A.; Perez-Campos, X.; Frank, W.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic tremor (TT) in Mexico has a complicated behavior due to the shape of the subducted plate. In the flat section the slab dives from the trench to a depth of 40 km at 150 km from the trench where it turns to be flat. It remains at 40 km depth till about 290 - 300 km from the trench where it continues to steeply dive into the mantle. All TT activity is within the flat slab section. An LFE catalog and the vertically averaged shear wave anisotropy observed from receiver functions at the slab interface are used to divide the region into 4 zones. (1) The Transient Zone located at the corner of the slab when it first arrives at 40 km depth (~130 km - 165 km from the trench) where the majority of LFE's are seen in small bursts that produce TT. (2) The Buffer Zone has almost no LFE and is located ~165 km - 190 km from the trench. (3) The sub-Sweet Spot is located ~190 - 204 km from the trench and seems to share many characteristics of the Sweet Spot, but has less than half the LFE activity observed in the Sweet Spot in addition to different anisotropy. (4) The Sweet Spot has the overwhelming majority of LFE and is located ~204 km - 245 km from the trench. No LFE is found from 245 km to 300 km from the trench despite the plate still being at 40 km depth. The anisotropy percentage in the continental crust drops significantly above the Transient Zone and Sweet Spot suggesting the crust acts as a seal in those two zones permitting trapped fluids to generate TT/LFE activity there as has been observed in other zones. The Buffer Zone coincides with a region of high fluid flow in the crust (Jodicke et al., 2005) suggesting that there is no seal in this zone allowing fluids to escape thereby limiting TT/LFE generation. The convergence of the zone would imply that the anisotropy preferred orientation at the plate interface should be perpendicular to the trench as much of it is. However, the fast azimuth direction rotates to be trench parallel in the region of the large SSE

  19. Active tectonic deformation along rejuvenated faults in tropical Borneo: Inferences obtained from tectono-geomorphic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj Joseph; Menier, David; Siddiqui, Numair; Kumar, Shashi Gaurav; Authemayou, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The island of Borneo is enveloped by tropical rainforests and hostile terrain characterized by high denudation rates. Owing to such conditions, studies pertaining to neotectonics and consequent geomorphic expressions with regard to surface processes and landscape evolution are inadequately constrained. Here we demonstrate the first systematic tectono-geomorphic evaluation of north Borneo through quantitative and qualitative morphotectonic analysis at sub-catchment scale, for two large drainage basins located in Sarawak: the Rajang and Baram basins. The extraction of morphometric parameters utilizing digital elevation models arranged within a GIS environment focuses on hypsometric curve analysis, distribution of hypsometric integrals through spatial autocorrelation statistics, relative uplift values, the asymmetry factor and the normalized channel steepness index. Hypsometric analysis suggests a young topography adjusting to changes in tectonic boundary conditions. Autocorrelation statistics show clusters of high values of hypsometric integrals as prominent hotspots that are associated with less eroded, young topography situated in the fold and thrust belts of the Interior Highlands of Borneo. High channel steepness and gradients (> 200 m0.9) are observed in zones corresponding to the hotspots. Relative uplift values reveal the presence of tectonically uplifted blocks together with relatively subsided or lesser uplifted zones along known faults. Sub-catchments of both basins display asymmetry indicating tectonic tilting. Stream longitudinal profiles demonstrate the presence of anomalies in the form of knickzones without apparent lithological controls along their channel reaches. Surfaces represented by cold spots of low HI values and low channel gradients observed in the high elevation headwaters of both basins are linked to isolated erosional planation surfaces that could be remnants of piracy processes. The implication of our results is that Borneo experiences

  20. Role of structural inheritances and major transfer fault-zones in the tectonic history of the Alboran Basin (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, Menchu; Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Balanya, Juan Carlos

    2014-05-01

    reorganization (N-S shortening) of the basin, which encompass wrench tectonics, margin rotations, sub-basin inversions, bending of former extensional structures, and further shale-tectonics. The recent NW-SE and NE-SW trending conjugate wrench-fault system that bound the actual structural domains observed offshore locates over major transfer-faults zones from the Miocene extension. The rotated segments of basin-margins and concomitant structural bending, as well as changes in the tectonic regimen of the transfer-fault systems are expressive of the aftermath of superimposed extensional and compressional processes in the Alboran Basin. The spatial and temporary evolution of the tectonic deformation documented by geological and geophysical observables in the Alboran Sea basin provides new insights into the critical role of the tectonic heritage and major transfer fault-zones in the geodynamic history of the GAS. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by projects RNM-3713, RNM-215, CTM2009-07715 and CGL2009-11384 (MINECO, JA, and FEDER founds, Spain).

  1. The Physics of a Volcanic System: What is the Actual Role Played by Tectonic Setting in Controlling Volcanic Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2005-12-01

    Modern text-books commonly explain volcanic activity as a direct consequence of plate tectonics, overlooking the different scales characteristic of both types of processes. By acknowledging such differences, however, it is possible to envisage a model of a volcanic system that is based in the same principles of hydrostatics established by Blaise Pascal over 300 yrs ago. Such principles allow us to estimate the local conditions required for the occurrence of volcanism at a given location highlighting the importance of the rock strength and the density difference between melt and its surroundings. This model shows that the minimum thickness of the zone of partial melting in the mantle (or seismically defined Low Velocity Zone) that is required to feed volcanic activity might range from 5 to over 100 km, but also that under certain circumstances a rock strength < 200 MPa may suffice to keep magma trapped at depth whereas in other cases a strength > 600 MPa will not suffice to stop magma ascent resulting in volcanic activity at the surface. Consequently, the model of volcanism developed here explains why is that a given LVZ may lead to volcanic activity in some places whereas a completely identical LVZ may not result in volcanic activity in a different location. Consequently, this model provides a general framework that allows us to better understand the actual role played by tectonic setting in controlling volcanism at a planetary scale.

  2. Tectonic Maps of the Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These tectonic relief maps of the north (left, view large [540k]) and south (right, view large [411k]) poles are the result of new satellite-based technologies which are being used to analyze tectonic activity in the Earth's crust. These maps, known as Digital Tectonic Activity Maps (DTAMs), synoptically depict the architecture of the Earth's crust including current and past tectonic activity. This is significant because it permits researchers to view broad zones of activity over the entire surface of the Earth, rather than focusing on single boundary features. By looking at these 'big pictures,' scientists can possibly identify regions of activity which were not previously recognized or mapped using traditional methods. For more information, see: DTAM web site Putting Earthquakes in Their Place Images courtesy Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data by Paul Lowman and Jacob Yates, NASA GSFC

  3. Coastline uplift in Oregon and Washington and the nature of Cascadia subduction-zone tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.O.; McCrumb, D.R.

    1988-02-01

    Coastline deformation resulting from great shallow thrust earthquakes can provide information concerning the paleoseismicity of a subduction zone and thus information on the nature of potential seismicity. The Cascadia subduction zone is different from most other subduction zones in that it has been quiescent with respect to great earthquakes for at least the past 200 yr. The Washington-Oregon coastline also differs from most other coastlines associated with subduction zones in its lack of uplifted Holocene shoreline features and low overall rate of late Quaternary uplift (0.2-0.6 mm/yr). The uplift differences suggest that repeated great earthquakes have not occurred along the Cascadia subduction zone at least during the late Holocene. Alternatively, if the plate interface has generated earthquakes, the differences may be explained by longer recurrence intervals for great earthquakes, smaller magnitude earthquakes, or a mechanism that does not result in uplift of the coastline where expected.

  4. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  5. The Meers Fault: Tectonic activity in southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelli, A.R.; Slemmons, D.B.; Brocoum, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    The Meers Fault in Southwestern Oklahoma is capable of producing large, damaging earthquakes. By comparison to historical events, a minimum of M = 6-3/4 to 7-1/4 could be expected. The most recent surface rupturing event occurred in the late Holocene, and it appears that one or more pre-Holocene events preceded it. Surface rupture length is at least 37 km. Displacements comprising the present-day scarp have left-lateral and high-angle reverse components. Vertical separation of the ground surface reaches 5 m, while lateral separation exceeds the vertical by a ratio of about 3:1 to 5:1, reaching about 20 m. Individual events apparently had maximum displacements of several meters. The Meers Fault may be part of a larger active zone. Based on surface expressions, the Washita Valley, Oklahoma and Potter County, Texas Faults may also have ruptures during the late Quaternary, although not as recently as the Meers Fault. Low sun angle photography in Southwestern Oklahoma revealed no evidence of fault activity, other than that of the Meers Fault, although activity may be concealed by poor preservation or ductile surface deformation. This suggests that additional areas of activity may be sparse and rupture infrequently.

  6. Rapid Kinematic and Tectonic Variations Along the 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark Plate Boundary Zone, Papua New Guinea and Woodlark Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Taylor, F. W.; Gahagan, L.; Watson, L.

    2004-12-01

    Previous GPS studies have shown the wide variability in present-day plate motions across the highly arcuate, 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark plate boundary extending from Papua New Guinea to the Solomon Islands. GPS-determined motions range from orthogonal oceanic spreading in the Woodlark basin, to continental transtension in the 2.5-km-high core complex area of easternmost Papua New Guinea, to continental strike-slip and transpression in 4-km-high mountains of the Papuan Peninsula. We use imagery, earthquake focal mechanisms, coral reef uplift data, and structural mapping studies to establish the along-strike continuity of the active plate boundary fault. Systematic angular changes in the direction of the plate vector along this continuous fault explain its varied tectonic geomorphology, Holocene uplift history, and geologic structure. We use a series of plate reconstructions to illustrate the longer term, Cenozoic evolution of this boundary including: its formation as an arcuate, N- and NE-dipping ophiolitic suture zone during Paleogene time, the progressive "unzippering" of this thrust over the past 6 Ma along a N- and NE-dipping, low-angle normal fault in easternmost Papua New Guinea, and its "zippering" or continued shortening on the suture thrust in the Owen Stanley Ranges of the Papuan Peninsula. Over the 1400-km-length of the fault, the length of segments of oceanic spreading, transtension, and transpression is 250-500 km; the time period separating one tectonic style from the succeeding style encroaching from the east is several million years. This systematic spatial and temporal superposition of tectonic styles, leads to complex - but predictable - along-strike variations in geologic history.

  7. Supra-subduction zone tectonic setting of the Muslim Bagh Ophiolite, northwestern Pakistan: Insights from geochemistry and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakar, Mohammad Ishaq; Kerr, Andrew C.; Mahmood, Khalid; Collins, Alan S.; Khan, Mehrab; McDonald, Iain

    2014-08-01

    The geology of the Muslim Bagh area comprises the Indian passive continental margin and suture zone, which is overlain by the Muslim Bagh Ophiolite, Bagh Complex and a Flysch Zone of marine-fluvial successions. The Muslim Bagh Ophiolite has a nearly-complete ophiolite stratigraphy. The mantle sequence of foliated peridotite is mainly harzburgite with minor dunite and contains podiform chromite deposits that grade upwards into transition zone dunite. The mantle rocks (harzburgite/dunite) resulted from large degrees of partial melting of lherzolite and have also been affected by melt-peridotite reaction. The Muslim Bagh crustal section has a cyclic succession of ultramafic-mafic cumulate with dunite at the base, that grades into wehrlite/pyroxenite with gabbros (olivine gabbro, norite and hornblende gabbro) at the top. The sheeted dykes are immature in nature and are rooted in crustal gabbros. The dykes are mainly metamorphosed dolerites, with minor intrusions of plagiogranites. The configuration of the crustal section indicates that the crustal rocks were formed over variable time periods, in pulses, by a low magma supply rate. The whole rock geochemistry of the gabbros, sheeted dykes and the mafic dyke swarm suggests that they formed in a supra-subduction zone tectonic setting in Neo-Tethys during the Late Cretaceous. The dykes of the mafic swarm crosscut both the ophiolite and the metamorphic sole rocks and have a less-marked subduction signature than the other mafic rocks. These dykes were possibly emplaced off-axis and can be interpreted to have been generated in the spinel peridotite stability zone i.e., < 50-60 km, and to have risen through a slab window. The Bagh Complex is an assemblage of Triassic-Cretaceous igneous and sedimentary rocks, containing tholeiitic, N-MORB-like basalts and alkali basalts with OIB-type signatures. Nb-Ta depletion in both basalt types suggests possible contamination from continental fragments incorporated into the opening Tethyan

  8. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony; Nielsen, Tove; Jokat, Wilfried; Thybo, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone - East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic unconformity (IMU), which marks the termination of syn-rift deposition in the deep-sea basins and onset of: (i) thermo-mechanical coupling across the GFZ, (ii) basin compression, and (iii) contourite deposition, north of the EGR. The onset of coupling across the GFZ is constrained by results of 2-D flexural backstripping. We explain the thermo-mechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf-progradation on the NE Greenland margin. Given an estimated middle-to-late Miocene (~15-10 Ma) age of the IMU, we speculate that the event is synchronous with uplift of the East and West Greenland margins. The correlation between margin uplift and plate-motion changes further indicates that the uplift was triggered by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intra-plate stresses related to global tectonics.

  9. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony B.; Nielsen, Tove; Jokat, Wilfried; Thybo, Hans; Dahl-Jensen, Trine

    2016-02-01

    Tectonic models predict that following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their postrift evolution. However, postbreakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic unconformity (IMU), which marks the termination of synrift deposition in the deep-sea basins and onset of (i) thermomechanical coupling across the GFZ, (ii) basin compression, and (iii) contourite deposition, north of the EGR. The onset of coupling across the GFZ is constrained by results of 2-D flexural backstripping. We explain the thermomechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf progradation on the NE Greenland margin. Given an estimated middle to late Miocene (~15-10 Ma) age of the IMU, we speculate that the event is synchronous with uplift of the east and west Greenland margins. The correlation between margin uplift and plate motion changes further indicates that the uplift was triggered by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intraplate stresses related to global tectonics.

  10. The feedback between active tectonics, fluid flow and mineralization in an Andean geotermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Arancibia, G.; Perez, P.; Sanchez, P.; Cembrano, J. M.; Stimac, J. A.; Lohmar, S.

    2012-12-01

    In the Andean Cordillera of Central-Southern Chile, geothermal resources occur in close spatial relationship with active volcanism. The nature of the relationship between tectonics and volcanism in this region is the result of interaction between the crustal structures of the basement and the ongoing regional stress field, which is primarily controlled by the oblique convergence of the Nazca and South America Plates. Between 39° and 46°S, the volcanic and geothermal activity is controlled by the NNE-trending, 1,000 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), an intra-arc dextral strike-slip fault system. Although there is consensus that volcanism (and hence geothermal activity) in southern Chile is largely controlled by the regional-scale tectonic stress field and architecture of the volcanic arc, there is limited scientific information about the role of local kinematic conditions on fluid flow and mineralization during the development and evolution of geothermal reservoirs. In this report, we present the preliminary results of an undergoing structural, mineralogical and geochemical study of the Tolhuaca geothermal system in southern Chile. The Tolhuaca geothermal reservoir formed as a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system, where shallow upflow resulted in near-boiling temperatures in a roughly horizontal liquid reservoir at 100-200 m depth (Melosh et al., 2010, 2012). In an early stage of evolution, hydrothermal brecciation and phase-separation (boiling) episodes penetrated at least 950 m depth into the deeper reservoir, and boiling was followed by steam-heated water invasion that cooled the reservoir. In a later stage, the preliminary conceptual model involves boiling and reheating of the reservoir, forming a system with deep hot brines that is connected to the shallow steam zone by an upflow conduit that is characterized by high-temperature mineralogy. The structural analysis of veins, fault-veins and faults of the Tol-1 drillcore (~1080 m depth) provide insights

  11. Extensional orogenic collapse captured by strike-slip tectonics: Constraints from structural geology and Usbnd Pb geochronology of the Pinhel shear zone (Variscan orogen, Iberian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rubén Díez; Pereira, Manuel Francisco

    2016-11-01

    The late Paleozoic collision between Gondwana and Laurussia resulted in the polyphase deformation and magmatism that characterizes the Iberian Massif of the Variscan orogen. In the Central Iberian Zone, initial continental thickening (D1; folding and thrusting) was followed by extensional orogenic collapse (D2) responsible for the exhumation of high-grade rocks coeval to the emplacement of granitoids. This study presents a tectonometamorphic analysis of the Trancoso-Pinhel region (Central Iberian Zone) to explain the processes in place during the transition from an extension-dominated state (D2) to a compression-dominated one (D3). We reveal the existence of low-dipping D2 extensional structures later affected by several pulses of subhorizontal shortening, each of them typified by upright folds and strike-slip shearing (D3, D4 and D5, as identified by superimposition of structures). The D2 Pinhel extensional shear zone separates a low-grade domain from an underlying high-grade domain, and it contributed to the thermal reequilibration of the orogen by facilitating heat advection from lower parts of the crust, crustal thinning, decompression melting, and magma intrusion. Progressive lessening of the gravitational disequilibrium carried out by this D2 shear zone led to a switch from subhorizontal extension to compression and the eventual cessation and capture of the Pinhel shear zone by strike-slip tectonics during renewed crustal shortening. High-grade domains of the Pinhel shear zone were folded together with low-grade domains to define the current upright folded structure of the Trancoso-Pinhel region, the D3 Tamames-Marofa-Sátão synform. New dating of syn-orogenic granitoids (SHRIMP Usbnd Pb zircon dating) intruding the Pinhel shear zone, together with the already published ages of early extensional fabrics constrain the functioning of this shear zone to ca. 331-311 Ma, with maximum tectonomagmatic activity at ca. 321-317 Ma. The capture and apparent cessation

  12. Tectonic study of the extension of the New Madrid fault zone near its intersection with the 38th parallel lineament

    SciTech Connect

    Braile, L.W.; Hinze, W.J.; Sexton, J.L.; Keller, G.R.; Lidiak, E.G.

    1982-06-01

    Gravity, magnetic, geologic, and seismicity data have been combined in a seismotectonic analysis of the New Madrid seismic zone. Previous studies have presented evidence for several rift zones in this area (Upper Mississippi enmbayment), including the Reelfoot rift, a late precambrian-early Paleozoic failed arm which extends north-northeast from the ancient continental margin. We suggest that the northern terminus of the Reelfoot rift forms a rift complex, with arms extending northeast into southwestern Indiana, northwest along the Mississippi River, and east into western Kentucky, which appears to correlate well with the seismicity in the area. This correlation suggests that faults associated with this rift complex are being reactivated in the contemporary stress field (east-northeast compression). If this interpretation is valid, it represents a seismotectonic model which can be used to predict the extent of future seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone. The proposed rift complex also provides a coherent model for the tectonic development of this region of the North American midcontinent.

  13. Major and Trace Element Geochemistry of the Mafic Magmatic Rocks from the Betul Mobile Belt, Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Ghatak, A.

    2015-12-01

    Peninsular shield of India is composed of several Archaean cratons bordered by Proterozoic mobile belts which amalgamated the Archaean cratons and helped in the growth of the Indian subcontinent. The ENE-WSW trending Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is one such important mobile belt which sutures the Bundelkhand and the Aravalli craton in the north and Bastar, Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons in the south. The CITZ is a collection of lithotectonic terranes ranging in age from Archaean to recent and comprises supracrustal belts, granulite belts, shear zones and felsic-mafic magmatic rocks. The Betul belt is characterized by a litho-package of plutonic magmatic rocks, volcano-sedimentary rocks, bimodal volcanics and associated base metal sulphide mineralization. The petrological, geochemical and geochronological evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks has significance in our understanding of Proterozoic crustal evolution in central India. Here we report major and trace element concentrations of 14 mafic samples (basaslts, gabbors, pyroxenites and dolerites) in an attempt to classify, characterise and suggest a spatial and temporal evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks of the Betul mobile belt vis-à-vis CITZ. Traditionally these rocks have been classified as being calc-alkaline rocks, related to arc volcanism and rift tectonics. We have divided these rocks into those have a positive Europium anomaly and those having a negative Europium anomaly to better understand the source and the contaminant for these rocks. We find characterisitic difference specifically in the trace element ratios and concentrations of the rocks with +Eu anomaly [La=10.69ppm; LaN/YbN=3.65] and those with -Eu anomaly [La=27.59; LaN/YbN=8.86]. Based on these data we propose that the Betul mafic rocks may have been derived from an enriched mantle source that experienced contamination from the lower continental crust or sub-continental lithosphere prior to eruption.

  14. Significant Centers of Tectonic Activity as Identified by Wrinkle Ridges for the Western Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R.C.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.; Franklin, B. J.; Dohm, J. M.; Lias, J.

    2000-01-01

    The western hemisphere region of Mars has been the site of numerous scientific investigations regarding its tectonic evolution. For this region of Mars, the dominant tectonic region is the Tharsis province. Tharsis is characterized by an enormous system of radiating grabens and a circumferential system of wrinkle ridges. Past investigations of grabens associated with Tharsis have identified specific centers of tectonic activity. A recent structural analysis of the western hemisphere region of Mars which includes the Tharsis region, utilized 25,000 structures to determine the history of local and regional centers of tectonic activity based primarily on the spatial and temporal relationships of extensional features. This investigation revealed that Tharsis is more structurally complex (heterogeneous) than has been previously identified: it consists of numerous regional and local centers of tectonic activity (some are more dominant and/or more long lived than others). Here we use the same approach as Anderson et al. to determine whether the centers of tectonic activity that formed the extensional features also contributed to wrinkle ridge (compressional) formation.

  15. Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Venezuela Margin and the Onset of the Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, T.; Rangin, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Lesser Antilles active island arc marks the eastern boundary of the Caribbean plate, where the Atlantic oceanic crust is subducted. Geodynamic history of the Grenada and Tobago basins, accepted as both the back arc and fore arc basins respectively for this convergent zone, is the key for a better understanding of the Antilles arc subduction onset. Still, recent studies propose that these two basins formed as a single paleogene depocenter. Analysis of industrial and academical seismic profiling supports this hypothesis, and shows these basins are two half-graben filled by 15 kilometers of cenozoic sediments. The seismic profiles across these basins, and particularly the Geodinos Bolivar seismic profiles, indicate that the Antilles magmatic arc develops in the midst of the previously-extended Grenada-Tobago basin from Miocene time to present. The pre-cenozoic basement of the Grenada-Tobago basin can be traced from the Aves ridge to the Tobago Island where cretaceous meta-volcanic rocks are cropping out. Therefore, this large basin extension has been initiated in early Paleocene time during stretching or subsidence of the great cretaceous Caribbean arc and long time before the onset of the lesser Antilles volcanic arc. The question arises for the mechanism responsible of this intra-plate extension. The Tobago Ridge consists of the backstop of the Barbados prism. The innermost wedge is particularly well imaged on seismic data along the Darien Ridge, where the isopach paleogene sediments are jointly deformed in latest Oligocene. This deformation is starved with the early miocene piggy-back basin. Hence, we conclude the innermost wedge in contact with the butresss is late Oligocene in age and can be considered as the onset of the subduction along the Antilles arc. These results are part of a cooperative research-industry programm conducted by CEREGE/EGERIE, Aix-en-Provence and GeoAzur, Nice, with Frontier Basin study group TOTAL S.A., Paris.

  16. Imaging the structure of the Northern Lesser Antilles (Guadeloupe - Virgin Island) to assess the tectonic and thermo-mechanical behavior of an arcuate subduction zone that undergoes increasing convergence obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurencin, M.; Marcaillou, B.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Graindorge, D.; Bouquerel, H.; Conin, M.; Crozon, J.; De Min, L.; De Voogd, B.; Evain, M.; Heuret, A.; Laigle, M.; Lallemand, S.; Lucazeau, F.; Pichot, T.; Prunier, C.; Rolandone, F.; Rousset, D.; Vitard, C.

    2015-12-01

    Paradoxically, the Northern Lesser Antilles is the less-investigated and the most tectonically and seismically complex segment of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone: - The convergence obliquity between the North American and Caribbean plates increases northward from Guadeloupe to Virgin Islands raising questions about the fore-arc tectonic partitioning. - The margin has undergone the subduction of the rough sediment-starved Atlantic Ocean floor spiked with ridges as well as banks docking, but the resulting tectonic deformation remains hypothetical in the absence of a complete bathymetry and of any seismic line. - Recent geodetic data and low historical seismic activity suggest a low interplate coupling between Saint-Martin and Anegada, but the sparse onshore seismometers located far from source zone cast doubt on this seismic gap. To shed new light on these questions, the ANTITHESIS project, 5 Marine Geophysical legs totaling 72 days, aims at recording a complete bathymetric map, deep and shallow seismic reflexion lines, wide-angle seismic data, heat-flow measurements and the seismic activity with a web of sea-bottom seismometers. Our preliminary results suggest that: - A frontal sliver of accretionary prism is stretched and expulsed northward by 50km along the left-lateral Bunce fault that limits the prism from the margin basement as far southward as 18.5°N. So far, this structure is the only interpreted sign of tectonic partitioning in the fore-arc. - The Anegada Passage extends eastward to the accretionary prism through strike-slip faults and pull-apart basins that possibly form a lef-lateral poorly-active system inherited from a past tectonic phase, consistently with geodetic and seismologic data. - The anomalously cold interplate contact, consistent with a low interseismic coupling, is possibly due to fluid circulation within the shallow crustal aquifer or a depressed thermal structure of the oceanic crust related to the slow-spreading at the medio

  17. Late Paleozoic tectonics of the Solonker Zone in the Wuliji area, Inner Mongolia, China: Insights from stratigraphic sequence, chronology, and sandstone geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guanzhong; Song, Guangzeng; Wang, Hua; Huang, Chuanyan; Zhang, Lidong; Tang, Jianrong

    2016-09-01

    The geology in the Wuliji area (including the Enger Us and Quagan Qulu areas) is important for understanding the Late Paleozoic tectonics of the Solonker Zone. Ultramafic/mafic rocks in the Enger Us area, previously interpreted as an ophiolitic suture, are actually lava flows and sills in a Permian turbiditic sequence and a small body of fault breccia containing serpentinite. Subduction zone features, such as accretionary complexes, magmatic arc volcanics or LP/HP metamorphism are absent. Early Permian N-MORB mafic rocks and Late Permian radiolarian cherts accompanied by turbidites and tuffeous rocks indicate a deep water setting. In the Quagan Qulu area, outcrops of the Late Carboniferous to Permian Amushan Formation are composed of volcano-sedimenary rocks and guyot-like reef limestone along with a Late Permian volcano-sedimentary unit. A dacite lava in the Late Permian volcano-sedimentary unit yields a zircon U-Pb age of 254 Ma. The gabbros in the Quagan Qulu area are intruded into the Amushan Formation and caused contact metamorphism of country rocks. Sandstones in the Upper Member of the Amushan Formation contain detrital clasts of volcanic fragments and mineral clasts of crystalline basement rocks (i.e. biotite, muscovite and garnet). Geochemical analysis of volcaniclastic sandstones shows a magmatic affinity to both continental island arc (CIA) and active continental margin (ACM) tectonic settings. A Late Permian incipient rift setting is suggested by analyzing the lithostratigraphic sequence and related magmatism in the Wuliji area. The volcano-sedimentary rocks in the Wuliji area experienced a nearly N-S shortening that was probably related to the Early Mesozoic nearly N-S compression well developed in other areas close to the Wuliji area.

  18. The Grenville Front Tectonic Zone: Results from the 1986 Great Lakes Onshore Seismic Wide-Angle Reflection and Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    1991-09-01

    The Grenville Front, which marks the orogenic boundary between the Archean Superior Structural Province and the much younger Grenville Province to the southeast, is one of the major tectonic features of the Canadian Shield. Within Canada, it is approximately 1900 km in length extending from the north shore of Lake Huron across Ontario and Quebec to Labrador. In 1986, a major coincident onship near-vertical reflection and onshore wide-angle reflection/refraction experiment (GLIMPCE-Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution) was conducted along a series of lines across the Great lakes. One of the lines, line J, ran across Georgian Bay and Lake Huron for a distance of 350 km and crossed the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone (GFTZ). The seismic signals from the air gun array source were well recorded by the onshore stations up to distances of 250 km with a seismic trace spacing of 50-62.5 m. The GFTZ had a profound effect on the nature of the reflector patterns observed on the onshore seismic sections. Data recorded by the stations on the east end of the line indicate that the crustal P phases are very complex and form a "shinglelike" pattern of reflected waves. Data recorded by stations at the center and at the western end of the line show that the Pg phases are normal and lack the shinglelike appearance. This character of arrivals was also observed on the corresponding S wave sections. A combined P and S wave forward modeling analysis shows that the GFTZ is composed of bands of reflectors dipping at angles of 20°-35° extending to the lower crust. These reflectors were also well imaged on the coincident near-vertical reflection data. Reflectors under the Britt domain to the east of the GFTZ have a shallower dip than those along the zone. The structure of the crust under the Manitoulin terrane to the west of the GFTZ is laterally homogeneous with a major intracrustal reflector at a depth of 17-20 km below the surface. Poisson's ratio is

  19. Active tectonics and mud diapirism in the Gulf of Squillace (Crotone Basin, Calabrian Arc, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, A.; Capozzi, R.; Lorenzini, S.; Oppo, D.; Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Calabrian arc is a prominent accretionary prism in the Mediterranean sea that contains alpine metamorphic rocks and connects the southern Apennine chain of Calabria, to the north, with the Maghrebian chain of Sicily, to the southwest. Recent active deformation inside the prism is testified by the earthquakes records and by submarine mud volcanism. The latter, not yet well defined within the accretionary prism, is generally associated to deeper active tectonic structures. In order to unravel the relationships between mud volcanoes and deeper deformations a study has been carried out in the Gulf of Squillace, located in the central portion of the backstop zone of the Calabrian arc and inside the Crotone basin. The deeper tectono-stratigraphic frame has been defined by using 10 well logs, 330 kms of public seismic reflection lines and three CROP seismic lines (the project for deep crust of Italy) recently processed with prestack depth migration. The study has been carried out within the Italian PRIN 2006 Project: "Tectonic and Sedimentation in the Accretionary Complex at the Front of the Calabrian Arc (Ionian Sea)". Three major tectonic units could be distinguished; from the top to the bottom, they are: 1) a metamorphic basement nappe (Alpine/Calabrian units); 2) a complex and east-verging Apenninic-Maghrebian prism, that can be subdivided in an outer prism sealed by middle Eocene(?)/Oligocene deposits and an inner prism sealed by middle/late Miocene deposits; 3) a deeper Mesozoic to Neogene relatively undeformed block interpreted as a thinned block of continental crust that preserves Mesozoic extensional fault. Subsurface mapping of Alpine/Calabrian and Apenninic-Maghrebian units show that their leading edges are oriented NNE-SSW and their tectonic stack was completed at least in the late Miocene; since then, WNW-ESE trending Catanzaro-Squillace transcurrent faults system and out-of-sequence thrusting started to locally reshape the backstop. The Cantanzaro

  20. Suture zones of the Urals as integral prospective ore-bearing tectonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteev, V. A.; Sazonov, V. N.; Ogorodnikov, V. N.; Polenov, Yu. A.

    2009-04-01

    Rift-related (1.2 Ga) and collision (380-240 Ma) suture zones of the Urals are described. The riftrelated suture zones comprise an ultramafic-gabbro complex with titanomagnetite mineralization, an ultramafic complex with chromite mineralization, and a complex of alkali granitoids with rare-metal (including REE) mineralization accompanied by K-feldspathites, albitites, and calcite metasomatic rocks. The collision suture zones are distinguished by early collision granitoids specialized for tungsten (scheelite) and gold, as well as by raremetal granites and such derivatives of them as pegmatite and greisen with rare-metal and colored-stone mineralization. The suture zones are characterized by long-term (up to 80 Ma or more) continuous-discontinuous periods of ore deposition; heterogeneous sources of ore matter and ore-bearing fluids; a polyelemental composition of lithogeochemical halos and an integral mineral composition of altered wall rocks; and the occurrence of mafic, intermediate, and felsic dikes at large gold deposits, as well as wide variations in PT parameters of the ore-forming process: T = 620-150°C and P = 3.2-0.6 kbar. Collision played a dual role in ore formation. On the one hand, collision led to deformation and metamorphism of precollision massive sulfide deposits and, to a lesser degree, Au-bearing Fe and Cu skarn and porphyry copper deposits, and, on the other hand, to the formation of new gold, rare-metal, quartz, colored-stone, talc, muscovite, and noble serpentine deposits. As a rule, this polygenetic mineralization differs in age and is related to collision volcanic and plutonic complexes. This diversity can be a good basis for metallogenic analysis, forecasting, and prospecting of various metallic deposits and industrial minerals. Polygenetic mineralization of various age known in suture zones is accompanied by integral lithogeochemical and metasomatic halos characterized by a continuous-discontinuous history. The complexity of ore

  1. GeoBioScience: Red Wood Ants as Bioindicators for Active Tectonic Fault Systems in the West Eifel (Germany).

    PubMed

    Berberich, Gabriele; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-05-17

    In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, a comprehensive investigation established the correlation between red wood ant mound (RWA; Formica rufa-group) sites and active tectonic faults. The current stress field with a NW-SE-trending main stress direction opens pathways for geogenic gases and potential magmas following the same orientation. At the same time, Variscan and Mesozoic fault zones are reactivated. The results showed linear alignments and clusters of approx. 3,000 RWA mounds. While linear mound distribution correlate with strike-slip fault systems documented by quartz and ore veins and fault planes with slickensides, the clusters represent crosscut zones of dominant fault systems. Latter can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. Gas analyses from soil air, mineral springs and mofettes (CO₂, Helium, Radon and H₂S) reveal limiting concentrations for the spatial distribution of mounds and colonization. Striking is further the almost complete absence of RWA mounds in the core area of the Quaternary volcanic field. A possible cause can be found in occasionally occurring H₂S in the fault systems, which is toxic at miniscule concentrations to the ants. Viewed overall, there is a strong relationship between RWA mounds and active tectonics in the West Eifel.

  2. Mineral chemistry of isotropic gabbros from the Manamedu Ophiolite Complex, Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India: Evidence for neoproterozoic suprasubduction zone tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellappa, T.; Tsunogae, T.; Chetty, T. R. K.; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The dismembered units of the Neoproterozoic Manamedu Ophiolite Complex (MOC) in the Cauvery Suture Zone, southern India comprises a well preserved ophiolitic sequence of ultramafic cumulates of altered dunites, pyroxenites, mafic cumulates of gabbros, gabbro-norites and anorthosites in association with plagiogranites, isotropic gabbros, metadolerites, metabasalts/amphibolites and thin layers of ferruginous chert bands. The isotropic gabbros occur as intrusions in association with gabbroic anorthosites, plagiogranite and metabasalts/amphibolites. The gabbros are medium to fine grained with euhedral to subhedral orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes and subhedral plagioclase, together with rare amphiboles. Mineral chemistry of isotropic gabbros reveal that the clinopyroxenes are diopsidic to augitic in composition within the compositional ranges of En(42-59), Fs(5-12), Wo(31-50). They are Ca-rich and Na poor (Na2O < 0.77 wt%) characterized by high-Mg (Mg# 79-86) and low-Ti (TiO2 < 0.35 wt%) contents. The tectonic discrimination plots of clinopyroxene data indicate island arc signature of the source magma. Our study further confirms the suprasubduction zone origin of the Manamedu ophiolitic suite, associated with the subduction-collision history of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique ocean during the assembly of Gondwana supercontinent.

  3. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Tornquist Zone and adjacent sedimentary basins in Scania and the southern Baltic Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlström, M.; Thomas, S. A.; Deeks, N.; Sivhed, U.

    1997-04-01

    Southernmost Sweden, Bornholm and the surrounding Baltic Sea region are located on a large-scale releasing bend in the dextral strike-slip system of the Tornquist Zone, with its resulting pull-apart basins. The well constrained geology of Scania and Bornholm has been combined with detailed on- and offshore borehole data and three proprietary marine seismic surveys. This in conjunction with supplementary BABEL deep seismic reflection findings allows a combined 3D interpretation of sediment/structure interactions. As a result, a regional interpretation has emerged which gives a new understanding of the interplay between structural movement on a complex strike-slip fault system (Tornquist Zone) and its intrazonal depressions (Vomb Trough and Colonus Shale Trough) as well as the sedimentation history of associated areas of sediment accumulation (Rønne and Arnager Grabens, Höllviken Halfgraben, Hanö Bay Basin and Skurup Platform). Detailed sequential litho- and seismo-stratigraphic descriptions have been possible by combination of the various data sets. This resulted in the clarification or recognition of previously unknown structural limits to sub-basins and highs in the study area. A 3D chronological (4D) model for the development of the region is proposed. This model takes into account the long-lived structural history combining elements of strike-slip, extension and inversion tectonics. The deep-seated faulting controlling these structures is integrated with the deep structure as revealed by the BABEL line in this area.

  4. Tectonic stress accumulation in Bohai-Zhangjiakou Seismotectonic Zone based on 3D visco-elastic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ju; Weifeng, Sun; Xiaojing, Ma; Hui, Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Future earthquake potential in the Bohai-Zhangjiakou Seismotectonic Zone (BZSZ) in North China deserves close attention. Tectonic stress accumulation state is an important indicator for earthquakes; therefore, this study aims to analyse the stress accumulation state in the BZSZ via three-dimensional visco-elastic numerical modelling. The results reveal that the maximum shear stress in the BZSZ increases gradually as the depth increases, and the stress range is wider in the lower layer. In the upper layer, the maximum shear stress is high in the Zhangjiakou area, whereas in the lower layer, relatively high values occur in the Penglai-Yantai area, which may be affected by the depth of the Moho surface. Besides, weak fault zones will be easily fractured when the maximum shear stress is not sufficiently high due to their low strengths, resulting in earthquakes. Therefore, based on the modelling results, the upper layer of the Zhangjiakou area and the lower layer of the Penglai-Yantai area in the BZSZ in North China are more likely to experience earthquakes.

  5. Presynaptic active zones in invertebrates and vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Frauke; Waites, Clarissa L; Garner, Craig C

    2015-01-01

    The regulated release of neurotransmitter occurs via the fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane called active zones (AZs). These regions are defined by a cytoskeletal matrix assembled at AZs (CAZ), which functions to direct SVs toward docking and fusion sites and supports their maturation into the readily releasable pool. In addition, CAZ proteins localize voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at SV release sites, bringing the fusion machinery in close proximity to the calcium source. Proteins of the CAZ therefore ensure that vesicle fusion is temporally and spatially organized, allowing for the precise and reliable release of neurotransmitter. Importantly, AZs are highly dynamic structures, supporting presynaptic remodeling, changes in neurotransmitter release efficacy, and thus presynaptic forms of plasticity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the study of active zones, highlighting how the CAZ molecularly defines sites of neurotransmitter release, endocytic zones, and the integrity of synapses. PMID:26160654

  6. Tectonic controls on fault-zone permeability in a geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen; Zoback, Mark; Benoit, Richard

    1998-01-01

    To determine factors controlling permeability variations within and adjacent to a fault-hosted geothermal reservoir at Dixie Valley, Nevada, we conducted borehole televiewer observations of wellbore failure (breakouts and cooling cracks) together with hydraulic fracturing stress measurements in six wells drilled into the Stillwater fault zone at depths of 2 to 3 km. Measurements in highly permeable wells penetrating the main geothermal reservoir indicate that the local orientation of the least horizontal principal stress, Shmin, is nearly optimal for normal faulting on the Stillwater fault. Hydraulic fracturing tests from these wells further show that the magnitude of Shmin is low enough to lead to frictional failure on the Stillwater and nearby subparallel faults, suggesting that fault slip is responsible for the high reservoir productivity. Similar measurements were conducted in two wells penetrating a relatively impermeable segment of the Stillwater fault zone, located approx. 8 and 20 km southwest of the geothermal reservoir (wells 66-21 and 45-14, respectively). The orientation of Shmin in well 66-21 is near optimal for normal faulting on the nearby Stillwater fault, but the magnitude of Shmin is too high to result in incipient frictional failure. In contrast, although the magnitude of Shmin in well 45-14 is low enough to lead to normal faulting on optimally oriented faults, the orientation of the Stillwater fault near this well is rotated by approx. 40?? from the optimal orientation for normal faulting. This misorientation, coupled with an apparent increase in the magnitude of the greatest horizontal principal stress in going from the producing to nonproducing wells, acts to inhibit frictional failure on the Stillwater fault zone in proximity to well 45-14. Taken together, data from the nonproducing and producing wells thus suggest that a necessary condition for high reservoir permeability is that the Stillwater fault zone be critically stressed for

  7. Active tectonics of northwestern U.S. inferred from GPS-derived surface velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert McCaffrey; Robert W. King; Suzette J. Payne; Matthew Lancaster

    2013-02-01

    Surface velocities derived from GPS observations from 1993 to 2011 at several hundred sites across the deforming northwestern United States are used to further elucidate the region's active tectonics. The new velocities reveal that the clockwise rotations, relative to North America, seen in Oregon and western Washington from earlier GPS observations, continue to the east to include the Snake River Plain of Idaho and south into the Basin and Range of northern Nevada. Regional-scale rotation is attributed to gravitationally driven extension in the Basin and Range and Pacific-North America shear transferred through the Walker Lane belt aided by potentially strong pinning below the Idaho Batholith. The large rotating section comprising eastern Oregon displays very low internal deformation rates despite seismological evidence for a thin crust, warm mantle, organized mantle flow, and elevated topography. The observed disparity between mantle and surface kinematics suggests that either little stress acts between them (low basal shear) or that the crust is strong relative to the mantle. The rotation of the Oregon block impinges on Washington across the Yakima fold-thrust belt where shortening occurs in a closing-fan style. Elastic fault locking at the Cascadia subduction zone is reevaluated using the GPS velocities and recently published uplift rates. The 18 year GPS and 80 year leveling data can both be matched with a common locking model suggesting that the locking has been stable over many decades. The rate of strain accumulation is consistent with hundreds of years between great subduction events.

  8. Late Carboniferous-early Permian events in the Trans-European Suture Zone: Tectonic and acid magmatic evidence from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelaźniewicz, A.; Oberc-Dziedzic, T.; Fanning, C. M.; Protas, A.; Muszyński, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) links the East and West European Platforms. It is concealed under Meso-Cenozoic cover. Available seismic data show that the lower crustal layer in the TESZ is an attenuated, 200 km wide, SW margin of Baltica. The attenuation occurred when Rodinia broke-up, which gave rise to evolution of the thinned, thus relatively unstable margin of Baltica. It accommodated accretions during Phanerozoic events. We focus on acid magmatism, specifically granitoid, observed close to the SW border of the TESZ in Poland. This border is defined by the Dolsk Fault Zone (DFZ) and the Kraków-Lubliniec Fault Zone (KLFZ) on which dextral wrenching developed as a result of the Variscan collision between Laurussia and Gondwana. The granitoids at the DFZ and KLFZ were dated at 300 Ma. In the Variscan foreland that overlaps the TESZ, orogenic thickening continued to 307-306 Ma, possibly contributed to melting of the thickened upper continental crust (εNd300 = - 6.0 to - 4.5) and triggered the tectonically controlled magmatism. The wrenching on the TESZ border faults caused tensional openings in the basement, which promoted magmatic centers with extrusions of rhyolites and extensive ignimbrites. The Chrzypsko-Paproć and Małopolska magmatic centers were developed at the DFZ and KLFZ, respectively. The magmatic edifices commenced at 302 Ma with relatively poorly evolved granites, which carried both suprasubduction and anorogenic signatures, then followed by more evolved volcanic rocks (up to 293 Ma). Their geochemistry and inherited zircons suggest that the felsic magmas were mainly derived from upper crustal rocks, with some mantle additions, which included Sveconorwegian and older Baltican components. The complex TESZ, with Baltica basement in the lower crust, was susceptible to transient effects of mantle upwelling that occurred by the end of the Variscan orogeny and resulted in an episode of the "flare-up" magmatism in the North German-Polish Basin.

  9. Supra-subduction zone extensional magmatism in Vermont and adjacent Quebec: Implications for early Paleozoic Appalachian tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.; Coish, R.; Evans, M.; Dick, G.

    2003-01-01

    Metadiabasic intrusions of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite occur in fault-bounded lithotectonic packages containing Stowe, Moretown, and Cram Hill Formation lithologies in the northern Vermont Rowe-Hawley belt, a proposed Ordovician arc-trench gap above an east-dipping subduction zone. Rocks of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite are characteristically massive and weakly foliated, have chilled margins, contain xenoliths, and have sharp contacts that both crosscut and are parallel to early structural fabrics in the host metasedimentary rocks. Although the mineral assemblage of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite is albite + actinolite + epidote + chlorite + calcite + quartz, intergrowths of albite + actinolite are probably pseudomorphs after plagioclase + clinopyroxene. The metadiabases are subalkaline, tholeiitic, hypabyssal basalts with preserved ophitic texture. A backarc-basin tectonic setting for the intrusive suite is suggested by its LREE (light rare earth element) enrichment, negative Nb-Ta anomalies, and Ta/Yb vs. Th/Yb trends. Although no direct isotopic age data are available, the intrusions are broadly Ordovician because their contacts are clearly folded by the earliest Acadian (Silurian-Devonian) folds. Field evidence and geochemical data suggest compelling along-strike correlations with the Coburn Hill Volcanics of northern Vermont and the Bolton Igneous Group of southern Quebec. Isotopic and stratigraphic age constraints for the Bolton Igneous Group bracket these backarc magmas to the 477-458 Ma interval. A tectonic model that begins with east-dipping subduction and progresses to outboard west-dipping subduction after a syncollisional polarity reversal best explains the intrusion of deformed metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks by backarc magmas.

  10. Pore-pressure sensitivities to dynamic strains: observations in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbour, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Triggered seismicity arising from dynamic stresses is often explained by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, where elevated pore pressures reduce the effective strength of faults in fluid-saturated rock. The seismic response of a fluid-rock system naturally depends on its hydro-mechanical properties, but accurately assessing how pore-fluid pressure responds to applied stress over large scales in situ remains a challenging task; hence, spatial variations in response are not well understood, especially around active faults. Here I analyze previously unutilized records of dynamic strain and pore-pressure from regional and teleseismic earthquakes at Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations from 2006 through 2012 to investigate variations in response along the Pacific/North American tectonic plate boundary. I find robust scaling-response coefficients between excess pore pressure and dynamic strain at each station that are spatially correlated: around the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault systems, the response is lowest in regions of the crust undergoing the highest rates of secular shear strain. PBO stations in the Parkfield instrument cluster are at comparable distances to the San Andreas fault (SAF), and spatial variations there follow patterns in dextral creep rates along the fault, with the highest response in the actively creeping section, which is consistent with a narrowing zone of strain accumulation seen in geodetic velocity profiles. At stations in the San Juan Bautista (SJB) and Anza instrument clusters, the response depends non-linearly on the inverse fault-perpendicular distance, with the response decreasing towards the fault; the SJB cluster is at the northern transition from creeping-to-locked behavior along the SAF, where creep rates are at moderate to low levels, and the Anza cluster is around the San Jacinto fault, where to date there have been no statistically significant creep rates observed at the surface. These results suggest that the strength

  11. Vertical tectonic deformation associated with the San Andreas fault zone offshore of San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, H. F.; Parsons, T.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-10-01

    A new fault map of the shelf offshore of San Francisco, California shows that faulting occurs as a distributed shear zone that involves many fault strands with the principal displacement taken up by the San Andreas fault and the eastern strand of the San Gregorio fault zone. Structures associated with the offshore faulting show compressive deformation near where the San Andreas fault goes offshore, but deformation becomes extensional several km to the north off of the Golden Gate. Our new fault map serves as the basis for a 3-D finite element model that shows that the block between the San Andreas and San Gregorio fault zone is subsiding at a long-term rate of about 0.2-0.3 mm/yr, with the maximum subsidence occurring northwest of the Golden Gate in the area of a mapped transtensional basin. Although the long-term rates of vertical displacement primarily show subsidence, the model of coseismic deformation associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake indicates that uplift on the order of 10-15 cm occurred in the block northeast of the San Andreas fault. Since 1906, 5-6 cm of regional subsidence has occurred in that block. One implication of our model is that the transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault to a fault 5 km to the east, the Golden Gate fault, is not required for the area offshore of San Francisco to be in extension. This has implications for both the deposition of thick Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments (the Merced Formation) observed east of the San Andreas fault, and the age of the Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault.

  12. Vertical tectonic deformation associated with the San Andreas fault zone offshore of San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Parsons, T.; Sliter, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    A new fault map of the shelf offshore of San Francisco, California shows that faulting occurs as a distributed shear zone that involves many fault strands with the principal displacement taken up by the San Andreas fault and the eastern strand of the San Gregorio fault zone. Structures associated with the offshore faulting show compressive deformation near where the San Andreas fault goes offshore, but deformation becomes extensional several km to the north off of the Golden Gate. Our new fault map serves as the basis for a 3-D finite element model that shows that the block between the San Andreas and San Gregorio fault zone is subsiding at a long-term rate of about 0.2-0.3??mm/yr, with the maximum subsidence occurring northwest of the Golden Gate in the area of a mapped transtensional basin. Although the long-term rates of vertical displacement primarily show subsidence, the model of coseismic deformation associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake indicates that uplift on the order of 10-15??cm occurred in the block northeast of the San Andreas fault. Since 1906, 5-6??cm of regional subsidence has occurred in that block. One implication of our model is that the transfer of slip from the San Andreas fault to a fault 5??km to the east, the Golden Gate fault, is not required for the area offshore of San Francisco to be in extension. This has implications for both the deposition of thick Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments (the Merced Formation) observed east of the San Andreas fault, and the age of the Peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault.

  13. Application of Seasat Altimetry to Tectonic Studies of Fracture Zones in the Southern Oceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    and the fracture zone topography. Acknowledgments: We thank Dan McKenzie, Steve Daly and Linda Meinke for their contributions to the programs used to...Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc., 64, 587-604. Sim.son, E.S.W., J.G. Sclater, B. Parsons, I. Norton and L. Meinke , 1919. Mesozoic magnetic lineatiorc in the...Solomon all reviewed my papers over the years and gave invaluable comments and advice. Linda Meinke and Steve Daly solved many of my computer problems

  14. Location, Age, and Tectonic Significance of the Western Idaho Suture Zone (WISZ)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Robert J.; Criss, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The Western Idaho Suture Zone (WISZ) represents the boundary between crust overlying Proterozoic North American lithosphere and Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic intraoceanic crust accreted during Cretaceous time. Highly deformed plutons constituted of both arc and sialic components intrude the WISZ and in places are thrust over the accreted terranes. Pronounced variations in Sr, Nd, and O isotope ratios and in major and trace element composition occur across the suture zone in Mesozoic plutons. The WISZ is located by an abrupt west to east increase in initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios, traceable for over 300 km from eastern Washington near Clarkston, east along the Clearwater River thorough a bend to the south of about 110? from Orofino Creek to Harpster, and extending south-southwest to near Ola, Idaho, where Columbia River basalts conceal its extension to the south. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages of hornblende and biotite from Jurassic and Early Cretaceous plutons in the accreted terranes are highly discordant within about 10 km of the WISZ, exhibiting patterns of thermal loss caused by deformation, subsequent batholith intrusion, and rapid rise of the continental margin. Major crustal movements within the WISZ commenced after about 135 Ma, but much of the displacement may have been largely vertical, during and following emplacement of batholith-scale silicic magmas. Deformation continued until at least 85 Ma and probably until 74 Ma, progressing from south to north.

  15. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase maintains active zone structure by stabilizing Bruchpilot

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shaoyun; Ali, Yousuf O; Ruan, Kai; Zhai, R Grace

    2013-01-01

    Active zones are specialized presynaptic structures critical for neurotransmission. We show that a neuronal maintenance factor, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), is required for maintaining active zone structural integrity in Drosophila by interacting with the active zone protein, Bruchpilot (BRP), and shielding it from activity-induced ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated degradation. NMNAT localizes to the peri-active zone and interacts biochemically with BRP in an activity-dependent manner. Loss of NMNAT results in ubiquitination, mislocalization and aggregation of BRP, and subsequent active zone degeneration. We propose that, as a neuronal maintenance factor, NMNAT specifically maintains active zone structure by direct protein–protein interaction. PMID:23154466

  16. Ti in zircon from the Boggy Plain zoned pluton: implications for zircon petrology and Hadean tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickert, R. B.; Williams, I. S.; Wyborn, D.

    2011-08-01

    The understanding of zircon crystallization, and of the Ti-in-zircon thermometer, has been enhanced by Ti concentration measurements of zircon from a small, concentrically zoned pluton in south-eastern Australia, the Boggy Plain zoned pluton (BPZP). Zircon crystals from rocks ranging in composition from gabbro to aplite were analysed for U-Th-Pb dating and Ti concentrations by an ion microprobe. Geochronological data yield a 206Pb/238U age of 417.2 ± 2.0 Ma (95% confidence) and demonstrate the presence of older inherited or xenocrystic zircon. Titanium measurements ( n = 158) yield a mean Ti concentration of 11.7 ± 6.1 ppm (2SD) which corresponds to a mean crystallization temperature of 790°C for an α-TiO2 = 0.74 (estimated using mineral equilibria), or 760°C for an α-TiO2 = 1.0. Apparent zircon crystallization temperatures are similar in all intrusive phases, although the gabbro yields slightly higher values, indicating that crystallization occurred at the same temperature in all rock types. This finding is consistent with previous work on the BPZP, which indicates that liquid-crystal sorting (crystal fractionation) was the dominant control on chemical differentiation, and that late, differentiated liquids were similar in composition for all rock types. A simple forward model approximately predicts the range of crystallization temperatures, but not the shape of the distributions, due to sampling biases and complexities in the cooling and crystallization history of the pluton. The distribution of Ti concentrations has a mode at a higher Ti (higher temperature) than the sample set of Hadean detrital zircon. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the skew to low-T in the Hadean dataset is due to the presence of zircon that crystallized from wet anatectic melts.

  17. Complexly deformed nappe/tectonic slide fault system -- North-central border zone Idaho batholith -- Moose Creek Buttes area, northern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Kell, R.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Moose Creek Buttes area ideally displays complicated macroscopic effects of superposed deformations (D2--D7) upon D1 isoclinal folds (F1) and tectonic slide faults. D1 structures developed in lower to middle parts of the Belt Supergroup (Proterozoic) under greenschist to upper amphibolite facies conditions (M1). Removing effects of D2--D7 superposed folding provides the basis for resolving the original configuration of D1 structures and M1 metamorphic zones. This restoration shows that tectonic slide faults were subhorizontal and bound a 4.5 km.-thick plate comprised of amphibolite facies (M1) Ravalli Group quartzite with minor overlying Empire Formation pelitic schist (star and ky zones) and underlying Prichard Formation pelitic schist (sill-mus and sill-K-spar zones). The configuration of restored F1 folds/tectonic slide faults and M1 metamorphic zones indicates deep-seated, east-directed thrusting after a thermal regime of high heat flow had been established up into Belt Supergroup sediments. The presence of D1 synkinematic tonalite and granite, and later superposed folding (D2--D4) attributed to forceful emplacement of Idaho batholith plutons (mid- to late Cretaceous) point to close proximity to an evolving magmatic arc. Hence, D1 is likely a part of late-Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous crustal shortening and plutonism in the orogenic belt along the subducting plate boundary of the North American Cordilleran.

  18. Recent tectonic activity on Pluto driven by phase changes in the ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Noah P.; Barr, Amy C.; Parmentier, Edgar M.

    2016-07-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft has found evidence for geologic activity on the surface of Pluto, including extensional tectonic deformation of its water ice bedrock see Moore et al. (2016). One mechanism that could drive extensional tectonic activity is global surface expansion due to the partial freezing of an ocean. We use updated physical properties for Pluto and simulate its thermal evolution to understand the survival of a possible subsurface ocean. For thermal conductivities of rock less than 3 W m-1 K-1, an ocean forms and at least partially freezes, leading to recent extensional stresses in the ice shell. In scenarios where the ocean freezes and the ice shell is thicker than 260 km, ice II forms and causes global volume contraction. Since there is no evidence for recent compressional tectonic features, we argue that ice II has not formed and that Pluto's ocean has likely survived to present day.

  19. Taiwan: a perfect field trip to study active tectonics and erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Cormier, Florence; Beauval, Véronique; Martinez, Claire-Marie; Seyeux, Jana

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan is located at the boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate to the East and the Eurasian Plate to the West. This plate boundary is rather complex since it comprises two subduction zones of reverse polarities. Due to this specific geodynamic context, this field is a perfect area to answer the French program in 5th grade (erosion processes) and 4th grade (active tectonics) in Earth Science class. That's why for the second year, students from the Lycée Français de Shanghai (LFS) in 4th grade will go for a 4-day field trip to discover volcanoes (in the Yangminshan National Park) and para-seismic constructions in the 101 Tower at Taipei. It will remind them the program of their previous class (5ème) through the visit of Yehliu Geographic Park and some other areas in the North of the Island where they will be able to observe different erosion processes (wind or water) carving the landscape. The aim of this field trip is first to show them that Earth Sciences cannot be studied only in class but also on the field to get a better understanding of the processes. In this manner, after having understood the internal thermal system of our Earth in class, they will see its manifestations on the surface of the Earth, by seeing an active explosive volcano with gas ejection, specific mineralization, and hot springs. Furthermore on the field, they will be able to do a link between the external and internal geodynamics processes usually studied separately in middle school. The poster presented will detail the first field trip in Taiwan realized in May 2013 by the LFS 4th grade students and will be made by the students going in June 2014. Thus, this activity will allow them to get a perspective of the topic that they will discover on the field trip.

  20. Applications of Morphochronology to the Active Tectonics of Tibet

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Tapponnier, P; Finkel, R C; Meriaux, A; der Woerd, J V; Lasserre, C; Chevalier, M; Xiwei, X; Haibing, L; King, G P

    2005-01-28

    The Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau were formed as a result of the collision of India and Asia, and provide an excellent opportunity to study the mechanical response of the continental lithosphere to tectonic stress. Geophysicists are divided in their views on the nature of this response advocating either (1) homogeneously distributed deformation with the lithosphere deforming as a fluid continuum or (2) deformation is highly localized with the lithosphere that deforms as a system of blocks. The resolution of this issue has broad implications for understanding the tectonic response of continental lithosphere in general. Homogeneous deformation is supported by relatively low decadal, geodetic slip-rate estimates for the Altyn Tagh and Karakorum Faults. Localized deformation is supported by high millennial, geomorphic slip-rates constrained by both cosmogenic and radiocarbon dating on these faults. Based upon the agreement of rates determined by radiocarbon and cosmogenic dating, the overall linearity of offset versus age correlations, and on the plateau-wide correlation of landscape evolution and climate history, the disparity between geomorphic and geodetic slip-rate determinations is unlikely to be due to the effects of surface erosion on the cosmogenic age determinations. Similarly, based upon the consistency of slip-rates over various observation intervals, secular variations in slip-rate appear to persist no longer than 2000 years and are unlikely to provide reconciliation. Conversely, geodetic and geomorphic slip-rate estimates on the Kunlun fault, which does not have significant splays or associated thrust faults, are in good agreement, indicating that there is no fundamental reason why these complementary geodetic and geomorphic methods should disagree. Similarly, the geodetic and geomorphic estimates of shortening rates across the northeastern edge of the plateau are in reasonable agreement, and the geomorphic rates on individual thrust faults demonstrate

  1. Copernican tectonic activities in the northwestern Imbrium region of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daket, Yuko; Yamaji, Atsushi; Sato, Katsushi

    2015-04-01

    Mare ridges and lobate scarps are the manifestations of horizontal compression in the shallow part of the Moon. Conventionally, tectonism within mascon basins has been thought to originate from mascon loading which is syndepositional tectonics (e.g., Solomon and Head, 1980). However, Ono et al. (2009) have pointed out that the subsurface tectonic structures beneath some mare ridges in Serenitatis appeared to be formed after the deposition of mare strata. Watters et al. (2010) also reported Copernican lobate scarps. Those young deformations cannot be explained by the mascon loading and are possibly ascribed to global cooling, orbital evolution and/or regional factors. Since mare ridges are topographically larger than lobate scarps, they might have large contribution to the recent contraction. In this study, we estimated until when the tectonic activities of mare ridges lasted in the northwestern Imbrium region. In order to infer the timing of the latest ages of tectonic activities, we used craters dislocated by the thrust faults that run along to the mare ridges in the study area. The ages of dislocated craters indicate the oldest estimate of the latest tectonic activity of the faults, because those craters must have existed during the tectonic activities. The ages of craters are inferred by the degradation levels classified by Trask (1971). We found ~450 dislocated craters in the study area. About 40 of them are smaller than 100 meter in diameter. Sub-hundred-meter-sized craters that still maintain their morphology sharp are classified into Copernican Period. Those small dislocated craters are interspersed all over the region, indicating that the most of the mare ridges in the study area were tectonically active in Copernican Period. In addition, we also found two sub-hundred-meter-sized craters dislocated by a graben at the west of Promontorium Laplace, indicating horizontal extension existed at Copernican Period. Consequently, tectonic activities in the study

  2. Preliminary study on hydrogeology in tectonically active areas.

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Lappin, Allen R.; Gettemy, Glen L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Lee, Moo Yul; Meier, Diane A.

    2006-09-01

    This report represents the final product of a background literature review conducted for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Internationally, research of hydrological and transport processes in the context of high level waste (HLW) repository performance, has been extensive. However, most of these studies have been conducted for sites that are within tectonically stable regions. Therefore, in support of NUMO's goal of selecting a site for a HLW repository, this literature review has been conducted to assess the applicability of the output from some of these studies to the geological environment in Japan. Specifically, this review consists of two main tasks. The first was to review the major documents of the main HLW repository programs around the world to identify the most important hydrologic and transport parameters and processes relevant in each of these programs. The review was to assess the relative importance of processes and measured parameters to site characterization by interpretation of existing sensitivity analyses and expert judgment in these documents. The second task was to convene a workshop to discuss the findings of Task 1 and to prioritize hydrologic and transport parameters in the context of the geology of Japan. This report details the results and conclusions of both of these Tasks.

  3. Radon concentration in soil gas around local disjunctive tectonic zones in the Krakow area.

    PubMed

    Swakoń, J; Kozak, K; Paszkowski, M; Gradziński, R; Łoskiewicz, J; Mazur, J; Janik, M; Bogacz, J; Horwacik, T; Olko, P

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radon in the vicinity of geologic fault zones within the Krakow region of Poland, and to determine the influence of such formations on enhanced radon concentrations in soil. Radon ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) concentration measurements in soil gas (using ionization chamber AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO and diffusion chambers with CR-39 detectors), as well as radioactive natural isotopes of radium, thorium and potassium in soil samples (using gamma ray spectrometry with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors), were performed. Site selection was based on a geological map of Krakow. Geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar and shallow acoustic seismic) were applied to recognize the geological structure of the area and to locate the predicted courses of faults. Elevated levels of radon and thoron in soil gas were found in the study area when compared with those observed in an earlier survey covering Krakow agglomeration. For (222)Rn, the arithmetic mean of registered concentration values was 39 kBq/m(3) (median: 35.5 kBq/m(3)). For (220)Rn, the arithmetic mean was 10.8 kBq/m(3) and median 11.8 kBq/m(3).

  4. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  5. Mechanisms for strain localization within Archaean craton: A structural study from the Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone, north-central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saheli; Patole, Vishal; Saha, Lopamudra; Pati, Jayanta Kumar; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of palaeo-continents involve breakup, dispersal and reassembly of cratonic blocks by collisional suturing that develop a network of orogenic (mobile) belts around the periphery of the stable cratons. The nature of deformation in the orogenic belt depends on the complex interaction of fracturing, plastic deformation and diffusive mass transfer. Additionally, the degree and amount of melting during regional deformation is critical as the presence of melt facilitates the rate of diffusive mass transfer and weakens the rock by reducing the effective viscosity of the deformed zone. The nature of strain localization and formation of ductile shear zones surrounding the cratonic blocks have been correlated with Proterozoic-Palaeozoic supercontinent assembly (Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana reconstruction). Although, a pre-Columbia supercontinent termed as Kenorland has been postulated, there is no evidence that supports the notion due to lack of the presence of shear zones within the Archaean cratonic blocks. In this contribution, we present the detailed structural analysis of ductile shear zones within the Bundelkhand craton. The ductlile shear zone is termed as Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone (BTZ) that extends east-west for nearly 300 km throughout the craton with a width of two-three kilometer . In the north-central India, the Bundelkhand craton is exposed over an area of 26,000 sq. The craton is bounded by Central Indian Tectonic zone in the south, the Great Boundary fault in the west and by the rocks of Lesser Himalaya in the north. A series of tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite gneiss are the oldest rocks of the Bundelkhand craton that also contains a succession of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks comprising of banded iron formation, quartzite, calc-silicate and ultramafic rocks. K-feldspar bearing granites intrude the tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite and the supracrustal rocks during the time span of 2.1 to 2.5 Ga. The TTGs near Babina, in central

  6. Late Pleistocene and Holocene uplift history of Cyprus: implications for active tectonics along the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, R.W.; Tsiolakis, E.; Stone, B.D.; Lord, A.; McGeehin, J.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Chirico, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the southern margin of the Anatolian microplate during the Neogene is complex, controversial and fundamental in understanding active plate-margin tectonics and natural hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our investigation provides new insights into the Late Pleistocene uplift history of Cyprus and the Troodos Ophiolite. We provide isotopic (14C) and radiogenic (luminescence) dates of outcropping marine sediments in eastern Cyprus that identify periods of deposition during marine isotope stages (MIS) 3, 4, 5 and 6. Past sea-levels indicated by these deposits are c. 95±25 m higher in elevation than estimates of worldwide eustatic sea-level. An uplift rate of c. 1.8 mm/year and possibly as much as c. 4.1 mm/year in the past c. 26–40 ka is indicated. Holocene marine deposits also occur at elevations higher than those expected for past SL and suggest uplift rates of c. 1.2–2.1 mm/year. MIS-3 marine deposits that crop out in southern and western Cyprus indicate uniform island-wide uplift. We propose a model of tectonic wedging at a plate-bounding restraining bend as a mechanism for Late Pleistocene to Holocene uplift of Cyprus; uplift is accommodated by deformation and seismicity along the margins of the Troodos Ophiolite and re-activation of its low-angle, basal shear zone.

  7. Morphotectonic evolution of triangular facets and wine-glass valleys in the Noakoh anticline, Zagros, Iran: Implications for active tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Shahram

    2012-07-01

    The Noakoh anticline is located in Kermanshah province and is part of the Simply Folded Belt of Zagros. Boundaries of 97 triangular facets and 67 wine-glass (W-G) valleys, which formed on anticline limbs, were delineated using Quickbird satellite imagery. The strata dip (D), area (A), base length (BL), topographic slope (S) of facets, the maximum width (M), outlet width (O) and ratio of maximum width to outlet width (W index) of W-G valleys were analysed in detail. Noakoh anticline was subdivided into 9 tectonic zones on the basis of dip, topographic slopes and width of limbs. Results show that there are strong positive correlations between means of D-BL and S-BL pairs. Poor positive correlations exist between means of D-A and S-A pairs. Among W-G valley metrics, the W index has strong relations with D and S parameters. Based on the results, steep facets with long bases and well developed W-G valleys with narrow outlets and wide upper parts are associated with more rotated limbs having steep slopes. Facets on the northeastern slope have more forest cover, micro-organism activity, karstic features and soil cover, whereas facets on relatively drier southwestern slope are characterized by physical weathering processes and minor karstic landforms. This study demonstrates that, apart from tectonic activity as a major control on the morphometry of facets and valleys, climate and slope aspect have also acted as secondary factors on the development of the studied landforms.

  8. Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern and central Alaska Range: Progressive basin development and deformation in a suture zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgway, K.D.; Trop, J.M.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Davidson, C.M.; Eastham, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    record regional subaerial uplift of the suture zone. (3) Shortening and exhumation of the suture zone peaked from 65 to 60 Ma on the basis of metamorphic and geochronologic data. In the southern part of the suture zone, submarine-fan deposits of the Kahiltna basin, which had been metamorphosed to kyanite schists at ???25 km depth and ???650 ??C, were exhumed and cooled through the biotite closure temperature (???300 ??C) by ca. 62 Ma. In the northern part of the suture zone, this time period was marked by shortening, uplift, and erosion of sedimentary strata of the Cantwell basin. (4) From 60 to 54 Ma, ???3 km of volcanic strata were deposited over deformed sedimentary strata of the Cantwell basin, and several granitic plutons (the McKinley sequence) were emplaced along the suture zone. (5) Following igneous activity, strikeslip displacement occurred from ca. 54 to 24 Ma along the Denali fault system, which had developed in the existing suture zone. Late Eocene-Oligocene strike-slip displacement resulted in the formation of several small sedimentary basins along the Denali fault system. (6) Regional transpressive shortening characterized the suture zone from ca. 24 Ma to the present. Flexural subsidence, related to regional shortening, is represented by late Eocene to Holocene nonmarine deposits of the Tanana foreland basin. Regional subsidence resulted in Miocene coal seams up to 20 m thick and well-developed lacustrine deposits. Overlying the Miocene deposits are ???1.2 km of Pliocene and Holocene conglomeratic deposits. Compositional and paleocurrent data from these younger deposits record regional Neogene uplift of the suture zone and recycling of detritus from older basins to the south that had become incorporated into the uplifted suture zone. Geologic mapping of major thrust faults along the northern and southern margins of the suture zone documents Paleozoic strata thrust over both Pliocene fluvial deposits and Quaternary glacial deposits of the Tanana basin.

  9. Chemical and Physical Weathering in a Hot-arid, Tectonically Active Alluvial System (Anza-Borrego Desert, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y. J.; Elwood Madden, M.; Soreghan, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and tectonics are primary controls on bedrock erosion, and sediment production, transport, and deposition. Additionally, silicate weathering in tectonically active regions is known to play a significant role in global climate owing to the high rates of physical erosion and exposure of unweathered bedrock to chemical weathering, which removes CO2 from the atmosphere. Therefore, the feedback between weathering and climate is key to understanding climate change through Earth history. This study investigates chemical and physical weathering of alluvial sediments in the Anza-Borrego Desert, California, located in the southern part of the San Andreas Fault System. This setting provides an ideal opportunity to study weathering in a hot and arid climate with mean annual temperatures of ~23 °C and mean annual precipitation of ~160 mm in the basin. Samples were collected along a proximal-to-distal transect of an alluvial-fan system sourced exclusively from Cretaceous tonalite of the Peninsular Range. The single bedrock lithology enables exploration of the effects of other variables — climate, transport distance, drainage area, and tectonics— on the physical and chemical properties of the sediments. Although minimal overall (CIA = 56-61), the degree of chemical weathering increases down transect, dominated by plagioclase dissolution. BET surface area of the mud (<63µm) fraction decreases distally, which is consistent with coarsening grain-size. Chemical alteration and BET surface area both increase in a distal region, within the active Elsinore Fault zone. Extensive fracturing here, together with a more-humid Pleistocene climate likely facilitated in-situ bedrock weathering; specifically, dissolution of primary minerals (e.g. plagioclase), preceding the arid alluvial erosion, transport, and deposition in the Holocene. This study further seeks to disentangle the complex record of the climate and tectonic signals imprinted in these sediments.

  10. Impact-related Events on Active Tectonic Regions Defined by Its Age, Shocked Minerals and Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Hirota, A.; Gorton, M.; Kedves, M.

    2002-03-01

    New type of impact-related event is defined at active tectonic region by using semi-circular structure, bulk XRF compositions with mixed data, shocked quartz grains with the PDFs texture, and Fe-Ni content. Example is discussed in Takamatsu MKT crater in Japan.

  11. Assessment of relative tectonic activity in the Trichonis Lake graben (Western Greece) using geomorphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karymbalis, Efthimios; Valkanou, Kanella; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Ferentinou, Maria; Giles, Philip; Papanastassiou, Dimitris; Gaki-Papanastassiou, Kalliopi; Tsanakas, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    In tectonically active areas fluvial systems and mountain fronts are controlled by the type, geometry, and recent activity of faults. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of neotectonics to the development of the fluvial landscape of the broader Trichonis Lake area (located in western continental Greece) through quantitative geomorphological analysis. The Trichonis Lake graben is a well-known tectonic depression of Quaternary age, which cuts across the early Tertiary NW-SE fold and thrust structures of the Pindos Mountain belt. It strikes WNW-ESE for a distance of 32 km and has a width of 10 km. The graben at the north and south flanks of the lake is bounded by E-W and NW-SE trending faults. Recent seismic activity (a shallow earthquake sequence in 1975 and a 2007 earthquake swarm) showed the existence of a NNW-SSE normal fault that dips to the NE and bounds the south-eastern shore of the lake. The studied catchments are developed on the hanging walls of these active normal faults. To evaluate the relative tectonic activity in the study area, various morphometric indices were measured for 35 catchments (slope of the valley sides of the catchment, hypsometric integral, catchment asymmetry factor, relief ratio, Melton's ruggedness number, stream-gradient index, ratio of valley floor width to valley height, and catchment shape) and 20 mountain fronts (mountain-front sinuosity index) around the lake. For the measurement of the geomorphometric variables a digital elevation model (DEM) with 2-m spatial resolution was derived from topographic maps at 1:5000 scale with 4-m contour lines, and a series of maps showing the spatial distribution of the variables were produced in a GIS environment. For each morphometric variable the catchments were classified into three classes. The combination of these morphometric variables allowed us to yield two new indices of relative tectonic activity (named IRTA - Index of Relative Tectonic Activity and IAT - Index of

  12. Tectonothermal evolution of a garnet-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneiss from the Moyar shear zone, south India and its bearing on the Neoarchean accretionary tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Subhadip; Nasipuri, Pritam

    2017-03-01

    We present mesoscale structural development across the Nilgiri Block and the flanking Moyar and Bhavani shear zones in south India, and detailed mineral-chemical and geothermobarometric studies of a garnet-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneiss from the easternmost part of the Moyar shear zone. Barring a narrow (< 100 μm) rim domain, major element distribution within garnet porphyroblasts reveals complete chemical homogenization. The absence of growth zoning in garnet porphyroblasts may suggest a protracted post-garnet growth residence period of the rock at elevated temperatures. Chemical zoning near garnet rim reflects the signature of both retrograde net-transfer (ReNTR) and retrograde exchange (ReER) equilibria. The ReNTR-equilibrium is recognized by prominent Mn kick-up in garnet, whereas the ReER-equilibrium is identified by divergence of Fe and Mg between garnet and biotite. Diffusion modelling, though qualitative, of the observed chemical zoning in garnet suggests an initial phase of rapid ( 150 °C/Ma) cooling, which may have been achieved by tectonic-extrusion-induced exhumation. Pressure-temperature conditions for peak, ReNTR and ReER are constrained, respectively, at 900 °C; 9-11 kbar, 735 °C; 8 kbar and 685 °C; 7.8 kbar. Analyses of structural fabrics establish oppositely verging nature of the Moyar and Bhavani shear zone and may suggest a doubly vergent orogenic development, with the former as prowedge and the latter as retrowedge. The presence of the Nilgiri Block as a topographically elevated region between these oppositely dipping thrust faults indeed corroborates a doubly vergent orogenic setup. The tectonic scenario is comparable with a continent-continent collision type accretionary tectonics. Peak high-P granulite facies metamorphism and post-peak long residence period of the studied quartzofeldspathic gneiss at deep crustal level suitably fit into the Neoarchean crustal dynamics resulting in crustal thickening, in the order of 41 km, within the

  13. Current Magmato-Tectonic Activity in the Asal-Ghoubbet Rift (Afar Depression, Republic of Djibouti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, C.; Doubre, C.; Dorbath, L.; Manighetti, I.; Jacques, E.; Geoffroy, L.

    2001-12-01

    The Asal-Ghoubbet rift, the most active, emerged segment of the Aden ridge, opens at 16+/-2 mm/yr. Although normal faulting operates in the rift, it does not accommodate the entire extension, so that dyking must occur at depth. In order to investigate the current relationship between tectonics and magmatism, we installed 11 seismometers (3 3C + one broad band; plus 6 permanent stations) in the northeastern part of the rift, site of the most active faults and of the Fieale volcano caldera, and monitored the seismic activity during 5 months. About 200 small-magnitude (time, <= 3) events could be accurately ( ~ 300m) localized in the emerged part of the rift, using an appropriate velocity model. All fall within the temporary network, forming three major clusters. Nine % of the events spread in the outermost part of the rift northern shoulder, where clear active faults and volcanic structures are lacking. All seem to nucleate at a similar depth, of 6-8 km. Seven % of the events nucleate at a shallow depth ( ~1 km) in the northern Disa Le Mallo subrift, zone of intense active faulting and fissuring. Finally, the majority of events (70%) cluster below the Fieale caldera, at a mean depth of 3 km, hence just above the inferred magma chamber. The analysis of the broader-scale seismological data acquired in the rift over the last 20 years, points to a similar distribution. Thirty five out of 50 focal mechanisms we calculated using P wave polarities, are consistent with a double-couple source model, and reveal predominant normal faulting on NW-SE-striking planes parallel to the faults which structure the rift. Fifteen events, however, show non-double couple radiation pattern, particularly in the Fieale area. These particular events may result from magmatic activity (filling or collapse of the magma chamber) and/or geothermal processes. In the other two areas, where they are also found, their origin is possibly related to fissuring or dyking. One seismic sequence also occurred

  14. Tectonic activity and the evolution of submarine canyons: The Cook Strait Canyon system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micallef, Aaron; Mountjoy, Joshu; Barnes, Philip; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are Earth's most dramatic erosional features, comprising steep-walled valleys that originate in the continental shelf and slope. They play a key role in the evolution of continental margins by transferring sediments into deep water settings and are considered important biodiversity hotspots, pathways for nutrients and pollutants, and analogues of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Although comprising only one third of continental margins worldwide, active margins host more than half of global submarine canyons. We still lack of thorough understanding of the coupling between active tectonics and submarine canyon processes, which is necessary to improve the modelling of canyon evolution in active margins and derive tectonic information from canyon morphology. The objectives of this study are to: (i) understand how tectonic activity influences submarine canyon morphology, processes, and evolution in an active margin, and (2) formulate a generalised model of canyon development in response to tectonic forcing based on morphometric parameters. We fulfil these objectives by analysing high resolution geophysical data and imagery from Cook Strait Canyon system, offshore New Zealand. Using these data, we demonstrate that tectonic activity, in the form of major faults and structurally-generated tectonic ridges, leaves a clear topographic signature on submarine canyon location and morphology, in particular their dendritic and sinuous planform shapes, steep and linear longitudinal profiles, and cross-sectional asymmetry and width. We also report breaks/changes in canyon longitudinal slope gradient, relief and slope-area regression models at the intersection with faults. Tectonic activity gives rise to two types of knickpoints in the Cook Strait Canyon. The first type consists of low slope gradient, rounded and diffusive knickpoints forming as a result of short wavelength folds or fault break outs and being restored to an equilibrium profile by upstream erosion and

  15. Active inversion tectonics, simple shear folding and back-thrusting at Rioni Basin, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Bonali, F. L.; Enukidze, O.; Tsereteli, N.; Kvavadze, N.; Varazanashvili, O.

    2017-03-01

    The Rioni Basin, located between the Greater and Lesser Caucasus in Georgia, is an outstanding example of ongoing inversion tectonics. Marine and continental deposits of Cretaceous-Neogene age have been locally uplifted since the end of Miocene. The uplifted area totals 1300 km2, and Plio-Quaternary river deposits have been raised up to 200 m above the surrounding plains. Inversion tectonics has been accompanied by the development of south-vergent asymmetrical folds and strike-slip faults along the border of the uplifted area. The folds have locally an en-échelon geometry and microtectonic data indicate rotation of the paleostress direction over time, suggesting simple shear deformation. In the interiors of the uplifted area, there are gentle symmetrical folds and one main active south-dipping reverse fault, corresponding to a backthrust. Morphostructural evidence, as well as the tilting of Quaternary strata, the offset of Quaternary alluvial deposits and the presence of crustal seismic activity, indicate that compressional tectonics is still active. The combination of field data with seismic reflection sections shows that inversion tectonics took place through a series of north-dipping blind thrusts and a wedge with passive back-thrusting. Uplift and contraction are more developed along the eastern part of the study area, suggesting the westward propagation of the closure of the Transcaucasian depression.

  16. The Central-Western Mediterranean: Anomalous igneous activity in an anomalous collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Duggen, Svend; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2011-01-01

    plate (Sardinia, Corsica, Balearic Islands, Kabylies, Calabria, Peloritani Mountains). The bulk of igneous activity in the central-western Mediterranean is believed to have tapped mantle 'wedge' regions, metasomatized by pressure-related dehydration of the subducting slabs. The presence of subduction-related igneous rocks with a wide range of chemical composition has been related to the interplay of several factors among which the pre-metasomatic composition of the mantle wedges (i.e., fertile vs. refractory mineralogy), the composition of the subducting plate (i.e., the type and amount of sediment cover and the alteration state of the crust), the variable thermo-baric conditions of magma formation, coupled with variable molar concentrations of CO 2 and H 2O in the fluid phase released by the subducting plates are the most important. Compared to classic collisional settings (e.g., Himalayas), the central-western Mediterranean area shows a range of unusual geological and magmatological features. These include: a) the rapid formation of extensional basins in an overall compressional setting related to Africa-Europe convergence; b) centrifugal wave of both compressive and extensional tectonics starting from a 'pivotal' region around the Gulf of Lyon; c) the development of concomitant Cenozoic subduction zones with different subduction and tectonic transport directions; d) subduction 'inversion' events (e.g., currently along the Maghrebian coast and in northern Sicily, previously at the southern paleo-European margin); e) a repeated temporal pattern whereby subduction-related magmatic activity gives way to magmas of intraplate geochemical type; f) the late-stage appearance of magmas with collision-related 'exotic' (potassic to ultrapotassic) compositions, generally absent from simple subduction settings; g) the relative scarcity of typical calcalkaline magmas along the Italian peninsula; h) the absence of igneous activity where it might well be expected (e.g., above the

  17. Magma-tectonic interactions in an area of active extension; a review of recent observations, models and interpretations from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rikke; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Drouin, Vincent; Rafn Heimisson, Elías; Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Árnadóttir, Þóra; Masterlark, Timothy; Ófeigsson, Benedíkt G.; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hooper, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The geological setting of Iceland provides rich opportunities of studying magma-tectonic interactions, as it constitutes Earth's largest part of the mid-oceanic ridge system exposed above sea level. A series of volcanic and seismic zones accommodate the ~2 cm/year spreading between the North-American and Eurasian plates, and the Icelandic hot-spot conveniently provides the means of exposing this oceanic crust-forming setting above sea-level. Both extinct and active plumbing system structures can be studied in Iceland, as the deeply eroded tertiary areas provide views into the structures of extinct volcanic systems, and active processes can be inferred on in the many active volcanic systems. A variety of volcanic and tectonic processes cause the Icelandic crust to deform continuously, and the availability of contemporaneous measurements of crustal deformation and seismicity provide a powerful data set, when trying to obtain insight into the processes working at depth, such as magma migration through the uppermost lithosphere, magma induced host rock deformation and volcanic eruption locations and styles. The inferences geodetic and seismic datasets allow on the active plate spreading processes and subsurface magma movements in Iceland will be reviewed, in particular in relation to the Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ). There the three phases of a rifting cycle (rifting, post-rifting, inter-rifting) have been observed. The NVZ is an extensional rift segment, bounded to the south by the Icelandic mantle plume, and to the north by the Tjörnes transform zone. The NVZ has typically been divided into five partly overlapping en-echelon fissure swarms, each with a central main volcanic production area. Most recently, additional insight into controlling factors during active rifting has been provided by the Bárðarbunga activity in 2014-2015 that included a major rifting event, the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since 1783, and a gradual caldera collapse. It is evident

  18. Active tectonics evaluation from geomorphic indices for the central and the southern Longmenshan range on the Eastern Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mingxing; Zeilinger, Gerold; Xu, Xiwei; Tan, Xibin; Wang, Qingliang; Hao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    We applied the geomorphic indices (hypsometry and stream length gradient) to evaluate the differential uplift of the central and southern Longmenshan, a mountain range characterized by rapid erosion, strong tectonic uplift, and devastating seismic hazards. The results of the geomorphic analysis indicate that the Beichuan-Yingxiu fault and the Shuangshi-Dachuan fault act as major tectonic boundaries separating areas experiencing rapid uplift from slow uplift. The results of the geomorphic analysis also suggest that the Beichuan-Yingxiu fault is the most active fault with the largest relative uplift rates compared to the rest of the faults in the Longmenshan fault system. We compared reflected relative uplift rates based on the hypsometry and stream length gradient indices with geological/geodetic absolute rates. Along-strike and across-strike variations in the hypsometry and stream length gradient correlate with the spatial patterns derived from the apatite fission track exhumation rates, the leveling-derived uplift rate, and coseismic vertical displacements during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. These data defined multiple fault relationships in a complex thrust zone and provided geomorphic evidence to evaluate the potential seismic hazards of the southern Longmenshan range.

  19. Changing Depositional Conditions of the Cretaceous-Paleocene Sediments in the Southern Sakarya Zone and Implications for Tectonic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykut, Tanyel; Koral, Hayrettin; Özkar Öngen, İzver

    2016-04-01

    Study area is located between Göynük (Bolu) and Nallıhan (Ankara), NW Anatolia, to the north of the Neotethyan (Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan) Suture Zone. It comprises units ranging from the Jurassic to Miocene ages. Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age pelagic limestones of the Soǧukçam Formation is the oldest rock, overlain by the Upper Cretaceous Gölpazarı Group. The Gölpazarı Group includes the Cenomanian-Campanian age turbiditic Yenipazar Formation and the Maastrichtian age Taraklı Formation. Over the Taraklı Formation lies conformably the Kızılçay Group, and it exhibits varying facies from north to south of the study area. In the north, there occurs the coral-bearing Lower Paleocene Selvipınar Formation. In the south, instead, there are clastics of the Kızılçay Group overthrust by the Soǧukçam Formation. Clastics and bituminous shales of the Kızılçay Group indicate a terrestrial setting of the study area during the Lower Paleocene-Eocene. The Soǧukçam and Yenipazar Formations represent deep marine conditions, while the Taraklı Formation a shallow one. This indicates the region underwent a rapid uplift due possibly to initial collision and overthrusting. In the post-Maastrichtian age units, the occurrence and lateral transitions of shallow marine and terrestrial sediments suggest a progress of uplift, but at different rates at different locations; at a relatively fast rate in the south and a slow rate in the north. The presence of tectonic features such as E-W oriented folds, overturned folds and faults are related to shortening during a collisional stage that affected the whole region.

  20. Slip sense inversion on active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan and its implications for Cenozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2004-05-01

    Analyses of deflected river channels, offset of basement rocks, and fault rock structures reveal that slip sense inversion occurred on major active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan such as the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones and the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Along the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones, small-size rivers cutting shallowly mountain slopes and Quaternary terraces have been deflected sinistrally, whereas large-size rivers which deeply incised into the Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains show no systematically sinistral offset or complicated hairpin-shaped deflection. When the sinistral offsets accumulated on the small-size rivers are restored, the large-size rivers show residual dextral deflections. This dextral offset sense is consistent with that recorded in the pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. S-C fabrics of fault gouge and breccia zone developed in the active fault zones show sinistral shear sense compatible with earthquake focal mechanisms, whereas those of the foliated cataclasite indicate a dextral shear sense. These observations show that the sinistral strike-slip shear fabrics were overprinted on dextral ones which formed during a previous deformation phase. Similar topographic and geologic features are observed along the MTL in the central-eastern part of the Kii Peninsula. Based on these geomorphological and geological data, we infer that the slip sense inversion occurred in the period between the late Tertiary and mid-Quaternary period. This strike-slip inversion might result from the plate rearrangement consequent to the mid-Miocene Japan Sea opening event. This multidisciplinary study gives insight into how active strike-slip fault might evolves with time.

  1. Convergent margin structure and tectonics of the Java subduction zone (105°E-122°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Barckhausen, U.; Djajadihardja, Y.; Engels, M.; Flueh, E. R.; Hindle, D. A.; Lueschen, E.; Mueller, C.; Planert, L.; Reichert, C. J.; Shulgin, A. A.; Wittwer, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Java margin is the site of oceanic subduction of the Indo-Australian plate underneath the Indonesian archipelago. Data from a suite of geophysical experiments conducted between 1997-2006 using RV SONNE as platform include seismic and seismological studies, potential field measurements and high-resolution seafloor bathymetry mapping. Tomographic inversions provide an image of the ongoing deformation of the forearc and the deep subsurface. We investigate the role of various key mechanisms that shape the first-order features characterizing the present margin architecture. Our results show a high variability in subduction zone processes along the Java margin, ranging from accretionary subduction to erosive processes to zero-budget mass transfer. These variations are closely linked to changes in character of the incoming plate. Off Western Java (105°E -109°E), near-full accretion of the trench sediment fill is associated with a well-developed accretionary prism fronting a 4 km deep forearc basin. The Central Java segment (109°E -115°E) experiences the collision of an oceanic plateau dotted with numerous seamounts, causing large-scale uplift of the forearc, coupled with erosion of the frontal prism and correlated mass wasting processes. Intense deformation of the forearc basin results from thrusting and compressional forces. In the neighbouring segment farther to the east (115°E-119°E), the lack of significant sediment input to the trench supports the notion that recycling of upper plate material in the forearc sustains the massive outer high observed here adjacent to a mature forearc basin. The incoming oceanic plate of the Argo Abyssal plain is devoid of a sediment drape and the original spreading fabric overprinted by bending-related faulting near the trench shape its morphology. The transition zone from the Java margin to the Banda Arc (119°E-122°E) experiences the early stages of continent-island arc collision associated with the convergence of the

  2. Active tectonics of the Oran (Algeria) Quaternary plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    youcef, Bouhadad; rabah, Bensalem; e-hadi, oubaiche

    2016-04-01

    The Oran region, in north-western Algeria, has been hit several times in the past by destructive moderate-sized and strong earthquakes. The Oran October 9th , 1790 (I0= X) was among the strongest seismic events in the western Mediterranean area comparable, if we consider the described effects, to the El- Asnam (1980, Ms=7.3) and Zemmouri (2003, Mw=6.8) earthquakes. Such strong seismic events requires the presence of major active geological structures that are re-activated several times in the past. In this work we present results of a multi- disciplinary study combining geomorphic analysis, field earthquake geological investigations and geophysical methods, undertaken to study the southern border of the Oran Quaternary plain. A 50 km long, SW-dipping and NE-SW trending active fault has been identified that showing clear quaternary deformation. Keywords: earthquake geology, active fault, geomorphic, geophysics, Algeria.

  3. Tectonic and Structural Controls of Geothermal Activity in the Great Basin Region, Western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulds, J. E.; Hinz, N.; Kreemer, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    We are conducting a thorough inventory of structural settings of geothermal systems (>400 total) in the extensional to transtensional Great Basin region of the western USA. Most of the geothermal systems in this region are not related to upper crustal magmatism and thus regional tectonic and local structural controls are the most critical factors controlling the locations of the geothermal activity. A system of NW-striking dextral faults known as the Walker Lane accommodates ~20% of the North American-Pacific plate motion in the western Great Basin and is intimately linked to N- to NNE-striking normal fault systems throughout the region. Overall, geothermal systems are concentrated in areas with the highest strain rates within or proximal to the eastern and western margins of the Great Basin, with the high temperature systems clustering in transtensional areas of highest strain rate in the northwestern Great Basin. Enhanced extension in the northwestern Great Basin probably results from the northwestward termination of the Walker Lane and the concomitant transfer of dextral shear into west-northwest directed extension, thus producing a broad transtensional region. The capacity of geothermal power plants also correlates with strain rates, with the largest (hundreds of megawatts) along the Walker Lane or San Andreas fault system, where strain rates range from 10-100 nanostrain/yr to 1,000 nanostrain/yr, respectively. Lesser systems (tens of megawatts) reside in the Basin and Range (outside the Walker Lane), where local strain rates are typically < 10 nanostrain/yr. Of the 250+ geothermal fields catalogued, step-overs or relay ramps in normal fault zones serve as the most favorable setting, hosting ~32% of the systems. Such areas have multiple, overlapping fault strands, increased fracture density, and thus enhanced permeability. Other common settings include a) intersections between normal faults and strike-slip or oblique-slip faults (27%), where multiple minor

  4. On the influence of the asthenospheric flow on the tectonics and topography at a collision-subduction transition zones: Comparison with the eastern Tibetan margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Jolivet, Laurent; Faccenna, Claudio; Gerya, Taras; Becker, Thorsten Wolfgang; Menant, Armel

    2016-10-01

    The tectonic and topographic evolution of southeast Asia is attributed to the indentation of India into Eurasia, gravitational collapse of the uplifted terrains and the dynamics of the Sunda and other western Pacific subduction zones, but their relative contributions remain elusive. Here, we analyse 3D numerical geodynamic modelling results involving a collision-subduction system and show that vigorous asthenospheric flow due to differential along-strike slab kinematics may contribute to the surface strain and elevations at collision-subduction transition zones. We argue that protracted northward migration of the collisional front and Indian slab during south to south-westward rollback subduction along the Sunda margin might have produced a similar asthenospheric flow. This flow could have contributed to the southeast Asia extrusion tectonics and uplift of the terrains around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and protruding from southeast Tibet. Therefore, we suggest that the tectonics and topographic growth east and southeast of Tibet are controlled not only by crustal and lithospheric deformation but also by asthenospheric dynamics.

  5. Tectonic significance of serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Stéphane; Schwartz, Stéphane; Reynard, Bruno; Agard, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    At plate boundaries, where deformation is localized along centimetre- to kilometre-scale shear zones, the influence of serpentinite on tectonic processes is linked to its unique rheological properties. In this paper we review the physical properties of serpentinites and their role in tectonic processes. At the ocean-continent transition, serpentinization weakens the upper mantle layer, promoting strain localization and allowing the normal faults in the distal margin to root at low angle. Similarly, at slow to ultra-slow spreading ridges, serpentinite is potentially very abundant at the seafloor and locally associated with domal structures. Extensional deformation is localized in a ~ 100 m thick shear zone at the footwall of detachment zones dominated by serpentine derived minerals. Within subduction zone, the depth of decoupling between the mantle wedge and the subducting slab corresponds to the stability depth of serpentine weak mineral. Dehydration of serpentine has also been hypothesized to play an important role in the origin of double seismic zones, however the exact mechanism through which dehydration promotes seismicity remains a matter of debate. During exhumation of high-pressure or ultrahigh-pressure rocks, the opposite trajectories of exhumation and subduction require a decoupling zone within the subducting slab. A serpentinized layer has the potential to become a decoupling zone between the oceanic crust and underlying lithosphere. The buoyancy of serpentinite also likely contributes to eclogite exhumation. Finally, along major strike-slip faults, serpentinites have been associated with fault creep, as well as low fault strength. The presence of serpentinite blocks along creeping segments of active faults worldwide is therefore likely to originate from fluids deriving from the progressive dehydration of the mantle wedge that move such bodies upward.

  6. Synergy of tectonic geomorphology, applied geophysics and remote sensing techniques reveals new data for active extensional tectonism in NW Peloponnese (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoulis, Ioannis; Vassilakis, Emmanuel; Mavroulis, Spyridon; Alexopoulos, John; Dilalos, Spyridon; Erkeki, Athanasia

    2015-05-01

    In tectonically active areas, such as in the northwest Peloponnese of western Greece, geomorphic processes are strongly influenced by active faulting; in many cases such faults cannot be easily identified. In this paper we apply multidisciplinary analysis (morphotectonic indices, neotectonic mapping, geophysical surveys and remote sensing techniques) to map the recently-recognized east-west trending Pineios River normal fault zone with a high degree of accuracy, and to better understand its contribution to the evolution of the ancient region of Elis during Holocene time. Fault activity seems to be related to frequent changes in river flow patterns and to displacements of the nearby shoreline. We argue that fault activity is the main reason for migration of Pineios river mouth as documented for several time periods during historical time. Quantitative constraints on deformation caused by the faulting were applied through the application of the morphotectonic indices proposed in this paper, including drainage network asymmetry and sinuosity, and mountain front sinuosity, all of which indicate that this is a highly active structure. Slip rates calculated to be as high as 0.48 mm/yr for the last 209 ka (based on previously published dating) were verified by applied geophysical methods. The fault surface discontinuity was identified at depth using vertical electrical resistivity measurements and depositional layers of different resistivity were found to be clearly offset. Displacement increases toward the west, reaching an observed maximum of 110 m. The most spectacular landform alteration due to surface deformation is the north-south migration of the river estuary into completely different open sea areas during the late Quaternary, mainly during the Holocene. The sediment transport path has been altered several times due to these changes in river geometry with and the most recent seeming to have occurred almost 2000 years ago. The river estuary migrated to its

  7. Moment tensor inversion of recent local moderate sized Van Earthquakes: seismicity and active tectonics of the Van region : Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafat, D.; Suvarikli, M.; Ogutcu, Z.; Kekovali, K.; Ocal, M. F.; Gunes, Y.; Pinar, A.

    2013-12-01

    The study area of the present research, the Van Region is located at the norththern end of the collision zone between the Anatolia and Arabian plates. Therefore, the southeast border of the Anatolian plate collides with the Arabian plate along the Bitlis Suture Zone. This zone is formed by collision of Arabian and in large scale Eurasian plates at mid-Miocen age. This type of thrust generation as a result of compressional regime extends east-west. The largest recorded earthquakes have all taken place along Southern Turkey (e.g. Lice, 1971; Varto, 1966; Caldiran, 1976). On the 23th of October 2011, an earthquake shook the Van Lake, Eastern Turkey, following a seismic sequence of more than three months in an unprecedented episode for this region characterized by null or low seismicity. The October 23, 2011 Van-Ercis Earthquake (Mw=7.1) was the most devastating resulting in loss of life and destruction. In order to study the aftershocks' activity of this main event, we installed and kept a seismic network of 10 broad-band (BB) stations in the area for an interval of nearly fifteen months. We characterized the seismogenic structure of the zone by calculating a minimum 1-D local velocity model and obtaining precise hypocentre locations. We also calculated fault plane solutions for more than 200 moderate sized earthquakes based on first motion polarities and commonly Moment Tensor Inversion Methods. The seismogenic zone would be localized at aproximately 10 km depth. Generally, the distribution of the important moderate earthquakes and the aftershock distribution shows that the E-W and NE-SW oriented fault segments cause the earthquake activities. Aftershock events are located along the eastern border of Lake Van and mainly between 5 and 10 km depth and disposed in two alignments: a ~E-W-trending alignment that matches with the trace of the Van Trust fault Zone and a NE-trending which could correspond to an structure not previously seen. Selected focal mechanisms show a

  8. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  9. Origin and tectonic implication of Triassic eclogite from the Song Ma suture zone between the Indochina and South China blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. Y.; Lo, C.; Grove, M.; Chung, S.; Iizuka, Y.; Tri, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Song-Ma suture zone in northern Vietnam and Laos marks the collision of the Indochina and South China blocks, which consists of ophiolite, metamorphic sole and meta-sediments. The Song Ma ophiolite consisting of serpentinized peridotite, layered gabbro, basalt and diabase is considered to represent the relics of the Paleothyan lithosphere. In this study, we provide new petrological, geochemical and geochronological data of the Song Ma eclogite for understanding its origin and tectonic implication. The eclogite is closely associated with garnet-phengite quartz schist and garnet amphibolite in the northwestern edge of the suture zone. It consists of porphyroblastic garnet and fine-grained matrix of omphacite, garnet, phengite, quartz and rutile. The porphyroblastic garnet has a large inclusion-rich core and a thin inclusion-free rim; the identified inclusions include quartz, taramite, barroisite, zoisite, epidote and rutile. Garnet porphyroblasts exhibit pronounced compositional zoning: i.e. increase pyrope with decreasing alm, grs and sps components from core (alm53-54Sps3-4Prp18-19Grs24-28) to rim (alm42-45Sps1Prp31-36Grs18-22) suggesting a prograde metamorphic history. Omphacite (Jd33-37) and phengite (Si, 3.34-3.45 pfu) are homogeneous in composition. Most interstitial amphibole in the matrix is retrograde phase. Grt-Cpx-Ph thermobarometer yielded a peak P-T condition of 28 ± 2 kbar and 700 ± 50 oC. All eclogites have basaltic composition: SiO2 ~ 49 wt%, TiO2 ~ 0.8 wt%, MgO ~ 8.6 wt% and FeOtotal 9.4-10.2 wt%. They show flat or slightly LREE-enriched patterns with negative Eu anomaly, and negative Sr and Ti anomalies in spider diagram. Selected major and trace element contents of eclogite, garnet amphibolite and metabasite plotted in the discrimination diagrams of 2Nb-Zr/4-Y and TiO2-FeO/MgO and Th/Yb-Nb/Yb suggest that the protoliths of the Song Ma eclogite and metabasite have MORB-type geochemical affinities. Zircon separates form an eclogite sample show

  10. Paleoseismology, seismic cycle and tectonic coupling of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone : Insights from micro-atolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil Accardo, Jennifer; Feuillet, Nathalie; Tapponnier, Paul; Deschamps, Pierre; Cabioch, Guy; Le Cornec, Florence; Jacques, Eric; Galetzka, John; Saurel, Jean-Marie

    2010-05-01

    The Lesser Antilles arc is a region of high seismic hazard, which results from the convergence of American and Caribbean plates at 2cm/yr. Several earthquakes of magnitude ≥ 7 have struck the islands in the past. The largest, latest ones occurred only 4 years apart in the mid-19th century, on January 11, 1839 and February 8, 1843, destroying the towns of Fort-de-France and Pointe-à-Pitre, respectively, and killing several thousand people. Today, an earthquake comparable to that of 1843 might cause tens thousands of casualties in Guadeloupe. In addition to devastating seismic shaking, such earthquakes may trigger large tsunamis. In the Lesser Antilles, the behavior and seismic history of the plate interface remain unknown. Important questions that must be answered are: What is the exact geometry and segmentation of the subduction zone? How large might mega-thrust earthquakes be? What are typical recurrence times for such earthquakes on each segment? Could a large earthquake recur in the next few decades? To better understand and constrain the seismic hazard related to mega-thrust in the Lesser Antilles, we tend to retrieve the history of strain accumulation and relief at the plate interface from alive or dead corals. Certain coral species form micro-atolls that grow just below the intertidal zone and thus "fossilize" with their upper surfaces a history of local relative sea level. The annual coral band (or ring) growth is limited upwards by the so-called Highest Level of Survival (HLS, connected to the elevation of the yearly lowest tide level). When the sea level rises or drops due to tectonic or climatic events, the micro-atoll growth is perturbed. By analyzing in detail the coral aragonite skeleton, and U/Th dating specific events, it is possible to retrieve the history of sea level change through at least parts of several centuries. We identified several sites with living micro-atolls in the islands we visited (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Antigua, Barbuda). In

  11. Identification of paleoearthquakes based on geomorphological evidence and their tectonic implications for the southern part of the active Anqiu-Juxian fault, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Qisong; Jiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingfa; Jiang, Hongbo; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xin

    2016-12-01

    This study utilized an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry system to acquire orthoimages and generate a digital elevation model (DEM) covering the southern part of the Anqiu-Juxian fault for geomorphological analysis and paleoearthquake identification. Six offset gullies were identified and analyzed on the orthoimages. Our results indicate that at least three large and several moderate earthquakes have occurred along the fault zone. Knickpoints recognized from the DEM reveal several paleoearthquakes. An average Holocene horizontal slip rate of 2.86 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 was estimated from the offset gullies, which is consistent with previous results from field surveys. The tectonic evolution of this fault zone is most likely related to subduction of the Pacific plate under the Eurasian plate, which gave rise to the right-lateral strike-slip and thrust movement of the Tan-Lu fault zone. This study provided valuable information regarding fault activity and paleoearthquake occurrence along the Anqiu-Juxian fault zone during the Holocene and demonstrated the potential of using UAVs for studies involving tectonic geomorphology.

  12. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Lagreulet, S.; Segovia, M.; Font, Y.; Lamarque, G.; Yepes, H.; Mothes, P.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrín, P.; Quidelleur, X.

    2014-02-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) extends over 60 km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the N-S segmented, en echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active, and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited N-S direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected at depth to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS data set indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4 mm/yr, which decreases northward along the fold system as it connects to the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely populated Quito region highlights the need for additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  13. Linking Europa's plume activity to tides, tectonics, and liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Roth, Lorenz; Retherford, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Much of the geologic activity preserved on Europa's icy surface has been attributed to tidal deformation, mainly due to Europa's eccentric orbit. Although the surface is geologically young (30-80 Myr), there is little information as to whether tidally-driven surface processes are ongoing. However, a recent detection of water vapor near Europa's south pole suggests that it may be geologically active. Initial observations indicated that Europa's plume eruptions are time-variable and may be linked to its tidal cycle. Saturn's moon, Enceladus, which shares many similar traits with Europa, displays tidally-modulated plume eruptions, which bolstered this interpretation. However, additional observations of Europa at the same time in its orbit failed to yield a plume detection, casting doubt on the tidal control hypothesis. The purpose of this study is to analyze the timing of plume eruptions within the context of Europa's tidal cycle to determine whether such a link exists and examine the inferred similarities and differences between plume activity on Europa and Enceladus. To do this, we determine the locations and orientations of hypothetical tidally-driven fractures that best match the temporal variability of the plumes observed at Europa. Specifically, we identify model faults that are in tension at the time in Europa's orbit when a plume was detected and in compression at times when the plume was not detected. We find that tidal stress driven solely by eccentricity is incompatible with the observations unless additional mechanisms are controlling the eruption timing or restricting the longevity of the plumes. The addition of obliquity tides, and corresponding precession of the spin pole, can generate a number of model faults that are consistent with the pattern of plume detections. The locations and orientations of these hypothetical source fractures are robust across a broad range of precession rates and spin pole directions. Analysis of the stress variations across

  14. Physical mechanism of the vertical electric field generation over active tectonic faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.

    2009-09-01

    The concept of the Global Electric Circuit (GEC) provides an explanation of the existence of a vertical atmospheric electric field and coupling between the ground and ionosphere. Presently, ionospheric physics pays more attention to electric fields and coupling processes in the polar and auroral regions, whereas in other areas the potential difference between the ground and ionosphere usually is not taken into account. Regional processes exist, however, that are able to significantly affect the GEC parameters and through modification of the ionospheric potential to create plasma density irregularities of different scales within the ionosphere. One such source of ionosphere modification is air ionization in the vicinity of active tectonic faults, which takes place due to increased radon emanation. This paper considers the process of local modification of the GEC and corresponding ionospheric variability due to tectonic activity.

  15. Evolution of the Sibişel Shear Zone (South Carpathians): A study of its type locality near Răşinari (Romania) and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Negulescu, Elena; Profeta, Lucia; Sǎbǎu, Gavril; Jianu, Denisa; Petrescu, Lucian; Hoffman, Derek

    2016-09-01

    The Sibişel Shear Zone is a 1-3 km wide, ductile shear zone located in the South Carpathian Mountains, Romania. In the Rășinari area, the ductile shear zone juxtaposes amphibolite facies rocks of the Lotru Metamorphic Suite against greenschist facies rocks of the Râuşorul Cisnădioarei Formation. The first represents the eroded remnants of Peri-Gondwanan arcs formed between the Neoproterozoic-Silurian (650-430 Ma), regionally metamorphosed to amphibolite facies during the Variscan orogeny (350-320 Ma). The second is composed of metasedimentary and metavolcanic Neoproterozoic-Ordovician (700-497 Ma) assemblages of mafic to intermediate bulk composition also resembling an island arc metamorphosed during the Ordovician (prior to 463 Ma). Between these lie the epidote amphibolite facies mylonitic and ultramylonitic rocks of the Sibișel Formation, a tectonic mélange dominated by mafic actinolite schists attenuated into a high strain ductile shear zone. Mineral Rb-Sr isochrons document the time of juxtaposition of the three domains during the Permian to Early Triassic ( 290-240 Ma). Ductile shear sense indicators suggest a right lateral transpressive mechanism of juxtaposition; the Sibişel shear zone is a remnant Permo-Triassic suture between two Early Paleozoic Gondwanan terranes. A zircon and apatite U-Th/He age transect across the shear zone yields Alpine ages (54-90 Ma apatite and 98-122 Ma zircon); these data demonstrate that the exposed rocks were not subjected to Alpine ductile deformation. Our results have significant implications for the assembly of Gondwanan terranes and their docking to Baltica during Pangea's formation. Arc terranes free of Variscan metamorphism existed until the Early Triassic, emphasizing the complex tectonics of terrane amalgamation during the closure of Paleotethys.

  16. Caldecott 4th bore tunnel project: influence of ground water flows and inflows triggered by tectonic fault zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhuber, G.; G. Neuhuber1, W. Klary1, A. Nitschke1, B. Thapa2, Chris Risden3, T. Crampton4, D. Zerga5

    2011-12-01

    The 4th Bore is a highway tunnel on California State Route 24 currently under construction. The 4th Bore is undertaken by the California State Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) and the Contra Costa County Transportation Commission (CCTC) to alleviate traffic congestion on SR24 connecting the cities of Oakland and Orinda in the San Francisco East Bay Area. The cost for the 4th Bore is estimated at $ 390.8 Mill. The 3,249 ft long 4th Bore tunnel will have excavated dimensions of approximately 40 ft height and 49 ft width. A total of 7 cross passages will run between the 3rd and the new 4th bore. Geology and Hydrogeology: The project is located in the Oakland Berkeley Hills of the SF Bay Area. The Caldecott Tunnels lie within the easterly assemblage of the Hayward fault zone province which consists of a sequence of sedimentary and volcanic rocks that accumulated in the interval between about 16 and 8.4 Ma (Miocene). The basal rocks of these Tertiary deposits consist of deep marine basin sediments of the Monterey Group. These rocks are overlain uncomfortably by an interbedded sequence of terrestrial sediments (Orinda Formation) and volcanic rocks (Moraga Formation). The Tertiary rocks have been folded into large amplitude, NW trending folds that are cut by N trending strike and slip faults. The SF Bay Region, which is crossed by 4 major faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward, and Calaveras), is considered one of the more seismically active regions of the world. The active Hayward fault lies 0.9mi to the west of the Caldecott Tunnels and is the closest major fault to the project area. The tunnel is at the moment under top heading construction: West Portal (360ft) and East Portal (1,968.5ft). While major faults typically influence groundwater flow, characterization of such influences is extremely difficult because of the heterogeneity of the hydraulic systems and the different lithological parameters and influences. Four major inactive fault zones striking

  17. Structure and Tectonics of Subophiolitic Mélanges in the Western Hellenides (Greece) and Implications for Ophiolitic Root Zones in the Balkans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghikas, Constandina; Dilek, Yildirim; Rassios, Anne E.

    2010-05-01

    The Jurassic Vourinos ophiolite is part of the Western Hellenide ophiolite belt in Greece and rests tectonically on the Pelagonian ribbon continent. The Vourinos and coeval Pindos ophiolite to the west display suprasubduction-zone geochemical affinities, and represent remnants of oceanic lithosphere formed in a rifted incipient arc-forearc setting within the Pindos Basin. In structurally descending order, and from west to east, the subophiolitic mélange beneath the Vourinos ophiolite contains the Agios Nikolaos Formation (ANF) and a rift assemblage, both of which display ENE-vergent thrust faults, shear zones, and folds. The ANF comprises schistose mudstone with pebbles, cobbles, and boulders of arenite and wacke derived from the crystalline basement of Pelagonia. Imbricated along ENE-directed thrust faults and metamorphosed up to lower amphibolite facies, the ANF represents continental rise deposits of the rifted Pelagonian margin. The rift assemblage includes blocks of basaltic lavas, ribbon chert, micritic cherty limestone, metagabbro, dolerite dikes, and serpentinite breccia that are commonly in thrust contact with each other and are tectonically imbricated with the Pelagonian carbonates; however, primary intrusive and depositional contacts are locally well preserved. Gabbro and dolerite dikes are locally intrusive into the recrystallized carbonates and metapelitic rocks of Pelagonia. Lavas display mid-ocean ridge basalt-within plate basalt affinities and represent Upper Triassic rift units that erupted during the separation of Pelagonia from Apulia. Gabbro, dolerite, and serpentinite breccia are the products of a magmatic rifting episode prior to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Pindos Basin. The Vourinos subophiolitic mélange thus consists of passive margin and rift assemblages that were tectonically overridden by the Vourinos ophiolite in the middle Jurassic. Its internal structure and evolutionary history represent a tectonic mélange character of

  18. Recent tectonic activity on Mercury revealed by small thrust fault scarps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Daud, Katie; Banks, Maria E.; Selvans, Michelle M.; Chapman, Clark R.; Ernst, Carolyn M.

    2016-10-01

    Large tectonic landforms on the surface of Mercury, consistent with significant contraction of the planet, were revealed by the flybys of Mariner 10 in the mid-1970s. The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission confirmed that the planet's past 4 billion years of tectonic history have been dominated by contraction expressed by lobate fault scarps that are hundreds of kilometres long. Here we report the discovery of small thrust fault scarps in images from the low-altitude campaign at the end of the MESSENGER mission that are orders of magnitude smaller than the large-scale lobate scarps. These small scarps have tens of metres of relief, are only kilometres in length and are comparable in scale to small young scarps on the Moon. Their small-scale, pristine appearance, crosscutting of impact craters and association with small graben all indicate an age of less than 50 Myr. We propose that these scarps are the smallest members of a continuum in scale of thrust fault scarps on Mercury. The young age of the small scarps, along with evidence for recent activity on large-scale scarps, suggests that Mercury is tectonically active today and implies a prolonged slow cooling of the planet's interior.

  19. Earthquake swarm activity in the Oaxaca segment of Middle American Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2013-05-01

    An outstanding question in geophysics is the degree to which the newly discovered family of slow fault slip behaviors is related to more traditional earthquakes, especially since theoretical predictions indicate slip in the deeper transitional zone promotes failure in the shallower seismogenic zone. The Oaxacan segment of the Middle American Subduction zone is a natural region to pursue detailed studies of the spectrum of fault slip due to the unusually shallow subduction angle and short trench-to-coast distances that bring broad portions of the seismogenic and transitional zones of the plate interface inland. A deployment of broadband seismometers in this region has improved the network coverage to ~70 km station spacing since 2006, providing new opportunities to investigate smaller seismic phenomena. While characterization of tectonic tremor has been a prominent focus of this deployment, the improved network has also revealed productive earthquake swarms, whose sustained periods of similar magnitude earthquakes are also thought to be driven by slow slip. We identify a particularly productive earthquake swarm in July 2006 (~600 similar earthquakes detected), which occurred during a week-long episode of tectonic tremor and geodetically detected slow slip. Using a multi-station "template matching" waveform cross correlation technique, we have been able to detect and locate swarm earthquakes several orders of magnitude smaller than that of traditional processing, particularly during periods of increased background activity, because the detector is finely tuned to events with similar hypocentral location and focal mechanism. When we scan for repeats of the event families detected in the July 2006 sequence throughout the 6+ years since, we find these families were also activated during several other slow slip episodes, which indicates a link between slow slip in the transition zone and earthquakes at the downdip end of the seismogenic portion of the megathrust.

  20. Active Seismicity and Tectonics in Central Asia from Seismological Data Recorded in the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountain Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Schurr, Bernd; Schneider, Felix M.; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mechie, James; Minaev, Vladislav; Abdybachaev, Ulan A.; Gadoev, Mustafo; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon

    2010-05-01

    Active tectonics in the Pamir mountains in central Asia, the westernmost part of the India-Eurasia collision zone, are controlled by ongoing convergence (about 20 mm/yr), causing substantial crustal shortening and compressional deformation. This leads to high seismicity rates throughout the region. Whereas seismic activity along the rim of the Pamir plateau is mostly compressional and concentrated along the Main Pamir Thrust, the distribution and focal mechanisms of earthquakes in its interior are more diffuse, with extensional events occurring along North-South trending rift zones (Kara Kul, Wachan). Seismicity in the south-western Pamir and in the Hindu Kush features frequent intermediate-depth earthquakes, reaching hypocentral depths of 300 km, which is rare for regions not obviously related to active subduction of oceanic lithosphere. These mantle earthquakes, which are not observed beneath the Himalayas and Tibet further east, form a rather well-defined Wadati-Benioff zone that was readily interpreted as subducted lithosphere present below the current collisional orogen. Earlier seismological studies showed the presence of a northward-dipping lithospheric slab under the Hindu Kush and a southward-dipping one beneath the Pamirs, with a small seismic gap in-between. Different hypotheses concerning the nature of these slabs (oceanic or continental lithosphere) and tectonic geometry in general (two slabs subducting in opposite directions or a single, hugely contorted slab) have been proposed in literature. Political instability in the region in the last two decades hampered on-site studies and field work, leaving many key issues poorly understood. In the framework of the multidisciplinary project TIPAGE (Tien Shan Pamir Geodynamic Programme), for the first time, new field campaigns collecting high quality data have been made possible. Local seismicity in the Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges (Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan) is currently being recorded by a temporary

  1. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  2. Similarities and contrasts in tectonic and volcanic style and history along the Colorado plateaus-to-basin and range transition zone in Western Arizona: Geologic framework for tertiary extensional tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. A.; Mckee, E. H.; Hartman, J. H.; Simmons, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The overall temporal and spatial relations between middle Tertiary volcanism and tectonism from the Basin and Range province onto the edge of the Colorado Plateaus province suggest that a single magnetic-tectonic episode affected the entire region more or less simultaneously during this period. The episode followed a post-Laramide (late Eocene through Oligocene) period of 25 million years of relative stability. Middle Tertiary volcanism did not migrate gradually eastward in a simple fashion onto the Colorado Plateau. In fact, late Oligocene volcanism appears to be more voluminous near the Aquarius Mountains than throughout the adjacent Basin and Range province westward to the Colorado River. Any model proposed to explain the cause of extension and detachment faulting in the eastern part of the Basin and Range province must consider that the onset of volcanism appears to have been approximately synchronous from the Colorado River region of the Basin and Range across the transition zone and onto the edge of the Colorado Plateaus.

  3. Glacier ice mass fluctuations and fault instability in tectonically active Southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauber, J.M.; Molnia, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Across the plate boundary zone in south central Alaska, tectonic strain rates are high in a region that includes large glaciers undergoing wastage (glacier retreat and thinning) and surges. For the coastal region between the Bering and Malaspina Glaciers, the average ice mass thickness changes between 1995 and 2000 range from 1 to 5 m/year. These ice changes caused solid Earth displacements in our study region with predicted values of -10 to 50 mm in the vertical and predicted horizontal displacements of 0-10 mm at variable orientations. Relative to stable North America, observed horizontal rates of tectonic deformation range from 10 to 40 mm/year to the north-northwest and the predicted tectonic uplift rates range from approximately 0 mm/year near the Gulf of Alaska coast to 12 mm/year further inland. The ice mass changes between 1995 and 2000 resulted in discernible changes in the Global Positioning System (GPS) measured station positions of one site (ISLE) located adjacent to the Bagley Ice Valley and at one site, DON, located south of the Bering Glacier terminus. In addition to modifying the surface displacements rates, we evaluated the influence ice changes during the Bering glacier surge cycle had on the background seismic rate. We found an increase in the number of earthquakes (ML???2.5) and seismic rate associated with ice thinning and a decrease in the number of earthquakes and seismic rate associated with ice thickening. These results support the hypothesis that ice mass changes can modulate the background seismic rate. During the last century, wastage of the coastal glaciers in the Icy Bay and Malaspina region indicates thinning of hundreds of meters and in areas of major retreat, maximum losses of ice thickness approaching 1 km. Between the 1899 Yakataga and Yakutat earthquakes (Mw=8.1, 8.1) and prior to the 1979 St. Elias earthquake (M s=7.2), the plate interface below Icy Bay was locked and tectonic strain accumulated. We used estimated ice mass

  4. Intermittent Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, P. G.; Behn, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    prevent the ultimate closure of the Pacific basin and thus the cessation of subduction. More noteworthy is where subduction is not initiating. First, there is no evidence for subduction initiation anywhere within the Atlantic basin (excluding the Caribbean and Scotia), despite the mature 100-200 my age of passive-margin oceanic lithosphere. The formation of the Alpine-Himalayan chain represents the cessation of roughly 10,000 km of subduction at about 35-50 ma, Yet, no new subduction zones have initiated south of India or Africa, the two major continents that participated in the collision. These examples illustrate that subduction does not immediately initiate following a continent-continent collision, and may lag by 10s if not 100s of millions of years. The stoppage of plate tectonics, or even a dramatic reduction in subduction flux, would have significant thermal consequences for the mantle. It would effectively mark a temporary switch to "stagnant-lid" tectonics, analogous to that found on Venus, resulting in a significant increase in global mantle potential temperature (30- 100°C per 100 my) and a possibly widespread increase in magmatic activity. Such a hiatus may have occurred in the Mid-Proterozoic (1.1-1.6Ga), an era characterized by the virtual absence of orogenic activity, the longest-lived passive margin (600 My), and the production of enigmatic "anorogenic" granites found over thousands of kilometers in a belt presently stretching from southwestern to northeastern North America.

  5. Late cretaceous extensional tectonics and associated igneous activity on the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, R. L.; Sundeen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Major, dominantly compressional, orogenic episodes (Taconic, Acadian, Alleghenian) affected eastern North America during the Paleozoic. During the Mesozoic, in contrast, this same region was principally affected by epeirogenic and extensional tectonism; one episode of comparatively more intense tectonic activity involving extensive faulting, uplift, sedimentation, intrusion and effusion produced the Newark Series of eposits and fault block phenomena. This event, termed the Palisades Disturbance, took place during the Late Triassic - Earliest Jurassic. The authors document a comparable extensional tectonic-igneous event occurring during the Late Cretaceous (Early Gulfian; Cenomanian-Santonian) along the southern margin of the cratonic platform from Arkansas to Georgia.

  6. Geomorphic signatures of active tectonics in the Trans-Yamuna segment of the western Doon valley, northwest Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, George; Sah, Madho P.

    Being involved in the late orogenic movements of the sub-Himalaya, the Doon valley and its Quaternary formations have received considerable attention from Earth scientists in the study of active tectonics and paleoseismic events. Study of aerial photographs and satellite data, and selected field checks not only confirmed neotectonic features already reported by various authors but also revealed the presence of more such features. In response to active tectonics, these features have affected very young terraces and Quaternary sediments in the Trans-Yamuna segment of the Doon valley in the western sub-Himalaya. In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the neotectonic implications of these movements on landforms in and around Sataun-Sirmuri Tal. Ground evidence indicates that the area has experienced at least three major tectonic impulses since the generation of the Main Boundary Thrust. The major tectonic disturbances are most likely due to co-seismic activity along the ongoing Himalayan tectonic processes. In this paper, we discuss some of the strong geomorphic signatures, such as lineament and active fault traces, pressure ridges, sag ponds, alluvial fans, river terraces and finally landslides, which are indicative of active tectonics in this area. On the basis of the present-day geomorphic configuration of this sub-Himalayan basin, a possible evolutionary history is also presented.

  7. Tectonic implications of Early Miocene OIB magmatism in a near-trench setting: The Outer Zone of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminami, Kazuo; Imaoka, Teruyoshi; Ogura, Kazuki; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Hideo; Mori, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    The Outer Zone of the SW Japan and northernmost Ryukyu arcs was affected by intense igneous activity during the Miocene, characterized by MORB-like basalts, alkaline basalts, and S-type (with subordinate I-type) felsic to intermediate volcano-plutonic complexes. These igneous rocks are inferred to be the products of near-trench magmatism. Early Miocene (∼18 Ma) alkaline basalt dikes from the Shingu-Otoyo area in central northern Shikoku, and an alkaline lamprophyre dike from Tanegashima, one of the northernmost Ryukyu Islands, pre-date the Middle Miocene felsic to intermediate igneous rocks. The basalts and lamprophyre have compositions of basanite, basalt, trachybasalt and phonotephrite. They are characterized by elevated large-ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Sr, Ba, and Th) and high concentrations of high-field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., TiO2, Nb, and Zr). The geochemical signatures of the basalts and lamprophyre suggest an ocean island basalt-type (OIB-type) mantle source. The occurrence of alkaline basalts and lamprophyre with OIB-type, intraplate geochemical signatures in a near-trench setting is unusual with regard to plate tectonic processes. We propose that trench-ward motion of the overriding plate during the period around the Early Miocene resulted in a shallowly dipping slab, and interplate coupling between the subducting Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) and the overlying crust beneath most of the Outer Zone in the western part of SW Japan and the northernmost Ryukyu Islands. The OIB-type magmatism in the near-trench environment is most plausibly explained by the upwelling of asthenospheric material from beneath the subducting slab, which migrated through fractures and/or tears in the slab. We envisage two possible scenarios for the formation of these fractures or tears: (1) the shallowing dip angle of the subducted PSP resulted in concave-upwards flexure of the slab, generating fractures in the flexed region; and (2) differential motion within

  8. Active Tectonics of Southern Alaska and the Role of the Yakutat Block Constrained by GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; Freymueller, J. T.; Larsen, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    GPS data from southern Alaska and the northern Canadian Cordillera have helped redefine the region's tectonic landscape. Instead of a comparatively simple interaction between the Pacific and North American plates, with relative motion accommodated on a single boundary fault, the margin is made up of a number of small blocks and deformation zones with relative motion distributed across a variety of structures. Much of this complexity can be attributed to the Yakutat block, an allochthonous terrane that has been colliding with southern Alaska since the Miocene. We present GPS data from across the region and use it to constrain a tectonic model for the Yakutat block collision and its effects on southern Alaska and eastern Canada. According to our model, the Yakutat block itself moves NNW at a rate of 50 mm/yr. Along its eastern edge, the Yakutat block is fragmenting into small crustal slivers. Part of the strain from the collision is transferred east of the Fairweather - Queen Charlotte fault system, causing the region inboard of the Fairweather fault to undergo a distinct clockwise rotation into the northern Canadian Cordillera. About 5% of the relative motion is transferred even further east, causing small northeasterly motions well into the northern Cordillera. Further north, the GPS data and model results indicate that the current deformation front between the Yakutat block and southern Alaska runs along the western side of the Malaspina Glacier. The majority of the ~37 mm/yr of relative convergence is accommodated along a narrow band of thrust faults concentrated in the southeastern part of the St. Elias orogen. Near the Bering Glacier, the tectonic regime abruptly changes as crustal thrust faults give way to subduction of the Yakutat block beneath the western St. Elias orogen and Prince William Sound. This change aligns with the Gulf of Alaska shear zone, implying that the Pacific plate may be fragmenting in response to the Yakutat collision. From the Bering

  9. Active tectonics in Southern Alaska and the role of the Yakutat block constrained by GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Julie

    2011-12-01

    GPS data from southern Alaska and the northern Canadian Cordillera have helped redefine the region's tectonic landscape. Instead of a comparatively simple interaction between the Pacific and North American plates, with relative motion accommodated on a single boundary fault, the margin is made up of a number of small blocks and deformation zones with relative motion distributed across a variety of structures. Much of this complexity can be attributed to the Yakutat block, an allochthonous terrane that has been colliding with southern Alaska since the Miocene. This thesis presents GPS data from across the region and uses it to constrain a tectonic model for the Yakutat block collision and its effects on southern Alaska and eastern Canada. The Yakutat block itself moves NNW at a rate of 50 mm/yr. Along its eastern edge, the Yakutat block is fragmenting into small crustal slivers. Part of the strain from the collision is transferred east of the Fairweather -- Queen Charlotte fault system, causing the region inboard of the Fairweather fault to undergo a distinct clockwise rotation into the northern Canadian Cordillera. About 5% of the relative motion is transferred even further east, causing small northeasterly motions well into the northern Cordillera. Further north, the GPS data and model results indicate that the current deformation front between the Yakutat block and southern Alaska runs along the western side of the Malaspina Glacier. The majority of the ˜37 mm/yr of relative convergence is accommodated along a narrow band of thrust faults concentrated in the southeastern part of the St. Elias orogen. Near the Bering Glacier, the tectonic regime abruptly changes as crustal thrust faults give way to subduction of the Yakutat block beneath the western St. Elias orogen and Prince William Sound. This change aligns with the Gulf of Alaska shear zone, implying that the Pacific plate is fragmenting in response to the Yakutat collision. The Bering Glacier region is

  10. Spatial analysis of Budovar stream catchment (Srem Loess Plateau, Serbia) in a tectonically active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Mladjen; Rvovic, Ivan; Sorak, Rada; Petrovic, Milos

    2016-04-01

    Budovar is the far longest stream on Srem Loess Plateau, with a length of a 52 km, and catchment area of 245 km2. Budovar stream drains a quite complex landscape in terms of generally flat loess plateau, with elevations decreasing gradually southeastward - from 213 m at slopes of Fru\\vska Gora Mountain to 70,9 m at the confluence with Danube river. The youngest (Pleistocene/Holocene) sedimentary formations in the catchment vary from slope loess on Fru\\vska Gora Mtn. in upper part, through typical plateau loess in middle part, and the finest bog-sediments in tectonic depressions in lower part. These deposits lie over the bog-lake-terrestrial sediments with thickness over 100 m. According the geodetic measurements, uplift of Fru\\vska Gora Mtn., which has been the strongest during the Middle Pleistocene, is still present, with rates of up to 1 mm/y in contrast of general uplift of the area, subsidence is recorded in two distinct parts of the catchment. Spatial analysis is done using a DEM, generated in ArcGIS 10.0 from the elevation points, 10 m contours and stream coverage available in 1:25.000 topographical maps. Both longitudinal and cross-section profiles of the valley reflect the influence of tectonic distortions and climatic fluctuations. Valleys in Budovar catchment have composite character - the valleys cross-sections vary from deep incised V-shape, reversed trapezoid shape and completely flat valleys in tectonic depressions. Moreover, there is almost no correlation between the shape of cross-sectional profiles and the direction of curvature of the main valley's long axis (left/right or straight), suggesting that the tectonic activity has the key role in shaping. The width of valleys in Budovar catchment area is in sharp contrast with present stream discharge, which suggests strong climate fluctuations since Upper Pleistocene. The longitudinal profiles also shows signs of kickpoints and some short reaches with increasing elevation in the flow direction. Key

  11. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of tectonic and metamorphic histories at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of an active continental margin is simulated in two dimensions, using a finite difference thermomechanical code with half-staggered grid and marker-in-cell technique. The effect of mechanical properties, changing as a function of P and T, assigned to different crustal layers and mantle materials in the simple starting structure is discussed for a set of numerical models. For each model, representative P T paths are displayed for selected markers. Both the intensity of subduction erosion and the size of the frontal accretionary wedge are strongly dependent on the rheology chosen for the overriding continental crust. Tectonically eroded upper and lower continental crust is carried down to form a broad orogenic wedge, intermingling with detached oceanic crust and sediments from the subducted plate and hydrated mantle material from the overriding plate. A small portion of the continental crust and trench sediments is carried further down into a narrow subduction channel, intermingling with oceanic crust and hydrated mantle material, and to some extent extruded to the rear of the orogenic wedge underplating the overriding continental crust. The exhumation rates for (ultra)high pressure rocks can exceed subduction and burial rates by a factor of 1.5 3, when forced return flow in the hanging wall portion of the self-organizing subduction channel is focused. The simulations suggest that a minimum rate of subduction is required for the formation of a subduction channel, because buoyancy forces may outweigh drag forces for slow subduction. For a weak upper continental crust, simulated by a high pore pressure coefficient in the brittle regime, the orogenic wedge and megascale melange reach a mid- to upper-crustal position within 10 20 Myr (after 400 600 km of subduction). For a strong upper crust, a continental lid persists over the entire time span covered by the simulation. The structural pattern is similar in all cases, with four zones from trench toward arc

  12. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone and its implications for the earthquake activities in the Songliao basin, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongyuan, Yu; Peizhen, Zhang; Wei, Min; Qinghai, Wei; Limei, Wang; Bin, Zhao; Shuang, Liu; Jian, Kang

    2015-08-01

    The Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone is a major tectonic feature cutting through the Songliao Basin from south to north in NE China. Five earthquakes with magnitudes over 5 that occurred during the past 30 years suggest the fault zone is a seismogenic structure with future seismic potential. The structural pattern, tectonic history, Quaternary activity and seismic potential have previously been unknown due to the Quaternary sedimentary coverage and lack of large historic earthquakes (M > 7). In this paper, we use seismic reflection profiles and drilling from petroleum explorations and shallow-depth seismic reflections to study those problems. The total length of the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone is more than 400 km; modern seismicity delineates it into 4 segments each with a length of 90-100 km. In cross-section view, the folds and associated faults form a complex structural belt with a width of more than 10 km. Shallow-level seismic reflection across the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone reveals that the Late Quaternary sediments were folded and faulted, indicating its present tectonic activity. The Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone and Songliao Basin have been subjected to three stages of tectonic evolution: a rifting stage characterized by normal faulting and extension (∼145-112 Ma), a prolonged stage of thermal subsidence (∼112-65 Ma), and a tectonic reversal that has been taking place since ∼65 Ma. Our shallow-level reflection profiles show that the folding and reverse faulting have influenced the Late Quaternary sediments. The seismicity and moderate earthquakes suggest that the tectonic activity persists today. The deformation rate across the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone, however, is measured to be very slow. In conjunction with the inference that most deformation in NE China may be taken up by the Yilan-Yitong Fault Zone bounding the Songliao Basin to the east, we suggest moderate earthquake potential and thus moderate seismic hazards along the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone. The geological structures, which

  13. Tectonic and kinematic study of a strike-slip zone along the southern margin of Central Ovda Regio, Venus: Geodynamical implications for crustal plateaux formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Ignacio; Capote, Ramón; Anguita, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    The tectonic system of the southern margin of Central Ovda Regio, a crustal plateau which straddles Venus equator, has been interpreted as a dextral strike-slip array, on the basis of evidence clearly identifiable, as are Riedel fracture patterns of different scales, en échelon folds and brittle strike-slip faults. This transcurrent regime developed two main shear belts (Inner and Outer, on respectively thicker and thinner crust), whose minimum dextral displacement has been estimated in 30-50 km. Since the up or downwelling models for plateau formation cannot easily explain tectonic shears of this magnitude along their margins, an alternative hypothesis has been built, which stands on the proposed collisional belt which could form Ovda northern border (King et al., 1998, Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 29, Abstract 1209; Tuckwell and Ghail, 2002, Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 33, Abstract 1566). Within this framework, the shear would represent a transcollisional transcurrent zone, similar to the strike-slip zones produced in the foreland of the Himalayas-Tibet collision front. Eastern Ovda would be an independent area of thickened crust, pushed to the SSE by the northern collision, with the deformation concentrated at its margins, and experiencing a shear strain on its southern margin. None of the data, however, either supports nor helps to discard theoretical subduction events as a cause of the collision. On the contrary, image relationships could be interpreted as evidence that the main shear deformation took place during the last global resurfacing event on the planet.

  14. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  15. Detection and Analysis of Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Relations with the Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Saroli, M.; Lancia, M.; Albano, M.; Lo Sardo, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geomorphological investigations focused on the definition of major factors conditioning the landscape evolution. The interaction of some of these factors as the litho-structural setting, the local relief, the tectonic activity, the climatic conditions and the seismicity plays a key-role in determining large scale slope instability phenomena which display the general morphological features of deep seated gravitational deformations (DSGD). The present work aims to detect the large scale gravitational deformation and relations with the active tectonics affecting the Abruzzo Region and to provide a description of the morphologic features of the deformations by means of aerial photograph interpretation, geological/geomorphological field surveys and DInSAR data. The investigated areas are morphologically characterized by significant elevation changes due to the presence of high mountain peaks, separated from surrounding depressed areas by steep escarpments, frequently represented by active faults. Consequently, relief energy favours the development of gravity-driven deformations. These deformations seem to be superimposed on and influenced by the inherited structural and tectonic pattern, related to the sin- and post-thrusting evolution. The morphological evidences of these phenomena, are represented by landslides, sackungen or rock-flows, lateral spreads and block slides. DInSAR analysis measured deformation of the large scale gravitative phenomena previously identified through aerial-photo analysis. DSGD may evolve in rapid, catastrophic mass movements and this paroxistic evolution of the deformations may be triggered by high magnitude seismic events. These assumptions point out the great importance of mapping in detail large scale slope instability phenomena in relation to the active faults, in a perspective of land-use planning such as the Abruzzo Region characterized by a high magnitude historical seismicity.

  16. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  17. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  19. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  20. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  1. Threshold bedrock channels in tectonically active mountains with frequent mass wasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korup, O.; Hayakawa, Y. S.; Codilean, A.; Oguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of how mountain belts grow and erode through time largely rely on the paradigm of fluvial bedrock incision as the main motor of response to differences in rock uplift, thus setting base levels of erosion in tectonically active landscapes. Dynamic feedbacks between rock uplift, bedrock river geometry, and mass wasting have been encapsulated within the concept of threshold hillslopes that attain a mechanically critical inclination capable of adjusting to fluvial incision rates via decreased stability and commensurately more frequent landsliding. Here we provide data that challenge the widely held view that channel steepness records tectonic forcing more faithfully than hillslope inclination despite much robust empirical evidence of such links between bedrock-river geometry and hillslope mass wasting. We show that the volume mobilized by mass wasting depends more on local topographic relief and the sinuosity of bedrock rivers than their mean normalized channel steepness. We derive this counterintuitive observation from an unprecedented inventory of ~300,000 landslides covering the tectonically active Japanese archipelago with substantial differences in seismicity, lithology, vertical surface deformation, topography, and precipitation variability. Both total landslide number and volumes increase nonlinearly with mean local relief even in areas where the fraction of steepest channel segments attains a constant threshold well below the maximum topographic relief. Our data document for the first time that mass wasting increases systematically with preferential steepening of flatter channel segments. Yet concomitant changes in mean channel steepness are negligible such that it remains a largely insensitive predictor of landslide denudation. Further, minute increases in bedrock-river sinuosity lead to substantial reduction in landslide abundance and volumes. Our results underline that sinuosity (together with mean local relief) is a key morphometric variable for

  2. Volcanic activity before and after large tectonic earthquakes: Observations and statistical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Silke; Walter, Thomas R.

    2009-06-01

    The study of volcanic triggering and interaction with the tectonic surroundings has received special attention in recent years, using both direct field observations and historical descriptions of eruptions and earthquake activity. Repeated reports of clustered eruptions and earthquakes may imply that interaction is important in some subregions. However, the subregions likely to suffer such clusters have not been systematically identified, and the processes responsible for the observed interaction remain unclear. We first review previous works about the clustered occurrence of eruptions and earthquakes, and describe selected events. We further elaborate available databases and confirm a statistically significant relationship between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes on the global scale. Moreover, our study implies that closed volcanic systems in particular tend to be activated in association with a tectonic earthquake trigger. We then perform a statistical study at the subregional level, showing that certain subregions are especially predisposed to concurrent eruption-earthquake sequences, whereas such clustering is statistically less significant in other subregions. Based on this study, we argue that individual and selected observations may bias the perceptible weight of coupling. The activity at volcanoes located in the predisposed subregions (e.g., Japan, Indonesia, Melanesia), however, often unexpectedly changes in association with either an imminent or a past earthquake.

  3. Evaluation of the relative tectonic activity in the eastern Lake Van basin, East Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağlam Selçuk, Azad

    2016-10-01

    The eastern part of the Lake Van basin (Van region, Turkey) is controlled by reverse faults, such as the Gürpınar, Everek and Alaköy faults. These represent the major tectonic structures within the Van region and have caused many devastating earthquakes. Based on quantitative analyses, the Quaternary activity and topographic relief control of each of these faults was investigated. The Gürpınar, Everek and Alaköy faults are restricted to the southern slopes of the Güzelsu, Everek, and Karasu basins, respectively. Analyses of the mountain front sinuosity (Smf) and valley floor width-to-height ratio (Vf) suggest high activity along the Gürpınar fault, the Everek fault, and the western part of the Alaköy fault. Furthermore, based on the integration between Smf and Vf, the estimated uplift rates were observed to increase from north to south. The Gürpınar and Everek hanging-wall blocks are characterized by uplift rates of > 0.5 mm yr- 1, whereas the Alaköy fault exhibited a rate of 0.05 to 0.5 mm yr- 1. These faults produce knickpoints or knickzones, complex basin hypsometric curves, and high values of the stream length-gradient index. Based on these geomorphic analyses, it was established that the tectonic activity of both the Gürpınar and Everek faults is greater than that of the Alaköy fault.

  4. Serpentinite slices within a tectonic zone at the base of the Juvavic nappe system in the Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria): characterization and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Katharina; Schuster, Ralf; Wagreich, Michael; Koller, Friedrich; Wimmer-Frey, Ingeborg

    2014-05-01

    The investigated serpentinites are present in an ENE-WSW orientated tectonic zone at the base of Juvavic nappes (Northern Calcareous Alps), situated at the eastern margin of the Eastern Alps (Lower Austria). They form small tectonically squeezed slices, which are embedded in Permotriassic schists and Middle to Upper Triassic limestones. These serpentinites play an important, but not yet understood role in reconstructing Neotethys evolution, Alpine Orogeny and the correlation of Dinarides and Alps. The largest serpentinite body near to Unterhöflein is 400 to 100 meters in size and was investigated by mineralogical (XRD) and petrological/geochemical (XRF) methods. The primary mineral composition is olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + chrome spinel. Pseudomorphs of pyroxenes are visible macroscopically, but almost all primary minerals are replaced by serpentine minerals. Former olivine is converted to chrysotile minerals, which show typical reticulate textures, orthopyroxene turned into lizardite pseudomorphs and chrome spinel is almost completely altered to magnetite. Major contents of chrysotile-α, chrysotile-γ and lizardite and minor antigorite, as well as secondary minerals like talc, chlorite and hydrogrossular were identified with XRD. Results from whole rock geochemistry indicate harzburgitic precursor rocks for the serpentinites. According to the low antigorite content, the rocks have only a weak metamorphic imprint and therefore an obduction rather than a subduction history is likely. This leads to the assumption that these serpentinites possibly originate from the Neotethys and not from the Penninic oceanic realm. Further, the tectonic position of the serpentinite slices is in close vicinity to sediments of the Meliata unit which also occur between Juvavic and underlying Tirolic nappe system (Mandl & Ondrejickova, 1993). Additionally, remnants from ophiolite nappes are found reworked into the surrounding Upper Cretaceous Gosau Group. In the latter

  5. Structure, age, and tectonic setting of a multiply reactivated shear zone in the piedmont in Washington, D.C., and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, A.H.; Drake, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Rock Creek shear zone is the dominant tectonic feature in the Piedmont in Washington, D.C. and adjacent parts of Maryland, has an exposed length of 25 km, and a width of up to 3 km. The shear zone is characterized by a complicated composite fabric produced by the imposition of both ductile and brittle structures as well as the reactivation, transposition, and folding of older structures during subsequent antithetic displacement. At least five main types of structural elements are discernible and include: 1) relict, medium- to coarse-grained mylonitic foliation and related structures produced by sinistral shearing under at least middle amphibolite facies conditions; 2) a ductile fault zone having an apparent sinistral displacement of at least several km and an unknown, but possibly significant component of upward throw of the east wall; 3) pervasive, fine-grained ultramylonitic foliation associated with quartz ribbons and late oblique shear bands, generated by dextral shearing under thermal conditions that appear to have progressed from middle greenschist to sub-greenschist (semi-brittle); 4) a system of oblique-(west wall up) and dextralship faults localized chiefly within a tectonic me??lange at the junction of two major strands, and whose motion spanned the ductile-brittle transition; and 5) a system of post-Cretaceous thrust faults that cut Coastal Plain rocks as young as Quaternary as well as the previously deformed crystalline rocks. The first two sets of structures are of probable Ordovician age and are thus believed to coincide with the Taconic event, which produced regional middle to upper amphibolite facies metamorphism, widespread plutonism, and extensive southwest-vergent fold phases in this area. In contrast, the dextral shearing and faulting were generated during final thermal cooling and represent the latest Paleozoic penetrative deformation that affected this area. They are very likely Alleghanian because of their great similarity to other better

  6. Active tectonic influence on the evolution of drainage and landscape: Geomorphic signatures from frontal and hinterland areas along the Northwestern Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Javed N.; Mohanty, C.

    2007-03-01

    The Kangra Re-entrant in the NW Himalaya is one of the most seismically active regions, falling into Seismic Zone V along the Himalaya. In 1905 the area experienced one of the great Himalayan earthquakes with magnitude 7.8. The frontal fault system - the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) associated with the foreland fold - Janauri Anticline, along with other major as well as secondary hinterland thrust faults, provides an ideal site to study the ongoing tectonic activity which has influenced the evolution of drainage and landscape in the region. The present study suggests that the flat-uplifted surface in the central portion of the Janauri Anticline represents the paleo-exit of the Sutlej River. It is suggested that initially when the tectonic activity propagated southward along the HFT the Janauri Anticline grew along two separate fault segments (north and south faults), the gap between these two fault and the related folds allowed the Sutlej River to flow across this area. Later, the radial propagation of the faults towards each other resulted in an interaction of the fault tips, which caused the rapid uplift of the area. Rapid uplift resulted in the disruption and longitudinal deflection of the Sutlej river channel. Fluvial deposits on the flat surface suggest that an earlier fluvial system flowed across this area in the recent past. Geomorphic signatures, like the sharp mountain fronts along the HFT in some places, as well as along various hinterland subordinate faults like the Nalagarh Thrust (NaT), the Barsar Thrust (BaT) and the Jawalamukhi Thrust (JMT); the change in the channel pattern, marked by a tight incised meander of the Beas channel upstream of the JMT indicate active tectonic movements in the area. The prominent V-shaped valleys of the Beas and Sutlej rivers, flowing across the thrust fronts, with Vf values ranging from <1.0-1.5 are also suggestive of ongoing tectonic activity along major and hinterland faults. This suggests that not only is the HFT

  7. Coseismic landslides reveal near-surface rock strength in a high-relief tectonically active setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallen, Sean F; Clark, Marin K; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We present quantitative estimates of near-surface rock strength relevant to landscape evolution and landslide hazard assessment for 15 geologic map units of the Longmen Shan, China. Strength estimates are derived from a novel method that inverts earthquake peak ground acceleration models and coseismic landslide inventories to obtain material proper- ties and landslide thickness. Aggregate rock strength is determined by prescribing a friction angle of 30° and solving for effective cohesion. Effective cohesion ranges are from 70 kPa to 107 kPa for 15 geologic map units, and are approximately an order of magnitude less than typical laboratory measurements, probably because laboratory tests on hand-sized specimens do not incorporate the effects of heterogeneity and fracturing that likely control near-surface strength at the hillslope scale. We find that strength among the geologic map units studied varies by less than a factor of two. However, increased weakening of units with proximity to the range front, where precipitation and active fault density are the greatest, suggests that cli- matic and tectonic factors overwhelm lithologic differences in rock strength in this high-relief tectonically active setting.

  8. Sediment yield from the tectonically active semiarid Western Transverse Ranges of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment yields from the world's rivers are generally highest from steep drainage basins with weak lithology, active tectonics, or severe land-use impacts. Here, we evaluate sediment yields from the Western Transverse Ranges of California in an attempt to explain why they are two- to tenfold greater than the surrounding areas of California. We found that suspended-sediment yields across the gauged basins of the Western Transverse Range during 1969-1999 varied by approximately an order of magnitude (740-5300 t/km2/yr). Similarly, fine-sediment concentrations for normalized discharge rates varied by almost two orders of magnitude (e.g., 1.3-110 g/L for the mean annual flood) for 11 previously unmonitored drainages of the Santa Ynez Mountains. Areas with high sediment yields consistently have weakly consolidated bedrock (Quaternary-Pliocene marine formations) and are associated with the highest rates of tectonic uplift of the region (>5 mm/yr). These regions are important to the sediment discharge budgets, because ???50% of the total suspended-sediment discharge from the Western Transverse Range is estimated to be generated within these regions, even though they represent only ???10% of the total watershed area. Previous estimates of suspended-sediment discharge from the Ventura River have likely been underestimated by ???50% because the gauging station is located immediately upstream of a high sediment yield region. We also found a significant and positive correlation between sediment yield and the percentage of a watershed with grassland and agricultural land use. These results suggest that there is adequate variation within the lithology, tectonics, and land use of the broader Western Transverse Range geologic province to induce large variations in sediment yield at the local scale. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  9. Tectonic and Hydrological Activities on Xanadu, Hotei and Tui Regions on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Di Marco, C.; Di Achille, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Flamini, E.; Meriggiola, R.; Poggiali, V.

    2012-12-01

    Xanadu (~10°S, 120°W), Tui (~24°S, 125°W) and Hotei (~26°S, 78°W) regions are three adjacent geomorphic provinces located on Titan's leading hemisphere. The interpretation of the geological activities of these regions is not unique. Radebaugh et al. (2010) proposed that complex geological activity occurred to form the highlands regions of Xanadu where first compression occurred, and subsequently extensional tectonism and erosion by methane precipitation. However, Brown et al. (2011) proposed that Xanadu is a wide and ancient impact crater basin. Nelson et al. (2009) observed surface reflectance variability at the Hotei region suggesting that such surface variability might be due to surface activity potentially related to cryovolcanic activity. Wide lobate features in the Tui and Hotei regions were identified using Cassini VIMS (Barnes et al. 2009) and RADAR observations (Walls et al. 2009) and were interpreted as cryovolcanic flows. However, Moore and Howard (2010) suggested that the observed lobate features in both regions might be paleolakes. We produced a geomorphological map encompassing the Xanadu, Tui and Hotei regions. Our geomorphological analysis is based on the Synthetic Aperture Radar images from the Cassini RADAR. We also used topographic data from radar altimeter and SAR-Topography technique datasets. We show that Xanadu is a dissected plateau whose formation most likely involved crustal uplift produced by compressional tectonic activity. We also show that both the Tui and Hotei regions present characteristics of closed drainage basins with an inflow of liquids from the highlands of Xanadu and a lack of outflow, suggesting that Hotei and Tui are endorheic basins that might contain ephemeral lakes currently appearing as dry lakebeds. Such lakebeds are likely filled with liquid hydrocarbons only during rare periods of significant rainfall and dry out due to evaporation.

  10. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase 2): Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.; Bandy, B.; Altis, S.; Lee, M.C.; Dwan, S.F.; Ku, K.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this study represent a continuation and refinement of the objectives addressed in Phase 1. This study focuses on trying to define the tectonics of sediment subduction at the trench axis through the use of accepted plate tectonic principles and the application of new subduction theory. The fundamental methods include: (1) compilation of all available bathymetric data from our Global Marine Geophysical Data Collection for all major ocean trenches, (2) generation of stacked bathymetric profiles and corresponding navigational maps, and structural maps, (3) selection and analysis of appropriate seismic reflection and refraction profiles and additional supporting data such as side-scan sonar, SEABEAM, magnetic, gravity and drilling data, and (4) detailed study of selected trench regions in which data quality and/or quantity is exceptional. Phase 2 of this project represents a unique compilation and synthesis of existing data for the world's deep ocean trenches. The analysis of data and discussion of results in the context of current literature aids our understanding of the sediment distribution and nature of sediment deformation through various stages of plate convergence, the determination of whether sediments are subducted or accreted, and the evaluation of the controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion. A major emphasis in our analysis of the data was to try and map the seaward-of-the-trench distribution of faults and associated surface roughness. Illustrations and an extensive bibliography are included in the report.

  11. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase 2): Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.; Bandy, B.; Altis, S.; Lee, M.C.; Dwan, S.F.; Ku, K.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this study represent a continuation and refinement of the objectives addressed in Phase 1. This study focuses on trying to define the tectonics of sediment subduction at the trench axis through the use of accepted plate tectonic principles and the application of new subduction theory. The fundamental methods include: (1) compilation of all available bathymetric data from our Global Marine Geophysical Data Collection for all major ocean trenches, (2) generation of stacked bathymetric profiles and corresponding navigational maps, and structural maps, (3) selection and analysis of appropriate seismic reflection and refraction profiles and additional supporting data such as side-scan sonar, SEABEAM, magnetic, gravity and drilling data, and (4) detailed study study of selected trench regions in which data quality and/or quantity is exceptional. Phase 2 of this project represents a unique compilation and synthesis of existing data for the world's deep ocean trenches. The analysis of data and discussion of results in the context of current literature aids our understanding of the sediment distribution and nature of sediment deformation through various stages of plate convergence, the determination of whether sediments are subducted or accreted, and the evaluation of the controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion. A discussion on petroleum and natural gas hydrate resource potential is included.

  12. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase 2): Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.; Bandy, B.; Altis, S.; Lee, M.C.; Dwan, S.F.; Ku, K.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1989-02-01

    This is volume one of three volumes. The objectives of this study represent a continuation and refinement of the objectives addressed in Phase I. This study focuses on trying to define the tectonics of sediment subduction at the trench axis through the use of accepted plate tectonic principles and the application of new subduction theory. The fundamental methods include: (1) compilation of all available bathymetric data from our Global Marine Geophysical Data Collection for all major ocean trenches, (2) generation of stacked bathymetric profiles and corresponding navigational maps, and structural maps, (3) selection and analysis of appropriate seismic reflection and refraction profiles and additional supporting data such as side-scan sonar, SEABEAM, magnetic, gravity and drilling data, and (4) detailed study of selected trench regions in which data quality and/or quantity is exceptional. Phase II of this project represents a unique compilation and synthesis of existing data for the world's deep ocean trenches. The analysis of data and discussion of results in the context of current literature aids our understanding of the sediment distribution and nature of sediment deformation through various stages of plate convergence, the determination of whether sediments are subducted or accreted, and the evaluation of the controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion. A discussion is included on forearc petroleum and natural gas hydrate resource potential. 128 figs.

  13. Tectonic history and thrust-fold deformation style of seismically active structures near Coalinga

    SciTech Connect

    Namson, J.S. ); Davis, T.L.; Lagoe, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Coalinga region can be divided into tectostratigraphic facies whose boundaries delineate two major tectonic events - one in the mid-Cenozoic (38-17 Ma) and one in the late Cenozoic (less than 3 Ma). The succession of these tectostratigraphic facies, and an integration of geology, subsurface well data, a seismic-reflection profile, and earthquake seismicity on a retrodeformable cross section, yield a model for the tectonic evolution of the Coalinga region. This model suggests that the structural style of both deformational events is characteristic of fold and thrust belts. The model also indicates that the causative fault of the May 2 earthquake is a ramped thrust. The results of this study, in combination with regional geologic relations, suggest that the Coalinga region is part of an active fold and thrust belt which borders the west and south sides of the San Joaquin Valley. The potential for future earthquakes due to movement of other blind thrust faults within this belt should be evaluated.

  14. Sea Level Changes and Active Tectonics of the Guerrero Coast, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M.; Cundy, A. B.; Sedor, M.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the interaction between sea-level changes and tectonic activity during the Holocene is essential in determining long-term tectonic deformation rates and in identifying prehistorical earthquake events along active margins. The Guerrero coast extends along the active Pacific margin of southwest Mexico and parallels the trench where the Cocos Plate subducts beneath the North American Plate. The last major earthquakes occurred in Guerrero in 1899, 1907, 1909, 1911, and 1957, but none have occurred since the major 1911 (Ms=7.6) earthquake in the northwest segment of the Guerrero seismic gap. The Guerrero gap is currently considered to be matured for a severe earthquake of estimated Mw= 8.1 to 8.4. We present preliminary results of geomorphic field surveying, sediment coring, and geochemical and microfaunal analyses of cored sediments on the Guerrero coast. The Coyuca lagoon strip of the Guerrero coast consists of long barrier beaches, behind which extends a lagoon, beach ridges, extensive swamps, mangrove swamps, salt pans, floodplains, alluvial plains, fluvial terraces, and abandoned meanders. Abandoned meanders and fluvial terraces indicate that the Coyuca River has migrated to the southeast. This migration, and changes in hill elevations near the coast, suggest a southeast tilting of this coastal segment. The morphology of the Guerrero coast has no evidence of long-term coastal uplift. This is consistent with short- term tide gauge measurements (1953-1999) and GPS data (1992-2000) indicative of subsidence rates of ~3 mm/yr (Kostoglodov et al., 2001) in this area. Five cores up to 5.5 m depth were taken nearby the Mitla, Coyuca, Tres Palos and Tecomate lagoons. Core stratigraphies show clear sequences of interbedded peats and clays, interspersed with sand units. The peat-clay sequences are similar to those observed along active margins elsewhere, and indicate fluctuations between marine and brackish/freshwater conditions. Two cores included sediments

  15. Using Digital Topography to Differentiate Erosionally Exhumed and Tectonically Active Mountains Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, K. L.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    Mountain ranges in the southern Rocky Mountains have departed on unique landscape evolutionary pathways in the late Cenozoic that are directly dependent upon the degree of post-orogenic tectonic activity they have experienced. The topography of Sierra Nacimiento, a Laramide uplift in west-central New Mexico lacking an active range-front fault, is shaped primarily by erosional exhumation that is continuous, but not steady, being driven by distal base level fall from Rio Grande incision and resultant south to north knickpoint migration. In contrast, the topography of the Taos Range, a rift flank uplift in north-central New Mexico is shaped by contrasting active stream incision and aggradation astride an active range front normal fault. The distinction between exhumation-dominated and tectonically-dominated mountain fronts is best quantified by analyses of a new metric we call the drainage basin volume to drainage basin area ratio (V-A ratio) as well as the gradients of first-order streams. Drainage basin volume and area are calculated by constructing topographic envelope maps from 10 m resolution digital elevation models (DEM). The envelope maps are pinned by the watershed divide and cover the maximum elevations in each drainage basin. Subtracting the original DEM from the maximum elevation envelope map produces a topographic residual map from which area and volume data can be obtained. The erosionally exhumed Sierra Nacimiento has a mean V-A ratio of 88 m while the tectonically active Taos Range has a mean V-A ratio of 140 m. Similarly, there are systematic differences in the gradients of first order streams measured both in the range block and approximately 5 km of adjacent piedmont. Streams were defined and subsequently Strahler ordered by a flow accumulation threshold of 250 water-equivalent grid cell units. First order stream channel long profiles were extracted from the DEM at 30 meter increments and gradients were calculated by a FORTRAN program. Gradients of

  16. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  17. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  18. Fault displacement rates and recent activity on the Ierapetra Fault Zone, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veliz, V.

    2015-12-01

    Crete is an eastern Mediterranean island that includes the highest forearc topography of the Hellenic subduction margin, along which the African and Eurasian plates converge at rates of ~40 mm/yr. The island is currently experiencing regional uplift and is broken up by numerous active normal faults that contribute to the shaping of its topography. The largest of these onshore tectonic features is, the Ierapetra Fault Zone (IFZ), a normal fault that traverses the entire width of eastern Crete (>20 km) with a NNE strike and west diping. Here we use geomorphologic, structural and kinematic indicators to discuss fault segmentation along the IFZ and to provide quantitative constraints on the late Quaternary (~16.5 and 33 kyr) displacement rate on the fault, including evidence of Holocene earthquake activity on its central segment.

  19. Geodetic component of the monitoring of tectonic and hydrogeological activities in Kopacki Rit Nature Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapo, Almin; Pribicevic, Bosko

    2013-04-01

    Based on the European and global experience, the amplitude change in the structural arrangement caused by recent tectonic movements, can be most accurately determined by repeated precise GPS measurements on specially stabilized geodetic and geodynamic points. Because of these reasons, the GPS method to determine the movements on specially stabilized points in the Nature park Kopacki rit is also applied in this project. Kopacki rit Nature Park is the biggest preserved natural flooded area on the Danube. It is spread over 23 000 hectares between the rivers Danube and Drava and is one of the biggest fluvial wetland valleys in Europe. In 1993 it was listed as one of internationally valuable wetlands according to the Ramsar Convention. By now in Kopacki rit there have been sights of about 295 bird species, more than 400 species of invertebrates and 44 types of fish. Many of them are globally endangered species like, white tailed eagle, black stork and prairie hawk. It's not rare to come across some deer herds, wild boars or others. Today's geological and geomorphological relations in the Nature park Kopacki rit are largely the result of climate, sedimentary, tectonic and anthropogenic activity in the last 10,000 years. Unfortunately the phenomenon of the Kopacki rit Nature park is in danger to be over in the near future due to those and of course man made activities on the Danube river. It is trough scientific investigations of tectonic and hydrogeological activities that scientist from University of Zagreb are trying to contribute to wider knowledge and possible solutions to this problem. In the year 2009 the first GPS campaign was conducted, and the first set of coordinates of stabilized points was determined which can be considered zero-series measurements. In 2010 a second GPS campaign was conducted and the first set of movements on the Geodynamic Network of Kopacki Rit Nature Park was determined. Processing GPS measurements from 2009 and 2010 was carried out in a

  20. The Geomorphological Evolution of a Landscape in a Tectonically Active Region: the Sennwald Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksay, Selçuk; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Hippe, Kristina; Graemiger, Lorenz; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-04-01

    earthquake activity shows that this region is tectonically still active (Mosar, 1999) with numerous earthquakes. The exposure ages imply that the rock failure occurred during the middle Holocene, a period of increased neotectonic activity in Eastern Alps suggested by Prager et al. (2007). This time period also coincides with notably wet climate, which has been suggested as an important trigger for landslides around this age across the Alps (Zerathe et al., 2014).

  1. Tectonic activity revealed by morphostructural analysis: Development of the Sierra de la Candelaria range, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelona, H.; Peri, G.; Tobal, J.; Sagripanti, L.; Favetto, A.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonically active broken foreland of NW Argentina is a recent analog of the eastern margin of the Puna plateau during Mio-Pliocene times and likely of other broken forelands worldwide. In order to evaluate active tectonism in the broken foreland of the NW Argentine Andes, we examined the complex geomorphology in the vicinity of the basement-cored Sierra de la Candelaria range at ˜26°S and deciphered multiple episodes of crustal deformation spanning the Pliocene to the Quaternary. Digital elevation models, satellite images and geological data within a GIS environment allowed us to analyze the terrain, drainage networks, river dynamics and structure, as well as to obtain detailed geomorphological mapping, active tectonic indices, longitudinal river profiles and structural sections. Three morphostructural segments were defined based on the structural features, the differential vertical dissection pattern over the basement, the faulted Pliocene to recent deposits, the stepwise propagation of anticlines and the distortion over the fluvial system. By combining the several lines of evidence, we concluded that the Sierra de la Candelaria range was subjected to a multi-stage development. The first stage uplifted the central segment concomitant with the formation of the surrounding ranges and with the main partition phase of the foreland. After a significant time lapse, the mountain range was subjected to southward thick-skinned growth and northward growth via stepwise thin-skinned deformation and exerted control over the dynamics of the Río Rosario. Taking into account the surrounding basins and ranges of the Sierra de la Candelaria, the southern Santa Bárbara System is characterized by partially isolated intramontane basins (Choromoro and Rosario) limited by shielded ranges that caused moisture block and shows continuous deformation. These features were related to early stages of a broken foreland evolution model and modern analogs were found at the northern

  2. Structural evolution of the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone, Uruguay: kinematics, deformation conditions and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriolo, S.; Oyhantçabal, P.; Heidelbach, F.; Wemmer, K.; Siegesmund, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone is a crustal-scale shear zone that separates the Piedra Alta Terrane from the Nico Pérez Terrane and the Dom Feliciano Belt in southern Uruguay. It represents the eastern margin of the Río de la Plata Craton and, consequently, one of the main structural features of the Precambrian basement of Western Gondwana. This shear zone first underwent dextral shearing under upper to middle amphibolite facies conditions, giving rise to the reactivation of pre-existing crustal fabrics in the easternmost Piedra Alta Terrane. Afterwards, pure-shear-dominated sinistral shearing with contemporaneous magmatism took place under lower amphibolite to upper greenschist facies conditions. The mylonites resulting from this event were then locally reactivated by a cataclastic deformation. This evolution points to strain localization under progressively retrograde conditions with time, indicating that the Sarandí del Yí Shear Zone represents an example of a thinning shear zone related to the collisional to post-collisional evolution of the Dom Feliciano Belt that occurred between the Meso- to Neoproterozoic (>600 Ma) and late Ediacaran-lower Cambrian times.

  3. Seismicity and active tectonics in the Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean: Constraints from an offshore-onshore seismological network and swath bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Villaseñor, Antonio; Leuchters, Wiebke; Watts, Anthony B.

    2015-12-01

    Seismicity and tectonic structure of the Alboran Sea were derived from a large amphibious seismological network deployed in the offshore basins and onshore in Spain and Morocco, an area where the convergence between the African and Eurasian plates causes distributed deformation. Crustal structure derived from local earthquake data suggests that the Alboran Sea is underlain by thinned continental crust with a mean thickness of about 20 km. During the 5 months of offshore network operation, a total of 229 local earthquakes were located within the Alboran Sea and neighboring areas. Earthquakes were generally crustal events, and in the offshore domain, most of them occurred at crustal levels of 2 to 15 km depth. Earthquakes in the Alboran Sea are poorly related to large-scale tectonic features and form a 20 to 40 km wide NNE-SSW trending belt of seismicity between Adra (Spain) and Al Hoceima (Morocco), supporting the case for a major left-lateral shear zone across the Alboran Sea. Such a shear zone is in accord with high-resolution bathymetric data and seismic reflection imaging, indicating a number of small active fault zones, some of which offset the seafloor, rather than supporting a well-defined discrete plate boundary fault. Moreover, a number of large faults known to be active as evidenced from bathymetry, seismic reflection, and paleoseismic data such as the Yusuf and Carboneras faults were seismically inactive. Earthquakes below the Western Alboran Basin occurred at 70 to 110 km depth and hence reflected intermediate depth seismicity related to subducted lithosphere.

  4. Primary centers and secondary concentrations of tectonic activity through time in the western hemisphere of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.C.; Dohm, J.M.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Franklin, B.J.; Tanaka, K.L.; Lias, J.; Peer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Five main stages of radial and concentric structures formed around Tharsis from the Noachian through the Amazonian as determined by geologic mapping of 24,452 structures within the stratigraphic framework of Mars and by testing their radial and concentric orientations. Tectonic activity peaked in the Noachian (stage 1) around the largest center, Claritas, an elongate center extending more than 20?? in latitude and defined by about half of the total grabens which are concentrated in the Syria Planum, Thaumasia, and Tempe Terra regions. During the Late Noachian and Early Hesperian (stage 2), extensional structures formed along the length of present-day Valles Marineris and in Thaumasia (with a secondary concentration near Warrego Vallis) radial to a region just to the south of the central margin of Valles Marineris. Early Hesperian (stage 3) radial grabens in Pavonis, Syria, Ulysses, and Tempe Terra and somewhat concentric wrinkle ridges in Lunae and Solis Plana and in Thaumasia, Sirenum, Memnonia, and Amazonis are centered northwest of Syria with secondary centers at Thaumasia, Tempe Terra, Ulysses Fossae, and western Valles Marineris. Late Hesperian/Early Amazonian (stage 4) structures around Alba Patera, the northeast trending alignment of Tharsis Montes, and Olympus Mons appears centered on Alba Patera. Stage 5 structures (Middle-Late Amazonian) represent the last pulse of Tharsis-related activity and are found around the large shield volcanoes and are centered near Pavonis Mons. Tectonic activity around Tharsis began in the Noachian and generally decreased through geologic time to the Amazonian. Statistically significant radial distributions of structures formed during each stage, centered at different locations within the higher elevations of Tharsis. Secondary centers of radial structures during many of the stages appear related to previously identified local magmatic centers that formed at different times and locations throughout Tharsis. Copyright 2001 by

  5. Tomographic Imaging of a New Seismic Zone in Northern Taiwan: Implications for Crustal Magnetism and Tectonic Inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Win-Bin; Chang, Gen-Sin; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2016-04-01

    To the west of 121°E, we found that the northern South China Sea magnetic anomaly in central Taiwan is coincident with high seismic velocity zone derived from a joint analysis of gravity anomaly and seismic travel time data. To the east of 121°E, we found a new seismic zone which remains enigmatic because of its apparent relationship with both the emplacement of high magnetic anomaly and termination of Okinawa Trough. In order to understand the new seismic zone and breakup of the high magnetic anomaly, a joint analysis of gravity anomaly and seismic travel time data have been used to construct three-dimensional velocity structure for the study area. Earthquake data were collected by the Central Weather Bureau Seismological Network from 2000 to 2012. A modified velocity model obtained by previously local earthquake tomography, was used to construct an initial three-dimensional gravity model, using a linear velocity-density relationship. To derive a crustal velocity-density model that accounts for both types of observations, this study performed a sequential inversion of traveltime and gravity data. The main features of our three-dimensional velocity model are: (1) an uplifted zone with velocity greater than 6.5 km/s is observed in the lower crust, (2) the width and the shape of the uplifted zone is found strongly correlated with the high magnetic belt, (3) the trend of the high-velocity zone turns from NE to N in central Taiwan, where the feature of high magnetic was truncated. This study suggested that integration of seismic data with new perspectives on crustal magnetism will provide a better understanding of terrane accretion, rifting processes, and passive margin formation in the Taiwan region.

  6. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  7. The QuakeSim Project: Numerical Simulations for Active Tectonic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Lyzenga, Greg; Granat, Robert; Fox, Geoffrey; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; McLeod, Dennis; Grant, Lisa; Tullis, Terry

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop a solid earth science framework for understanding and studying of active tectonic and earthquake processes, this task develops simulation and analysis tools to study the physics of earthquakes using state-of-the art modeling, data manipulation, and pattern recognition technologies. We develop clearly defined accessible data formats and code protocols as inputs to the simulations. these are adapted to high-performance computers because the solid earth system is extremely complex and nonlinear resulting in computationally intensive problems with millions of unknowns. With these tools it will be possible to construct the more complex models and simulations necessary to develop hazard assessment systems critical for reducing future losses from major earthquakes.

  8. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  9. Frictional properties of saponite-rich gouge from a serpentinite-bearing fault zone along the Gokasho-Arashima Tectonic Line, central Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sone, Hiroki; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Moore, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    We studied a serpentinite-bearing fault zone in Gokasho-Arashima Tectonic Line, Mie Prefecture, central Japan, characterizing its internal structures, mineral assemblage, permeability, and frictional properties. The fault core situated between the serpentinite breccia and the adjacent sedimentary rocks is characterized by a zone locally altered to saponite. The clayey gouge layer separates fault rocks of serpentinite origin containing talc and tremolite from fault rocks of sedimentary origin containing chlorite but no quartz. The minerals that formed within the fault are the products of metasomatic reaction between the serpentinite and the siliceous rocks. Permeability measurements show that serpentinite breccia and fault gouge have permeability of 10−14–10−17 m2 and 10−15–10−18 m2, respectively, at 5–120 MPa confining pressure. Frictional coefficient of the saponite-rich clayey fault gouge ranged between 0.20 and 0.35 under room-dry condition, but was reduced to 0.06–0.12 when saturated with water. The velocity dependence of friction was strongly positive, mostly ranging between 0.005 and 0.006 in terms of a–b values. The governing friction law is not constrained yet, but we find that the saponite-rich gouge possesses an evolutional behavior in the opposite direction to that suggested by the rate and state friction law, in addition to its direct velocity dependence.

  10. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.

  11. Late Proterozoic evolution of the northern part of the Hamisana zone, northeast Sudan - Constraints on Pan-African accretionary tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes deformation fabrics developed in the northern part of the Hamisana zone in northeast Sudan. New structural data are presented which establish a structural chronology that characterizes distinct events of accretion, folding, and thrust faulting and reactivation of accretion-related faults. The structural data point to an intraplate compressional origin for the Hamisana zone. A review of available isotopic age data is carried out, and it is concluded that Pan-African accretionary processes may have been analogous to Phanerozoic ophiolite and island arc accretion in the western North American Cordillera, where penetrative deformation occurred in response to periodic intraplate shortening events, rather than an ultimate collision of unrelated crustal fragments.

  12. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase I). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilde, T.W.C.

    1984-08-01

    The objective was to determine the fate of sediments at convergent lithospheric plate boundaries. The study focuses on the structures of the Circum-Pacific trenches and shallow portions of the associated subduction zones. Sediment distribution and the nature of sediment deformation was defined through the various stages of plate convergence to determine if the sediments are subducted or accreted. The controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion were determined. 50 figs. (ACR)

  13. Groundwater study using drill holes in the Abukuma granitic province, NE Japan: chemical and isotopic features in the fracture zone around the geological tectonic line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H. A.; Tsukamoto, H.; Kazahaya, K.; Takahashi, M.; Morikawa, N.; Yasuhara, M.; Inamura, A.; Handa, H.; Nakamura, T.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical and isotopic features of groundwater in a granitic province are considered to be controlled by water origin, water-rock reaction and/or fracture connection in rocks. Under the depth of a weathering layer, groundwater is existed only in cracks of granite, and its chemical nature or origin has been poorly understood because of difficulties on collection of water samples preserving its natural conditions. On the other hand, a geological tectonic line in a granitic province might provide an influence to groundwater as a path for ascending deep fluid. We conducted a study for chemical processes of groundwater in cracks with investigation of an influence of tectonic line by drilling three bore holes at two sites in a same rock body; Miharu site is located ca. 1.2km west from the Morioka-Shirakawa tectonic line, and Shirasawa site is ca. 5km west. In situ sampling of waters in cracks of granite are done with the single and double packer methods. The drill holes were made 305m and 135m at the Miharu site and 230m at the Shirasawa site. Using these bole holes, groundwater features in the fracture zone around the geological tectonic line can be compared with those outside it. Chemical type of groundwater has a variety with depth; the shallower groundwater is categorized as Ca-HCO3- type with slight NO3 contamination whereas deeper groundwater has Na-HCO3- type. Stable isotope composition of water showed that all the sample water is meteoric origin. Those have significantly low values (ca. 10‰ of δD lower than shallow groundwater) obviously indicating that the groundwater does not originate from the present meteoric water. Groundwater with low δD and δ18O values is likely recharged in an ice age consistent with the 14C date showing the age of carbon ranging from 10000 to 15000 yrBP. The vertical trends of chemical and isotopic components are similar between the two holes at the Miharu site, but different between the two sites, Miharu and Shirasawa. The

  14. Compression-extension transition of continental crust in a subduction zone: A parametric numerical modeling study with implications on Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Cathaysia Block.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xuran; Chan, Lung Sang; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The Cathaysia Block is located in southeastern part of South China, which situates in the west Pacific subduction zone. It is thought to have undergone a compression-extension transition of the continental crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic during the subduction of Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia-Pacific Plate, resulting in extensive magmatism, extensional basins and reactivation of fault systems. Although some mechanisms such as the trench roll-back have been generally proposed for the compression-extension transition, the timing and progress of the transition under a convergence setting remain ambiguous due to lack of suitable geological records and overprinting by later tectonic events. In this study, a numerical thermo-dynamical program was employed to evaluate how variable slab angles, thermal gradients of the lithospheres and convergence velocities would give rise to the change of crustal stress in a convergent subduction zone. Model results show that higher slab dip angle, lower convergence velocity and higher lithospheric thermal gradient facilitate the subduction process. The modeling results reveal the continental crust stress is dominated by horizontal compression during the early stage of the subduction, which could revert to a horizontal extension in the back-arc region, combing with the roll-back of the subducting slab and development of mantle upwelling. The parameters facilitating the subduction process also favor the compression-extension transition in the upper plate of the subduction zone. Such results corroborate the geology of the Cathaysia Block: the initiation of the extensional regime in the Cathaysia Block occurring was probably triggered by roll-back of the slowly subducting slab.

  15. Nature of the contact zone between the North Cascades crystalline core and the Methow Sequence In the Ross Lake Area, Washington: Implications for Cordilleran tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriens, Bryan; Wernicke, Brian

    1990-10-01

    Previous analyses of the accretionary history of NW Washington-SW British Columbia have suggested the possibility of large-scale, dextral-slip faulting events to explain the present day regional outcrop pattern. The contact zone between the crystalline Skagit Complex and the volcano-sedimentary Methow sequence has been considered to be a major fault, named the Ross Lake fault by Misch (1966), and has been considered to be a possible large-scale strike-slip fault by later workers. Detailed mapping of this contact zone in the Ross Lake area shows that the brittle faults and mylonites thought by Misch to express dextral shearing along the contact are not continuous, throughgoing structures, and that the contact between Skagit orthogneisses and Methow sequence strata is primarily intrusive. Furthermore, the mylonites show both left- and right-lateral shear. The Skagit-Methow contact is therefore not a major terrane boundary but rather a tectonized intrusive contact that has not accommodated significant motion between the two regions. Based on these observations and regional synthesis of timing relations, deformation in the contact zone is interpreted to express regional ENE-WSW shortening, not major dextral slip, in the early Tertiary. Since no terrane-bounding fault exists, the Cretaceous-Tertiary history of the Ross Lake area can be interpreted as follows: (1) Jurassic(?)-Early Cretaceous forearc/rift basin sedimentation (deposition of the lower Methow sequence); (2) 110-95 Ma, imbrication of the lower Methow sequence and its basement of oceanic crustal rocks by east-vergent thrusting, with concomitant development of a west-derived foredeep in the upper Methow sequence; (3) 95-85 Ma, arc magmatism, with genesis of the Skagit migmatite from Methow and older basement protoliths; and (4) Paleocene-Early Eocene folding, faulting, uplift, and exposure of a relatively intact 25+ km crustal section, termed the Skagit-Methow crustal section by Kriens and Wernicke (1987).

  16. Compression-extension transition of continental crust in a subduction zone: A parametric numerical modeling study with implications on Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Cathaysia Block

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lung Sang; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The Cathaysia Block is located in southeastern part of South China, which situates in the west Pacific subduction zone. It is thought to have undergone a compression-extension transition of the continental crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic during the subduction of Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia-Pacific Plate, resulting in extensive magmatism, extensional basins and reactivation of fault systems. Although some mechanisms such as the trench roll-back have been generally proposed for the compression-extension transition, the timing and progress of the transition under a convergence setting remain ambiguous due to lack of suitable geological records and overprinting by later tectonic events. In this study, a numerical thermo-dynamical program was employed to evaluate how variable slab angles, thermal gradients of the lithospheres and convergence velocities would give rise to the change of crustal stress in a convergent subduction zone. Model results show that higher slab dip angle, lower convergence velocity and higher lithospheric thermal gradient facilitate the subduction process. The modeling results reveal the continental crust stress is dominated by horizontal compression during the early stage of the subduction, which could revert to a horizontal extension in the back-arc region, combing with the roll-back of the subducting slab and development of mantle upwelling. The parameters facilitating the subduction process also favor the compression-extension transition in the upper plate of the subduction zone. Such results corroborate the geology of the Cathaysia Block: the initiation of the extensional regime in the Cathaysia Block occurring was probably triggered by roll-back of the slowly subducting slab. PMID:28182640

  17. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  18. Geochemical evidence for the Paleoproterozoic arc - Back arc basin association and its importance in understanding the evolution of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, H.; Mondal, M. E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is considered to be one sector in a series of Paleoproterozoic orogens that stitched together the supercontinent Columbia. The Paleoproterozoic Mahakoshal belt forms the foundation of the CITZ. Metabasalts and metaclastic rocks of the Mahakoshal belt have been studied for major elements and trace elements, including the rare earth elements (REE). Metabasalts of the lower Saleemanabad Formation are grouped into two types. However, both types of metabasalt depict a back arc basalt character by showing enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs like K, Rb, Cs and Ba) and light rare earth elements (LREEs) but show depletions in high field strength elements (HFSEs like Nb, Ta, Y, and Ti) and HREE (heavy rare earth elements) in comparison to the N-MORB. This is further supported by some key elemental ratios like Ba/Nb, Nb/Ta, La/Nb, Eu/Eu*, Nb/Nb*, and REE patterns. The geochemistry of the metaclastic rocks of the lower Saleemanabad, middle Parsoi, and upper Dudhmaniya Formations of the Mahakoshal belt show an arc signature rather than the cratonic signature in the Bundlekhand TTG and N-MORB normalised diagrams. The arc signature (calc-alkaline series) of metaclastic rocks is further supported by various tectonic discrimination diagrams. The overall study indicates that the Mahakoshal belt was formed as a back arc rift basin very close to continental arcs on the hinterland of the Bundelkhand craton at the initial stage of subduction as a result of trench rollback followed by thermal relaxation and basin inversion. The sediment supply started from the continental arcs lying south of the Mahakoshal basin. Furthermore, the present study strengthens the mechanism of subduction-related outgrowth of Columbia along its continental margins and implies that the CITZ is a major Precambrian crustal boundary that began as a Mahakoshal back arc rift by northward subduction.

  19. Present-day submarine hydrothermal activity in the Taupo-Rotorua Zone (Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, A.B.; Egorov, Yu.O.; Fazlullin, S.M.; Gavrilenko, G.M.; Shul`kin, V.I.; Chertkova, L.V.

    1994-09-01

    We made detailed descriptions of the structure and material composition of sedimentary and water columns in the vicinity of active submarine hydrothermal activity in the southern part of the Bay of Plenty (North Island, New Zealand). Geophysical methods revealed that the hydrothermal system is confined to a tectonically distinct zone with a sedimentary cover characterized by complex structure. Chemical and mineralogical investigations confirmed that the activity of underwater vents exerts no substantial regional influence on the composition and features of ore mineralization in these formations. It is shown that essentially hydrothermal formations distinguishable within areas of otherwise monotypic sediments directly coincide with zones of hydrothermal discharge in the ocean floor. The absence of pronounced hydrothermal anomalies, together with the presence of {open_quotes}tongues{close_quotes} of anomalous concentrations of water-soluble gases suggests that the discharges are primarily hydrothermal in character.

  20. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. John; Denny, F. Brett; Follmer, Leon R.; Masters, John M.

    1999-05-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  1. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  2. New constraints on the Pan-African tectonics and the role of the Mwembeshi Zone in Central Zambia: Deformation style and timing of two orthogonal shortening events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, Kalin; Lehmann, Jeremie; Saalmann, Kerstin; Milani, Lorenzo; Kinnaird, Judith; Charlesworth, Guy; Rankin, William; Frei, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    dextral strike-slip zones. East of the granite, D2 resulted in E-W trending open folds that refolded the D1 structures. This folding becomes more intense and the folds are tighter when approaching the MwZ to the south. Along the MwZ, the molasse rocks, deposited after D1 (post ~528 Ma, based on new detrital-zircon ages), recorded high-strain greenschist facies coaxial deformation and the formation of E-W trending isoclinal folds with a steep south-dipping axial planar cleavage. This study shows that the area north of the MwZ is characterised by two orthogonal contraction events. The newly described D1 event of E-W shortening in the Hook area cannot be correlated with any of the published Pan-African tectonic models for the Lufilian Arc and Zambezi Belt. The D2 event of N-S shortening affected the region in response to the final docking between the Lufilian Arc and the Zambezi Belt. The strongest effect of this event was observed along the MwZ, which, during this stage, was a zone of intense coaxial deformation.

  3. Seismogenic deformation field in the Mojave block and implications for tectonics of the eastern California shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Jeffrey R.; Twiss, Robert J.; Hauksson, Egill

    1996-04-01

    From the aftershocks of the 1992 Landers earthquake, we infer the orientation of the principal strain rate axes (d1 > d2 > d3; d1 lengthening), their relative magnitude, and the relative spin of fault blocks by using a micropolar continuum model to invert the seismic P and T axes. The seismogenic deformation is consistent with the geodetic measurements of the coseismic displacement and with the secular deformation of the central Mojave block. Regionally, the aftershock data define two major domains within the central Mojave block: (1) the western Mojave block, including the San Bernardino Mountains and the epicentral area of the Big Bear earthquake, which is characterized by E-W d1 (lengthening) and N-S d3 (shortening); and (2) the central Mojave block, including the Landers surface rupture zone, which is characterized by NW-SE d1 and NE-SW d3. Inversion for the principal strain axes of geodetically measured coseismic displacements across the Big Bear and Landers seismogenic zones gives results similar to the aftershock inversions for those areas, indicating that the aftershocks accommodate a deformation similar to the main rupture and do not reflect elastic rebound or residual stresses. The background seismicity for 1981 to 1991 shows the same characteristic d1 and d3 orientations for the two domains, indicating that the secular seismogenic strain has the same regional geometry as the 1992 coseismic deformation. The micropolar inversion also provides values of the relative vorticity parameter W, which reflects a difference between the vorticity of a shearing continuum and the vorticity of fault-bounded blocks rotating within tabular seismogenic shear zones. The observed fault geometry along the Kickapoo fault suggests a pinned-block model for the local block rotation that is consistent with the values of W obtained from our inversions. We interpret the regional NW-SE orientation of d1 in the central Mojave block to be characteristic of the dextral eastern

  4. Salt tectonics and thermal imprint along an inverted passive margin: the Montcaou anticline, Chaînons Béarnais, North Pyrenean Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Aubourg, Charles; Cuyala, Jean-Baptiste; Hoareau, Guilhem; Callot, Jean-Paul; Péré, Eve; Labaume, Pierre; Ducoux, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Resulting from the late Cretaceous-Tertiary Iberia-Eurasia convergence, the building of the Pyrenean belt followed a pre-orogenic period of rifting where the Eurasian margin was extremely stretched. The geometry and the evolution of this paleo-margin, now constituting the North Pyrenean Zone, remain however controversial. Although localized high-temperature deformation and isolated peridotite bodies have been related to crustal thinning, processes controlling the distribution of these hot paleo-temperatures and mantle outcrops are still unknown. In this study we investigate the possible role of salt tectonics, recognized in the Aquitanian basin and the Pyrenean foreland, on the development of such thermal anomalies and the exhumation of peridotites bodies. We thus performed a detailed structural and thermal characterization of the region of the Montcaou anticline (Chaînon Béarnais, North Pyrenean Zone) where salt structures have been already described. We propose balanced geological cross-sections along this anticline displaying a peridotite body in its core, embedded in Triassic evaporitic deposits. In addition, to assess the thermal imprint occurring in this area, we measured a wide set of paleo-temperature proxies, using RAMAN spectrometry on carbonaceous material. Intensively folded Jurassic and lower Cretaceous sedimentary formations (with evidences of overturned sedimentary sections), erosional unconformities and strong thickness variations in Urgonian limestones associated to the Montcaou anticline suggest a salt ridge or diapir growth since upper Aptian times. Superimposition of Pyrenees-related compressional deformation then allowed salt structure tilting and propagation of top-to-the-north thrust faults. In this region, the distribution of thermal anomalies (up to 420 °C), as well as occurrences of high-temperature scapolite minerals, seems correlated with these salt structures. Indeed, high thermal conductivity of salt material could enhance the

  5. Active tectonic features and structural dynamics of the summit area of Mt. Etna (Italy) revealed by soil CO2 and soil temperature surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammanco, Salvatore; Melián, Gladys; Neri, Marco; Hernández, Pedro A.; Sortino, Francesco; Barrancos, José; López, Manuela; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Perez, Nemesio M.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the results of an extensive geochemical survey aimed at measuring soil CO2 effluxes and soil temperatures over a large portion of Mt. Etna's summit area, coupled with an updated structural survey of the same area. The main goals of this study were i) to find concealed or hidden volcano-tectonic structures in the studied area by detecting anomalous soil gas emissions, ii) to investigate the origin of the emitted gas and the mechanism of gas and heat transport to the surface, iii) to produce a structural model based both on the surface geology and on the soil gas data and, lastly, iv) to contribute to the assessment of hazard from slope failure and crater collapses at Mt. Etna. The results revealed many concealed structural lines that followed the major directions of structural weakness in the summit area of Mt. Etna, mostly due to a combined action of gravitational spreading of the volcano and magma intrusions. Both recent and old volcano-tectonic lines were found to act as pathways for the leakage of magmatic gases to the surface. An important role in driving magmatic gases to the surface is also played by fracturing and faulting due to caldera-forming collapses and smaller crater collapses. Correlation between soil CO2 emissions and soil temperature allowed discriminating areas of active shallow hydrothermal circulation along deep fractures (characterized by high values of both parameters, but mostly soil temperature) from those affected by undeveloped fractures that did not reach the surface (characterized by high CO2 emissions at low temperature). The former corresponded to weak zones of the volcano edifice that were frequently site of past eruptions, indicating that those areas keep a high potential for future opening of eruptive fissures. The latter were likely related to sites where new eruptive fissures may open in the near future due to backward propagation of extensional tectonic stress.

  6. Late Quaternary loess landscape evolution on an active tectonic margin, Charwell Basin, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Matthew W.; Almond, Peter C.; Roering, Joshua J.; Tonkin, Philip J.

    2010-10-01

    Loess deposits constitute an important archive of aeolian deposition reflecting wider patterns of glacial atmospheric circulation, and more localised interactions between riverine source areas, loess trapping efficiency and geomorphic controls on erosion rate. Conceptual models have been formulated to explain the coeval evolution of loess mantles and associated landscapes (loess landscape models) but none apply to areas of tectonically induced base-level lowering. This study uses an age sequence of alluvial fill terraces in the Charwell Basin, north-eastern South Island New Zealand, which straddles the transpressive Hope Fault, to investigate geomorphic controls on loess landscape evolution in an active tectonic region. We hypothesize that the more evolved drainage networks on older terraces will more effectively propagate base-level lowering by way of a greater areal proportion of steep and convex hillslopes and a smaller proportion of non-eroding interfluves. Eventually, as the proportion of interfluves diminishes and hillslope convexity increases, terraces shift from being net loess accumulators to areas of net loess erosion. We investigate the nature of erosion and the geomorphic thresholds associated with this transition. Morphometric analysis of alluvial terraces and terrace remnants of increasing age demonstrated geomorphic evolution through time, with a decrease in extent of original planar terrace tread morphology and an increase in frequency of steeper slopes and convexo-concave land elements. The number of loess sheets and the thickness of loess increased across the three youngest terraces. The next oldest (ca. 150 ka) terrace remnant had the greatest maximum number of loess sheets (3) and loess thickness (8 m) but the loess mantle was highly variable. A detailed loess stratigraphic analysis and the morphometric analysis place this terrace in a transition between dominantly planar, uniformly loess-mantled landforms and loess-free ridge and valley terrain

  7. Active Tectonics of Western Turkmenistan; Implications for the Onset of South Caspian Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Jackson, J.; Priestley, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Kopeh Dagh and Balkan mountain ranges of West Turkmenistan are actively deforming as a result of Arabia- Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made from satellite and topographic data, with historical and recent seismicity to identify major active faults, and how they contribute to regional shortening. Between 55--57.5°E, partitioned (north-vergent) thrust and right-lateral strike-slip fault segments, comprising the Ashkabad fault zone, accommodate regional shortening and the westward-extrusion of the NW Kopeh Dagh-South Caspian block, relative to Central Iran and Eurasia. Reconstruction of displaced geology indicates 35~km total right-lateral motion across the Ashkabad fault zone. The Balkan region lies along-strike of the Ashkabad fault zone, west of 55°E. Fault plane solutions indicate shortening is partitioned onto the Balkan thrust and right-lateral Kum-Dagh fault zones. Thrust earthquakes are relatively deep (30--45~km) and lie along a north-dipping plane which extends 40±5~km north beneath the Balkan anticline. Receiver function data from Turkmenbashi and Nebit Dagh indicate these earthquakes occur in the base of the crust, and may therefore be related to bending of the NW Kopeh Dagh-South Caspian lithosphere as it is overthrust by Eurasia. Movement on a north-dipping blind thrust fault is consistent with the broad asymmetric (south-vergent) fold structure of the Balkan range. Recent uplift is also indicated by extensional faults which displace Quaternary geomorphology along the range crest. South of the Balkan range, right-lateral shear occurs across the Kum-Dagh fault zone which is expressed as a series of right-stepping anticlines (affecting Pliocene Red Series and younger sediments), forming important traps for hydrocarbons. An important structural change occurs near 55°E. To the west, Eurasia overthrusts the NW Kopeh Dagh- South Caspian block, while to the east the polarity of thrusting changes and the Kopeh Dagh

  8. Peculiar Active-Tectonic Landscape Within the Sanctuary of Zeus at Mt. Lykaion (Peloponnese, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Sanctuary of Zeus (Mt. Lykaion) lies in the Peloponnese within the Pindos fold and thrust belt. It is the object of investigation of the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey (http://lykaionexcavation.org/). Mt. Lykaion is a thrust klippe, on the summit of which is an upper sanctuary marked by an ash altar, temenos, and column bases. Earliest objects recovered from the ash altar go back to 3000 BCE, leading Dr. David Romano (University of Pennsylvania), a principal leader of the project, to conclude that worship of divinities on the summit is ancient. Detailed structural geological mapping reveals one dimension of the "power" of the site. Crisscrossing the upper sanctuary are scree bands that mark the traces of active normal faults, which are expressions of tectonic stretching of the Aegean region. The scree bands, composed of cinder-block-sized limestone blocks, range up to 10 m in outcrop breadth, 100 m in length, and 5 m in thickness. Though discontinuous, most of the scree bands lie precisely on the traces of through-going faults, which cut and displace the sedimentary formations of the Pindos group. Some cut the thrust fault, whose elliptical trace defines the Lykaion klippe. What makes the scree bands of this active-tectonic landscape "peculiar" is that there are no cliffs from which the scree descends. Rather, the bands of scree occur along flanks of smooth, rounded hillslopes and ridges. The scree bands coincide with modest steps in the topography, ranging from tens of centimeters to several tens of meters. The specific bedrock formation where the bands are best developed is an Upper Cretaceous limestone whose average platy-bedding thickness (approximately 20 cm) matches closely the average joint spacing. The limestone has little mechanical integrity. It cannot support itself as a scarp footwall and instead collapses into a pile of scree, whose upper-surface inclination conforms to a stable angle of repose. Evidence of the contemporary nature of this

  9. Glaciation in a tectonically active environment: Preliminary observations from the Inylchek and Sary-Dzaz Valleys, Kyrgyz Tian Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.; Beel, C.; Blomdin, R.; Caffee, M. W.; Chen, Y.; Codilean, A.; Goehring, B. M.; Gribenski, N.; Harbor, J.; Hattestrand, C.; Heyman, J.; Ivanov, M.; Kassab, C.; Li, Y.; Petrakov, D.; Rogozhina, I.; Stroeven, A. P.; Usubaliev, R.; Wetzel, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Tian Shan comprises a series of generally east-northeast trending mountain ranges and intermontane basins in Central Asia, formed in response to northward propagation of stresses associated with the India-Asia collision and focused between the Tarim Basin and the Kazakh Shield. These ranges are typically bounded by seismically active reverse or oblique-slip faults occupying reactivated zones of crustal weakness formed during prior deformational episodes. Neogene deformation distributed across the Tian Shan has resulted in some of the world's highest peaks outside the Himalaya, particularly in eastern Kyrgyzstan along the border with China and Kazakhstan. Major glaciers drain these peaks - one of the largest is the glacier that occupies the Inylchek Valley. This glacier is currently the focus of an intensive monitoring effort by Kyrgyz, German and Austrian groups to understand its mass balance in response to climate change, yet not much is known about its response to previous glaciations. Much of the Inylchek Valley lies along the Atbashi-Inylchek fault (also known as the South Tian Shan Suture), a major left-oblique slip fault that forms the southern boundary of the Sary-Dzaz range. Recent thermochronologic work has shown this range to be uplifting rapidly since ca. 2-3 Ma. This portion of the Inylchek Valley is linear but transitions to a southward-trending releasing bend at its western end, forming what has been mapped as a pull-apart basin. This end of the Inylchek Valley contains a moraine complex that we sampled for surface exposure dating by 10Be and 26Al in 2011. Results for both nuclides from two large boulders on this moraine indicate a preliminary age of approximately 20 ka (Lal/Stone scaling). The southern slope of the Sary-Dzaz range is characterized by a series of ridges and terraces spanning ca. 800 m in altitude from the present valley bottom, yet glaciers within the range and their associated deposits are restricted to the uppermost sections of

  10. Gravity Data from the Teboursouk Area ("Diapirs Zone", Northern Tunisia): Characterization of Deep Structures and Updated Tectonic Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Fatma; Balti, Hadhemi; Kadri, Ali; Gasmi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Located between eastern segments of the Atlas and Tell-Rif oro-genic belts, the "Dome zone" of northern Tunisia is characterized by the juxtaposition of various structures that mainly controlled the long geody-namic history of this part of the south-Tethyan Margin. To better understand the organization and deep extension of these structures, gravity data from the Teboursouk key area are proposed. These data include the plotting of Bouguer anomaly map and related parameters such as vertical and horizontal gradients, upward continuation and Euler solution. Compared to geological and structural maps available, they allow the identification of new deep structures and greater precision regarding the characteristics and organization of known ones; consequently, an updated structural pattern is proposed.

  11. Not so simple "simply-folded Zagros": The role of pre-collisional extensional faulting, salt tectonics and multi-stage thrusting in the Sarvestan transfer zone (Fars, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Eugenio; Aldega, Luca; Bigi, Sabina; Minelli, Giorgio; Shaban, Ali

    2016-03-01

    The Sarvestan plain is bounded by highly elevated anticlines associated with thrusts or transpressional faults and hosts the NNW-SSE Sarvestan transfer zone. Surface and subsurface geological data, and 22 seismic lines allowed us to reconstruct the 3D geometry of the area. Mixed layer illite-smectite and 1D burial and thermal modelling were used to constrain the complex geological evolution of the Sarvestan plain where inherited structures strongly controlled the geometry of syn- to post-collisional contractional structures. Paleozoic-Mesozoic rifting related extension generated E-W and NNW-SSE normal fault systems. Such faults were associated with changes in the thickness of the sedimentary cover. Lateral facies changes were later induced by the Cretaceous obduction of ophiolites, cropping out some tens of km north of the study area. During the Miocene the footwall and the hanging wall of the Sarvestan Fault had different thermal evolution. This is tentatively explained by flow of Cambrian salt from the plain area towards the hanging wall of the Sarvestan Fault, associated with salt diapirism during Lower-Middle Miocene time. Salt tectonics is invoked also to explain, at least in part, the development of the overturned anticline in the hanging wall of the Sarvestan Fault. An early phase of contractional deformation occurred in the Middle Miocene (since 15 My, i.e., after the deposition of the Agha Jari Fm) generating the E-W oriented folds buried below the plain, likely inverting inherited normal faults. The erosion of these structures was followed by the deposition of the Bakhtiari Fm conglomerates in Middle-Late Miocene times. A later phase of contractional tectonics generated the thrust faults and the anticlines bounding the Sarvestan plain some 6-5 My ago. The Sarvestan dextral transpressional fault, that likely acted as a strongly oblique ramp of the Maharlu thrust, mainly structured in this period, although its activity may have continued until present.

  12. Extensional tectonics on continents and the transport of heat and matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    Intracontinental zones of extensional tectonic style are commonly of finite width and length. Associated sedimentary troughs are fault-controlled. The evolution of those structures is accompanied by volcanic activity of variable intensity. The characteristic surface structures are usually underlaid by a lower crust of the transitional type while deeper subcustal areas show delayed travel times of seismic waves especially at young tectonic provinces. A correspondence between deep-seated processes and zones of continental extension appears obvious. A sequential order of mechanisms and their importance are discussed in the light of modern data compilations and quantitative kinematic and dynamic approaches. The Cenozoic exensional tectonics related with the Rhine River are discussed.

  13. Comparative analysis of geodynamic activity of the Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean segments of the Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelidze, Tamaz; Eppelbaum, Lev

    2013-04-01

    The Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone (AHCZ) underwent recent transverse shortening under the effect of collisional compression. The process was accompanied by rotation of separate microplates. The Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean regions are segments of the of the AHCZ and are characterized by intensive endogenous and exogenous geodynamic processes, which manifest themselves in occurrence of powerful (with magnitude of 8-9) earthquakes accompanied by development of secondary catastrophic processes. Large landslides, rock falls, avalanches, mud flows, etc. cause human deaths and great material losses. The development of the aforesaid endogenous processes is set forth by peculiarities of the deep structure of the region and an impact of deep geological processes. The Caucasus is divided into several main tectonic terranes: platform (sub-platform, quasi-platform) and fold-thrust units. Existing data enable to perform a division of the Caucasian region into two large-scale geological provinces: southern Tethyan and northern Tethyan located to the south of and to the north of the Lesser Caucasian ophiolite suture, respectively. The recent investigations show that the assessments of the seismic hazard in these regions are not quite correct - for example in the West Caucasus the seismic hazard can be significantly underestimated, which affects the corresponding risk assessments. Integrated analysis of gravity, magnetic, seismic and thermal data enables to refine the assessment of the seismic hazard of the region, taking into account real rates of the geodynamic movements. Important role play the last rheological constructions. According to Reilinger et al. (2006) tectonic scheme, the West flanking of the Arabian Plate manifests strike-slip motion, when the East Caucasian block is converging and shortening. The Eastern Mediterranean is a tectonically complex region located in the midst of the progressive Afro-Eurasian collision. The recent increasing geotectonic

  14. Fold-related fractures - a brittle tectonic case study of the Helvetic zone in Vorarlberg (western Austria) and Upper Allgäu (Bavaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerlauth, M.

    2012-04-01

    Michael Zerlauth1,2 , Marcel Schulz1,2 , Hugo Ortner1 , Bernhard Fügenschuh1, Christian Zangerl2 1 Institut für Geologie und Paläontologie, Leopold Franzens Universität, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria 2 alpS-Gmbh, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria In the eastern Alps the Helvetic units exposed at the surface form a narrow belt restricted to the westernmost part of Austria and the northerly adjacent southernmost part of Bavaria. The Helvetic zone represents a Tertiary fold-and-thrust belt made up of Jurassic to Cretaceous shelf sediments deposited on the European margin of the Eurasian plate. In the course of an industry-funded project, the potential of these units for deep hydro-geothermal energy is investigated. Potential targets for hydrothermal exploration are more or less thick carbonate sequences that can be traced throughout the Helvetic zone, namely the Late Jurassic Quinten Limestone and the Early Cretaceous Schrattenkalk-Fm. In depths of at least 3000m below sea level, that have to be drilled to gain water with at least 90°C, uncemented fractures at any scale are the only cavities within these carbonates to be expected. Therefore, brittle structures are studied at differing scales of observation; aerial photos and surface outcrops are analyzed as well as thin sections. All the data obtained so far were collected in areas deformed homogenously: measuring stations were located outside large scale shear zones and either in fold-limbs or hinge zones. A constantly geometrical relationship between the orientation of the various fractures, the sedimentary layering and the trace of the axial planes can be inferred, as already stated by Hancock (1985). Besides extension fractures, veins and stylolithes, conjugated hybrid and shear fractures are quite common, indicating layer-parallel shortening normal to the axial planes as well as axial elongation. Hence, all of the structures observed can be genetically linked with thrusting and folding during regional N-S compressional

  15. Caltepec fault zone: An Early Permian dextral transpressional boundary between the Proterozoic Oaxacan and Paleozoic Acatlán complexes, southern Mexico, and regional tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elías-Herrera, Mariano; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Fernando

    2002-06-01

    The tectonic boundary between the Grenville-age Oaxacan and Paleozoic Acatlán crystalline complexes in southern Mexico, named the Caltepec fault zone (CFZ), is characterized for the first time as a dextral transpressional, NNW trending and ENE dipping ductile fault zone of Early Permian age. The complexes are welded by a syntectonic magmatic epidote-bearing granite along the entire length of the CFZ. From east to west, the 2-6 km wide CFZ consists of disrupted and retrograded banded gneisses of the Oaxacan complex, quartz-feldspar mylonite, and the syntectonic magmatic epidote-bearing Cozahuico granite (CZG) with huge xenoliths (up to several kilometers long and up to 600 m wide) of the Proterozoic gneisses, thrust westward over metasedimentary tectonites of the Acatlán complex. The CZG shows magmatic fabrics that represent a transition to solid-state deformation characterized by subvertical foliation, subhorizontal NNE and SSE dipping mineral stretching lineation and dextral kinematics. The megaxenoliths underwent partial melting developing banded migmatites with layers of epidote-bearing granitic neosome. The parallelism of fabrics in these anatexitic rocks and in the enclosing deformed granite suggests that ductile deformation, migmatization of xenolithic gneisses, and granite emplacement along the CFZ were coeval. The neosome yielded a U-Pb zircon concordant age of 275.6 +/- 1 Ma probably dating the peak of the tectonothermal event. We interpret the CFZ as a major terrane boundary accommodating transpressional interaction between the Acatlán and Oaxaquia blocks, which were amalgamated in an oblique convergent setting by Early Permian time, as the leading edge of Gondwana impinged onto the southern margin of Laurentia along the Marathon-Ouachita suture to form Pangea.

  16. Landform development in a zone of active Gedi Fault, Eastern Kachchh rift basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothyari, Girish Ch.; Rastogi, B. K.; Morthekai, P.; Dumka, Rakesh K.

    2016-02-01

    An earthquake of 2006 Mw 5.7 occurred along east-west trending Gedi Fault (GF) to the north of the Kachchh rift basin in western India which had the epicenter in the Wagad upland, which is approximately 60 km northeast of the 2001 Mw 7.7 earthquake site (or epicenter). Development of an active fault scarp, shifting of a river channel, offsetting of streams and uplift of the ground indicate that the terrain is undergoing active deformation. Based on detailed field investigations, three major faults that control uplifts have been identified in the GF zone. These uplifts were developed in a step-over zone of the GF, and formed due to compressive force generated by left-lateral motion within the segmented blocks. In the present research, a terrace sequence along the north flowing Karaswali river in a tectonically active GF zone has been investigated. Reconstructions based on geomorphology and terrace stratigraphy supported by optical chronology suggest that the fluvial aggradation in the Wagad area was initiated during the strengthening (at ~ 8 ka) and declining (~ 4 ka) of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). The presence of younger valley fill sediments which are dated ~ 1 ka is ascribed to a short lived phase of renewed strengthening of ISM before present day aridity. Based on terrace morphology two major phases of enhanced uplift have been estimated. The older uplift event dated to 8 ka is represented by the Tertiary bedrock surfaces which accommodated the onset of valley-fill aggradation. The younger event of enhanced uplift dated to 4 ka was responsible for the incision of the older valley fill sediments and the Tertiary bedrock. These ages suggest that the average rate of uplift ranges from 0.3 to 1.1 mm/yr during the last 9 ka implying active nature of the area.

  17. Formation and evolution of yardangs activated by Late Pleistocene tectonic movement in Dunhuang, Gansu Province of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Wu, Fadong; Zhang, Xujiao; Zeng, Peng; Ma, Pengfei; Song, Yuping; Chu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Developed in the Anxi-Dunhuang basin, the yardangs of Dunhuang (western China) are clearly affected by tectonic movement. Based on fieldwork, this study ascertained three levels of river terrace in the area for the first time. Through the analysis of river terraces formation and regional tectonic movement, the study ascertained that the river terraces were formed mainly by Late Pleistocene tectonic uplift, which had activated the evolution of yardangs in the study area. By electron spin resonance (ESR) dating and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the starting time and periodicity of the evolution of the yardangs were determined. The river terraces designated T3, T2 and T1 began to evolve at 109.0 ˜98.5, 72.9 ˜66.84 and 53.2 ˜38.0 kaBP, respectively, which is the evidence of regional neotectonic movement. And, the formation of the yardangs was dominated by tectonic uplift during the prenatal stage and mainly by wind erosion in the following evolution, with relatively short stationary phases. This research focused on the determination of endogenic processes of yardangs formation, which would contribute to further understanding of yardangs formation from a geological perspective and promote further study of yardang landform.

  18. Paleoseismic evidence for late Holocene tectonic deformation along the Saddle mountain fault zone, Southeastern Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Sherrod, Brian; Hughes, Jonathan F.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Czajkowski, Jessica L.; Walsh, Timothy J.; Contreras, Trevor A.; Schermer, Elizabeth R.; Carson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Trench and wetland coring studies show that northeast‐striking strands of the Saddle Mountain fault zone ruptured the ground about 1000 years ago, generating prominent scarps. Three conspicuous subparallel fault scarps can be traced for 15 km on Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) imagery, traversing the foothills of the southeast Olympic Mountains: the Saddle Mountain east fault, the Saddle Mountain west fault, and the newly identified Sund Creek fault. Uplift of the Saddle Mountain east fault scarp impounded stream flow, forming Price Lake and submerging an existing forest, thereby leaving drowned stumps still rooted in place. Stratigraphy mapped in two trenches, one across the Saddle Mountain east fault and the other across the Sund Creek fault, records one and two earthquakes, respectively, as faulting juxtaposed Miocene‐age bedrock against glacial and postglacial deposits. Although the stratigraphy demonstrates that reverse motion generated the scarps, slip indicators measured on fault surfaces suggest a component of left‐lateral slip. From trench exposures, we estimate the postglacial slip rate to be 0.2  mm/yr and between 0.7 and 3.2  mm/yr during the past 3000 years. Integrating radiocarbon data from this study with earlier Saddle Mountain fault studies into an OxCal Bayesian statistical chronology model constrains the most recent paleoearthquake age of rupture across all three Saddle Mountain faults to 1170–970 calibrated years (cal B.P.), which overlaps with the nearby Mw 7.5 1050–1020 cal B.P. Seattle fault earthquake. An earlier earthquake recorded in the Sund Creek trench exposure, dates to around 3500 cal B.P. The geometry of the Saddle Mountain faults and their near‐synchronous rupture to nearby faults 1000 years ago suggest that the Saddle Mountain fault zone forms a western boundary fault along which the fore‐arc blocks migrate northward in response to margin‐parallel shortening across the Puget Lowland.

  19. Constraining the age of Liuqu Conglomerate, southern Tibet: Implications for tectonic evolution of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Sandiford, M.; Kohn, B.

    2014-12-01

    The depositional age and provenance of the Liuqu Conglomerate (LC), distributed along the Indus-Yarlung suture zone (IYSZ) in South Tibet, remain controversial, leading to different interpretations, such as a Paleogene basin deposited during India-Asia collision (Wang et al., 2010) or the result of the collision between India and an intra-oceanic arc (Aitchison et al., 2007). Here, we report low-temperature thermochronometry data (apatite fission track, apatite and zircon U-Th/He) for the LC in the Xigaze area, to constrain its depositional age, provenance and burial-exhumation history. Five samples from Liuqu yielded consistent AFT ages of ~6-8Ma, and dispersed single-grain AFT ages of six samples range from ~ 140 to 5 Ma, and single grain AFT ages for grains with >0.4 Cl (wt%) content was calculated three age-peaks of ~16.4 ±3.0, 37.3 ± 6.4 and 89.5 ± 22.2 Ma. Four groups of detrital ZHe ages, including 18 scattered single grain ages in the range of ~20 - 107.9 Ma, yielded four age peaks of ~20, 37, 66 and 104 Ma. We interpret the AHe ages of the LC as having been completely thermally reset, while AFT ages have been partially annealed and ZHe ages have not been thermally reset, suggesting that the post-depositional maximum temperature of the LC was > 80 °C and < 110°C. Collectively, our results indicate that the Liuqu Conglomerate was probably deposited in the Early Miocene time, similar to the Qiuwu-Dazhuka conglomerates which are located in the northern part of the IYSZ, as one component of the Gangrinboche Group, and was derived from the Xigaze forearc basin, Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone, as well as the Tethyan Himalaya. Furthermore, the Liuqu Conglomerate was exhumed to the surface by post-depositional incision of a tributary of the Yarlung Zangbo river by the Late Miocene time.Aitchison, J. C.; Ali, J. R., and Davis, A. M. 2007, When and where did India and Asia collide?: J. Geophys. Res. v. 112: B05423, doi:10.1029/2006JB004706.Wang, J.G., Hu, X.M., Wu

  20. Debris Flow Architecture and Processes in Offshore Trinidad: Implications for basin fill in tectonically active margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L.; Wood, L.; Mann, P.

    2004-12-01

    The eastern continental margin of Trinidad is situated along the tectonically active oblique converging southeastern boundary of the Caribbean and South American plates and proximal to the Orinoco Delta. Factors that have contributed to gravitational instabilities in the shelf edge include high sedimentation accumulation rates, high frequency sea-level fluctuations during the Quaternary, frequent earthquakes and the abundance of methane hydrate. This volatile mix of factors favor the formation of episodic gravity induced deposits that have affected thousands of square kilometers of the deep marine environment. Debris flows are the predominant type of gravity induced deposits in the area. Multiple episodes of debris flow occurrence have been identified using nearly 10,000 square kilometers of three-dimensional seismic data that cover the entire eastern margin. Units can reach up to 250 meters in thickness and occur over 100's of kilometer square areas. Maps that have been generated for the uppermost flow show significant basal scour, up to 33 meters deep generated during passage of the flow. Scours also show divergent patterns in map view indicating changes in the flow conditions. Flow scour erosional shadows around prominent seafloor mud volcanoes preserving evacuated strata on the downslope side of these obstructions. Internal architecture shows high amplitude discontinuous and chaotic seismic facies, and stacked thrust imbricates association with compressional bends in the flow path. The scale and occurrence frequency of these features suggest that they may form a significant threat to submarine installations and possibly generate tsunamigenic waves that can threaten shipping and coastal communities.

  1. Volcanic activity before and after large tectonic earthquakes: Observations and statistical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Walter, T. R.

    2009-04-01

    The study of volcanic triggering and coupling to the tectonic surroundings has received special attention in recent years, using both direct field observations and historical descriptions of eruptions and earthquake activity. Repeated reports of volcano-earthquake interactions in, e.g., Europe and Japan, may imply that clustered occurrence is important in some regions. However, the regions likely to suffer clustered eruption-earthquake activity have not been systematically identified, and the processes responsible for the observed interaction are debated. We first review previous works about the correlation of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, and describe selected local clustered events. Following an overview of previous statistical studies, we further elaborate the databases of correlated eruptions and earthquakes from a global perspective. Since we can confirm a relationship between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes on the global scale, we then perform a statistical study on the regional level, showing that time and distance between events follow a linear relationship. In the time before an earthquake, a period of volcanic silence often occurs, whereas in the time after, an increase in volcanic activity is evident. Our statistical tests imply that certain regions are especially predisposed to concurrent eruption-earthquake pairs, e.g., Japan, whereas such pairing is statistically less significant in other regions, such as Europe. Based on this study, we argue that individual and selected observations may bias the perceptible weight of coupling. Volcanoes located in the predisposed regions (e.g., Japan, Indonesia, Melanesia), however, indeed often have unexpectedly changed in association with either an imminent or a past earthquake.

  2. Au-Ag polymetallic mineralization within tectonically weak zones along the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Silberman, M.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The Music Mountain mining district lies at the base of the Grand Wash Cliffs, a major fault-line scarp along the Grand Wash fault, which marks the SW margin of the Colorado Plateau. Nearly vertical Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins parallel, and are in contact with, altered diabase and granite porphyry dikes that cut Proterozoic granite, schist, and gneiss. The gold-bearing veins range in thickness from an inch to several feet and contain significant amounts of sulfide minerals. Diabase dikes and quartz veins in the district and to the north consistently strike N42[degree]W to N57[degree]W, which is one of the most prevalent fracture orientation throughout NW Arizona. In the Gold Basin-Lost Basin districts to the north, the Au occurs in such pegmatite-quartz veins that strike NE. Thirty miles east along Diamond Creek, quartz veins and diabase dikes strike N45[degree]E and are associated with Au and Ag anomalies in stream-sediments and panned concentrates. To the west major Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins of the Wallapai mining district show consistent strikes from N30[degree] to 60[degree]W. K-Ar ages of hydrothermal alterations of 4 NW oriented diabase dikes that have quartz veins along them, range from 935 [+-] 35 to 755 [+-] 21 Ma. Sericite from altered granite porphyry, adjacent to a mineralized vein, gave a K-Ar age of 72 [+-]2 Ma. All geochemical sites (within a 1,000 mi[sup 2] area) determined to be anomalous in Au lie within 2 mi of either the Grand Wash or Hurricane faults. The Hurricane and Grand Wash faults, major Precambrian fault zones that were reactivated in the Phanerozoic, appear to be good exploration targets for Au-rich quartz veins associated with pegmatite or diabase dikes, many of which may be buried beneath the thick alluvium of Hualapai Valley.

  3. Active tectonics, paleoseismology and associated methodological challenges posed by the slow moving Alhama de Murcia fault (SE Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Ortuño, Maria; Masana, Eulàlia; Pallàs, Raimon; Perea, Hector; Baize, Stephane; García-Meléndez, Eduardo; Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Echeverria, Anna; Rockwell, Thomas; Sharp, Warren D.; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Medialdea, Alicia; Rhodes, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The Alhama de Murcia fault (AMF) is a 87 km-long left-lateral slow moving fault and is responsible for the 5.1 Mw 2011 Lorca earthquake. The characterization of the seismic potential of seismogenic strike-slip slow moving faults is necessary but raises huge methodological challenges, as most paleoseismological and active tectonic techniques have been designed on and for fast moving faults. The AMF is used here as a pilot study area to adapt the traditional geomorphological and trenching analyses, especially concerning the precise quantification of offset channels. We: 1) adapted methodologies to slow moving faults, 2) obtained, for the first time, the slip rate of the AMF, and 3) updated its recurrence period and maximum expected magnitude. Morphotectonic studies aim to use the measured tectonic offset of surface channels to calculate seismic parameters. However, these studies lack a standard criterion to score the analysed features. We improved this by differentiating between subjective and objective qualities, and determining up to three objective parameters (lithological changes, associated morphotectonics and shape, and three shape sub-parameters; all ranging from 0 to 1). By applying this methodology to the AMF, we identified and characterized 138 offset features that we mapped on a high-resolution (0.5 × 0.5 m pixel size) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from a point cloud acquired in 2013 by airborne light detection and ranging (lidar). The identified offsets, together with the ongoing datings, are going to be used to calculate the lateral slip rate of the AMF. In three-dimensional trenches, we measured the offsets of a buried channel by projecting the far-field tendency of the channel onto the fault. This procedure is inspired by the widespread geomorphological procedure and aims to avoid the diffuse deformation in the fault zone associated with slow moving faults. The calculation of the 3D tendency of the channel and its projection onto the fault permitted

  4. Soils and geomorphic evolution of bedrock facets on a tectonically active mountain front, western Sangre de Cristo Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, Christopher M.

    1990-09-01

    Soil profiles, colluvial stratigraphy, and detailed hillslope morphology are key elements used for geomorphic interpretations of the form and long-term evolution of triangular facets on a 1200 m high, tectonically active mountain front. The facets are developed on Precambrian gneisses and Tertiary volcanic and plutonic rocks along a complexly segmented, active normal-fault zone in the Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico. The detailed morphologies of 20- to 350 m high facets are defined by statistical and time-series analyses of 40 field transects that were keyed to observations of colluvium, bedrock, microtopography, and vegetation. The undissected parts of most facets are transport-limited hillslopes mantled with varying thicknesses (0.1 to > 1 m thick) of sand and gravel colluvium between generally sparse (≤10-30%) bedrock outcrops. Facet soils range from (a) thin (≤ 0.2 m) weakly developed soils with cumulic silty A or transitional A/B epipedons above Cox horizons in bedrock or colluvium, to (b) deep (≥0.5-1 m) moderately to strongly developed profiles containing thick cambic (Bw) and/or argillic (Bt) horizons that commonly extend into highly weathered saprolitic bedrock. The presence of strongly weathered profiles and thick colluvium suggests that rates of colluvial transport and hillslope erosion are less than or equal to rates of soil development over at least a large part of the Holocene. The catenary variation of soils and colluvium on selected facet transects indicate that the degree of soil development generally increases and the thickness of colluvium decreases upslope on most facets. This overall pattern is commonly disrupted on large facet hillslopes by irregular secondary soil variations linked to intermediate-scale (20-60 + m long) concave slope elements. These features are interpreted to reflect discontinuous transport and erosion of colluvium down-slope below bedrock outcrops. The degree of weathering in subsurface bedrock commonly

  5. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  6. LAR, liprin alpha and the regulation of active zone morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Emily; Johnson, Karl G

    2007-11-01

    Active zones are protein-rich regions of neurons that act as sites of synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release at the pre-synaptic terminus. Although the discovery that the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR and its cytoplasmic binding partner liprin alpha are essential for proper active zone formation is nearly a decade old, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have identified a number of binding partners for both LAR and liprin alpha, several of which play key roles in active zone assembly. These include nidogen, dallylike and syndecan--extracellular ligands for LAR that regulate synapse morphogenesis. In addition, liprin-alpha-interacting proteins such as ERC2, RIM and the MALS/Veli-Cask-Mint1 complex cooperate to form a dense molecular scaffold at the active zone that is crucial for proper synaptic function. These studies allow us to propose testable models of LAR and liprin alpha function, and provide insights into the fundamental molecular mechanisms of synapse formation and stabilization.

  7. The Proteome of the Murine Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Volknandt, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The proteome of the presynaptic active zone controls neurotransmitter release and the short- and long-term structural and functional dynamics of the nerve terminal. The proteinaceous inventory of the presynaptic active zone has recently been reported. This review will evaluate the subcellular fractionation protocols and the proteomic approaches employed. A breakthrough for the identification of the proteome of the presynaptic active zone was the successful employment of antibodies directed against a cytosolic epitope of membrane integral synaptic vesicle proteins for the immunopurification of synaptic vesicles docked to the presynaptic plasma membrane. Combining immunopurification and subsequent analytical mass spectrometry, hundreds of proteins, including synaptic vesicle proteins, components of the presynaptic fusion and retrieval machinery, proteins involved in intracellular and extracellular signaling and a large variety of adhesion molecules, were identified. Numerous proteins regulating the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton are indicative of the functional and structural dynamics of the presynapse. This review will critically discuss both the experimental approaches and prominent protein candidates identified. Many proteins have not previously been assigned to the presynaptic release sites and may be directly involved in the short- and long-term structural modulation of the presynaptic compartment. The identification of proteinaceous constituents of the presynaptic active zone provides the basis for further analyzing the interaction of presynaptic proteins with their targets and opens novel insights into the functional role of these proteins in neuronal communication. PMID:28250380

  8. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  9. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  10. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  11. Glacier Ice Mass Fluctuations and Fault Instability in Tectonically Active Southern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SauberRosenberg, Jeanne M.; Molnia, Bruce F.

    2003-01-01

    Across southern Alaska the northwest directed subduction of the Pacific plate is accompanied by accretion of the Yakutat terrane to continental Alaska. This has led to high tectonic strain rates and dramatic topographic relief of more than 5000 meters within 15 km of the Gulf of Alaska coast. The glaciers of this area are extensive and include large glaciers undergoing wastage (glacier retreat and thinning) and surges. The large glacier ice mass changes perturb the tectonic rate of deformation at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. We estimated surface displacements and stresses associated with ice mass fluctuations and tectonic loading by examining GPS geodetic observations and numerical model predictions. Although the glacial fluctuations perturb the tectonic stress field, especially at shallow depths, the largest contribution to ongoing crustal deformation is horizontal tectonic strain due to plate convergence. Tectonic forces are thus the primary force responsible for major earthquakes. However, for geodetic sites located < 10-20 km from major ice mass fluctuations, the changes of the solid Earth due to ice loading and unloading are an important aspect of interpreting geodetic results. The ice changes associated with Bering Glacier s most recent surge cycle are large enough to cause discernible surface displacements. Additionally, ice mass fluctuations associated with the surge cycle can modify the short-term seismicity rates in a local region. For the thrust faulting environment of the study region a large decrease in ice load may cause an increase in seismic rate in a region close to failure whereas ice loading may inhibit thrust faulting.

  12. Quaternary landscape evolution of tectonically active intermontane basins: the case of the Middle Aterno River Valley (Abruzzo, Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, Emanuela; Gori, Stefano; Della Seta, Marta; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Fredi, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Aterno River Valley is characterised by different Quaternary tectonic depressions localised along the present course of the Aterno River (Central Apennine) .This valley includes the L'Aquila and Paganica-Castelnuovo-San Demetrio tectonic basins, to the North, the Middle Aterno Valley and the Subequana tectonic basin, to the South. The aim of this contribution is to improve the knowledge about the Quaternary geomorphological and tectonic evolution of this portion of the Apennine chain. A synchronous lacustrine depositional phase is recognized in all these basins and attributed to the Early Pleistocene by Falcucci et al. (2012). At that time, this sector of the chain showed four distinct closed basins, hydrologically separated from each other and from the Sulmona depression. This depression, actually a tectonic basin too, was localized South of the Middle Aterno River Valley and it was drained by an endorheic hydrographic network. The formation of these basins was due to the activity of different fault systems, namely the Upper Aterno River Valley-Paganica system and San Pio delle Camere fault, to the North, and the Middle Aterno River Valley-Subequana Valley fault system to the South. These tectonic structures were responsible for the origin of local depocentres inside the depressions which hosted the lacustrine basins. Ongoing surveys in the uppermost sectors of the Middle Aterno River Valley revealed the presence of sub-horizontal erosional surfaces that are carved onto the carbonate bedrock and suspended several hundreds of metres over the present thalweg. Gently dipping slope breccias referred to the Early Pleistocene rest on these surfaces, thus suggesting the presence of an ancient low-gradient landscape adjusting to the local base level.. Subsequently, this ancient low relief landscape underwent a strong erosional phase during the Middle Pleistocene. This erosional phase is testified by the occurrence of valley entrenchment and of coeval fluvial

  13. 10 Ma of Igneous Activity in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt: Tectonic and Geomagnetic Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Martinez, V. C.; Osete, M. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    A total of 51 sites with geochronological control were sampled in the central and western segments of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Together with other previously published 69 sites from the eastern segment, they span the spatial and temporal activity of the TMVB. Using now the same reference directions and methodologies, they are analyzed in order (i) to determine the possible occurrence and significance (spatially and temporally) of vertical axis crustal block rotations that have been reported in this region; and (ii) to study the geomagnetic Paleo Secular Variation during the last 10 Ma; to check the previously suggested existence of a "Pacific Dipole Window" extending to Mexico. Paleomagnetic results, backed by statistical tests performed according to their geographical distribution (3 structural segments) or according to their ages (Late Miocene, Pliocene or Quaternary), do not support the notion that large vertical axis block rotations (paleomagnetically detectable) occurred in this arc after Late Miocene times. They suggest that the TMVB could be considered paleomagnetically as an unique tectonic domain under a transtensional regime, where its extension component prevails over its left-lateral component. The mean paleomagnetic directions, obtained in the age ranges 10-5 Ma and 5-0 Ma, do not differ from their respective reference directions. In both datasets, VGPs have been selected using quality Fisher's precision parameters and optimum cutoff angles. This results in a circularly symmetrical data distribution with statistically indistinguishable antipodal normal and reverse polarities. VGP dispersions are consistent with those from globally distributed observations at Mexican latitudes for the Miocene and the Plio- Quaternary. An analysis of all the published paleomagnetic data from the TMVB, when combined all together and selected in the same terms, do not support neither the existence of large crustal block rotations nor the persistence of a

  14. Spectral damping scaling factors for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Campbell, Kenneth; Abrahamson, Norman; Silva, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra, including the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) models, are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and non-structural systems can have damping ratios other than 5%, depending on various factors such as structural types, construction materials, level of ground motion excitations, among others. This report provides the findings of a comprehensive study to develop a new model for a Damping Scaling Factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE to spectral ordinates with damping ratios between 0.5 to 30%. Using the updated, 2011 version of the NGA database of ground motions recorded in worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions (i.e., the NGA-West2 database), dependencies of the DSF on variables including damping ratio, spectral period, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, duration, and local site conditions are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions are found to have less significant influence on DSF and are not included in the model. The proposed model for DSF provides functional forms for the median value and the logarithmic standard deviation of DSF. This model is heteroscedastic, where the variance is a function of the damping ratio. Damping Scaling Factor models are developed for the “average” horizontal ground motion components, i.e., RotD50 and GMRotI50, as well as the vertical component of ground motion.

  15. Early Cretaceous fracture zones in the Bay of Bengal and their tectonic implications: Constraints from multi-channel seismic reflection and potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Radhakrishna; G, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satyabrata; Bastia, Rabi; D, Twinkle

    2012-02-01

    Due to the lack of clearly discernible magnetic anomaly identifications and fracture zones in the Bay of Bengal (BOB), the early Cretaceous plate reconstruction history of eastern Gondwanaland remains an unresolved issue with regard to the separation of the East Coast of India from the conjugate Enderby Basin of Antarctica. Based on the correlation of oceanic basement information obtained from a vast amount of deep reflection seismic data, we identified 16 NW-SE-trending fracture zones (FZ1-FZ16) in the BOB region. The trends of these fracture zones at the ECMI indicate two distinctly different sets, one set in the direction ~N25°W to N35°W in the southern part (FZ1-FZ7) and the other set in ~N50°W (FZ8-FZ15) direction along the northern part. These two sets of fracture zones further support the earlier inferences about the segmented nature of the ECMI into southern sheared/oblique rifted margin and the northern normal rifted margin. While, the southern part of the ECMI had formed under slow/asymmetric spreading and mixed transform setting with its conjugate western Enderby Basin, the northern part of the ECMI formed after the breakup of the Elan Bank from India at M2. Considering this scenario, we infer the presence of Late Mesozoic (younger to M4) anomalies along the ECMI and the subdued nature of magnetic anomalies in the western BOB can be explained by the obliquity of fracture zones with respect to the coast, as observed in many marginal smooth zones of the world oceans. The disposition of the 85°E ridge with respect to the pre-evolved BOB crust and early Cretaceous volcanic episodes in the region together indicate an emplacement of the ridge from ~105 Ma onwards as a result of a hotspot source related to the Kerguelen super plume during its intense eruption activity.

  16. A detection method of subrecent to recent tectonic activity in the anticlinal system of the northern Negev, Israel

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberman, E.; Wachs, D. )

    1988-02-01

    Geomorphological and geophysical methods combined with borehole information were employed to search for possible subrecent small-scale vertical movement along the anticlinal fold belt of the central Negev, Israel. Such tectonic deformation might indicate displacement on the buried reverse faults underneath the anticlines. Variations in the thickness of the alluvial fill in the study area, which are in accordance with the fold structures, could be an indication of recent folding activity along the anticlinal system. In order to detect these thickness variations in the alluvial fill, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity measurements were carries out along the valley of Nahal Besor, which crosses the anticlinal belt. The thickness variations of the alluvial fill along the valley were not found to indicate any significant tectonic movement along the anticlines during the Pleistocene. The thickest alluvium was found overlying a karst bedrock, hence karst relief is suggested to be responsible for these variations.

  17. Paleomagnetic and structural evidence for localized tectonic rotation associated with fault drag in the northeastern Mojave Desert: Implications for the late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Eastern California shear zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconnell, D. F.; Mccabe, C.; Dokka, R. K.; Chu, M.

    1994-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data, coupled with detailed geological analysis of the southeastern Goldstone Lake region, indicate that lower Miocene volcanic and epiclastic rocks of the Pink Canyon area have been folded, faulted and tectonically rotated approximately 28.4 + or - 9.0 deg clockwise about a vertical axis. The Coyote Canyon Fault is locally folded about a vertical axis approximately 25 deg in a clockwise sense in the Pink Canyon area. Timing relationships indicate that rotation is post-early Miocene; regional relationships imply that deformation is late Miocene to Holocene in age. These relationships imply that tectonic rotation is local rather than regional in extent as proposed by some tectonic models. The results of this study are generally consistent with the Dokka and Travis model and the subsequently revised Dokka model of strain partitioning in the northeastern Mojave Desert block.

  18. Volcanic and Tectonic Setting of Hydrothermal Activity on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 4° - 11°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, B.; Devey, C. W.; German, C. R.; Haase, K. M.; Koschinsky, A.; Lackschewitz, K.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    The recurrence rate of volcanism at mid-ocean ridges should drop with spreading rate. Although the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, with a spreading full rate of ~3.6 cm/yr, might therefore be expected to show only sporadic magmatic activity, we present information on recently-discovered volcanically, tectonically and hydrothermally active areas south of the equator (at 4°48'S and 9°33'S, see also German et al. 2005; Haase et al. 2005 EOS Trans. AGU 86 (52) Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstr. OS21C-04 & -05). Around the 4°48'S area the median valley floor forms a ~10 km wide, hour-glass shaped, plateau with water depths of around 3000 m. Four closely-spaced vent fields (the high-temperature sites Turtle Pits, Red Lion and Comfortless Cove and the diffuse low-temperature Wideawake site) occur along a flat (total relief 50 m), volcanically and tectonically active 2 km section of this plateau (see German et al. 2005, Haase et al. 2005 op. cit. also Koschinsky et al. this meeting). The Turtle Pits site lies within a small depression associated with a fracture marked by aligned collapse pits. This central depression is surrounded by laminated sheet flows to the north and northwest, whereas jumbled flows are more prevalent to the east. Comfortless Cove is also associated with young volcanics and shows strong tectonic influence on vent location. Red Lion in contrast shows no clear tectonic control - it is characterised by four active chimneys which sit directly on a pillow lava floor. The 9°33'S area is situated on 11 km-thick crust (Bruguier et al. 2003 JGR 108 2093) at 1490 m water depth and is marked by fresh pillow lavas, sheet flows, lava lakes and collapse structures. Low- temperature, diffuse hydrothermal activity is abundant in the area (Haase et al. 2005; Koschinsky et al. 2006 op. cit.) as are larger extinct hydrothermal mounds suggesting more vigourous hydrothermalism in the past. All sites are located east of a large NNW trending escarpment flanking horst and graben

  19. The Urumieh Plutonic Complex (NW Iran): Record of the geodynamic evolution of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone during Cretaceous times - Part II: Magnetic fabrics and plate tectonic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalamghash, J.; Bouchez, J. L.; Vosoughi-Abedini, M.; Nédélec, A.

    2009-10-01

    The Urumieh complex, to the north of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (NW Iran), belongs to a plutonic arc that took place above the northeastward dipping subduction of Arabia under Iran during Late Cretaceous times. Seven granitoid bodies occupying an area of ˜300 km 2 can be sorted into three suites. According to the isotope chronology study of Ghalamghash et al. [Ghalamghash, J., Nédélec, A., Bellon, H., Vousoughi-Abedini, M., Bouchez, J.L., in press. The Urumieh Plutonic Complex: a magmatic record of the geodynamic evolution of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (NW Iran) during Cretaceous times - Part II: petrogenesis and 40K/40Ar dating. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences], the two first suites were emplaced during the same event at ˜100 Ma, and the third one was emplaced ˜20 Ma later: (1) the diorites form the largest bodies and comprise the Ghamishlu and Dourbeh stocks; (2) the biotite-granites are composed by the Sehkani, Nari and Doustak bodies, and (3) the younger bodies are represented by the Bardkish syenite and the Dourbeh granite. These bodies were subjected to systematic microstructural observations, and magnetic fabric measurements that yield information about their emplacement kinematics. The magnetic lineations of the diorites and biotite-granites (the early suites) call for a dominant NW-trending stretching during their intrusion, attributed to the transpressive deformation of the overriding Sanandaj-Sirjan microplate during the north-to northeastward motion of the subducting western branch of the Neo-Tethys. Oblique plate motion with ˜20% of strain partitioning along a NNW-trending plate boundary accounts for the observed magmatic structures. Intrusion of the younger bodies took place after consumption of this western oceanic domain at about 80 Ma. The NW-trending lineations of the syenite suggest that the transpressive regime was continuing, while the steep lineations and the peculiar microstructures of the Dourbeh granite call for a forceful intrusion. Our

  20. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ∼30 fmol kg−1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1–9 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10–980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20–100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3–1)×10−1 kg(0.3–1)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼7.5×104 km2∼7.5×104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg(0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial–interglacial transitions.

  1. Tectonic Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes representative quantitative tectonic-geomorphology studies made during the last century, focusing on fault-bounded mountain-front escarpments, marine terraces, and alluvial geomorphic surfaces (considering stream terraces, piedmont fault scarps, and soils chronosequences). Also suggests where tectonic-geomorphology courses may best fit…

  2. Thermal basin modelling of the Arauco forearc basin, south central Chile — Heat flow and active margin tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Philipp P.; Echtler, Helmut; Littke, Ralf; Alfaro, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    The Arauco basin is part of the coastal forearc domain in South-Central Chile. During its evolution since the Late Cretaceous it was subject to multiple deposition cycles and the erosion of lower bathyal to beach and lagoon sediments. These different environments were established in alternating accretional and erosive subduction tectonic settings along the South Andean active margin. Whereas the general development is well understood, inconsistencies arise regarding the origin of the high thermal maturity of Eocene coals and the estimates of vertical movements of the whole area during the Cenozoic. Thermal modelling of this forearc basin provides new insights regarding its thermal evolution and evaluation of the magnitudes of subsidence and inversion. Results are based on the analysis of coal samples from surface outcrops, mines and drill cores of ten onshore wells from ENAP/Sipetrol. Newly derived vitrinite reflectance (VR r) measurements indicated a temperature in the range of 135-150 °C for the oldest sediment unit of the Arauco basin, which was reached in post Eocene times. Furthermore, 1D basin modelling techniques indicate scenarios that could explain the coalification values in the basin's sediments. The models were calibrated against VR r data from drill core samples supplied by ENAP/Sipetrol. A Miocene and an Oligocene subsidence/inversion scenario were considered, while neither could be securely discarded based on the modelling results. Furthermore, it can be shown that the current thermal maturity was not reached by an increased heat flow (HF) or a deep subsidence only. Consequently, a structural inversion accompanied by the erosion of ~ 3.0 ± 0.4 km depending on the locality in combination with a high HF of ~ 64 ± 4 mW/m 2 is the best explanation of the available data. The HF, which is high for a forearc setting, can be attributed to the increased temperature of the relatively young subducted Nazca Plate and an additional influence of ascending hot

  3. New multi-beam bathymetric map of the Ionian Sea (Central Mediterranean): Evidence for active sedimentary and morpho-tectonic processes along the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, M. A.; Kopp, H.; Krastel, S.; Bohrmann, G.; Garlan, T.; Zaragosi, S.; Klaucke, I.; Wintersteller, P.; Loubrieu, B.; Le Faou, Y.; San Pedro, L.; Dominguez, S.; Rovere, M.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.

    2015-12-01

    A combined dataset of multi-beam bathymetry, based on 5 recent marine geophysical surveys since 2010 as well as a compilation of earlier surveys, now spans the vast majority of the Ionian Sea and the active margin of East Sicily and Calabria. (The new surveys are: R/V Meteor cruise 86, 2010 PI - S. Krastel; MocoSed R/V PourquoiPas 2012 PI - T. Garlan; Circee R/V Suroit 2013 PI - M.-A. Gutscher; R/V Meteor cruise 111, 2014 PI's - H. Kopp, M.-A. Gutscher; R/V Meteor cruise 112, 2014 PI - G. Bohrmann). This new compilation of mostly unpublished bathymetric data is presented as a 2 arc-sec (60m) grid and reveals fine-scale structures on the seafloor in unprecedented detail. These include the deeply incised Malta-Hyblean Escarpment, numerous submarine canyons, broad regions of relatively flat seafloor dominated by fields of sediment waves, the gently undulating anticlinal fold-and-thrust belts of two accretionary wedge complexes related to the Hellenic subduction (W Mediterranean ridge) and to the Calabrian arc. These accretionary wedges intersect and overlap and define two of the three sides of the triangular Ionian abyssal plain. The internal structure of these morpho-tectonic provinces as well as the transition zones between them is also imaged by high-resolution 72-channel seismic reflection profiles. Together these data offer new insights into the interaction and competition between active sedimentary and tectonic processes shaping this part of the Central Mediterranean. Acknowledgment: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe).

  4. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  5. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  6. Tectonically active sediment dispersal system in SW Taiwan margin with emphasis on the Gaoping (Kaoping) Submarine Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ho-Shing; Chiang, Cheng-Shing; Shen, Su-Min

    2009-03-01

    The sediment dispersal system in southwestern Taiwan margin consists of two main parts: the subaerial drainage basin and the offshore receiving marine basin. In plan view, this sediment dispersal system can be further divided into five geomorphic units: (1) the Gaoping (formerly spelled Kaoping) River drainage basin, (2) the Gaoping (Kaoping) Shelf, (3) the Gaoping (Kaoping) Slope, (4) the Gaoping (Kaoping) Submarine Canyon and (5) the Manila Trench in the northernmost South China Sea. The Gaoping River drainage basin is a small (3250 km 2), tectonically active and overfilled foreland basin, receiving sediments derived from the uprising Central Range of Taiwan with a maximum elevation of 3952 m. The Gaoping Submarine Canyon begins at the mouth of the Gaoping River, crosses the narrow Gaoping Shelf (~ 10 km) and the Gaoping Slope, and finally merges into the northern termination of the Manila Trench over a distance of ~ 260 km. The SW Taiwan margin dispersal system is characterized by a direct river-canyon connection with a narrow shelf and frequent episodic sediment discharge events in the canyon head. In a regional source to sink scheme, the Gaoping River drainage basin is the primary source area, the Gaoping Shelf being the sediment bypass zone and the Gaoping Slope being the temporary sink and the Manila Trench being the ultimate sink of the sediment from the Taiwan orogen. It is inferred from seismic data that the outer shelf and upper slope region can be considered as a line source for mass wasting deposits delivered to the lower Gaoping Slope where small depressions between diapiric ridges are partially filled with sediment or are empty. At present, recurrent hyperpycnal flows during the flood seasons are temporarily depositing sediments mainly derived from the Gaoping River in the head of the Gaoping Submarine Canyon. On the decadal and century timescales, sediments temporarily stored in the upper reach are removed over longer timescales probably by

  7. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  8. Active Tectonics in the Central Chilean Andes: 3D Tomography Based on the Aftershock Sequence of the 28 August 2004 Shallow Crustal Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Farias, M.; Charrier, R.; Gonzalez, A.

    2008-12-01

    Most of the seismological research in the Andes has been mainly oriented to the detection and understanding of the seismicity associated with megathrust earthquakes that characterize the subduction environment that governs the Andean tectonics. However, deployments of temporary networks have allowed the detection of intense crustal seismicity beneath the Chilean forearc-arc region. The temporary seismic network deployed along the Las Leñas and Pangal river valleys (34°25'S), between January and May 2004 permitted to better constrain the abundant shallow intra-continental seismicity previously detected in that region. Although most of the seismicity is randomly distributed in the region, several microearthquakes occur along the trace of the major El Fierro fault-system. This system is well recognized between 33°30' and 35°15'S and is located at or close to the eastern contact between Mesozoic and Cenozoic deposits in the Principal Cordillera and, locally, below active volcanoes, being considered to have participated in the extension and tectonic inversion of a widely extended (>600 km long) Cenozoic basin along the Principal Cordillera. Further south, at 35°S, a Mw=6.5 strike-slip shallow earthquake occurred on August 28, 2004, near of the headwater of the Teno river, close to the Planchon volcano. A 3D detailed Vp and Vs velocities determination was obtained along the 2004 earthquake aftershock area. The aftershocks are distributed along one branch of the El Fierro fault system, with a NNE-SSW direction and depths lower than 15 km. The rupture zone coincides with a sharp contrast in Vp and Vs, also in coincidence with the presence of hydrothermal fluids, gypsum diapers and the volcanic arc, suggesting rheological contrast controlling deformation. At the surface, this zone present an intense contractive deformation produced during the Neogene, which differs from what can be observed in other regions. Present day deformation related to seismicity has no

  9. Importance of active tectonics during karst formation. A Middle Eocene to Pleistocene example of the Lina Moutains (Irian Jaya, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thery, J.-M.; Pubellier, M.; Thery, B.; Butterlin, J.; Blondeau, A.; Adams, C. G.

    1999-05-01

    The Lina Moutains show a typical example of karst formation associated to recent and active tectonics. The limestone samples were collected from giant potholes present beneath the heavy rainforest, during speleological expeditions to the Bird's Head of Irian-Jaya. Micropalaeontological data allow us to give a Middle Pleistocene age for the most recent karst formation. A detailed stratigraphy between the Upper Lutetian and the Middle Pleistocene was recorded, with tectonic events during the Oligocene and Pleistocene. The edge of the resurgence layer was also dated. We also conclude the probable existence of a subterraneous network downhill of the karst within the most recent levels of the Kais Limestone formation. We replace this formation within the tectonic evolution of this area between the Eocene and the Middle Pleistocene, in conjunction with the oblique convergence of the Pacific plate carrying volcanic arc fragments and the Australian margin, which resulted in folding, normal faulting associated with local extension, and wrench motion, which are settings capable of creating uplift of the carbonated platform.

  10. Tectonic framework of the Northern California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    The northern coast of California is one of the most seismically active regions in the continental United States. This activity is largely due to tectonic forces resulting from differing relative motions between three extensive lithospheric plates that meet in this region. These crustal plates are bounded by long fault systems-the Cascadia subduction zone, the San Andreas fault system, and the Mendocino fault- that accommodate these differences in plate motion and that are capable of periodically producing damaging earthquakes. Historic earthquake locations are concentrated in the victinity of the tectonically unstable intersection of these tthree plates and their bounding fault systems. 

  11. Cenozoic Tectonic Activity of the "Passive" North America Margin: Evidence for Cenozoic Activity on Mesozoic or Paleozoic Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedorub, O. I.; Knapp, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic history of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) incorporates two cycles of continental assembly, multiple pulses of orogeny, rifting, and post-rift geodynamic evolution. This is reflected in the heterogeneous lithosphere of the ENAM which contains fault structures originated in Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras. The South Georgia Rift basin is probably the largest Mesozoic graben within its boundaries that is associated with the breakup of Pangea. It is composed of smaller sub-basins which appear to be bounded by high-angle normal faults, some of which may have been inverted in late Cretaceous and Cenozoic eras. Paleozoic structures may have been reactivated in Cenozoic time as well. The ENAM is characterized by N-NE maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This maximum compressional stress field is sub-parallel to the strike of the Atlantic Coast province fault systems. Camden, Augusta, Allendale, and Pen Branch faults are four of the many such reactivated faults along the southern part of ENAM. These faults are now buried under the 0-400 m of loosely consolidated Cretaceous and Cenozoic age sediments and thus are either only partially mapped or currently not recognized. Some of the objectives of this study are to map the subsurface expression and geometry of these faults and to investigate the post Cretaceous deformation and possible causes of fault reactivation on a passive margin. This study employs an integrated geophysical approach to investigate the upper 200 m of identified locations of the above mentioned faults. 2-D high-resolution shallow seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity surveys, GPR, 2-D electrical resistivity and well data are used for analyses and interpretation. Preliminary results suggest that Camden fault shows signs of Cenozoic reactivation through an approximately 30 m offset NW side up mainly along a steeply dipping fault zone in the basal contact of Coastal Plain sediments with the Carolina Piedmont. Drill

  12. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Central Mediterranean, the differential roll-back of the subducting Nubia Plate caused the Neogene-Quaternary extrusion of the Calabrian arc onto the oceanic Ionian slab, and the opening of the oceanic Tyrrhenian Basin, in the overriding Eurasia Plate. The differential motion at the edges of the arc was largely accommodated along transform faults that propagated across the orogenic belt. Since the Late Quaternary, the southern edge of the arc has been replaced by the roughly N-S oriented Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (SCRZ) that formed as the NNW-directed normal faults of NE Sicily, crossing the orogenic belt, have linked the NNE-oriented Tyrrhenian margin of southern Calabria with the NNW-trending Africa-Ionian boundary of southeastern Sicily. Our study focused on the Sicily shoulder of the SCRZ, where the transition zone between the extensional belt and the still active Nubia-Eurasia convergent margin is characterized by two distinct mobile crustal wedges, both lying on an upwarped Mantle, where a re-orientations of the σ1 is combined with volcanism (e.g. Etna, Aeolian islands) and a huge tectonic uplift. In southeastern Sicily, the Hyblean-Etnean region evolved, since about 0.85 Ma, as an indipendent crustal wedge, moving towards the NNW and pointing to the active Mt. Etna volcano. A local ENE crustal stretching accompanied the traslation of the block and pre-dated the ESE-oriented extension governing the propagation of the southernmost branch of the SCR, which started at about 330 ka B.P.. Similarly, the Peloritani-Aeolian region, flanked by the 125 ka-old NE-Sicily branch of the rift zone, represents a mostly submerged crustal wedge that migrates towards the NE, diverging from the rest of the Sicily collision zone and pointing to the Stromboli volcano. The Peloritani-Aeolian block is characterized by the occurrence of a wide central NE-oriented collapsed basin contoured by an actively uplifting region, whose tectonic boundaries are evidenced by a sharp

  13. Middle proterozoic tectonic activity in west Texas and eastern New Mexico and analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Precambrian history of west Texas and eastern New Mexico is complex, consisting of four events: Early Proterozoic orogenic activity (16309-1800 Ma), formation of the western granite-rhyolite province (WGRP) (1340-1410 Ma), Grenville age tectonics (1116-1232 Ma), and middle Proterozoic extension possibly related to mid-continent rifting (1086-1109 Ma). Pre-Grenville tectonics, Grenville tectonics, and mid-continent rifting are represented in this area by the Abilene gravity minimum (AGM) and bimodal igneous rocks, which are probably younger. We have used gravity modeling and the comparison of gravity and magnetic anomalies with rock types reported from wells penetrating Precambrian basement to study the AGM and middle Proterozoic extension in this area. The AGM is an east-northeast-trending, 600 km long, gravity low, which extends from the Texas-Oklahoma border through the central basin platform (CBP) to the Delaware basin. This feature appears to predate formation of the mafic body in the CBP (1163 Ma) and is most likely related to Pre-Grenville tectonics, possibly representing a continental margin arc batholith. Evidence of middle Proterozoic extension is found in the form of igneous bodies in the CBP, the Van Horn uplift, the Franklin Mountains, and the Sacramento Mountains. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies shows that paired gravity and magnetic highs are related to mafic intrusions in the upper crust. Mapping of middle Proterozoic igneous rocks and the paired anomalies outlines a 530 km diameter area of distributed east-west-oriented extension. The Debaca-Swisher terrain of shallow marine and clastic sedimentary rocks is age correlative with middle Proterozoic extension. These rocks may represent the lithology of possible Proterozoic exploration targets. Proterozoic structures were reactivated during the Paleozoic, affecting both the structure and deposition in the Permian basin.

  14. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  15. Integrating geology and geomorphology; the key to unlocking Quaternary tectonic framework of the San Andreas Fault zone in the San Gorgonio Pass region, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, K. J.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of southern California is a locus of long-continued Quaternary deformation and landscape evolution within a structural complexity, colloquially referred to as a knot in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone. The geomorphology of the SGP region reflects the complex history of geologic events involved in the formation and resolution of this structural knot. We recognize five morphologically distinct terrains in and around SGP; the San Gorgonio Block (SGB), Yucaipa Ridge (YRB), Pisgah Peak (PPB), Kitching Peak (KPB), and Devil's Garden blocks (DGB). Morphometric analyses, including drainage density, hypsometry, topographic profiles, and stream-power measurements and discontinuities, consistently demonstrate distinctions between the blocks. Our focus in this study is on the KPB and PPB terrains, both developed in crystalline rocks of San Gabriel Mountains type. KPB is bounded on the north by the Mission Creek strand of the SAF and on the east by the Whitewater Fault; PPB is bounded on the north by the San Bernardino strand of the SAF, which continues southeastward into the core of SGP and there separates PPB from KPB. KPB has significantly greater topographic relief than PPB, and the two blocks have internal morphometric and geologic characteristics that differ significantly. Canyons in KPB lack thick Quaternary alluvial fills, and hillslopes have shed numerous bedrock landslides. Canyons in PPB contain large volumes of Middle-Pleistocene through Holocene alluvium, associated with areally extensive relict geomorphic surfaces. We use the geomorphic differences, along with geologic factors, to reconstruct tectonically driven landscape evolution over the last 100-200 Ka years. The KPB and PPB both are bounded southward by contractional structures of the San Gorgonio Pass Fault zone (SGPFZ), but geologic complexity within this zone differs markedly south of each block. South of KPB, the SGPFZ consists of multiple thrust-fault strands, some

  16. Tectonic conditionality endogenic geoecological processes on a shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kholmianskaia, Galina

    2014-05-01

    Influence on a sea ecosystem of deep tectonic structures and processes is considered. From the point of view of studying endogenic geoecological processes and the phenomena ensuring origin of «endogenic» ecological dangers, us the following interests, first of all: a structurally-tectonic structure, a lithologic-stratigraphic section, hydro- and lithodynamic, a hydrology, seismic activity, endogenic ingress of heavy metals, a structure cryolithozone The map of endogenic dangers to water area Barents and Karasky seas is made. In the list of the endogenic dangers which have been taken out on the map, have entered: - Areas of heavy metals endogenic origins; - Zones of hyperactivity of corrosion processes; - Zones of the raised seismological activity; - Areas active roiling at seismological influences; - Zones of negative influence on biogene communities, - Characteristics of influence of natural electric field on lithodynamic processes. The most part flooded at the bottom of technogenic objects is located within the tectonic zones characterised by raised intensity of corrosion processes. The tectonic reasons, in the big degree, cause dynamics of the deep hydro-geological processes providing receipt in hydrosphere of the sea highly mineralized waters, negatively influencing on a biogenic component of an ecosystem. The most vulnerable are the biogenic forms living in deeper sites of the sea. On the map are allocated and ranked some zones endogenic hydro-geological dangers to biogenic communities. At displays of seismological activity endogenic tectonic nature process roiling the ground deposits, menacing to normal dwelling biota, leading to death ground invertebral organisms, to sharp pauperisation of a forage reserve benthos feeder will have fishes, to sharp reduction of population nectobentofages and predators. At last, infringement of a hydrochemical mode in aggregate with endogenic receipts can strengthen aforementioned negative processes. The geoecological map of

  17. An automatic continuous monitoring station for groundwater geochemistry at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Wei; Yang, Tsanyao F.; Fu, Ching-Chou; Hilton, David R.; Liu, Tsung-Kwei; Walia, Vivek; Lai, Tzu-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have revealed that gas compositions of fluid samples collected from southwestern Taiwan where many hot springs and mud volcanoes are distributed along tectonic sutures show significant variation prior to and after some disaster seismic events. Such variations, including radon activity, CH4/CO2, CO2/3He and 3He/4He ratios of gas compositions, are considered to be precursors of earthquakes in this area. To validate the relationship between fluid compositions and local earthquakes, a continuous monitoring station has been established at Yun-Shui, which is an artesian well located at an active fault zone in SW Taiwan. It is equipped with a radon detector and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) for in-situ measurement of the dissolved gas composition. Data is telemetered to Taipei so we are able to monitor variations of gas composition in real time. Furthermore, we also installed a syringe pump apparatus for the retrieval and temporal analysis of helium (SPARTAH) at this station. From the SPARTAH samples, we can obtain detailed time series records of H-O isotopic compositions, DIC concentration and δ13C isotopic ratios, and anion concentration of the water samples at this station. After continuous monitoring for about one year, some anomalies occurred prior to some local earthquakes. It demonstrates that this automated system is feasible for long-term continuous seismo-geochemical research in this area. Keywords: monitoring; geochemistry; isotope; dissolved gases; pre-seismic signal.

  18. Coseismic fault zone deformation caused by the 2014 Mw=6.2 Nagano-ken-hokubu, Japan, earthquake on the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line revealed with differential LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Ishimura, D.; Homma, S.; Mukoyama, S.; Niwa, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Mw = 6.2 Nagano-ken-hokubu earthquake struck northern Nagano, central Japan, on November 22, 2014, and accompanied a 9-km-long surface rupture mostly along the previously mapped N-NW trending Kamishiro fault, one of the segments of the 150-km-long Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system. While we mapped the rupture and measured vertical displacement of up to 80 cm at the field, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) shows densely spaced fringes on the hanging wall side, suggesting westward or uplift movement associated with thrust faulting. The mainshock focal mechanism and aftershock hypocenters indicate the source fault dips to the east but the InSAR images cannot exactly differentiate between horizontal and vertical movements and also lose coherence within and near the fault zone itself. To reveal near-field deformation and shallow fault slip, here we demonstrate a differential LiDAR analysis using a pair of 1 m-resolution pre-event and post-event bare Earth digital terrain models (DTMs) obtained from commercial LiDAR provider. We applied particle image velocity (PIV) method incorporating elevation change to obtain 3-D vectors of coseismic displacements (Mukoyama, 2011, J. Mt. Sci). Despite sporadic noises mostly due to local landslides, we detected up to 1.5 m net movement at the tip of the hanging wall, more than the field measurement of 80 cm. Our result implies that a 9-km-long rupture zone is not a single continuous fault but composed of two bow-shaped fault strands, suggesting a combination of shallow fault dip and modest amount (< 1.5 m) of slip. Eastward movement without notable subsidence on the footwall also supports the low angle fault dip near the surface, and significant fault normal contraction, observed as buckled cultural features across the fault zone. Secondary features, such as subsidiary back-thrust faults confirmed at the field, are also visible as a significant contrast of vector directions and slip amounts.

  19. Analysis of tectonic features in US southwest from Skylab photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Tubbesing, L.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Skylab photographs were utilized to study faults and tectonic lines in selected areas of the U.S. Southwest. Emphasis was on elements of the Texas Zone in the Mojave Desert and the tectonic intersection in southern Nevada. Transverse faults believed to represent the continuation of the Texas Zone were found to be anomalous in strike. This suggests that the Mojave Desert block was rotated counterclockwise as a unit with the Sierra Nevada. Left-lateral strike-slip faults in Lake Mead area are interpreted as elements of the Wasatch tectonic zone; their anomalous trend indicates that the Lake Mead area has rotated clockwise with the Colorado Plateau. A tectonic model relating major fault zones to fragmentation and rotation of crustal blocks was developed. Detailed correlation of the high resolution S190B metric camera photographs with U-2 photographs and geologic maps demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing S190B photographs for the identification of geomorphic features associated with recent and active faults and for the assessment of seismic hazards.

  20. Escape tectonics and the extrusion of Alaska: Past, present, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redfield, T.F.; Scholl, D. W.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; Beck, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The North Pacific Rim is a tectonically active plate boundary zone parts of which may be characterized as a laterally moving orogenic stream. Crustal blocks are transported along large-magnitude strike-slip faults in western Canada and central Alaska toward the Aleutian-Bering Sea subduction zones. Throughout much of the Cenozoic, at and west of its Alaskan nexus, the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream (NPRS) has undergone tectonic escape. During transport, relatively rigid blocks acquired paleomagnetic rotations and fault-juxtaposed boundaries while flowing differentially through the system, from their original point of accretion and entrainment toward the free face defined by the Aleutian-Bering Sea subduction zones. Built upon classical terrane tectonics, the NPRS model provides a new framework with which to view the mobilistic nature of the western North American plate boundary zone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Control of salt tectonics by young basement tectonics in Brazil`s offshore basins

    SciTech Connect

    Szatmari, P.; Mohriak, W.

    1995-08-01

    The Campos basin (offshore SE Brazil) is one of the most successful areas of oil exploration in South America. Discovered 20 years ago, its production (500,000 b/d) and reserves (2.9 billion barrels) are second only to Venezuela`s. This richness is due, to a large extent, to intense salt tectonics and the abundance of turbidites. Reactivated basement structures onshore provide a unique opportunity to understand the role of young basement tectonics in controlling salt tectonics and petroleum occurrence. The mountains of SE Brazil, over 1500 m high, formed by the reactivation of late Precambrian thrust and wrench zones under E-W compression, presumably caused by Mid-Atlantic ridge push. Coastal mountain ranges, up to 3000 m high, are limited to the segment of the Atlantic between the Vitoria-Trindade hotspot chain and the Rio Grande Rise. The coastal ranges formed as this segment of oceanic crust and adjacent continental margin were pushed WSW along a reactivated Precambrian wrench zone. To the north of this segment, salt tectonics is mostly due to basinward sliding on a tilted salt layer. Along the coastal ranges, to this is added basinward escape of the salt from beneath prograding sediments derived from the rising mountains. Extension above the salt tends to be compensated by compression farther basinward. Salt canopies, frequent in the Gulf of Mexico, occur only near the Abrolhos hotspot, where high temperatures during volcanic activity sharply reduced the viscosity of the salt.

  2. Role of the offshore Pedro Banks left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in the plate tectonic evolution of the northern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.; Saunders, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous workers, mainly mapping onland active faults on Caribbean islands, defined the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone as a 200-km-wide bounded by two active and parallel strike-slip faults: the Oriente fault along the northern edge of the Cayman trough with a GPS rate of 14 mm/yr, and and the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) with a rate of 5-7 mm/yr. In this study we use 5,000 km of industry and academic data from the Nicaraguan Rise south and southwest of the EPGFZ in the maritime areas of Jamaica, Honduras, and Colombia to define an offshore, 700-km-long, active, left-lateral strike-slip fault in what has previously been considered the stable interior of the Caribbean plate as determined from plate-wide GPS studies. The fault was named by previous workers as the Pedro Banks fault zone because a 100-km-long segment of the fault forms an escarpment along the Pedro carbonate bank of the Nicaraguan Rise. Two fault segments of the PBFZ are defined: the 400-km-long eastern segment that exhibits large negative flower structures 10-50 km in width, with faults segments rupturing the sea floor as defined by high resolution 2D seismic data, and a 300-km-long western segment that is defined by a narrow zone of anomalous seismicity first observed by previous workers. The western end of the PBFZ terminates on a Quaternary rift structure, the San Andres rift, associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism and thickening trends indicating initial rifting in the Late Miocene. The southern end of the San Andreas rift terminates on the western Hess fault which also exhibits active strands consistent with left-lateral, strike-slip faults. The total length of the PBFZ-San Andres rift-Southern Hess escarpment fault is 1,200 km and traverses the entire western end of the Caribbean plate. Our interpretation is similar to previous models that have proposed the "stable" western Caribbean plate is broken by this fault whose rate of displacement is less than the threshold

  3. A comprehensive view of Late Quaternary fluvial sediments and stratal architecture in a tectonically active basin: Influence of eustasy, climate, and tectonics on the Bengal Basin and Brahmaputra River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincavage, R.; Goodbred, S. L.; Williams, L. A.; Pickering, J.; Wilson, C.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.; Reitz, M. D.; Hossain, S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mondal, D. R.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    More than 130 closely-spaced (~3-5 km) boreholes have been drilled along five transects in the upper Bengal Basin, providing the first detailed record of the stratigraphic architecture and provenance of the entire Late Quaternary fluviodeltaic sedimentary succession of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta (GBMD). This effort is part of BanglaPIRE, an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort aimed at unraveling the history and mechanisms of river-tectonic-basin interactions in the GBMD and Bengal basin, around which three tectonic plates converge. Following the Younger-Dryas, the onset of a strong summer monsoon coincident with continued eustatic sea-level rise initiated construction of the modern delta and rapid development of a thick (up to 80 m) succession of fluvial and deltaic sediments. These deposits illustrate several (3-4) avulsions and asymmetric occupations of the Brahmaputra River in the tectonically active Sylhet Basin. We hypothesize that the longer occupation periods (10 3 years) may be classified as major river avulsions driven by autogenic fluvial processes, whereas shorter occupation periods (10 2 years) reflect minor distributive events that may have been initiated by allogenic forcing via floods or earthquakes. Subsidence rates in Sylhet Basin, driven by an active foredeep, are relatively high (~5 mm/yr); however, the Brahmaputra River does not regularly migrate towards this side of the delta. Annual widespread flooding of Sylhet Basin may negate the potential topographic attraction for the system to be steered in this direction. Furthermore, a gentle westward topographic tilt of the active thrust front of the Tripura fold belt appears to have forced lateral steering of the Brahmaputra River and initiated erosion of a bench-cut terrace into an adjacent Pleistocene landform. Tectonic effects over longer timescales (10 3 years) are revealed by the presence of sediment with a unique provenance at the core of regional anticlines, which

  4. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  5. Combined effects of Eurasia/Sunda oblique convergence and East-Tibetan crustal flow on the active tectonics of Burma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude; Maurin, Thomas; Masson, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    It is widely accepted that deformation of the India/Sunda plate is the result of partitioned hyper oblique convergence. Presently, sub-meridian dextral strike slip faulting accommodates this India/Sunda motion in a buffer zone, the Burma platelet. This wide dextral strike slip shear zone is complicated by the side effect of the Tibet plateau collapse that can be described in term of crustal flow and gravity tectonics. The loss of potential energy related to this plateau collapse affects most of the Burmese platelet particularly in its northernmost part. Interaction of these two distinct geodynamic processes is recorded in the GPS based regional strain field, the analysis of seismic focal mechanism but also from direct geologic observations both onshore and offshore Myanmar and Bangladesh. We propose the apparent E-W shortening component of this so called partitioned hyper-oblique subduction is only the effect of regional gravitational forces related to the Tibet plateau collapse whereas the NS strike slip faulting accommodates the India/Sunda motion.

  6. 77 FR 71167 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59--Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Related Preparations Production), Lincoln, Nebraska Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. submitted a notification of proposed production activity for the...

  7. Late Pleistocene to Historical Activity of the Hovd Fault (Mongolian Altay) from Tectonic Geomorphology and Paleoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M. A.; Battogtokh, D.; Ritz, J. F.; Kurtz, R.; Braucher, R.; Klinger, Y.; Ulzibat, M.; Chimed, O.; Demberel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Active tectonics of western Mongolia is dominated by large strike-slip fault systems that produced great historical earthquakes: the Bulnay fault (Mw 8.1 and 8.4 in 1905), the Fu-Yun fault (Mw 8.0 in 1931) and the Bogd fault (Mw 8.1 in 1957). Central to these faults is the Altay Range that accommodates ~4 mm/yr of right-lateral motion. An earthquake of similar magnitude occurred in 1761 and has been attributed to the Hovd fault were seemingly fresh surface rupture was reported in 1985. Here, we study the Ar-Hötöl section of the Hovd fault where surface rupture was described over a length of ~200 km. Detailed mapping of stream gullies from high-resolution Pleiades satellite images show a consistent pattern of right-lateral offsets from a few meters to ~500 m. At Climbing Rock, we surveyed a gully offset by 75 ± 5 m. The associated surface was sampled for 10Be profile which yields an exposure age of 154 ± 20 ka. The resulting minimal right-lateral slip rate ranges 0.4-0.6 mm/yr. However, drainage reconstruction suggests this surface may have recorded as much as 400 ± 20 m of cumulative offset. This implies the Hovd fault may accommodate as much as 2.6 ± 0.4 mm/yr, which would make it the main active fault of the Altay. At a smaller scale, TLS topography documents offsets in the order of 2.5-5 m that likely correspond to the most recent surface-rupturing event with Mw ~8. A value of 2.8-3.0 m is reconstructed from a Uiger grave dated AD 750-840. At Marmot Creek and Small Creek, short drainages flow across the fault and form ponds against the main scarp. Two paleoseimic trenches reveal similar stratigraphy with numerous peat layers that developed over alluvial sands. The fault exhibits near vertical strands affecting pre-ponding units as well as a well-developed peat unit radiocarbon-dated AD 1465-1635. This unit likely corresponds to the ground surface at the time of the last rupture. It is overlain with a sandy pond unit on top of which a second continuous peat

  8. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Okubo, Paul G; Shearer, Peter M

    2003-04-18

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (>/=13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  9. The petrology, phase relations and tectonic setting of basalts from the taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand and the Kermadec Island arc - havre trough, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Graham, Ian J.; Peter Kokelaar, B.; Cole, James W.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    1990-10-01

    Volcanism in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and the Kermadec arc-Havre Trough (KAHT) is related to westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate. The tectonic setting of the TVZ is continental whereas in KAHT it is oceanic and in these two settings the relative volumes of basalt differ markedly. In TVZ, basalts form a minor proportion (< 1%) of a dominant rhyolite (97%)-andesite association while in KAHT, basalts and basaltic andesites are the major rock types. Neither the convergence rate between the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates nor the extension rates in the back-arc region or the dip of the Pacific Plate Wadati-Benioff zone differ appreciably between the oceanic and continental segments. The distance between the volcanic front and the axis of the back-arc basin decreases from the Kermadec arc to TVZ and the distance between trench and volcanic front increases from around 200 km in the Kermadec arc to 280 km in TVZ. These factors may prove significant in determining the extent to which arc and backarc volcanism in subduction settings are coupled. All basalts from the Kermadec arc are porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) with assemblages generally dominated by plagioclase but with olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. A single dredge sample from the Havre Trough back arc contains olivine and plagioclase microphenocrysts in glassy pillow rind and is mildly alkaline (< 1% normative nepheline) contrasting with the tholeiitic nature of the other basalts. Basalts from the TVZ contain phenocryst assemblages of olivine + plagioclase ± clinopyroxene; orthopyroxene phenocrysts occur only in the most evolved basalts and basaltic andesites from both TVZ and the Kermadec Arc. Sparsely porphyritic primitive compositions (Mg/(Mg+Fe 2) > 70) are high in Al 2O 3 (>16.5%), and project in the olivine volume of the basalt tetrahedron. They contain olivine (Fo 87) phenocrysts and plagioclase (> An 60) microphenocrysts. These magmas have ratios of

  10. Response of Cenozoic turbidite system to tectonic activity and sea-level change off the Zambezi Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelino, Jude A.; Reichert, Christian; Jokat, Wilfried

    2017-03-01

    Submarine fans and turbidite systems are important and sensitive features located offshore from river deltas that archive tectonic events, regional climate, sea level variations and erosional process. Very little is known about the sedimentary structure of the 1800 km long and 400 km wide Mozambique Fan, which is fed by the Zambezi and spreads out into the Mozambique Channel. New multichannel seismic profiles in the Mozambique Basin reveal multiple feeder systems of the upper fan that have been active concurrently or consecutively since Late Cretaceous. We identify two buried, ancient turbidite systems off Mozambique in addition to the previously known Zambezi-Channel system and another hypothesized active system. The oldest part of the upper fan, located north of the present-day mouth of the Zambezi, was active from Late Cretaceous to Eocene times. Regional uplift caused an increased sediment flux that continued until Eocene times, allowing the fan to migrate southwards under the influence of bottom currents. Following the mid-Oligocene marine regression, the Beira High Channel-levee complex fed the Mozambique Fan from the southwest until Miocene times, reworking sediments from the shelf and continental slope into the distal abyssal fan. Since the Miocene, sediments have bypassed the shelf and upper fan region through the Zambezi Valley system directly into the Zambezi Channel. The morphology of the turbidite system off Mozambique is strongly linked to onshore tectonic events and the variations in sea level and sediment flux.

  11. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast...-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Signal International Texas GP, LLC, in Orange, Texas....

  12. Tectonics of China: Continental scale cataclastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John J., Jr.

    inference is made from recently published plate tectonic interpretations. Geologic maps show that there are six elements and that each element has a Precambrian, crystalline core which is surrounded by upper Paleozoic continental margin suites of rocks, including subduction complexes, among others. Geologic data on ophiolites demonstrate that the brittle elements and their margins were juxtaposed and then welded together along suture zones during Permian and Triassic time to make China. Cenofcoic plate motions affecting China resulted in the collision with India where it converges with southwest China and the extension in eastern China where island arcs move away from the mainland and where grabens are actively forming. The juxtaposition to Siberia, which acts as a buttress against northern China, explains the compression of western China, and the absence of a buttress in the Pacific Ocean explains why eastern China can extend. Furthermore, laboratory data on the mechanical behavior of rock under conditions analogous to the shallow crustal conditions of interest in China show that all rocks are weaker in extension than they are in compression. Basement rock in western China is strong because it is compressed, but this same basement rock is weak in eastern China because it is in extension. The tectonics of China or, in mechanistic terms, the way in which the mechanical framework of China responds to Cenozoic boundary forces was a result of China's previous plate tectonic history. Crystalline cores are the rigid blocks that form brittle elements. Both the continental margin suites and the sutures are the ductile zones. The sutures and sediment patterns seen in the basins and ranges of China can be explained in terms of this tectonic scenario.

  13. Geodetic and geological evidence of active tectonics in south-western Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, G.; Bruno, V.; Cocorullo, C.; Cultrera, F.; Ferranti, L.; Guglielmino, F.; Guzzetta, L.; Mattia, M.; Monaco, C.; Pepe, F.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated geological, geodetic and marine geophysical data provide evidence of active deformation in south-western Sicily, in an area spatially coincident with the macroseismic zone of the destructive 1968 Belice earthquake sequence. Even though the sequence represents the strongest seismic event recorded in Western Sicily in historical times, focal solutions provided by different authors are inconclusive on possible faulting mechanism, which ranges from thrusting to transpression, and the seismogenic source is still undefined. Interferometric (DInSAR) observations reveal a differential ground motion on a SW-NE alignment between Campobello di Mazara and Castelvetrano (CCA), located just west of the maximum macroseismic sector. In addition, new GPS campaign-mode data acquired across the CCA alignment documents NW-SE contractional strain accumulation. Morphostructural analysis allowed to associate the alignment detected through geodetic measurements with a topographic offset of Pleistocene marine sediments. The on-land data were complemented by new high-resolution marine geophysical surveys, which indicate recent contraction on the offshore extension of the CCA alignment. The discovery of archaeological remains displaced by a thrust fault associated with the alignment provided the first likely surface evidence of coseismic and/or aseismic deformation related to a seismogenic source in the area. Results of the integrated study supports the contention that oblique thrusting and folding in response to NW-SE oriented contraction is still active. Although we are not able to associate the CCA alignment to the 1968 seismic sequence or to the historical earthquakes that destroyed the ancient Greek city of Selinunte, located on the nearby coastline, our result must be incorporated in the seismic hazard evaluation of this densely populated area of Sicily.

  14. Tectonic structure of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leychenkov, German; Grikurov, Garrik; Golynsky, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    First overviews of tectonic structure of the Southern Continent were made by the pioneers of Antarctic earth science investigations almost 100 years ago. Despite rapidly advancing international geological studies under the Antarctic Treaty, the presentations of Antarctic tectonic structure remained largely speculative until the end of the past century when implementation of modern analytical and remote-sensing research technologies enabled compilation of more credible tectonic models of Antarctica. The East Antarctic bedrock consists mainly of the Precambrian crystalline complexes and the Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic platform units. Crystalline Shield is locally complicated by Neoproterozoic aulacogenes and Late Paleozoic to Mesozoic rifts. Shield assemblages reliably recognized in coastal outcrops indicate the predominant occurrence of Archean cratonic nuclei and Mesoproterozoic mobile belts. The undisturbed platform cover strata are exposed in East Antarctica mainly along its boundary with West Antarctica. Tectonic structure of ice-covered regions (more that 99% of the East Antarctic territory) is interpreted using mostly magnetic and bedrock topography data, but other geophysical and geological information (satellite, airborne and over-ice gravity; seismology; active seismics; erratics; detrital zircons dates; etc.) is also important. Archean cratons are geologically documented in western Dronning Maud Land, Enderby Land, Princess Elizabeth Land and in the southern Prince Charles Mts. Their distribution under the ice is marked by a specific magnetic pattern including low-amplitude mosaic and/or high-amplitude long-wavelength anomalies. The most extensive ancient craton being 1000 km across is believed to extend from the southern Prince Charles Mts. to the Gamburtsev Mts. Mesoproterozoic mobile belts are distinguished by elongated high-amplitude magnetic anomalies and are mapped along the costal area as the zone of 250-600 km wide. The Gamburtsev Mts. area is also

  15. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  16. Precise Landslide Displacement Time Series from Continuous GPS Observations in Tectonically Active and Cold Regions: A Case Study in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) has been frequently used as a scientific tool to detect potential earth mass movements and to track creeping landslides. In this study, we investigated four-years of continuous GPS data (September 2006-July 2010) recorded at a landslide site in Alaska. This GPS station (AC55) was installed on an un-identified creeping site by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project, which was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The landslide moves with a steady horizontal velocity of 5.5 cm/year toward NEE, and had a subsidence rate of 2.6 cm/year. There was a considerable correlation between annual snow loading and melting cycles and seasonal variations of the landslide displacements. The seasonal movements vary year to year with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.5 cm and 1.0 cm in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. This study addresses three challenging issues in applying GPS for landslide monitoring in tectonically active and cold regions. The three challenges include (1) detecting GPS-derived positions that could be contaminated by the snow and ice accumulated on GPS antennas during cold seasons, (2) establishing a precise local reference frame and assessing its accuracy, and (3) excluding local seasonal ground motions from GPS-derived landslide displacements. The methods introduced in this study will be useful for GPS landslide monitoring in other tectonically active and/or cold regions.

  17. Channel morphometry, sediment transport, and implications for tectonic activity and surficial ages of Titan basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, Richard; Clayton, Jordan A.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial features on Titan and drainage basins on Earth are remarkably similar despite differences in gravity and surface composition. We determined network bifurcation (Rb) ratios for five Titan and three terrestrial analog basins. Tectonically-modified Earth basins have Rb values greater than the expected range (3.0–5.0) for dendritic networks; comparisons with Rb values determined for Titanbasins, in conjunction with similarities in network patterns, suggest that portions of Titan's north polar region are modified by tectonic forces. Sufficient elevation data existed to calculate bed slope and potential fluvial sedimenttransport rates in at least one Titanbasin, indicating that 75 mm water ice grains (observed at the Huygens landing site) should be readily entrained given sufficient flow depths of liquid hydrocarbons. Volumetric sedimenttransport estimates suggest that ~6700–10,000 Titan years (~2.0–3.0 x 105 Earth years) are required to erode this basin to its minimum relief (assuming constant 1 m and 1.5 m flows); these lowering rates increase to ~27,000–41,000 Titan years (~8.0–12.0 x 105 Earth years) when flows in the north polar region are restricted to summer months.

  18. Channel morphometry, sediment transport, and implications for tectonic activity and surficial ages of Titan basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, R.; Clayton, J.A.; Kirk, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial features on Titan and drainage basins on Earth are remarkably similar despite differences in gravity and surface composition. We determined network bifurcation (Rb) ratios for five Titan and three terrestrial analog basins. Tectonically-modified Earth basins have Rb values greater than the expected range (3.0-5.0) for dendritic networks; comparisons with Rb values determined for Titan basins, in conjunction with similarities in network patterns, suggest that portions of Titan's north polar region are modified by tectonic forces. Sufficient elevation data existed to calculate bed slope and potential fluvial sediment transport rates in at least one Titan basin, indicating that 75mm water ice grains (observed at the Huygens landing site) should be readily entrained given sufficient flow depths of liquid hydrocarbons. Volumetric sediment transport estimates suggest that ???6700-10,000 Titan years (???2.0-3.0??105 Earth years) are required to erode this basin to its minimum relief (assuming constant 1m and 1.5m flows); these lowering rates increase to ???27,000-41,000 Titan years (???8.0-12.0??105 Earth years) when flows in the north polar region are restricted to summer months. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time.

  20. Tectonic burial and exhumation cycles tracked by muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology in a strike-slip fault zone, central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idleman, Lauren; Cosca, Michael A.; Heizler, Matthew T.; Thomson, Stuart N.; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.

    2014-02-01

    Muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages from the eastern margin of the Niğde massif in central Anatolia track the timing of initial exhumation, reburial, and final exhumation and cooling of metamorphic rocks deformed within a strike-slip fault zone. Although the ages of initial and final cooling were known from previous studies, our new results document the timing of the reheating/reburial event. Muscovite from four of eight gneiss samples have Late Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages that date initial cooling at ~ 75 Ma. The remaining samples have perturbed spectra that climb to Late Cretaceous ages with increasing extraction temperatures during analysis. These perturbed samples are located beneath a faulted unconformity overlain by Paleogene sedimentary deposits that were derived in part from the metamorphic rocks, then buried, metamorphosed, and deformed under greenschist facies conditions. Samples close to the faulted unconformity are more perturbed than structurally deeper samples. The age of the thermal perturbation is determined at 30 ± 5 Ma using multi-diffusion domain modeling of K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar data from two gneiss samples, one located close to the unconformity and one at a structurally deeper level. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar results and modeled K-feldspar temperature-time histories show that the eastern margin of the Niğde massif experienced a reheating event that peaked at ~ 30 Ma. The thermal pulse has been attributed to reburial associated with transpression in the Ecemiş segment of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone along the eastern margin of the Niğde massif. Activity of this fault zone may represent a far-field expression of the onset of collision of Arabia with Eurasia in SE Anatolia.

  1. Pleistocene calcrete deposits from southern Spain as indicators of climatic conditions and tectonic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Maria J.; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Martin-Banda, Raquel

    2014-05-01

    Quaternary calcrete horizons are common weathering products in arid and semi-arid regions of southern Spain. We have analysed a calcrete profile developed within poorly sorted gravels of an alluvial fan. These deposits were sourced from the Carrascoy Range, a fault generated mountain front located in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera (South Spain). During the Pleistocene the climate in southern Spain was dry, either in the form of semi-arid/arid conditions or as seasonal moisture deficits. Alluvial channel incision trends appeared to be disrupted by episodes of alluvial aggradation produced during cold and dry glacial periods. At the top of the aggradational phases, pedogenic processes operated profusely, and, as a result, several calcretes (stage V mature calcrete profiles) were formed. We have analysed one of these calcrete profiles that appears subvertical within the forelimb of a regional fold in relation to the Carrascoy Fault activity. The calcrete consist of a densely cemented hardpan horizon (20 to 40 cm thick) overlain by a thin, 2-cm thick laminar crust. Below the hardpan horizon, carbonate concentrations gradually decrease to clast-coating textures. Calcretes form progressively and a wide range of carbonate phases occur within a single horizon, being the laminar crust the final stage of evolution within a mature pedogenic calcrete deposit, and, therefore, the carbonate within it postdates all the cement phases within the profile. The location of the latest cement phase of the calcrete deposit has been estimated by microscopic observations (to establish their suitability for dating) together with a detailed sedimentological analysis of the calcrete profile in the field. The laminar crust consists of less than 1 mm thick laminae characterized by the alternation of layers of micrite and layers of micrite with ooids, detrital grains and clays indicating environmental conditions in which sedimentation rates were low and episodic. By using radiometric

  2. Differential structural and geomorphic mountain-front evolution in an active continental collision zone: the NW Pamir, southern Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Hilley, G. E.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Coutand, I.

    2002-12-01

    Western, central, and eastern segments of the Trans Alai mountain front in the northern Pamir of Kyrgyzstan have accommodated varying degrees of approachment of the Pamir orogen with respect to the Tien Shan mountains to the north. Ongoing collision between the northwestern corner of the Indian indenter and Eurasia has resulted in closure of the intramontane Alai Valley, which separates the Tien Shan and Trans Alai (Pamir) ranges. The different segments highlight the processes of shaping tectonically active mountain fronts in a semi-arid environment. In this study, we have characterized this variation in processes with compilations of regional tectonic information, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps, topographic analyses, and interpretation of seismic reflection data. Along the sinuous western segment of the mountain front, dextrally oblique thrusting has created a wide (>500m) zone of highly erodible fault gouge. This fault zone impinges on the southern Tien Shan, but complete basin closure is prevented by erosion of the westward-flowing Kyzilsu River; the Kyzilsu valley forms the only outlet and is the vestige of a formerly contiguous sedimentary basin linking the Tarim Basin of China with the Tadjik Depression in the west. Numerous large landslides rooted in the fault zone have covered the trace of the active fault, which is partially undercut by the Kyzilsu River. Older, large landslides in this setting are associated with different levels of fluvial terraces of the former or present course of the Kyzilsu River, suggesting a causative relation between lateral fluvial scouring, failure of mechanically weak mountain fronts, ongoing faulting, and mass transfer. Along the linear central segment, deformation is confined to a narrow single south-dipping thrust fault that juxtaposes Pliocene/Pleistocene and Holocene conglomerates. In this sector, the mountain front has numerous Holocene offsets. This prevailing structural style and the long-term deformation are

  3. Differential structural and geomorphic mountain-front evolution in an active continental collision zone: the NW Pamir, southern Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Hilley, G. E.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Coutand, I.

    2003-04-01

    Western, central, and eastern segments of the Trans Alai mountain front in the northern Pamir of Kyrgyzstan have accommodated varying degrees of approachment of the Pamir orogen with respect to the Tien Shan mountains to the north. Ongoing collision between the northwestern corner of the Indian indenter and Eurasia has resulted in closure of the intramontane Alai Valley, which separates the Tien Shan and Trans Alai (Pamir) ranges. The different segments highlight the processes of shaping tectonically active mountain fronts in a semi-arid environment. In this study, we have characterized this variation in processes with compilations of regional tectonic information, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps, topographic analyses, and interpretation of seismic reflection data. Along the sinuous western segment of the mountain front, dextrally oblique thrusting has created a wide (>500m) zone of highly erodible fault gouge. This fault zone impinges on the southern Tien Shan, but complete basin closure is prevented by erosion of the westward-flowing Kyzilsu River; the Kyzilsu valley forms the only outlet and is the vestige of a formerly contiguous sedimentary basin linking the Tarim Basin of China with the Tadjik Depression in the west. Numerous large landslides rooted in the fault zone have covered the trace of the active fault, which is partially undercut by the Kyzilsu River. Older, large landslides in this setting are associated with different levels of fluvial terraces of the former or present course of the Kyzilsu River, suggesting a causative relation between lateral fluvial scouring, failure of mechanically weak mountain fronts, ongoing faulting, and mass transfer. Along the linear central segment, deformation is confined to a narrow single south-dipping thrust fault that juxtaposes Pliocene/Pleistocene and Holocene conglomerates. In this sector, the mountain front has numerous Holocene offsets. This prevailing structural style and the long-term deformation are

  4. Tectonic interpretation of the 13 february 2001, mw 6.6, El Salvador Earthquake: New evidences of coseismic surface rupture and paleoseismic activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Diaz, J. J.; Canora, C.; Villamor, P.; Capote, R.; Alvarez-Gomez, J. A.; Berryman, K.; Bejar, M.; Tsige, M.

    2009-04-01

    In February 2001 a major strike slip earthquake stroke the central part of El Salvador causing hundreds of people killed, thousands injured and extensive damage. After this event the scientific effort was mainly focused on the study of the enormous and catastrophic landslides triggered by this event and no evidences of surface faulting were detected. This earthquake was produced by the reactivation of the Ilopango-San Vicente segment of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Recently, a surface rupture displacement on the ground was identified. The analysis of aerial and field photographs taken few hours after the event and the mapping of the conserved ground structures shows a pure strike-slip displacement ranging from 20 to 50 cm, with secondary features indicating dextral shearing. The paleoseismic analysis made through the excavation of six trenches and Radiocarbon dating indicate a minimum slip rate of 2.0 mm/yr and a recurrence of major ruptures (Mw > 6.5) lower than 500 yr. These evidences give interesting local data to increase our understanding about the tectonic behavior and the way how active deformation develops along the northern limit of the forearc sliver related to the Centroamerican subduction area.

  5. The active zone T-bar--a plasticity module?

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Carolin; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2010-09-01

    The synaptic active zone, the site where Ca(2+)-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles takes place, is commonly associated with protein-rich, electron-dense cytomatrices. The molecular composition and functional role of active zones, especially in the context of vesicular exo- and endocytosis, are under intense investigation. Per se, Drosophila synapses, which display so-called T-bars as electron-dense specializations, should be a highly suitable model system, as they allow for a combination of efficient genetics with ultrastructural and electrophysiological analyses. However, it needed a biochemical approach of the Buchner laboratory to "molecularly" access the T-bar by identification of the CAST/ERC-family member Bruchpilot as the first T-bar-residing protein. Genetic elimination of Bruchpilot revealed that the protein is essential for T-bar formation, calcium channel clustering, and hence proper vesicle fusion and patterned synaptic plasticity. Recently, Bruchpilot was shown to directly shape the T-bar, likely by adopting an elongated conformation. Moreover, first mechanisms that control the availability of Bruchpilot for T-bar assembly were described. This review seeks to summarize the information on T-bar structure, as well as on functional aspects, formulating the hypothesis that T-bars are genuine "plasticity modules."

  6. Southeast Papuan crustal tectonics: Imaging extension and buoyancy of an active rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abers, G. A.; Eilon, Z.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Kim, YH.; Obrebski, M.; Dieck, C.

    2016-02-01

    Southeast Papua hosts the world's youngest ultra-high-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks. These rocks are found in an extensional setting in metamorphic core complexes. Competing theories of extensional shear zones or diapiric upwelling have been suggested as driving their exhumation. To test these theories, we analyze the CDPAPUA temporary array of 31 land and 8 seafloor broadband seismographs. Seismicity shows that deformation is being actively accommodated on the core complex bounding faults, offset by transfer structures in a manner consistent with overall north-south extension rather than radial deformation. Rayleigh wave dispersion curves are jointly inverted with receiver functions for crustal velocity structure. They show crustal thinning beneath the core complexes of 30-50% and very low shear velocities at all depths beneath the core complexes. On the rift flanks velocities resemble those of normal continents and increase steadily with depth. There is no evidence for velocity inversions that would indicate that a major density inversion exists to drive crustal diapirs. Also, low-density melt seems minor within the crust. Together with the extension patterns apparent in seismicity, these data favor an extensional origin for the core complexes and limit the role of diapirism as a secondary exhumation mechanism, although deeper mantle diapirs may be undetected. A small number of intermediate-depth earthquakes, up to 120 km deep, are identified for the first time just northeast of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. They occur at depths similar to those recorded by UHP rocks and similar temperatures, indicating that the modern seismicity occurs at the setting that generates UHP metamorphism.

  7. Tree Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Peter R.

    2004-09-01

    Nature often replicates her processes at different scales of space and time in differing media. Here a tree-trunk cross section I am preparing for a dendrochronological display at the Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Nature Sanctuary (Calvert County, Maryland) dried and cracked in a way that replicates practically all the planform features found along the Mid-Oceanic Ridge (see Figure 1). The left-lateral offset of saw marks, contrasting with the right-lateral ``rift'' offset, even illustrates the distinction between transcurrent (strike-slip) and transform faults, the latter only recognized as a geologic feature, by J. Tuzo Wilson, in 1965. However, wood cracking is but one of many examples of natural processes that replicate one or several elements of lithospheric plate tectonics. Many of these examples occur in everyday venues and thus make great teaching aids, ``teachable'' from primary school to university levels. Plate tectonics, the dominant process of Earth geology, also occurs in miniature on the surface of some lava lakes, and as ``ice plate tectonics'' on our frozen seas and lakes. Ice tectonics also happens at larger spatial and temporal scales on the Jovian moons Europa and perhaps Ganymede. Tabletop plate tectonics, in which a molten-paraffin ``asthenosphere'' is surfaced by a skin of congealing wax ``plates,'' first replicated Mid-Oceanic Ridge type seafloor spreading more than three decades ago. A seismologist (J. Brune, personal communication, 2004) discovered wax plate tectonics by casually and serendipitously pulling a stick across a container of molten wax his wife and daughters had used in making candles. Brune and his student D. Oldenburg followed up and mirabile dictu published the results in Science (178, 301-304).

  8. Solar wind control of auroral zone geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Searls, C.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    Solar wind magnetosphere energy coupling functions are analyzed using linear prediction filtering with 2.5 minute data. The relationship of auroral zone geomagnetic activity to solar wind power input functions are examined, and a least squares prediction filter, or impulse response function is designed from the data. Computed impulse response functions are observed to have characteristics of a low pass filter with time delay. The AL index is found well related to solar wind energy functions, although the AU index shows a poor relationship. High frequency variations of auroral indices and substorm expansions are not predictable with solar wind information alone, suggesting influence by internal magnetospheric processes. Finally, the epsilon parameter shows a poorer relationship with auroral geomagnetic activity than a power parameter, having a VBs solar wind dependency.

  9. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  10. Surface Rupture of the 2005 Kashmir, Pakistan, Earthquake and its Active Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, H.; Nakata, T.; Tsutsumi, H.; Kondo, H.; Sugito, N.; Awata, Y.; Akhtar, S. S.; Majid, A.; Khattak, W.; Awan, A. A.; Yeats, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    The 8th October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of Mw 7.6 struck the westernmost area of the Indian-Eurasian collision zone, resulting in the worst earthquake disaster ever recorded along the frontal Himalaya. Although none of the historical Himalayan earthquakes is reported to have produced primary surface rupture, our field mapping reveals that the 2005 earthquake accompanied a NW-trending ~70-km-long distinctive surface rupture with maximum and mean vertical separations of ~7 m and ~3 m, respectively. Typical surface expression of faulting is a NE-side-up fault scarp or warp with surface shortening features at its base and tension cracks on its crest. Bulging and back-tilting are also observed on the upthrown side at many places. The surface rupture is subdivided into three geometrical segments separated by small steps. Location of the hypocenter suggests that the rupture was initiated at a deep portion of the northern-central segment boundary and bilaterally propagated to eventually break three segments. Mapped surface rupture trace clearly shows that neither the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) nor the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is responsible for the earthquake, but a geomorphologically-evident active fault within the Sub-Himalaya, the Balakot-Garhi fault, is a causative fault, although a part of the Balakot-Garhi fault appears to coincide with the surface trace of the MBT. Cumulative vertical separation of the most extensively recognized fluvial terrace surface is 7-8 times larger than the 2005 separation, implying occurrence of 7-8 similar earthquakes after the surface abandonment. If this deeply-incised fill surface is related to sediment yield increase due to the last major glaciation around 20 ka, the rupture interval and vertical slip rate of the Balakot-Garhi fault are estimated to be on the order of ~3000 years and ~1 mm/yr, respectively. By using the seismologically determined fault dip of ~30 degrees, horizontal shortening rate across the fault is then

  11. Anatomy of mass transport deposits in the Dead Sea: sedimentary processes in an active tectonic hypersaline basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Nicolas; Hadzhiivanova, Elitsa; Neugebauer, Ina; Brauer, Achim; Schwab, Markus; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Continental archives such as interplate endorheic lacustrine sedimentary basins provide an excellent source of data for studying regional climate, seismicity and environmental changes through time. Such is the case for the sediments that were deposited in the Dead Sea basin, a tectonically active pull-apart structure along the Dead Sea fault (DSF). This elongated basin is characterized by steep slopes and a deep and flat basin-floor, which are constantly shaped by seismicity and climate. In this study, we present initial results on the sedimentology and internal structure of mass transport deposits in the Pleistocene Dead Sea. The database used for this study consists of a long core retrieved at ~300 m water depth in the deepest part of the Dead Sea as part of an international scientific effort under the auspice of the ICDP. Micro-facies analysis coupled by elemental scanning (µXRF), granulometry and petrophysical measurements (magnetic susceptibility) have been carried out on selected intervals in order to decipher and identify the source-to-sink processes and controlling mechanisms behind the formation of mass transport deposits. The findings of this study allowed defining and characterizing the mass transport deposits into separate sedimentary facies according to the lake level and limnological conditions. Investigating sediments from the deep Dead Sea basin allowed better understanding and deciphering the depositional processes in relation with the tectonic forces shaping this basin.

  12. Analysis of radar images of the active volcanic zone at Krafla, Iceland: The effects of look azimuth biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The geomorphic expression of Mid-Ocean-Ridge (MOR) volcanism in a subaerial setting occurs uniquely on Earth in Iceland, and the most recent MOR eruptive activity has been concentrated in the Northeastern Volcanic Zone in an area known as Krafla. Within the Krafla region are many of the key morphologic elements of MOR-related basaltic volcanism, as well as volcanic explosion craters, subglacial lava shields, tectonic fissure swarms known as gjar, and basaltic-andesite flows with well developed ogives (pressure-ridges). The objective was to quantify the degree to which the basic volcanic and structural features can be mapped from directional SAR imagery as a function of the look azimuth. To accomplish this, the current expression of volcanic and tectonic constructs was independently mapped within the Krafla region on the E, W, and N-looking SAR images, as well as from SPOT Panchromatic imagery acquired in 1987. The initial observations of the E, W, and N images indicates that fresh a'a lava surfaces are extremely radar bright (rough at 3 cm to meter scales) independent of look direction; this suggests that these flows do not have strong flow direction related structures at meter and cm scales, which is consistent with typical Icelandic a'a lava surfaces in general. The basic impression from a preliminary analysis of the effects of look azimuth biasing on interpretation of the geology of an active MOR volcanic zone is that up to 30 percent of the diagnostic features can be missed at any given look direction, but that having two orthogonal look direction images is probably sufficient to prevent gross misinterpretation.

  13. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  14. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  15. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  16. Initiation of plate tectonics from post-magma ocean chemical overturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, B. J.; Bercovici, D.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the initiation of plate tectonics on Earth from thermo-chemical mantle convection after magma ocean solidification. Plate tectonics likely began early in Earth's history, based on Archean arc and back-arc rock assemblages such as greenstone belts. Furthermore, the presence of zircons as early as 4.4 Ga indicates that plate tectonics, or at least some type of surface recycling, was active on Earth soon after magma ocean solidification. However, initiating plate tectonic style surface recycling is extremely difficult. In the modern day Earth weak zones created through plate tectonic processes, such as oceanic fracture zones and dormant spreading ridges, provide nucleation points for new subduction zones, and hence the maintenance of plate tectonics. In the early Earth, prior to plate tectonics, this mechanism is absent. Therefore another process responsible for forming the lithospheric weak zones that are requisite for the initiation of plate tectonics is necessary. We hypothesize that thermo-chemical convection in the mantle immediately following magma ocean solidification will create damaged weak zones before the proto-lithosphere cools and becomes to stiff to sink back into the mantle (i.e. before a stagnant lid forms). We model an initially hot mantle, cooling from the surface such that it undergoes convective instability. We use a damage-grainsize feedback mechanism (referred to as grain-damage) for lithospheric weak zone formation; this mechanism causes lithospheric weakening due to convective stresses, similar to the psuedoplastic yield stress rheology, and allows for dormant weak zones, which psuedoplasticity does not. We also include an initially unstable compositional density profile created by chemical differentiation during magma ocean solidification. Crystal settling at the bottom of the magma ocean, and compaction of melt out of this solid layer, isolates the solidifying mantle from the chemically evolving liquid. As a result, dense

  17. 78 FR 55057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 134--Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu America Corporation, (Construction and Forestry Equipment), Chattanooga, Tennessee On...

  18. 77 FR 61381 - Foreign-Trade Zone 7-Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 7--Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Authorization of Production Activity, Baxter Healthcare of Puerto Rico, (Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Intravenous Bags...

  19. 78 FR 36523 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 84--Houston, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Toshiba International Corporation; (Hybrid Electric Vehicle Motors and Generators Production);...

  20. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  1. Active tectonics of North Haji Abad (Hormozgan region) in south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shafiei bafti, amir

    2014-05-01

    Zagros Active Fold -thrust Belt is situated in the northern margin of the Arabian Plat and formed due to shortening, thickening and uplift of tethys sedimentary basin between Arabian and Iranian plates. In this study, the rate of uplift in the northern margin of the Zagros Mountains in southern Iran are examined. The Zagros fault zone in this region is composed of a set faults, including Deragah, Haji Abad, Tezerj and several other faults and also we call these branches from F1 to F8. These segments puts from northwest to the East- Southeast. Based on field surveys and Geological maps, we prepared a structural map from major faults of Zagros fault system for identify faults pattern and estimating of uplift rate movements in Zagros fault. Three methods used to calculation of uplift rate: A: Asymmetry index Accordance with the procedure, in studied area, northeast drainage are longer than of southwest drainage and east minor drainages also longer than the west side drainages, Uplifting in this region is characterized by mentioned asymmetry factor. The amount of this index is AF=71.81. B. Interaction between the faults movements and erosion process We comparison contrast between uplifting movement rates and erosion rates in different parts of studied region by Smf and other indexes. Average amount of Smf=1.1. C. Evaluation of Uplift rate of alluvial terraces was performed by sediment ages and terraces height. We surveyed Quaternary facieses which have ages between 17,000 and 30,000 years old. the rate of uplifting for each fault is follows : Deragah fault and F8 fault between 1.0 to 1.85mm per year and F7, F6, F5, and F4 faults, have a rate Uplifting between 0.6 to 1.0 mm per year and the rate of Uplift for other faults is between 0.04 to 0.06 mm per year. According to our studies, uplift rates in north -east and south-west more than other regions The minimum rate at different stations are about 0.5mm/y to 0.93mm/y and its maximum is 0.88 mm/y to 1.47mm/y.

  2. Geochemistry, geothermics and relationship to active tectonics of Gujarat and Rajasthan thermal discharges, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, A.; Chandrasekharam, D.; Vaselli, O.; Magro, G.; Tassi, F.; Pansini, G. L.; Bhramhabut, A.

    2003-09-01

    Most thermal spring discharges of Rajasthan and Gujarat in northwestern India have been sampled and analysed for major and trace elements in both the liquid and associated gas phase, and for 18O/ 16O, D/H (in water), 3He/ 4He and 13C/ 12C in CO 2 (in gas) isotopic ratios. Most thermal springs in Rajasthan are tightly associated to the several regional NE-SW strike-slip faults bordering NE-SW ridges formed by Archaean rocks at the contact with Quaternary alluvial and aeolian sedimentary deposits of the Rajasthan desert. Their Ca-HCO 3 immature character and isotopic composition reveals: (1) meteoric origin, (2) relatively shallow circulation inside the crystalline Archaean formations, (3) very fast rise along faults, and (4) deep storage temperatures of the same order of magnitude as discharging temperatures (50-90°C). Thermal spring discharges in Gujarat are spread over a larger area than in Rajasthan and are associated both with the NNW-SSE fault systems bordering the Cambay basin and the ENE-WSW strike-slip fault systems in the Saurashtra province, west of the Cambay basin. Chemical and isotopic compositions of springs in both areas suggest a meteoric origin of deep thermal waters. They mix with fresh or fossil seawater entering the thermal paths of the spring systems through both the fault systems bordering the Cambay basin, as well as faults and fractures occurring inside the permeable Deccan Basalt Trap in the Saurashtra province. The associated gas phase, at all sampled sites, shows similar features: (1) it is dominated by the presence of atmospheric components (N 2 and Ar), (2) it has high crustal 4He enrichment, (3) it shows crustal 3He/ 4He signature, (4) it has low CO 2 concentration, and (5) the only analysed sample for 13C/ 12C isotopic ratio in CO 2 suggests that CO 2 has a strong, isotopically light organic imprint. All these features and chemical geothermometer estimates of spring waters suggest that any active deep hydrothermal system at the base

  3. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Nadine; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modeling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometer scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organization of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins. PMID:25688186

  4. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV gen