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Sample records for active teenage girls

  1. Characteristics of sexually active teenage girls who would be pleased with becoming pregnant.

    PubMed

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Krauss, Melissa J; Spitznagel, Edward L; Schootman, Mario; Cottler, Linda B; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2013-04-01

    To investigate factors associated with favorable pregnancy attitudes among teenage girls. Participants were sexually active teenage girls aged 15-18 years old (n = 965) who took part in the 2002 or 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). Multinomial multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of being pleased with a teenage pregnancy. Sixteen percent of sexually active teenage girls (n = 164) would be pleased (11 % a little pleased, 5 % very pleased) if they became pregnant. In a multivariable model, participants who had not yet discussed sexual health topics (i.e., how to say no to sexual intercourse or birth control) or had only discussed birth control with a parent were more likely to be very pleased with a teenage pregnancy than participants who had discussed both topics with a parent. Prior pregnancy, racial/ethnic group status, older age, and having parents with a high school education or less also increased the odds of being pleased with a teenage pregnancy. Being pleased with a teenage pregnancy was correlated with a lack of discussion of sexual health topics with parents, prior pregnancy, and sociodemographic factors (having less educated parents, racial/ethnic group status). Pregnancy prevention efforts can be improved by acknowledging the structural and cultural factors that shape teenage pregnancy attitudes.

  2. Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Horace R.; Brown-Thirston, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    "Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling" focuses on a range of social phenomenon that impact the lives of adolescent females of color. The authors highlight the daily challenges that African-American, Chicana, and Puerto Rican teenage girls face with respect to peer and family influences, media stereotyping, body image,…

  3. Nutrition Lessons Improve Hispanic Teenage Girls' Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neyman, Michelle R.; Block, Gladys; Morris, Jennifer L.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2000-01-01

    Nutrition knowledge and dietary intake among 184 Hispanic teenage girls were assessed before and after a nutrition education intervention involving five weekly lessons. Intervention participants increased their nutrition knowledge by 50 percent and showed modest improvement in dietary behavior. Contains 16 references and data on subjects' dietary…

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis in sexually active teenage girls. Factors related to genital chlamydial infection: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Rahm, V A; Odlind, V; Pettersson, R

    1991-08-01

    The incidence of new infections with C trachomatis was found to be 19%. Predisposing factors for a subsequent chlamydial infection were multiple partners, smoking and previous infection with C trachomatis. Girls with a spread cervical ectopy were not more likely to contract a chlamydial infection in one year than girls without an ectopy. Oral contraceptive use was not found to predispose for a chlamydial infection.

  5. A Qualitative Study to Examine Feasibility and Design of an Online Social Networking Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Teenage Girls

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Gisela; Kavanagh, Madeleine; Maher, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background Online social networks present wide-reaching and flexible platforms through which to deliver health interventions to targeted populations. This study used a social marketing approach to explore teenage girls’ perceptions of physical activity and the potential use of online social networks to receive a physical activity intervention. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 19 Australian teenage girls (ages 13 to 18 years) with varying levels of physical activity and socioeconomic status. A semi-structured format was used, with groups discussion transcribed verbatim. Content analysis identified emergent themes, with triangulation and memos used to ensure accuracy. Results Physical activity was most appealing when it emphasised sport, exercise and fitness, along with opportunities for socialisation with friends and self-improvement. Participants were receptive to delivery of a physical activity intervention via online social networks, with Facebook the most widely reported site. Participants commonly accessed online social networks via mobile devices and particularly smartphones. Undesirable features included promotion of physical activity in terms of walking; use of cartoon imagery; use of humour; and promotion of the intervention via schools, each of which were considered “uncool”. Participants noted that their parents were likely to be supportive of them using an online social networking physical activity intervention, particularly if not promoted as a weight loss intervention. Conclusion This study identified key features likely to increase the feasibility and retention of an online social networking physical activity intervention for teenage girls. Guidelines for the design of interventions for teenage girls are provided for future applications. PMID:26934191

  6. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  7. Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenage Girls: An Illusory Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Boynes, Matthew; Hudson, James I.; Field, Alison E.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent media reports have portrayed an alarming increase in apparent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use among American teenage girls; Congress even held hearings on the subject in June 2005. We questioned whether AAS use among teenage girls was as widespread as claimed. Methods We reviewed four large national surveys and many smaller surveys examining the prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls. Virtually all of these surveys used anonymous questionnaires. We asked particularly whether the language of survey questions might generate false-positive responses among girls who misinterpreted the term “steroid.” We also reviewed data from other countries, together with results from the only recent study (to our knowledge) in which investigators personally interviewed female AAS users. Results The surveys produced remarkably disparate findings, with the lifetime prevalence of AAS use estimated as high as 7.3% among ninth-grade girls in one study, but only 0.1% among teenage girls in several others. Upon examining the surveys reporting an elevated prevalence, it appeared that most used questions that failed to distinguish between anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, and over-the-counter supplements that respondents might confuse with “steroids.” Other features in the phrasing of certain questions also seemed likely to further bias results in favor of false-positive responses. Conclusions Many anonymous surveys, using imprecise questions, appear to have greatly overestimated the lifetime prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls; the true lifetime prevalence may well be as low as 0.1%. Future studies can test this impression by using a carefully phrased question regarding AAS use. PMID:17127018

  8. A teenage girl with green hair.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Yasin, Shima K; Yoo, Jinny K

    2014-01-01

    An adolescent girl with blond hair, her family, and classmates noted that her hair was progressively turning green. Initially the green color was thought to be secondary to chlorine from the local swimming pool. This was not the real cause. The chlorotrichosis was actually caused by an excessive amount of dissolved copper from copper pipes in the home plumbing system. Copper had leached from the plumbing and accumulated in the pipes because the rented house had been vacant for many months. Risk factors for chlorotrichosis include light-colored hair, copper plumbing, long periods when the water was not thoroughly flushed out of the copper pipes, and frequent shampooing.

  9. SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ADOLESCENT GIRLS' RESILIENCE TO TEENAGE PREGNANCY IN BEGORO, GHANA.

    PubMed

    Gyan, Sylvia Esther; Ahorlu, Collins; Dzorgbo, Dan-Bright S; Fayorsey, Clara K

    2016-09-20

    This study focuses on how older adolescent girls access and utilize social capital to develop resilience against teenage pregnancy in Begoro, Ghana. A survey of 419 non-pregnant girls aged 15-19 years, selected using a multi-stage cluster sampling technique, was conducted in 2012. Qualitative data were gathered through in-depth interviews with ten girls purposively selected from the survey respondents. Parents, relatives, teachers and religious groups were found to be important sources of social capital for the non-pregnant girls in developing resilience against teenage pregnancy. In addition, resilient girls tended to rely on multiple sources of social capital. It is recommended that stakeholders and policymakers in Ghana ensure that these significant sources of social capital in adolescent girls' sexual experience are equipped with the right information to help girls decrease the risk of teenage pregnancy.

  10. Effects of area and family deprivation on risk factors for teenage pregnancy among 13-15-year-old girls.

    PubMed

    Smith, Debbie M; Elander, James

    2006-11-01

    Information is needed about how the effects of socio-economic deprivation on teenage pregnancy are mediated by proximal risk factors, in order to target area-wide and family interventions more effectively. Using a 2x2 factorial design, we tested the separate and interacting effects of area deprivation and family deprivation on six specific proximal risk factors for teenage pregnancy: early sexual activity, life expectations, knowledge and beliefs about contraceptives, attitude to abortion, beliefs about love, and use of local sexual health services. Data were collected from 201 13-15-year-old girls in deprived and non-deprived families living in deprived and more affluent areas of the United Kingdom. Area deprivation significantly increased early sexual activity, and both area and family deprivation significantly reduced life expectations. Significant interactions between area and family deprivation showed that the impact of living in a deprived area depends to some extent on family circumstances, with implications for targeting different types of intervention. Living in a deprived area increased early sexual activity much more markedly among girls in deprived families, so interventions to reduce early sexual activity could target individually deprived girls living in deprived areas. Living in a more affluent area increased life expectations, but only among girls in non-deprived families, so both area-wide and individually targeted interventions would be needed to raise life expectations among girls most at risk of teenage pregnancy.

  11. Contraceptive Use and Non-Use among Teenage Girls in a Sexually Motivated Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suvivuo, Pia; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Kontula, Osmo

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative narrative study examined contraceptive use and non-use in light of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The purpose of this paper was to understand contraceptive use and non-use among Finnish teenage girls: why do girls use or not use contraception in a sexually motivated situation and how do the determinants of the Theory of Planned…

  12. The Effects of Bullying on Teenage Girls in Swaziland High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshotsho, Nokwanda; Thwala, S'lungile K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics that make teenage girls vulnerable to bullying in high schools in the Manzini region of Swaziland. It determined how personality traits of victims of different parenting styles contribute to adolescent girls being bullied. The findings of the study revealed that bullying is very rife…

  13. Sexual assault while too intoxicated to resist: a general population study of Norwegian teenage girls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Underage drinking is widespread, but studies on alcohol-related sexual victimization among teenage girls are almost non-existent. Research on individual correlates and risk factors of sexual victimization more generally is also meager. This study focuses on sexual assault while incapacitated due to drunkenness among 15–18 year-old girls and examines how age, drinking behavior, impulsivity and involvement in norm-violating activities are associated with such victimization experiences. Methods Data stemmed from a school survey (response rate: 85%) in 16 Norwegian municipalities. Almost all analyses were restricted to girls who had been intoxicated in the past year (n = 2701). In addition to bivariate associations, adjusted odds ratios and relative risks of incapacitated sexual assault (ISA) were estimated. Further, population-attributable fractions were calculated to explore how the prevalence of ISA victimization was likely to be affected if effective preventive measures were targeted solely at high-risk groups. Results The majority of the girls (71%) had been intoxicated in the past year, of which 7% had experienced ISA victimization in the same period. The proportion of victims decreased by age within the group that had been intoxicated, reflecting that the youngest girls were more likely to get severely drunk. Impulsivity and involvement in norm-violating behaviors were identified as potential risk factors, but the population-attributable fractions indicated that the groups with the highest risk of ISA victimization accounted for only a minority of all the cases of such victimization. Conclusion Sexual assault against teenage girls who are too drunk to resist seems to be prevalent in Norway – notably among the youngest girls who engage in heavy episodic drinking. This study also suggests that one should reconsider the notion that no individual attributes are related to females’ sexual assault victimization. It also indicates that a high risk

  14. Teenage sexual activity in Zambia: the need for a sex education policy.

    PubMed

    Pillai, V K; Yates, D L

    1993-07-01

    Data from a study of teenage sexual activity among secondary school girls show the need for a sex education policy as a first step in controlling teenage fertility in Zambia. A large proportion of teenage females enter into close relationships with males at young ages and a high proportion of young females have engaged in sexual intercourse. Most of these sexually active females do not use family planning methods even though a large proportion of them have heard of modern methods. The teenagers receive very little sex education from their parents and a modern institutional sex education programme is needed.

  15. Building a Self: Teenaged Girls and Issues of Self-Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flansburg, Sundra

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter summarizes the current state of understanding about self-esteem in teenaged girls. It notes that self-esteem is a concept that is difficult to define and to measure. Current research indicates that self-esteem is composed of many factors; however, a reasonable functional definition is the value a person places on herself or…

  16. Teenage Pregnancy as Moral Panic: Reflections on the Marginalization of Girls' Feelings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockett, Lynn S.; Knetzer, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that library media centers and public libraries are among the main institutions responsible for providing information on teenage pregnancy. Argues that the treatment of teen pregnancy as an "epidemic" by the United States government and the media, and the representation of pregnant girls in young adult fiction contribute to gender…

  17. [Cytogenetic features of teenage girls with secondary amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Nachetova, T A; Nefidova, V E

    2014-11-01

    Some features of the chromosome apparatus status were studied in 25 adolescent girls, aged 14-18, with secondary amenorrhea and in 29 girls of the same age with a regular menstrual cycle. Materials for cytogenetic analysis were preparations of chromosomes at the stage of metaphase obtained from the culture of the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The technique of the culture preparation was carried out according to the standard method. 2225 metaphase plates were analyzed in girls with secondary amenorrhea, and 2603 plates were tested in their healthy age-mates. An increased total level of chromosomal aberrations and a rise in the frequency of disorders in the chromatid, chromosome and genome types of peripheral blood lymphocytes have been registered in the examined persons as compared with their healthy age-mates. We have shown, that polyploid cell registered in 15 times oftener in adolescent girls with SA as compared with healthy girls. It can be assumed that some marked changes in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in patients with secondary amenorrhea and in their healthy age-mates may arise both as a result of exposure to the multiple environmental factors and disorders of rather complicated processes of DNA damages reparation.

  18. Girls Online Feeling Out of Bounds: Girl Scout Research Institute Study on Teenage Girls and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    A study of girls' Internet usage collected data from 1,246 girls aged 13-18 via focus groups, personal journals, and surveys. Many girls didn't know how to react to situations like pornography or sexual harassment in chat room conversations. Girls wanted proactive involvement from adults, not just prohibitive advice, on navigating the Internet.…

  19. Physical Education for High School Students. A Book of Sports, Athletics, and Recreational Activities for Teen-Age Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William H., Ed.

    This book about physical activity was written especially for high school students. It is divided into chapters on different physical events. Among the activities discussed are archery, badminton, baseball and softball, golf, riflery, swimming, tennis, touch football, volleyball, and wrestling. Each chapter contains discussions of the history of…

  20. In-School Neighborhood Youth Corps. 14/15 Year-Old Black Teenage Girl Project, Memphis, Tennessee. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Andrew; And Others

    This study analyzes the effects on 14- and 15-year-old black teenage girls of entering and participating in a specially designed work program. The girls were provided with supports in their work settings, well-defined tasks, supervisors as well as regularly scheduled peer interaction groups led by a young black woman considered to be an…

  1. Does Father Absence Place Daughters at Special Risk for Early Sexual Activity and Teenage Pregnancy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Pettit, Gregory S.; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    Longitudinal studies in two countries investigated impact of father absence on girls' early sexual activity (ESA) and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicated that greater exposure to father absence strongly related to elevated ESA and adolescent pregnancy risk. Elevated risk was not explained (U.S. sample) or only partly explained (New Zealand…

  2. Peer and Individual Risk Factors in Adolescence Explaining the Relationship Between Girls' Pubertal Timing and Teenage Childbearing.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, C Emily; Cance, Jessica Duncan; Maslowsky, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Girls with early pubertal timing are at elevated risk for teenage childbearing; however, the modifiable mechanisms driving this relationship are not well understood. The objective of the current study was to determine whether substance use, perceived peer substance use, and older first sexual partners mediate the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Data are from Waves 1-15 of the female cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), a nationwide, ongoing cohort study of U.S. men and women born between 1980 and 1984. The analytic sample (n = 2066) was 12-14 years old in 1997 and ethnically diverse (51 % white, 27 % black, 22 % Latina). Using structural equation modeling, we found substance use in early adolescence and perceived peer substance use each partially mediated the relationships among girls' pubertal timing, sexual debut, and teenage childbearing. Our findings suggest early substance use behavior as one modifiable mechanism to be targeted by interventions aimed at preventing teenage childbearing among early developing girls.

  3. Summary of the Findings from a Study About Cigarette Smoking Among Teen-Age Girls and Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelovich, Skelly and White, Inc., New York, NY.

    This paper presents the major results of a study for the American Cancer Society on cigarette smoking among teen-age girls and young women, and findings relevant to the prevention and quitting of smoking. The four major trends found in this study are: (1) a dramatic increase in cigarette smoking among females; (2) an intellectual awareness of the…

  4. Motivation and Self-Perception Profiles and Links with Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Wang, C. K. John

    2003-01-01

    Research shows a decline in participation in physical activity across the teenage years. It is important, therefore, to examine factors that might influence adolescent girl's likelihood of being physically active. This study used contemporary theoretical perspectives from psychology to assess a comprehensive profile of motivational and…

  5. Exploring Work: Fun Activities for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA. Women's Educational Equity Act Dissemination Center.

    This document contains learning activities to help middle school girls begin the career planning process and resist gender-role stereotyping. The activities are designed for individuals and/or groups of girls either in classroom settings or in organizations such as Girl Scouts and 4-H Clubs. A total of 30 activities are organized into 4 sections…

  6. [Phyllodes tumor in a 12-year old teenage girl: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Issara, Karima; Houjami, Majdouline; Sahraoui, Souha; Bouchbika, Zineb; Benchakroun, Nadia; Jouhadi, Hassan; Tawfiq, Nezha; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are very rare and are exceptional in children and adolescents; their treatment is based on surgery and radiotherapy, with a good prognosis. We report the case of a 12-year old teenage girl presenting with a mass in the left breast. The diagnosis of a phyllodes tumor was confirmed on the basis of clinical, imaging and histological examinations. Treatment consisted of a large tumorectomy without adjuvant therapy, with good evolution during a 2-year follow-up.

  7. Development and preliminary evaluation of a behavioural HIV-prevention programme for teenage girls of Latino descent in the USA.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Tatiana M; Lopez, Cristina M; Saulson, Raelle; Borkman, April L; Soltis, Kathryn; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; de Arellano, Michael; Wingood, Gina M; Diclemente, Ralph J; Danielson, Carla Kmett

    2014-01-01

    National data suggests that teenage girls of Latino descent in the USA are disproportionately affected by HIV, with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting the rate of new infections being approximately four times higher compared to White women of comparable age . This paper highlights the need for an effective single-sex HIV-prevention programme for teenage girls of Latino descent and describes the development and preliminary evaluation of Chicas Healing, Informing, Living and Empowering (CHILE), a culturally-tailored, HIV-prevention programme exclusively for teenage girls of Latino descent that was adapted from Sisters Informing, Healing, Living and Empowering (SiHLE), an evidence-based HIV- prevention program that is culturally tailored for African American young women. Theatre testing, a pre-testing methodology to assess consumer response to a demonstration of a product, was utilised to evaluate the relevance and utility of the HIV programme as well as opportunities for the integration of cultural constructs. Future directions for the evaluation of CHILE are discussed.

  8. Development and preliminary evaluation of a behavioural HIV prevention program for teenage girls of Latino descent in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Tatiana M.; Lopez, Cristina M.; Saulson, Raelle; Borkman, April L.; Soltis, Kathryn; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; de Arellano, Michael; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Danielson, Carla Kmett

    2014-01-01

    National data suggests that teenage girls of Latino descent in the USA are disproportionately affected by HIV with the rate of new infections being approximately 4 times higher compared to White women of comparable age (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013). This paper highlights the need for an effective single-sex HIV prevention program for teenage girls of Latino descent and describes the development and preliminary evaluation of Chicas Healing, Informing, Living and Empowering (CHILE), a culturally-tailored, HIV prevention programme exclusively for teenage girls of Latino descent that was adapted from Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering (SiHLE), an evidence-based HIV prevention program that is culturally tailored for African American young women. Theatre testing, a pre-testing methodology to assess consumer response to a demonstration of a product, was utilised to evaluate the relevance and utility of the HIV program as well as opportunities for the integration of cultural constructs. Future directions for the evaluation of CHILE are discussed. PMID:24697607

  9. My space, my body, my sexual subjectivity: social media, sexual practice and parental control among teenage girls in urban Chiang Mai.

    PubMed

    Fongkaew, Warunee; Fongkaew, Kangwan

    2016-01-01

    This ethnographic study conducted among young women aged 18-21 years in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, explored the parental control mechanisms imposed by Thai middle-class families on the sexuality of their daughters. It addressed the ways in which young women tactically use the social media in order to negotiate the sexual controls they encountered in everyday life. Taking the teenage girls' point of view, this paper argues that, as active agents, young women achieve a certain level of sexual autonomy and construct their own sexual selves in modern northern Thai society, despite their parents' attempts to prevent this. The paper highlights the ways in which social media are used by Thai girls in order to achieve such a goal. Research findings should inform the development of future programmes on sexual health promotion, parental skills and sexual communication between Thai parents and their children.

  10. Trapped in a Moral Order: Moral Identity, Positioning and Reflexivity in Stories of Confrontation among Latin American Teenage School Girls in Madrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patiño-Santos, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the forms of reflexivity that emerge in the conversational narratives of Latin American teenage school girls co-produced during sociolinguistic interviews, in a multicultural school in the centre of Madrid. The narratives about confrontation at school portray the girls' actions and ways of making sense of such behaviours, in…

  11. Does father absence place daughters at special risk for early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Ellis, Bruce J; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Fergusson, David M; Horwood, L John; Pettit, Gregory S; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    The impact of father absence on early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy was investigated in longitudinal studies in the United States (N = 242) and New Zealand (N = 520), in which community samples of girls were followed prospectively from early in life (5 years) to approximately age 18. Greater exposure to father absence was strongly associated with elevated risk for early sexual activity and adolescent pregnancy. This elevated risk was either not explained (in the US. study) or only partly explained (in the New Zealand study) by familial, ecological, and personal disadvantages associated with father absence. After controlling for covariates, there was stronger and more consistent evidence of effects of father absence on early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy than on other behavioral or mental health problems or academic achievement. Effects of father absence are discussed in terms of life-course adversity, evolutionary psychology, social learning, and behavior genetic models.

  12. Clothing-Selection Habits of Teenage Girls Who Are Sighted and Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Al

    2000-01-01

    A study that compared the clothing-selection habits of 15 adolescent girls with blindness and 15 sighted girls found parents played a larger role in selecting the clothing for the girls with blindness, girls with blindness wore less makeup and jewelry, and care requirements were more important to girls with blindness. (Contains 12 references.) (CR)

  13. "I Want to Help Girls Like Me": An Exploration of the Educational Aspirations of Teenage Girls in Kolkata Slums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipe, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study used participatory visual research in order to develop an understanding of the educational experiences of urban poor adolescent girls in Kolkata and to elicit their capabilities. The sample comprised urban poor girls who were undergoing formal education at a religious, philanthropic primary school in Kolkata. Findings from…

  14. Interventions with Young Female Offenders and Teenage Girls at Risk: Alternative Educational Services in a Singapore Girls' Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Kaili Chen; Choo, Andrew; Lim, Liping

    2009-01-01

    This article presents factors that place girls at risk of delinquency and offending as well as the patterns in juvenile delinquency trends for females in Singapore. The authors also describe Singapore's overall structure of services for young offenders and the current status of alternative education programmes for young women engaged in delinquent…

  15. Subjective sleep duration and quality influence diet composition and circulating adipocytokines and ghrelin levels in teen-age girls.

    PubMed

    Al-Disi, Dara; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Khanam, Latifa; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz; Al-Saif, Mohammad; Sabico, Shaun; Chrousos, George

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between sleep duration and quality, diet and hormones of obesity may help design effective lifestyle intervention strategies. Here we studied such associations in lean and obese teen-aged Saudi girls. In this cross-sectional observational study, 126 girls (62 lean and 64 obese) aged 14 -18 years (16.5 ± 1.5) were evaluated. A general questionnaire, which included sleep and diet questions, was obtained and anthropometric measurements and overnight fasting blood samples for determination of glucose, lipid profile and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, resistin and ghrelin were collected. Subjects that slept < 5 hours/day had a higher percent of carbohydrate intake (p = 0.04) than those who slept > 7 hours/day. Adiponectin levels were higher in the lean than the obese group and increased in proportion to hours of sleep. Ghrelin had an inverse association with subjective sleep duration (p = 0.04), while resistin levels were directly proportional to it. Thus, the duration and quality of sleep influenced diet composition and the circulating levels of adipocytokines and ghrelin in adolescent girls. Long and uninterrupted sleep was associated with a better diet and a more favorable hormonal profile.

  16. A Teenage Girl with Acute Dyspnea and Hypoxemia during Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tanpowpong, P.; Thongpo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) can cause morbidity and mortality. We present the case of teenager who developed dyspnea and hypoxemia few hours after red cell transfusion. After being admitted for close monitoring and oxygen therapy, her symptoms spontaneously resolved. Message: dyspnea during red cell transfusion should raise the suspicion of TRALI. PMID:27891282

  17. Sex, Seizures, and Drugs: What Teenage Girls and Their Parents Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Osborne, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of transition, marking a period in which a teen's sexuality is developing physically and emotionally. A parent's job is to help children understand these feelings and how to respond safely and appropriately. While sexuality is important for both boys and girls, many issues are unique to females. Young girls with seizures need…

  18. Aggression, physical activity levels and sex role identity in teenagers exposed in utero to MPA.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, B; Shye, D; Harlap, S; Baras, M; Lieblich, A

    1989-09-01

    Sex-dimorphic traits and behavior were measured in a 17-year old prospective study of 74 teenager boys and 98 girls who had been exposed to medroxyprogesterone acetate in utero compared with 459 boys and 546 girls not exposed. Bem Sex Role Identity scores were identical in exposed and non-exposed teenagers of each sex. There were no significant differences between MPA-exposed and non-exposed males or females on the Buss-Durkee overall aggression scale and on its assaultiveness subscale. Mothers of exposed males more often reported that teachers had complained that their offspring were naughty in school. No such difference was reported for females, nor for other school behaviors of dominance/aggression, activity, shyness and quietness. Exposed and non-exposed children were similar in the number of accidents experienced in childhood, as reported by their mothers, and in participation in competitive sports. These findings fail to support hypotheses posed by earlier researchers that exposure in utero to medroxyprogesterone acetate might alter sex-dimorphic behavior or traits in later life.

  19. A process evaluation of the art of yoga project mentor program for incarcerated teenage girls.

    PubMed

    Harris, Danielle Arlanda; Malone, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Returning to the community upon release from custody is a difficult process to navigate, and there are scant resources available to juvenile female offenders, in particular. Comprehensive wraparound aftercare and mentor services are a central component of successful community reentry, and the well-established unique characteristics of juvenile girls make it necessary to create programs catered specifically to them. The present study employed a case study design to describe and evaluate the Art of Yoga Project's Mentor Program. Eight girls and their mentors were followed for a period of 12 months after the girls' release from custody. Preliminary results from qualitative content analysis suggest that the program was valuable for the girls who participated.

  20. Building Science Identity in Disadvantaged Teenage Girls using an Apprenticeship Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, E. C.; Conner, L.; Tzou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Expeditionary science differs from laboratory science in that expeditionary science teams conduct investigations in conditions that are often physically and socially, as well as intellectually, challenging. Team members live in close quarters for extended periods of time, team building and leadership affect the scientific process, and research tools are limited to what is available on site. Girls on Ice is an expeditionary science experience primarily for disadvantaged girls; it fully immerses girls in a mini scientific expedition to study alpine, glacierized environments. In addition to mentoring the girls through conducting their own scientific research, we encourage awareness and discussion of different sociocultural perspectives on the relation between the natural world, science, and society. The experience aligns closely with the apprenticeship model of learning, which can be effective in enhancing identification with science. Using a mixed-methods approach, we show that the Girls on Ice model helps girls (1) increase their interest and engagement in science and build a stronger science identity, (2) develop confidence, importantly they develop a combined physical and intellectual confidence; (3) engage in authentic scientific thinking, including critical thinking and problem solving; and (4) enhance leadership self-confidence. We discuss these results in a learning sciences framework, which posits that learning is inseparable from the social and physical contexts in which it takes place.

  1. The impact of training problem-solving skills on self-esteem and behavioral adjustment in teenage girls who have irresponsible parents or no parents

    PubMed Central

    Shahgholy Ghahfarokhi, F; Moradi, N; Alborzkouh, P; Radmehr, S; Zainali, M

    2015-01-01

    Proper psychological interventions are of great importance because they help enhancing psychological and public health in adolescents with irresponsible parents or no parents. The current research aimed to examine the impact of training problem-solving experiment on self-esteem and behavioral adjustment in teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents. Methodology: The approach of the present research was a semi-test via a post-test-pre-test model and a check team. Hence, in Tehran, 40 girls with irresponsible parents or no parents were chosen by using the Convenience modeling, and they were classified into 2 teams: control and experiment. Both groups were pre-tested by using a demography questionnaire, Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale, and a behavioral adjustment questionnaire. Afterwards, both groups were post-tested, and the obtained data were examined by using inferential and descriptive methods through SPSS 21. Findings: Findings indicated that the training problem-solving skills significantly increased the self-esteem and the behavioral adjustment in teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents (P < 0/ 001). Conclusion: The conclusion of this research was that training problem-solving methods greatly helps endangered people such as teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents, because these methods are highly efficient especially when they are performed in groups, as they are cheap and accepted by different people. PMID:28316718

  2. The impact of training problem-solving skills on self-esteem and behavioral adjustment in teenage girls who have irresponsible parents or no parents.

    PubMed

    Shahgholy Ghahfarokhi, F; Moradi, N; Alborzkouh, P; Radmehr, S; Zainali, M

    2015-01-01

    Proper psychological interventions are of great importance because they help enhancing psychological and public health in adolescents with irresponsible parents or no parents. The current research aimed to examine the impact of training problem-solving experiment on self-esteem and behavioral adjustment in teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents. Methodology: The approach of the present research was a semi-test via a post-test-pre-test model and a check team. Hence, in Tehran, 40 girls with irresponsible parents or no parents were chosen by using the Convenience modeling, and they were classified into 2 teams: control and experiment. Both groups were pre-tested by using a demography questionnaire, Rosenberg's self-esteem scale, and a behavioral adjustment questionnaire. Afterwards, both groups were post-tested, and the obtained data were examined by using inferential and descriptive methods through SPSS 21. Findings: Findings indicated that the training problem-solving skills significantly increased the self-esteem and the behavioral adjustment in teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents (P < 0/ 001). Conclusion: The conclusion of this research was that training problem-solving methods greatly helps endangered people such as teenage girls with irresponsible parents or no parents, because these methods are highly efficient especially when they are performed in groups, as they are cheap and accepted by different people.

  3. White Teenage Girls and Affirmative Action in Higher Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsis, H.

    2010-01-01

    This is an initial and exploratory comment on the pilot phase of a study into adolescent female white identity and socio-sexual desire in post-apartheid South Africa. In the course of this pilot it became apparent that historical issues of race and racism are openly discussed in these girls' classrooms. Yet, despite these everyday interactions the…

  4. Gendered Subjective Theologies: Dutch Teenage Girls and Boys on the Role of Religion in Their Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ter Avest, Ina; Jozsa, Dan-Paul; Knauth, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    In this article about the Dutch contribution to the REDCo sub-project on the role of gender, related to religion in/and school, the authors present the characteristics in the answers girls and boys, respectively gave to their questionnaires. Qualitative as well as quantitative methods were used in this research project. The research findings show…

  5. [Problems with pregnancy, delivery and puerperium in teenage girls hospitalized in a city hospital].

    PubMed

    Kukulski, P; Kwaśniewski, S; Szymański, J

    1993-08-01

    At the paper the problems of girls hospitalized at the Gynaecological and Obstetrician ward of the hospital situated on the border of city agglomeration were described. The data regards as pregnancy, delivery and puerperium and they were collected in last two years.

  6. A Racial Comparison of Developmental Change in Marital-Family Status Projections of Teenage Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Katheryn Ann

    It is hypothesized that the process of development of orientations toward marriage and procreation will differ for Negro and white girls in terms of goal definitions, import accorded the goals, and dynamics of these orientations. Regarding the latter, it is expected that orientations of both groups will become more realistic over time,…

  7. Complex messages regarding a thin ideal appearing in teenage girls' magazines from 1956 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Luff, Gina M; Gray, James J

    2009-03-01

    Seventeen and YM were assessed from 1956 through 2005 (n=312) to examine changes in the messages about thinness sent to teenage women. Trends were analyzed through an investigation of written, internal content focused on dieting, exercise, or both, while cover models were examined to explore fluctuations in body size. Pearson's Product correlations and weighted-least squares linear regression models were used to demonstrate changes over time. The frequency of written content related to exercise and combined plans increased in Seventeen, while a curvilinear relationship between time and content relating to dieting appeared. YM showed a linear increase in content related to dieting, exercise, and combined plans. Average cover model body size increased over time in YM while demonstrating no significant changes in Seventeen. Overall, more written messages about dieting and exercise appeared in teen's magazines in 2005 than before while the average cover model body size increased.

  8. An ergonomic study on teenage girls working in the manual brick manufacturing units in the unorganized sectors in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Subhashis; Sett, Moumita; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2010-06-01

    There are laws which protect and prevent the teenage girls from working. But still in the developing countries like India, Bangladesh, etc. teenage girls coming from low socio-economic background work, to add to the family income. There is dearth of data regarding the ergonomic studies of the teenage girls working in the manual brick manufacturing units of the unorganized sectors in India. Therefore, a field study was conducted in about four brick manufacturing units of West Bengal, India. Their job in these fields was to carry 8-10 unbaked and sun-dried bricks (49.11 +/- 2.13 Kg) from the brick field to the kiln-top and again carry the baked bricks back from the kiln to some other corner of the brick field, under the hot sun. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating their work load and their consequent work-related health effects. Results show that 86 % of them suffered from work-related pain in different body parts and there was an increase in their physiological and psychological parameters after work. It is concluded that the frequent use of awkward postures while at work (OWAS) and performing heavy to moderate types of tasks in the field are deteriorating their health conditions.

  9. A rare benign renal tumour presenting as polycythaemia in a teenage girl.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, S; Fitzpatrick, J M; McGuire, B; O'Malley, K J; Shaw, C; Fabre, A

    2010-04-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with polycythemia. CT abdomen revealed an enhancing mass in the upper pole of her left kidney with features suggestive of renal cell carcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. Histology demonstrated a well circumscribed, focally encapsulated, round blue cell tumour showing areas of microcalcifications and numerous psammoma bodies. Imunostaining showed diffuse positive staining for CD 57. This was consistent with a diagnosis of metanephric adenoma a rare benign epithelial renal tumour.

  10. Effect of aerobic exercise on hunger feelings and satiety regulating hormones in obese teenage girls.

    PubMed

    Prado, Wagner L; Balagopal, P Babu; Lofrano-Prado, Mara C; Oyama, Lila M; Tenório, Thiago Ricardo; Botero, João Paulo; Hill, James O

    2014-11-01

    Exercise is implicated in modifying subsequent energy intake (EI) through alterations in hunger and/or satiety hormones. Our aim was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on hunger, satiety regulatory peptides, and EI in obese adolescents. Nine obese girls (age: 13-18 years old, BMI: 33.74 ± 4.04 kg/m2) participated in this randomized controlled crossover study. Each participant randomly underwent 2 experimental protocols: control (seated for 150 min) and exercise (exercised for 30 min on a treadmill performed at ventilatory threshold [VT] intensity and then remained seated for 120 min). Leptin, peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)), and subjective hunger were measured at baseline as well as 30 min and 150 min, followed by 24-hr EI measurement. Exercise session resulted in an acute increase in PYY(3-36) (p < .01) without changes in leptin and/or hunger scores. The control session increased hunger scores (p < .01) and decreased circulating leptin levels (p = .03). There was a strong effect size for carbohydrate intake (d = 2.14) and a modest effect size for protein intake (d = 0.61) after the exercise compared with the control session. Exercise performed at VT intensity in this study appears to provoke a state of transient anorexia in obese girls. These changes may be linked to an increase in circulating PYY3-36 and maintenance of leptin levels.

  11. After-School Physical Activity Programs for Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Doris L.; Poczwaradowski, Artur; Eisenman, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Describes adolescent girls' responses to an after-school physical activity program, examining how it functioned as a listening tool within a social marketing approach to promoting physical activity. Focus groups and interviews indicated that girls enjoyed and valued the program. Though the program did not increase girls' physical activity levels,…

  12. Promoting Physical Activity in Middle School Girls: Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Larry S.; Catellier, Diane J.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Young, Deborah R.; Elder, John P.; Lohman, Timothy G.; Stevens, June; Jobe, Jared B.; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity is important for weight control and good health; however, activity levels decline in the adolescent years, particularly in girls. Design Group randomized controlled trial Setting/participants Middle school girls with English-speaking skills and no conditions to prevent participation in physical activity in 36 schools in six geographically diverse areas of the United States. Random, cross-sectional samples were drawn within schools: 6th graders in 2003 (n=1721) and 8th graders in 2005 (n=3504) and 2006 (n=3502). Intervention A 2-year study-directed intervention (fall 2003 to spring 2005) targeted schools, community agencies, and girls to increase opportunities, support, and incentives for increased physical activity. Components included programs linking schools and community agencies, physical education, health education, and social marketing. A third-year intervention used school and community personnel to direct intervention activities. Main outcome measures The primary outcome, daily MET-weighted minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MET-weighted MVPA), was assessed using accelerometry. Percent body fat was assessed using anthropometry. Results After the staff-directed intervention (pre-stated primary outcome), there were no differences (mean= −0.4, 95% CI= CI= −8.2 to 7.4) in adjusted MET-weighted MVPA between 8th-grade girls in schools assigned to intervention or control. Following the Program Champion–directed intervention, girls in intervention schools were more physically active than girls in control schools (mean difference 10.9 MET-weighted minutes of MVPA, 95% CI=0.52–21.2). This difference is about 1.6 minutes of daily MVPA or 80 kcal per week. There were no differences in fitness or percent body fat at either 8th-grade timepoint. Conclusion A school-based, community-linked intervention modestly improved physical activity in girls. PMID:18312804

  13. Bilateral primary breast lymphoma in a teenage girl with multi-organ involvement.

    PubMed

    Poureisa, Masoud; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Mazaheri-Khameneh, Ramin; Ghadirpour, Ali

    2013-09-09

    We present 16 years old girl with primary breast lymphoma involving the both breasts simultaneously and co-incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement which originated from the breast, in addition to evidence of lymphoma in multi-organ such as skin, mediastinum and some abdominal viscera. Bilaterality has been observed in some series, but reports are few and series are often very small. Radiologic features may be indistinguishable from those of the other breast malignancies, but it can be concluded that primary involvement of the breast with lymphoma should be considered when breast mass or inflammatory changes occur in a patient without any previously diagnosed lymphoma. The clinical behavior, imaging and therapeutic procedures are discussed. The findings of this report may have clinical impact on oncologists or that may alter the disease concept of bilateral breast lymphoma.

  14. [On mechanism of functional changes in the organism of teenagers at different levels of locomotor activity].

    PubMed

    Mindubaeva, F A; Shukurov, F A; Salikhova, Y Y; Niyazova, Y I; Ramazanov, A K

    2015-02-01

    Comprehensive study of the cardiovascular system functional condition of 15-16 teenagers while in normal daily locomotor activity and in the mode of regular moderate physical activity was performed. The features of cerebral circulation and myocardium functional condition of teenagers are studied depending on initial tonus of the autonomic nervous system and locomotor activity level in the process of continuous step physical activity on tredmil. The condition of regulatory mechanisms, providing adaptation of teenagers in the conditions of modern school was studied. Research results showed, that elasticity of cerebrum arterial vessels, veins tone, venous outflow for teenagers not having regular physical activity, considerably mionectic. More adequate reaction of coronary blood flow in the process of physical activity is educed for the trained teenagers with the balanced autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm. This group showed a higher level and regulation quality of organism reserve possibilities.

  15. Sedentary Activity and Body Composition of Middle School Girls: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Charlotte; Webber, Larry S.; Baggett, Chris D.; Ward, Dianne; Pate, Russell R.; Murray, David; Lohman, Timothy; Lytle, Leslie; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between sedentary activity and body composition in 1,458 sixth-grade girls from 36 middle schools across the United States. Multivariate associations between sedentary activity and body composition were examined with regression analyses using general linear mixed models. Mean age, body mass index, and…

  16. Classroom Activities in Nutrition in Teenage Pregnancy. Bulletin No. 91140.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Gian; Hetzel, Barbara A.

    The lessons developed in this guide were designed for pregnant teenagers and teenage parents enrolled in the Wisconsin School-Age Parent (SAPAR) Program. The lessons can also be adapted for use in non-SAPAR courses such as family and consumer education, health, and language arts. The guide has eight chapters: Introduction (a preliminary lesson…

  17. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  18. Girls' Perspectives: Physical Activity and Self-Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffee, Lynn; Manzer, Rebecca

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between activity and positive self-esteem in girls 9 to 12 years of age was explored in this study. The hypothesis was that the positive relationship between physical activity and positive self-esteem which exists for women also exists for girls. A secondary goal was to gain insight into some of the factors that are associated…

  19. High School Girls' Perceptions of Selected Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Bretzing, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    High school students, and particularly girls, are not very active (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006). To help girls develop the abilities to enjoy lifetime, healthy physical activity, physical educators need to provide curricula that will achieve this goal. In the process, they need to make sure they are aligned with the current…

  20. Teenage Prostitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marjorie E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper explores: precipitating social conditions which might predispose an adolescent girl to deviant sexual activity; experiences which may initiate entrance into prostitution; and the treatment of sexual deviance in young girls by the Juvenile Justice System. (Author)

  1. Empowering Girls with Chemistry, Exercise and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily D.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.; Clapham, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that a girl's career interests in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) declines between grades 6 and 8. Similarly, in middle school, there is a decrease in physical activity among girls. Researchers at the University of Rhode Island (URI) conducted a chemistry-based science camp that took place…

  2. Scale Development for Perceived School Climate for Girls' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Voorhees, Carolyn C.; Sallis, James F.; Elder, John P.; Dowda, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To test an original scale assessing perceived school climate for girls' physical activity in middle school girls. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). Results: CFA retained 5 of 14 original items. A model with 2 correlated factors, perceptions about teachers' and boys' behaviors,…

  3. A model for promoting physical activity among rural South African adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Kinsman, John; Norris, Shane A.; Kahn, Kathleen; Twine, Rhian; Riggle, Kari; Edin, Kerstin; Mathebula, Jennifer; Ngobeni, Sizzy; Monareng, Nester; Micklesfield, Lisa K.

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, the expanding epidemic of non-communicable diseases is partly fuelled by high levels of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. Women especially are at high risk, and interventions promoting physical activity are urgently needed for girls in their adolescence, as this is the time when many girls adopt unhealthy lifestyles. Objective This qualitative study aimed to identify and describe facilitating factors and barriers that are associated with physical activity among adolescent girls in rural, north-eastern South Africa and, based on these, to develop a model for promoting leisure-time physical activity within this population. Design The study was conducted in and around three secondary schools. Six focus group discussions were conducted with adolescent girls from the schools, and seven qualitative interviews were held with sports teachers and youth leaders. The data were subjected to thematic analysis. Results Seven thematic areas were identified, each of which was associated with the girls’ self-reported levels of physical activity. The thematic areas are 1) poverty, 2) body image ideals, 3) gender, 4) parents and home life, 5) demographic factors, 6) perceived health effects of physical activity, and 7) human and infrastructural resources. More barriers to physical activity were reported than facilitating factors. Conclusions Analysis of the barriers found in the different themes indicated potential remedial actions that could be taken, and these were synthesised into a model for promoting physical activity among South African adolescent girls in resource-poor environments. The model presents a series of action points, seen both from the ‘supply-side’ perspective (such as the provision of resources and training for the individuals, schools, and organisations which facilitate the activities) and from the ‘demand-side’ perspective (such as the development of empowering messages about body image for teenage girls, and

  4. Texting to increase physical activity among teenagers (TXT Me!): Rationale, design, and methods proposal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity decreases from childhood through adulthood. Among youth, teenagers (teens) achieve the lowest levels of physical activity, and high school age youth are particularly at risk of inactivity. Effective methods are needed to increase youth physical activity in a way that can be maintai...

  5. Should Arranged Marriages for Teenage Girls Be Allowed?: How Public Schools Should Respond to Illiberal Cultural Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Paula

    2008-01-01

    In this article I offer a framework for thinking about how public schools in liberal societies ought to respond to instances of arranged marriages for girls from deeply communitarian cultural groups. Focusing on three cases of culturally and religiously arranged marriages from the Hmong, Islamic fundamentalist and Mormon fundamentalist…

  6. Psychosocial factors influencing teenage sexual activity, use of contraception and unplanned pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Woodward, V M

    1995-12-01

    In order to gain insight into factors affecting sexual behavior among teenagers in the UK, a comparative study was undertaken from May to July 1992 using data gathered from 30 teenagers attending a prenatal clinic with an unplanned pregnancy and 31 never-pregnant teenage girls attending a family planning (FP) clinic. The self-completed questionnaire contained 19 items that elicited information on age, ethnicity, living arrangements, parents' occupation (not included in the analysis), religion, school or employment, academic achievement, communication about sexual matters, menarche, sexual experience, current relationships, contraceptive usage, sources of contraceptives, and perception of available systems of support in dealing with sexual matters. It was found that the two groups were similar in regard to demographic factors, age at initiation of sexual intercourse, total number of sexual partners, number having a current regular boyfriend, and length of interval between going out with a boy and initiating sexual intercourse. The FP teens were more likely to be living with both natural parents, to be in school, to depend upon books for sexual information (rather than their mothers), and to discuss values with friends. The pregnant teens were involved in lengthier relationships with their boyfriends, were more likely to be cohabiting with their boyfriends, and were more likely to be unemployed and out of school. These findings indicate that no simple model exists to predict teenage sexual or contraceptive behavior. Further studies are warranted into the effects of family discord, of unemployment, and of perceptions of future possibilities on the use of contraception and incidence of unplanned pregnancy during adolescence.

  7. A Cultural and Historical Perspective on Pregnancy-related Activity among U.S. Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Anita C.

    1982-01-01

    Compares changes in birth rates, sexual activity, abortion rates, illegitimate births, and incidence of giving babies up for adoption among White and Black adolescents and explores social and cultural influences on the racial differences. Presents suggestions for culturally related interventions in the area of teenage pregnancy. (Author/MJL)

  8. Promoting the interest of African American teenage girls in science: What can we learn from an exemplary African American science teacher?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMath, Cynthia Stewart

    This study focused on science teaching that promoted the interest of African American teenage girls in the science classroom of an exemplary African American science teacher. It focused on, observed and examined the planning, teaching and learning strategies used by the science teacher. It also described what the science teacher experienced during her high school years, during college, during her teaching career. The case study approach/method was used for this research to capture the description and examination of the practices of the science teacher. This research described how an African American female science teacher serves as a role model and influence a number of African Americans students, especially girls, who experience careers in science. During the interviews and observations the researcher used a system of record keeping for the study to include note taking, audio taping and pictures. It is evident in the findings that the teacher in this study had qualities of an exemplary teacher according to the research. It is further evident that the teacher served as a role model for her students. The results indicated that the exemplary African America science teacher was motivated by her former African American science teacher that served as a role model. The results in this study implied that the lack of the presence of more exemplary African American science teachers has an impact on the level of interest that African American students have in science. Further, it is implied that there is a great need for more practical research that may lead to closing the gap of missing African American science teachers.

  9. Associations between the School Environment and Adolescent Girls' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Joanna; Levin, Kate A.; Inchley, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores school sports facility provision, physical education allocation and opportunities for physical activity and their association with the number of days adolescent girls participate in at least 60 min of moderate-vigorous physical activity per week (MVPAdays). Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires from…

  10. The secret struggle of the active girl: a qualitative synthesis of interpersonal factors that influence physical activity in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Standiford, Anne

    2013-10-01

    The author conducted a systematic review of 19 international, multidisciplinary, qualitative studies of interpersonal factors that influence physical activity in adolescent girls. Themes were deductively generated based on reported findings, and were organized according to frequency of occurrence. Themes were further organized according to a theoretical model to illustrate how interpersonal, perceptual, and situational influences affect physical activity in adolescent girls. The three most frequently discovered themes follow: (a) ability comparison and competition; (b) family, peer, and teacher influence; and (c) appearance concerns. It is important to consider the influence of gender role conflict on physical activity.

  11. Targetting Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue of the Bernard van Leer Foundation newsletter focuses on the problem of teenage pregnancy and teenage parenthood in developing and developed nations, and examines the problems that teenage mothers face in different societies. It explores societal norms and values related to teenage parenting; the effects of teenage parents on…

  12. Pregnant and Parenting Black Teenagers: Some Educational Preventors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    Black teenage girls have more than half the babies born to single teenagers, and as they are more frequently poor as well, they are more susceptible to the negative effects early childbearing has on future schooling and jobs. Studies show that teenage mothers are far less likely to complete high school or enter the work force than other teenagers.…

  13. Project Destiny: Initiating Physical Activity for Nonathletic Girls through Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyles, Carli; Lounsbery, Monica

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to emphasize the need to develop unique physical activity and sport programs that specifically target the participation of nonathletic and nonactive girls. In addition, the authors provide an overview of an example of one such program, Project Destiny. A description of Project Destiny is provided in terms of its…

  14. Teen Girls and Technology: What's the Problem, What's the Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    Are teenage girls being left behind in the technology race? According to author and professor Lesley Farmer, teenage girls are not embracing technology and all of its potential impact on their futures. In "Teen Girls and Technology", Farmer explores the developmental issues of teen girls, including the reality of girls and tech as it now stands.…

  15. Endometriosis in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Sarıdoğan, Ertan

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis affects a significant proportion of teenagers. Published studies suggest that laparoscopically confirmed endometriosis could be found in over 60% of adolescent girls undergoing laparoscopic investigation for pain, in 75% of girls with chronic pelvic pain resistant to treatment and in 70% of girls with dysmenorrhea and in approximately 50% of girls with chronic pelvic pain not necessarily resistant to treatment. Both early and advanced forms, including deep endometriosis have been reported to be present in teenagers. It has recently been claimed that deep endometriosis has its roots in teenage years. Risk factors include obstructive mullerian anomalies, family history, early menarche and early onset dysmenorrhea. Both surgical and medical treatment approaches are used for treatment in this age group, but care should be taken when treatment with GnRHa and progestins is being considered due to their potential impact on bone formation. Further studies are urgently needed to determine whether early diagnosis and treatment of teenage endometriosis lead to better long term outcomes or simply increase number of interventions without preventing progression of the disease.

  16. Acute psychosis due to non-paraneoplastic anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis in a teenage girl: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kramina, Sandra; Kevere, Laura; Bezborodovs, Nikita; Purvina, Santa; Rozentals, Guntis; Strautmanis, Jurgis; Viksna, Zane

    2015-12-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a disease occurring when antibodies produced by the body's own immune system attack NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the brain. Most anti-NMDAR encephalitis cases are associated with paraneoplastic syndrome. We analyze the case of a 15-year-old girl who was hospitalized in a child psychiatry clinic in Riga, Latvia, with de novo acute polymorphic psychotic disorder gradually progressing to a catatonic state. The patient received antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy with no beneficial effect. The council of doctors discussed differential diagnoses of schizophrenia-induced catatonia and the autoimmune limbic encephalitis-induced catatonic condition. When the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis was finally confirmed by repeated immunological assays (specific immunoglobulin [Ig] G and IgM in her blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid), and a paraneoplastic process was ruled out, she was started on immunomodulating therapy (methylprednisolone, Ig, plasmapheresis, rituximab), which changed the course of her disease. On immunomodulating treatment, her physical and mental health have gradually improved to almost complete reconvalescence. Psychiatrists should consider anti-NMDAR encephalitis as a differential diagnosis in first-episode psychosis patients presenting with disorientation, disturbed consciousness, pronounced cognitive deficits, movement disorder, dysautonomia, or rapid deterioration, and test for specific IgG NR1 autoantibodies, even if there are no specific findings on routine neuroimaging, electroencephalography (EEG), or cerebrospinal fluid tests.

  17. Effects of providing a nutrition education program for teenagers: dietary and physical activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Yuen, Dorothy T W

    2009-06-01

    This study enhanced nutritional knowledge in an education program and encouraged healthy dietary habits and regular physical activity among teenagers. A total of 203 adolescents from a secondary school in Hong Kong took part in the study. Their Body Mass Index, dietary habits, and physical exercise pattern were recorded and examined before and after the health education program. The prevalence of overweight and obesity, together with the fat composition, were high among the participants before the nutrition education program. There was a marked gain in knowledge upon its completion. A follow-up action conducted 3 months later revealed positive outcomes in relation to the diet and physical activity level. The teenagers were able to take control of their health and requested the tuck shop to sell more healthy food and reduce the supply of unhealthy items. The educational initiatives in dietary habits and physical activities proved to be effective in encouraging the teenagers to eat more healthily and to adopt an active lifestyle.

  18. Reaching Teenagers with Sex Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Margaret

    The problem of teenage pregnancy can be viewed as endemic, a part of American culture not easy to change. Although the number of girls under 15 who are becoming pregnant is not very large (13,000 in 1978), the cost of pregnancy to the girls themselves, their families, and society is very great. Results of data analyses from action research,…

  19. Sex and America's Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alan Guttmacher Inst., New York, NY.

    Although sexual activity is common among teenagers, it is not as widespread, and does not begin as early, as most adults believe. This report provides detailed data and analysis of sex among adolescents. Adolescent sexual activity is grouped in ten categories: (1) Rites of passage; (2) The context of adolescents' lives; (3) Sex among teenagers;…

  20. Activities to Attract Girls to Physics in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, Dina; Araste, Afshin Mohseni; Fadaei, Azita Seied

    2009-04-01

    In Iran there is no difference between boys' and girls' activities in scientific works; however, they study separately at schools until they reach the university level. Before going to university, students think engineering and medical science are better than the other sciences for earning enough money to support their lives. But after the entrance exam for universities most of the girls choose basic sciences based on their test results. Creative methods of teaching physics at the elementary and secondary levels, such as "Dominos in Physics" and "Physics in Nature," and understanding physics through real-life examples and animation are important for attracting students to further studies and careers in physics. Participating in international physics competitions and holding national tournaments and university open houses in physics is also very helpful. Studying physics can improve students' abilities and also help them to imagine, decide, think, and live better.

  1. Measuring Social Provisions for Physical Activity among Adolescent Black and White Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluate the validity of the Social Provisions Scale for physical activity among adolescent Black (n = 896) and White (n = 823) girls. The girls completed the scale and measures of subjective norms and physical activity in the eighth and ninth grades. Within the sample of White girls, the Social Provisions Scale contained 24 items that…

  2. Differences in Physical Activity between Black and White Girls Living in Rural and Urban Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Gwen M.; Dowda, Marsha; Ward, Dianne S.; Dishman, Rod K.; Trost, Stewart G.; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell R.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship of race and rural/urban setting to physical, behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental factors associated with physical activity among eighth grade girls. More differences related to race than setting. Black girls were less active and more heavy than white girls. Enjoyment of physical education and family involvement in…

  3. Teenage pregnancy: who suffers?

    PubMed

    Paranjothy, S; Broughton, H; Adappa, R; Fone, D

    2009-03-01

    In this review, we examine the epidemiology of teenage pregnancy (girls aged 15-17 years) in the UK and consider the evidence for its impact on the health and well-being of the mother, the baby, the father and society. There has been some decrease in the teenage pregnancy rate over the last decade in the UK but rates are still considerably higher than those in other European countries. Pregnancy and childbirth during the teenage years are associated with increased risk of poorer health and well-being for both the mother and the baby, possibly reflecting the socio-economic factors that precede early pregnancy and childbirth. There is little evidence concerning the impact of teenage fatherhood on health and future studies should investigate this. The effect on society is a perpetuation of the widening gap in health and social inequalities. Public health interventions should aim to identify teenagers who are vulnerable and support those who are pregnant with evidence based interventions such as teenage antenatal clinics and access to initiatives that provide support for early parenthood.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Neurodevelopment in Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Himes, John H.; Jacobs, David R.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphate exposures can affect children’s neurodevelopment, possibly due to neurotoxicity induced by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and may affect boys more than girls. We tested the hypothesis that lower AChE activity is associated with lower neurobehavioral development among children living in Ecuadorian floricultural communities. METHODS: In 2008, we examined 307 children (age: 4–9 years; 52% male) and quantified AChE activity and neurodevelopment in 5 domains: attention/executive functioning, language, memory/learning, visuospatial processing, and sensorimotor (NEPSY-II test). Associations were adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and height-for-age, flower worker cohabitation, and hemoglobin concentration. RESULTS: Mean ± standard deviation AChE activity was 3.14 ± 0.49 U/mL (similar for both genders). The range of scores among neurodevelopment subtests was 5.9 to 10.7 U (standard deviation: 2.6–4.9 U). Girls had a greater mean attention/executive functioning domain score than boys. In boys only, there were increased odds ratios of low (<9th percentile) neurodevelopment among those in the lowest tertile versus the highest tertile of AChE activity (odds ratios: total neurodevelopment: 5.14 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84 to 31.48]; attention/executive functioning domain: 4.55 [95% CI: 1.19 to 17.38], memory/learning domain: 6.03 [95% CI: 1.17 to 31.05]) after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic factors, height-for-age, and hemoglobin. Within these domains, attention, inhibition and long-term memory subtests were most affected. CONCLUSIONS: Low AChE activity was associated with deficits in neurodevelopment, particularly in attention, inhibition, and memory in boys but not in girls. These critical cognitive skills affect learning and academic performance. Added precautions regarding secondary occupational pesticide exposure would be prudent. PMID:24249815

  5. Street Smarts: Activities That Help Teenagers Take Care of Themselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael

    Because growing up has become the art of survival for many young people, a professionally conducted course in street smarts can help them identify problems, understand consequences, and make good decisions. The information and activities contained in this text can teach students how to take care of themselves when confronted with challenges. It…

  6. The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: rationale, study protocol, and baseline results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Child and adolescent obesity predisposes individuals to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality from a range of lifestyle diseases. Although there is some evidence to suggest that rates of pediatric obesity have leveled off in recent years, this has not been the case among youth from low socioeconomic backgrounds. The purpose of this paper is to report the rationale, study design and baseline findings of a school-based obesity prevention program for low-active adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods/Design The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) intervention will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. NEAT Girls is a 12-month multi-component school-based intervention developed in reference to Social Cognitive Theory and includes enhanced school sport sessions, interactive seminars, nutrition workshops, lunch-time physical activity (PA) sessions, PA and nutrition handbooks, parent newsletters, pedometers for self-monitoring and text messaging for social support. The following variables were assessed at baseline and will be completed again at 12- and 24-months: adiposity, objectively measured PA, muscular fitness, time spent in sedentary behaviors, dietary intake, PA and nutrition social-cognitive mediators, physical self-perception and global self-esteem. Statistical analyses will follow intention-to-treat principles and hypothesized mediators of PA and nutrition behavior change will be explored. Discussion NEAT Girls is an innovative intervention targeting low-active girls using evidence-based behavior change strategies and nutrition and PA messages and has the potential to prevent unhealthy weight gain and reduce the decline in physical activity and poor dietary habits associated with low socio-economic status. Few studies have reported the long-term effects of school-based obesity prevention programs and the current study has the potential to make an important contribution to the

  7. Butterfly Girls; promoting healthy diet and physical activity to young African American girls online: rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Young African American girls have a high risk of obesity. Online behavior change programs promoting healthy diet and physical activity are convenient and may be effective for reducing disparities related to obesity. This report presents the protocol guiding the design and evaluation of a culturally and developmental appropriate online obesity prevention program for young African American girls. Methods/Design The Butterfly Girls and the Quest for Founder’s Rock is an 8-episode online program delivered as an animated, interactive comic. The program promotes healthy diet and physical activity and is specifically designed for 8–10 year old African American girls. Girls, parents, and community representatives provided formative feedback on cultural relevance and developmental appropriateness. A three-group (treatment, comparison, wait-list control) randomized design (n = 390 parent/child dyads) is employed, with child as the unit of assignment. Change in body mass index is the primary outcome; change in fruit and vegetable consumption, water, and physical activity are secondary outcomes. Data collection occurs at baseline, approximately 3 months after baseline (i.e., completion of the online program), and approximately three months later (i.e., maintenance assessment). Two dietary recalls are collected at each data collection period by trained interviewers using the Nutrient Data System for Research (NDSR 2012) system. Physical activity is objectively measured by seven days of accelerometry. Psychosocial and process data are also collected. Girls in the treatment and comparison groups will be interviewed at post 1 to obtain information on personal reactions to the program. Discussion This research will develop and evaluate the efficacy of an online program for reducing obesity risk among girls at risk of obesity and related diseases. Online programs offer the potential for wide dissemination, thus reducing disparities related to obesity. Trial

  8. The Role of Peer Social Network Factors and Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Carolyn C.; Murray, David; Welk, Greg; Birnbaum, Amanda; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Pfeiffer, Karin Allor; Saksvig, Brit; Jobe, Jared B.

    2005-01-01

    This report studies the relationship between peer-related physical activity (PA) social networks and the PA of adolescent girls. Methods: Cross-sectional, convenience sample of adolescent girls. Mixed-model linear regression analyses to identify significant correlates of self-reported PA while accounting for correlation of girls in the same…

  9. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout and NIRCam Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Higgins, M. L.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, the University of Arizona's (UA) NIRCam E/PO team (NASA James Webb Space Telescope) and the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council began a long-term collaboration to bring astronomy activities and concepts to Girl Scout leaders, staff, and volunteers and, in turn, to their councils and girls, i.e., to train the trainers. Nationally, our goal is to reach leaders in all councils. To date, this program has reached nearly 200 adults from 39 councils nationwide (plus Guam and Korea), bringing together leaders, UA graduate students, and NIRCam scientists and educators to experience Arizona's dark skies. Locally, our goal is to provide Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education to girls of all ages throughout southern Arizona. To accomplish this in astronomy, we have additional ongoing collaborations with the Planetary Science Institute, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and, most recently with the Amphitheater School District. One of the programs that we have been recently emphasizing is Family Science and Astronomy Nights. These programs can be run at our local Girl Scout facility or can be incorporated into programs that we are running in local schools. Our near-term goal is to provide a series of interconnected activities that can be done in classrooms, in afterschool programs, as part of the Family Science and Astronomy Nights, or in summer astronomy camps. Our long-term goal is to empower girls ultimately to become leaders who are excited about the night sky and can take lead roles presenting activities and facilitating astronomy nights. Our poster will display a variety of the activities we have refined and developed through this progam: scale models of the Solar System and beyond, classifying Solar System objects, a portable human orrery, observing the night sky with and without telescopes, constellation transformations, and constellation sorting cards.NIRCam E/PO website: http://zeus.as.arizona.edu/ dmccarthy/GSUSA

  10. Black Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Peter W.; Boult, Brenda E.

    1996-01-01

    Asserts black teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases in South Africa are at threatening levels. Outlines selected consequences based on the assertion that teenage pregnancy is multi-causational. Hypothesizes teenage pregnancy needs reexamination in terms of the pheronomal climate's impact on prepuberial girls; and nature's way of…

  11. Preventing Obesity Among Adolescent Girls: One-Year Outcomes of the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Okely, Anthony D; Dewar, Deborah; Collins, Clare E; Batterham, Marijka; Callister, Robin; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2012-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the impact of a 12-month multicomponent school-based obesity prevention program, Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls among adolescent girls. DESIGN Group randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. SETTING Twelve secondary schools in low-income communities in the Hunter and Central Coast regions of New South Wales, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Three hundred fifty-seven adolescent girls aged 12 to 14 years. INTERVENTION A multicomponent school-based intervention program tailored for adolescent girls. The intervention was based on social cognitive theory and included teacher professional development, enhanced school sport sessions, interactive seminars, nutrition workshops, lunch-time physical activity sessions, handbooks and pedometers for self-monitoring, parent newsletters, and text messaging for social support. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), BMI z score, body fat percentage, physical activity, screen time, dietary intake, and self-esteem. RESULTS After 12 months, changes in BMI (adjusted mean difference, -0.19; 95% CI, -0.70 to 0.33), BMI z score (mean, -0.08; 95% CI, -0.20 to 0.04), and body fat percentage (mean, -1.09; 95% CI, -2.88 to 0.70) were in favor of the intervention, but they were not statistically different from those in the control group. Changes in screen time were statistically significant (mean, -30.67 min/d; 95% CI, -62.43 to -1.06), but there were no group by time effects for physical activity, dietary behavior, or self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS A school-based intervention tailored for adolescent girls from schools located in low-income communities did not significantly reduce BMI gain. However, changes in body composition were of a magnitude similar to previous studies and may be associated with clinically important health outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION anzctr.org.au Identifier: 12610000330044.

  12. Butterfly Girls; promoting healthy diet and physical activity to young African American girls online: Rationale and design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Young African American girls have a high risk of obesity. Online behavior change programs promoting healthy diet and physical activity are convenient and may be effective for reducing disparities related to obesity. This report presents the protocol guiding the design and evaluation of a culturally ...

  13. Teenage Cohabitation, Marriage, and Childbearing

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.; Cohen, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Cohabitation is an integral part of family research; however, little work examines cohabitation among teenagers or links between cohabitation and teenage childbearing. Drawing on the National Survey of Family Growth (2006–10), we examine family formation activities (i.e., cohabitation, marriage, and childbearing) of 3,945 15–19 year old women from the mid 1990s through 2010. One-third (34%) of teenagers cohabit, marry, or have a child. Teenage cohabitation and marriage are both positively associated with higher odds of having a child. The vast majority of single pregnant teenagers do not form a union before the birth of their child; only 22% cohabit and 5% marry. Yet most single pregnant teenagers eventually cohabit, 59% did so by the child’s third birthday and about 9% marry. Cohabitation is an important part of the landscape of the adolescent years, and many teenage mothers described as “single mothers” are actually in cohabiting relationships. PMID:25972620

  14. Are Physical Activity Interventions Equally Effective in Adolescents of Low and High Socio-Economic Status (SES): Results from the European Teenage Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Simon, C.; De Meester, F.; Van Lenthe, F.; Spittaels, H.; Lien, N.; Faggiano, F.; Mercken, L.; Moore, L.; Haerens, L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to study whether physical activity (PA) interventions in European teenagers are equally effective in adolescents of low versus high socio-economic status (SES). Based on a systematic review (Project TEENAGE), three school-based studies for secondary analyses were selected. SES stratified analyses were run in: (i) a Belgian…

  15. Changes in physical activity levels following 12-week family intervention in Hispanic girls: Bounce study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric obesity is a major health problem among Hispanic girls. Physical activity guidelines recommend that children engage in at least 60 min of moderate to vigorous activity daily. To examine the changes in physical activity level pre- and post-intervention. Hispanic girls in control (CG; N=26, ...

  16. Brief Report: Relationships between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudsepp, Lennart; Neissaar, Inga

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between changes in physical activity and depressive symptoms in adolescent girls. Participants were 277 urban adolescent girls. Physical activity was measured using the 3-Day Physical Activity Recall and depressive symptoms were assessed using questionnaire. Data were collected on three occasions over a 3-year…

  17. Implementation of a School Environment Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in High School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, D. S.; Saunders, R.; Felton, G. M.; Williams, E.; Epping, J. N.; Pate, R. R.

    2006-01-01

    Physical activity levels begin to decline in childhood and continue falling throughout adolescence, with girls being at greatest risk for inactivity. Schools are ideal settings for helping girls develop and maintain a physically active lifestyle. This paper describes the design and implementation of "Lifestyle Education for Activity Program", or…

  18. Effect of Physical Activity on BMI and Percent Body Fat of Chinese Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Frank H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of regular physical activity on body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat of Chinese girls grouped by age and physical activity patterns. Measurements of skinfold, height, and weight, and BMI calculations, found differences in BMI and percent body fat between active and inactive girls. (SM)

  19. Physical Activity Attitudes, Preferences, and Practices in African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieser, Mira; Vu, Maihan B.; Bedimo-Rung, Ariane L.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Moody, Jamie; Young, Deborah Rohm; Moe, Stacey G.

    2006-01-01

    Physical activity levels in girls decline dramatically during adolescence, most profoundly among minorities. To explore ethnic and racial variation in attitudes toward physical activity, semistructured interviews (n = 80) and physical activity checklists (n = 130) are conducted with African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian middle school girls in…

  20. Physical Activity Attitudes, Preferences, and Practices in African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian Girls

    PubMed Central

    Grieser, Mira; Vu, Maihan B.; Bedimo-Rung, Ariane L.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Moody, Jamie; Young, Deborah Rohm; Moe, Stacey G.

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity levels in girls decline dramatically during adolescence, most profoundlyamong minorities. To explore ethnic and racial variation in attitudes toward physical activity, semistructured interviews (n = 80) and physical activity checklists (n = 130) are conducted with African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian middle school girls in six locations across the United States. Girls from all groups have similar perceptions of the benefits of physical activity, with staying in shape as the most important. Girls have similar negative perceptions of physical activity, including getting hurt, sweating, aggressive players, and embarrassment. Chores, runningor jogging, exercises, and dance are common activities for girls regardless of ethnicity. Basketball, swimming, running, and dance are commonly cited favorite activities, although there are slight differences between ethnic groups. The results suggest that factors other than ethnicity contribute to girls’physical activity preferences and that distinct interventions may not be needed for each ethnic group. PMID:16397158

  1. Effects of Title IX and sports participation on girls' physical activity and weight.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Robert; Xu, Xin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the association between girls' participation in high school sports and the physical activity, weight, body mass, and body composition of adolescent females during the 1970s when girls' sports participation was dramatically increasing as a result of Title IX. We found that increases in girls' participation in high school sports, a proxy for expanded athletic opportunities for adolescent females, were associated with an increase in physical activity and an improvement in weight and body mass among girls. In contrast, adolescent boys experienced a decline in physical activity and an increase in weight and body mass during the period when girls' athletic opportunities were expanding. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that Title IX and the increase in athletic opportunities among adolescent females it engendered had a beneficial effect on the health of adolescent girls.

  2. Black teenage pregnancy in South Africa: some considerations.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, P W; Boult, B E

    1996-01-01

    Black teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases in South Africa have reached a threatening level. Accepting that teenage pregnancy is multi-causational, this article outlines selected consequences. It concludes that teenage pregnancy as a social problem needs reexamination in terms of two hypotheses: that the pheronomal climate has an impact on prepuberal girls; and that teenage pregnancy is nature's way of ensuring the survival of the species.

  3. Preconception nutrition, physical activity, and birth outcomes in adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yiqiong; Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Harville, Emily Wheeler

    2015-01-01

    Background Recommendations for preconception care usually include optimal nutrition and physical activity, but these have not been tested extensively for their relationship with birth outcomes such as low birthweight and preterm birth. Methods Data from Waves I, II and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) contractual dataset were utilized. In Wave I in-home interview, participants were asked to recall their frequency of having five types of food on the previous day, including milk, fruit, vegetables, grains, and sweets. At Wave II, participants reported the previous day's intake of 55 items, and results were categorized into high-calorie sweet, high-calorie non-sweet, and low-calorie food. At Wave I in-home interview, participants were also asked how many times in a week or during the past week they were involved in types of physical activity. At Wave IV, female participants reported pregnancies and birth outcomes. Multivariable linear regression analysis with survey weighting was used to predict birthweight and gestational age. Results There were no associations between reported food intake and birth outcomes. Girls who engaged in more episodes of active behavior had higher birthweights (p<0.01), but hours of sedentary behavior was not associated with birthweight. Multivariable analysis also indicated a u-shaped association between BMI and birthweight (p for quadratic term=0.01). Conclusion Adolescents who are more physically active prior to pregnancy have more positive birth outcomes as represented by birthweight. PMID:26233291

  4. A Typology of Middle School Girls: Audience Segmentation Related to Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staten, Lisa K.; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Jobe, Jared B.; Elder, John P.

    2006-01-01

    The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) combines social ecological and social marketing approaches to promote girls' participation in physical activity programs implemented at 18 middle schools throughout the United States. Key to the TAAG approach is targeting materials to a variety of audience segments. TAAG segments are individuals…

  5. School Influences on the Physical Activity of African American, Latino, and White Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Susan C.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Chaumeton, Nigel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of school-related variables on the physical activity (PA) levels of early adolescent African American, Latino, and White girls. Methods: Data were collected from 353 African American (N?=?123), Latino (N?=?118), and White (N?=?112) girls. Physical activity levels included a PA…

  6. Physical Activity and Self-Esteem in Girls: The Teen Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffee, Lynn; Ricker, Sherri

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between activity and positive self-esteem in girls 12 to 17 years of age was explored by this study. The primary goal was to determine if the positive relationship between physical activity and positive self-esteem which exists for women also exists for girls. It was also hoped that insight would be gained regarding the factors…

  7. The Impact of Playworks on Boys' and Girls' Physical Activity during Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleeker, Martha; Beyler, Nicholas; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Fortson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: School-based programs, such as Playworks, that guide students in organized activities during recess and make improvements to the recess play yard may lead to significant increases in physical activity--especially for girls. This study builds on past research by investigating the impact of Playworks separately for girls and boys.…

  8. The Effect of Recreational Activities on Self-Esteem Development of Girls in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayazit, Betül

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of recreational activities on self-esteem development of girls in adolescence. For this purpose, a total of 20 girls in adolescence period took part in the present study. Recreational activities program included bowling, patenga, orienteering, basketball, volleyball, badminton, ping-pong, dance, fun…

  9. Comparison of Social Variables for Understanding Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Ruth P.; Motl, Robert W.; Dowda, Marsha; Dishman, Rod K.; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate social support and theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs in explaining physical activity in adolescent girls. Methods : One thousand seven hundred ninety-seven 8 th -grade girls completed a survey measuring social provisions, family support, TPB constructs, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and team sport…

  10. Teenage Suicide: A Critical Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Suicide and attempted suicide among teenagers has risen dramatically since 1960, especially among girls. Three theories of the causes of suicide (emotional crises, brain chemistry and nonexpression of grief) are discussed. Depression and other first stage warning signals, and the nature of second stage "cries for help," are considered. (CM)

  11. Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Mary C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the problems of teenage pregnancy, including the costs to society, the challenge to educators, and the types of preventive programs developing across the country. Programs dealing strictly with reproduction and contraception are the least effective deterrents to teenage pregnancy. (MD)

  12. Coping with Teen-Age Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavick, Carol A.

    In 1968 the California Education Code section on physically handicapped minors was amended to include pregnant girls. This change was intended to give school districts the responsibility and the funds to develop special classes or schools for teenage pregmant girls. This special class makes it possible to provide more educational materials,…

  13. Gender Differences in Ayrshire Teenagers' Attitudes to Sexual Relationships, Responsibility, and Unintended Pregnancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooke, Alister; Capewell, Simon; Whyte, Meg

    2000-01-01

    Examines attitudes of 129 teenagers concerning teenage pregnancy and early sex. Results indicate that 73% of girls advocated joint responsibility for contraceptive protection compared with only 46% of boys. Significantly more boys than girls saw nothing wrong with casual sex and significantly less boys than girls upheld the virtue of commitment in…

  14. Associations between family support, family intimacy, and neighborhood violence and physical activity in urban adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Kuo, JoAnn; Voorhees, Carolyn C; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Young, Deborah Rohm

    2007-01-01

    We examined the association between various dimensions of the family environment, including family intimacy and involvement in activities, family support for physical activity, and neighborhood violence (perceived and objective) and physical activity among urban, predominantly African American, ninth-grade girls in Baltimore, Md. Greater family intimacy (P = .05) and support (P = .01), but not neighborhood violence, was associated with physical activity. Family factors, including family intimacy and support, are potential targets in physical activity interventions for urban high-school girls.

  15. Long-Term Effects of a Physical Activity Intervention in High School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Russell R.; Saunders, Ruth; Dishman, Rod K.; Addy, Cheryl; Dowda, Marsha; Ward, Dianne S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Physical activity decreases during childhood and adolescence, and physical activity levels are significantly lower in females than males, particularly during adolescence. Schools are attractive settings in which to implement interventions designed to promote physical activity in girls and young women, but few studies have tested the sustained effects of such interventions. Design Cross-sectional. Data were collected in 2002–2003 and analyzed in 2006–2007. Setting/Participants 1594 adolescent girls in 22 high schools. Intervention The intervention, Lifestyle Education for Activity Program (LEAP), was designed to increase physical activity in 9th grade girls through two channels: changes in instructional practices and changes in the school environment. This study (LEAP 2) examined the extent to which effects of the intervention were maintained when the girls were in 12th grade. Main Outcome Measures Number of 30-minute blocks per day of vigorous physical activity. Results Girls in the intervention schools that most fully implemented and maintained the intervention were more likely than girls in the other schools to participate in an average of one or more blocks of vigorous physical activity per day (p=0.04; OR=1.49; 95% CI=1.01, 2.20). Conclusions A comprehensive physical activity intervention that is fully implemented and maintained can increase participation in vigorous physical activity by high school girls. PMID:17888853

  16. Developmental and Individual Differences in Girls' Sex-Typed Activities in Middle Childhood and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Shanahan, Lilly; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Crouter, Ann C.; Booth, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Girls' time in sex-typed leisure activities was studied across 2 years in middle childhood (n=98, M=8.2 years in Year 1), early adolescence (n=106, M=11.7 years), and middle adolescence (n=86, M=14.9 years). In annual home interviews, White middle-class girls, mothers, and fathers rated their gendered attitudes, interests, and personality…

  17. Where Has Class Gone? The Pervasiveness of Class in Girls' Physical Activity in a Rural Town

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, John; Mooney, Amanda; Casey, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to animate discussion around how social class operates with adolescent girls from low socio-economic status backgrounds to shape and inform their decisions about participation in physical activity (PA) inside and outside of school. Examining the instance of girls in a single secondary school in an Australian regional town, the…

  18. Impact of gender and age on executive functioning: do girls and boys with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder differ neuropsychologically in preteen and teenage years?

    PubMed

    Seidman, Larry J; Biederman, Joseph; Monuteaux, Michael C; Valera, Eve; Doyle, Alysa E; Faraone, Stephen V

    2005-01-01

    ADHD is known to have neuropsychological correlates, characterized mainly by executive function (EF) deficits. However, most available data are based on studies of boys through age 12. Our goal was to assess whether girls with ADHD express neuropsychological features similar to those found in boys, and whether these impairments are found in both preteen and teen samples. Participants were 101 girls and 103 boys with DSM-III-R ADHD, and 109 comparison girls and 70 boys without ADHD, ages 9 to 17 years. Information on neuropsychological performance was obtained in a standardized manner blind to clinical status. Primary regression analyses controlled for age, socioeconomic status, learning disability, and psychiatric comorbidity. Girls and boys with ADHD were significantly more impaired on some measures of EFs than healthy comparisons but did not differ significantly from each other. With the exception of 1 test score there were no significant Sex x Diagnosis interactions. Moreover, there were no more significant interactions among age, gender, and diagnosis than would be expected by chance. Neuropsychological measures of EFs were comparably impaired in girls compared to boys with ADHD, and these impairments are found at ages 9 to 12 and ages 13 to 17. These findings suggest that executive dysfunctions are correlates of ADHD regardless of gender and age, at least through the late teen years.

  19. Promotion of Physical Activity Among High-School Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Russell R.; Ward, Dianne S.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Felton, Gwen; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Many adolescent girls fail to meet national guidelines for physical activity, and the prevalence of obesity is increasing among this group. Our study examined the effects of a comprehensive school-based intervention on physical activity among high-school girls. Methods. A group-randomized controlled field trial was conducted at 24 high schools. A school-based sample of 2744 girls (48.7% African American, 46.7% White) participated in a measurement protocol when they were in eighth and then ninth grade. A comprehensive physical activity intervention was designed to change the instructional program and the school environment to increase support for physical activity among girls. Results. At follow-up, 45% of girls in the intervention schools and 36% of girls in the control schools reported vigorous physical activity during an average of 1 or more 30-minute time blocks per day over a 3-day period. Conclusions. A comprehensive school-based intervention can increase regular participation in vigorous physical activity among high-school girls. PMID:16118370

  20. Measurement characteristics of activity-related psychosocial measures in 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls in the Girls health Enrichment Multisite Study (GEMS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: This paper presents reliability and validity analyses of physical activity-related psychosocial questionnaires completed by 8- to 10-year-old African-American girls at baseline and follow-up assessments of pilot intervention studies in the Girls health Enrichment Multi-site Study (GEMS)....

  1. Teenage pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal care - teenage pregnancy ... the baby. If you decide to continue the pregnancy, it is important to have good prenatal care. ... trimester is the first 3 months of your pregnancy. During this time, you will have a prenatal ...

  2. Teenage Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Teenage Sexuality Ages & Stages Listen Español Text Size ...

  3. The contribution of dance to daily physical activity among adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Structured physical activity (PA) programs are well positioned to promote PA among youth, however, little is known about these programs, particularly dance classes. The aims of this study were to: 1) describe PA levels of girls enrolled in dance classes, 2) determine the contribution of dance classes to total moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and 3) compare PA between days with a dance class (program days) and days without a dance class (non-program days). Methods Participants were 149 girls (11-18 years) enrolled in dance classes in 11 dance studios. Overall PA was assessed with accelerometry for 8 consecutive days, and girls reported when they attended dance classes during those days. The percent contribution of dance classes to total MVPA was calculated, and data were reduced to compare PA on program days to non-program days. Data were analyzed using mixed models, adjusting for total monitoring time. Results Girls engaged in 25.0 ± 0.9 minutes/day of MVPA. Dance classes contributed 28.7% (95% CI: 25.9%-31.6%) to girls' total MVPA. Girls accumulated more MVPA on program (28.7 ± 1.4 minutes/day) than non-program days (16.4 ± 1.5 minutes/day) (p < 0.001). Girls had less sedentary behavior on program (554.0 ± 8.1 minutes/day) than non-program days (600.2 ± 8.7 minutes/day) (p < 0.001). Conclusions Dance classes contributed a substantial proportion (29%) to girls' total MVPA, and girls accumulated 70% more MVPA and 8% less sedentary behavior on program days than on non-program days. Dance classes can make an important contribution to girls' total physical activity. PMID:21816074

  4. Perceptions of Physical Activity and Influences of Participation in Young African-American Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shannon; Knight, Candace; Crew-Gooden, Annette

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore African-American adolescent girls' perceptions of physical activity participation, examine how physical activity is defined and identify the most preferred forms of physical activity. Qualitative focus group interviews of a convenience sample (N = 30; Mean age = 14.3 years) were used to identifyfactors that influence African-American girls' physical activity participation as well as to explore how physical activity is defined within this population. Four themes emerged: (a) benefits and motivation to engage in physical activity, (b) behaviors consistent with perceived physical activity, (c) most enjoyable physical activity/activities, and (d) barriers to physical activity. Physical activities that promoted normative adolescent development (i.e., autonomy) were perceived as most beneficial, desirable, and most likely to be sustained. Implications of these findings highlight the importance of the incorporation of socialization and peer engagement in physical activity programs designed for African-American adolescent girls.

  5. Teenagers Talking about Reading and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, Clare

    2008-01-01

    Past research has shown teenagers to be reluctant to read and less likely to visit libraries than younger children. These conclusions are debated and further investigation is needed. Difficulties abound in researching teenagers' opinions. Teenagers can be reluctant to participate in activities and peer support is often very important in…

  6. Effects of Body Fat on Weight Concerns, Dating, and Sexual Activity: A Longitudinal Analysis of Black and White Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Udry, J. Richard; Suchindran, Chirayath; Campbell, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Investigated implications of body-fat differences for dating and sexual activity and implications of heterosexual activity for dieting and weight concerns in adolescent girls. Found that among white girls, and blacks with college-educated mothers, more body fat was associated with lower dating probability, even among non-obese girls. Body fat was…

  7. Experiences in Sport, Physical Activity, and Physical Education Among Christian, Buddhist, and Hindu Asian Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Iku; Gupta, Nidhi; Gill, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural scholarship in sport and exercise psychology should help us understand and apply cultural competencies for all to be physically active. In the present study, two Asian countries, Japan and Singapore, were chosen. The participation rate for physical activities among adolescent girls tends to be lower than that of boys in both countries. Thus, the purpose of the project was to gain knowledge and understanding about sociocultural factors that may explain adolescent girls' perceptions and behaviors toward sport, physical activity, and physical education (PE). A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with focus groups was used to understand meanings of physical activity among Buddhist Japanese, and Hindu Indians and Christian Chinese from Singapore. Each focus group consisted of four or five girls and female researchers. Based on the analysis, we created four themes which were "cultural identities," "Asian girls and sport/physical activities," "PE experiences," "motivation for future involvement." The Buddhist Japanese, Hindu Indian, and Christian Chinese participants each reported unique physical activity experiences, and all the participants were aware of how Asian culture may affect being physically active. Experiences of PE classes were similar but perceptions of their PE attire were different for Christian Chinese and Hindu Indian adolescent girls. Based on the results, the importance of nurturing cultural competencies and ways to encourage girls to be physically active throughout life were discussed. PMID:23412952

  8. Experiences in sport, physical activity, and physical education among Christian, Buddhist, and Hindu Asian adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kaori; Kodani, Iku; Gupta, Nidhi; Gill, Diane L

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural scholarship in sport and exercise psychology should help us understand and apply cultural competencies for all to be physically active. In the present study, two Asian countries, Japan and Singapore, were chosen. The participation rate for physical activities among adolescent girls tends to be lower than that of boys in both countries. Thus, the purpose of the project was to gain knowledge and understanding about sociocultural factors that may explain adolescent girls' perceptions and behaviors toward sport, physical activity, and physical education (PE). A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with focus groups was used to understand meanings of physical activity among Buddhist Japanese, and Hindu Indians and Christian Chinese from Singapore. Each focus group consisted of four or five girls and female researchers. Based on the analysis, we created four themes which were "cultural identities," "Asian girls and sport/physical activities," "PE experiences," "motivation for future involvement." The Buddhist Japanese, Hindu Indian, and Christian Chinese participants each reported unique physical activity experiences, and all the participants were aware of how Asian culture may affect being physically active. Experiences of PE classes were similar but perceptions of their PE attire were different for Christian Chinese and Hindu Indian adolescent girls. Based on the results, the importance of nurturing cultural competencies and ways to encourage girls to be physically active throughout life were discussed.

  9. The Juggling Act: A Phenomenological Study of Gifted and Talented Girls' Experiences with Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Eunice; Wardman, Janna; Bruce, Toni; Millward, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Facebook is a frequently accessed social networking site with more than one billion active users worldwide. Although there are numerous studies on its impact on teenagers, none have investigated its impact on gifted and talented girls. This study's aim was to understand the social media experiences of talented female student leaders. A qualitative…

  10. A Case Study of a Girls' Exergaming Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Yoonsin

    2012-01-01

    Girls 6 to 19 years old have the highest rates of obesity with about thirty percent being obese in the US (Ogden et al., 2006). Researchers studying the prevention of childhood obesity are examining exergames because playing video games is popular among youth (Rideout, Foehr, & Roberts, 2010). Recent research has mainly focused on energy…

  11. Do Motives to Undertake Physical Activity Relate to Physical Activity in Adolescent Boys and Girls?

    PubMed

    Kopcakova, Jaroslava; Veselska, Zuzana Dankulincova; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Kalman, Michal; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-07-08

    Low levels of physical activity (PA) during adolescence contribute to obesity and poor health outcomes in adolescence, and these associations endure into adulthood. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between motives for PA and the level of PA among adolescent boys and girls. We obtained data regarding motives for PA and frequency of PA in 2010 via the Health Behavior in School-aged Children cross-sectional study in the Czech and Slovak Republics (n = 9018, mean age = 13.6, 49% boys). Respondents answered questions about their motives for PA and the frequency of their PA. Motives for PA were assessed using 13 items, which were structured in four groups. We explored the association between the motives for PA and sufficient PA using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, and separately for boys and girls. "Good child" motives and Achievement motives were significantly associated with sufficient PA among both boys and girls. Health motives were associated with sufficient PA only among boys, and Social motives were associated with sufficient PA only among girls. Motives for PA were associated with the level of PA, and this association was partially gender dependent. These gender differences should be considered in interventions focusing on enhancement of PA.

  12. Texting to Increase Physical Activity Among Teenagers (TXT Me!): Rationale, Design, and Methods Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Dora; Bhatt, Riddhi; Baranowski, Tom; Rodgers, Wendy; Jago, Russell; Anderson, Barbara; Liu, Yan; Mendoza, Jason A; Tapia, Ramsey; Buday, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity decreases from childhood through adulthood. Among youth, teenagers (teens) achieve the lowest levels of physical activity, and high school age youth are particularly at risk of inactivity. Effective methods are needed to increase youth physical activity in a way that can be maintained through adulthood. Because teens text a great deal, text messages promoting walking, a low cost physical activity, may be an effective method for promoting sustainable physical activity. Objective The objective of our study was to determine the effect of pedometers, self selected step goals, and texts grounded in the self-determination theory (SDT) on physical activity among the teens. Methods “TXT Me!” was a 12 week intervention that texted 14-17 year olds to increase their daily physical activity by increasing the number of steps they take each day. The intervention was grounded in the SDT. Formative research with the teens helped construct the intervention and develop the texts. A total of 84 texts were developed (12 to set a step goal, and 72 promoting autonomy, competence, and relatedness). The pilot evaluation used a four group, randomized design (n=160). After baseline data collection, the participants were randomized to one of four conditions (no treatment control, pedometer only, pedometer + weekly prompts, pedometer + weekly prompts + SDT grounded texts). Data were collected at baseline and immediately upon completion of the study. The primary outcome was physical activity, measured by 7 days of accelerometry. Basic psychological needs, physical activity motivation, process evaluation, and program satisfaction data were also collected. Results To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to explore the use of stand alone, SDT grounded texts, supported by pedometers and prompts to set a self selected step goal, as a method for increasing physical activity among teens. Conclusions This pilot study will contribute valuable information

  13. A typology of middle school girls: audience segmentation related to physical activity.

    PubMed

    Staten, Lisa K; Birnbaum, Amanda S; Jobe, Jared B; Elder, John P

    2006-02-01

    The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) combines social ecological and social marketing approaches to promote girls' participation in physical activity programs implemented at 18 middle schools throughout the United States. Key to the TAAG approach is targeting materials to a variety of audience segments. TAAG segments are individuals who share one or more common characteristic that is expected to correlate with physical activity. Thirteen focus groups with seventh and eighth grade girls were conducted to identify and characterize segments. Potential messages and channels of communication were discussed for each segment. Based on participant responses, six primary segments were identified: athletic, preppy, quiet, rebel, smart, and tough. The focus group information was used to develop targeted promotional tools to appeal to a diversity of girls. Using audience segmentation for targeting persuasive communication is potentially useful for intervention programs but may be sensitive; therefore, ethical issues must be critically examined.

  14. Teenagers and Satanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredenberg, Alice M.

    The background of Satanism and typical Satanic activities are described. It is noted that contemporary Satanism has three forms: solitary Satanists, outlaw cults, and neo-Satanic churches. Included in a description of Satanic activities are Heavy Metal music and fantasy games, both of which are intensely interesting to teenagers. The next section…

  15. Overweight and obese teenagers: why is adolescence a critical period?

    PubMed

    Alberga, A S; Sigal, R J; Goldfield, G; Prud'homme, D; Kenny, G P

    2012-08-01

    This paper discusses the critical period of adolescence and its potential role in the development and persistence of obesity. The adolescent years are characteristic of changes in body composition (location and quantity of body fat), physical fitness and decreased insulin sensitivity during puberty. This period of growth and maturation is also marked with behavioural changes in diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and psychological health. Physical activity and sport participation decline during adolescence especially in teenage girls, while sedentary behaviour, risk for depression and body esteem issues increase during the teenage years. These physiological and behavioural changes during adolescence warrant the attention of health practitioners to prevent the onset and continuation of obesity throughout the lifespan.

  16. Physical activity and physical fitness in African-American girls with and without obesity.

    PubMed

    Ward, D S; Trost, S G; Felton, G; Saunders, R; Parsons, M A; Dowda, M; Pate, R R

    1997-11-01

    Lack of physical activity and low levels of physical fitness are thought to be contributing factors to the high prevalence of obesity in African-American girls. To examine this hypothesis, we compared habitual physical activity and physical fitness in 54 African-American girls with obesity and 96 African-American girls without obesity residing in rural South Carolina. Participation in vigorous (> or = 6 METs) (VPA) or moderate and vigorous physical activity (> or = 4 METs) (MVPA) was assessed on three consecutive days using the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using the PWC 170 cycle ergometer test. Upper body strength was determined at two sites via isometric cable tensiometer tests. Relative to their counterparts without obesity, girls with obesity reported significantly fewer 30-minute blocks of VPA (0.90 +/- 0.14 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.14) and MVPA (1.2 +/- 0.18 vs. 1.7 +/- 0.16) (p < 0.01). Within the entire sample, VPA and MVPA were inversely associated with body mass index (r = -0.17 and r = -0.19) and triceps skinfold thickness (r = -0.19 and r = -0.22) (p < 0.05). In the PWC 170 test and isometric strength tests, girls with obesity demonstrated absolute scores that were similar to, or greater than, those of girls without obesity; however, when scores were expressed relative to bodyweight, girls with obesity demonstrated significantly lower values (p < 0.05). The results support the hypothesis that lack of physical activity and low physical fitness are important contributing factors in the development and/or maintenance of obesity in African-American girls.

  17. Teenagers who plan parenthood.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Julie A

    2004-01-01

    It is clear that a variable number of teenage mothers have, to some extent, planned parenthood. From an evolutionary perspective, it could be argued that teenage childbearing may in fact be a positive adaptive mechanism for humans raised in a hostile environment. Life history theory suggests that in risky and uncertain environments the optimal reproductive strategy is to reproduce early in order to maximise the probability of leaving any descendents at all. If some teenagers are planning or hoping for pregnancy, it is possible that some positive behavioural changes may be observed. This has proven to be the case with many teenagers altering their risk taking behaviours in the anticipation and expectation of pregnancy. There is now substantial evidence that teenagers who become pregnant were at higher risk than the general population for using cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. However, once pregnant, rates of consumption are usually lower compared with their non-pregnant peers or even their own personal pre-pregnancy rates of consumption. Therefore, for some teenagers, the conscious or unconscious prospect of pregnancy represents a potential space in which to rethink behaviours that may be harmful to themselves as a future mother, and also to their child. Given that teenage motherhood is not going to simply vanish, it is important to remember to focus research and services on validated interventions that may assist teenage mothers fulfill their ambitions of parenthood and simultaneously provide the best outcomes for their offspring. Evidence-based interventions focus on sustained home visitation by nurses, with limited evidence supporting the use of volunteers. In contrast, evidence suggests that home visitation by paraprofessionals may not be effective. Other strategies that may be helpful include the use of multidisciplinary teenage pregnancy clinics that have been noted to be associated with improved pregnancy outcomes. The role of new mothers' groups, other

  18. Urban Middle School African American Girls' Attitudes toward Physical Education and Out-of-School Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this two-part study were (1) to investigate urban middle school African American girls' physical activity levels and their relationships to attitudes and, (2) to explore urban middle school African American girls' attitude toward physical education. A total of (N = 649) African American girls from 14 New York City middle schools…

  19. Physical Activity Trajectories and Multi-Level Factors among Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Zook, Kathleen R.; Saksvig, Brit I.; Wu, Tong Tong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although the decline of physical activity in adolescent girls is well-documented, there are girls whose physical activity does not follow this pattern. This study examined the relationships between physical activity trajectories and personal, psychosocial and environmental factors among adolescent girls. Methods Participants were from the University of Maryland field site of the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls. Of 730 girls measured in 8th grade, 589 were re-measured in 11th grade. Moderate to vigorous physical activity was assessed by accelererometers; participants were categorized as active maintainers (n=31), inactive maintainers (n=410), adopters (n=64), or relapsers (n=56). Height and weight were measured, personal and psychosocial information was collected from surveys, and distance from home to school and parks was assessed from Geographical Information Systems. Multivariable logistic regression was used for data analysis. Results Variables at individual, social, and environmental levels predicted active maintainers and inactive maintainers, while only individual-level variables predicted adoption. None predicted relapse. Higher (favorable) scores for physical self-concept, perceived body fat, friend and family physical activity support, frequency of physical activity with friends, and shorter distance from home to a park predicted active maintainers. Overweight/obese status, earlier age at menses, and lower scores for physical self-concept, perceived body fat, friend physical activity support, and frequency of physical activity with friends, and further distance from home to school predicted inactive maintainers. High physical self-concept and not being overweight/obese predicted adopters. Conclusion Multi-level factors appear to predict behavior maintenance rather than actual change. Implications and Contribution Although physical activity declines among girls during adolescence, some maintain and others increase their physical activity. Our

  20. Qualitative Iranian study of parents' roles in adolescent girls' physical activity habit development.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Vahide; Anoosheh, Monireh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ehsani, Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    Parents are likely to be key influences on children's physical activity behaviors, although it is not clear how. This study was designed to explore parents' roles in Iranian adolescent girls' physical activity habit development. A qualitative study was conducted by means of semistructured one-to-one interviews with 25 participants, including 16 adolescent girls (10-19 years of age), seven mothers, and two fathers. Content analysis was applied. Two main themes emerged as parental role in adolescent girls' physical activity behavior: developing interest in physical activity (making children familiar with physical activity, discovering talents, and role modeling) and providing support to adolescents for physical activity (material and immaterial). This study provided a better understanding of how Iranian parents influence their children's physical activity behavior. This will enable nurses to design more effective family-based interventions.

  1. The teenager with palpitations.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat-Yazdi, Farshad; Koenig, Peter R

    2014-02-01

    Palpitations can result from cardiac awareness (increased conscious perception of the heart beating) or from a fast or irregular cardiac rhythm. Most causes for palpitations in the teenager can be diagnosed with minimal testing. Patients with an abnormal ECG, non-sinus tachycardia, abnormal cardiac examination, concerning family history, or palpitations associated with activity or syncope should be referred to a pediatric cardiologist. This article discusses the evaluation, testing, and management of teenagers with palpitations. It also provides a general guideline for referral for subspecialty evaluation.

  2. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  3. Why are early maturing girls less active? Links between pubertal development, psychological well-being, and physical activity among girls at ages 11 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Kirsten Krahnstoever; Werder, Jessica L; Trost, Stewart G; Baker, Birgitta L; Birch, Leann L

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has shown that early maturing girls at age 11 have lower subsequent physical activity at age 13 in comparison to later maturing girls. Possible reasons for this association have not been assessed. This study examines girls’ psychological response to puberty and their enjoyment of physical activity as intermediary factors linking pubertal maturation and physical activity. Participants included 178 girls who were assessed at age 11, of whom 168 were reassessed at age 13. All participants were non-Hispanic white and resided in the U.S. Three measures of pubertal development were obtained at age 11 including Tanner breast stage, estradiol levels, and mothers’ reports of girls’ development on the Pubertal Development Scale (PDS). Measures of psychological well-being at ages 11 and 13 included depression, global self worth, perceived athletic competence, maturation fears, and body esteem. At age 13, girls’ enjoyment of physical activity was assessed using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale and their daily minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed using objective monitoring. Structural Equation Modeling was used to assess direct and indirect pathways between pubertal development at age 11 and MVPA at age 13. In addition to a direct effect of pubertal development on MVPA, indirect effects were found for depression, global self worth and maturity fears controlling for covariates. In each instance, more advanced pubertal development at age 11 was associated with lower psychological well-being at age 13, which predicted lower enjoyment of physical activity at age 13 and in turn lower MVPA. Results from this study suggest that programs designed to increase physical activity among adolescent girls should address the self-consciousness and discontent that girls’ experience with their bodies during puberty, particularly if they mature earlier than their peers, and identify activities or settings that make differences in

  4. Impact of Teenage Motherhood on the Academic Performance in Public Primary Schools in Bungoma County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barmao-Kiptanui, Catherine; Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga; Lelan, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy and motherhood is a concern in both developed and developing countries and is a complex reality of contemporary society however the re-entry of teenage mothers into the school system continues to demand attention as society's negative attitude towards pregnant girls and teenage mothers persists. Those who do return to school…

  5. Sexually Active Teenagers Are More Likely To Be Depressed and To Attempt Suicide. A Report of the Heritage Center for Data Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Robert E.; Johnson, Kirk A.; Noyes, Lauren R.

    Although teen sexual activity has declined in recent years, the overall rate is still high. The problems associated with teen sexual activity are well known. Less widely known are the psychological and emotional problems associated with this activity. The present study examines the linkage between teenage sexual activity and emotional health. The…

  6. Engaging Girls in STEM: How to Plan or Revamp Your EPO Resources or Activities to be More Effective for Girls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Lora V.; Peterson, Karen A.; Sharma, Mangala; Smith, Denise

    2012-01-01

    This two-hour workshop, which was held as a follow-on to the plenary session "Engaging Girls in STEM: A Discussion of Foundational and Current Research on What Works," offered research-based insights, resources, and tips to help participants plan or revamp programs and resources aimed at encouraging girls in science. Led by Karen Peterson, PI for the National Girls Collaborative Project,1 the workshop included: a brief discussion about effective strategies recommended for encouraging girls in STEM; hands-on experience, where participants-availing of the expert's guidance-applied the recommended strategies to alter or tailor an existing or planned program/resource to be more girl-friendly; and a sharing out, where the participants reflected on the results of the hands-on exercise and developed action items to continue carrying out the girl-friendly best practices in science, technology, engineering, and math education and public outreach.

  7. Engaging Girls in STEM: How to Plan or Revamp Your EPO Resources or Activities to be More Effective for Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Peterson, K. A.; Sharma, M.; Smith, D.

    2012-08-01

    This two-hour workshop, which was held as a follow-on to the plenary session "Engaging Girls in STEM: A Discussion of Foundational and Current Research on What Works," offered research-based insights, resources, and tips to help participants plan or revamp programs and resources aimed at encouraging girls in science. Led by Karen Peterson, PI for the National Girls Collaborative Project,1 the workshop included: a brief discussion about effective strategies recommended for encouraging girls in STEM; hands-on experience, where participants - availing of the expert's guidance - applied the recommended strategies to alter or tailor an existing or planned program/resource to be more girl-friendly; and a sharing out, where the participants reflected on the results of the hands-on exercise and developed action items to continue carrying out the girl-friendly best practices in science, technology, engineering, and math education and public outreach.

  8. Body image, BMI, and physical activity in girls and boys aged 14-16 years.

    PubMed

    Kantanista, Adam; Osiński, Wiesław; Borowiec, Joanna; Tomczak, Maciej; Król-Zielińska, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body image, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity in adolescents. The study included 1702 girls and 1547 boys aged 14-16 years. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was evaluated by the Physical Activity Screening Measure. Body image was assessed using the Feelings and Attitudes Towards the Body Scale, and participants' BMI was determined based on measured height and weight. Compared to boys, girls reported more negative body image (p<.05). The results of the three-way hierarchical regression revealed that body image was a statistically significant positive predictor of MVPA for adolescents, regardless of BMI. Additionally, body image was a stronger predictor of MVPA in boys than in girls. These findings suggest that body image, rather than BMI, is important in undertaking physical activity in adolescents and should be considered when preparing programs aimed at improving physical activity.

  9. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murdock, N H

    1998-03-01

    Pregnancy among women under age 15 years is unusual, but not rare. About one third of the approximately 3 million total pregnancies which occur each year in the US are to teenagers. However, only about 30% of all pregnant adolescents receive adequate prenatal care, even though it is women in that age group who most need such care. Teen mothers have a higher rate of anemia and pregnancy-induced hypertension, most probably related to diet. Infants born to teen mothers are more likely to be premature and of low birth weight. Infants born to teen mothers are also more predisposed to mental retardation, brain damage, and birth injuries. Teen mothers are more likely to have poor weight gain, premature labor, abruptio placentae, and preeclampsia. The psychosocial reasons why teenage women become pregnant are considered, as well as the relevant media influences. While teenage pregnancy remains a major problem in the US, 1996 statistics indicate an overall 4% decline to 54.7 births/1000 among women aged 15-19 years. Teenage women need to be taught that there are many options in life other than pregnancy.

  10. The Influence of Instruction Modality on Brain Activation in Teenagers with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: Two Case Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Betty; Jantzen, Kelly J.; Olvera, Dianne; Steinberg, Fred; Scott Kelso, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Teenagers with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) have difficulty with fine-motor coordination, which may relate to the novelty of the task or the lack of "self-talk" to mediate action. In this study, we required two teenagers with NLD and two control group teenagers to touch the thumb of each hand firmly and accurately to the fingertips of the…

  11. Understanding gender norms, nutrition, and physical activity in adolescent girls: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Rebecca A; Rehman, Laurene; Kirk, Sara F L

    2015-01-24

    Public health is currently focused on childhood obesity, and the associated behaviors of physical activity and nutrition. Canadian youth are insufficiently active and do not meet nutritional guidelines. This is of particular concern for adolescent girls, as they are less active than boys, become less active as they age, and engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors. The purpose of this review is to determine what is known from the existing literature about how gender norms are understood in relation to the health-related behaviors of PA and nutrition in young girls. This scoping review follows the framework of Arksey and O'Malley, involving defining a research question, study identification and selection, charting, interpretation, summarizing, and reporting. In total, 28 documents are reviewed, and characteristics are summarized quantitatively and qualitatively. Five major themes are identified: (1) Girls' relationships with PA are complex and require negotiating gender roles, (2) the literature focuses on dieting rather than nutrition, (3) appearance and perceptions influence behaviors, (4) "body" focused discourse is significant to girls' experiences, and (5) social influences, institutions, and environments are influential and may offer opportunity for future research and action. Gaps in the literature are identified and discussed. It is concluded that young girls' activity and nutrition is affected by gender norms and feminine ideals through complex negotiations, perceptions, body-centered discourse, and societal influences.

  12. "In the Eye of the Beholder...": Girls', Boys' and Teachers' Perceptions of Boys' Aggression to Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Laurence; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    Because children and young teenagers usually associate in same-sex groups, psychological research concerned with adolescent aggression has often concentrated on within-sex relationships. However, during adolescence, boys and girls increasingly interact socially. This paper reports a study of boy-to-girl aggression as perceived by girls, boys and…

  13. Sexualities, Teenage Pregnancy and Educational Life Histories in Portugal: Experiencing Sexual Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Laura; Araujo, Helena C.; Santos, Sofia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Portuguese working-class teenage girls' voices and experiences concerning sexuality and pregnancy. Within a sociological, feminist and educational framework, it explores the girls' perspective on sexual and intimate citizenship as evidence of fairer forms of regulation of teenage sexualities. Through building life histories…

  14. Pubertal development, physical self-perception, and motivation toward physical activity in girls.

    PubMed

    Labbrozzi, Dina; Robazza, Claudio; Bertollo, Maurizio; Bucci, Ines; Bortoli, Laura

    2013-08-01

    We examined the differences in physical self-perception and motivation toward physical activity in early- and mid-adolescent girls. Body Mass Index (BMI) and pubertal status, assessed by means of the Tanner scale, were collected in 11-year-old (n=74) and 13-year-old girls (n=60). The assessment included six scales from the Physical Self-Description Questionnaire, the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale, and the Situational Intrinsic Motivation Scale. Age differences emerged, with older girls showing a poorer physical perception and lower scores in intrinsic motivation and enjoyment of physical activity. In the subsample of 11-year-olds, findings showed that more developed girls reported a poorer physical perception on the scales of body fat, global physical self-concept, and appearance, and a lower score in the PACES positive scale. Results underscore the need to promote interventions aimed at encouraging active lifestyles among children and adolescent girls, in order to prevent overweight prior to pubertal onset.

  15. Youth research. Naked wire and naked truths: a study of reproductive health risks faced by teenage girls in Honiara, Solomon Islands, November 1997.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    A qualitative research project conducted in 1997 in the Solomon Islands used questionnaires, focus groups discussions, and in-depth interviews to gather information on reproductive health risks faced by young, unmarried women in Honiara. In this setting, urbanization and poverty, migration, unemployment, and low levels of education increase the risk for youth of acquiring HIV/AIDS or a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Young women, who must yield to the authority of their male relatives, often have clandestine sexual relationships beginning as early as age 12 and are unable to negotiate safe sex behavior. Commercial sexual exchanges are also on the increase. Sex education is generally confined to secondary schools, although most girls drop-out after primary school. The main source of sex information is the media and friends. While there is concern about adolescent pregnancy rates, contraceptive access is restricted to young, unmarried women. The reaction of a family to an adolescent pregnancy is initial anger and ultimate acceptance. Condom use is low, largely because it is believed that it interferes with sexual pleasure. Because the young women are unable to negotiate safe sex, they are at risk of pregnancy, STDs, and HIV/AIDS. The situation can be improved by creating an enabling environment for young women through policy initiatives, improving knowledge, promoting condom use, providing reproductive health services, and improving communication channels.

  16. Social physique anxiety and physical activity in early adolescent girls: the influence of maturation and physical activity motives.

    PubMed

    Niven, Ailsa; Fawkner, Samantha; Knowles, Ann-Marie; Henretty, Joan; Stephenson, Claire

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we examined the influence of maturation on social physique anxiety, the relationship between social physique anxiety and current and future physical activity levels, and the influence of motives for physical activity on this relationship in early adolescent girls (n=162; mean age = 11.8 +/- 0.3 years). Participants completed the Pubertal Development Scale, the modified Social Physique Anxiety Scale, and the Motives for Physical Activity Scale at baseline and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children at baseline and 6 months later. The girls became less active across the 6 months and girls in the early stages of maturation had significantly lower social physique anxiety than the girls in the middle and late stages of maturation. Social physique anxiety was not related to current or future physical activity in the sample as a whole. Cluster analysis identified four groups with different motive profiles and the High Appearance and Fitness group demonstrated a moderate negative relationship between social physique anxiety and physical activity at phase 1, whereas the other groups did not. These findings indicate that social physique anxiety may increase with maturation and the relationship between social physique anxiety and physical activity is dependent on reasons for being active. For girls who are motivated to be active primarily by body-related reasons, social physique anxiety is likely to lead to lower levels of physical activity.

  17. A Typology of Middle School Girls: Audience Segmentation Related to Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Staten, Lisa K.; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Jobe, Jared B.; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) combines social ecological and social marketing approaches to promote girls’ participation in physical activity programs implemented at 18 middle schools throughout the United States. Key to the TAAG approach is targeting materials to a variety of audience segments. TAAG segments are individuals who share one or more common characteristic that is expected to correlate with physical activity. Thirteen focus groups with seventh and eighth grade girls were conducted to identify and characterize segments. Potential messages and channels of communication were discussed for each segment. Based on participant responses, six primary segments were identified: athletic, preppy, quiet, rebel, smart, and tough. The focus group information was used to develop targeted promotional tools to appeal to a diversity of girls. Using audience segmentation for targeting persuasive communication is potentially useful for intervention programs but may be sensitive; therefore, ethical issues must be critically examined. PMID:16397160

  18. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL AVULSION FRACTURE OF THE TIBIAL TUBEROSITY IN A TEENAGER: CASE REPORT AND THERAPY USED

    PubMed Central

    e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Pires; Puell, Thiago; e Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in teenagers is a rare lesion. We describe the first case in the literature, in a teenage girl who sustained a fall while jumping during a volleyball match. No predisposing factors were iden tified. The lesions were treated with open surgical reduction and internal fixation. The aim of the present study was to present a case of simultaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity in a teenage girl and the therapy used. PMID:27042651

  19. Mediators Affecting Girls’ Levels of Physical Activity Outside of School: Findings from the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moody, Jamie; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Metcalfe, Lauve; Parra-Medina, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Background Providing after school activities is a community level approach for reducing the decline in physical activity of girls as they reach early adolescence. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors as potential mediators of after school physical activity in adolescent girls. Methods We assessed objectively measured levels of physical activity occurring outside of school and potential predictors and mediators of activity in girls participating in the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls (TAAG). Results We found that the TAAG intervention had a statistically significant and positive effect on out of school activity in the 2006 cohort. Self-efficacy, friends’ social support, total social support, and difficulty getting to and from community activities mediated the level of moderate to vigorous physical activity in girls. Conclusions Parents, communities, and schools should provide and enhance opportunities outside of the school day for adolescents to be active. Reducing transportation barriers and enlisting social support appear to be key. PMID:20012810

  20. Title IX, Girls' Sports Participation, and Adult Female Physical Activity and Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Robert; Xu, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Arguably, the most important school-based intervention to increase physical activity was Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which led to a 600% increase in girls' sports participation between 1972 and 1978. We studied the effect of this increase in sports participation and athletic opportunities while young on the physical activity and…

  1. Centralising Space: The Physical Education and Physical Activity Experiences of South Asian, Muslim Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stride, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the physical education (PE) and physical activity experiences of a group of South Asian, Muslim girls, a group typically marginalised in PE and physical activity research. The study responds to ongoing calls for research to explore across different spaces in young people's lives. Specifically, I draw on a…

  2. Physical Activities and Sedentary Pursuits in African American and Caucasian Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.; Felton, Gwen M.; Saunders, Ruth; Ward, Dianne S.; Dishman, Rod K.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe and compare the specific physical activity choices and sedentary pursuits of African American and Caucasian American girls. Participants were 1,124 African American and 1,068 Caucasian American eighth-grade students from 31 middle schools. The 3-Day Physical Activity Recall (3DPAR) was used to measure…

  3. Adventure Therapy with Girls At-Risk: Responses to Outdoor Experiential Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autry, Cari E.

    2001-01-01

    Explored the feelings, attitudes, and perceptions of at- risk adolescent girls from a psychiatric rehabilitation facility following their participation in adventure therapy that involved outdoor experiential activities. Interview data indicated that participants found positive meaning within various activities. The resulting themes were…

  4. Keep Fit. Suggested Fitness Activities for Forms 1-4 Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinataci, S.

    This booklet is designed for teachers who conduct physical education programs and who coach sports in schools where modern training equipment is not available. Most of the equipment described or shown in this booklet can be improvised. The activities are designed for girls in grades seven through ten. The following activities are covered in the…

  5. Teenage mothers and the health of their children.

    PubMed

    Botting, B; Rosato, M; Wood, R

    1998-01-01

    Teenage mothers continue to present challenges to social policy and remain of topical interest to the media. This article discusses trends in teenage conception rates, their outcomes and long term consequences. In 1996, 7 per cent of all births were to girls aged under 20. On average children born to teenage girls have lower birthweights, increased risk of infant mortality and an increased risk of some congenital anomalies. They are less likely to be breastfed and more likely to live in deprived circumstances. These factors in turn influence their health and long term opportunities.

  6. Physical Activity and Sport in the Lives of Girls. Physical & Mental Health Dimensions from an Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport.

    This report highlights relevant research and expert opinion on girls' involvement in physical activity and sport. Research findings revealed: (1) more girls are participating in a wider array of physical activities than ever before; (2) regular physical activity in adolescence can reduce risk for obesity and hyperlipidemia, increase bone mass and…

  7. Evaluation development for a physical activity positive youth development program for girls.

    PubMed

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; Cole, Amy N; Montgomery, Anna K

    2016-04-01

    Girls on the Run (GOTR) is an after school program for girls in third through fifth grade which utilizes a physical activity based positive youth development curriculum that culminates with completing a 5K run. Unfortunately, there is little empirical data documenting GOTR participant changes that align with the curriculum and describe the evaluation process. Therefore, this study presents an evaluation of GOTR consisting of three main processes: curriculum content analysis and stakeholder focus groups (N=11) to identify key outcomes of the program; community-based participatory research to collaborate with program personnel to further identify important outcomes; and the design and pilot testing of an instrument (N=104) for assessing changes in the theoretically grounded outcomes over time. Findings demonstrated a positive collaborative process that led to important information to be used for an impact evaluation of Girls on the Run and for future evaluation development efforts for physical activity based positive youth development.

  8. Teenage Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in doubt. Perhaps they are personally opposed to abortion. Or they know deep in their hearts that ... in life and therefore wish to have an abortion. Most girls, though, agonize over this difficult decision, ...

  9. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities: Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Beltz, Adriene M; McHale, Susan M; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2016-10-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were mediated by gender identity and moderated by hormones. Gender attitudes (i.e., gender-role attitudes and attitudes about being a girl), gender identity, and gender-typed activities were reported by 54 girls aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure, including 40 girls with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical (NC) CAH exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Both girls with C-CAH and NC-CAH reported positive attitudes about being a girl and egalitarian gender attitudes, consistent with their female-typical gender identity. In contrast, girls with C-CAH had more male-typed activity interest and participation than girls with NC-CAH. Gender attitudes were linked to activities in both groups, with gender identity mediating the links. Specifically, gender-role attitudes and positive attitudes about being a girl were associated with feminine gender identity, which in turn was associated with decreased male-typed activity interests and participation, and increased female-typed activity interests. Our results are consistent with schema theories, with attitudes more closely associated with gender identity than with prenatal androgens.

  10. Poor parenting: teenagers' views on adolescent pregnancies in eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sekiwunga, Richard; Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2009-12-01

    In Uganda teenage pregnancy is considered a problem for moral and social, as well as health, reasons. This qualitative stud,y in Busia District focused on the views of teenagers themselves as expressed in 9 focus group discussions with girls and boys. Their perspectives were contrasted with those of community leaders and mothers of adolescents. The young people blamed teenage pregnancy on failures of the parental generation. They asserted that parents and guardians were both too lenient and too harsh, that they failed to provide for their daughters' needs, and that they pressured them into early marriages instead of giving priority to education. Although poverty and family breakdown were recognized as underlying structural causes of parental failure, the teenagers experienced these factors in their everyday lives as problems with their parents and guardians. The teenagers expressed the 'enlightened' view that adolescent pregnancy was undesireable, even though many girls have few alternatives to marriage and childbearing.

  11. Emergent Subjectivity in Caring Institutions for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinsson, Susanne; Nord, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how different mealtime situations help shape teenager and staff subjectivities in two Swedish residential care homes and a special school for girls and boys, 12-15 years old, with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Three mealtime networks are analysed using concepts from actor-network theory, treating architectural…

  12. Intervention for Spanish Overweight Teenagers in Physical Education Lessons

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-López, Emilio J.; Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Moral-García, José E.; Pantoja-Vallejo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Physical education is a favourable educational framework for the development of programmes aimed at increasing physical activity in children and thus reducing sedentarism. The progressive increase of overweight students demands global control and follow-up measurement of these behaviours in both in and out of school. The pedometer can be a useful tool in this field. It is easy to use and allow Physical Education (PE) departments to quantify their students' number of steps/day. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a pedometer intervention on body fat and BMI levels in overweight teenagers. Besides, the effects of the programme are analysed according to two other variables: pedometer ownership and gender, distinguishing between out-of-school and school hours, weekdays and weekends. The sample comprises 112 overweight students (49 boys and 63 girls) from 5 secondary schools. Participants were asked to follow a physical activity programme consisting on a minimum of 12000 and 10000 steps/day for boys and girls, respectively. It also allowed them to get up to 2 extra points in their PE marks. Results were measured after 6 weeks of programme application as well as after 6 weeks of retention. Results revealed significantly reduced BMI in the teenagers with their own pedometer (p < 0.05). The difference observed in the number of steps/day between boys (12050) and girls (9566) was significant in all measured time periods (p < 0.05). Besides, both overweight boys and girls were observed to take 1000 steps/day less at weekends than in weekdays. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposal of 12000 and 10000 steps for overweight boys and girls, respectively, accompanied by a reinforcement programme in their final PE marks, seems sufficient to obtain significant BMI reductions. Besides, PE is shown a favourable framework for the proposal of pedometer-impelled weight loss programmes in overweight youth. Key pointsA programme of 12000 and 10000 steps for overweight

  13. Bidirectional linkages between psychological symptoms and sexual activities among African American adolescent girls in psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa R; Donenberg, Geri R; Emerson, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines longitudinal associations between light and heavy sexual experiences and psychiatric symptoms in African American adolescent girls receiving mental health care. Research supports bidirectional associations between adolescent romantic and sexual behaviors and depression and other mental health problems, but this finding has not been examined among African American youth or in clinical samples. African American girls in psychiatric treatment suffer disparities in HIV/AIDS vulnerability, and understanding the context of girls' risk-taking (and how psychological symptoms contribute) may aid prevention efforts. Two-hundred-sixty-five African American girls seeking psychiatric care were assessed for mental health symptoms and light and heavy sexual behaviors. Participants completed a 6-month follow-up. Baseline light sexual activity predicted increased internalizing and externalizing symptoms and substance use at follow-up. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicted increased heavy sexual behaviors over time, including HIV-risk behaviors. Results support the association between romantic involvement and depression. Psychological symptoms may play a key role in the emergence of risky sexual behaviors among African American adolescent girls in psychiatric care and should be considered in prevention program development.

  14. "Power, Regulation and Physically Active Identities": The Experiences of Rural and Regional Living Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, M.; Mooney, A.; Smyth, J.; Payne, W.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on interpretations of Foucault's techniques of power, we explored the discourses and power relations operative between groups of girls that appeared to influence their participation in Physical Education (PE) and outside of school in sport and physical activity (PA) in rural and regional communities. Interviews and focus groups were…

  15. Diet and physical activity in African-American girls: Seasonal differences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diet and physical activity (PA) may vary by season. Two 24-hour dietary recalls and 7 days of accelerometry were collected from 342 8-10 year-old African-American girls between January 2013 and October 2014. Season was based on time of data collection (fall, spring, winter, summer). Seasonal differe...

  16. Promoting Physical Activity in Girls: A Case Study of One School's Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, Gwen; Saunders, Ruth P.; Ward, Dianne S.; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2005-01-01

    This case study profiles one of 24 high schools that participated in a school-based, NIH-funded study to increase physical activity among high school girls. The case study school was one of 12 randomly assigned to the intervention group. The study intervention was based on the premise that a successful intervention is developed and tailored by…

  17. Factorial Validity and Invariance of a Self-Report Measure of Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the factorial validity and factorial invariance of the 3-day physical activity recall (3DPAR) using confirmatory factor analysis. Adolescent girls from two cohorts (N=955, N=1,797) completed the 3DPAR in the eighth grade; participants in Cohort 2 (N=1,658) completed the 3DPAR again 1 year later in the ninth grade. The 3DPAR…

  18. Self-Motivation and Physical Activity among Black and White Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motl, Robert W.; Dishman, Rod K.; Felton, Gwen; Pate, Russell R.

    2003-01-01

    Established the psychometric properties of the Self-Motivation Inventory for Children (SMI-C) using tests of factorial validity, factorial invariance, latent mean structure, and predictive validity. Two cohorts of black and white adolescent girls completed the SMI-C and various physical activity measures. The single-factor, positively worded,…

  19. Transition in Participation in Sport and Unstructured Physical Activity for Rural Living Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eime, R. M.; Payne, W. R.; Casey, M. M.; Harvey, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for lifelong health; however, participation is lower in rural compared with metropolitan areas and declines during adolescence, particularly for girls. It is likely that this decline is related to the number of life transitions that occur during adolescence. This qualitative study examined the views of active…

  20. Interventions to Promote Physical Activity among Young and Adolescent Girls: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho-Minano, Maria J.; LaVoi, Nicole M.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.

    2011-01-01

    A narrative systematic review was conducted to describe the available evidence from physical activity (PA) interventions that targeted girls aged 5-18 years and to determine their effectiveness and key characteristics of success. Systematic literature searches were conducted using four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, PsychInfo and SPORTDiscus…

  1. Psycho-Physiological Contributions of Physical Activity and Sports for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, Linda K

    1998-01-01

    Sport and physical activity contribute to the physical movement capabilities of girls, the health status of their bodies, the values and ethical behaviors they develop, and their personal development of a unique identity. This paper offers an overview of contributions and potential challenges related to physiological dimensions and psychosocial…

  2. Girls' Sports and Physical Activities in the Community: An Inclusive Vision for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varpalotai, Aniko; Doherty, Alison

    The Gender Equity in Recreation Services Policy for the City of London (Ontario, Canada, November 1996) was the first municipal policy of its kind in Canada. It followed the development of the Sport Canada Policy on Women in Sport and the Ontario Policy on Full and Fair Access for Women and Girls in Sport and Physical Activity. It resulted from…

  3. Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls from Low-Income Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Deborah L.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Morgan, Philip J.; Okely, Anthony D.; Costigan, Sarah A.; Lubans, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesized structural paths in Bandura's social-cognitive theory (SCT) model on adolescent girls' physical activity following a 12-month physical activity and dietary intervention to prevent obesity. Method: We conducted a 12-month follow-up study of 235 adolescent girls ("M[subscript…

  4. Running into Trouble: Constructions of Danger and Risk in Girls' Access to Outdoor Space and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers girls' participation in running and other outdoor physical activities in their local areas in London, UK. The paper is concerned with the operation of risk discourses in and around this participation and looks at the way that such discourses impacted on girls' opportunities to take part in physical activities that required…

  5. Physical activities and sedentary pursuits in African American and Caucasian girls.

    PubMed

    Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R; Felton, Gwen M; Saunders, Ruth; Ward, Dianne S; Dishman, Rod K; Trost, Stewart G

    2004-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe and compare the specific physical activity choices and sedentary pursuits of African American and Caucasian American girls. Participants were 1,124 African American and 1,068 Caucasian American eighth-grade students from 31 middle schools. The 3-Day Physical Activity Recall (3DPAR) was used to measure participation in physical activities and sedentary pursuits. The most frequently reported physical activities were walking, basketball, jogging or running, bicycling, and social dancing. Differences between groups were found in 11 physical activities and 3 sedentary pursuits. Participation rates were higher in African American girls (p < or = .001) for social dancing, basketball, watching television, and church attendance but lower in calisthenics, ballet and other dance, jogging or running, rollerblading, soccer, softball or baseball, using an exercise machine, swimming, and homework. Cultural differences of groups should be considered when planning interventions to promote physical activity.

  6. Changes in physical activity, self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Neissaar, Inga; Raudsepp, Lennart

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal relationships between naturally occurring changes in leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms and self-efficacy in adolescent girls. We also aimed to test whether depressive symptoms would moderate the self-efficacy-physical activity relationship. Participants were 181 urban adolescent girls. Physical activity was measured using the 3-Day Physical Activity Recall. Self-efficacy and depressive symptoms were assessed using questionnaires. Body height and body mass were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Data were collected on three occasions over a 2-year period. There was a decrease in physical activity and self-efficacy and increase in depressive symptoms across three measurement occasions. There were statistically significant and negative relationships between initial level and change for physical activity and depressive symptoms. Initially higher levels of physical activity were related with initially lower levels of depressive symptoms, and change in physical activity across time was inversely associated with change in levels of depressive symptoms across measurements. There were statistically significant and positive relationships between initial level and change for physical activity and self-efficacy after controlling effect of BMI. Latent growth modeling (LGM) also indicated a moderating effect of depressive symptoms on the self-efficacy-physical activity relationship. Girls who had high initial levels of self-efficacy and smaller increases in depressive symptoms had the lowest decline in physical activity participation. Our results encourage the design of interventions that reduce depressive symptoms and increase self-efficacy as a possible of means of increasing adolescent girls' physical activity.

  7. Validity of Social-Cognitive Measures for Physical Activity in Middle-School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Derek P.; Sallis, James F.; Saunders, Ruth; Dunn, Andrea L.; Bedimo-Rung, Ariane L.; Ring, Kimberly B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The factorial validity and measurement equivalence/invariance of scales used to measure social-cognitive correlates of physical activity among adolescent girls were examined. Methods Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to questionnaire responses obtained from a multi-ethnic sample (N = 4885) of middle-school girls from six regions of the United States. A cohort of 1893 girls completed the scales in both sixth and eighth grades, allowing longitudinal analysis. Results Theoretically and statistically sound models were developed for each scale, supporting the factorial validity of the scales in all groups. Multi-group and longitudinal invariance was confirmed across race/ethnicity groups, age within grade, BMI categories, and the 2-year period between grades. Conclusions The scores from the scales provide valid assessments of social-cognitive variables that are putative mediators or moderators of change in physical activity. The revised scales can be used in observational studies of change or interventions designed to increase physical activity among girls during early adolescence. PMID:19433571

  8. Transition in participation in sport and unstructured physical activity for rural living adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Eime, R M; Payne, W R; Casey, M M; Harvey, J T

    2010-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for lifelong health; however, participation is lower in rural compared with metropolitan areas and declines during adolescence, particularly for girls. It is likely that this decline is related to the number of life transitions that occur during adolescence. This qualitative study examined the views of active rural living girls regarding the factors affecting their sport and PA participation, using the socioecological model. Twenty-seven girls aged 16-17 from four schools participated in semi-structured focus group discussions. Content and thematic analysis was conducted from verbatim transcripts using NVivo. The girls enjoyed involvement in community club sport with friends and they reported living in communities where participation in sport was a major form of social interaction. However, the desire to succeed educationally was a critical factor affecting their participation in sport and PA and influenced their movement from structured club sport to more flexible, but socially isolated individual activities. It is recommended that future longitudinal research should track rural living adolescent females as they complete secondary school, in order to better understand the influence of educational priorities upon sport and PA participation and to identify practical strategies for both schools and community organizations to foster continuing participation throughout this crucial period of life transition.

  9. Associations of Body Size and Composition with Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    LOHMAN, TIMOTHY G.; RING, KIMBERLY; SCHMITZ, KATHRYN H.; TREUTH, MARGARITA S.; LOFTIN, MARK; YANG, SONG; SOTHERN, MELINDA; GOING, SCOTT

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether components of body composition (size, fat mass, and fat-free mass) were related to physical activity. Methods A random sample of 60 eligible sixth grade girls at each of 36 schools (six schools per region and six regions in total sample); complete measurements on 1553 girls. Physical activity was assessed over 6 d in each girl using an accelerometer, and body composition was assessed using a multiple regression equation using body mass index and triceps skinfold. Minutes of moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous physical activity were estimated from accelerometer counts per 30 s above threshold values determined from a previous study. Results Significant inverse relationships were found for all measures of body size and composition and all physical activity indices. The combination of fat and fat-free mass expressed as a weight and as an index (divided by height squared) along with race, SES, site, and school were most highly associated with physical activity in multiple regression analysis, accounting for 14–15% of the variance in physical activity. Fat mass was more closely related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and vigorous physical activity (VPA) than fat-free mass with higher standardized regression coefficients. Conclusion We conclude that both fat mass or fat mass index as well as fat-free mass or fat-free mass index make independent contributions in association with physical activity levels. These indices are recommended for future studies. PMID:16775560

  10. Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing of Teenagers Aged 15-19 in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 209

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Gladys M.; Abma, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring sexual activity and contraceptive use among U.S. adolescents is important for understanding differences in their risk of pregnancy. In 2013, the U.S. birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 dropped 57% from its peak in 1991, paralleling a decline in the teen "pregnancy" rate. But these rates are still higher than those in other…

  11. Psychosocial determinants of participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Hispanic and Latina middle school-aged girls.

    PubMed

    Foran, Amanda C; Cermak, Sharon A; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2013-01-01

    We examined physical activity (PA)-related psychosocial factors, weight status, and self-reported participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in Latina middle school-aged girls. Baseline data from a middle school-based health behavior study (N = 326) was used. Contrasting activity-level groups were identified (81 most active, 144 least active) and compared. More active girls had significantly greater social support for PA, motivation to exercise, and positive meanings of PA than their less active peers. There was no significant difference in body mass index (BMI) percentile, barriers to PA, or negative meanings of PA between groups. Less active girls reported more screen time activities than the highly active girls. Positive psychosocial factors may be predictive of participation in MVPA for middle school-aged Latina youth. However, BMI may not be directly related to PA participation in this population.

  12. Psychosocial Predictors of Changes in Adolescent Girls' Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors over the Course of the "Go Girls!" Group-Based Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, A. Justine; Chen, Michelle Y.; Schmader, Toni; Jung, Mary E.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Beauchamp, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in social cognitions targeted within a group-based mentoring program for adolescent girls were examined as predictors of changes in physical activity (PA) and dietary behavior (in two separate models) over the course of the 7-week program. Data were collected from 310 participants who participated in the program. Multilevel path models…

  13. Monitoring activities of teenagers to comprehend their habits: study protocol for a mixed-methods cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efforts to increase physical activity in youth need to consider which activities are most likely to be sustained over time in order to promote lifelong participation in physical activity. The Monitoring Activities of Teenagers to Comprehend their Habits (MATCH) study is a prospective cohort study that uses quantitative and qualitative methods to develop new knowledge on the sustainability of specific physical activities. Methods/design Eight hundred and forty-three grade 5 and 6 students recruited from 17 elementary schools in New Brunswick, Canada, are followed-up three times per year. At each survey cycle, participants complete self-report questionnaires in their classroom under the supervision of trained data collectors. A sub-sample of 24 physically active students is interviewed annually using a semi-structured interview protocol. Parents (or guardians) complete telephone administered questionnaires every two years, and a health and wellness school audit is completed for each school. Discussion MATCH will provide a description of the patterns of participation in specific physical activities in youth, and enable identification of the determinants of maintenance, decline, and uptake of participation in each activity. These data will inform the development of interventions that take into account which activities are the most likely to be maintained and why activities are maintained or dropped. PMID:23849265

  14. Hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia in a girl with macrophage activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Kazuki; Kodo, Kazuki; Maeda, Jun; Omori, Sayu; Hida, Mariko; Mori, Tetsuya; Awazu, Midori

    2006-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorders, is accompanied by the overproduction of cytokines. We describe a girl with macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic-onset juvenile arthritis who developed hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypouricemia associated with a high level of serum tumor necrosis factor alpha. Renal proximal tubule dysfunction was considered to be the cause, which may be attributable to tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  15. Evaluation of GoGirlGo!; A practitioner based program to improve physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background GoGirlGo! (GGG) is designed to increase girls’ physical activity (PA) using a health behavior and PA-based curriculum and is widely available for free to afterschool programs across the nation. However, GGG has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the GGG curricula to improve PA, and self-efficacy for and enjoyment of PA in elementary aged girls (i.e., 5-13 years). Methods Nine afterschool programs were recruited to participate in the pilot (within subjects repeated measures design). GGG is a 12-week program, with a once a week, one-hour lesson with 30 minutes of education and 30 minutes of PA). Data collection occurred at baseline, mid (twice), post, and at follow-up (3-months after the intervention ended). PA was assessed via accelerometry at each time point. Self-efficacy for and enjoyment of PA was measured using the Self-Efficacy Scale and the Short-PA enjoyment scale and was assessed at baseline, post, and follow-up. Fidelity was assessed at midpoint. Results Across all age groups there was a statistically significant increase in PA. Overall, on days GGG was offered girls accumulated an average of 11 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA compared to 8 minutes during non-GGG days. There was a statistically significant difference in girls’ self-efficacy for PA reported between baseline and post, which was maintained at follow-up. An improvement in enjoyment of PA for girls was found between baseline and follow-up. According to fidelity assessment, 89% of the activities within the curriculum were completed each lesson. Girls appeared to respond well to the curriculum but girls 5-7 years had difficulties paying attention and understanding discussion questions. Conclusions Even though there were statistically significant differences in self-efficacy for PA and enjoyment of PA, minimal increases in girls’ PA were observed. GGG curricula improvements are warranted. Future GGG programming

  16. Implementation of a school environment intervention to increase physical activity in high school girls.

    PubMed

    Ward, D S; Saunders, R; Felton, G M; Williams, E; Epping, J N; Pate, R R

    2006-12-01

    Physical activity levels begin to decline in childhood and continue falling throughout adolescence, with girls being at greatest risk for inactivity. Schools are ideal settings for helping girls develop and maintain a physically active lifestyle. This paper describes the design and implementation of 'Lifestyle Education for Activity Program', or LEAP. LEAP used a health team approach with participatory strategies to provide training and support, instructional capacity building and opportunities to adapt school instructional program and environmental supports to local needs. The social-ecological model, based on social cognitive theory, served as the organizing framework for the LEAP intervention and elements of the coordinated school health program model as intervention channels. For the 12 intervention schools, LEAP staff documented 191 visits and interactions with 850 individuals over the 2-year period. Teachers reported successful implementation of most components of the intervention and demonstrated optimism for sustainability. These results indicate that a facilitative approach to intervention implementation can be used successfully to engage school personnel, and to change instructional programs and school environments to increase the physical activity level of high school girls.

  17. Relationship between observational learning and health belief with physical activity among adolescents girl in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostamian, Marzieh; Kazemi, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activities among adolescents affects health during pubescence and adolescence and decrease in physical activities among adolescents has become a global challenge. The aim of the present study was to define the relation between the level of physical activity among adolescent girls and their health beliefs as personal factor and level of observational learning as environmental factor. Materials and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional study that was conducted on 400 students aged from 11 to 19 years in Isfahan, Iran. Information regarding the duration of physical activity with moderate/severe intensity was measured in four dimensions of leisure time (exercising and hiking), daily activities, and transportation-related activities using the International Physical Activity questionnaire. Health belief structures included perceived sensitivity, intensity of perceived threat, perceived benefits, and barriers and self-efficacy; observational learning was measured using a researcher-made questionnaire. Results: Results showed that perceived barriers, observational learning, and level of self-efficacy were related to the level of physical activity in all dimensions. In addition, the level of physical activity at leisure time, transportation, and total physical activity were dependent on the intensity of perceived threats (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed that the intensity of perceived threats, perceived barriers and self-efficacy structures, and observational learning are some of the factors related to physical activity among adolescent girls, and it is possible that by focusing on improving these variables through interventional programs physical activity among adolescent girls can be improved. PMID:28194200

  18. Bone speed of sound and physical activity levels of overweight and normal-weight girls and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mathew; Ludwa, Izabella; Corbett, Lauren; Klentrou, Panagiota; Bonsu, Peter; Gammage, Kimberley; Falk, Bareket

    2011-02-01

    Bone properties, reflected by speed of sound (SOS), and physical activity levels were examined in overweight (OW) girls (n = 19) and adolescents (n = 22), in comparison with normal-weight (NW) girls (n = 21) and adolescents (n = 13). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was higher in NW than in OW in both age groups. Tibial SOS was lower in OW compared with NW in both age groups. MVPA correlated with tibial SOS, once age was partialed out. The results suggest that overweight girls and adolescents are characterized by low tibial SOS, which may be partially attributed to lower physical activity levels.

  19. Male-typical visuospatial functioning in gynephilic girls with gender dysphoria — organizational and activational effects of testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sarah M.; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Veltman, Dick J.; Klink, Daniel T.; Bakker, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex differences in performance and regional brain activity during mental rotation have been reported repeatedly and reflect organizational and activational effects of sex hormones. We investigated whether adolescent girls with gender dysphoria (GD), before and after 10 months of testosterone treatment, showed male-typical brain activity during a mental rotation task (MRT). Methods Girls with GD underwent fMRI while performing the MRT twice: when receiving medication to suppress their endogenous sex hormones before onset of testosterone treatment, and 10 months later during testosterone treatment. Two age-matched control groups participated twice as well. Results We included 21 girls with GD, 20 male controls and 21 female controls in our study. In the absence of any group differences in performance, control girls showed significantly increased activation in frontal brain areas compared with control boys (pFWE = 0.012). Girls with GD before testosterone treatment differed significantly in frontal brain activation from the control girls (pFWE = 0.034), suggesting a masculinization of brain structures associated with visuospatial cognitive functions. After 10 months of testosterone treatment, girls with GD, similar to the control boys, showed increases in brain activation in areas implicated in mental rotation. Limitations Since all girls with GD identified as gynephilic, their resemblance in spatial cognition with the control boys, who were also gynephilic, may have been related to their shared sexual orientation rather than their shared gender identity. We did not account for menstrual cycle phase or contraceptive use in our analyses. Conclusion Our findings suggest atypical sexual differentiation of the brain in natal girls with GD and provide new evidence for organizational and activational effects of testosterone on visuospatial cognitive functioning. PMID:27070350

  20. Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting: Findings from the Detroit Teen Parenting Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickel, Annette U.; And Others

    This study investigated the child rearing strategies endorsed by pregnant adolescent girls. The sample consisted of 124 pregnant adolescent girls from two alternative high schools for pregnant or parenting teenage girls in the Detroit (Michigan) Metropolitan Area. Child rearing strategies were assessed using the Rickel Modified Form of the Block…

  1. Attracting girls to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Anne; Sui, Manling

    2013-03-01

    Large regional differences remain in the number of girls studying physics and the number of female physicists in academic positions. While many countries struggle with attracting female students to university studies in physics, climbing the academic ladder is the main challenge for these women. Furthermore, for many female physicists the working climate is not very supportive. The workshop Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, South Africa 2011, addressed attitudes among education-seeking teenagers and approaches for attracting young girls to physics through successful recruitment plans, including highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications. The current paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from this workshop.

  2. Homebound Teenage Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Justin F.

    Teenage parenting and pregnancy is discussed in terms of incidence, health consequences, effect on teenage growth and development, social and economic costs, and existing programs sponsored by DHEW (Department of Health, Education, and Welfare). (SBH)

  3. What Would Catherine of Sienna Do? Spiritual Formation and the Brains of Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dori; Edwards, Ned

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how new knowledge about the adolescent female brain lends theoretical support to narrative and contemplative practices of spiritual formation of girls. Current brain research supports the use of particular methods of religious formation for teenagers in general, and teenage girls in particular. This article suggests that…

  4. Teenage Suicide in Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David; Wilson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The teenage suicide rate in Zimbabwe did not change much during the 1970s, though the rate rose for female teenagers. Female teenagers used poison as a method of suicide more often than did adults, and self-immolation had increased in frequency among young women by the mid-1980s. (Author)

  5. Facebook photo activity associated with body image disturbance in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Meier, Evelyn P; Gray, James

    2014-04-01

    The present study examined the relationship between body image and adolescent girls' activity on the social networking site (SNS) Facebook (FB). Research has shown that elevated Internet "appearance exposure" is positively correlated with increased body image disturbance among adolescent girls, and there is a particularly strong association with FB use. The present study sought to replicate and extend upon these findings by identifying the specific FB features that correlate with body image disturbance in adolescent girls. A total of 103 middle and high school females completed questionnaire measures of total FB use, specific FB feature use, weight dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, thin ideal internalization, appearance comparison, and self-objectification. An appearance exposure score was calculated based on subjects' use of FB photo applications relative to total FB use. Elevated appearance exposure, but not overall FB usage, was significantly correlated with weight dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, thin ideal internalization, and self-objectification. Implications for eating disorder prevention programs and best practices in researching SNSs are discussed.

  6. Associations among physical activity, screen time, and sleep in low socioeconomic status urban girls.

    PubMed

    Greever, Cory J; Ahmadi, Matthew; Sirard, John; Alhassan, Sofiya

    2017-03-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with higher risk of poor health outcomes in low socioeconomic status (SES) urban elementary age girls. Decreased physical activity (PA) and increased screen time may be associated with poor sleep. This study examined if PA and screen time are associated with sleep in girls from a low SES urban community. Baseline data from 7 to 12 year-old girls (n = 55) from two interventions conducted in Springfield, MA between 2012 and 2015 were used. PA was measured via accelerometry for seven days. Screen time and sleep were assessed via validated questionnaires. Sleep was also assessed via accelerometry in a subsample of girls (n = 24) for 7 days. Associations among PA, screen time, and sleep were analyzed using multiple linear regression. More minutes of screen time per day (p = 0.01, r(2) = 0.35, r(2) adjusted = 0.23) was associated with worse sleep quality (β = 0.50, p = 0.02). There were negative correlations between PA and the number of awakenings per night (r = - 0.45, p = 0.04) and between counts per minute and sleep fragmentation (r = - 0.65, p = 0.002) assessed by accelerometer. In this population, increased screen time was associated with worse sleep quality and decreased PA was correlated with more awakenings per night and higher sleep fragmentation. These findings suggest that screen time and PA may be modifiable risk factors for interventions seeking to improve sleep in this population.

  7. Managed Activity Graded Exercise iN Teenagers and pre-Adolescents (MAGENTA) feasibility randomised controlled trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Amberly; Beasant, Lucy; Hollingworth, William; Metcalfe, Chris; Gaunt, Daisy; Mills, Nicola; Jago, Russell; Crawley, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a relatively common and disabling condition, yet there is a limited evidence base for treatment. There is good evidence that graded exercise therapy is moderately effective in adults with CFS/ME, but there is little evidence for the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, acceptability or best method of delivery for paediatric CFS/ME. This study aims to investigate the acceptability and feasibility of carrying out a multicentre randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of graded exercise therapy compared with activity management for children/teenagers who are mildly or moderately affected with CFS/ME. Methods and analysis 100 paediatric patients (8–17 years) with CFS/ME will be recruited from 3 specialist UK National Health Service (NHS) CFS/ME services (Bath, Cambridge and Newcastle). Patients will be randomised (1:1) to receive either graded exercise therapy or activity management. Feasibility analysis will include the number of young people eligible, approached and consented to the trial; attrition rate and treatment adherence; questionnaire and accelerometer completion rates. Integrated qualitative methods will ascertain perceptions of feasibility and acceptability of recruitment, randomisation and the interventions. All adverse events will be monitored to assess the safety of the trial. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the National Research Ethics Service (South West—Frenchay 15/SW/0124). Trial registration number ISRCTN23962803; Pre-results. PMID:27377634

  8. Adolescent girls, illegal abortions and "sugar-daddies" in Dar es Salaam: vulnerable victims and active social agents.

    PubMed

    Silberschmidt, M; Rasch, V

    2001-06-01

    Adolescent girls' early sexual activity, early pregnancy, induced abortions and the increase in HIV infections have become major concerns in Sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts, though, to understand their sexual behaviour and to prevent reproductive health problems are almost non-existent. Adolescent girls are normally seen as victims and easy preys of (often older and married) men's sexual exploitation. This article, which is based on a qualitative study of 51 adolescent girls who had just had an illegal abortion in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, reveals that these girls are not only victims but also willing preys and active social agents engaging in high-risk sexual behaviour. In order to get material benefits they expose themselves to serious health risks, including induced abortion - without realising their own vulnerability. In our study, one out of four girls had more than one partner at the time they became pregnant, and many counted on an illegally induced abortion if they got pregnant. Even if adolescents are now allowed free access to family planning information, education and services, our study shows that this remains in the realm of theory rather than practice. Moreover, most adolescent girls are not aware about their right to such services. The paper concludes that the vulnerability of adolescent girls increases without the recognition that sexuality education and contraceptive services do not constitute a licence to practice illicit sex - but rather a means to create more mature and responsible attitudes and to increase sexual and reproductive health.

  9. Ankle Accelerometry for Assessing Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls: Threshold Determination, Validity, Reliability, and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Erin R.; Treuth, Margarita S.; Gormely, Candice; Epps, LaShawna; Snitker, Soren; Black, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ankle accelerometry allows for 24-hour data collection, improving data volume/integrity versus hip accelerometry. Using Actical ankle accelerometry, the purpose was to (a) develop sensitive/specific thresholds; (b) examine validity/reliability; (c) compare new thresholds with manufacturer’s; and (d) examine feasibility in a community sample (low-income, urban adolescent girls). Methods Two studies were conducted with 6th–7th grade girls (age 10–14 years): Laboratory study (n=24)- Two Actical accelerometers were placed on the ankle and worn while measuring energy expenditure (Cosmed K4b2, Metabolic Equivalents (METs)) during 10 prescribed activities. Analyses included device equivalence reliability (intraclass correlation (ICC): activity counts of 2 Acticals), criterion-related validity (correlation: activity counts and METs), and calculations of sensitivity, specificity, kappa and ROC curves for thresholds. Free-Living study (n=459)- an Actical was worn >7 days on the ankle (full 24-hour days retained). Analyses included feasibility (frequencies: missing data) and paired t-tests (new thresholds versus manufacturer’s). Results Laboratory study- Actical demonstrated reliability (ICC=.92) and validity (r=.81). Thresholds demonstrated sensitivity (91%), specificity (84%), kappa=.73 (p=.043), area under curve range .81–.97. Free-Living study- 99.6% wore the accelerometer; 84.1% had complete/valid data (mean=5.7 days). Primary reasons for missing/invalid data: Improper programming/documentation (5.2%), failure to return device (5.0%), wear-time ≤2 days (2.8%). The Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) threshold (>3200 counts/minute) yielded 37.2 minutes/day, 2–4.5 times lower than the manufacturer’s software (effect size=.74–4.05). Conclusions Validity, reliability, and feasibility evidences support Actical ankle accelerometry to assess physical activity in community studies of adolescent girls. When comparing manufacturers’ software

  10. Experiences of pregnancy and motherhood among teenage mothers in a suburb of Accra, Ghana: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gyesaw, Nana Yaa Konadu; Ankomah, Augustine

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of teenage girls who are mothers or who are currently pregnant in sub-Saharan African countries is staggering. There are many studies regarding teenage pregnancy, unsafe abortions, and family planning among teenagers, but very little is known about what happens after pregnancy, ie, the experience of teenage motherhood. Several studies in Ghana have identified the determinants of early sexual activity, contraception, and unsafe abortion, with teenage motherhood only mentioned in passing. Few studies have explored the experiences of adolescent mothers in detail with regard to their pregnancy and childbirth. This qualitative study explores the experiences of adolescent mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and care of their newborns. Methods This qualitative study was based on data from focus group discussions and indepth interviews with teenage mothers in a suburb in Accra. Participants were recruited from health facilities as well as by snowball sampling. Results Some of the participants became pregnant as a result of transactional sex in order to meet their basic needs, while others became pregnant as a result of sexual violence and exploitation. A few others wanted to become pregnant to command respect from people in society. In nearly all cases, parents and guardians of the adolescent mothers were upset in the initial stages when they heard the news of the pregnancy. One key finding, quite different from in other societies, was how often teenage pregnancies are eventually accepted, by both the young women and their families. Also observed was a rarity of willingness to resort to induced abortion. Conclusion Special programs should be initiated by the government and the various responsible departments to address ignorance on sexual matters, and the challenges and risks associated with pregnancy and parenting by adolescents. Parenting techniques should be taught in sex education programs. PMID:24250233

  11. "This Choice Thing Really Works?…?" Changes in Experiences and Engagement of Adolescent Girls in Physical Education Classes, during a School-Based Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Fiona; Gray, Shirley; Inchley, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a significant amount of research which shows a proportion of girls are not engaging with physical education (PE) in school, resulting in a number of relatively inactive girls within the PE class. These girls are often identified in the literature as "low active", "hard to reach" or "disengaged".…

  12. Affecting Girls' Activity and Job Interests Through Play: The Moderating Roles of Personal Gender Salience and Game Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Emily F; Liben, Lynn S

    2016-01-01

    Gender schema theory (GST) posits that children approach opportunities perceived as gender appropriate, avoiding those deemed gender inappropriate, in turn affecting gender-differentiated career trajectories. To test the hypothesis that children's gender salience filters (GSF-tendency to attend to gender) moderate these processes, 62 preschool girls (M = 4.5 years) were given GSF measures. Two weeks later, they played a computer game about occupations that manipulated the game-character's femininity (hyperfeminized Barbie vs. less feminized Playmobil Jane). Following game play, girls' interests in feminine activities showed an interaction of game condition and GSF: High-GSF girls showed intensified feminine activity interests only with Barbie; low-GSF girls showed no change with either character. Neither GSF nor game condition affected occupational interests. Implications for GST, individual differences, and occupational interventions are discussed.

  13. And So It Continues...Teenage Magazines and Their Focus on the Superficial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redcross, Natalie Ryder; Grimes, Tresmaine

    2012-01-01

    Teenage magazine content, after decades, continues to complicate decision making in the communication of the young, impressionable girls who read them. Previous research has indicated that teenagers can be negatively influenced by the media, including teen magazines (e.g., Redcross, 2003; Milkie, 2002; Durham, 2008; Lamb & Brown, 2006). These…

  14. Understanding School Dropout for Urban, Ethnic Minority Teenage Mothers with Learning Disabilities (LD). Disability Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor-Ritzler, Tina; Balcazar, Fabricio E.; McDonald, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Youth who experience either LD or teenage motherhood often drop out of school. Further, about 50% of young girls with LD become mothers by their early 20s compared to 28% of young women in the general population. There is therefore a high likelihood that teenage mothers with LD will drop out of school. Dropping out of school is of concern because…

  15. [Teenage pregnancy in Madagascar: impact on the health of mother and child].

    PubMed

    Binet, Clotilde; Gastineau, Bénédicte; Rakotoson, Lina

    2009-01-01

    In committing itself to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, Madagascar committed itself to reducing maternal and infant mortality. Teenagers must be a target for activities to improve maternal and child health, for analyses of survey data show clearly that teenager pregnancies present a risk to the health of both young mothers and their children; in particular, both have a higher risk of death than older mothers and their children. These differences can be explained both by biological factors and socioeconomic variables (place of residence, educational level, etc). The issue of abortion is also important, for it is an important cause of maternal mortality, especially among young girls. Beyond the actions of prevention, post-abortion care could help to reduce the complications of abortions and thus mortality among women.

  16. "Because I am Muslim, I cannot wear a swimsuit": Muslim girls negotiate participation opportunities for physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Manal; Oliver, Kimberly L

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on the works of postcolonial critical feminist and Arab Muslim feminist scholars, we discuss in this paper how 4 muslim girls (ages 14- 17 years) negotiated their participation in opportunities for physical activity. Data collection methods included self mapping questionnaires, digital photos, private journal entries, and recordings of informal conversations. We discuss (a) how three discursive challenges emerged in veiling-off opportunities for physical activity, and (b) how the girls uncovered alternative ways of being physically active. To promote active life practices with muslim girls, we need to (a) navigate the diversity of young muslims within the intersecting discourses in their lives that potentially challenge their participation in physical activities, and (b) honor young muslims' choices while negotiating their chances of maintaining physical activities.

  17. Increased aggression and activity level in 3- to 11-year-old girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

    PubMed

    Pasterski, Vickie; Hindmarsh, Peter; Geffner, Mitchell; Brook, Charles; Brain, Caroline; Hines, Melissa

    2007-09-01

    Experimental research in a wide range of mammals has documented powerful influences of androgen during early development on brain systems and behaviors that show sex differences. Clinical research in humans suggests similar influences of early androgen concentrations on some behaviors, including childhood play behavior and adult sexual orientation. However, findings have been inconsistent for some other behaviors that show sex differences, including aggression and activity level in children. This inconsistency may reflect small sample sizes and assessment limitations. In the present study, we assessed aggression and activity level in 3- to 11-year-old children with CAH (38 girls, 29 boys) and in their unaffected siblings (25 girls, 21 boys) using a questionnaire that mothers completed to indicate current aggressive behavior and activity level in their children. Data supported the hypotheses that: (1) unaffected boys are more aggressive and active than unaffected girls; (2) girls with CAH are more aggressive and active than their unaffected sisters; and (3) boys with and without CAH are similar to one another in aggression and activity level. These data suggest that early androgens have a masculinizing effect on both aggressive behavior and activity level in girls.

  18. Changes in facial electromyographic activity in spider-phobic girls after psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leutgeb, Verena; Schienle, Anne

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies of spider phobia have indicated that disgust is a crucial disorder-relevant emotion and that the facial electromyogram (EMG) of the levator labii region is a reliable disgust indicator. The present investigation focused on EMG effects of psychotherapy in thirty girls (aged between 8 and 14 years) suffering from spider phobia. They were presented with phobia-relevant, generally fear-inducing, disgust-inducing and affectively neutral pictures in a first EMG session. Subsequently, patients were randomly assigned to either a therapy group or a waiting-list group. Therapy-group participants received a single session of exposure therapy in vivo. One week later a second EMG session was conducted. Patients of the waiting-list group received exposure therapy after the second EMG session. After therapy, the girls were able to hold a living spider in their hands and rated spiders more positive, and less arousing, fear- and disgust-inducing. Moreover, they showed a reduction of average levator labii activity in response to pictures of spiders, reflecting the reduction of feelings of disgust. A positive side effect of the therapy was a significant drop in overall disgust proneness and a decreased average activity of the levator labii muscle in response to generally disgust-inducing pictures. Results emphasize the role of disgust feelings in spider-phobic children and suggest that overall disgust proneness should also be targeted in therapy.

  19. Title IX, girls' sports participation, and adult female physical activity and weight.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Robert; Xin Xu

    2010-02-01

    Arguably, the most important school-based intervention to increase physical activity was Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which led to a 600% increase in girls' sports participation between 1972 and 1978. We studied the effect of this increase in sports participation and athletic opportunities while young on the physical activity and weight of adult women some 20-25 years later. Our results indicate that adult women who were affected by Title IX and had greater opportunity to participate in athletics while young had lower body mass index (BMI) and lower rates of obesity and reported being more physically active than women who were not afforded these opportunities. However, effect sizes were quite modest.

  20. Changing Girls' Education in Peru.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Cory; Brush, Lorie; Provasnik, Stephen; Fanning, Marina; Lent, Drew; De Wilde, Johan

    Access to quality education is a problem for all rural children in Peru, but especially for rural girls, who complete primary school at far lower rates than other Peruvian children. In 1998, USAID launched the Girls' Education Activity (GEA) in Peru, also known as New Horizons for Girls' Education, which aims to increase girls' completion of…

  1. Integrating psychological research on girls with feminist activism: a model for building a liberation psychology in the United States.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kathryn E; Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S; Lyons, Aoife L

    2003-03-01

    A liberation psychology is needed to bridge the gap between psychology's focus on individual distress and broad social forces that foster such distress. We offer a model for bridging this gap by focusing on a specific area of psychology (psychological research on girls) and a specific social movement (feminist activism). Psychological research on girls and feminist activism share the common goal of improving the lives of girls and women. However, both have fallen short of this goal. This is due, in part, to the weaknesses associated with each endeavor and to the fact that the complementary strengths of each have remained isolated from the other. In this paper, we propose a common language and shared framework to integrate psychological research with feminist activism. First, we review the basic strengths and weaknesses associated with psychological research and feminist activism, with a particular focus on how they are distinct from one another. Second, we provide a taxonomic framework for integrating these two areas on the basis of the stress paradigm, with specific examples provided from our recent reviews of the literature and our own empirical work with adolescent girls. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future work needed to integrate psychological research on girls with feminist activism toward the goal of building a liberation psychology in the United States.

  2. Modeling Sexual Activity among Schoolgirls in Zambia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillai, Vijayan K.; Gupta, Rashmi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a model of sexual activity among secondary school-going Zambian girls. Identifies the role of dating as an intervening variable in explaining the variation in sexual activity among teenagers. Schools are an important setting for the young to meet and initiate sexual relationships. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.…

  3. Video game addiction: Impact on teenagers' lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Mahindru, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    Use of video games as a leisure-time activity has increased among teenagers. Excessive use of video games is associated with psychosocial dysfunctions in the user's life. Two teenagers came for consultation to our Service for Healthy Use of Technology (SHUT) clinic for management of addiction due to video games. They were assessed using a clinical interview as well as the General Health Questionnaire and Griffith criteria for video games. The cases emphasize the addictive potential of video games and their association with lifestyle changes. Addiction to video games has implications for screening and intervention among teenagers.

  4. Using self-determination theory to promote adolescent girls' physical activity: Exploring the theoretical fidelity of the Bristol Girls Dance Project

    PubMed Central

    Sebire, Simon J.; Kesten, Joanna M.; Edwards, Mark J.; May, Thomas; Banfield, Kathryn; Tomkinson, Keeley; Blair, Peter S.; Bird, Emma L.; Powell, Jane E.; Jago, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To report the theory-based process evaluation of the Bristol Girls' Dance Project, a cluster-randomised controlled trial to increase adolescent girls' physical activity. Design A mixed-method process evaluation of the intervention's self-determination theory components comprising lesson observations, post-intervention interviews and focus groups. Method Four intervention dance lessons per dance instructor were observed, audio recorded and rated to estimate the use of need-supportive teaching strategies. Intervention participants (n = 281) reported their dance instructors' provision of autonomy-support. Semi-structured interviews with the dance instructors (n = 10) explored fidelity to the theory and focus groups were conducted with participants (n = 59) in each school to explore their receipt of the intervention and views on the dance instructors' motivating style. Results Although instructors accepted the theory-based approach, intervention fidelity was variable. Relatedness support was the most commonly observed need-supportive teaching behaviour, provision of structure was moderate and autonomy-support was comparatively low. The qualitative findings identified how instructors supported competence and developed trusting relationships with participants. Fidelity was challenged where autonomy provision was limited to option choices rather than input into the pace or direction of lessons and where controlling teaching styles were adopted, often to manage disruptive behaviour. Conclusion The successes and challenges to achieving theoretical fidelity in the Bristol Girls' Dance Project may help explain the intervention effects and can more broadly inform the design of theory-based complex interventions aimed at increasing young people's physical activity in after-school settings. PMID:27175102

  5. [Assessment of selected features of the lifestyle being conduicive to the state of health of 16-18 year old girls. Part I. Dieting, physical activity, smoking and drinking alcohol].

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Ewa; Zechałko-Czajkowska, Alicja; Biernat, Jadwiga; Mikołajczak, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze health attitude of 409 16-18 year old girls from Wrocław in three areas: physical activity, dieting, and smoking and alcohol use. Research indicated different levels of underweight among 17.4% of girls, overweight and obesity among 11.2% of girls, and inappropriate level of physical activity among 60% of girls. Negative self-evaluation of own appearance among 50% of girls contributed to dieting among 32% of girls. Studies indicated as well that 49% of girls smoke, and 89% of girls drink alcohol occasionally or every week.

  6. Reducing teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Debbie

    2011-03-01

    The Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group (TPIAG) was established in 2000 to advise the government about reducing teenage pregnancy rates and supporting teenage parents to continue with their education. The group reached the end of its tenure in December 2010. This short article highlights some of the key issues from the final report and provides some insights into past achievements and future directions from an interview with Gill Frances, TPIAG's chair.

  7. Staff's perceptions of the use of evidence-based physical activity promotion strategies for promoting girls' physical activity at afterschool programs: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Danae; Huberty, Jennifer; Beets, Michael; Tibbits, Melissa

    2014-08-01

    There is a need to improve girls' physical activity (PA) in afterschool programs as girls' PA levels are consistently lower than boys'. An evidence-based professional development framework, the 5 Ms, has been effective in helping staff to improve PA in both girls and boys but further improvements in girls' PA are needed. Little is known about staff's perceptions of using PA promotion strategies to promote girls' PA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore staff perceptions of the use of evidence-based PA promotion strategies for promoting PA in girls. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff from three community-based afterschool programs located within a school setting (n=18). Data were analyzed using the process of immersion/crystallization. A majority of staff had some knowledge of PA promotion strategies but few staff consistently utilized these strategies and a majority felt several strategies were unnecessary (i.e., having a PA policy). Newer staff reported depending on senior staff to promote PA in girls. Overall, findings suggest that staff's perceptions may impact their use of PA promotions strategies. The results of this study will contribute to the enhancement of an existing staff training framework (the 5 Ms) to improve girls' PA in afterschool programs.

  8. A comparative study of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mahavarkar, S H; Madhu, C K; Mule, V D

    2008-08-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a global problem and is considered a high-risk group, in spite of conflicting evidence. Our objective was to compare obstetric outcomes of pregnancy in teenagers and older women. This was a retrospective study of case records of pregnancies from August 2000 to July 2001. Girls aged < or =19 years were compared with pregnancy outcomes in older women (19-35 years) in the same hospital. The study took place in the Government General Hospital, Sangli, India, a teaching hospital in rural India, with an annual delivery rate of over 3,500. A total of 386 teenage pregnancies were compared with pregnancies in 3,326 older women. Socioeconomic data, age, number of pregnancies, antenatal care and complications, mode of delivery, and neonatal outcomes were considered. The incidence of teenage pregnancy in the study was 10%. A significant proportion of teenage pregnant mothers were in their first pregnancies. The teenage mothers were nearly three times more at risk of developing anaemia (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 2.2-3.7, p < 0.0001) and delivering pre-term (OR = 2.97, 95% CI = 2.4-3.7, p < 0.0001). Teenage mothers were twice as likely to develop hypertensive problems in pregnancy (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.5-3.2, p < 0.0001) and were more likely to deliver vaginally with no significant increase in the risk of assisted vaginal delivery or caesarean section. Young mothers were nearly twice at risk of delivering low birth weight babies (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.5-2.2, p < 0.0001) and 50% less likely to have normal birth weight babies (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9, p < 0.0001). The outcome of this study showed that teenage pregnancies are still a common occurrence in rural India in spite of various legislations and government programmes and teenage pregnancy is a risk factor for poor obstetric outcome in rural India. Cultural practices, poor socioeconomic conditions, low literacy rate and lack of awareness of the risks are some of the main contributory factors. Early booking

  9. Acne and hirsuties in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Barth, Julian H; Clark, Sheila

    2003-02-01

    Acne and body hair are both cutaneous responses to androgenic stimulation. They are normal events in adolescent girls. There is considerable variation in the evolution of the two conditions. The sebaceous gland is exquisitely sensitive to androgens, and acne appears with the onset of puberty, peaks in prevalence in the teenage years and gradually improves thereafter. Hair growth on the face, trunk and limbs develops more slowly and generally peaks in the 20s. Indications for endocrine investigation include very severe acne, onset of acne and hirsuties in the very early stage of puberty (Tanner stage 3) and systemic virilism. Treatment for acne and hirsuties can be either topical or systemic. The choice of therapy is based on the severity of the disease rather than the results of endocrine investigation. Further, since PCO is related to impaired glucose tolerance, advice relating to lifestyle changes should be offered to prevent the development of diabetes.

  10. School Is Hell: Gendered Fears in Teenage Horror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Explores the use of schools as settings for teenage horror films. Asserts that these narratives reflect the stress of social pressures and uncertainties, particularly young girls. Focuses on the television show, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," while making this argument. Includes references. (CMK)

  11. First Births among Adolescent Girls: Risk and Protective Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Kunz, James

    1999-01-01

    Survey administered to 958 girls studied effects of sociodemographic risk factors for adolescent nonmarital childbearing. Analysis showed adolescents girls who experienced five or more sociodemographic risk factors were 16 times more likely to experience a nonmarital childbirth during their teenage years. Under similar levels of risk, adolescent…

  12. Raising Their Voices: The Politics of Girls' Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lyn Mikel

    Challenging conventional characterization of teenage girlhood as a wasteland of depression, low self-esteem, and passive victimhood, this book presents accounts of young girls showing how their voices are shaped and constrained by socioeconomic class. Based on a year-long study involving conversations with white adolescent girls from the working…

  13. Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipher, Mary

    More American adolescent girls today are prey to depression, eating disorders, addictions, and suicide attempts than ever before. This book is an exploration of the underlying causes of this disturbing phenomena, structured around therapy case studies of various teenage girls. The position is taken that despite the women's movement, adolescent…

  14. Food, eating and taste: parents' perspectives on the making of the middle class teenager.

    PubMed

    Backett-Milburn, Kathryn C; Wills, Wendy J; Roberts, Mei-Li; Lawton, Julia

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports findings from a qualitative study of views and understandings of dietary practices in middle class families. Thirty five parents/main food providers of boys and girls aged 13/14 years, living in Eastern Scotland, were interviewed about their and their teenagers' everyday lives, food, health and family practices. One of our aims was to understand more about the social and cultural conditions which might be promoting more positive dietary health and physical well-being amongst middle class families. Most parents' accounts appeared rooted in a taken-for-grantedness that family members enjoyed good health, lived in relatively secure and unthreatening environments regarding health and resources, and were able to lead active lives, which they valued. Although controlling teenagers' eating practices was presented as an ongoing challenge, active supervision and surveillance of their diets was described, as was guiding tastes in 'the right direction'. Parents described attempts to achieve family eating practices such as commensality, cooking from scratch, and encouraging a varied and nutritional 'adult' diet and cosmopolitan tastes, though work and activities could compromise these. These middle class families might be characterized as having future oriented 'hierarchies of luxury and choice', in which controlling and moulding teenagers' food practices and tastes was assigned a high priority.

  15. The Relationship between Psychosocial Correlates and Physical Activity in Underserved Adolescent Boys and Girls in the ACT Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lawman, Hannah G.; Wilson, Dawn K.; Van Horn, M. Lee; Resnicow, Ken; Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests motivation, enjoyment, and self-efficacy may be important psychosocial factors for understanding physical activity (PA) in youth. While previous studies have shown mixed results, emerging evidence indicates relationships between psychosocial factors and PA may be stronger in boys than girls. This study expands on previous research by examining the effects of motivation, enjoyment and self-efficacy on PA in underserved adolescent (low income, ethnic minorities) boys and girls. Based on previous literature, it was hypothesized the effects of motivation, enjoyment and self-efficacy on moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) would be stronger in boys than in girls. Methods Baseline cross-sectional data were obtained from a randomized, school-based trial (Active by Choice Today; ACT) in underserved 6th graders (N=771 girls, 651 boys). Intrapersonal variables for PA were assessed via self-report and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for each predictor. MVPA was assessed with 7-day accelerometry estimates. Results Multivariate regression analyses stratified by sex demonstrated a significant positive main effect of self-efficacy and motivation on MVPA for girls. Boys also showed a positive trend for the effect of motivation on MVPA. Conclusions The results from this study suggest motivation and self-efficacy should be better integrated to facilitate the development of more effective interventions for increasing PA in underserved adolescents. PMID:21359129

  16. Gender differences in Ayrshire teenagers' attitudes to sexual relationships, responsibility and unintended pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Hooke, A; Capewell, S; Whyte, M

    2000-08-01

    Disadvantages and risks related to teenage pregnancy, together with a recent increase in Scottish conception rates among teenagers aged 13-15 years old, give cause for concern. Using an illustrated short story and questionnaire, attitudes of 129 Ayrshire teenagers aged 14-15 years old were examined to teenage pregnancy, and more generally to early sex. Seventy-three percent of girls advocated joint responsibility for contraceptive protection compared with only 46% of boys (p<0.01). Also, significantly more boys than girls saw nothing wrong with casual sex (21%vs. 5%, p<0.01), and significantly less boys than girls upheld the virtue of commitment in sexual relationships (27%vs. 54%, p<0.01). Sex education programmes should explore these gender-related disparities.

  17. [The social problem of pregnancy in teenagers].

    PubMed

    del Rey Calero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy in teenagers in an important problem due to its human, health and social implication, and the World Health Organization considers them as high-risk pregnancies. About one-third to one-half of teenagers assume high risk sex behaviours. Fecundity rates among teenagers have risen up 19 per 1,000. Birth from adolescents mothers (11,284 in the year 2,000) have not increased due to abortion (rate of 9,8 per 1,000) and the percentage of adolescents pregnant girls who have an abortion, 50% (in 2003). Sexual education campaigns have failed. Odds ratio for became pregnant was 3.2 among those girls who consulted about oral contraceptives, 2.9 in those who use oral contraceptives, and 2.7 in those who used contraceptive sheath. These data indicate that information per se is not enough is not accompanied by ah round training of the personality as to values, self-control and responsability.

  18. School and Teenage Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duraj, Liba

    1984-01-01

    Reports figures indicating a rise in teenage suicide in Canada. Shows how the problem is compounded by silence resulting from official and parent reactions and social taboo. Discusses some of the causes of teenage suicide and explains the role of the school and family in suicide intervention and prevention. (SB)

  19. NUTRITIONAL HEALTH OF TEENAGERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILL, MARY

    SURVEYS HAVE SHOWN THAT SOME TEENAGERS HAVE FOOD INTAKES THAT FAIL TO SUPPLY THE RECOMMENDED DIETARY ALLOWANCE FOR EACH OF THE NUTRIENTS. HOWEVER, THE NUMBER OF TEENAGERS CLASSIFIED AS HAVING INADEQUATE NUTRIENT INTAKES DEPENDS UPON WHICH REVISION OF THE RECOMMENDED DIETARY ALLOWANCES HAS BEEN USED AS A BASE FOR EVALUATION. IN EXAMINING THE…

  20. [Screening for cardiovascular diseases among teenagers that will engage in sport activities].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Franco; Mercado, Carolina; Troncoso, Ivana; Heusser, Felipe; Clavería, Cristián

    2010-02-01

    Promotion of physical activity must be a priority in all modern societies, but there are some persons with medical conditions that can develop serious symptoms associated with sports, that can even be fatal, such as sudden death (SD). Adolescents are the age groups with the higher level of participation in recreation or competitive sports. International studies have demonstrated that approximately 1:250.000 adolescents die during the practice of sports. Of these, 50% had a prodrome 24 hours before the event and 75% had an underlying cardiovascular disease. Therefore, adolescents should be screened for cardiovascular diseases prior to their engagement in sports. This review gives a scientific approach to this issue, usually oversized by mass media. It also analyzes and reports international governmental strategies and practical tools for the clinician that must perform this type of screening.

  1. From Passive to Active Listening: "Lullaby of Clubland" by Everything but the Girl, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Geoffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    This two-part article revisits the British group Everything But the Girl. In this first part, the author describes Dr. Patricia Shehan Campbell's (2004) exciting ideas for fully engaging students during listening lessons. The author uses Everything But the Girl's song "Lullaby Of Clubland (Jay "Sinister" Sealee Remix)" to model Dr. Campbell's…

  2. Girls' Active Identities: Navigating Othering Discourses of Femininity, Bodies and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Within physical education and sport, girls must navigate discourses of valued athletic and gendered bodies that marginalise or "other" non-normative performances through systems of surveillance and punishment. The purpose of this paper is to share girls' perspectives on how these discourses affected their gender performances and activity…

  3. Girls' schooling and the perceived threat of adolescent sexual activity in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Grant, Monica J

    2012-01-01

    Despite its relative infrequency, pregnancy is perceived by parents in rural Malawi as a leading cause of school dropout among female students. This paper explores parents' beliefs about adolescent sexual activity and schoolgirl pregnancy and how these perceptions frame parents' aspirations and expectations about girls' schooling. In-depth interviews were collected in rural Malawi from 60 adults aged 25-50 who were the parent of at least one school-aged child. Four themes emerged from the data: how expectations about sexual activity frame parental expectations about schooling duration and dropout, the loss of parental control, the negative influence of classmates and schools as unsafe environments. These concerns frame how parents consider a daughter's schooling prospects and are active even for parents whose daughters are not sexually active or who are not yet old enough to have gone through puberty. Although all parents aspire for their children to attend secondary school, these perceptions of daughters' relative risk weaken parents' motivation to encourage daughters to remain in school.

  4. "Because I Am Muslim, I Cannot Wear a Swimsuit:" Muslim Girls Negotiate Participation Opportunities for Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamzeh, Manal; Oliver, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the works of postcolonial critical feminist and Arab Muslim feminist scholars, we discuss in this paper how 4 Muslim girls (ages 14-17 years) negotiated their participation in opportunities for physical activity. Data collection methods included self-mapping questionnaires, digital photos, private journal entries, and recordings of…

  5. Data to Action: Using Formative Research to Develop Intervention Programs to Increase Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Steckler, Allan; Gittelsohn, Joel; Saunders, Ruth P.; Saksvig, Brit I.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Lytle, Leslie A.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    Formative research is used to inform intervention development, but the processes of transmitting results to intervention planners and incorporating information into intervention designs are not well documented. The authors describe how formative research results from the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) were transferred to planners to…

  6. The Role of Self-Efficacy and Referent Specific Social Support in Promoting Rural Adolescent Girls' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Forlaw, Loretta

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the role of social support (SS) and self-efficacy (SE) for physical activity (PA) in rural high school girls (N = 259, 15.5+1.2yrs). Methods: Using structural equation modeling, the relationships among PA, SS for PA from mother, father, and peers, and SE for overcoming barriers, seeking support, and resisting competing…

  7. Early to Bed: A Study of Adaptation among Sexually Active Urban Adolescent Girls Younger than Age Sixteen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andres; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Caminis, Argyro; Vermeiren, Robert; Henrich, Christopher C.; Schwab-Stone, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between sexual activity among urban adolescent girls and four global measures of psychosocial adaptation (academic motivation, school achievement, depressive symptoms, and expectations about the future). Method: Data derived from the Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey administered in 1998 to…

  8. Physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and socioeconomic status among Finnish girls and boys aged 6-8 years.

    PubMed

    Lampinen, Eeva-Kaarina; Eloranta, Aino-Maija; Haapala, Eero A; Lindi, Virpi; Väistö, Juuso; Lintu, Niina; Karjalainen, Panu; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Laaksonen, David; Lakka, Timo A

    2017-05-01

    We studied differences in physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviour (SB), and the types of PA and SB between Finnish girls and boys and children from different socioeconomic backgrounds (SES). We assessed PA, SB, parental education, and household income using detailed questionnaires in a representative population sample of 486 children (238 girls, 248 boys) aged 6-8 years. Girls spent on average 1.7 h/day and boys 2.0 h/day in total PA (p = 0.002). Altogether 66% of girls and 54% of boys had less than 2 h of total PA per day (p = 0.012). Girls had lower levels of unsupervised PA (45 vs. 54 min/day, p = 0.001), supervised PA (1.5 vs. 1.9 h/week, p = 0.009), and PA during school recess (1.8 vs. 1.9 h/week, p = 0.032) than boys. Girls had higher levels of total SB (3.8 vs. 3.4 h/day, p = 0.015) but lower levels of screen-based SB (1.5 vs. 1.9 h/day, p < 0.001) than boys. Lower parental education and household income were associated with lower levels of supervised PA in girls (p = 0.011 and p = 0.008, respectively) and in boys (p = 0.006 and p = 0.003, respectively). Lower parental education and household income were also related to higher levels of screen-based SB in boys (p = 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively) but not in girls. Girls have lower levels of total, unsupervised, and supervised PA, PA during recess, and screen-based SB but higher levels of total SB than boys. Lower parental education and household income are associated with lower levels of supervised PA in both genders and higher levels of screen-based SB in boys.

  9. Pilot Intervention to Increase Physical Activity among Sedentary Urban Middle School Girls: A Two-Group Pretest-Posttest Quasi-Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lorraine B.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Lo, Yun-Jia; Wesolek, Stacey M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine whether girls in one school receiving nurse counseling plus an after-school physical activity club showed greater improvement in physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, and body composition than girls assigned to an attention control condition in another school (N = 69). Linear regressions…

  10. "Am I Able? Is It Worth It?" Adolescent Girls' Motivational Predispositions to School Physical Education: Associations with Health-Enhancing Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairclough, Stuart; Hilland, Toni; Stratton, Gareth; Ridgers, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The study purpose was to investigate predictive associations between adolescent girls' motivational predispositions to physical education (PE) and habitual physical activity. Two hundred girls (age 13.1 [plus or minus] 0.6 years) completed the Physical Education Predisposition Scale and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children.…

  11. [Teenage pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mora-Cancino, María; Hernández-Valencia, Varcelino

    2015-05-01

    In Mexico, 20% of the annual births are presented in women younger than 20 years old. Pregnancy in adolescents puts at risk mother and child health. This risk is major while the woman is younger, especially when the social and economic conditions are not favorable, which is decisive in later psychosocial development. It has been pointed out that the youths with low education, with minor academic and laboral expectations, with low self-esteem and assertiveness, tend to begin early their active sexual life, to use less frequently contraceptives, and in the case of younger women, to be pregnant, with the risk of abortion because they cannot to make the best decision. It is important to take into account the social context and the special characteristics of the family to understand situation of adolescent at risk of pregnancy.

  12. A Path Analysis to Identify the Psychosocial Factors Influencing Physical Activity and Bone Health in Middle-School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shreela V.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Kelder, Steven H.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Day, R. Sue; Hergenroeder, Albert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify pathways used by psychosocial factors to influence physical activity and bone health in middle-school girls. Methods Baseline data from the Incorporating More Physical Activity and Calcium in Teens (IMPACT) study collected in 2001 to 2003 were used. IMPACT was a 1 1/2 years nutrition and physical activity intervention study designed to improve bone density in 717 middle-school girls in Texas. Structural Equations Modeling was used to examine the interrelationships and identify the direct and indirect pathways used by various psychosocial and environmental factors to influence physical activity and bone health. Results Results show that physical activity self-efficacy and social support (friend, family engagement, and encouragement in physical activity) had a significant direct and indirect influence on physical activity with participation in sports teams as the mediator. Participation in sports teams had a direct effect on both physical activity (β= 0.20, P < .05) and bone health and (β=0.13, P < .05). Conclusion The current study identified several direct and indirect pathways that psychosocial factors use to influence physical activity and bone health among adolescent girls. These findings are critical for the development of effective interventions for promoting bone health in this population. PMID:19953837

  13. A comparison of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in 9–11 year old British Pakistani and White British girls: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that British children of South Asian origin are less active and more sedentary than White British children. However, little is known about the behaviours underlying low activity levels, nor the familial contexts of active and sedentary behaviours in these groups. Our aim was to test hypotheses about differences between British Pakistani and White British girls using accelerometry and self-reports of key active and sedentary behaviours, and to obtain an understanding of factors affecting these behaviours using parental interviews. Methods Participants were 145 girls (70 White British and 75 British Pakistani) aged 9–11 years and parents of 19 of the girls. Accelerometry data were collected over 4 days and girls provided 24-hour physical activity interviews on 3 of these days. Multilevel linear regression models and generalised linear mixed models tested for ethnic differences in activity, sedentary time, and behaviours. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents. Results Compared to White British girls, British Pakistani girls accumulated 102 (95% CI 59, 145) fewer counts per minute and 14 minutes (95% CI 8, 20) less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. British Pakistani girls spent more time (28 minutes per day, 95% CI 14, 42) sedentary. Fewer British Pakistani than White British girls reported participation in organised sports and exercise (OR 0.22 95% CI 0.08, 0.64) or in outdoor play (OR 0.42 95% CI 0.20, 0.91). Fewer British Pakistani girls travelled actively to school (OR 0.26 95% CI 0.10, 0.71). There was no significant difference in reported screen time (OR 0.88 95% CI 0.45, 1.73). Parental interviews suggested that structural constraints (e.g. busy family schedules) and parental concerns about safety were important influences on activity levels. Conclusions British Pakistani girls were less active than White British girls and were less likely to participate in key active behaviours

  14. Reaching Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Charlotte E.; Kuriloff, Peter J.; Cox, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    If educators want to engage girls in learning, they must align teaching practices with girls' specific needs. In a study modeled after Reichert and Hawley's study of boys, the authors learned that lessons with hands-on learning, elements of creativity, multimodal projects, and class discussions all worked to stimulate girls'…

  15. Self-Efficacy Moderates the Relation Between Declines in Physical Activity and Perceived Social Support in High School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Ruth P.; Motl, Robert W.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test whether self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to physical activity has direct, indirect (i.e., mediated), or moderating relations with naturally occurring change in perceived social support and declines in physical activity during high school. Methods Latent growth modeling was used with measures completed in the 8th, 9th, and 12th grades by a cohort of 195 Black and White girls. Results Self-efficacy was stable and moderated the relation between changes in physical activity and perceived social support. Girls who maintained a perception of strong social support had less of a decline in physical activity if they also had high self-efficacy. However, girls having high self-efficacy had a greater decline in physical activity if they perceived declines in social support. Conclusions Randomized controlled trials of physical activity interventions based on social cognitive theory should consider that the influence of girls’ perceptions of social support on their physical activity may differ according to their efficacy beliefs about barriers to physical activity. PMID:18812410

  16. Awareness of demands and unfairness and the importance of connectedness and security: Teenage girls’ lived experiences of their everyday lives

    PubMed Central

    Einberg, Eva-Lena; Lidell, Evy; Clausson, Eva K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have demonstrated that stress and mental health problems have increased among adolescents and especially among girls, although little is still known concerning what girls experience in their everyday lives. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of teenage girls’ everyday lives, as experienced by the girls themselves. A phenomenological approach of reflective lifeworld research was used, and the findings are based on eight qualitative interviews with girls aged 13–16 years. The essence of teenage girls’ everyday lives as experienced by the girls themselves can be described as consciousness regarding demands and unfairness and regarding the importance of connectedness and security. The girls are aware of the demands of appearance and success, and they are conscious of the gender differences in school and in the media that affect them. The girls are also conscious about the meaning of connectedness with friends and family, as well as the importance of the security of their confidence in friends and feeling safe where they stay. If teenage girls feel connected and secure, protective factors in the form of manageability and meaningfulness can act as a counterweight to the demands and unfairness of everyday life. For professionals who work with teenage girls, the results from this study can be important in their work to support these girls. PMID:26084273

  17. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  18. Qualitative evaluation of the Teenage Mothers Project in Uganda: a community-based empowerment intervention for unmarried teenage mothers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A large proportion of unmarried teenage mothers in Uganda face physical, psychological, and social problems after pregnancy and childbirth, such as obstetric complications, lack of education, and stigmatisation in their communities. The Teenage Mothers Project (TMP) in Eastern Uganda empowers unmarried teenage mothers to cope with the consequences of early pregnancy and motherhood. Since 2000, 1036 unmarried teenage mothers, their parents, and community leaders participated in economic and social empowerment interventions. The present study explored the changes resulting from the TMP as well as factors that either enabled or inhibited these changes. Methods Semi-structured interviews (N = 23) were conducted with former teenage mothers , community leaders, and project implementers, and lifeline histories were obtained from former teenage mothers (N = 9). Quantitative monitoring data regarding demographic and social characteristics of teenage mother participants (N = 1036) were analysed. Results The findings suggest that, overall, the TMP seems to have contributed to the well-being of unmarried teenage mothers and to a supportive social environment. It appears that the project contributed to supportive community norms towards teenage mothers’ position and future opportunities, increased agency, improved coping with early motherhood and stigma, continued education, and increased income generation by teenage mothers. The study findings also suggest limited change in disapproving community norms regarding out-of-wedlock sex and pregnancy, late active enrolment of teenage mothers in the project (i.e., ten months after delivery of the child), and differences in the extent to which parents provided support. Conclusions It is concluded that strengths of the community-based TMP seem to be its socio-ecological approach, the participatory planning with community leaders and other stakeholders, counselling of parents and unmarried teenage mothers, and

  19. Teenagers and sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000872.htm Teenagers and sleep To use the sharing features on this page, ... need. What Makes it Hard for Teens to Sleep? Several factors make it hard for teens to ...

  20. The prevalence of hypercalciuria in girl kids with over active bladder

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Rafiei, Mohammad; Aziminejad, Atefeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hypercalciuria may be a sign of over active bladder, these symptoms may be treated if we get rid of hypercalciuria. Objectives: This paper is intended to get to the prevalence of hypercalciuria in girl kids with over active bladder. Patients and Methods: All patients with index of over active urinary bladder who admitted to Amir-Kabir hospital of Arak and children who have admitted without any particular disease just for a laboratory check were studied simultaneously. Urine sample was taken from both groups. Results: The prevalence of hypercalciuria in the group with normal urinary bladder was 22.6% and in the case group was 42.9%. Hypercalciuria was reported in 30 (22.6%) children of control group and 57 (42.9%) children of case group. Based on chi-square test, hypercalciuria distribution between the two groups is not homogeneous (P = 0.001). Mean calcium to creatinine ratios were 2.384330 ± 0.55694 (mg/mg) and 2.186552 ± 0.56714 (mg/mg) for control and case groups respectively and no significant difference is observed between the two groups (P = 0.976). Based on logistic regression test, there is a significant relationship between both case and control groups and the occurrence of hypercalciuria with 2.58 times more than control group observed in case group. Conclusion: Based on the high prevalence of hypercalciuria in case group, examination and treatment of hypercalciuria in patients with over active bladder may be effective. PMID:26693498

  1. Tanning and beauty: Mother and teenage daughters in discussion.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer L; Geller, Alan C; Schoenhammer, Maria; Gordon, Mallorie; Bishop, Marilyn; Shuk, Elyse; Oliveria, Susan; Halpern, Allan C

    2016-07-01

    Tanning increases dramatically through the teenage years, but the family context of this health risk behavior is relatively unstudied. We conducted videotaped conversations between teenage girls (10th and 11th grade) and their mothers. We developed a coding system for discussion content and highlight findings including inadequate knowledge concerning the harms of tanning and positive views of outdoor tanning over indoor tanning, yet agreement that all tans are attractive. Many teens believed that indoor tanning is sometimes necessary to achieve the tanned look. These findings can usefully guide intervention development regarding the harms of all tanning, rather than indoor or outdoor tanning specifically.

  2. How safe do teenagers behave on Facebook? An observational study.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin; Raes, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    The substantial use of social network sites by teenagers has raised concerns about privacy and security. Previous research about behavior on social network sites was mostly based on surveys and interviews. Observational research overcomes problems inherent to this research method, for example social desirability. However, existing observational research mostly focuses on public profiles of young adults. Therefore, the current observation-study includes 1050 public and non-public Facebook-profiles of teenagers (13-18) to investigate (1) what kind of information teenagers post on their profile, (2) to what extent they protect this information using privacy-settings and (3) how much risky information they have on their profile. It was found that young people mostly post pictures, interests and some basic personal information on their profile. Some of them manage their privacy-settings as such that this information is reserved for friends' eyes only, but a lot of information is accessible on the friends-of-friends' pages. Although general risk scores are rather low, more detailed analyses show that teenagers nevertheless post a significant amount of risky information. Moreover, older teenagers and girls post more (risky) information while there are no differences in applying privacy settings. We found no differences in the Facebook behavior of teenagers enrolled in different education forms. Implications of these results are discussed.

  3. The impact of menstrual cycle-related physical symptoms on daily activities and psychological wellness among adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Kirsten C; Kiesner, Jeff; Pastore, Massimiliano; Scholte, Ron H J

    2016-06-01

    Associations between perimenstrual physical and psychological symptoms have not been adequately studied among adolescent girls. The purpose of the present study was to test a mediation hypothesis postulating that perimenstrual disengagement from daily activities would mediate the association between physical symptoms and psychological symptoms. A non-clinical sample of N = 208 Italian adolescent girls (age M = 16.68 years) completed a 95-item online retrospective questionnaire regarding perimenstrual symptoms, and how these symptoms affect their daily activities. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the mediation hypothesis. Results showed that physical and psychological symptoms were strongly associated. More importantly, results supported the hypothesis that perimenstrual disengagement from daily activities mediates the association between physical symptoms and psychological symptoms, but only for depressed mood and cognitive symptoms. This study provides support for a novel theoretical framework linking diverse aspects of menstrual cycle change. Longitudinal research is needed to replicate these findings.

  4. The Effects of Minimum Wages on Teenage Employment, Enrollment, and Idleness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David

    A study described the effects of minimum wages on teenagers by using individual-level panel data on school and work transitions of teenagers. Panel data from 1979-92 measuring transitions among alternative employment and enrollment activities of teenagers were obtained from matched Current Population Surveys data sets. Findings indicated that…

  5. Acceptance of and Engagement in Risky Driving Behaviors by Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkar, Sheila; Andreas, Marie

    2004-01-01

    Data gathered from 1,430 teenage student drivers and 880 teenage traffic violators were used to examine the levels of exposure to risky driving behaviors and perceptions concerning the level of danger of such behaviors. For student drivers, 55% reported exposure to risky driving by being in a car with a driver engaging in such activities as drunk…

  6. How Can I Get My Teenager to Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winebrenner, Rosemary

    The main barriers to teenage reading are lack of reading skills, lack of reading materials, and lack of time for reading. The school has often unconsciously contributed to the teenager's not reading by overloading him with homework and providing too many after-school activities. Another important factor that affects the child's attitude toward…

  7. Examination of perceived neighborhood characteristics and transportation on changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior: The Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Evenson, Kelly R; Murray, David M; Birnbaum, Amanda S; Cohen, Deborah A

    2010-09-01

    We examined the association between perceived neighborhood characteristics and transport and 2-year changes in accelerometer-determined nonschool MET-weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MW-MVPA) and sedentary behavior of adolescent girls. Reporting that children do not play outdoors in their neighborhood, that their neighborhood was well lit, and that there were trails in their neighborhood were each associated with significant decreases in nonschool MW-MVPA. None of the neighborhood or transportation measures was associated with changes in nonschool sedentary behavior. Further work is needed to understand the determinants of the decline in physical activity and the increase in sedentary behavior among adolescent girls.

  8. Construct Validity of Selected Measures of Physical Activity Beliefs and Motives in Fifth and Sixth Grade Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Ruth P.; McIver, Kerry L.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Scales used to measure selected social-cognitive beliefs and motives for physical activity were tested among boys and girls. Methods Covariance modeling was applied to responses obtained from large multi-ethnic samples of students in the fifth and sixth grades. Results Theoretically and statistically sound models were developed, supporting the factorial validity of the scales in all groups. Multi-group longitudinal invariance was confirmed between boys and girls, overweight and normal weight students, and non-Hispanic black and white children. The construct validity of the scales was supported by hypothesized convergent and discriminant relationships within a measurement model that included correlations with physical activity (MET • min/day) measured by an accelerometer. Conclusions Scores from the scales provide valid assessments of selected beliefs and motives that are putative mediators of change in physical activity among boys and girls, as they begin the understudied transition from the fifth grade into middle school, when physical activity naturally declines. PMID:23459310

  9. A description of the social–ecological framework used in the trial of activity for adolescent girls (TAAG)

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John P.; Lytle, Leslie; Sallis, James F.; Young, Deborah Rohm; Steckler, Allan; Simons-Morton, Denise; Stone, Elaine; Jobe, Jared B.; Stevens, June; Lohman, Tim; Webber, Larry; Pate, Russell; Saksvig, Brit I.; Ribisl, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Social–ecological (SE) models are becoming more widely used in health behavior research. Applying SE models to the design of interventions is challenging because models must be tailor-made for each behavior and population, other theories need to be integrated into multilevel frameworks, and empirical research to guide model development is limited. The purpose of the present paper is to describe a SE framework that guided the intervention and measurement plans for a specific study. The trial of activity for adolescent girls (TAAG) is a multi-center study of interventions to reduce the decline of physical activity in adolescent girls. The TAAG framework incorporates operant learning theory, social cognitive theory, organizational change theory and the diffusion of innovation model in a multi-level model. The explicit and practical model developed for TAAG has already benefited the study and may have elements that can generalize to other health promotion studies. PMID:16855014

  10. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1978-12-01

    Antecedent factors operative in the causation of adolescent pregnancy include: The sexuality of contemporary society, especially the media. Prolongation of educational any vocational preparation in industrialized western society. Normal physical maturation at an early age. Peer and social pressure. Low expectations of life among minority and economically poor individuals. The conspiracy of silence surrounding sexuality and the inability of society to admit and deal realistically with the sexual activity of adolescents. Failure to provide sex education, clarification of values, family-life education, preparation for parenthood, and knowledge of birth-control and family-planning services targeted to teenagers, including adolescent males. Psychological and emotional problems. Failure to provide available and accessible early pregnancy-detection services with adequate counseling and support services. Failure to provide abortion services. Failure to provide supportive services to adolescents who have a child in order to prevent repeated pregnancy. Pregnancy, childbearing, and motherhood represent ultimate feminine fulfillment to many in our society, and unless attainable expectations and desirable alternatives are available, adolescents will continue to see little reason to postpone pregnancy and childbearing.

  11. A school-based smoking prevention program for adolescent girls in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, M M

    1989-01-01

    Teenaged girls comprise the largest percentage of new cigarette smokers in the United States today. Factors contributing to smoking initiation include peer pressure, family and social influences, cigarette availability, and cigarette advertising. Because three-quarters of smokers become dependent on cigarettes by age 20, smoking prevention programs aimed at the adolescent population have great potential. The proposed program outlined is directed at girls 12 to 18 years of age in New York City. Among the objectives are increasing students' knowledge of the short- and long-term health effects of smoking and awareness of the social factors which lead to smoking. Participants would be taught social skills and behaviors which could help them to resist initiating smoking, by such activities as assertiveness training through role playing. Endurance sports activities would be emphasized while learning of the effects of smoking on physical conditioning. The costs of such a program are estimated, and classroom activities are outlined. PMID:2493667

  12. Teenage sex talk.

    PubMed

    Hadley, A

    Although an international study recently revealed that 87% of the UK's teenage mothers are unmarried, the highest figure in the world according to Alan Guttmacher Institute data of 1998, the teen conception rate in the country has declined considerably over the past 25 years and the number of teen mothers has been almost halved. Teens, as well as couples in other age groups, are increasingly cohabiting outside of marriage rather than getting married; more than two-thirds of babies born to teenagers are jointly registered by both parents. However, despite the decline in teenage conceptions since 1970, the UK still has one of the highest rates in Europe. The UK's real scandal is its failure to give young people the information they need to manage their sexual health. International research has proven that sexual health can be improved if societies are open about sex, accept teenage sexuality, and permit discussion about sex without embarrassment. Moreover, sex and relationships education should start at an early age, and young people should have easy access to free and confidential sex advice. Individuals under age 16 years have the right to the same degree of confidentiality as that afforded to adults. Vast potential exists for nurses to increase teenagers' use of services by removing the key obstacles which deter them from seeking advice: fears about confidentiality, lack of service publicity, and inappropriate opening times.

  13. Jayapura Teenagers Smoking Behavior.

    PubMed

    Herawati, Lucky; Budiman, Johan Arief; Haryono, W; Mulyani, Wiwiek

    2017-02-01

    Smoking behavior is a threat for Indonesian teenagers, including in the city of Jayapura, Papua province. The purpose of this study was to access Jayapura teenagers smoking behavior and knowledge including parents and other family members. The study was conducted on 78 respondents (grade 7, aged 11-14 years old), using cluster random sampling for selecting the public and private junior high school in Jayapura. The data collected was smoking behavior of respondents, parents and other family members (using self-reported questionnaire), and respondents' knowledge about the dangers of smoking (using tests with Cronbach's alpha 0.701). Data were analyzed descriptively and analytically using Chi-square, 95 % level of significant. The results showed 29.3 % of teenagers, 69.23 % of parents and 25.6 % of other family members were smokers, their knowledge was low (an average score of 60.81 out of 100), there was no significant statistical relationship between knowledge and smoking behavior among respondents (p = 0.079), and there is no significant relationship between teenagers behavior with the behavior of the parents (p = 0.609) and other family members (p = 0.578), 87 % of teenagers became smokers because there were individuals who smoke at home.

  14. Family support for physical activity in girls from 8th to 12th grade in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Dowda, Marsha; Dishman, Rod K.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Pate, Russell R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between perceived family support and other selected correlates of physical activity (PA) with changes in PA over time. Methods A total of 421 girls in South Carolina completed questionnaires at 8th, 9th and 12th grades (1998–2003). Family support for PA, PA self-efficacy, perceived behavioral control, attitudes, availability of equipment, and PA were measured. Results Growth curve analysis showed that family support, perceived behavioral control, and self-efficacy were independently related to age-related changes in PA as reflected by total METs. Girls who reported lower family support at the 8th grade measure had more rapid declines in PA, and a unit change in family support was related to approximately 1/3 of a standard deviation change in total METs. Conclusions Maintenance of support from family members may reduce the decline in PA independent of girl’s self-efficacy and perceived behavioral control. PMID:17157371

  15. From Passive to Active Listening: "Lullaby of Clubland" by Everything but the Girl, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Geoffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of this two-part article, the author described Dr. Patricia Shehan Campbell's (2004) exciting ideas for fully engaging students during listening lessons. He chose Everything But the Girl's song "Lullaby Of Clubland the Jay "Sinister" Sealee Remix" to model Dr. Campbell's pedagogical sequence. He also described the three-stage…

  16. Treatment Fidelity of Motivational Interviewing Delivered by a School Nurse to Increase Girls' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lorraine B.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Maier, Kimberly S.; LaDrig, Stacey M.; Berg-Smith, Steven Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which involves the use of person-centered, directive counseling techniques, shows promise for changing adolescent behaviors. The purpose of this article was to describe the methodology and findings related to the treatment fidelity of three face-to-face motivational interviewing sessions involving middle school girls and…

  17. Bidirectional Linkages between Psychological Symptoms and Sexual Activities among African American Adolescent Girls in Psychiatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Lisa R.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines longitudinal associations between light and heavy sexual experiences and psychiatric symptoms in African American adolescent girls receiving mental health care. Research supports bidirectional associations between adolescent romantic and sexual behaviors and depression and other mental health problems, but this finding…

  18. Exploring attitudes and behaviour towards teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Redwood, Tracey; Pyer, Michelle; Armstrong-Hallam, Sarah

    2012-03-01

    This article illustrates a methodological approach, which actively engaged 14 to 19 year olds in the research process. This two phase study explored the attitudes and behaviours of young people towards teenage pregnancy in Northamptonshire, UK. The first phase involved training young mothers to lead six focus groups with three specifically targeted 'at-risk' groups; other teenage mothers, young offenders and looked after children (from 14 to 19 years of age). An open question began each focus group but the young women or peer researchers were aware of the topics they wished to explore and provided prompts as necessary. Seven topics are presented under the headings of: alcohol and drugs; planned pregnancy; professionals' treatment; need for love; support by family, friends and partners; labelling and the reality for teenage mothers; and future aspirations. The reasons for pregnancy or consequences of pregnancy are discussed under the implications and recommendations.

  19. Attracting Girls to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandow, Barbara; Marks, Ann; Borg, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In most countries the number of girls studying physics, as well female physicists in academic positions, is still low. Active recruitment at all levels is essential to change this situation. In some countries a large proportion of students are female, but career progression is difficult. Highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications is a major approach in attracting girls to physics. This paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from the workshop, Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, Seoul, 2008.

  20. Teenage Drug Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    16. Davis, Richard. " Teenage Pregnancy: A Theoretical Analysis of a Social Problem." Adolescence , 24:93 (Spring 1989), 19-28. Donovan, John, and...difficulties in comparing across geographic 0 boundaries.) We also contacted experts in adolescent behavior to locate other studies or data since the...decrease. We found that teen pregnancy, Page I GAO/PEMI)1-3 Teenage Du Use 0 0 0 0 0 S 0 0 0 0 3.241016 i it birth, and abortion rates remain

  1. Adolescent girls with illegally induced abortion in Dar es Salaam: the discrepancy between sexual behaviour and lack of access to contraception.

    PubMed

    Rasch, V; Silberschmidt, M; Mchumvu, Y; Mmary, V

    2000-05-01

    This article reports on a study of induced abortion among adolescent girls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who were admitted to a district hospital in Dar es Salaam because of an illegally induced abortion in 1997. In the quantitative part of the study, 197 teenage girls (aged 14-19) were asked for socio-economic details, contraceptive knowledge/use, age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners. In the qualitative part, 51 teenage girls were interviewed in-depth about their relationships with their partners, sexual behaviour, contraceptive use and reasons for non-use, and why they became pregnant. The girls were sexually active at an early age and having sex mainly with men older than themselves. Although most of the girls were in love with and enjoyed sex with their partners, they also entered these relationships to obtain money or gifts in exchange for sex. Most were not using contraception or condoms though they were also at risk of STDs and HIV. These girls were getting pregnant expecting their boyfriends to marry them, or because they did not think they could become pregnant or failed to use contraception correctly. Most adolescent girls are not aware of the 1994 Tanzanian policy that gave them the right to seek family planning services and in practice these services are not being provided. There is a need for youth-friendly family planning services and to make abortion safe and legal, in order to reduce unwanted pregnancies and abortion-related complications and deaths among adolescent girls.

  2. Pre-Teenage Children's Experiences with Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, James; MacDonald, Fiona; McKeganey, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the drinking experiences and motivations of 77 pre-teenage children. The main reason which the children gave for occasional or regular drinking was the pleasure which they derived both from the effects of the alcohol and from the social interaction which accompanied the activity. Several of the children claimed that they…

  3. Family-focused physical activity, diet, and obesity interventions in African American girls: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.; Adams-Wynn, Alexis W.; DiSantis, Katherine I.; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2012-01-01

    Obesity interventions that involve family members may be effective with racial/ethnic minority youth. This review assessed the nature and effectiveness of family involvement in obesity interventions among African American girls aged 5–18 years, a population group with high rates of obesity. Twenty-six databases were searched between January 2011 and March 2012, yielding 27 obesity pilot or full-length prevention or treatment studies with some degree of family involvement and data specific to African American girls. Interventions varied in type and level of family involvement, cultural adaptation, delivery format, and behavior change intervention strategies; most targeted parent-child dyads. Some similarities in approach based on family involvement were identified. The use of theoretical perspectives specific to African American family dynamics was absent. Across all studies, effects on weight-related behaviors were generally promising but often non-significant. Similar conclusions were drawn for weight-related outcomes among the full-length randomized controlled trials. Many strategies appeared promising on face value, but available data do not permit inferences about whether or how best to involve family members in obesity prevention and treatment interventions with African American girls. Study designs that directly compare different types and levels of family involvement and incorporate relevant theoretical elements may be an important next step. PMID:23057473

  4. Teenagers' Explanations of Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert; Knutsen, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore how teenagers explain why bullying takes place at school, and whether there were any differences in explaining bullying due to gender and prior bullying experiences. One hundred and seventy-six Swedish students in Grade 9 responded to a questionnaire. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods)…

  5. [Teenagers creating art].

    PubMed

    Ahovi, Jonathan; Viverge, Agathe

    Teenagers need to interpret the world around them, sometimes in a completely different way to that in which, as children, they represented external reality. Some like drawing. They can use it to express their thoughts on death, sexuality or freedom. Their creative capacities are immense: they are creating art.

  6. Split Ends: Teenage Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Ruth

    Noting that family members need to work together to find ways of relating that feel comfortable, this book is intended to help teenage stepchildren understand stepfamily life and to find ways to make it happier. The chapters are: (1) "Divided Loyalty," including being a go-between for divorcing parents and where to live; (2) "Can Access Be Fun?"…

  7. Teenagers, Media, Taste!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Doris

    An example of the influence of television on the reading interests of teenagers may be seen in the popularity of the book "Eric," the true story of a boy's four-and-a-half-year battle with leukemia, which began just two days before he entered college. Although the television adaptation was inaccurate in many details concerning Eric's…

  8. Parenting as a Teenager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobe, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    Today, many government and private agencies, clinics, foundations, and schools are sponsoring programs and literature for teen-age parents. These range in scope from fetal and maternal nutrition, to family planning counseling, to informal rap sessions on parenthood, to workshops on child care. (Author)

  9. Summer Options for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Cindy

    This guide to more than 1,000 summer programs for teenagers encompasses recreational and academic programs sponsored by colleges, universities, independent schools, foundations, museums, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit businesses. Every program listed accepts students age 13-18; some programs also accept participants older or younger.…

  10. Bold Books for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Don

    2005-01-01

    "Bold Books for Teenagers" provides dynamic, informative viewpoints on important issues in publishing and teaching contemporary literature, especially literature for adolescents. Reviews of young adult literature also appear in this column. This article examines how English teachers can help students explore their interests without promoting any…

  11. Teenagers and Welfare Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Paul

    This report examines the extent to which welfare reform is changing adolescent behaviors that lead to welfare dependency. It begins by discussing the provisions in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 that require teenagers to stay in school and live with a parent, concluding that relatively little can be…

  12. Teenage Nutrition and Physique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huenemann, Ruth L.; And Others

    Body size, composition, and conformation in a teen-age population, and associated factors were studied to obtain useful data for planning programs in public health nutrition. This book describes the purpose, methods, and findings of this four-year longitudinal and cross-sectional study conducted in Berkeley, California, during the years 1961 to…

  13. Bibliography on Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Health Information Program and Services (CHIPS), Carson, CA.

    This unannotated bibliography lists 44 books on teenage pregnancy. Publisher, date, price and ISBN number are supplied in each instance. The list is divided into the following five sections: Reference; General; Parenthood; Sexuality; and Teen-Parent Relations. Two additional sections list five films and four pamphlets respectively. One of the…

  14. Building positive life skills the Smart Girls way: evaluation of a school-based sexual responsibility program for adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Graves, Kelly N; Sentner, Annette; Workman, Jean; Mackey, Wanda

    2011-05-01

    In response to the public health epidemic of teenage pregnancy, the present study investigated a new, gender-specific, school-based approach to adolescent pregnancy prevention for middle school girls called Smart Girls Life Skills Training(©) (Smart Girls). Participants included 854 students (633, experimental group; 221, control group) across three time points to assess change in social sexuality expectations, personal/self sexuality expectations, perceived susceptibility, and parent-adolescent communication. Girls who received the Smart Girls curriculum increased their personal/self sexuality expectations and improved some aspects of their parent-adolescent communication compared to control group participants. The evaluation provides initial evidence that Smart Girls is at least partially effective at changing personal/self sexuality expectations and parent-adolescent communication for middle school girls. Implications, recommendations, and next steps for school-based teen pregnancy prevention programs are offered.

  15. Immunization of teenagers with a fifth dose of reduced DTaP-IPV induces high levels of pertussis antibodies with a significant increase in opsonophagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aase, Audun; Herstad, Tove Karin; Merino, Samuel; Bolstad, Merete; Sandbu, Synne; Bakke, Hilde; Aaberge, Ingeborg S

    2011-08-01

    Waning vaccine-induced immunity against Bordetella pertussis is observed among adolescents and adults. A high incidence of pertussis has been reported in this population, which serves as a reservoir for B. pertussis. A fifth dose of reduced antigen of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis and inactivated polio vaccine was given as a booster dose to healthy teenagers. The antibody activity against B. pertussis antigens was measured prior to and 4 to 8 weeks after the booster by different assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) of IgG and IgA against pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), IgG against pertactin (PRN), opsonophagocytic activity (OPA), and IgG binding to live B. pertussis. There was a significant increase in the IgG activity against PT, FHA, and PRN following the booster immunization (P < 0.001). The prebooster sera showed a geometric mean OPA titer of 65.1 and IgG binding to live bacteria at a geometric mean concentration of 164.9 arbitrary units (AU)/ml. Following the fifth dose, the OPA increased to a titer of 360.4, and the IgG concentration against live bacteria increased to 833.4 AU/ml (P < 0.001 for both). The correlation analyses between the different assays suggest that antibodies against FHA and PRN contribute the most to the OPA and IgG binding.

  16. Teen-Age Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Marion

    1973-01-01

    Actions of school systems with respect to pregnant schoolgirls are neglectful and often hostile and punitive. The way schools treat such girls may influence what kinds of citizens and parents the girls will become and how they will relate to the school system as their children grow up in it. (Author/CB)

  17. Literacy as a Translocal Practice: Digital Multimodal Literacy Practices among Girls Resettled as Refugees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omerbašic, Delila

    2015-01-01

    Situated in critical sociocultural theory of literacy with a particular focus on literacy in relation to space and displacement, this qualitative study considers how nine teenage girls who were resettled as refugees from Thailand engage in productions of translocality through multimodal literacy practices in digital spaces. The girls are…

  18. Effects of Overweight on Risky Sexual Behavior of Adolescent Girls. NBER Working Paper No. 16172

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averett, Susan; Corman, Hope; Reichman, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    We use data from The National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health to estimate effects of adolescent girls' overweight on their propensity to engage in risky sexual behavior. We estimate single equation, two-stage, and sibling fixed-effects models and find that overweight or obese teenage girls are more likely than their recommended-weight…

  19. A New Creative Learning Centre at a Girls School in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Brisbane Girls Grammar School's new Creative Learning Centre was conceived to group arts studies which were previously scattered across the campus and to serve all students as a meeting place and technology hub. The building is specifically designed to provide the most flexible and innovative environment for teenaged girls, having special regard…

  20. South African teachers' responses to teenage pregnancy and teenage mothers in schools.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Deevia; Morrell, Robert; Shefer, Tamara; Ngabaza, Sisa

    2010-11-01

    South African law forbids excluding pregnant teenagers from school and permits young parents to continue with their schooling. However, the existence of progressive policy and law does not by itself ensure that pregnant teenagers and young parents remain in school or experience as little disruption to their studies as possible. Two of the factors influencing the experiences that pregnant girls and young parents have are the attitudes and practices of teachers. We explore how teachers in diverse South African secondary schools respond to young women's pregnancy and parenting. Teachers' responses are situated within a complex set of meanings invoking sexuality (and sexual censure), gender, class and race. We argue that many teachers view teenage pregnancy and parenting as social problems - a domain of sexual shame with negative effects and disruptive to the academic life of the school (including teachers and other learners). Teachers do not monolithically subscribe to such negativity and, in the context of changing policy and gender equality, there are glimmers of hope. Without much support, training or any formal school-based support, many teachers show care and concern for pregnant women and young parents, providing some hope for better experiences of schooling.

  1. Divorce and the American teenager.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, M L

    1985-10-01

    Divorce is woven into the fabric of today's American society, and parents and professionals alike are concerned about the effects of divorce on children of all ages. Research in this area is in its infancy, particularly research about how divorce effects teenagers, but research thus far has helped us to appreciate that divorce is difficult for children of all ages. This paper considers the effects of divorce on teenagers by drawing from existing research and clinical experiences with teenagers. The focus of this presentation is how teenagers feel when parents divorce and how they behave in response to divorce. The purpose of this focus is to provide those who interact with teenagers a greater understanding of how teenagers react to divorce.

  2. Efficacy of a Group Therapy for Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourigny, Marc; Hebert, Martine; Daigneault, Isabelle; Simoneau, Ann Claude

    2005-01-01

    The effects of a group therapy program for teenage girls reporting child sexual abuse were evaluated by means of a pretest/post-test design with a control group. The psycho-educational intervention consisted of an average of 20 weekly two-hour meetings. Results of the repeated analyses of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant improvement in…

  3. Middle School Girls Sample "Hard Hat" Life at Construction Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Aneeta

    2013-01-01

    On a Monday morning in July, a fan as tall as a refrigerator churned noisily in the cavernous classroom. As the outdoor temperature crept higher, teenage girls wearing hardhats and safety glasses wiped perspiration and sawdust from their faces. This was not a field trip. This was the second hour of camp at Ranken Technical College in St. Louis,…

  4. Helping pregnant teenagers.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, D; Starling, M E

    1994-08-01

    Teenagers who are pregnant face many difficult issues, and counseling by physicians can be an important source of help. We suggest guidelines for this counseling, beginning with a review of the scope and consequences of adolescent pregnancy. Communication strategies should be aimed at building rapport with techniques such as maintaining confidentiality, avoiding judgmental stances, and gearing communication to cognitive maturity. Techniques for exploring family relationships are useful because these relationships are key influences on subsequent decisions and behaviors. We discuss topics related to abortion and childbearing, such as safety, facilitation of balanced decision making, the use of prenatal care, and the formulation of long-term plans. Physicians who can effectively discuss these topics can help pregnant teenagers make informed decisions and improve their prospects for the future.

  5. Ward's area location, physical activity, and body composition in 8- and 9-year-old boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Cardadeiro, Graça; Baptista, Fátima; Zymbal, Vera; Rodrigues, Luís A; Sardinha, Luís B

    2010-11-01

    Bone strength is the result of its material composition and structural design, particularly bone mass distribution. The purpose of this study was to analyze femoral neck bone mass distribution by Ward's area location and its relationship with physical activity (PA) and body composition in children 8 and 9 years of age. The proximal femur shape was defined by geometric morphometric analysis in 88 participants (48 boys and 40 girls). Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) images, 18 landmarks were digitized to define the proximal femur shape and to identify Ward's area position. Body weight, lean and fat mass, and bone mineral were assessed by DXA, PA by accelerometry, and bone age by the Tanner-Whitehouse III method. Warps analysis with Thin-Plate Spline software showed that the first axis explained 63% of proximal femur shape variation in boys and 58% in girls. Most of this variation was associated with differences in Ward's area location, from the central zone to the superior aspect of the femoral neck in both genders. Regression analysis demonstrated that body composition explained 4% to 7% of the proximal femur shape variation in girls. In boys, body composition variables explained a similar amount of variance, but moderate plus vigorous PA (MVPA) also accounted for 6% of proximal femur shape variation. In conclusion, proximal femur shape variation in children ages 8 and 9 was due mainly to differences in Ward's area position determined, in part, by body composition in both genders and by MVPA in boys. These variables were positively associated with a central Ward's area and thus with a more balanced femoral neck bone mass distribution.

  6. Plasma androgenic activity in women with acne vulgaris and in healthy girls before, during and after puberty.

    PubMed

    Odlind, V; Carlström, K; Michaëlsson, G; Vahlqvist, A; Victor, A; Mellbin, T

    1982-03-01

    The possible relationship between plasma androgenic activity and acne vulgaris was investigated. Plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were determined in healthy girls during different stages of puberty, in healthy adult women and in women with acne vulgaris. Testosterone increase during puberty, whereas SHBG decreased during the early stages before it increased and stabilized plasma concentrations of testosterone and SHBG. Women with severe acne vulgaris had testosterone levels in the same range but the SHBG levels were significantly lower than those of healthy women and women with mild acne. These results show a high androgenic activity in the intermediate stages of puberty, when acne vulgaris is a common complaint and an increased androgenic activity in adult women with severe acne vulgaris.

  7. TEENAGERS AS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Arthur

    1958-01-01

    Adolescents tend to abandon the program of preventive and therapeutic medical care established for them in infancy by pediatrician and parents. Factors in this resistance were analyzed, and a teenage clinic was established. In review of experience over a four-year period, during which the number of appointments monthly rose from 20 to 300, it was noted that the needs of adolescents are related to their stage of development. In the teenage clinic the adolescent assumes an increasingly important role in communication between himself and the physician, with concurrent diminution of the parental role. Special goals of medical counseling of adolescents include strengthening of parent-adolescent relationships and adjustment of the teenager to school and community. The adolescent requests information about normal and abnormal growth and development (obesity, acne, sexual changes). Somatic abnormalities noted on physical examination were of three classes: (1) “Normal” deviations (male gynecomastia, adolescent striae, functional heart murmurs). (2) Medical problems usual to persons of any age. (3) Comparatively rare entities (lupus erythematosus disseminatus, Laurence-Moon-Biedel syndrome). PMID:13608297

  8. Neural activation during anticipated peer evaluation and laboratory meal intake in overweight girls with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Nelson, Eric E; Engel, Scott G; Vannucci, Anna; Field, Sara E; Romer, Adrienne L; Hannallah, Louise; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Shomaker, Lauren B; Courville, Amber B; Pine, Daniel S; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-03-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC-, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to "let yourself go and eat as much as you want." Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC- had increased activity (p<.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC- (p<.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p<.005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits may lead to

  9. Mediating Effects of Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level

    PubMed Central

    Cardon, Greet; De Craemer, Marieke; D’Haese, Sara; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls. Methods In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0±1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education) from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active) and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active). Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon’s product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. Results Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05). Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls’ physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%. Conclusions This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls’ physical activity both directly and indirectly through the

  10. Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildsmith, Elizabeth; Manlove, Jennifer; Jekielek, Susan; Moore, Kristin Anderson; Mincieli, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent's family environment, and the adolescent's own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains…

  11. Psychometric properties of the Social Cognitive Theory questionnaire for physical activity in a sample of Iranian adolescent girl students.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, M S; Niknami, S; Hidarnia, A; Hajizadeh, E

    2016-08-18

    This research examined the validity and reliability of a researcher-developed questionnaire based on Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) to assess the physical activity behaviour of Iranian adolescent girls (SCT-PAIAGS). Psychometric properties of the SCT-PAIAGS were assessed by determining its face validity, content and construct validity as well as its reliability. In order to evaluate factor structure, cross-sectional research was conducted on 400 high-school girls in Tehran. Content validity index, content validity ratio and impact score for the SCT-PAIAGS varied between 0.97-1, 0.91-1 and 4.6-4.9 respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis approved a six-factor structure comprising self-efficacy, self-regulation, family support, friend support, outcome expectancy and self-efficacy to overcoming impediments. Factor loadings, t-values and fit indices showed that the SCT model was fitted to the data. Cronbach's α-coefficient ranged from 0.78 to 0.85 and intraclass correlation coefficient from 0.73 to 0.90.

  12. Little Adults: Child and Teenage Commercial Sexual Exploitation in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silvia, Antonio Marcio

    2016-01-01

    This current study explores three contemporary Brazilian films' depiction of commercial sexual exploitation of young girls and teenagers. It points out how the young female characters cope with the abuses they suffer and proposes that these filmic representations of the characters' experiences expose a significant social problem of contemporary…

  13. Unusual location of the Libman-Sacks endocarditis in a teenager: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wałdoch, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Joanna; Dorniak, Karolina

    2016-02-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis may be the first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk of its occurrence increases with the co-existence of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. Changes usually involve the mitral valve and the aortic valve. In this report, we present a case of Libman-Sacks endocarditis of the tricuspid valve in a teenage girl.

  14. The Effects of Attitudes on Teenage Premarital Pregnancy and Its Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    Studies the influence of self-esteem, locus of control, attitudes toward women's family roles, attitudes toward school, educational aspirations, and religiosity on the probability of teenage premarital pregnancy and its resolution. Results for 1,142 white adolescent girls show that self-esteem and attitudes toward schooling and family roles were…

  15. Dealing with teen-age pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P L

    1991-01-01

    The author finds that teenage pregnancy is more complicated than access to contraception or abortion. At risk teenagers are not identifiable, only at risk factors such as isolation, lack of perception of future opportunities, lack of self esteem, lack of self worth, poor performance in school, poor role models or lack of role models at home or in the community. There is indictment of parents who are just as much in need. The focus on teen pregnancy as one dimensional belies the reality that health, family, work, social and cultural experience affect people's decisions and sexual behavior. The recommendation is for a holistic approach, regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic background. Adolescents need education and jobs as well as preventive health, body image, and nutrition in conjunction with contraceptives. Where success is defined by motherhood or fatherhood, birth control pills sit in drawers at home. Teenagers need to be convinced that there is some benefit in being connected to mainstream society. Support services need to help teenagers answer the question of what's in it for me? Why? Teenagers need assistance in attaining educational success, job success, the ability to handle anger, and leadership opportunities. A holistic approach is not only realistic but also is the most practical with the longest term benefit. With resources for teen pregnancy superseded by the problems of AIDs and crack gangs, there is a constantly changing political agenda for resource allocation. In fact, teenage pregnancy is reflective of social ills in an urban society simultaneous with drug abuse, school dropouts, juvenile crime and gang activity. The common denominator is that teens all need good educational opportunities, good health, and good housing. Parent involvement is needed, and it is presumptuous to believe that a couple of hours of contact a week can change lives. Parents need respect and understanding for their important role; they need information and a role

  16. Teenage pregnancy in adolescents with an incarcerated household member.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Mathilde Logan; Loper, Ann Booker

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the association between the incarceration of a household member and adolescent pregnancy, and evaluates whether this association extends beyond that of other variables associated with sexual health. We used data from 12 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: Child and Young Adult. After eliminating males and individuals who did not respond to key questions, a sample of 1,229 girls (ages 14-19) was analyzed. Girls who experienced the incarceration of a household member faced more demographic and family environment risk factors than those who did not. Regression analyses demonstrated that the addition of a household incarceration variable afforded superior prediction of teenage pregnancy relative to the prediction based on demographic and family features alone. Programs that are directed toward reducing teen pregnancy will benefit from attention to the home situation of the at-risk girl, particularly the experience of household member incarceration and related family dynamics.

  17. Social-Cognitive Correlates of Physical Activity in a Multi-Ethnic Cohort of Middle-School Girls: Two-year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Andrea L.; Sallis, James F.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Pratt, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The study examined social-cognitive correlates of physical activity in a multi-ethnic cohort of girls from six regions of the United States who participated in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls during their 6th and 8th grade school years. Methods Girls completed validated questionnaires and wore accelerometers that measured weekly physical activity in the spring of 2002 and 2005. Results In 8th grade, self-efficacy and perceived social support had indirect relations with physical activity mediated through perceived barriers, which was inversely related to physical activity. Self-efficacy also had a direct relation with physical activity. Conclusions Correlations were smaller than those obtained in studies that measured physical activity by self-reports, suggesting that previous estimates were inflated by common method artifact. Nonetheless, physical activity trials among girls during early adolescence might focus on increasing self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to physical activity and on ways by which perceived barriers can otherwise be reduced. PMID:19468040

  18. Turtle Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Charles; Ponder, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The day the Turtle Girls received Montel's adoption papers, piercing screams ricocheted across the school grounds instantaneously and simultaneously--in that moment, each student felt the joy of civic stewardship. Read on to find out how a visit to The Turtle Hospital inspired a group of elementary students to create a club devoted to supporting…

  19. A Longitudinal Examination of the Influence of Maturation on Physical Self-Perceptions and the Relationship with Physical Activity in Early Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Ann-Marie; Niven, Ailsa G.; Fawkner, Samantha G.; Henretty, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the influence of maturation on physical self-perceptions and the relationship with physical activity in early adolescent girls (N = 150; mean age = 12.79 plus or minus 0.31). Physical characteristics were measured and participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children, the Children and…

  20. Teenage Mothers' Experiences of Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yardley, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with exploring the impact of stigma upon teenage mothers. Drawing upon the findings of in-depth interviews with 20 teenage mothers, the study explores the ways and contexts within which stigma is experienced and identifies differential effects and coping mechanisms reported by the participants. Thereafter, it is suggested…

  1. Strategies for Supporting Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Robin A.; Thompson, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Programs for teenage mothers provided through school districts or community agencies often have their own curricular agenda for teaching teenage mothers about the proper care of and nutrition for infants and the typical stages of child development, but not all programs are successful in supporting the development of positive early relationships…

  2. Teenage Employment and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Kaylin M.; Staff, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Most American youth hold a job at some point during adolescence, but should they work? This article presents a broad overview of teenage employment in the United States. It begins by describing which teenagers work and for how long and then focuses attention on the consequences (both good and bad) of paid work in adolescence. It then presents…

  3. Factors Affecting Teenager Cyber Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Lim, Kyu Yon; Cho, Sun Yoo; Jung, Bo Kyung; Choi, Se Bin

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to investigate structural relationships among teenagers' peer attachment, self-control, academic stress, internet usage time, and cyber delinquency. The data source was the Korea Youth Panel Survey, and the responses from 920 teenagers in the 12th grade provided the study data. Structural equation modeling was used for the analysis.…

  4. Changing Girls' Education in Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provasnik, Stephen; Brush, Lorie; Heyman, Cory; Fanning, Marina; Lent, Drew; De Wilde, Johan

    Guatemala's school completion rates are among the lowest in Latin America and are particularly low in rural indigenous areas ravaged by 36 years of civil conflict. In 1997, USAID launched the Girls' Education Activity, known as Proyecto Global in Guatemala, to increase the percentage of girls who complete fifth grade, especially in rural areas and…

  5. Adolescent Girls Face the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffee, Lynn; Bergeron, Suzie

    1994-01-01

    This article is the final report on a study of adolescent girls which explored the relationship between physical activity and self-esteem. Two earlier phases of the study collected data on girls aged 9 to 12 years (n=76) and aged 12 to 17 years (n=67). A questionnaire explored: (1) confidence and perceived competence; (2) sports and activity…

  6. Narratives of Compensated Dating of Girls in Hong Kong Using Routine Activity Theory: Results of a Focus Group Study of Guardians.

    PubMed

    Li, Jessica C M; Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Jia, Cindy X S; Yu, Yolanda M Y; Nguyen, Ping

    2016-05-13

    This article presents public discourses on compensated dating of adolescent girls in Chinese society. Data are obtained from eight focus groups comprising 50 guardians at private, parochial, and public levels (i.e., social workers, police officers, parents of students, and community representatives). Qualitative data are used to demonstrate how the guardians conceptualize and contextualize compensated dating as an outcome of the dynamics of societal features. Social features such as contemporary ideologies, Internet technology advancement, commercialization of human relationships, and ambiguity between "right" and "wrong" motivate the service providers and customers of compensated dating, and accelerate their convergence and weakened levels of guardianship in society. This study is the first to connect the features of compensated dating of adolescent girls with recent societal changes using the routine activity approach. The findings confirm the application of the routine activity approach in the phenomenon of girls' compensated dating, and also offer theoretical and practical implications.

  7. Nutrition in Teenage Pregnancy. A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Dian

    This package of nutrition lessons was developed for teaching pregnant teenagers and teenaged parents enrolled in School-Aged Maternity (SAM) Programs in Wisconsin about nutrition. This guide provides a set of flexible lessons and resources for the SAM teacher (and for any person involved in teaching pregnant teenagers or teenaged parents) to…

  8. Girls in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Three years ago, the San Diego Zoo embarked on a new crusade--to introduce opportunities in the scientific realm to a small, diverse population of girls at a local inner-city, low-income junior high school. Researchers from the National Council for Research on Women found that mentoring programs and the opportunity to perform active science are…

  9. Effectiveness of a summer healthy lifestyle program for promoting moderate-vigorous activity in minority girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current physical activity guidelines recommend that children engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity each day. However, there is little research on what types of activities are most effective for facilitating this amount of activity. To assess which physical activities elicite...

  10. Relapsing macrophage activating syndrome in a 15-year-old girl with Still's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophage activating syndrome is a severe, potentially life-threatening condition that may accompany Still's disease. It is characterized by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, severe cytopenia, serious liver dysfunction, coagulopathy and neurologic involvement. The principal treatment for patients with this syndrome includes etoposide 150 mg/2 M twice a week for two weeks, dexamethasone 10 mg/2 M for two weeks and cyclosporine 3 mg/kg to 5 mg/kg for a longer period. Cases of relapse of macrophage activating syndrome are relatively rare. Case presentation We describe the case of a 15-year-old Iraqi girl with Still's disease who developed macrophage activating syndrome with acute respiratory distress syndrome that required resuscitation and mechanical ventilation. Following intensive treatment, including high dose steroids and cyclosporine, the patient improved significantly. Two weeks after cyclosporine was discontinued, however, she was readmitted with an acute relapse of macrophage activating syndrome manifested by spiking fever, arthralgias, maculopapular rash and leukocytosis. This time the patient recovered following the reintroduction of treatment with cyclosporine and the addition of mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept). Conclusion We believe that cyclosporine is a cornerstone for the treatment of Still's disease. We recommend continuing this medication for several weeks following the patient's clinical recovery in order to prevent macrophage activating syndrome relapses. PMID:20062775

  11. Sociocultural factors of teenage pregnancy in Latino communities: preparing social workers for culturally responsive practice.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Elizabeth; Pecukonis, Edward V; Zhou, Kelly

    2014-11-01

    Despite gains in reducing teenage pregnancy during the past 20 years, disparities in teenage pregnancy rates persist: The teenage pregnancy rate in Latino communities is now nearly double the average rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Considering the significant risks teenage pregnancy and parenting pose to both the teenager and the child, and that social workers are already often working in communities with populations at risk, this is not only a major public health issue, but one that the field of social work is well positioned to actively address. This article synthesizes pertinent literature on some of the social and cultural influences important for understanding this phenomenon. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  12. Factors associated with Hispanic teenagers' attitude toward the importance of birth control.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J W; Lanz, J B

    1991-10-01

    Attitudes of 240 female Hispanic teenagers in 1984-85 in New York City toward the importance of birth control (ATIBC) are examined as a reflection of the following: demographic factors, educational aspirations, maternal characteristics, religiosity, clarity of longterm goals, and perception of friends' behavior, i.e., the degree, formation, and variation of these factors. The nonrandom sample was recruited from pregnancy prevention classes. The questionnaire was available in English or Spanish. 9 research questions were of interest including whether girls in female-headed households were more likely to be sexually active and have higher ATIBC scores, whether Catholics will have lower ATIBC scores, whether spanish preference speakers have lower ATIBC scores, whether working mothers' children, or more highly educated mothers' children were more sexually active and have higher scores, whether religiosity lowers scores, whether higher educational aspirations increases scores, whether childrens' beliefs that most of the friends use contraceptive is related to higher cores, and whether clearer longterm goals are related to higher scores. The attitude scale was based on Kirby's and Cvetkovich and Grote's work and focused on peer influence, parental attitudes, and strength of intention to use contraceptives. Other measures are identified by specific questions, i.e., clarity of longterm goals is measured by the question: I have a clear idea of where I'm headed in the future, and I know what I want out of life. The results indicated that 4 variables were significantly associated with ATIBC scores: 1) lower scores were associated with teenagers who had mothers with low education (2nd-9th grades), and 2) teenagers who spoke Spanish best; 3) perceived importance of religion was significantly related to lower ATIBC scores such that great importance was related to low scores and little importance was related to high scores; and 4) teenagers' belief about their friends' potential

  13. Helping Teenage Girls Avoid the Female Athlete Triad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilardi, Deb

    2002-01-01

    Describes how school nurses can advocate for adolescent female students and help them avoid the female athlete triad that includes disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. The article focuses on consequences of the triad, how to uncover the symptoms, working to improve public support, and creating a successful program through partnership.…

  14. [Food calcium intake in teenager women in Panama].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ortega, Myriam

    2008-09-01

    The adequacy of calcium intake from food and carbonated drinks consumption levels in a Panama City's female adolescents group was studied. We evaluated 180 teenage girls (12-17 years) in two public schools using food frequency questionnaires and a 24-hour food recall. According to the results, milk and cheese were this population's main calcium source. Milk was a food source in 60.5%, while 56.7% indicated that they eat cheese. On average, a once-a-day intake of one of these dairy products was observed in 1/4 of the group. Ice cream and pulses were secondary calcium sources. Yogurt, milk-made meals and beverages, green vegetables, fortified food and sardines were not components of these girls' food habits. The average calcium intake was 440 mg/d +/- 423 according to the food frequency questionnaire and 314 mg/d +/- 255 according to their 24-hour food recall. Calcium's low level intakes are less than 50% of the recommended daily intake for this age group. Carbonated drinks were consumed by 72% of the group and 30% drank one unit daily. Dairy products are the main calcium source for the studied group. However, because of insufficient calcium intake and high consumption of carbonated drinks, the future bone health of these teenage girls is at risk.

  15. Research and Activism about Girls' Education for Global Democracy: The Case of the Campaign "Etna, Volcano of Peace," Catania, Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cristaldi, Melita; Pampanini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    According to a progressive interpretation of human development, girls' education should form an integral part of a full democratic system. Nevertheless, girls' education is threatened and attacked in many ways in current societies, be they authoritarian or democratic societies, developing or developed ones. In this article the two authors, both…

  16. The Impact of Puberty and Sexual Activity upon the Health and Education of Adolescent Girls and Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, J.

    1987-01-01

    Sex equity issues which are emphasized in this article include: (a) how boys and girls negotiate reproductive transitions; (b) how male and female sexual maturity is treated differently by parents, educators, and society; and (c) how the consequences of puberty and sexual behavior may differ for boys and girls. (IAH)

  17. [Chlamydia trachomatis infections in teenagers].

    PubMed

    Gille, G; Klapp, C

    2007-01-01

    Adolescents enter puberty early and many have sexual intercourse at a young age. That sexual intercourse can have side effects with life-long consequences is still a taboo field. In Germany, we do not have figures about the prevalence of the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted diseases in young people. Therefore the Medical Association for the Promotion of Women's Health (AGGF) initiated a prevalence study on infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in girls younger than 18 years in Berlin (n=266). After informed consent, information was given in 92 school classes. Thereafter in 30 offices of gynecologists the girls were offered a PCR test for the detection of CT free of charge. The results--10% of the 17-year-old girls had an acute chlamydial infection after an average of 19 months of sexual activity--suggest that in Germany there is a hidden epidemic among adolescents. Adolescents are not adequately informed about the risks of CT infection; medical counseling is both desired and effective.

  18. 'Let's get wasted': A discourse analysis of teenagers' talk about binge drinking.

    PubMed

    Chainey, Timothy A; Stephens, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Teenage binge drinking is a significant health issue. To explore teenagers talk about binge drinking, four peer-group interviews were conducted with 20 teenagers, aged 16-18 years, with experience of excessive alcohol use. A discourse analysis showed that a 'drinking is cool' discourse constructed 'getting wasted' as an integral part of social life, while a 'drinking as a social lubricant' discourse described the behavioural functions of alcohol use. Participants also actively resisted an 'alcohol is bad' discourse, which acknowledges the risks of alcohol use. The findings illustrate how teenagers use these resources in sophisticated ways to position the teen drinker positively and negatively.

  19. Physical Activity Levels and Motivational Responses of Boys and Girls: A Comparison of Direct Instruction and Tactical Games Models of Games Teaching in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lindsey; Harvey, Stephen; Savory, Louise; Fairclough, Stuart; Kozub, Stephen; Kerr, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to independently determine the levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and self-determined motivation of both boys and girls as they participated in prolonged units of invasion games (i.e. 6-12 lessons) through two pedagogical models: direct instruction and the tactical games model (TGM). It was…

  20. Her Life Depends on It II: Sport, Physical Activity, and the Health and Well-Being of American Girls and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staurowsky, Ellen J.; Miller, Kathleen E.; Shakib, Sohaila; De Souza, Mary Jane; Ducher, Gaele; Gentner, Noah; Theberge, Nancy; Williams, Nancy I.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the Women's Sports Foundation published the first edition of "Her Life Depends On It" (Don Sabo, Kathleen E. Miller, Merrill J. Melnick, and Leslie Heywood). At that time, it was clear that evidence-based research confirmed that regular physical activity and sport provides the critical foundation, in no small part, that allows girls and…

  1. Her Life Depends on It II: Sport, Physical Activity, and the Health and Well-Being of American Girls and Women. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staurowsky, Ellen J.; DeSouza, Mary Jane; Ducher, Gaele; Gentner, Noah; Miller, Kathleen E.; Shakib, Sohaila; Theberge, Nancy; Williams, Nancy I.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the Women's Sports Foundation published the first edition of "Her Life Depends On It" (Sabo et al.). At that time, it was clear that evidence-based research confirmed that regular physical activity and sport provides the critical foundation, in no small part, that allows girls and women to lead healthy, strong, and fulfilled lives. Now,…

  2. Cultural beliefs and teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horn, B

    1983-09-01

    The influence of cultural variables on teenage pregnancy is not clearly understood. In-depth interviews with 20 Native American Indian, 17 black and 18 white teenage women indicated intercultural differences in beliefs about: (1) prevention of pregnancy, (2) significance of becoming a mother at an early age and (3) kinds of support systems available to them within their social network. The implications of these differences for nursing care include recognition and acceptance of intercultural differences and support of a decision-making model of pregnancy prevention for teenagers that incorporates diverse belief systems.

  3. The Big Jump: A Classroom Guide for Teaching Insurance to Teenagers and Young Adults through Creative Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Credit Union National Association, Inc., Madison, WI.

    This kit contains a teaching guide with objectives, answers, and instructions for each activity and spirit masters color coded to correspond with the appropriate chapter in the teaching guide. Five program segments are presented: (1) introduction to insurance; (2) homeowners/renters insurance; (3) automobile and motorcycle insurance; (4) health…

  4. Love Hurts (in More Ways Than One): Specificity of Psychological Symptoms as Predictors and Consequences of Romantic Activity Among Early Adolescent Girls*

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Lisa R.; Davila, Joanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Li, Po Ching Clara; Yoneda, Athena; Hershenberg, Rachel; Miller, Melissa Ramsay

    2012-01-01

    Objective Research has linked adolescent romantic and sexual activities to depressive symptoms. The current study examines whether such activities are uniquely linked to depressive symptoms versus symptoms of other disorders (including anxiety, externalizing, and eating disorders), and whether co-occurring symptoms more precisely account for the association between depressive symptoms and romantic involvement. Method Early adolescent girls (N = 83; mean age = 13.45) participated in baseline and 1-year follow up data collection. Results Romantic (i.e., dating and sexual) activities were longitudinally related to numerous types of symptoms. The association between depressive symptoms and romantic variables remained when considering co-occurring symptoms. Girls with more comorbid disorders reported more romantic activities. Conclusions Results suggest that the maladaptive consequences and precipitants of adolescent romantic activities extend beyond depression, but also imply that this association is not secondary to comorbid symptoms. Future work should clarify causal pathways. PMID:22307747

  5. Lower physical activity is associated with fat infiltration within skeletal muscle in young girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat infiltration within skeletal muscle is strongly associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. Lower physical activity may be a risk factor for greater fat infiltration within skeletal muscle, although whether lower physical activity is associated with fat infiltrati...

  6. Involving Girls in Program Evaluations: Girls Study Girls Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Colette

    2005-01-01

    Based on an interview with Dr. PeiYao Chen, a research analyst with Girls Incorporated, this article explores how the "Girls Study Girls Inc." participatory research project was conducted, what it meant for those involved, and what other programs can learn from it.

  7. [Teenagers' drawings in transcultural consultations].

    PubMed

    Simon, Amalini; Titia Rizzi, Alice

    The place of teenagers' drawings has been studied as part of a transcultural consultation, based on the creativity of the children of migrants. When speaking is difficult, drawings enable teenagers to show another dimension of their internal world. Aravin, a young Tamil boy, who lacked the necessary words, was able to express all the complexity of his thoughts through his drawings, finally being able to formulate in the group the difficult situations which he was drawing.

  8. Social Support as a Factor Inhibiting Teenage Risk-Taking: Views of Students, Parents and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott-Chapman, Joan; Denholm, Carey; Wyld, Colin

    2008-01-01

    A large-scale study conducted in Tasmania, Australia, of teenage risk-taking across 26 potentially harmful risk activities has examined a range of factors that encourage or inhibit risk-taking. Among these factors, the degree of social and professional support the teenage students say they would access for personal, study or health problems has…

  9. Specific Features of Value Orientations and Social Mindsets of Deviant Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovsyanik, Olga A.; Belinskaya, Darya B.; Kochetkov, Igor G.; Deberdeeva, Nelia A.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the studied problem is determined by a continuous growth of suicidal activity in a majority of economically developed countries of the world. The statistical data on teenage suicides is especially frightening: according to the recent data (2014) among teenagers at the age of 15-19 there are 5,9 suicidal cases for 100 thousand…

  10. Teenagers: fertility control behavior and attitudes before and after abortion, childbearing or negative pregnancy test.

    PubMed

    Evans, J R; Selstad, G; Welcher, W H

    1976-01-01

    Following abortion or delivery, teenagers' knowledge and use of effective contraception improved markedly; but those who had negative pregnancy tests continued to take risks--and to get pregnant--subsequently. Most sexually active teenagers were poorly educated on the facts of reproduction, and began to have intercourse before seeking contraception.

  11. Video Games vs. Reading and School/Cognitive Performances: A Study on 27000 Middle School Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieury, Alain; Lorant, Sonia; Trosseille, Bruno; Champault, Françoise; Vourc'h, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    Video games are a very common leisure activity among teenagers and the aim of this study is to analyse their relations with cognitive and school performances. This study is part of a broad survey, conducted on 27,000 French teenagers (14.5 years old) in middle school (9th grade). The survey contained both a questionnaire on leisure activities…

  12. Teenagers and Family Planning: A Case of Special Needs. Fact Sheet Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Early Education and Development.

    Facts on teenage pregnancy, particularly with reference to Minnesota, are discussed. Contents discuss the following topics: Teenage pregnancy is a significant problem in the United States; adolescents' stage of development influences their views on sexuality; many sexually active adolescents do not use contraceptives; adolescent males have special…

  13. Mobile Devices: Toys or Learning Tools for the 21st Century Teenagers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kee, Ch'ng Lay; Samsudin, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Learning is interwoven in daily life and so it can be take place at anytime and anywhere by using mobile device. In the 21st century, mobile devices have become ubiquitous, affordable and accessible for the teenagers. The teenagers have the opportunity to perform the learning activities by using the mobile devices. However, what are they used…

  14. Effect of Recreational Noise Exposure on Hearing Impairment among Teenage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Chen-Yin; Chao, Keh-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the potential impact of children's hearing loss on learning and development. Recently, numerous teenage students have been found to be fond of listening to music on personal devices and participating in recreational music activities. The objective of this study was to investigate teenage students' hearing…

  15. Effects of Habitual Physical Activity and Fitness on Tibial Cortical Bone Mass, Structure and Mass Distribution in Pre-pubertal Boys and Girls: The Look Study.

    PubMed

    Duckham, Rachel L; Rantalainen, Timo; Ducher, Gaele; Hill, Briony; Telford, Richard D; Telford, Rohan M; Daly, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Targeted weight-bearing activities during the pre-pubertal years can improve cortical bone mass, structure and distribution, but less is known about the influence of habitual physical activity (PA) and fitness. This study examined the effects of contrasting habitual PA and fitness levels on cortical bone density, geometry and mass distribution in pre-pubertal children. Boys (n = 241) and girls (n = 245) aged 7-9 years had a pQCT scan to measure tibial mid-shaft total, cortical and medullary area, cortical thickness, density, polar strength strain index (SSIpolar) and the mass/density distribution through the bone cortex (radial distribution divided into endo-, mid- and pericortical regions) and around the centre of mass (polar distribution). Four contrasting PA and fitness groups (inactive-unfit, inactive-fit, active-unfit, active-fit) were generated based on daily step counts (pedometer, 7-days) and fitness levels (20-m shuttle test and vertical jump) for boys and girls separately. Active-fit boys had 7.3-7.7 % greater cortical area and thickness compared to inactive-unfit boys (P < 0.05), which was largely due to a 6.4-7.8 % (P < 0.05) greater cortical mass in the posterior-lateral, medial and posterior-medial 66 % tibial regions. Cortical area was not significantly different across PA-fitness categories in girls, but active-fit girls had 6.1 % (P < 0.05) greater SSIpolar compared to inactive-fit girls, which was likely due to their 6.7 % (P < 0.05) greater total bone area. There was also a small region-specific cortical mass benefit in the posterior-medial 66 % tibia cortex in active-fit girls. Higher levels of habitual PA-fitness were associated with small regional-specific gains in 66 % tibial cortical bone mass in pre-pubertal children, particularly boys.

  16. From Snuggling and Snogging to Sampling and Scratching: Girls' Nonparticipation in Community-Based Music Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sarah; Cohen, Bruce M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on gendered youth music practices in community-based organizations (CBOs) in Australia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Drawing on interviews and observational fieldwork from the Playing for Life research project, the authors highlight the absence of young women from many activities, especially in the area…

  17. Longitudinal Changes in Beliefs by Stage of Physical Activity Adoption in Iranian Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taymoori, Parvaneh; Berry, Tanya R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to examine the relationships among physical activity (PA)-related beliefs and to determine to what extent Iranian adolescents in different stages of PA adoption differ in perceived benefits and barriers during a 3-year transition from junior high school to high school. Methods: Data were collected from…

  18. Overcoming the Obstacle Course: Teenage Boys and Reading; Boy Books, Girl Books: Should We Re-Organize Our School Library Collections?; Guys and Reading; Where the Boys Are...; From "Boys' Life" to "Thrasher": Boys and Magazines; Connecting with Boys at Lunch: A Success Story; Motivating Boys as Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Patrick; Fiorelli, Dawn Cartwright; Doiron, Ray; Scieszka, Jon; Haupt, Allison; Cox, Ruth E.; Martin, Robie; Dahlhauser, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Includes seven articles that discuss overcoming obstacles to getting teenage boys to read. Highlights include what teacher-librarians can do; what boys see as obstacles; material selection; collection organization; gender issues; learning differences; magazines; lunchtime book discussion groups; motivating boys as beginning readers; and popular…

  19. Environmental factors and teenagers' personalities: The role of personal and familial Socio-Cultural Level.

    PubMed

    Menardo, Elisa; Balboni, Giulia; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-02-24

    Environmental (e.g., socio-cultural context), individual (e.g., genetic makeup), and interpersonal (e.g., caregiver-children relationships) factors can play a crucial role in shaping the development of the teenagers' personality. In this study, we focused on the Socio-Cultural Level that designates the set of preferences, knowledge, and behaviors that characterize an individual's way of life and depend on his or her cultural, social, and economic resources. We studied the relationship between Socio-Cultural Level (personal, maternal, and paternal) and Big Five personality traits of 191 teenagers living in the same geographical area. Results showed that Socioeconomic Status (i.e., parental education level and occupational prestige), which is the only dimension generally measured in investigations on Socio-Cultural Level, was not related with personality. In contrast, Cultural Capital and Social Capital were associated with different personality traits. Personal Cultural Capital was related to Openness to experience of boys and girls and to Extraversion of girls; personal Social Capital was related to Extraversion of girls, Emotional stability of boys, and Agreeableness of both boys and girls; maternal Cultural Capital was associated with Openness to experience of daughters. Overall, the personality of teenagers was more related to their own Cultural and Social Capital than to the Cultural and Social Capital of their parents. Moreover, the relationship between Cultural Capital and Social Capital of boys/girls and of fathers/mothers was moderate in strength. It seems that parents influence the development of personality of their teenagers indirectly, their Socio-Cultural Level shaping the Socio-Cultural Level of their sons and daughters.

  20. Physical self-concept and self-esteem mediate cross-sectional relations of physical activity and sport participation with depression symptoms among adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Hales, Derek P; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Felton, Gwen A; Saunders, Ruth; Ward, Dianne S; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R

    2006-05-01

    The authors tested whether physical self-concept and self-esteem would mediate cross-sectional relations of physical activity and sport participation with depression symptoms among 1,250 girls in 12th grade. There was a strong positive relation between global physical self-concept and self-esteem and a moderate inverse relation between self-esteem and depression symptoms. Physical activity and sport participation each had an indirect, positive relation with global physical self-concept that was independent of objective measures of cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness. These correlational findings provide initial evidence suggesting that physical activity and sport participation might reduce depression risk among adolescent girls by unique, positive influences on physical self-concept that operate independently of fitness, body mass index, and perceptions of sports competence, body fat, and appearance.

  1. Brief report: the influence of posttraumatic stress on unprotected sex among sexually active adolescent girls and boys involved in the child welfare system of the United States.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Courtenay E

    2013-10-01

    While posttraumatic stress (PTS) has been positively associated with risky sexual behavior (RSB) among adult women, there is a paucity of research examining PTS in relation to RSB among adolescent girls and boys. This study aimed to replicate findings among adult women with sexually active adolescents (179 females and 106 males) involved in a national study of children in the United States child welfare system. After controlling for age and the complex study design, sexually active adolescent girls with clinically significant PTS symptoms were more than seven times more likely than those without such symptoms to report unprotected intercourse. In contrast, sexually active adolescent boys with clinically significant PTS symptoms were less likely than those without such symptoms to report unprotected intercourse. Research is needed to 1) understand the mechanisms linking PTS and RSB, 2) further explore gender differences reported here, and 3) inform RSB interventions in this high-risk population.

  2. [Assessment of risk factors of metabolic syndrome in girls and boys from south-west area of Poland].

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Jolanta; Piotrowska, Ewa; Biernat, Jadwiga; Wyka, Joanna; Zechałko-Czajkowska, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    The research was aimed at evaluating risk factors: level of physical activity, BMI, using of unhealthy substances, appearing of illness in the family, age and sex in according to increase frequency of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in teenagers from Wrocław. Height and the body weight were measured to assess BMI according to Cole's index in group of 409 girls and 369 boys. Metabolic syndrome was characterized when three of risk factors was noticed like: high level of triglycerids (> or = 110 mg/dl), glucose (> or = 110 mg/dl), waist circumference (> or = 90 percentyl) or low level of HDL - cholesterol (< or = 40 mg/dl). Logistic regression and odds ratio were used to identify number of group with MS (7.7% boys, 6.4% girls), generally 7.1%. One components of ZM was noticed in 36.8% of group, two - 14.9%. Metabolic syndrome was not stated in 41.3% of teenagers. A significant influence of the excess weight and the obesity, the age of pupils, smoking cigarettes to the height of the risk of the metabolic syndrome and his components was stated. In the MS prevention they are essential alterable elements: a proper physical effort, the standardization of parameters of the body and not-taking substances.

  3. Girls Are Great. Contemporary Issues: Growing Up Female.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosatche, Harriet S.; And Others

    This document is designed to help Girl Scout leaders understand the maturation of girls and how to assist the girls in their development. The information and activities described in this booklet are designed to help girls see themselves in a positive way, understand some of the forces that influence them as they develop, and cope with the stresses…

  4. Mixed Abuse of Alcohol and Drugs in Teenagers in Sweden vs. a Group from the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutzell, Sture

    1995-01-01

    Examined the subsequent life and development of teenagers under probation who abused alcohol and drugs. Suggests that regardless of the social environment in which they grow up, children, both boys and girls, are in a risk zone if they use alcohol and drugs, and there is an enormous gap in their social adjustment compared with children that do…

  5. Teenage Drinking: Does Advertising Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Charles; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed teenagers (grades 7-12) about their drinking behavior, their exposure to alcohol advertising, relevant demographic information, and other communication influences. Concluded that exposure to alcohol advertising is significantly associated with teenage drinking behavior and intentions. (PD)

  6. Reducing the Risks of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, M. Faith

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the medical and social risks of teenage pregnancy and describes two successful programs dealing with pregnancy and parenting: the St. Paul Maternal and Infant Care Project in Minnesota and the Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project in San Francisco. (SK)

  7. Teenage Pregnancy: A Family Life Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theriot, Rosemary; Bruce, Becky

    1988-01-01

    Looks at issues surrounding teenage pregnancy and describes different school-based approaches to sex education. Stresses that parental involvement is critical to the success of any effective program for reducing teenage pregnancy. (RWB)

  8. Effect of teenage smoking on the prevalence of periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Kari, Kirsti; Pajukanta, Riitta; Elonheimo, Outi; Koskenvuo, Markku; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate how teenage smoking affects the prevalence of periodontal bacteria and periodontal health with the hypothesis that smoking increases the prevalence of the bacteria. Oral health of 264 adolescents (15- to 16-year-olds) was clinically examined, and their smoking history was recorded. The participants also filled in a structured questionnaire recording their general health and health habits. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were taken for polymerase chain reaction analysis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Treponema denticola. The prevalence of P. intermedia (21% vs. 4%, p = 0.01) and T. forsythia and T. denticola (23% vs. 8%, p < 0.05, for both) was higher among female smokers than among non-smokers. T. forsythia and T. denticola were more often associated with bleeding on probing (29% vs. 12%; 25% vs. 10%, respectively) and deep pockets (25% vs. 15%; 23% vs. 10%, respectively) with smokers than non-smokers. Among the girls, a significant association was found between pack-years and the prevalence of P. nigrescens (p < 0.007). In both genders, A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were rare in this study. To conclude, periodontal bacteria were associated with higher periodontal index scores among all teenage smokers. Smoking girls harbored more frequently certain periodontal bacteria than non-smokers, but this was not seen in boys. Hence, our study hypothesis was only partly confirmed.

  9. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  10. Deaf Teenagers and Family Alcohol Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Raymond P.

    1987-01-01

    Deaf teenagers have more trouble coping with the effects of parental alcohol abuse than do hearing teenagers. Suggestions are made for helping the deaf teenager and other family members deal with these problems, especially in potentially violent situations. Two short case studies are provided to illustrate intervention methods and outcomes.…

  11. A Subcultural Theory of Teenage Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1987-01-01

    The concept of "subcultures" is applied to depressed and suicidal teenagers. A case example is presented of a group of five teenagers, three of whom killed themseles. The characteristics of the group members are described in order to pinpoint the defining values of a teenage suicidal subculture. (Author)

  12. Teenage Victims: A National Crime Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Catherine J.

    The information in this report on teenage victims of crime is based on data obtained from the National Crime Survey for the years 1982 through 1984. The introduction summarizes crimes against teenagers, highlighting numbers, rates of victimization, and differences in crimes against teenagers and adults. These topics are discussed in detail: (1)…

  13. Popular Media and the Teenage Sexual Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strover, Sharon

    A qualitative study examined how teenagers react to and interpret certain popular media messages. In addition it explored the relationship between content containing various sexual messages and teenagers' responses to those messages, with particular attention to the critical abilities this audience exhibits. Fifty male and female teenagers aged…

  14. Preadolescent Violence among Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    This research study explored preadolescent girl-to-girl violence based on the perceptions of the victim at 14 years of age and those of her family. Using a heuristic research design (Moustakas, 1990), this constant comparative analysis of multiple data sources found (a) a clearly delineated progression of girl-to-girl violence, (b) blindness…

  15. The presence of altered craniocervical posture and mobility in smartphone-addicted teenagers with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kee, In-Kyung; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jung, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Jae-Kap

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphones are widely used by teenagers and adults for various purposes. As teenagers use smartphones more actively than adults, they are more prone to be addicted to smartphones. Furthermore, excessive usage of smartphones can lead to various psychosocial and physical symptoms. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred teenage subjects were recruited and divided into normal and addiction groups, based on the criteria of the smartphone addiction scale-short version questionnaire. Craniocervical posture and mobility were examined by lateral cephalometric analysis and a cervical range of motion instrument. [Results] Cephalometric analysis showed no significant difference in the craniocervical angles of the resting positions of the two groups. However, measurement using an inclinometer revealed a significantly flexed cervical posture while using smartphones and decreased cervical range of motion in the smartphone-addicted teenagers. The clinical profile of temporomandibular disorders revealed that muscular problems were more frequently presented in the smartphone-addicted teenagers. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that smartphone addiction has a negative influence on craniocervical posture and mobility. Further, it can be postulated that smartphone addiction among teenagers may have contributed to the occurrence of myogenous temporomandibular disorders. In conclusion, smartphone-addicted teenagers may be more frequently subjected to muscular disturbance in the craniocervical area, which probably affects the pathologic process of temporomandibular disorders in teenagers. PMID:27065516

  16. The presence of altered craniocervical posture and mobility in smartphone-addicted teenagers with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kee, In-Kyung; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jung, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Jae-Kap

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Smartphones are widely used by teenagers and adults for various purposes. As teenagers use smartphones more actively than adults, they are more prone to be addicted to smartphones. Furthermore, excessive usage of smartphones can lead to various psychosocial and physical symptoms. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred teenage subjects were recruited and divided into normal and addiction groups, based on the criteria of the smartphone addiction scale-short version questionnaire. Craniocervical posture and mobility were examined by lateral cephalometric analysis and a cervical range of motion instrument. [Results] Cephalometric analysis showed no significant difference in the craniocervical angles of the resting positions of the two groups. However, measurement using an inclinometer revealed a significantly flexed cervical posture while using smartphones and decreased cervical range of motion in the smartphone-addicted teenagers. The clinical profile of temporomandibular disorders revealed that muscular problems were more frequently presented in the smartphone-addicted teenagers. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that smartphone addiction has a negative influence on craniocervical posture and mobility. Further, it can be postulated that smartphone addiction among teenagers may have contributed to the occurrence of myogenous temporomandibular disorders. In conclusion, smartphone-addicted teenagers may be more frequently subjected to muscular disturbance in the craniocervical area, which probably affects the pathologic process of temporomandibular disorders in teenagers.

  17. Sociodemographic differences in the occurrence of teenage pregnancies in Finland in 1987–1998: a follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Vikat, A; Rimpela, A; Kosunen, E; Rimpela, M

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: To analyse sociodemographic differences in the occurrence of pregnancies to 14 to 19 year olds and changes in these differences from 1987 to 1998. Design: Follow up of adolescent survey respondents using registers. Setting and subjects: The dataset includes information on all registered pregnancies (abortions, births, and miscarriages, n=2743) of the female respondents (n=28 914) to the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey (AHLS) from 1987 to 1998. In the AHLS, self administered questionnaires were mailed every second year to independent samples of 12, 14, 16, and 18 year olds representative for Finland. Main outcome measure: Relative risk (hazard) of becoming pregnant at teenage. Main results: Girls from lower socioeconomic background had a higher pregnancy risk. Girls who did not live with both parents at the baseline survey had higher pregnancy risk than those who did, and girls who lived in a stepfamily had a higher risk than those who lived in a one parent family. Swedish speaking girls had a lower pregnancy risk than the Finnish speaking girls. There was no systematic change from 1987 to 1998 in most sociodemographic differentials in the teenage pregnancy risk, however, there was some increase in the differences by family structure. Changes in the sociodemographic structure did not explain the levelling off of the downward trend in teenage pregnancy risk, nor did the regional socioeconomic differences explain regional differentials in teenage pregnancy risk. Conclusion: Although the reduction of socioeconomic and regional differences has been a general objective in Finnish social and health policies, the relative differences in teenage pregnancies have not decreased. PMID:12177081

  18. The influence of thermal discomfort on the attention index of teenagers: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mazon, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    In order to measure the effect on the attention of teenagers of thermal discomfort due to high temperature and humidity, two experiments were conducted in two different indoor conditions of temperature and humidity in non-air-conditioned classrooms. The participants were a heterogeneous group of 117 teenagers, aged 12 to 18 years, and the experiments reproduced the actual conditions of teaching in a classroom in the Mediterranean climate. In order to measure the attention index, a standard Toulouse-Pieron psychological test was performed on the 117 teenagers in these two conditions, and the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV), the physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), the Standard effective Temperature (SET*) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) indices were calculated to estimate the grade of discomfort using the RayMan Pro model. Conditions of greater discomfort decreased the attention index in the whole group, especially in those aged 12-14, among whom the attention index dropped by around 45% when compared to comfortable conditions. However, teenage attention at ages 17 and 18 shows little variation in discomfort in respect to thermally comfortable conditions. In addition, the attention index for boys and girls shows the same variation in discomfort conditions. However, girls have a slightly higher attention index than boys in discomfort and thermal comfort experiments.

  19. The influence of thermal discomfort on the attention index of teenagers: an experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    In order to measure the effect on the attention of teenagers of thermal discomfort due to high temperature and humidity, two experiments were conducted in two different indoor conditions of temperature and humidity in non-air-conditioned classrooms. The participants were a heterogeneous group of 117 teenagers, aged 12 to 18 years, and the experiments reproduced the actual conditions of teaching in a classroom in the Mediterranean climate. In order to measure the attention index, a standard Toulouse-Pieron psychological test was performed on the 117 teenagers in these two conditions, and the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV), the physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), the Standard effective Temperature (SET*) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) indices were calculated to estimate the grade of discomfort using the RayMan Pro model. Conditions of greater discomfort decreased the attention index in the whole group, especially in those aged 12-14, among whom the attention index dropped by around 45 % when compared to comfortable conditions. However, teenage attention at ages 17 and 18 shows little variation in discomfort in respect to thermally comfortable conditions. In addition, the attention index for boys and girls shows the same variation in discomfort conditions. However, girls have a slightly higher attention index than boys in discomfort and thermal comfort experiments.

  20. Atypical Functional Brain Activation during a Multiple Object Tracking Task in Girls with Turner Syndrome: Neurocorrelates of Reduced Spatiotemporal Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Elliott A.; Stoddard, Joel; Lai, Song; Lackey, John; Shi, Jianrong; Ross, Judith L.; Simon, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with spatial and numerical cognitive impairments. We hypothesized that these nonverbal cognitive impairments result from limits in spatial and temporal processing, particularly as it affects attention. To examine spatiotemporal attention in girls with Turner syndrome versus typically developing controls, we used a…

  1. Using Mobile Devices in Physical Education to Enhance Learning and Physical Activity for At-Risk Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbone, Anne; Perez, Samantha L.; Virgilio, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to illustrate how a physical education program uses mobile devices to motivate at-risk girls attending an urban charter school. Permitting students to use mobile devices in physical education gives students a "technological freedom" that has been removed in other contexts. The apps described in this article…

  2. Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts (Girl Scout Stars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Girl Scouts of the USA; Girl Scouts of Northern California; University of Arizona; Astronomical Society of the Pacific; Aires Scientific

    2017-01-01

    Girl Scout Stars aims to enhance STEM experiences for Girl Scouts in grades K-12. New space science badges are being created for every Girl Scout level. Using best practices, we engage girls and volunteers with the fundamental STEM concepts that underpin our human quest to explore the universe. Through early and sustained exposure to the people and assets of NASA and the excitement of NASA’s Mission, they explore STEM content, discoveries, and careers. Today’s tech savvy Girl Scout volunteers prefer just-in-time materials and asynchronous learning. The Volunteer Tool Kit taps into the wealth of NASA's online materials for the new space science badges. Training volunteers supports troop activities for the younger girls. For older girls, we enhance Girl Scout summer camp activities, support in-depth experiences at Univ. of Arizona’s Astronomy Camp, and “Destination” events for the 2017 total solar eclipse. We partner with the Night Sky Network to engage amateur astronomers with Girl Scouts. Univ. of Arizona also leads Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout volunteers. Aires Scientific leads eclipse preparation and summer sessions at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for teams of volunteers, amateur astronomers and older Girl Scouts.There are 1,900,000 Girl Scouts and 800,000 volunteers in the USA. During development, we work with the Girl Scouts of Northern California (50,000 girl members and 31,000 volunteers) and expand across the USA to 121 Girl Scout councils over five years. SETI Institute leads the space science educators and scientists at Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Univ. of Arizona, and Aires Scientific. Girl Scouts of the USA leads dissemination of Girl Scout Stars with support of Girl Scouts of Northern California. Through professional development of Girl Scout volunteers, Girl Scout Stars enhances public science literacy. Girl Scout Stars supports the NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Education Objectives and NASA’s STEM Engagement and

  3. A longitudinal examination of the influence of maturation on physical self-perceptions and the relationship with physical activity in early adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Ann-Marie; Niven, Ailsa G; Fawkner, Samantha G; Henretty, Joan M

    2009-06-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the influence of maturation on physical self-perceptions and the relationship with physical activity in early adolescent girls (N=150; mean age=12.79+/-0.31). Physical characteristics were measured and participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Children, the Children and Youth Physical Self-Perception Profile and the Pubertal Development Scale on two occasions 12 months apart. The results demonstrated a decrease in overall physical activity levels over 12 months which was not influenced by maturational status or physical characteristics. Additional analysis indicated that physical self-perceptions partially accounted for the explained variance in physical activity change, with physical condition being an important individual predictor of physical activity. Further analysis indicated that body mass was an important individual predictor of changes in perceptions of body attractiveness and physical self-worth. At this age maturation has a limited influence on the physical activity behaviours of early adolescent girls and although the variance in physical activity was partly accounted for by physical self-perceptions, this was a relatively small contribution and other factors related to this drop in physical activity need to be considered longitudinally.

  4. Teenage Pregnancy: The Problem That Hasn't Gone Away.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alan Guttmacher Inst., New York, NY.

    This document gives information about teenage pregnancy and related issues. The document is divided into 10 sections and then further subdivided into components. The components contain prose summaries with statistical charts. Section 1, Sexuality Activity and Marriage, provides data on trends in premarital sex and marriage rates for black and…

  5. Acting to Create a Healthy Environment. Teenage Health Teaching Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Teenage Health Teaching Modules (THTM) program is a health education curriculum for adolescents. Each THTM module frames an adolescent health task emphasizing development of self-assessment, communication, decision making, health advocacy, and self-management. This module encourages students to take a more active interest in environmental…

  6. Teenagers and Their Babies: A Perinatal Home Visitor's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardone, Ida; Gilkerson, Linda; Wechsler, Nick

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers and Their Babies" is a self-study and preparation guide for paraprofessional home-based visitors to engage expectant and new parents in an exploration of their baby's development and their expectations for parenthood. The guide includes service interventions--strategies, techniques, and activities--for home visitors and doulas to use…

  7. Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Venla; Sourander, Andre; Klomek, Anat; Niemelä, Solja; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention.

  8. The production of erotica: photobooks of teenage models in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chu, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the production of erotica in a Chinese cultural context. It takes the photo books featuring teenage models published in Hong Kong in 2010 as case studies in which a total of 2,205 photographs of teenage models were analyzed. In-depth interviews were conducted with six producers of these images. It was found that the set of erotic pictures was characterized by three distinctive features. First, they emphasized a look of innocence that suggested purity, fragility, and delicacy. Second, albeit being sexy and desirable, the girls were often presented as if they were unaware of their sexiness. The implication was that their sexiness was unintentional and, thus, the girls were not to blame. Finally, a sense of intimacy was purposefully built between the models and readers by constituting a direct gaze and presenting models as ordinary "girls next door." All these echoed the emphasis of female chastity in Chinese culture. It appears that in Hong Kong, where sexuality issues often provoke debates, the producers of sexy images have benefited from media controversies. By heightening expectations of potential customers, they fuel the "erotic" imagination of the readers. The production of erotica is, hence, completed through a collaboration between teenage models, producers, marketers, and consumers.

  9. "Being Grown": How Adolescent Girls with Disabilities Narrate Self-Determination and Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States young women with disabilities are experiencing economic and educational disadvantages. Although post-school outcomes have shown improvement, young women continue to experience high unemployment rates, low wages, and high rates of poverty. In this study, I explore the experiences of four teenage girls who have been labeled…

  10. Community-Based Feminist Programming for Girls: An Approach to Pregnancy Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankford, Evelyn R.

    This program seeks to prevent adolescent pregnancy and childbearing through a community-based feminist social service program serving teenage girls. This DAWN program, Discovery and Awareness for Women Now, was initiated as a result of the Women's Movement which has had a serious and positive impact on the lives of most adult women. Yet, teenage…

  11. Psychological correlates of teenage motherhood.

    PubMed

    Barth, R P; Schinke, S P; Maxwell, J S

    1983-12-01

    The social and economic consequences of adolescent motherhood are known, yet the psychological associates are largely unstudied. Clinical studies point to distressing reactions to adolescent pregnancy, and do not reflect changes in social attitudes about teenage parenting. In the study, adolescent mothers (n=62), pregnant teenagers (n=63), and non-pregnant and nonparenting (n=60) adolescents enrolled in public high schools completed measures of socioeconomic status, depression, anxiety, loneliness, selfesteem, and social supports. Study participants were enrolled in 3 schoolaged parent programs in urban, suburban and semirural schools. Students' ages ranged from 11 to 21 years. By race, 49% of the young women were Black, 36.8% were White, 5.6% were Native American, 7% were Asian, 4% were Hispanic, and 5% declined to identify their ethnicity. Pregnant, parenting and comparison participants were recruited in the classes of the young women. Findings suggest that adolescent mothers and pregnant teenagers are less distressed by their situation than was once thought. Social supports and socioeconomic status predicted psychological well-being better thanparenting status. Expanded schools programs for teenage mothers and renewed efforts to enhance young mothers' social and socioeconomic resources are recommended.

  12. Sextalk for Parents and Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, June

    Most parents want to prepare their adolescents for sexual relationships, but find it difficult to discuss sex with their teenagers. This books aims to help families improve communication and presents in a short-story format, factual information on sexuality. It is intended as an introduction to the subject of sex and as a quick reference tool for…

  13. Safety for Teen-Agers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounds, Elenore T.; And Others

    This booklet is designed for teenage students and discusses safety and first aid. The first part of the booklet covers safety instruction, causes of accidents, what it means to be safety-minded, and discusses experimental safe-car design and testing programs. The second part presents basic descriptions for first aid treatment of common injuries…

  14. Who's Minding the Teenage Brain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how researchers study the adolescent brain--a subject of inquiry that did not exist a generation ago. Any parent of a teenager knows that adolescents often have difficulty navigating through their world. Now scientists are starting to find out why. Peering into the minds of maturing youngsters, researchers are…

  15. Teenage Parents: A Global Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Kimberly A.

    This instructional packet consists of an essay, a wall poster, and a teacher's guide that provide information and statistics about teenage parents throughout the world. The purpose of these materials is to give junior high and high school students an overview of the health, social, psychological, economic, and demographic effects of teenage…

  16. Teenage Parenting: Looking for Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Laurie A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the types of resources available to pregnant teenagers and adolescent parents in Canada. Recommends changes that will improve psychological, day care, and health services, as well as create effective parenthood education programs. (Canadian Home Economics Association, 151 Slater Street, Suite 805, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5H3.) (SK)

  17. Teenage Pregnancy. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephen P.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints series challenge readers to question their own opinions and assumptions. By reading carefully balanced views, readers confront new ideas on the topic of interest. Although some experts believe that the problem of teenage pregnancy has been overstated, other recent studies have led many people to believe that…

  18. What Teenagers Want to Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinsohn, Florence; Kelly, G. Lombard

    One of a series of illustrated books written by physicians for their patients, this publication, aimed at te teenager, points out some biological and psychological changes which occur in adolescence. The first few chapters deal with sex drives, male anatomy, female anatomy, conception and pregnancy. Sociological and controversial aspects of…

  19. Social Consequences of Teenage Childbearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Harriet B.

    Most research on teenage parenthood is concerned with illegitimacy and its determinants such as attitudes toward sex, contraceptive knowledge and practice, family relationships, and cultural factors. Empirical studies on the consequences of illegitimacy are generally limited to problems of recidivism, school dropouts, and welfare dependency.…

  20. Eating breakfast more frequently is cross-sectionally associated with greater physical activity and lower levels of adiposity in overweight Latina and African American girls1234

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cheng Kun; Davis, Jaimie N; Shen, Ernest; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena T; Belcher, Britni R; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Weigensberg, Marc J; Goran, Michael I; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Eating breakfast is believed to promote a healthy body weight. Yet, few studies have examined the contribution of energy balance–related behavioral factors to this relation in minority youth. Objective: We assessed the associations between breakfast consumption and dietary intake, physical activity (PA), and adiposity before and after accounting for energy intake and PA in minority girls. Design: Cross-sectional data were obtained on body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat (measured by BodPod), dietary intake (measured with 3-d dietary records), and PA (measured with 7-d accelerometry) from 87 Latina and African American girls 8–17 y of age (75% Latina, 80% overweight). Dietary records were used to categorize girls as more frequent breakfast eaters (MF; 2 or 3 of 3 d; n = 57) or less frequent breakfast eaters (LF; 0 or 1 of 3 d; n = 30). Chi-square tests, ANCOVA, and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Mediation was assessed with a Sobel test. Results: Compared with the MF group, the LF group spent 30% less time (12.6 min/d) in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA; P = 0.004) and had a higher percentage body fat (P = 0.029). MVPA accounted for 25% (95% CI: −8.8%, 58.1%; P = 0.139) of the relation between breakfast consumption and percentage body fat. We were unable to show that energy intake or MVPA was a significant mediator of the relation between breakfast consumption and adiposity in this sample. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that among predominantly overweight minority girls, MVPA, but not energy intake, was associated with both breakfast consumption and adiposity; however, a lack of power reduced our ability to detect a significant mediation effect. Other unobserved variables likely contribute to this relation. PMID:23803890

  1. Effect of maternal age and growth on placental nutrient transport: potential mechanisms for teenagers' predisposition to small-for-gestational-age birth?

    PubMed

    Hayward, Christina E; Greenwood, Susan L; Sibley, Colin P; Baker, Philip N; Challis, John R G; Jones, Rebecca L

    2012-01-15

    Teenagers have an increased risk of delivering small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. Young maternal age and continued skeletal growth have been implicated as causal factors. In growing adolescent sheep, impaired placental development and nutrient transfer cause reduced birth weight. In human pregnancies, SGA is associated with reduced placental amino acid transport. Maternal growth has no effect on placental morphology or cell turnover, but growing teenagers have higher birth weight:placental weight ratios than nongrowing teenagers. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporter activity would be affected by maternal age and/or growth status. Placentas from teenagers and adults were collected. Teenagers were defined as growing or nongrowing based on knee height measurements. System A amino acid transporter activity was quantified as sodium-dependent uptake of [(14)C]methylaminoisobutyric acid into placental fragments. Teenagers had lower placental system A activity than adults (P < 0.05). In adults, placental system A activity was lower in SGA infants than appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) infants (P < 0.05). In teenagers, AGA and SGA infants had lower placental system A activity than AGA infants born to adults (P < 0.05). Placental system A activity was higher in growing teenagers than in nongrowing teenagers (P < 0.001). Placental mRNA expression of system A transporter isoforms SLC38A1 and -2 was lower in teenagers than in adults (P < 0.05) but did not differ between growing and nongrowing teenagers. There was no difference in transporter protein expression/localization between cohorts. Teenagers have inherently reduced placental transport, which may underlie their susceptibility to delivering SGA infants. Growing teenagers appear to overcome this susceptibility by stimulating the activity, but not expression, of system A transporters.

  2. Teenage pregnancies and abortion.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E

    1984-01-01

    likely to reject the abortion alternative. Vital statistics suggest that, for the most part, it is abortion rather than contraception that exerts an ameliorating effect on the birthrate of the younger mothers. The most disturbing aspect of these statistics is the magnitude of the very real problems associated with children bearing children. 2/3 of all women who have their 1st baby before the age of 20 will be below the poverty level. A correlation exists between poor marital adjustment and early childbearing. The divorce rate is 3 times higher when 1 spouse is younger than age 20. There are also problems for the infant of the teenage mother, including an increase in stillbirths and prematurity, and increase in small for date infants, and physical, psychological and social disadvantages over time for children born to mothers in their early teens.

  3. African American girls and the challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Rozie-Battle, Judith L

    2002-01-01

    The research on the psychosocial development of African American girls is limited. Information that is available focuses on teen pregnancy and health issues such as nutrition and physical activity. African American girls are facing challenges, including poverty, crime, poor self-esteem, and peer pressure. Despite some of the negative characteristics attributed to African American girls, many are achieving some success. Policy makers and service providers need to recognize the resiliency and unique needs of African American girls and develop services that ensure their needs are being fully met.

  4. “Not all my friends need to know”: a qualitative study of teenage patients, privacy, and social media

    PubMed Central

    El Emam, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Background The literature describes teenagers as active users of social media, who seem to care about privacy, but who also reveal a considerable amount of personal information. There have been no studies of how they manage personal health information on social media. Objective To understand how chronically ill teenage patients manage their privacy on social media sites. Design A qualitative study based on a content analysis of semistructured interviews with 20 hospital patients (12–18 years). Results Most teenage patients do not disclose their personal health information on social media, even though the study found a pervasive use of Facebook. Facebook is a place to be a “regular”, rather than a sick teenager. It is a place where teenage patients stay up-to-date about their social life—it is not seen as a place to discuss their diagnosis and treatment. The majority of teenage patients don't use social media to come into contact with others with similar conditions and they don't use the internet to find health information about their diagnosis. Conclusions Social media play an important role in the social life of teenage patients. They enable young patients to be “regular” teenagers. Teenage patients' online privacy behavior is an expression of their need for self-definition and self-protection. PMID:22771531

  5. Girls and ADHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Article Body The fact that many more boys than girls are diagnosed with ADHD—at a ... many parents and teachers that ADHD is a “boys’ disorder” that rarely occurs in girls. In fact, ...

  6. Engaging teenagers productively in service design.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Simon; Sustar, Helena; Wolstenholme, Daniel; Dearden, Andy

    2013-09-01

    Engaging young people in participatory design can be challenging, particularly in health-related projects. In a study co-designing diabetes support and information services with teenagers, we found framing activities using popular culture was a useful strategy. Various cultural references helped us stage activities that were productive for the design process, and were engaging for our young participants (e.g. exploring practical implications through discussions in a 'Dragons' Den'). Some activities were more effective than others and the idea of language-games, which has been widely explored in participatory design, explains why our strategy was successful when there was a clear 'family resemblance' between the popular cultural references and certain essential stages of designing. However, attention is required in selecting appropriate cultural references if this strategy is adopted elsewhere, and design facilitators should focus first on devising accessible language-games, rather than expecting popular cultural references to provide complete solutions to the challenge of staging participatory design.

  7. Helping Girls Take a Byte Out of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Carol J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes several strategies principals can use to improve girls' confidence in using computer and information technology, such as making technology instruction "girl friendly," stressing active and cooperative learning, and demonstrating the positive impact of technology on society. (PKP)

  8. [Healthcare for teenagers: are we working together?].

    PubMed

    Derksen-Lubsen, G; Jambroes, M; Essink-Bot, M L

    2016-01-01

    There are about 1.8 million children between 10 and 18 years of age in the Netherlands in 2016. These teenagers account for approximately 10% of the total population. Teenagers are relatively healthy and do not make much use of curative care. However, they are an important group in terms of public health, because a basis for good health in later life is created in the teenage years. Good health in teenagers is also important for education, relationships and employment, and their health has an influence on the health of the next generation. Child and adolescent healthcare plays an important part in preventive care for teenagers. Better cooperation and exchange of information between paediatricians, specialists in child and adolescent healthcare and general practitioners are important in order to optimise care for teenagers.

  9. Does the economy affect teenage substance use?

    PubMed

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    This research examines how teenage drug and alcohol use responds to changes in the economy. In contrast to the recent literature confirming pro-cyclical alcohol use among adults, this research offers strong evidence that a weaker economy leads to greater teenage marijuana and hard-drug use and some evidence that a weaker economy also leads to higher teenage alcohol use. The findings are based on logistic models with state and year fixed effects, using teenagers from the NLSY-1997. The evidence also indicates that teenagers are more likely to sell drugs in weaker economies. This suggests one mechanism for counter-cyclical drug use - that access to illicit drugs is easier when the economy is weaker. These results also suggest that the strengthening economy in the 1990s mitigated what would otherwise have been much larger increases in teenage drug use.

  10. Teenage Parent Coping Skills. [Teenage Parent Program] Annual Report--FY 87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owensboro Public Schools, KY.

    In an attempt to deal with teenage pregnancy, the Owensboro, Kentucky, City School System operated the Teenage Parent Program, an inner-city program for pregnant teenagers from all schools in Daviess County. A "Coping Skills Project" was designed to enhance this program by improving parenting attitudes and skills, increasing career awareness, and…

  11. Building Self-Sufficiency among Welfare-Dependent Teenage Parents: Lessons from the Teenage Parent Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Rebecca, Ed.

    This report synthesizes first-phase evaluation results of the Teenage Parent Demonstration program. This program, whose cornerstone is case management, responded to three concerns: (1) rising welfare caseloads; (2) persistently high rates of teenage pregnancies and births; and (3) the high probability that teenage parents will go onto welfare and…

  12. Pueblo Girls: Growing Up in Two Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Marcia

    This book portrays San Ildefonso Pueblo on the east bank of the Rio Grande river in New Mexico through the lives of Sonja, age 10, and her sister Desiree, age 8. Growing up in San Ildefonso Pueblo, the girls enjoy the same activities as other American girls, such as basketball, cheerleading, playing video games, and sending e-mail. But they also…

  13. Sex, Power, and the Violent School Girl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artz, Sibylle

    This book examines the worlds and practices of school girls who participate in violent activities, but who are not involved with the juvenile justice system, members of gangs, or a visible minority group. It provides an understanding of where the violent school girl stands in relation to her nonviolent female peers, and her violent and nonviolent…

  14. Jessie, a Girl with Two Moms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Danné E.

    2016-01-01

    "The Jessie Books" are a seven-book series complete with a dedicated website. Each book features a 5-year-old girl named Jessie who happens to live in a city with her two moms. Each book features Jessie as an ordinary young girl engaging in familiar, life-enriching activities. Across "The Jessie Books," the community of…

  15. Developing the Girl as a Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hembrow-Beach, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Single-sex educational environments can create young women who are engaged, active leaders. Girls receive differential treatment in combined-sex education environments. Girls often do not receive the encouragement or instruction to assume leadership. I want to identify the elements of single-sex education that foster female leadership and consider…

  16. USAID Adolescent Girl Strategy Implementation Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Agency for International Development, 2016

    2016-01-01

    USAID's commitment to empowering adolescent girls to reach their full potential is reflected in the Agency's larger efforts to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. The Agency holds decades of experience leading advances for greater gender equality and empowerment that benefit adolescent girls; however, these activities have not been…

  17. Reading Girls: Living Literate and Powerful Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettis, Pam; Roe, Mary F.

    2008-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors merge two bodies of previously separated scholarship: (1) a socio-cultural understanding of adolescent girls in light of the shifting meaning of ideal girlhood, and (2) the participation and success of adolescent girls in school-based literacy activities. They apply these fields of inquiry to explore the…

  18. Overweight and obese adolescent girls: the importance of promoting sensible eating and activity behaviors from the start of the adolescent period.

    PubMed

    Todd, Alwyn S; Street, Steven J; Ziviani, Jenny; Byrne, Nuala M; Hills, Andrew P

    2015-02-17

    The adolescent period is associated with changes in eating and activity behaviors in girls. Less reliance on parental provision and choice of food, coupled with a decrease in participation in physical activity and sport, can create an energy imbalance, predisposing to weight gain. Physiological alterations to body composition, reduction in insulin sensitivity, and psychological adjustments may further amplify the risk of becoming overweight and maintaining an unhealthy level of body fat into childbearing years. During pregnancy excess body fat is a risk factor for poor pregnancy outcomes and may predispose an infant to a lifelong heightened risk of being overweight and developing chronic disease. Interventions aimed at preventing the accumulation of body fat in adolescent girls and young women may have far reaching impact and be critically important in reducing intergenerational weight gain. Lifestyle interventions in adolescence have the potential to modify adult obesity risk by switching at-risk individuals from a high to lower obesity risk trajectory. This paper discusses multiple approaches to assist at-risk individuals reduce obesity risk. A key focus is placed on engagement in food preparation and choice, and opportunities for physical activity and sport. Support, education, and opportunity at home and at school, are often associated with the success of lifestyle interventions, and may enable adolescents to make positive choices, and engage in health promoting behaviors during adolescence and childbearing years.

  19. Overweight and Obese Adolescent Girls: The Importance of Promoting Sensible Eating and Activity Behaviors from the Start of the Adolescent Period

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Alwyn S.; Street, Steven J.; Ziviani, Jenny; Byrne, Nuala M.; Hills, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    The adolescent period is associated with changes in eating and activity behaviors in girls. Less reliance on parental provision and choice of food, coupled with a decrease in participation in physical activity and sport, can create an energy imbalance, predisposing to weight gain. Physiological alterations to body composition, reduction in insulin sensitivity, and psychological adjustments may further amplify the risk of becoming overweight and maintaining an unhealthy level of body fat into childbearing years. During pregnancy excess body fat is a risk factor for poor pregnancy outcomes and may predispose an infant to a lifelong heightened risk of being overweight and developing chronic disease. Interventions aimed at preventing the accumulation of body fat in adolescent girls and young women may have far reaching impact and be critically important in reducing intergenerational weight gain. Lifestyle interventions in adolescence have the potential to modify adult obesity risk by switching at-risk individuals from a high to lower obesity risk trajectory. This paper discusses multiple approaches to assist at-risk individuals reduce obesity risk. A key focus is placed on engagement in food preparation and choice, and opportunities for physical activity and sport. Support, education, and opportunity at home and at school, are often associated with the success of lifestyle interventions, and may enable adolescents to make positive choices, and engage in health promoting behaviors during adolescence and childbearing years. PMID:25690003

  20. The physical self in motion: within-person change and associations of change in self-esteem, physical self-concept, and physical activity in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Magnus; Asci, Hulya; Crocker, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of within-person change, and associations of change, in global self-esteem (GSE), physical self-perceptions (PSP), and physical activity in a sample of 705 Canadian adolescent girls over three measurements points and 24 months. The Physical Self-Perceptions Profile (PSPP) was used to measure GSE and PSP, and the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A) was used to assess physical activity. Latent growth curve models were used to analyze the data. All PSP variables except for body attractiveness demonstrated significant average decline, but also significant was the change in between-person heterogeneity. Change in GSE and PSP was moderately to strongly related on a between-person level and weakly to moderately associated on a within-person level. Change in physical activity was related to change in the majority of the PSP variables but not to change in GSE.

  1. Preventing Illegitimate Teenage Pregnancy Through Systems Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    Social workers, Cooperating with doctors, nurses, hospital social workers and educators in other helping systems, conducted a demonstration project described here, aimed at preventing illegitimate teenage pregnancy. (Author)

  2. Teenage parents and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J

    1996-06-18

    Teenage parents are cast into adult roles before the role experimentation and identity development tasks of middle adolescence can be completed. Understanding the etiology of this social problem requires an ecological perspective encompassing individual characteristics, person-context variables, and societal factors such as race and social class. Risk factors identified in the literature on adolescent pregnancy in the US include: absence of a future orientation or aspirations, lack of assertiveness and interpersonal skills to control physical intimacy, low socioeconomic status and minority group membership, growing up in a single-parent family, a history of sexual abuse, five or more siblings, a sister or friend who became a teenage mother, lax parental supervision of dating and free time, low self-esteem, and dropping out or failing in school. The limited data on adolescent fathers suggest they have histories of substance use, delinquency, failure to graduate from high school, financial difficulty, and exposure to family violence. The offspring of adolescent parents show a higher incidence of developmental delays and mild mental retardation than children of adults and are at increased risk of child abuse and neglect. Teen parents raised in dysfunctional families tend to perpetuate destructive methods of child rearing and have unrealistic, age-inappropriate expectations for infants and toddlers. Teenage parents' lack of competence can be mitigated, however, by positive living arrangements, a supportive family of origin, peer support groups, quality child care, school-based services, and accurate information about parenting and child development.

  3. Parent's Guide to Girls' Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutko, Thomas

    This pamphlet provides guidelines for parents in encouraging their daughters to participate in and enjoy athletic activities. Brief discussions are presented on: (1) the value of sport; (2) girls' needs at different age levels; (3) guidelines for supportive behavior; (4) special needs of the female athlete; (5) parent/child/coach relationship; (6)…

  4. Anthropometric predictors of low birth weight outcome in teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maso, M J; Gong, E J; Jacobson, M S; Bross, D S; Heald, F P

    1988-05-01

    The highest relative risks of low birth weight are found among births to teenage mothers. An analysis of anthropometrics (weight, mid-arm circumference, and triceps skinfold) among black teenagers attending an adolescent prenatal program was studied. The sample consisted of 100 girls under 17 years. Data were collected from 19 to 35 weeks gestation. Adolescent mothers who delivered low birth weight (LBW) infants demonstrated different patterns of anthropometric changes than teen mothers who delivered normal birth weight (NBW) infants. Mean mid-arm circumference increases in the LBW group (0.05 mm/wk) were significantly less than mean increases in the NBW group (0.80 mm/wk) (p less than 0.05). Arm fat area estimates of the LBW mothers demonstrated weekly depletion (-24.9 mm2/wk), which was significantly less than those of the NBW group, who accumulated fat (+15.3 mm2/wk) (p less than .05). Changes in maternal nutritional status may in part mediate the birthweight outcome in adolescent pregnancy. Anthropometrics may be useful in predicting those teens at highest risk of bearing LBW infants.

  5. Epidemiologic profile and triggering factors of voluntary poisoning in teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Nistor, Nicolai; Jitareanu, Cristina; Frasinariu, Otilia Elena; Ciomaga, Irina Mihaela; Rugina, Aniela Luminita; Streanga, Violeta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Self-poisoning is an important medical and social problem in adolescents. We performed an observational cross-sectional retrospective study on a group of 219 adolescents admitted for voluntary intoxications at “St. Mary” Children's Emergency Hospital, Iasi during 1 year period. Epidemiological aspects and triggering factors have been analyzed. Data collected from the patients’ files were centralized in an SPSS 18.0 database and processed with confidence interval of 95%. We found that pharmaceutical drugs have been usually involved (34.7%), mostly in girls (56.3% vs. 15.5%; P = 0.0001). The most frequently cited reason for poisoning was family conflict, with a relative risk (RR) 1.43 times higher in girls, as well as scholar conflict (RR = 1.39). A great percentage of the monitored girls presented severe depression (23.3% vs. 6.9%; P = 0.001), with an RR more than 3 times higher than in the case of boys. All cases evolved favorably, no death having been recorded, even if 18 teenagers initially presented an extremely serious condition, being admitted in various stages of coma (Glasgow coma scale score < 8). We found that self-inflicted poisonings with pharmaceutical drugs was more common in girls and the use of drug and alcohol intoxication was found especially in boys. The most common pharmaceutical drug involved in self-poisoning was acetaminophen. Psychological disorders and family or school conflicts are the most important triggering factors of voluntary poisoning. Risk factors should be identified after stabilizing the patient, and actions should be taken in order to prevent a fatal recurrence. PMID:28151858

  6. All-Girls Adventure Programmes: What Are the Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, Anja; Mack, Erica Nixon; Budbill, Nadine W.; McKenney, Priscilla

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the benefits of all-girls adventure programmes from the perspective of adolescent girls. Participants included 361 girls aged 10-17 years from diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds who completed a variety of adventure programmes. Adventure activities included rock climbing, sea kayaking, mountaineering, backpacking,…

  7. Teenagers with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) poisoning.

    PubMed

    Spina, Sean P; Taddei, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    We report 2 cases of teenagers who were poisoned with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) and presented to the emergency department with a severe acute anticholinergic toxidrome after ingestion of several hundred seeds. The patients presented with visual hallucinations, disorientation, incomprehensible and nonsensical speech, and dilated sluggish pupils. Both patients required restraints for combativeness until adequate sedation with lorazepam and haloperidol was achieved. Jimson weed is found in southern Canada and the United States and can cause acute anticholinergic poisoning and death in humans and animals. The treatment of choice for anticholinergic poisoning is mainly supportive care and gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal. Jimson weed intoxication should be considered in cases of patients presenting with unexplained peripheral and central anticholinergic symptoms including delirium, agitation and seizures, especially among younger patients and partygoers. It is important that health care professionals recognize that Jimson weed is a toxic, indigenous, "wild" growing plant, subject to misuse and potentially serious intoxication requiring hospitalization.

  8. New Literacies Practices of Teenage "Twitter" Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This study is an empirical study into the new literacy practices of five teenage "Twitter" users on Twitter. Qualitative methods were used to describe the most prominent ways of participating on "Twitter." Results indicate that teenagers used "Twitter" for self-expression, communication, friendship maintenance, and…

  9. Teaching the At-Risk Teenage Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    While all teenage behavior and character traits can be challenging, the issues facing the at-risk teenager are particularly thorny. Anger, aggression, and a lack of good decision-making may happen on a minute-to-minute basis, as teachers try to guide these young adults. Unlocking the key to keeping them in school and facilitating proficiency in…

  10. Teenage Sexual Health Needs: Asking the Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Carolyn; Allan, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In response to rising prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) among teenagers, this study was designed to examine teenage perceptions of sex education, access to services, and attitudes relevant to STI. Design/methodology/approach: A focus group study was conducted in three schools to discuss the sexual health needs of…

  11. Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

    During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

  12. Teenagers' Attitudes Toward the Hometown Daily Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Laurence R.

    To determine the attitudes of teenagers toward their hometown newspapers was the purpose of this study. A four-page questionnaire in which students compared the local newspaper with other news media and expressed their attitudes on statements about this newspaper was answered by 887 teenagers. Tentative conclusions indicated that the students felt…

  13. Special Sitters: Teenage Respite Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Penny; Legaz, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Camp Fire's Special Sitters Project addresses the need for respite care experienced by parents of disabled children. The project trains teenagers to care for young handicapped children and links the teenagers with parents who call for babysitting service. The project has been successfully replicated in five communities. (Author/JDD)

  14. Pregnant Teenagers' Knowledge of Infant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Ann S.

    This study investigated pregnant teenagers' knowledge about infant development during the period of their pregnancy. The sample consisted of 98 teenagers between 14 and 19 years old who were pregnant with their first child; all were planning to keep their babies. The group was approximately 50% black and 50% white, 50% middle class and 50% working…

  15. Teenage Mothering: Child Development at Five Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Developmental outcome was compared in 1,031 Singleton children of teenage mothers and 10,950 Singleton children of older mothers. Children born to teenage mothers and living with them through the first five years of life performed less well than other children in tests of vocabulary and behavior, were shorter on the average, and had smaller head…

  16. The Shopping Mall: A Teenager Hangout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kathryn H.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated teenagers' use of the shopping mall as a "hangout" through interviews with 51 adolescents using the mall, and 10 hours of behavioral observations. Results indicated that many teenagers visit the shopping center regularly to watch members of the opposite sex, play video games, see friends, shop, and people-watch. (Author/NRB)

  17. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  18. Preventing Teenage Pregnancies in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helge, Doris

    Two-thirds of all schools in the United States are rural and three-fourths are small. Statistically, most teenage parents are from such school systems. Yet the problem of teenage pregnancy is most frequently overlooked by rural and small school communities. In fact, some cultural factors and resource deficiencies of these communities actually…

  19. Teenage Pregnancy: A Critical Family Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott (C.S.) Foundation, Flint, MI.

    The Mott Foundation has been involved with the issue of teenage pregnancy for 15 years, and has supported a network of programs with the main objective of finding new ways to deal with the negative consequences of teenage pregnancy. This report, which reflects the Foundation's perspective, is divided into six sections. The first provides an…

  20. The biopsychosocial aspects of unwanted teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Suzanne J

    Unwanted teenage pregnancy is a major health problem in Wales and perioperative nurses are frequently involved in caring for teenagers undergoing surgical termination of pregnancy. By providing such adolescents with holistic care--by taking into account both biological and psychological aspects of health--nurses can help reduce an adolescent's anxiety and pain.

  1. Intensification of the phenomenon of violence in the family environment of teenagers.

    PubMed

    Latalski, Maciej; Skórzyńska, Hanna; Pacian, Anna; Sokół, Marlena

    2004-01-01

    Childhood and adolescence are the periods of life when the experience of violence accumulates. As socially weaker individuals, children and teenagers are exposed to violence. The factors that increase the risk of child maltreatment include, above all, social and cultural factors and the stress that family suffer from. The literature on this subject distinguishes four categories of child maltreatment, namely: emotional, physical, negligence and sexual abuse. The survey involved 250 representatives of high school teenagers aged 15-20, including 145 girls and 105 boys. The research method was the survey estimating the Scale of Battered Child Syndrome (for teenagers and adults). The results show that a big group of teenagers admitted to having experienced at least one of four kinds of domestic violence. The group is not uniform, however, and the socio-cultural factors that affect the kind and intensification of the phenomenon of violence have been revealed. The most frequent reasons for using violence are: low level of education, unemployment of parents and material status connected with this fact, low frequency of attendance to religious services, alcohol abuse, and place of living. On account of the intensification of the phenomenon of violence in the domestic environment and both direct and distant consequences of the phenomenon in the form of mental and physical disorders of individuals as well as the dangers for the proper development of the society that result from it, there is a need to continue doing research on this phenomenon.

  2. Motivation for eating behaviour in adolescent girls: the body beautiful.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J

    2006-11-01

    Body dissatisfaction is commonplace for teenage girls and is associated with dieting and unhealthy weight-control behaviours. The idealisation and pursuit of thinness are seen as the main drivers of body dissatisfaction, with the media prominent in setting thin body ideals. Television and consumer magazine production in the UK are extensive, annually releasing 1x10(6) h programming and >3000 magazine titles. Their engagement by adolescent girls is high, and in surveys girls identify thin and revealing body images as influential to the appeal of thinness and their pursuit of dieting. Experimental studies show a short-term impact of these images on body dissatisfaction, especially in teenagers who are already concerned about body image. Magazine images appear more influential than television viewing. For many adolescents selecting thin-image media is purposive, permitting comparison of themselves with the models or celebrities featured. Indeed, the impact of the media needs to be understood within a social context, as engagement is often a highly-social process. Media influence is uneven because of differences in its content and manner of communication, and individual differences in vulnerability to its content. Greater social responsibility on the part of the media and better media literacy by children would be beneficial. For those working in adolescent nutrition it is a reminder that adolescent food choice and intake are subject to many competing, contradictory and non-health-related determinants.

  3. [Vulvovaginitis in young girls].

    PubMed

    Olejek, Anita; Kellas-Sleczka, Sylwia; Kozak-Darmas, Iwona; Bilska, Anna; Zamłyński, Jacek; Horak, Stanisław; Nowak, Leszek

    2009-12-01

    Vulvovaginitis is the most common cause of gynecological complaints in young girls. Factors which cause vulvovaginitis include, among other things, low level of sexual hormones (hypoestrogenism), the anatomical proximity of the rectum and delicate vulvar skin and vaginal mucosa. Usually vulvovaginitis in young girls is caused by non-specific factors. The aim of the study was to present the most frequent causes of vulvovaginitis in young girls.

  4. "Just Be Friends": Exposing the Limits of Educational Bully Discourses for Understanding Teen Girls' Heterosexualized Friendships and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    The present paper explores the conceptual limitations of the bully discourses that ground UK anti-bullying policy frameworks and psychological research literatures on school bullying, suggesting they largely ignore gender, (hetero)sexuality and the social, cultural and subjective dynamics of conflict and aggression among teen-aged girls. To…

  5. Preparing Girls To Care for Self and Families Project. Annual Report: July 1, 1988-June 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owensboro Public Schools, KY.

    A Preparing Girls Project was incorporated into the Teenage Parent Program, which had been in operation in the Owensboro (Kentucky) City School System since August 1961. It was intended to produce more capable single teen mothers who would be more likely to finish their education and join the labor force. The assessment instruments were reworked…

  6. Preparing Girls To Care for Self and Families Project. Annual Report July 1, 1989-June 30, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teenage Parent Program, Owensboro, KY.

    A "Parenting Girls Project" was operated within the Teenage Parent Program in the Owensboro City School System, Kentucky. Objectives involved continuation and expansion strategies: raising student assessment scores in parenting attitudes on the Performance and Attitudinal Scale (PAS), increasing student assessment scores in career…

  7. Views of teenagers on termination of pregnancy at Muyexe high school in Mopani District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lebese, Tsakani R.; Maputle, Sonto M.; Mulaudzi, Lindiwe

    2016-01-01

    Background Teenage pregnancy is a global social health concern especially because of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, sexually transmitted infections, high rate of termination of pregnancy (TOP), adolescents’ parenthood and decreased level of contraceptives. Aim To explore the views of teenagers on the TOP at Muyexe high school in a rural village of Mopani District, Limpopo Province. Setting Muyexe high school in a rural village of Mopani District, Limpopo Province, in South Africa. Methodology A qualitative method using explorative and descriptive designs was used to find in-depth description and understanding of teenagers’ views on TOP. The target population was girls aged 15–19 years at Muyexe high school in Mopani District. Non-probability, convenient sampling was used to select high school teenage girls who had undergone TOP for the study. Data were collected using individual self-report technique (interview). Tesch’s eight steps of qualitative data analysis were used. Measures to ensure trustworthiness and ethical considerations were observed. Results Two major themes were revealed: (1) Views of teenagers regarding TOP (poverty, relationship problems and single parenthood, negative impact on the teen’s life while attending school) and (2) teenager’s fears regarding pregnancy (stigma, fear of parents and friends, rape and incest and fear of giving birth). Conclusion Majority of participants had knowledge about TOP; some had experiences about TOP while others held inadequate knowledge. Recommendations were based on the findings by teaching dangers of TOP and various contraceptive methods to prevent unwanted pregnancies and TOP. PMID:27380849

  8. No Loitering: Some Ideas about Small Town Teenage Hangouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Herb

    1993-01-01

    Describes what goes on in teenage hangouts and why hangouts are important in providing a social meeting place for teenagers. Discusses physical features that make hangouts attractive, how small communities can effectively manage teenage hangouts, and how teenage hangouts encourage social development including developing a sense of community. (LP)

  9. Naturalistic Assessment of Novice Teenage Crash Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suzanne E.; Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, Sheila E.; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crash risk is highest during the first months after licensure. Current knowledge about teenagers’ driving exposure and the factors increasing their crash risk is based on self-reported data and crash database analyses. While these research tools are useful, new developments in naturalistic technologies have allowed researchers to examine newly-licensed teenagers’ exposure and crash risk factors in greater detail. The Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study (NTDS) described in this paper is the first study to follow a group of newly-licensed teenagers continuously for 18 months after licensure. The goals of this paper are to compare the crash and near-crash experience of drivers in the NTDS to national trends, to describe the methods and lessons learned in the NTDS, and to provide initial data on driving exposure for these drivers. Methods A data acquisition system was installed in the vehicles of 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers 16 years of age during their first 18 months of independent driving. It consisted of cameras, sensors (accelerometers, GPS, yaw, front radar, lane position, and various sensors obtained via the vehicle network), and a computer with removable hard drive. Data on the driving of participating parents was also collected when they drove the instrumented vehicle. Findings The primary findings after 18 months included the following: (1) crash and near-crash rates among teenage participants were significantly higher during the first six months of the study than the final 12 months, mirroring the national trends; (2) crash and near-crash rates were significantly higher for teenage than adult (parent) participants, also reflecting national trends; (3) teenaged driving exposure averaged between 507-710 kilometers (315-441 miles) per month over the study period, but varied substantially between participants with standard errors representing 8-14 percent of the mean; and (4) crash and near-crash types were very similar for male and female

  10. An atypical limping teenager.

    PubMed

    Liegeois, Claire; Stewart, Charles

    2015-08-14

    A 13-year-old boy presented with a 5-day history of left-sided limp of gradual onset. There was no history of trauma. He developed a fever and rigours a few days before presenting to the paediatric emergency department. On examination, he was tender on palpating the left gluteal area on active mobilisation of the left hip and could not weight bear on the left leg. Pelvic X-rays and ultrasound of the left hip were normal. The blood results showed raised inflammatory markers and normal white cell count. The blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. On day 2, a left hip MRI was performed as well as CT-guided drainage. Diagnosis of left sacroiliac septic arthritis was made. After an initial lack of improvement under intravenous ceftriaxone, a drain was inserted and left in situ for 8 days with double intravenous antibiotic therapy instituted. The patient made a full recovery.

  11. Listen to the Voices of Unwed Teenage Mothers in Malaysian Shelter Homes: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saim, Nor Jana; Dufåker, Mona; Eriksson, Malin; Ghazinour, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research aims to explore the daily life experiences of Malaysian unwed teenage mothers in shelter homes. The research is based on the thematic analysis of interviews with seventeen respondents aged from 12 to 18 years. Eight sub-themes described the experience of the unwed teenage mothers in the shelter home and led to three overall themes: rules and regulations, relationship with the staff and relationship with the other girls at the shelter home. The findings indicated that the shelter homes involved were not fulfilling the standard of the Malaysian national laws and United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. We strongly suggest that the authorities provide a clear guideline concerning the implementation of Malaysian national laws and United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. PMID:23985103

  12. The sleepy teenager - diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Engström, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sleepy teenager puts the doctor in a, often tricky, situation where it must be decided if we deal with normal physiology or if we should suspect pathological conditions. What medical investigations are proper to consider? What differential diagnoses should be considered in the first place? And what tools do we actually have? The symptoms and problems that usually are presented at the clinical visit can be both of medical and psychosocial character - and actually they are often a mixture of both. Subsequently, the challenge to investigate the sleepy teenager often includes the examination of a complex behavioral pattern. It is important to train and develop diagnostic skills and to realize that the physiological or pathological conditions that can cause the symptoms may have different explanations. Research in sleep disorders has shown different pathological mechanisms congruent with the variations in the clinical picture. There are probably also different patterns of involved neuronal circuits although common pathways may exist. The whole picture remains to be drawn in this interesting and challenging area.

  13. A 3-year physical activity intervention program increases the gain in bone mineral and bone width in prepubertal girls but not boys: the prospective copenhagen school child interventions study (CoSCIS).

    PubMed

    Hasselstrøm, H A; Karlsson, M K; Hansen, S E; Grønfeldt, V; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing the amount of time spent in physical education classes on bone mineral accrual and gain in bone size in prepubertal Danish children. A total of 135 boys and 108 girls, aged 6-8 years, were included in a school-based curriculum intervention program where the usual time spent in physical education classes was doubled to four classes (180 min) per week. The control group comprised age-matched children (62 boys and 76 girls) recruited from a separate community who completed the usual Danish school curriculum of physical activity (90 min/week). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (g/cm(2)), and bone width at the calcaneus and distal forearm before and after 3 years of intervention. Anthropometrics and Tanner stages were evaluated on the same occasions. General physical activity was measured with an accelerometer worn for 4 days. In girls, the intervention group had a 12.5% increase (P = 0.04) in distal forearm BMC and a 13.2% increase (P = 0.005) in distal forearm scanned area compared with girls in the control group. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups in boys. Increasing the frequency of physical education classes for prepubertal children is associated with a higher accrual of bone mineral and higher gain in bone size after 3 years in girls but not in boys.

  14. A teenager with uncontrolled hypertension: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Takayasu Arteritis is a vasculitis occurring mostly in young females which may present in diverse ways. Here we report a teenager with Takayasu Arteritis who presented with uncontrolled hypertension. This case depicts an atypical presentation of this disease where the girl visited many physicians for controlling the level of hypertension and put a diagnostic dilemma about the underlying etiology of young hypertension. Case presentation A 13 year old girl presented with epistaxis, persistent headache and uncontrolled hypertension. Her clinical examination revealed normal radial, very feeble femoral and absent other lower limb pulses. There was a blood pressure discrepancy of 50/40 mm of Hg between two arms. There were bruits over multiple areas including the abdominal aorta. She had features of left ventricular hypertrophy. Her Arch aortogram showed hugely dilated arch of aorta which became abruptly normal just after origin of left subclavian artery. There was ostio-proximal stenosis of right bracheocephalic artery, left common carotid and left subclavian artery with post stenotic dilatation of all the vessels. Abdominal aortogram revealed critical stenosis of abdominal aorta above the origin of renal arteries with a pressure gradient of 80/11 mm of Hg. Conclusion Takayasu’s Arteritis should also be kept in mind while searching for the cause of uncontrolled hypertension in the young age group. PMID:23194278

  15. The obstetric implications of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Ho, L F

    1997-10-01

    A retrospective review was performed on the obstetric outcome of teenage pregnancies delivered in 1 year in a tertiary centre. The results were compared with the rest of the obstetric population in the same hospital in the same year. The teenage mothers (n = 194) had increased incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (5.2 versus 1.0%, P < 0.05), and preterm labour (13.0 versus 7.0%, P < 0.01), but decreased incidence of gestational glucose intolerance (3.1 versus 11.4%, P < 0.001), when compared with the non-teenage mothers (n = 4914). There was no difference in the types of labour, while the incidence of Caesarean section was lower (4.1 versus 12.6%, P < 0.001) in the teenage mothers. Although the incidence of low birthweight was higher in the teenage mothers (13.5 versus 6.5%, P < 0.001), there was no significant difference in the mean birthweight, gestation at delivery, incidence of total preterm delivery, or perinatal mortality or morbidity. The results indicate that the major risk associated with teenage pregnancies is preterm labour, but the perinatal outcome is favourable. The good results accomplished in our centre could be attributed to the free and readily available prenatal care and the quality of support from the family or welfare agencies that are involved with the care of teenage mothers.

  16. Girls Leading Outward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Heather; Reyes, Jazmin; Moceri, Dominic C.; Morana, Laura; Elias, Maurice J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a program implemented in Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey to help at-risk, minority middle school girls realize their leadership potential. The GLO (Girls Leading Outward) program was developed by the Developing Safe and Civil Schools Project at Rutgers University and is facilitated by university students. Selected middle…

  17. Puberty in girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... hips and breasts than when you were a little girl. Expect Lots of Body Changes Your body makes ... wonder when you will get your period. Usually girls get their period about 2 years after their ... (this is what could happen with unprotected sex), the egg may plant itself into this uterus ...

  18. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  19. Protecting Black Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Monique W.

    2016-01-01

    Statistics show that black girls in U.S. K-12 public schools are overrepresented among students who face disciplinary approaches (such as suspensions) that exclude or even criminalize them. Morris explains how black girls face conditions that make them vulnerable to a phenomenon she calls "school to confinement pathways"--conditions like…

  20. [Caring for teenagers with anorexia].

    PubMed

    Lapp, Aymeric

    2015-04-01

    Anorexia mainly affects young girls, although more and more boys and adults are also concerned. The consequences of eating disorders have a significant impact on young people's health. Nurses play a key role in the therapeutic contract set up during the hospital treatment.

  1. [Some features of teenage beer alcoholism combined with hashish addiction].

    PubMed

    Pogosov, A V; Anosova, E V

    2010-01-01

    Sixty male teenagers with beer alcoholism combined with hashish addiction were examined. The beer consumption was promoted by drinking customs existing in the microsociety, curiosity, pressure of other people, the existing opinion on harmlessness of beer and its availability. In all cases, subjects began to use hashish after the development of beer alcoholism. Peculiarities of combined pathologies were as follows: one disease (beer alcoholism) created conditions for the development of another one (hashish addiction); the polymorphism of clinical symptoms (the syndrome of addiction included symptoms of both diseases); reciprocity of these diseases. Psychosensory disorders played a central role in clinical presentations of mixed intoxication. There was the increase of tolerance to hashish while the amount of consumed beer remained stable. Symptoms characteristic of dependence of both psychoactive substances were present in the clinical presentations of the syndrome. Mental disorders (dysphoric signs) were observed more frequently in the abstinent syndrome in the combined beer and hashish reception. Personality changes in teenagers promoted criminal activity.

  2. Leadership Workshops for Adult Girl Scout Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; McCarthy, Donald; DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Reaching Stars Team

    2016-10-01

    This year, the University of Arizona is conducting its first two Leadership Workshops for Girl Scout adult leaders. These workshops are being supported by a five-year NASA Collaborative Agreement, Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts (www.seti.org/GirlScoutStars), through the SETI Institute in collaboration with the University of Arizona, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), the Girl Scouts of Northern California, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Aries Scientific, Inc. These workshops are an outgrowth of Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout Leaders, a 14-year "Train the Trainer" program funded by NASA through the James Webb Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) education and outreach team. We are continuing our long-term relationship with all Girl Scout Councils to engage girls and young women not only in science and math education, but also in the astronomical and technological concepts relating to NASA's scientific mission. Our training aligns with the GSUSA Journey: It's Your Planet-Love It! and introduces participants to some of the activities that are being developed by the Girl Scout Stars team for GSUSA's new space science badges for all Girl Scout levels being developed as a part of Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts.The workshops include hands-on activities in basic astronomy (night sky, stars, galaxies, optics, telescopes, etc.) as well as some more advanced concepts such as lookback time and the expansion of the Universe. Since the inception of our original Astronomy Camp in 2003, our team has grown to include nearly 280 adult leaders, staff, and volunteers from over 79 Councils in 43 states and the District of Columbia so they can, in turn, teach young women essential concepts in astronomy, the night sky environment, applied math, and engineering. Our workshops model what astronomers do by engaging participants in the process of science inquiry, while equipping adults to host astronomy-related programs with

  3. Effects of a 12-Week Physical Activity Protocol Delivered by YMCA After-School Counselors (Youth Fit for Life) on Fitness and Self-Efficacy Changes in 5-12-Year-Old Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Westcott, Wayne L.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Unruh, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address reduced physical education (PE) in elementary schools, a 12-week physical activity protocol was tested on 5-12-year-old, primarily African American, girls (n = 226) and boys (n = 344) at 14 YMCA after-school care sites. The 3 times/week, 45-min session curriculum included cardiovascular, resistance, and flexibility training, in which…

  4. Teenage mothers and their infants.

    PubMed

    Badger, E

    1985-06-01

    The outcomes of the IS/MT pilot project and the expanded services program as well as program replications in other geographic areas suggest that efforts to support the teenage mother in the care of her firstborn infant can have a demonstrable effect. Completing school, securing employment, going off welfare, and acting on a decision to prevent subsequent unwanted pregnancies were all secondary effects of a 20-week postnatal mother-infant class program designed to positively influence infant development. Similar treatment effects have been reported by IS/MT replications in St. Louis and Genesee County, Michigan. Other program innovations, however, lacking the funds and/or the expertise to conduct adequate evaluations, are nonetheless significant because they provide a groundswell capable of establishing a climate for social change. At the community level, this is expressed in the creation of new service paradigms, as in Norfolk and Memphis, where individuals and agencies are transformed and experiment with new solutions to thorny problems. At the national level, it is expressed in coalitions and political alliances around a single issue, as with the Children's Defense Fund and adolescent and single-parent families. As one who has spent almost 20 years addressing the consequences of teenage parenthood, it is heartening to know that the time is near to address the prevention of the problem. Let us hope that the Children's Defense Fund agenda accurately reflects the beliefs and feelings of the majority of our citizenry and that our national priorities will change to include the reduction of teen pregnancy and teen parenthood.

  5. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  6. Girl prostitution in India.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K K

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the nature, magnitude, causes, and consequences of female child prostitution in India and offers measures for control and prevention of girl prostitution. Data are obtained from the 6-city study of prostitution and the author's own research. An estimated 85% of all prostitutes in Calcutta and Delhi entered the work at an early age. The numbers are rising. The promotion of tourism is linked with prostitution. Girl prostitutes are primarily located in low-middle income areas and business districts and are known by officials. Brothel keepers regularly recruit young girls. An estimated 33% of prostitutes are young girls. In Bangalore, Calcutta, Delhi, and Hyderabad, there are an estimated 10,000 girl prostitutes. UNICEF estimates about 300,000 child prostitutes. Girl prostitutes are grouped as common prostitutes, singers and dancers, call girls, religious prostitutes or devdasi, and caged brothel prostitutes. Religious prostitutes are mainly found in the South. Caged ones are found in Bombay. A little over 50% of prostitutes come from other countries, such as Nepal and Bangladesh. The girls tend to come from urban slums and poor rural areas. High prostitute supply regions include Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, and West Bengel states. About 85% are Hindus, and about 66% are from scheduled castes and tribes. Bangalore and Bombay have a higher proportion of girl prostitutes. The causes of prostitution include ill treatment by parents, bad company, family prostitutes, social customs, inability to arrange marriage, lack of sex education, media, prior incest and rape, early marriage and desertion, lack of recreational facilities, ignorance, and acceptance of prostitution. Economic causes include poverty and economic distress. Psychological causes include desire for physical pleasure, greed, and dejection. Most enter involuntarily. A brief profile is given of the life of a prostitute.

  7. Engaging teenagers productively in service design

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Simon; Sustar, Helena; Wolstenholme, Daniel; Dearden, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Engaging young people in participatory design can be challenging, particularly in health-related projects. In a study co-designing diabetes support and information services with teenagers, we found framing activities using popular culture was a useful strategy. Various cultural references helped us stage activities that were productive for the design process, and were engaging for our young participants (e.g. exploring practical implications through discussions in a ‘Dragons’ Den’). Some activities were more effective than others and the idea of language-games, which has been widely explored in participatory design, explains why our strategy was successful when there was a clear ‘family resemblance’ between the popular cultural references and certain essential stages of designing. However, attention is required in selecting appropriate cultural references if this strategy is adopted elsewhere, and design facilitators should focus first on devising accessible language-games, rather than expecting popular cultural references to provide complete solutions to the challenge of staging participatory design. PMID:26516621

  8. The UPA score and teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garlick, R; Ineichen, B; Hudson, F

    1993-03-01

    Teenage motherhood is often said to be the result of deficient contraceptive and abortion services. Using data from the Public Health Common Data Set (PH CDS) we demonstrate two important effects in a Regional Health Authority: higher rates of conception are related to a live birth rather than an abortion pregnancy outcome; District Health Authorities (DHAs) with high underprivileged area scores (UPA) are more likely to have high rates of conception in the teenage years than those districts with low scores.

  9. Cleft Type, Age, and Sex Differences in Teen-Agers' Ratings of Their Own Behavior, Self-Esteem, and Attitude toward Clefting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip

    1980-01-01

    The behavior, self-esteem, and attitude toward clefting of 94 adolescents being treated at a clinic for oral-facial anomalies and communicative disorders were examined. Younger teenagers were more aggressive, more active, and had more somatic complaints than did the older teenagers. (SBH)

  10. Girls, Cars, and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Beth

    2005-03-01

    For the past two summers, I have run an NSF-funded residential camp for girls ages 14-17. This camp is designed to stimulate girls' interest in science by building on their interest in automobiles. The girls spend half the day in hands-on work with cars at Morrisville State College. The other half of the day is dedicated to laboratory exercises at Colgate University that have been designed to help girls learn the science behind the operation of cars. While it is impossible to assess the long-range impact of this program after only two years, the results seem promising. I will discuss the camp program, with particular emphasis on the laboratory experiments that have been developed, which could easily be incorporated into standard high school or college laboratories.

  11. A Girl Is No Girl Is a Girl_: Girls-Work after Queer Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busche, Mart

    2013-01-01

    This contribution gives an overview over 40 years of girls-work in Germany. It highlights certain topics and theoretical implications and emphasises especially the realisation of queer theory and deconstructivism in the last 10 years. (Contains 4 notes.)

  12. Picture this!: using participatory photo mapping with Hispanic girls.

    PubMed

    Morales-Campos, Daisy Y; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Esparza, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Hispanic girls are burdened with high levels of obesity and are less active than the general adolescent population, highlighting the need for creative strategies developed with community input to improve physical activity behaviors. Involving girls, parents, and the community in the intervention planning process may improve uptake and maintenance of physical activity. The purpose of this article was to describe how we engaged adolescent girls as partners in community-based intervention planning research. We begin with an overview of the research project and then describe how we used Participatory Photo Mapping to engage girls in critical reflection and problems solving.

  13. Outdoor Education in Girl Scouting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Carolyn L.

    This book was written to help Girl Scout leaders prepare themselves and the girls with whom they work to enjoy outdoor experiences together. It complements the age-level handbook and leaders' guide, and training provided by the local Girl Scout council. The book contains nine chapters. The first chapter lists age-level characteristics of girls,…

  14. Using Web-Based Activities to Promote Reading: An Exploratory Study with Teenagers (Uso de actividades en la red para promover la lectura: un estudio exploratorio con adolescentes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rátiva Velandia, Marlén; Pedreros Torres, Andrés Leonardo; Núñez Alí, Mónica

    2012-01-01

    It is considered valuable to take advantage of web activities to improve and qualify the English teaching and learning processes, especially in the promotion of reading comprehension. In this article we share the process and results of a study that focused on some activities based on web materials that were designed and used with 10th grade…

  15. Comparison of peak muscle power between Brazilian and French girls.

    PubMed

    Nanci Maria, França; Eric, Doré; Mario, Bedu; Emmanuel, Van Praagh

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the muscle power of Brazilian circumpubertal girls and extended the analysis to a cross-cultural dimension. A total of 462 children, 123 Brazilian girls and 339 French girls, 9-18 years, participated in this investigation. Anthropometric data included body mass (BM), height, skinfold thicknesses, and estimated lean leg volume (LLV). All subjects completed a physical activity questionnaire. Cycling peak power was measured including the flywheel inertia of the device (CPPi). Brazilian girls self-assessed their maturation using pubic hair development. CPPi and optimal velocity (v(opt) = velocity at CPPi) increased with stages of puberty. A multiple stepwise regression with anthropometric variables as explanatory factors showed only LLV and age explaining the variance of CPPi (R2 = 0.40, P < 0.001). Therefore, 60% of the variance of CPPi in Brazilian girls was related to undetermined qualitative individual factors, which may be related to cycling skill. Even when normalized for anthropometric variables, the anaerobic performance (CPPi and v(opt)) of Brazilian girls was significantly lower than a cohort of French girls. The latter demonstrated a high participation in sport and training activities, while 50% of the Brazilian girls had only physical education classes in the form of regular physical activity. Moreover, most of the Brazilian girls demonstrated an ineffective sprint cycling skill. The data suggest that motor learning is an important issue in muscle power assessment and might, therefore, partially explain peak power differences in Brazilian compared with French girls.

  16. "Girls Are Worse": Drama Queens, Ghetto Girls, Tomboys, and the Meaning of Girl Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses a race-class-gender intersectional approach to analyze qualitative interviews with girls at two public high schools to better understand a common perception that "girls are worse" when it comes to school fights. Several different understandings of why girls fight emerged from the data. On one hand, girls' perception of…

  17. Access to safe and legal abortion for teenage women from deprived backgrounds in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Hung, Suet Lin

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study in 2007-08 on the abortion experiences of teenage women from deprived backgrounds in Hong Kong. Twenty-nine young women aged 13-24 who had undergone one or more induced abortions in their teen years were interviewed and participated in group empowerment sessions. Ten were unemployed, four were students, the rest were employed on low pay in unskilled occupations. Abortion services are legal and available in public and private services, but they charge fees ranging from HK$310 to $10,000, and do abortions only up to 24 weeks of pregnancy. Many young women resort to poor quality illegal clinics and clinics in mainland China because the cost is lower, they do not wish to tell their parents, who would be asked for consent, and/or they want to protect their sex partners, who may be reported and prosecuted if the girl is under-age. There is a need to strengthen services for teenage women in Hong Kong, especially those who are pregnant and from deprived backgrounds. There is also a need for professionals who deliver adolescent health and social welfare services, and for society to rethink and re-examine its views and attitudes towards teenage pregnancy, sexuality and abortion.

  18. Girls Study Girls Inc.: engaging girls in evaluation through participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiyao; Weiss, Faedra Lazar; Nicholson, Heather Johnston

    2010-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2007, Girls Incorporated conducted research about the experience of five affiliates from different parts of the United States as they engaged with girls in Girls Study Girls Inc., a participatory evaluation project that explored the meaning and impact of Girls Inc. environments and uncovered ways such environments can be improved. We describe the context and motivation for using participatory action research [PAR] in Girls Inc. environments and discuss the relevance and importance of PAR for organizations that empower girls and young women. We explain the process of training and engaging Girls Inc. members in research, discuss the effectiveness of Girls Study Girls Inc. as an evaluation strategy, and conclude this article with lessons learned and recommendations for using PAR in evaluating youth development programs.

  19. Positioning Australia's Contemporary Health and Physical Education Curriculum to Address Poor Physical Activity Participation Rates by Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Edwards, Allan; Cudmore, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given the wealth of research identifying how schools are in a strong position to promote physical activity (PA) among children, it would be reasonable to suggest that initial experiences of physical education and school sport are critical factors influencing whether a student will develop a healthy relationship to PA. However, research…

  20. Reducing Teenage Binge Drinking and Drunk Driving on the Reservation: The Pikanii Action Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Still Smoking, Dorothy; Bull Shoe, Debbie Whitegrass

    2012-01-01

    The Pikanii Action Team project addressed the issues of teenage drinking and drunk driving on the Blackfeet Reservation. Basing their actions on locally-generated research, the Pikanii Action Team conducted a series of activities and initiatives to promote public awareness and action related to high-risk activities related to drinking. The team's…

  1. Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Young Black Girls: Relations to Body Fatness and Aerobic Fitness, and Effects of a Randomized Physical Activity Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gutin, Bernard; Harris, Ryan A.; Howe, Cheryl A.; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Zhu, Haidong; Dong, Yanbin

    2011-01-01

    There is little evidence from randomized trials showing that physical activity alone influences biomarker profiles in youths. This study tested two hypotheses: (i) that elevated body fatness and poor fitness would be associated with unfavorable levels of cardiometabolic biomarkers in 8–12-y-old black girls (n = 242) and (ii) that a 10-mo PA intervention would have favorable effects on the fatness-related cardiometabolic biomarkers. At baseline, all fatness indices (i.e., percent body fat, visceral adipose tissue, BMI, and waist circumference) were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with unfavorable levels of insulin, glucose, systolic BP, diastolic BP, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Aerobic fitness was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with favorable levels of insulin, CRP, fibrinogen, and HDL2. The PA intervention had significant and favorable effects on fitness, fatness, and two biomarkers—resting heart rate and LDL cholesterol. More research is needed to clarify what types of interventions can enhance the cardiometabolic health of youths. PMID:22007244

  2. Letting girls speak out about science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dale; Leary, Rosemary

    The purpose of this study was to try to determine what influences girls to choose science. Forty girls were interviewed in Grades 2, 5, 8, 11 using a semistructured protocol. The interview focused on feelings about science, science careers, peer and parental support, and how science is taught. To determine whether their responses were based on gender, each girl was asked to respond to questions as if she were a boy. The girls were highly self-confident and positive about science. All of the girls took a strong equity position and asserted that women can and should do science. The girls liked learning science in an interactive social context rather than participating in activities that isolated them such as independent reading, writing, or note taking. Those who chose science careers were drawn to them because of strong affective experiences with a loved one and a desire to help. The interviews were analyzed through the framework of women's affective and psychological needs.Received: 15 July 1993; Revised: 23 May 1994;

  3. Reflections of Girls in the Media: A Content Analysis. A Study of Television Shows and Commercials, Movies, Music Videos, and Teen Magazine Articles and Ads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Signorielli, Nancy

    A study examined kinds of messages prevalent in the media used by preteen and teenage girls, asking what messages are sent about goals, dating, careers, behavior, and appearance and its relationship to well being. Four media were the subject of the study, which comprised 12 samples from television programs, theatrical films, music videos, and teen…

  4. Focus on Ability: Serving Girls with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Martha E.; Dennison, Martha Jo

    This handbook is designed to introduce adults in Girl Scouting to the rewards, pleasures, and challenges of working with girls who have disabilities. Included in the book are definitions of various disabling conditions, ways in which activities can be adapted, and behavioral expectations. Also included are activities for simulation of the…

  5. Abstinence and Teenagers: Prevention Counseling Practices of Health Care Providers Serving High-Risk Patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Cynthia C.; Henderson, Jillian T.; Schalet, Amy; Becker, Davida; Stratton, Laura; Raine, Tina R.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT Abstinence-only education has had little demonstrable impact on teenagers’ sexual behaviors, despite significant policy and funding efforts. Given the struggle over resources to improve teenagers’ reproductive health outcomes, the views of clinicians serving teenagers at high risk for unintended pregnancy and STDs merit particular attention. METHODS In 2005, a qualitative study with 31 clinicians serving low-income, at-risk patients was conducted. A semistructured interview guide was used to ask clinicians about adolescent pregnancy, HIV and STD prevention counseling, and when they include abstinence. Thematic content analysis was used to examine the content of the counseling and the techniques used in different situations. RESULTS Providers reported offering comprehensive counseling, presenting abstinence as a choice for teenagers, along with information about contraceptives and condoms. Several providers mentioned that with young, sexually inexperienced teenagers, they discuss delaying sexual activity and suggest other ways to be affectionate, while giving information on condoms. Providers explained how they assess whether teenagers feel ready to be sexually active and try to impart skills for healthy relationships. Some described abstinence as giving teenagers a way to opt out of unwanted sexual activity. Many support abstinence if that is the patient’s desire, but routinely dispense condoms and contraceptives. CONCLUSIONS Overall, providers did not give abstinence counseling as a rigid categorical concept in their preventive practices, but as a health tool to give agency to teenagers within a harm reduction framework. Their approach may be informative for adolescent policies and programs in the future. PMID:20618752

  6. Pilot evaluation of physical and psychological effects of a physical trek programme including a dog sledding expedition in children and teenagers with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Clothilde; André, Nicolas; Gentet, Jean-Claude; Verschuur, Arnauld; Michel, Gérard; Sotteau, Frédéric; Martha, Cécile; Grélot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To evaluate the feasibility and to measure the effects of a six-week-long adapted physical activity programme (APAP), including 5 days of intense dog sledding, on the physical and psychological health of children and adolescents treated for cancer. Methods Eleven children and teenagers (4 girls, 7 boys; mean age 14.3 ± 2.9 years) participated in this monocentric pilot programme of adapted physical activities from February 2013 to March 2013. Seven were still on treatment. The programme lasted 6 weeks. A series of physical tests and psychological questionnaires were carried out before and after the programme. Results All children and teenagers completed the full programme. An improvement in all physical and psychological parameters was observed. Statistically significant differences were observed for global self-esteem (6.2 ± 2.1 to 7.7 ± 1.8; p = 0.02), perceived sport competence (5.3 ± 3.2 to 7.4 ± 2; p = 0.02) and perceived physical strength (5.6 ± 2.5 to 7.1 ± 1.8; p = 0.001). Regarding physical tests, the physical training led to statistically significant improvement for sit-ups (13.8 ± 2.6 to 21.75 ± 5.4; p = 0.01), muscle tone (76 ± 23.7 to 100 ± 22.9; p = 0.01), and resting heart rate (96.1 ± 3.2 to 91.6 ± 4.5; p = 0.03). Conclusion This programme is feasible in children and adolescents even during their oncologic treatment. During the 6-week programme, children and adolescents improved their physical and psychological health, and the putative benefits of the APAP are discussed. A larger randomised trial started in 2014. PMID:26284122

  7. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  8. Relating to Adolescents: Educators in a Teenage World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Susan Eva

    2009-01-01

    Teaching teenagers can be very rewarding; it can also be very challenging. Relating to Adolescents helps adults who work with teenagers to understand what happens in their dynamic with students. From the "Five Things Teens Need from Grown-Ups" to the "Seven Grown-Up Skills," this book covers all aspects of the adult-teenager relationship and…

  9. Teenagers' Web Questions Compared with a Sexuality Curriculum: An Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; McCutchen, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teenagers need information about their changing bodies. Many young people do not receive adequate or accurate puberty/sexuality education from their parents or school, so many teenagers are going online to have their sexuality questions answered. Purpose: This research examines teenagers' web questions on sexuality, and an example of…

  10. A Changing Time. Handbook for Parents of Teen-Agers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; And Others

    This booklet was written to help parents understand their teenagers. Chapter One discusses changes in teenagers, both physical and emotional. The importance of peer groups is discussed. The changes in the world since the parents were teenagers, are discussed in Chapter Two including: (1) the school and (2) the emphasis on planning for the future.…

  11. Correlates of Teenage Drinking Behavior in Two Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjepkes, Phyllis Kathleen; Hayden, Davis C.

    A survey of research literature on teenage alcohol use will reveal many variables related to teenage drinking. This study compared these variables in two separate communities to ascertain their global validity. To investigate factors leading to teenage alcohol use, 218 high school seniors from Washington and Iowa were surveyed. Dependent variables…

  12. Skateboarding Alone? Making Social Capital Discourse Relevant to Teenagers' Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Susie

    2006-01-01

    Bound to the notion of teenage apathy is the concern that young people are increasingly disengaged from political and community issues and lacking in social capital. Voting is often regarded as the ultimate form of civic engagement, which implicitly excludes young teenagers from consideration through their status as non-voters. Teenagers'…

  13. Cognitive Appraisal, Stress, and Coping in Teenage Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzi, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined the stressful work experiences of 20 teenagers. Results indicated teenagers make differential assessments of stressful work situations; sex differences in assessment of coping options exist; specific emotions have stronger association with different types of primary appraisal; teenagers use problem and emotion-focused coping; and…

  14. Teenage Pregnancy: Issues and Strategies for School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolle, George E.; And Others

    Many school administrators view teenage pregnancy as a top problems facing their school systems. Programs designed to reduce the teenage pregnancy rate must address multiple factors connected with teenage pregnancy. School-based clinic programs provide comprehensive primary health care for low income youth, require parental consent, provide mental…

  15. Teenage Pregnancy: An Update and Guide to Mott Foundation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugg, Carol D.

    This document focuses on the involvement of the Mott Foundation in the problem of teenage pregnancy. After a brief introduction to the topic including statistics on the incidence of teenage pregnancy, methods by which other organizations and foundations have attacked the problem of teenage pregnancy are described. The role of the Mott Foundation…

  16. Extreme Economics: Teaching Children and Teenagers about Money. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babbage, Keen J.

    2009-01-01

    What Financial future awaits the current generation of children and teenagers in the United States? Our children and teenagers did not cause the financial problems that confront the nation and impacts their families, but they will pay part of the price for these financial problems. What should children and teenagers know about personal finance?…

  17. Using Erikson To Work More Effectively with Teenage Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Lorraine

    2003-01-01

    Provides suggestions to help early childhood teachers work more effectively with teenage parents and become significant adults in teenage parents' lives. Suggestions include fostering positive identification and addressing individual teenager needs. Presents Erikson's stages of psychosocial development as a basis for recommendations to develop…

  18. The Relationship of Childhood Sexual Abuse to Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Reinholtz, Cindy; Angelini, Patricia Jo

    1997-01-01

    Examined the sexual history of 2,003 young women to determine whether childhood sexual abuse contributed to a greater risk for teenage pregnancy. Results indicate that sexual abuse alone was not related to the incidence of teenage pregnancy, but sexual precocity was related to much higher incidences of teenage pregnancy. (RJM)

  19. The New Alcoholics: Teenagers. Public Affairs Pamphlet No. 499.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Jules

    This brief pamphlet on teenage alcoholism is one in a series published by the Public Affairs Committee. It was designed to give concise and useful information on teenage alcohol problems, and was written for both adults and youth. Statistics are offered as proof that large numbers of American teenagers are already problem drinkers. The current…

  20. Group therapy techniques for sexually abused preteen girls.

    PubMed

    Berman, P

    1990-01-01

    This article describes an open-ended, structured, highly intensive therapy group for sexually abused preteen girls that was the primary mode of treatment for 11 girls from multiproblem, low-income, rural, white families. The active support of Child Protective Service workers was important in maintaining the girls in treatment in the face of strong parental opposition. Unique features of the group included simultaneous group goals and individualized goals. A case description illustrates the makeup and functioning of the program.