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Sample records for active temperature stabilization

  1. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  3. Modeling the effect of water activity and storage temperature on chemical stability of coffee brews.

    PubMed

    Manzocco, Lara; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2007-08-01

    This work was addressed to study the chemical stability of coffee brew derivatives as a function of water activity (aw) and storage temperature. To this purpose, coffee brew was freeze-dried, equilibrated at increasing aw values, and stored for up to 10 months at different temperatures from -30 to 60 degrees C. The chemical stability of the samples was assessed by measuring H3O+ formation during storage. Independently of storage temperature, the rate of H3O+ formation was considerably low only when aw was reduced below 0.5 (94% w/w). Beyond this critical boundary, the rate increased, reaching a maximum value at ca. 0.8 aw (78% w/w). Further hydration up to the aw of the freshly prepared beverage significantly increased chemical stability. It was suggested that mechanisms other than lactones' hydrolysis, probably related to nonenzymatic browning pathways, could contribute to the observed increase in acidity during coffee staling. The temperature dependence of H3O+ formation was well-described by the Arrhenius equation in the entire aw range considered. However, aw affected the apparent activation energy and frequency factor. These effects were described by simple equations that were used to set up a modified Arrhenius equation. This model was validated by comparing experimental values, not used to generate the model, with those estimated by the model itself. The model allowed efficient prediction of the chemical stability of coffee derivatives on the basis of only the aw value and storage temperature. PMID:17658750

  4. Activity-stability relationships revisited in blue oxidases catalyzing electron transfer at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Roulling, Frédéric; Godin, Amandine; Cipolla, Alexandre; Collins, Tony; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Feller, Georges

    2016-09-01

    Cuproxidases are a subset of the blue multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of toxic Cu(I) ions into less harmful Cu(II) in the bacterial periplasm. Cuproxidases from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria display the canonical features of temperature adaptation, such as increases in structural stability and apparent optimal temperature for activity with environmental temperature as well as increases in the binding affinity for catalytic and substrate copper ions. In contrast, the oxidative activities at 25 °C for both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are similar, suggesting that the nearly temperature-independent electron transfer rate does not require peculiar adjustments. Furthermore, the structural flexibilities of both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are also similar, indicating that the firm and precise bindings of the four catalytic copper ions are essential for the oxidase function. These results show that the requirements for enzymatic electron transfer, in the absence of the selective pressure of temperature on electron transfer rates, produce a specific adaptive pattern, which is distinct from that observed in enzymes possessing a well-defined active site and relying on conformational changes such as for the induced fit mechanism. PMID:27315165

  5. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  6. Abrus precatorius Leaves: Antioxidant Activity in Food and Biological Systems, pH, and Temperature Stability

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Mahalingu, Sowmya; Urooj, Asna

    2014-01-01

    Natural antioxidants present in foods and other biological materials have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional and therapeutic effects. Antioxidant constituents of plant materials act as radical scavengers and convert the radicals to less reactive species. Abrus precatorius (AP) was analyzed for its proximate and phytochemical composition. The leaves were extracted with methanol (ME) and analyzed for antioxidant activity by radical scavenging method, reducing power, ferric reducing capacity, and in vitro inhibition of Fenton's reagent-induced oxidation in oil emulsion and microsomes. In addition, the effect of temperature (100°C, 15, and 30 min) and pH (4.5, 7, and 9) C on the antioxidant activity of ME was investigated. The leaves were rich in total polyphenols, flavonoids, β-carotene, glutathione, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid. The ME exhibited varying degree of antioxidant activity in a dose-dependent manner. The AP exhibited more inhibition of oxidation in microsomes (73%) than compared to oil emulsion (21%). Heat treatment resulted in an increase of radical scavenging activity of extract (28% to 43%). At pH 4.5 the extract exhibited more antioxidant activity and stability compared to pH 7 and 9. Data indicates that potential exists for the utilization of Abrus precatorius as a natural antioxidant. PMID:25383222

  7. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  8. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  9. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Sang; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  10. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  11. Membrane fluidity as a factor in production and stability of bacterial ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lindow, S E

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the rate of appearance of bacterial ice nuclei upon cooling of suspensions of Pseudomonas syringae cells and the disappearance of ice nuclei upon warming of the cells before assay for ice nucleation activity. While no substantial change in numbers of ice nuclei active at either -5 or at -9 degrees C was observed in cells that were grown at temperatures lower than 24 degrees C and cooled to 21 degrees C before assay, large increases in -5 but not -9 degrees C ice nuclei were observed in cells grown at temperatures greater than 24 degrees C. Ice nucleation activity of cells subjected to a decrease in temperature before assay increased immediately upon temperature shift, but 8 to 12 min was required before maximum rates of increase in numbers of ice nuclei were observed. The rate of appearance of ice nuclei in cell suspensions incubated at relatively cold temperatures prior to assay was substantially less than those incubated at temperatures approaching 24 degrees C. Cells rapidly lost ice nucleation activity when warmed to above 27 degrees C before assay; the rate of loss of ice nuclei in cells grown at a given temperature increased rapidly as the temperature to which they were warmed before assay increased. Ice nuclei disappeared most rapidly when cells grown at low temperatures were warmed before assay, suggesting that ice nucleus stability was lower in highly fluid membranes. The logarithm of the half-life of ice nuclei in cells was directly related to the concentration of the membrane fluidizing agent, 2-phenethyl alcohol, in which they were suspended. PMID:7781327

  12. An A-site-deficient perovskite offers high activity and stability for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinlong; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Shanshan; Zou, Jin; Shao, Zongping

    2013-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) directly convert fossil and/or renewable fuels into electricity and/or high-quality heat in an environmentally friendly way. However, high operating temperatures result in high cost and material issues, which have limited the commercialization of SOFCs. To lower their operating temperatures, highly active and stable cathodes are required to maintain a reasonable power output. Here, we report a layer-structured A-site deficient perovskite Sr0.95 Nb0.1 Co0.9 O3-δ (SNC0.95) prepared by solid-state reactions that shows not only high activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at operating temperatures below 600 °C, but also offers excellent structural stability and compatibility, and improved CO2 resistivity. An anode-supported fuel cell with SNC0.95 cathode delivers a peak power density as high as 1016 mW cm(-2) with an electrode-area-specific resistance of 0.052 Ω cm(2) at 500 °C.

  13. Thermodynamic modelling of clay dehydration, stability and compositional evolution with temperature, pressure and H 2O activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, O.; Dubacq, B.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a thermodynamic approach to model the stepwise dehydration with increasing temperature or decreasing H 2O activity of K, Na, Ca and Mg-smectite. The approach relies on the relative stability of the different solid-solutions that describe the hydration of di- or trioctahedral-smectites containing 0, 1, 2 or 3 interlayer water layers. The inclusion of anhydrous mica end-members makes it possible to cover, with the same solid-solution model, the entire range of composition from low-charge smectite to mica, through high-charge smectite and illite. Non-ideal Margules parameters were used to describe the non-ideality of the solid solutions between the hydrated and dehydrated smectite end-members. Standard state properties of all smectite end-members as well as Ca- and Mg-muscovite and -phlogopite were initially estimated by oxide summation. These values were then refined and the other non-ideal interactions were estimated on the basis of different experimental data. The stepwise dehydration of smectite, and its stability and compatibility relations were calculated by Gibbs free energy minimising. Our results account for the progressive evolution of smectite to interlayered illite/smectite and then to mica, as observed in nature and experiments, and our model provides an explanation for the thermodynamic stability of smectite and illite/smectite compared to mica + kaolinite or pyrophyllite assemblages. The results suggest that the enthalpic contribution of interlayer water is a function of the ionic potential of the interlayer cation and the number of interlayer water molecules. This evolution makes possible to estimate the standard-state thermodynamic parameters and hydration-temperature behaviour of smectite of virtually all possible compositions. For the four-interlayer cations considered in the study, our model reproduces the 3 → 2 → 1 water-layer transitions that accompany a reduction of water activity or an increase of temperature at ambient pressure

  14. High temperature jet fuel stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E.M.; Selvaraj, L.; Stallman, J.B.

    1996-10-01

    We have previously discussed the rationale for development of jet fuels with enhanced thermal stability at temperatures above 400{degrees}C. At these temperatures we are encroaching into the so-called pyrolysis regime, where the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds into free radicals is facile and leads to the rapid degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Notwithstanding, we established that the formation of carbonaceous materials is significantly retarded in hydrocarbon mixtures containing molecules such as benzyl alcohol (BzOH). It was ascertained that BzOH acts as a hydrogen donor capping aliphatic radicals formed at temperatures > 400{degrees}C while transforming into relatively stable products. These results suggested is superior high temperature thermal stabilizers might be found among the more conventional hydrogen donors that find application in coal liquefaction and similar hydrogenation processes. Here we present the results of {open_quotes}screening{close_quotes} and kinetic studies of traditional hydrogen donors, such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline and the like, together with simple derivatives designed to test the importance of specific factors in the thermal stabilization of jet fuels.

  15. Assessment of two immobilized lipases activity and stability to low temperatures in organic solvents under ultrasound-assisted irradiation.

    PubMed

    Batistella, Luciane; Ustra, Mara K; Richetti, Aline; Pergher, Sibele B C; Treichel, Helen; Oliveira, J V; Lerin, Lindomar; de Oliveira, Débora

    2012-03-01

    Both stability and catalytic activity of two commercial immobilized lipases were investigated in the presence of different organic solvents in ultrasound-assisted system. In a general way, for Novozym 435, the use of ethanol as solvent led to a loss of activity of 35% after 10 h of contact. The use of iso-octane conducted to a gradual increase in lipase activity in relation to the contact time, reaching a maximum value of relative activity of 126%. For Lipozyme RM IM, after 5 h of exposure, the enzyme presented no residual activity when ethanol was used as solvent. The solvents tert-butanol and iso-octane showed an enhancement of about 20 and 17% in the enzyme activity in 6 h of exposure, respectively. Novozym 435 and Lipozyme IM presented high stability to storage after treatment under ultrasound-assisted system using n-hexane and tert-butanol as solvents.

  16. Assessment of two immobilized lipases activity and stability to low temperatures in organic solvents under ultrasound-assisted irradiation.

    PubMed

    Batistella, Luciane; Ustra, Mara K; Richetti, Aline; Pergher, Sibele B C; Treichel, Helen; Oliveira, J V; Lerin, Lindomar; de Oliveira, Débora

    2012-03-01

    Both stability and catalytic activity of two commercial immobilized lipases were investigated in the presence of different organic solvents in ultrasound-assisted system. In a general way, for Novozym 435, the use of ethanol as solvent led to a loss of activity of 35% after 10 h of contact. The use of iso-octane conducted to a gradual increase in lipase activity in relation to the contact time, reaching a maximum value of relative activity of 126%. For Lipozyme RM IM, after 5 h of exposure, the enzyme presented no residual activity when ethanol was used as solvent. The solvents tert-butanol and iso-octane showed an enhancement of about 20 and 17% in the enzyme activity in 6 h of exposure, respectively. Novozym 435 and Lipozyme IM presented high stability to storage after treatment under ultrasound-assisted system using n-hexane and tert-butanol as solvents. PMID:21779888

  17. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectinase enzyme from guava (Psidium guajava) peel: Enzyme recovery, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Murshid, Fara Syazana; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Islam Sarker, Zaidul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions on the yield, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability of the pectinase enzyme from guava peel. The ultrasound variables studied were sonication time (10-30 min), ultrasound temperature (30-50 °C), pH (2.0-8.0), and solvent-to-sample ratio (2:1 mL/g to 6:1 mL/g). The main goal was to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions to maximize the recovery of pectinase from guava peel with the most desirable enzyme-specific activity and stability. Under the optimum conditions, a high yield (96.2%), good specific activity (18.2 U/mg), temperature stability (88.3%), and storage stability (90.3%) of the extracted enzyme were achieved. The optimal conditions were 20 min sonication time, 40 °C temperature, at pH 5.0, using a 4:1 mL/g solvent-to-sample ratio. The study demonstrated that optimization of ultrasound-assisted process conditions for the enzyme extraction could improve the enzymatic characteristics and yield of the enzyme.

  18. Temperature Stabilization Requirements for Unchopped Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, Marc C.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature stabilization requirements of unchopped thermistor bolometers and thermopile detectors are analyzed. The detector temperature, on which the bolometer output signal depends, is quite sensitive to changes in instrument temperature but relatively insensitive to changes in scene temperature. In contrast, the difference in temperature between detector and substrate (instrument), on which the thermopile signal depends, is equally sensitive to changes in instrument and scene temperature. Expressions for these dependencies are derived based on a simplified instrument model. It is shown that for a typical uncooled thermal imager, the temperature stabilization requirements for a bolometer are two orders of magnitude more stringent than those for a thermopile detector. Keywords: thermistor, bolometer, thermopile, detector, IR, thermal, temperature stabilization

  19. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  20. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  1. Influence of stabilizing agent and synthesis temperature on the optical properties of silver nanoparticles as active materials in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudin, Lufsyi; Suharyadi, Edi; Utomo, Agung Bambang Setio; Abraha, Kamsul

    2016-04-01

    It has been successfully carried out the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction method. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as metal precursors and trisodium citrate as the reducing agent. In the synthesis process, were varied the stabilizing agent of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and heating temperature. The formation of silver nanoparticles was observed visually with discoloration (yellowish). The formation and the structure of silver nanoparticles in colloidal solution were further examined through their optical properties by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The wavelength absorption spectrum of colloidal silver nanoparticles shows that maximum surface plasmon absorption for the trisodium citrate-synthesized nanoparticles was at 429.43 nm for temperature of 90°C. The addition of the stabilizer sharpened spectrum curves and caused red shift in the maximum absorption peak of 429.01 nm and 427.09 nm for PVA and PVP respectively. Meanwhile, the addition of the synthesis temperature also sharpened the maximum surface plasmon absorption band and the red shift the maximum absorption peak of 428.79 nm and 428.58 nm for temperature of 110°C and 120°C respectively. Red shift of the maximum absorption peak indicates a smaller particle size. The maximum surface plasmon absorption band in the range of 427.09 nm to 429.43 nm indicates the presence of spherical or roughly spherical silver nanoparticles and TEM imaging confirmed this shape. TEM imaging results show that the diameter size of the silver nanoparticles range of 10 nm to 60 nm as well as the morphology (crystallites) of silver nanoparticles have spherical geometry with particle distribution which quite dispersive. The dispersibility of nanoparticles such as this could potentially be used as an active material of SPR biosensor.

  2. Enzyme stability of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze drying and during storage in low water activity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-08-01

    Stability of enzymes such as β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), hexokinase (HK), and ATPase of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 wk of storage at low water activity (a(w)) at room temperature was studied. Bacteria were microencapsulated using alginate formulation with or without mannitol fortification (sodium alginate and mannitol [SAM] and sodium alginate [SA], respectively) by creating gel beads followed by freeze drying. Two types of dried gel beads were then stored at low a(w), such as 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2; storage in an aluminum foil was used as control. All storage was carried out at room temperature of 25 °C for 10 wk. Measurement of β-gal, β-glu, LDH, PK, HK, and ATPase (with or without exposure to pH 2.0 for 2 h) activities was carried out before freeze drying, after freeze drying, and after 10 wk of storage. There was a significant decrease in almost all enzyme activities, except that of PK. SAM and SA showed no different effect on maintaining enzyme activities during freeze drying. Storage for 10 wk at room temperature at various low a(w) using SAM and SA system had a significant effect on retention of most enzymes studied, except that of PK and LDH. Storage at a(w) of 0.07 and 0.1 was more effective in maintaining enzyme activities than storage at a(w) of 0.2 and in an aluminum foil. However, mannitol fortification into alginate system did not significantly improve retention of enzymes during 10 wk of storage. PMID:21696390

  3. Temperature Stability of the Sky Quality Meter

    PubMed Central

    Schnitt, Sabrina; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of −15°C to 35°C, and during temperature changes of −33°C/h and +70°C/h. This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%, indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions. PMID:24030682

  4. Temperature stability of the sky quality meter.

    PubMed

    Schnitt, Sabrina; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C M

    2013-01-01

    The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM)was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of -15 °C to 35 °C, and during temperature changes of -33 °C/h and +70 °C/h.This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%,indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions. PMID:24030682

  5. Temperature, stability, and the hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Schellman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in free energy are normally used to track the effect of temperature on the stability of proteins and hydrophobic interactions. Use of this procedure on the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons, a standard representation of the hydrophobic effect, leads to the conclusion that the hydrophobic effect increases in strength as the temperature is raised to approximately 140 degrees C. Acceptance of this interpretation leads to a number of far-reaching conclusions that are at variance with the original conception of the hydrophobic effect and add considerably to the complexity of interpretation. There are two legitimate thermodynamic functions that can be used to look at stability as a function of temperature: the standard Gibbs free energy change, deltaG degrees, and deltaG degrees/T. The latter is proportional to the log of the equilibrium constant and is sometimes called the Massieu-Planck function. Arguments are presented for using deltaG degrees/T rather than deltaG degrees for variations in stability with temperature. This makes a considerable difference in the interpretation of the hydrophobic interaction, but makes little change in the stability profile of proteins. Protein unfolding and the aqueous solubility of benzene are given as examples. The contrast between protein unfolding and the hydration of nonpolar molecules provides a rough estimate of the contribution of other factors that stabilize and destabilize protein structure. PMID:9414210

  6. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g‑1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g‑1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  7. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g−1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g−1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  8. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g(-1)) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g(-1)). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  9. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  10. Activity, stability and deactivation behavior of Au/CeO 2 catalysts in the water gas shift reaction at increased reaction temperature (300 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Moemen, A.; Karpenko, A.; Denkwitz, Y.; Behm, R. J.

    The effect of increasing the reaction temperature to 300 °C on the activity, stability and deactivation behavior of a 4.5 wt.% Au/CeO 2 catalyst in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction in idealized reformate was studied by kinetic and spectroscopic measurements at 300 °C and comparison with previously reported data for reaction at 180 °C under similar reaction conditions [A. Karpenko, Y. Denkwitz, V. Plzak, J. Cai, R. Leppelt, B. Schumacher, R.J. Behm, Catal. Lett. 116 (2007) 105]. Different procedures for catalyst pretreatment were used, including annealing at 400 °C in oxidative, reductive or inert atmospheres as well as redox processing. The formation/removal of stable adsorbed reaction intermediates and side products (surface carbonates, formates, OH ad, CO ad) was followed by in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), the presence of differently oxidized surface species (Au 0, Au 0‧, Au 3+, Ce 3+) was evaluated by XPS. The reaction characteristics at 300 °C generally resemble those at 180 °C, including (i) significantly higher reaction rates, (ii) comparable apparent activation energies (44 ± 1/50 ± 1 kJ mol -1 vs. 40 ± 1 kJ mol -1 at 180 °C), (iii) a correlation between deactivation of the catalyst and the build-up of stable surface carbonates, and (iv) a decrease of the initially significant differences in activity after different pretreatment procedures with reaction time. Different than expected, the tendency for deactivation did not decrease with higher temperature, due to enhanced carbonate decomposition, but increases.

  11. GC-MS analysis of bioactive components and biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Hybanthus enneaspermus at room temperature evaluation of their stability and its larvicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Suman, T Y; Rajasree, S R Radhika; Jayaseelan, C; Mary, R Regina; Gayathri, S; Aranganathan, L; Remya, R R

    2016-02-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Hybanthus enneaspermus extract at room temperature that act as a reducing agent as well as capping agent has been investigated. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), zeta potential, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The silver surface plasmon resonance was observed at 420 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD peaks were observed at 2θ values in 38.20°, 44.40°, 64.60°, and 77.50° which are indexed as (111), (200), (220), and (311) bands of face-centered cubic (fcc) structures of silver. FTIR revealed the AgNPs were capped with plant compounds of alcohol, phenols, carbonyl, amines, and amide functional groups. TEM image shows that the particles were of spherical, hexagonal, and triangular in shape, and the size range was 16-26 nm. Further, DLS exhibits the average size of 25.2 nm and the zeta values were measured (-27.1 mV) which proves the stability of the AgNPs. The conversion of Ag(+) ions into Ag(0) was calculated using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and was found to be 96 %. The biosynthesized AgNPs showed the larvicidal activity with the LC50 values of 17.24 and 13.12 mg/L against the fourth-instar larvae of Anopheles subpictus and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the plant extract showed that 39 bioactive phytochemical compounds have been found to possess a wide range of activities, which may help in the protection against incurable diseases.

  12. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  13. Synthesis and characterizations of palladium catalysts with high activity and stability for formic acid oxidation by hydrogen reduction in ethylene glycol at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meixia; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Li, Yuexia; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a Pd/C catalyst with high activity as well as excellent stability has been prepared by hydrogen gas reduction of Pd(II) precursor in ethylene glycol solution with the assistance of appropriate amount of sodium citrate. Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of 3.8 nm and excellent uniformity are obtained. The Pd/C catalyst synthesized in this work shows an electrochemical surface area of 68.6 m2 g-1 and displays activities of 819 A g-1. Strikingly, the Pd/C catalyst also exhibits excellent stability, which has been confirmed by its slow activity decay under repeated potential cycles as well as chronoamperometric test. The activity for Pd/C at the 300th and 500th cycle remains at 5.5 and 2.4 mA cm-2, respectively, which is 25% and 11% of its initial value, respectively. The oxidation currents at the Pd/C and Pd/C-Citrate (control) at 0 V decrease to 44% and 25% of their initial values. Transmission electron microscopy observations on the Pd/C catalyst after 1000 potential cycles reveal that, in addition to carbon support corrosion, Pd agglomeration together with more serious Pd dissolution occur at the same time, leading to a decrease of the electrocatalytic performance.

  14. [Performance stability of CANON reactor and temperature impact].

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Dong; Meng, Xue-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    In order to study long-term effect of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) reactor, performance stability was investigated by using synthetic inorganic ammonia-rich wastewater as raw water with a continuous flow CANON reactor. Both performances of short-cut nitrification and ANAMMOX were stable for more than one year. Under the condition that inner temperature at 35 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.39 and 8.01, and hydraulic retention time 3.7-5.1 h, the average total nitrogen removal load was 1.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), and the average and maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency were 65.09% and 81.65% respectively. Under sudden low temperature conditions, both ANAMMOX bacteria and AOB were inhibited, however, the ANAMMOX bacteria were inhibited more, which caused highly accumulated nitrite. When temperature increased to 35 degrees C as normal, the performance of CANON reactor recovered soon, which means low temperature impact will have no significant influence on stability. When the temperature reached more than 50 degrees C, the activity of ANAMMOX bacteria was completely destroyed, so high temperature must be avoided, though AOB can recovered to normal in one week.

  15. Chemical stability of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the available studies on the chemical stability of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) in various environments was made. The La(1.8)Ba(0.2)CuO4 HTS is unstable in the presence of H2O, CO2, and CO. The YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor is highly susceptible to degradation in different environments, especially water. The La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO4 and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O HTS are relatively less reactive than the YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Processing of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) HTS in purified oxygen, rather than in air, using high purity noncarbon containing starting materials is recommended. Exposure of this HTS to the ambient atmosphere should also be avoided at all stages during processing and storage. Devices and components made out of these oxide superconductors would have to be protected with an impermeable coating of a polymer, glass, or metal to avoid deterioration during use.

  16. Stability of CdTe solar cells at elevated temperatures: Bias, temperature, and Cu dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltner, Jason F.; Sites, James R.

    1999-03-01

    A systematic study of the stability of CdTe solar cells fabricated by SCI and NREL has been made. Cells were stressed at elevated temperatures under various bias conditions, both with illumination (˜2 suns) and in the dark. An activation energy of approximately 1 eV is implied from cells stressed at various elevated temperatures. The stability of CdTe solar cells was found to be bias dependent and device-specific. Cells made with thick CdTe and no back-contact copper as well as by at least one SCI recipe were very stable. Extrapolation of effects assuming Arrhenius behavior yields estimated lifetime expectations for the cells stressed at elevated temperatures.

  17. A Physics-Based Temperature Stabilization Criterion for Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft testing specifications differ greatly in the criteria they specify for stability in thermal balance tests. Some specify a required temperature stabilization rate (the change in temperature per unit time, dT/dt), some specify that the final steady-state temperature be approached to within a specified difference, delta T , and some specify a combination of the two. The particular values for temperature stabilization rate and final temperature difference also vary greatly between specification documents. A one-size-fits-all temperature stabilization rate requirement does not yield consistent results for all test configurations because of differences in thermal mass and heat transfer to the environment. Applying a steady-state temperature difference requirement is problematic because the final test temperature is not accurately known a priori, especially for powered configurations. In the present work, a simplified, lumped-mass analysis has been used to explore the applicability of these criteria. A new, user-friendly, physics-based approach is developed that allows the thermal engineer to determine when an acceptable level of temperature stabilization has been achieved. The stabilization criterion can be predicted pre-test but must be refined during test to allow verification that the defined level of temperature stabilization has been achieved.

  18. High activity and stability of codon-optimized phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Photobacterium profundum SS9 at low temperatures and its application for in vitro production of oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Hong, Soohye; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of Photobacterium profundum SS9 can be expressed and purified using the Escherichia coli expression system. In this study, a codon-optimized PEPC gene (OPPP) was used to increase expression levels. We confirmed OPPP expression and purified it from extracts of recombinant E. coli SGJS117 harboring the OPPP gene. The purified OPPP showed a specific activity value of 80.3 U/mg protein. The OPPP was stable under low temperature (5-30 °C) and weakly basic conditions (pH 8.5-10). The enzymatic ability of OPPP was investigated for in vitro production of oxaloacetate using phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and bicarbonate. Only samples containing the OPPP, PEP, and bicarbonate resulted in oxaloacetate production. OPPP production system using E. coli could be a platform technology to produce high yields of heterogeneous gene and provide the PEPC enzyme, which has high enzyme activity.

  19. Structure and Stability of Jarosite at High Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D. D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Daemen, L. L.; Hartl, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Jarosite, KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and its related sulfates commonly occur in acid drainage environments as the weathering products of sulfide ore deposits. They can also precipitate from aqueous sulfates due to oxidation of H2S in epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activities. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and thus life) on Mars. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and thermodynamic stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 650 K and/or pressures up to 8 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  20. Stability of nystatin in mouthrinses; effect of pH temperature, concentration and colloidal silver addition, studied using an in vitro antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Vermerie, N; Malbrunot, C; Azar, M; Arnaud, P

    1997-08-01

    Alkaline low concentration nystatin mouthrinses extemporanely prepared can be used to treat oropharyngeal candidiasis in immunodeficient patients. However, their expiration dates are not distinctly determined. The stability of nystatin, added (as Mycostatine) at a concentration of 14,400 U/ml in 10-4N hydrochloric acid, purified water and 1.4% injectable sodium hydrogen carbonate with or without 0.002% colloidal silver (an antiseptic agent added because of its known antifungal potency) was studied after storage in tinted glass bottles at 5 degrees C and 22 degrees C over 11 days, and compared with reconstituted 100,000 U/ml aqueous Mycostatine oral suspension. At 2, 4, 7, 9, and 11 days after preparation. Samples were tested for pH, microbial contamination, and assayed by an in vitro microbiological test. Neither significant variation of pH nor microbial contamination were in evidence. Nystatin 14400 U/ml maintained at least 90% of its initial concentration for 4 days in acid at both temperatures, for 7 days (5 degrees C) and 4 days (22 degrees C) in aqueous and alkaline environments, for 9 days (5 degrees C) and 7 days (22 degrees C) in 1.4% injectable sodium hydrogen carbonate containing colloidal silver which showed an antifungal potency. The 100,000 U/ml aqueous Mycostatine oral suspension was stable for 9 days and 4 days at 5 degrees C and 22 degrees C respectively. An ambulant patient can keep a low concentration alkaline antifungal mouthrinse at home for a week at 5 degrees C.

  1. [Stability of CaF2 at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Qi, Qingjie; Liu, Jianzhong; Cao, Xinyu; Zhou, Junhu; Zhang, Shuxin; Kefa, Cen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of CaF2 in atmosphere, dry and moist air at elevated temperatures were studied by gaseous fluorides direct absorption and fluoride ion-selective electrode (ISE) measurements technique supplemented by differential thermal analysis (DTA), chemical analysis (pyrohydrolysis-ISE method) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The principal reaction was shown to be hydrolysis of CaF2 at high temperature and CaF2 were actually hydrolyzed appreciably at about 830 +/- 10 degrees C in moist atmospheres. Kinetics calculation showed that hydrolysis reaction was first order and the activation energy for the hydrolysis was 115 +/- 2 kJ/mol, applicable over the range 850 degrees C-1350 degrees C. The research results will be of significance for fluoride pollution control during coal combustion and clay-brickmaking. PMID:12145925

  2. [Stability of CaF2 at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Qi, Qingjie; Liu, Jianzhong; Cao, Xinyu; Zhou, Junhu; Zhang, Shuxin; Kefa, Cen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of CaF2 in atmosphere, dry and moist air at elevated temperatures were studied by gaseous fluorides direct absorption and fluoride ion-selective electrode (ISE) measurements technique supplemented by differential thermal analysis (DTA), chemical analysis (pyrohydrolysis-ISE method) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The principal reaction was shown to be hydrolysis of CaF2 at high temperature and CaF2 were actually hydrolyzed appreciably at about 830 +/- 10 degrees C in moist atmospheres. Kinetics calculation showed that hydrolysis reaction was first order and the activation energy for the hydrolysis was 115 +/- 2 kJ/mol, applicable over the range 850 degrees C-1350 degrees C. The research results will be of significance for fluoride pollution control during coal combustion and clay-brickmaking.

  3. Thermoelectric refrigerator having improved temperature stabilization means

    DOEpatents

    Falco, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    A control system for thermoelectric refrigerators is disclosed. The thermoelectric refrigerator includes at least one thermoelectric element that undergoes a first order change at a predetermined critical temperature. The element functions as a thermoelectric refrigerator element above the critical temperature, but discontinuously ceases to function as a thermoelectric refrigerator element below the critical temperature. One example of such an arrangement includes thermoelectric refrigerator elements which are superconductors. The transition temperature of one of the superconductor elements is selected as the temperature control point of the refrigerator. When the refrigerator attempts to cool below the point, the metals become superconductors losing their ability to perform as a thermoelectric refrigerator. An extremely accurate, first-order control is realized.

  4. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  5. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower.

  6. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-09-11

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower. 1 fig.

  7. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  8. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  9. Active crystals and their stability.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas M; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    A recently introduced active phase field crystal model describes the formation of ordered resting and traveling crystals in systems of self-propelled particles. Increasing the active drive, a resting crystal can be forced to perform collectively ordered migration as a single traveling object. We demonstrate here that these ordered migrating structures are linearly stable. In other words, during migration, the single-crystalline texture together with the globally ordered collective motion is preserved even on large length scales. Furthermore, we consider self-propelled particles on a substrate that are surrounded by a thin fluid film. We find that in this case the resulting hydrodynamic interactions can destabilize the order.

  10. Effect of stabilization on biomass activity.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Okutman Tas, Didem; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Insel, Guclu

    2012-02-20

    The study aimed to compare aerobic and aerobic/anoxic stabilization processes in terms of organic matter and the biomass removal efficiencies using a municipal sludge sample. The efficiency of stabilization process was assessed monitoring suspended solids (SS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC, DOC), nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate parameters. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements were conducted to determine active biomass concentration. On the 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, the SS, VSS and TOC removal efficiencies were 22%, 28% and 55%, respectively. Under aerobic/anoxic conditions, removal efficiencies for SS, VSS and TOC were 25%, 27% and 67%. On the 17th day of the stabilization, SS and VSS removal rates were 60 mg SS/L day and 47 mg VSS/L day for aerobic and 102 mg SS/L day and 63 mg VSS/L day for aerobic/anoxic conditions, respectively. These findings reflected the higher stabilization performance of the aerobic/anoxic conditions. Based on respirometric results, the ratios of the active biomass were decreased to 30% and 24% for the 17th and 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, respectively. Such results have significant implications relative to the activity decrease quantification of the biomass as well as its further application potentials after aerobic or aerobic/anoxic sludge stabilization. PMID:21791229

  11. Stability of peptides in high-temperature aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-09-01

    Estimated standard molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous dipeptides and their constituent amino acids indicate that temperature increases correspond to increased stability of peptide bonds relative to hydrolysis reactions. Pressure increases cause slight decreases in peptide bond stability, which are generally offset by greater stability caused by temperature increases along geothermal gradients. These calculations suggest that peptides, polypeptides, and proteins may survive hydrothermal alteration of organic matter depending on the rates of the hydrolysis reactions. Extremely thermophilic organisms may be able to take advantage of the decreased energy required to form peptide bonds in order to maintain structural proteins and enzymes at elevated temperatures and pressures. As the rates of hydrolysis reactions increase with increasing temperature, formation of peptide bonds may become a facile process in hydrothermal systems and deep in sedimentary basins.

  12. Localized temperature stability in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC).

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steven Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa.

    2012-04-01

    The base dielectrics of commercial low temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) systems have a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ({tau}{sub f}) in the range -50 {approx} -80 ppm/C. In this research we explored a method to realize zero or near zero {tau}{sub f} resonators by incorporating {tau}{sub f} compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC structure. To select composition for {tau}{sub f} adjustment, {tau}{sub f} compensating materials with different amount of titanates were formulated, synthesized, and characterized. Chemical interactions and physical compatibility between the {tau}{sub f} modifiers and the host LTCC dielectrics were investigated. Studies on stripline (SL) resonator panels with multiple compensating dielectrics revealed that: 1) compositions using SrTiO{sub 3} provide the largest {tau}{sub f} adjustment among titanates, 2) the {tau}{sub f} compensation is proportional to the amount of SrTiO{sub 3} in compensating materials, as well as the thickness of the compensating layer, and 3) the most effective {tau}{sub f} compensation is achieved when the compensating dielectric is integrated next to the SL. Using the effective dielectric constant of a heterogeneous layered dielectric structure, results from Method of Momentum (MoM) electromagnetic simulations are consistent with the experimental observations.

  13. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  14. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  15. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  16. High-precision temperature control and stabilization using a cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Daiki; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Komine, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    We describe a method for precisely controlling temperature using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler that involves inserting fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers into a conventional cryosystem. Temperature fluctuations in a GM cryocooler without a large heat bath or a stainless-steel damper at 4.2 K are typically of the order of 200 mK. It is particularly difficult to control the temperature of a GM cryocooler at low temperatures. The fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers enabled us to dramatically reduce temperature fluctuations at low temperatures. A standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations of 0.21 mK could be achieved when the temperature was controlled at 4.200 0 K using a feedback temperature control system with two heaters. Adding the dampers increased the minimum achievable temperature from 3.2 to 3.3 K. Precise temperature control between 4.200 0 and 300.000 K was attained using the GM cryocooler, and the standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations was less than 1.2 mK even at 300 K. This technique makes it possible to control and stabilize the temperature using a GM cryocooler.

  17. High temperature stability multilayers for EUV condenser optics

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Stearns, D G

    2005-05-03

    We investigate the thermal stability of Mo/SiC multilayer coatings at elevated temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies show that upon annealing a thermally-induced structural relaxation occurs that transforms the polycrystalline Mo and amorphous SiC layers in as-deposited multilayers into amorphous Mo-Si-C alloy and crystalline SiC, respectively. After this relaxation process is complete the multilayer is stable at temperatures up to 400 C.

  18. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  19. Research on Social Stability Mechanisms Based on Activation Energy and Gradual Activation Reaction Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Miao; Gu, Jifa

    This paper draws a comparison between social stability and chemical reaction process, and brings forward the concept of “social temperature” and “activation energy of social agent”. It is considered that social temperature turns out to be the macro symptom of social average energy, and its unceasing up-climbing roots in the energy accumulation of “inferiorization” process of social system; that “activation energy of social agent” stands for the social energy or temperature where individuals or groups reach the limit of their psychological bearing ability. This paper, basing on above concepts, elaborates on and demonstrates the gradual activation reaction mechanisms of social stability by a lot of concrete examples. It is thought that there is a threshold value for social stability, and the society will be unstable if social temperature goes higher than this value; that the larger the social average activation energy is, the higher the temperature threshold value of social stability will be; and considering that different groups have different activation energy, those fragile groups with low activation energy are often the risk source which might pose a threat to social stability.

  20. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  1. Stability of Topological Quantum Phases at Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakis, Spyridon; Pytel, Justyna

    2012-02-01

    We prove stability of the spectral gap for gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonians under general, quasi-local perturbations. We present a necessary and sufficient condition for stability, which we call Local Topological Quantum Order and show that this condition implies an area law for the entanglement entropy of the groundstate subspace. This result extends previous work by Bravyi et al, on the stability of topological quantum order for the groundstate subspace of Hamiltonians composed of commuting projections with a common zero-energy subspace. Moreover, our result implies that zero-temperature topological order is robust against quasi-local perturbations, for all topologically ordered subspaces that correspond to the groundstate space of a gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonian. Finally, even in the absence of topological order, we show that symmetry-protected sectors are also stable against perturbations respecting the same symmetries.

  2. Stability of the high-temperature G-16 primer composition

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, N.A.; Weinmaster, R.R.; Massis, T.A.; Fleming, W.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of the G-16 pyrotechnic primer mixture of antimony sulfide, calcium silicide, and potassium chlorate was studied at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C in sealed and open environments. Data have shown that this mixture is stable in open environments at 200/sup 0/C for up to 48 hours. However, in sealed, limited volume environments, the mixture completely decomposes within 24 hours at 200/sup 0/C. In sealed environments, the mixture shows stability with copper present. Both functional testing and chemical analysis were used to evaluate the primer composition after temperature exposure. The degree of degradation of the mixture was determined from the concentration of final reaction products (sulfate and chloride ions), using ion chromatography. When copper was present, the intermediate reaction products were scavenged by the copper, and the degradation was reduced. The role of copper in the reaction was verified with differential scanning calorimetry and surface analysis. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Activation and stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-06-28

    As environmentally benign "green" solvents, room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been used as solvents or (co)solvents in biocatalytic reactions and processes for a decade. The technological utility of enzymes can be enhanced greatly by their use in ionic liquids (ILs) rather than in conventional organic solvents or in their natural aqueous reaction media. In fact, the combination of green properties and unique tailor-made physicochemical properties make ILs excellent non-aqueous solvents for enzymatic catalysis with numerous advantages over other solvents, including high conversion rates, high selectivity, better enzyme stability, as well as better recoverability and recyclability. However, in many cases, particularly in hydrophilic ILs, enzymes show relative instability and/or lower activity compared with conventional solvents. To improve the enzyme activity as well as stability in ILs, various attempts have been made by modifying the form of the enzymes. Examples are enzyme immobilization onto support materials via adsorption or multipoint attachment, lyophilization in the presence of stabilizing agents, chemical modification with stabilizing agents, formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates, pretreatment with polar organic solvents or enzymes combined with suitable surfactants to form microemulsions. The use of these enzyme preparations in ILs can dramatically increase the solvent tolerance, enhance activity as well as stability, and improve enantioselectivity. This perspective highlights a number of pronounced strategies being used successfully for activation and stabilization of enzymes in non-aqueous ILs media. This review is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to present a general overview of the potential approaches to activate enzymes for diverse enzymatic processes and biotransformations in ILs. PMID:20445940

  4. Bonding glass to metal with plastic for stability over temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Chris L.; Petrie, Stephen P.

    2001-11-01

    To enable the invention of higher power IRCM lasers, 3D LIDAR systems, Designator/Rangefinders and other Instruments subjected to a broad range of operating conditions, there is a need to develop improved technology to hold small mirrors, lenses, beamsplitters and other optical elements with repeatable and high dimensional stability over wide environmental temperature ranges, an do so with great economy. The intent of this effort was to begin identifying significant factors for bonding small mirrors for high stability. A screening experiment was performed in which half-inch diameter flat mirrors were face bonded to similar mirror mounts, then bolted to a reference test fixture and subjected to an environmental temperature range of -40 to +70 degrees C. Mount material, optic material, adhesive material, bond joint design, and bond thickness were varied. The resulting tilt errors in the mirror assemblies were measured. Steps were taken to isolate the bond joint stability as opposed to stability in the mounted mirror subassemblies. The effort required to minimize experimental noise was much greater than anticipated. This first experimental effort failed to identify main factors with statistical significance, however; some results are interesting. Perhaps also of interest is the progress made at characterizing the experimental setup and process, and lessons learned in control of noise factors in this kind of experiment.

  5. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Agirbasli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and myocardial infarction (MI). The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:25386620

  6. Effect of the thermal stabilization temperature on the change in the texture of polyacrylonitrile fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlitdinova, A. G.; Tyumentsev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of temperature of isothermal treatment on the change in sizes L 010 of coherent scattering regions and texture of a polyacrylonitrile fiber during its transition to the structure of a thermally stabilized fiber is analyzed using X-ray structure analysis. An increase in the thermostabilization temperature at a constant stretching load stimulates simultaneously a more active increase in size L 010 and texturing of polyacrylonitrile fibers at the initial stage. Active evolution of the phase transformation at temperatures 275-290°C during further thermostabilization is accompanied by a substantial decrease in the texture of the polymer that has not experienced the phase transformation by this instant.

  7. Effect of dialysate temperature on hemodynamic stability among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2009-07-01

    Cooling the dialysate below 36.5 degrees C is an important factor that contributes to hemodynamic stability in patients during hemodialysis (HD). In this study, the effect of dialysate temperature on hemodynamic stability, patients' perception of dialysis discomfort and post dialysis fatigue were assessed in a group of patients on HD. A total of 50 patients, all of whom were on 3-times-per-week dialysis regimen, were studied. Patients were assessed during six dialysis sessions; in three sessions, the dialysate temperature was normal (37 degrees C) and in three other sessions, the dialysate temperature was low (35 degrees C). Specific scale questionnaires were used in each dialysis session, to evaluate the symptoms during the dialysis procedure as well as post-dialysis fatigue, and respective scores were noted. The results showed that usage of low dialysate temperature was associated with the following: higher post dialysis systolic blood pressure (P< 0.05) and lower post dialysis heart rate (P< 0.01), with similar ultrafiltration rates, better intra-dialysis symptoms score and post-dialysis fatigue scores (P< 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively), shorter post-dialysis fatigue period (P< 0.001) as well as higher urea removal (P< 00001) and Kt/V (P< 0.0001). Patients' perceptions were measured by a questionnaire, which showed that 76% of them felt more energetic after dialysis with cool dialysate and requested to be always dialyzed with cool dialysate. Low temperature dialysate is particularly beneficial for highly symptomatic patients, improves tolerance to dialysis in hypotensive patients and helps increase ultrafiltration while maintaining hemodynamic stability during and after dialysis.

  8. Enhancing catalytic activity and stability for CO2 methanation on Ni@MOF-5 via control of active species dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Li, Bo; Lu, Gongxuan; Ma, Jiantai

    2015-01-31

    A novel, highly active catalyst Ni@MOF-5 showed unexpected activity at low temperature for CO2 methanation. The characterization results indicated that Ni was uniformly and highly dispersed over MOF-5. This catalyst showed high stability and almost no deactivation in long term stability tests up to 100 h. PMID:25518948

  9. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  10. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  11. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  12. Steric stabilization of modified nanoclays triggered by temperature.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana; Parisi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Halloysite clay nanotubes were modified through the adsorption of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-amine terminated (PNIPA-NH2) onto the external surface by exploiting electrostatic interactions at pH=6. In spite the amount of attached polymer is rather low (1 wt%), the properties of the nanotubes are deeply modified. The apparent specific volume and isentropic compressibilities of the hybrid nanomaterial dispersed in water evidenced the transferring of the termosensitive property from the polymer to halloysite. The hydrodynamic radius as well as the ζ-potential of the nanohybrid are consistent with the attachment of a positively charged polymer onto the negative surface of the nanotube. The colloidal stability was strongly enhanced in the temperature domain below the lower critical solution temperature. This methodology endowed to obtain hollow nanotubes with a stimuli-responsive corona. PMID:26409004

  13. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-08-09

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  14. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept.

  15. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  16. Freeze-dried vaccine against Rinderpest: stability and activity study.

    PubMed

    Languet, B; Precausta, P; Mackowiak, M; Dubourget, P; Reynaud, G; Duret, C

    1985-01-01

    A freeze-dried vaccine against Rinderpest was prepared from modified virus multiplied in calf kidney cell culture. Characteristics of the vaccine are as follows: high titre after freeze-drying (10(4) CCID50/dose), well-adapted freeze-drying stabilizer which ensures maintenance of the infective titre of the vaccinal virus, even under severe conditions (3.5 days at +45 degrees C), use of an appropriate solvent: magnesium sulphate molar solution or more simply physiological saline (for stability after reconstitution even at high temperatures--up to 4 h at +45 degrees C). The activity of the vaccine, tested in cattle by antibody titration and resistance to specific challenge perfectly satisfies requirements set by the WHO and OIE.

  17. Stability and variability: indicators for passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kunlin; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M H; Sternad, Dagmar

    2008-06-01

    Using a rhythmic task where human subjects bounced a ball with a handheld racket, fine-grained analyses of stability and variability extricated contributions from open-loop control, noise strength, and active error compensation. Based on stability analyses of a stochastic-deterministic model of the task--a surface contacting the ball by periodic movements--open-loop or dynamic stability was assessed by the acceleration of the racket at contact. Autocovariance analyses of model and data were further used to gauge the contributions of open-loop stability and noise strength. Variability and regression analyses estimated active error compensation. Empirical results demonstrated that experienced actors exploited open-loop stability more than novices, had lower noise strength, and applied more active error compensations. By manipulating the model parameter coefficient of restitution, task stability was varied and showed that actors graded these three components as a function of task stability. It is concluded that actors tune into task stability when stability is high but use more active compensation when stability is reduced. Implications for the neural underpinnings for passive stability and active control are discussed. Further, results showed that stability and variability are not simply the inverse of each other but contain more quantitative information when combined with model analyses.

  18. Benzodiazepine stability in postmortem samples stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula; Bastos, M Lourdes; Teixeira, Helena M

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepine (lorazepam, estazolam, chlordiazepoxide, and ketazolam) stability was studied in postmortem blood, bile, and vitreous humor stored at different temperatures over six months. The influence of NaF, in blood and bile samples, was also investigated. A solid-phase extraction technique was used on all the studied samples, and benzodiazepine quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection. Benzodiazepine concentration remained almost stable in all samples stored at -20°C and -80°C. Estazolam appeared to be a stable benzodiazepine during the six-month study, and ketazolam proved to be the most unstable benzodiazepine. A 100% loss of ketazolam occurred in all samples stored over 1 or 2 weeks at room temperature and over 8 or 12 weeks at 4°C, with the simultaneous detection of diazepam. Chlordiazepoxide suffered complete degradation in all samples, except preserved bile samples, stored at room temperature. Samples stored at 4°C for 6 months had a 29-100% decrease in chlordiazepoxide concentration. The data obtained suggest that results from samples with these benzodiazepines stored long-term should be cautiously interpreted. Bile and vitreous humor proved to be the most advantageous samples in cases where degradation of benzodiazepines by microorganisms may occur.

  19. Stability of coronene at high temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Jennings, E; Montgomery, W; Lerch, Ph

    2010-12-01

    The infrared response of coronene (C(24)H(12)) under pressure and temperature conditions up to 10 GPa and 300 °C is examined in situ using a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron-source Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that is present in the interstellar medium and meteorites which may have contributed to the Earth's primordial carbon budget. It appears to undergo a reversible phase transition between 2 and 3.2 GPa at ambient temperature; new intramolecular bonds in the region 840-880 cm(-1) result from compression. We document the shift of spectral features to higher wavenumbers with increasing pressure but find this change suppressed by increased temperature. By investigating the stability of coronene over a range of naturally occurring conditions found in a range of environments, we assess the survival of the molecule through various terrestrial and extraterrestrial processes. Coronene has previously been shown to survive atmospheric entry during Earth accretion; this can now be extended to include survival through geological processes such as subduction and silicate melting of the rock cycle, opening the possibility of extraterrestrial coronene predating terrestrial accretion existing on Earth.

  20. Actively stabilized silicon microrings with integrated surface-state-absorption photodetectors using a slope-detection method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Poon, Andrew W

    2016-09-19

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate actively stabilized silicon microrings with integrated surface-state-absorption (SSA) photodetectors using a slope-detection method. Our proof-of-concept experiments reveal that the active stabilization using multiple discrete-step slope thresholds can effectively reduce the microring transmitted intensity variations upon various temperature modulation conditions. We demonstrate an actively stabilized microring transmission with intensity modulations within ~2.5 dB upon a 5mHz temperature modulation between 17 °C and 31 °C, which is ~7.5dB improved from without stabilization. The active alignment tolerance between the stabilized microring resonance wavelength and a carrier wavelength is ~0.16 nm over a 14°C temperature modulation. We observe open eye-diagrams at a data transmission rate of up to 30 Gb/s under temperature modulations with actively stabilized silicon microrings. PMID:27661872

  1. Electrical conductivity and electron-spin resonance in oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile subjected to elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and electron spin resonance measurements are presented for oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers subjected to heat treatment at temperatures ranging from 700 to 950 K. Conductivity measurements made at temperatures between 77 and 523 K reveal that PAN fibers heat treated in vacuum behave as semiconductors, with a room-temperature conductivity dominated by the contributions of impurity states, with an activation energy of 88 kcal/mole. A decrease in conductivity is observed upon air which is attributed to a decrease in the electron-phonon scattering time. ESR spectra indicate that conducting pathways having metallic properties are formed at temperatures as low as 715 K, although the contribution of these pathways to the room-temperature conductivity is extremely small next to the contribution of localized spin centers.

  2. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  3. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Struvay, Caroline; Feller, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts. PMID:23109875

  4. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Glen A.; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-10-26

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (~500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko–Scheffler van der Waals corrections. Additionally, the embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ~0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Furthermore, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are

  5. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Glen A; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Nimlos, Mark R; Curtiss, Larry A; Beckham, Gregg T

    2015-11-19

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (∼500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko-Scheffler van der Waals corrections. The embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ∼0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Moreover, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are possible at

  6. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes.

  7. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes. PMID:26619225

  8. Thermal Design to Meet Stringent Temperature Gradient/Stability Requirements of SWIFT BAT Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is an instrument on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) SWIFT spacecraft. It is designed to detect gamma ray burst over a broad region of the sky and quickly align the telescopes on the spacecraft to the gamma ray source. The thermal requirements for the BAT detector arrays are very stringent. The maximum allowable temperature gradient of the 256 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors is PC. Also, the maximum allowable rate of temperature change of the ASICs of the 256 Detector Modules (DMs) is PC on any time scale. The total power dissipation of the DMs and Block Command & Data Handling (BCDH) is 180 W. This paper presents a thermal design that uses constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) to minimize the temperature gradient of the DMs, and loop heat pipes (LHPs) to transport the waste heat to the radiator. The LHPs vary the effective thermal conductance from the DMs to the radiator to minimize heater power to meet the heater power budget, and to improve the temperature stability. The DMs are cold biased, and active heater control is used to meet the temperature gradient and stability requirements.

  9. Magnetic-divertor stabilization of an axisymmetric plasma with anisotropic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagawa, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Cho, T.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2006-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic stabilization of an axisymmetric mirror plasma with a magnetic divertor is studied. An equation is found for the flute modes, which includes the stabilizing influence of ion temperature anisotropy and nonparaxial magnetic fields, as well as a finite ion Larmor radius. It is shown that if the density profile is sufficiently gentle, then the nonparaxial configuration can stabilize all modes as long as ion temperature is radially uniform. This can be demonstrated even when the density vanishes on the separatrix and even for small ion Larmor radii. It is found, however, that the ion temperature gradient makes the unstable region wider; high ion temperature is required to stabilize the flute mode.

  10. High Temperature Magnetic Stabilization of Cobalt Nanoparticles by an Antiferromagnetic Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    De Toro, José A; Marques, Daniel P; Muñiz, Pablo; Skumryev, Vassil; Sort, Jordi; Givord, Dominique; Nogués, Josep

    2015-07-31

    Thermal activation tends to destroy the magnetic stability of small magnetic nanoparticles, with crucial implications for ultrahigh density recording among other applications. Here we demonstrate that low-blocking-temperature ferromagnetic (FM) Co nanoparticles (T(B)<70  K) become magnetically stable above 400 K when embedded in a high-Néel-temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) NiO matrix. The origin of this remarkable T(B) enhancement is due to a magnetic proximity effect between a thin CoO shell (with low Néel temperature, T(N), and high anisotropy, K(AFM)) surrounding the Co nanoparticles and the NiO matrix (with high T(N) but low K(AFM)). This proximity effect yields an effective antiferromagnet with an apparent T(N) beyond that of bulk CoO, and an enhanced anisotropy compared to NiO. In turn, the Co core FM moment is stabilized against thermal fluctuations via core-shell exchange-bias coupling, leading to the observed T(B) increase. Mean-field calculations provide a semiquantitative understanding of this magnetic-proximity stabilization mechanism. PMID:26274435

  11. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  12. New stability and stabilization criteria for fuzzy neural networks with various activation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiyalagan, K.; Sakthivel, R.; Anthoni, S. Marshal

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the stability analysis and control design of Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy neural networks with various activation functions and continuously distributed time delays are addressed. By implementing the delay-fractioning technique together with the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach , a new set of sufficient conditions is derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which ensure the stability of the considered fuzzy neural networks. Further, based on the above-mentioned techniques, a control law with an appropriate gain control matrix is derived to achieve stabilization of the fuzzy neural networks. In addition, the results are extended to the study of the stability and stabilization results for TS fuzzy uncertain neural networks with parameter uncertainties. The stabilization criteria are obtained in terms LMIs and hence the gain control matrix can be easily determined by the MATLAB LMI control toolbox. Two numerical examples with simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained result.

  13. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  14. ALD functionalized nanoporous gold: thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Biener, Monika M; Biener, Juergen; Wichmann, Andre; Wittstock, Arne; Baumann, Theodore F; Bäumer, Marcus; Hamza, Alex V

    2011-08-10

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications, but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only 1 nm thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1,000°C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO(2) ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high-temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  15. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  16. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  17. A facile approach to enhance the high temperature stability of magnetite nanoparticles with improved magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of Zn2+ doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties, blocking and Curie temperatures, and the high temperature phase stability of magnetite nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. The Zn2+ doped nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6) are prepared by simple co-precipitation technique and are characterized by high temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HTXRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. Our HTXRD studies show that the decomposition temperature of pure magnetite (Fe3O4) in vacuum is increased by 300 °C (from 700 to 1000 °C), with 0.2 fraction of Zn2+ doping. The DSC studies under air environment also show that the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature increases with the zinc fraction. The increase in transition temperature is attributed to the increase in the activation energy of the maghemite to hematite phase transition after the replacement of Fe3+ with larger diameter Zn2+ in the A site. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization increases from 61 to 69 emu/g upon 0.2 fraction of Zn2+, which augments the utility of the doped compound for practical applications. While the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping concentration, the blocking temperature shows an opposite trend. The blocking temperature values were found to be 262, 196, 144, and 153 K for 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 fraction of zinc, respectively. The reduction in TB is attributed to weak dipole-dipole interactions and local exchange coupling between nanoparticles. All the Zn2+ doped samples show superparamagnetic nature. These findings are extremely useful in producing superparamagnetic nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for high temperature applications.

  18. Activation of Phosphorylase Kinase by Physiological Temperature.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Julio E; Thompson, Jackie A; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M

    2015-12-29

    In the six decades since its discovery, phosphorylase kinase (PhK) from rabbit skeletal muscle has usually been studied at 30 °C; in fact, not a single study has examined functions of PhK at a rabbit's body temperature, which is nearly 10 °C greater. Thus, we have examined aspects of the activity, regulation, and structure of PhK at temperatures between 0 and 40 °C. Between 0 and 30 °C, the activity at pH 6.8 of nonphosphorylated PhK predictably increased; however, between 30 and 40 °C, there was a dramatic jump in its activity, resulting in the nonactivated enzyme having a far greater activity at body temperature than was previously realized. This anomalous change in properties between 30 and 40 °C was observed for multiple functions, and both stimulation (by ADP and phosphorylation) and inhibition (by orthophosphate) were considerably less pronounced at 40 °C than at 30 °C. In general, the allosteric control of PhK's activity is definitely more subtle at body temperature. Changes in behavior related to activity at 40 °C and its control can be explained by the near disappearance of hysteresis at physiological temperature. In important ways, the picture of PhK that has emerged from six decades of study at temperatures of ≤30 °C does not coincide with that of the enzyme studied at physiological temperature. The probable underlying mechanism for the dramatic increase in PhK's activity between 30 and 40 °C is an abrupt change in the conformations of the regulatory β and catalytic γ subunits between these two temperatures.

  19. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  20. High temperature stability of lanthanum silicate dielectric on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jur, J. S.; Lichtenwalner, D. J.; Kingon, A. I.

    2007-03-05

    Integration of a high-{kappa} dielectric into complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices requires thermal stability of the amorphous dielectric phase and chemical compatibility with silicon. The stability of amorphous lanthanum silicate on Si (001) is investigated by means of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor measurements, back side secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) after a 1000 deg. C, 10 s anneal in nitrogen ambient. Back side SIMS depth profiling of the TaN/LaSiO{sub x}/Si gate stack reveals no detectable lanthanum in the silicon substrate, and HRTEM shows stability of the amorphous LaSiO{sub x}. An effective work function near 4.0 eV is obtained for these gate stacks, making the stack design ideal for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication.

  1. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  2. Influence of temperature on the activity of anammox granular biomass.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, D; Czerwionka, K; Makinia, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a short-term and long-term effect of temperature on the anammox rate and determination of temperature coefficients in the Arrhenius and Ratkowsky equations. The short-term effects of temperature on the anammox granular biomass were investigated in batch tests at ten different temperatures in the range of 10-55 °C. The maximum overall nitrogen removal rate of 1.3 gN gVSS(-1)·d(-1) was observed at 40 °C (VSS: volatile suspended solids). The minimum rate, close to 0 gN gVSS(-1)·d(-1), was observed for the limits of the analyzed temperature range (10 and 55 °C). The activity tests carried out at 55 °C showed an irreversible loss of the activity due to the observed biomass lysis. Subsequently to the batch tests, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated at different temperatures (from 30 to 11 °C) to determine the long-term effects of temperature. The system was successfully operated at 15 °C, but when temperature was decreased to 11 °C, nitrite started to accumulate and the system lost its stability. The temperature coefficient (θ) was 1.07 for the batch tests carried out in the temperature range of 10-40 °C. In contrast, during the long-term SBR operation, substantially different θ had to be estimated for two temperature ranges, 1.07 (T = 15-30 °C) and 1.65 (T = 11-15 °C).

  3. Influence of temperature on the activity of anammox granular biomass.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, D; Czerwionka, K; Makinia, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a short-term and long-term effect of temperature on the anammox rate and determination of temperature coefficients in the Arrhenius and Ratkowsky equations. The short-term effects of temperature on the anammox granular biomass were investigated in batch tests at ten different temperatures in the range of 10-55 °C. The maximum overall nitrogen removal rate of 1.3 gN gVSS(-1)·d(-1) was observed at 40 °C (VSS: volatile suspended solids). The minimum rate, close to 0 gN gVSS(-1)·d(-1), was observed for the limits of the analyzed temperature range (10 and 55 °C). The activity tests carried out at 55 °C showed an irreversible loss of the activity due to the observed biomass lysis. Subsequently to the batch tests, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated at different temperatures (from 30 to 11 °C) to determine the long-term effects of temperature. The system was successfully operated at 15 °C, but when temperature was decreased to 11 °C, nitrite started to accumulate and the system lost its stability. The temperature coefficient (θ) was 1.07 for the batch tests carried out in the temperature range of 10-40 °C. In contrast, during the long-term SBR operation, substantially different θ had to be estimated for two temperature ranges, 1.07 (T = 15-30 °C) and 1.65 (T = 11-15 °C). PMID:27191575

  4. Synthesis, thermal stability, and photocatalytic activity of nanocrystalline titanium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youjian; Zhang, Hong; Ma, DeKun; Ma, Jianhua; Ye, Hongnan; Qian, Gaojin; Ye, Yi

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The synthesized temperature is lower than some conventional methods. {yields} These raw materials are safe; all manipulations are rather safe and convenient. {yields} The product exhibits photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B. -- Abstract: Titanium carbide (TiC) was prepared via one simple route by the reaction of metallic magnesium powders with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and potassium acetate (CH{sub 3}COOK) in an autoclave at 600 {sup o}C and 8 h. Phase structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the product was cubic TiC, which consisted of particles with an average size of about 100 nm in diameter. The product was also studied by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its photocatalysis. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 350 {sup o}C in air. In addition, we discovered that the cubic TiC powders exhibited photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) under 500 W mercury lamp light irradiation.

  5. Experimental Study of the Stability of Aircraft Fuels at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of fuel stability was conducted in an apparatus which simulated an aircraft gas turbine fuel system. Two fuels were tested: Jet A and Number 2 Home Heating oil. Jet A is an aircraft gas turbine fuel currently in wide use. No. 2HH was selected to represent the properties of future turbine fuels, particularly experimental Reference Broad Specification, which, under NASA sponsorship, was considered as a possible next-generation fuel. Tests were conducted with varying fuel flow rates, delivery pressures and fuel pretreatments (including preheating and deoxygenation). Simulator wall temperatures were varied between 422K and 672K at fuel flows of 0.022 to 0.22 Kg/sec. Coking rate was determined at four equally-spaced locations along the length of the simulator. Fuel samples were collected for infrared analysis. The dependence of coking rate in Jet A may be correlated with surface temperature via an activation energy of 9 to 10 kcal/mole, although the results indicate that both bulk fluid and surface temperature affect the rate of decomposition. As a consequence, flow rate, which controls bulk temperature, must also be considered. Taken together, these results suggest that the decomposition reactions are initiated on the surface and continue in the bulk fluid. The coking rate data for No. 2 HH oil are very highly temperature dependent above approximately 533K. This suggests that bulk phase reactions can become controlling in the formation of coke.

  6. Insights into the functionality and stability of designer cellulosomes at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulou, Anastasia P; Moraïs, Sarah; Georgoulis, Anastasios; Morag, Ely; Bayer, Edward A; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G

    2016-10-01

    Enzymatic breakdown of lignocellulose is a major limiting step in second generation biorefineries. Assembly of the necessary activities into designer cellulosomes increases the productivity of this step by enhancing enzyme synergy through the proximity effect. However, most cellulosomal components are obtained from mesophilic microorganisms, limiting the applications to temperatures up to 50 °C. We hypothesized that a scaffoldin, comprising modular components of mainly mesophilic origin, can function at higher temperatures when combined with thermophilic enzymes, and the resulting designer cellulosomes could be employed in higher temperature reactions. For this purpose, we used a tetravalent scaffoldin constituted of three cohesins of mesophilic origin as well as a cohesin and cellulose-binding module derived from the thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. The scaffoldin was combined with four thermophilic enzymes from Geobacillus and Caldicellulosiruptor species, each fused with a dockerin whose specificity matched one of the cohesins. We initially verified that the biochemical properties and thermal stability of the resulting chimeric enzymes were not affected by the presence of the mesophilic dockerins. Then we examined the stability of the individual single-enzyme-scaffoldin complexes and the full tetravalent cellulosome showing that all complexes are stable and functional for at least 6 h at 60 °C. Finally, within this time frame and conditions, the full complex appeared over 50 % more efficient in the hydrolysis of corn stover compared to the free enzymes. Overall, the results support the utilization of scaffoldin components of mesophilic origin at relatively high temperatures and provide a framework for the production of designer cellulosomes suitable for high temperature biorefinery applications. PMID:27207145

  7. Precision capacitor has improved temperature and operational stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookshier, W. K.; Lewis, R. N.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum dielectric capacitor is fabricated from materials with very low temperature coefficients of expansion. This precision capacitor in the 1000-2000 picofarad range has a near-zero temperature coefficient of capacitance, eliminates ion chamber action caused by air ionization in the dielectric, and minimizes electromagnetic field charging effects.

  8. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  9. Stability of whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions during chilled storage and temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Reiffers-Magnani, Christel K; Bot, Arjen

    2004-06-16

    The stability of heat-treated and/or acidified, partly-crystalline-fat-based, whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions against partial coalescence was investigated during chilled storage (at 5 degrees C) and repeated temperature cycling (three times between 5 and 25 degrees C). Experiments focused on the evolution of firmness and droplet size (using pulsed field gradient NMR and scanning electron microscopy). Besides the effects of denaturation and/or acidification, the influence of the droplet size of the dispersed phase on emulsion stability was investigated also. It was found that heat treatment or acidification before emulsification led to unstable emulsions during temperature cycling, whereas heat treatment after acidification resulted in stable emulsions. PMID:15186103

  10. The role of hydration in enzyme activity and stability: 2. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity and stability in a continuous gas phase reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Russell, A J

    1996-03-20

    The degree of enzyme hydration is the one of the most important factors which can affect enzyme activity and stability in water-limited environments. Alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH) has been used as a model enzyme to study the effects of hydration on activity, stability, and cofactor stability with gas phase substrates. In all cases, the enzyme is essentially inactive until a temperature-independent degree of surface coverage by water molecules has been reached. The critical water content corresponds to 40-50% of a single monolayer. Careful control of the degree of hydration, by adjustments to gas humidity and temperature, enables the enzyme to be stabilized for periods exceeding 1 month, whereas in water the half-life of the enzyme is 30 min. The reaction with gas phase substrates follows a pseudo-first-order mechanism with an activation energy of 7.5 +/- kcal/mol, which is almost half of that in aqueous solution. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

  12. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  13. Stabilization of solar films against hi temperature deactivation

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, Clinton F.

    1984-03-20

    A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a solar absorptive film consisting essentially of copper oxide, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide; (2) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass or a stainless steel; and (3) an interlayer of platinum, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of platinum to obtain a stable conductor-dielectric tandem.

  14. Investigating the Stability of eLiposomes at Elevated Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G; Javadi, Marjan

    2015-08-01

    eLiposomes encapsulate a perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion droplet inside a liposome. Ultrasound is then used as a trigger mechanism to vaporize the perfluorocarbon, break the liposome, and release the desired drug to the tumor tissue. The purpose of this research is to show that eLiposomes synthesized using perfluoropentane are stable above the normal boiling point of the perfluoropentane and at body temperature and thus has potential for use in vivo. Experiments involving the release of fluorescent calcein molecules were performed on eLiposomes to measure the release of calcein at various temperatures in the absence of ultrasound. Results showed that eLiposomes are stable at body temperatures and that as the temperature increases above 40°C, calcein release from these novel nanocarriers increases.

  15. Modeling Physical Stability of Amorphous Solids Based on Temperature and Moisture Stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua Alan; Zografi, George; Gao, Ping; Gong, Yuchuan; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry was utilized to monitor the crystallization process of amorphous ritonavir (RTV) and its hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate-based amorphous solid dispersion under various stressed conditions. An empirical model was developed: ln(τ)=ln(A)+EaRT-b⋅wc, where τ is the crystallization induction period, A is a pre-exponential factor, Ea is the apparent activation energy, b is the moisture sensitivity parameter, and wc is water content. To minimize the propagation of errors associated with the estimates, a nonlinear approach was used to calculate mean estimates and confidence intervals. The physical stability of neat amorphous RTV and RTV in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate solid dispersions was found to be mainly governed by the nucleation kinetic process. The impact of polymers and moisture on the crystallization process can be quantitatively described by Ea and b in this Arrhenius-type model. The good agreement between the measured values under some less stressful test conditions and those predicted, reflected by the slope and R(2) of the correlation plot of these 2 sets of data on a natural logarithm scale, indicates its predictability of long-term physical stability of amorphous RTV in solid dispersions. To further improve the model, more understanding of the impact of temperature and moisture on the amorphous physical stability and fundamentals regarding nucleation and crystallization is needed.

  16. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  17. Modeling Physical Stability of Amorphous Solids Based on Temperature and Moisture Stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua Alan; Zografi, George; Gao, Ping; Gong, Yuchuan; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry was utilized to monitor the crystallization process of amorphous ritonavir (RTV) and its hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate-based amorphous solid dispersion under various stressed conditions. An empirical model was developed: ln(τ)=ln(A)+EaRT-b⋅wc, where τ is the crystallization induction period, A is a pre-exponential factor, Ea is the apparent activation energy, b is the moisture sensitivity parameter, and wc is water content. To minimize the propagation of errors associated with the estimates, a nonlinear approach was used to calculate mean estimates and confidence intervals. The physical stability of neat amorphous RTV and RTV in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate solid dispersions was found to be mainly governed by the nucleation kinetic process. The impact of polymers and moisture on the crystallization process can be quantitatively described by Ea and b in this Arrhenius-type model. The good agreement between the measured values under some less stressful test conditions and those predicted, reflected by the slope and R(2) of the correlation plot of these 2 sets of data on a natural logarithm scale, indicates its predictability of long-term physical stability of amorphous RTV in solid dispersions. To further improve the model, more understanding of the impact of temperature and moisture on the amorphous physical stability and fundamentals regarding nucleation and crystallization is needed. PMID:27185539

  18. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  19. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiena, C.; Coviello, V.; Arattano, M.; Chiarle, M.; Morra di Cella, U.; Pirulli, M.; Pogliotti, P.; Scavia, C.

    2012-07-01

    The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps). In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007-2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs. In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence. The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  20. Stability Curve Prediction of Homologous Proteins Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature () and the change in heat capacity () of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies () at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted 's, 's and folding free energies at room temperature () are equal to 13 , 1.3 ) and 4.1 , respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed. PMID:25032839

  1. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, M Luisa; Risso, Valeria A; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm's, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm's are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV's but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm's for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  2. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  3. Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil-based lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil (PSO)-based lubricants have been investigated by the pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) method. It was found that PSO samples have lower oxidative stability than their precursor, soybean oil. The main reason for the...

  4. Emotional stability, anxiety, and natural killer activity under examination stress.

    PubMed

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Rovesti, S; Pinelli, M; Vivoli, R; Solfrini, V; Vivoli, G

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the relation between a stable personality trait, a mood state and immune response to an examination stress. A self-reported measure of emotional stability (BFQ-ES scale) was obtained in a sample (n = 39) randomly selected from 277 cadets; this personality trait was also investigated by completing a neuroticism scale (Eysenck personality inventory) and a trait-anxiety scale (STAI). Natural killer (NK) cell activity was measured at baseline, long before the examination time and the examination day. The state-anxiety scale evaluated the response to the stressful stimulus. Taking subjects all together, the academic task did not result in significant modification over baseline in NK cell activity. Subjects were then divided into three groups based on emotional stability and state-anxiety scores: high emotional stability/low anxiety, medium, and low emotional stability/high anxiety. Examination stress induced significant increases in NK cell activity in the high emotional stability/low anxiety group, no effect in the medium group, and significant decreases in the low emotional stability/high anxiety group. The repeated-measure ANOVA revealed a significant interaction of group x period (baseline vs. examination) for both lytic units and percent cytolysis. The results did not change after introducing coffee and smoking habits as covariates. Our findings suggest that the state-anxiety acts in concert with a stable personality trait to modulate NK response in healthy subjects exposed to a psychological naturalistic stress. The relation between anxiety and poor immune control has been already described, whereas the ability of emotional stability to associate with an immunoenhancement has not yet reported. The peculiarity of our population, a very homogeneous and healthy group for life style and habits, can have highlighted the role of emotional stability, and may account for the difference with other studies.

  5. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  6. Temperature, activity, and lizard life histories

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, S.C.; Porter, W.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Lizard life-history characteristics vary widely among species and populations. Most authors seek adaptive or phylogenetic explanations for life-history patterns, which are usually presumed to reflect genetic differences. However, lizard life histories are often phenotypically plastic, varying in response to temperature, food availability, and other environmental factors. Despite the importance of temperature to lizard ecology and physiology, its effects on life histories have received relatively little attention. The authors present a theoretical model predicting the proximate consequences of the thermal environment for lizard life histories. Temperature, by affecting activity times, can cause variation in annual survival rate and fecundity, leading to a negative correlation between survival rate and fecundity among populations in different thermal environments. Thus, physiological and evolutionary models predict the same qualitative pattern of life-history variation in lizards. They tested their model with published life-history data from field studies of the lizard Sceloporus undulatus, using climate and geographical data to reconstruct estimated annual activity seasons. Among populations, annual activity times were negatively correlated with annual survival rate and positively correlated with annual fecundity. Proximate effects of temperature may confound comparative analyses of lizard life-history variation and should be included in future evolutionary models. 125 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Probing impact of active site residue mutations on stability and activity of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Daudé, David; Topham, Christopher M; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a transglucosidase from the GH13 family of glycoside-hydrolases that naturally catalyzes the synthesis of α-glucans from the widely available donor sucrose. Interestingly, natural molecular evolution has modeled a dense hydrogen bond network at subsite -1 responsible for the specific recognition of sucrose and conversely, it has loosened interactions at the subsite +1 creating a highly promiscuous subsite +1. The residues forming these subsites are considered to be likely involved in the activity as well as the overall stability of the enzyme. To assess their role, a structure-based approach was followed to reshape the subsite -1. A strategy based on stability change predictions, using the FoldX algorithm, was considered to identify the best candidates for site-directed mutagenesis and guide the construction of a small targeted library. A miniaturized purification protocol was developed and both mutant stability and substrate promiscuity were explored. A range of 8 °C between extreme melting temperature values was observed and some variants were able to synthesize series of oligosaccharides with distributions differing from that of the parental enzyme. The crucial role of subsite -1 was thus highlighted and the biocatalysts generated can now be considered as starting points for further engineering purposes.

  8. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  9. High temperature stability of a 316 austenitic stainless steel coated with cerium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Del Angel, Humberto

    Cerium oxide (CeO2-x) nanoparticles were used for coating protection on a 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel (Aust. SS) to enhance the thermal stability of the oxide films formed at high temperatures. Three simple coating methods were used, dipping, spraying and spinning in order to explore the coating film morphology, nanoparticle distribution and its effect on thermal stability of the steel substrates. Experimentally, the selected steel was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. The cerium oxide nanoparticles used on the three methods were synthesized in the laboratory obtaining nanoparticles in the range of 3.5 to 6.2 nanometers. It was found that cerium oxide particle size is affected by temperature. In this case, the activation energy for particle growth was estimated to be around 21,1 kJ/mol. Characterization of the film morphologies before and after oxidation were carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Surface Profilometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). A comparison of the three coating methods was carried out for the particular case of the 316 Aust. SS coupons. In addition, the oxidation kinetics was experimentally investigated for the coated samples. For this purpose thermal gravimetric determinations were made at 800°C, 900°C, and 1000°C and oxidation rate constants were calculated at each temperature.

  10. Miniature High Stability High Temperature Space Rated Blackbody Radiance Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. A.; Beswick, A. G.

    1987-09-01

    This paper presents the design and test performance of a conical cavity type blackbody radiance source that will meet the requirements of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite program (UARS). Since a radiance source meeting the requirements of this experiment was unavailable in the commercial market, a development effort was undertaken by the HALOE Project. The blackbody radiance source operates in vacuum at 1300 K + 0.5 K over any 15-minute interval, uses less than 7.5 watts of power, maintains a 49°C outer case temperature, and fits within the 2.5 x 2.5 x 3.0 inch envelope allocated inside the HALOE instrument. Also, the unit operates in air, during ground testing of the HALOE instrument, where it uses 17 watts of power with an outer case temperature of 66°C. The thrust of this design effort was to minimize the heat losses, in order to keep the power usage under 7.5 watts, and to minimize the amount of silica in the materials. Silica in the presence of the platinum heater winding used in this design would cause the platinum to erode, changing the operating temperature set-point. The design required the development of fabrication techniques which would provide very small, close tolerance parts from extremely difficult-to-machine materials. Also, a space rated ceramic core and unique, low thermal conductance, ceramic-to-metal joint was developed, tested and incorporated in this design. The completed flight qualification hardware has undergone performance, environmental and life testing. The design configuration and test results are discussed in detail in this paper.

  11. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement.

  12. Effect of temperature change on anammox activity.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal appears as a prerequisite for the implementation of energy autarchic municipal wastewater treatment plants. Whilst the application of anammox-related technologies in the side-stream is at present state of the art, the feasibility of this energy-efficient process in main-stream conditions is still under investigation. Lower operating temperatures and ammonium concentrations, together with a demand for high and stable nitrogen removal efficiency, represent the main challenges to overcome for this appealing new frontier of the wastewater treatment field. In this study, we report the short-term effect of temperature on the maximum biomass specific activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria as evaluated by means of batch tests. The experiments were performed on anammox biomass sampled from two full-scale reactors and two lab-scale reactors, all characterized by different reactor configurations and operating conditions. The results indicate that for the anammox conversion, the temperature dependency cannot be accurately modeled by one single Arrhenius coefficient (i.e., θ) as typically applied for other biological processes. The temperature effect is increasing at lower temperatures. Adaptation of anammox bacteria after long-term cultivation at 20 and 10°C was observed. Implications for modeling and process design are finally discussed.

  13. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight

    PubMed Central

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J.; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z. Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory–motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  14. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight.

    PubMed

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-08-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory-motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots.

  15. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight.

    PubMed

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-08-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory-motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  16. Sensing disks for slug-type calorimeters have higher temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Graphite sensing disk for slug-type radiation calorimeters exhibits better performance at high temperatures than copper and nickel disks. The graphite is heat-soaked to stabilize its emittance and the thermocouple is protected from the graphite so repeated temperature cycling does not change its sensitivity.

  17. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  18. Chemical modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. for improved activity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, N S; Kishore, Vijay; Manonmani, H K

    2014-01-01

    L-Asparaginase (ASNase), an antileukemia enzyme, is facing problems with antigenicity in the blood. Modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. was tried to obtain improved stability and improved functionality. In our experiment, modification of the enzyme was tried with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin by crosslinking using glutaraldehyde, N-bromosuccinimide, and mono-methoxy polyethylene glycol. Modified enzymes were studied for activity, temperature stability, rate constants (kd), and protection to proteolytic digestion. Modification with ovalbumin resulted in improved enzyme activity that was 10-fold higher compared to native enzyme, while modification with bovine serum albumin through glutaraldehyde cross-linking resulted in high stability of L-asparaginase that was 8.5- and 7.62-fold more compared to native enzyme at 28°C and 37°C by the end of 24 hr. These effects were dependent on the quantity of conjugate formed. Modification also markedly prolonged L-asparaginase half-life and serum stability. N-Bromosuccinimide-modified ASNase presented greater stability with prolonged in vitro half-life of 144 hr to proteolytic digestion relative to unmodified enzyme (93 h). The present work could be seen as producing a modified L-asparaginase with improved activity and stability and can be a potential source for developing therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  19. Atmospheric Stability & Turbulence from Temperature Profiles over Sicily During Summer 2002 & 2003 HASI Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretation of the temperature measurements data retrieved during the balloon campaigns (in 2002 and in 2003) for testing HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument), launched from the Italian Space Agency Base in Trapani (Sicily), are presented. Both ascending and descending phases are analysed; data reveal interesting features near the tropopause (present in the region between 11km-14km), where temperature cooling can be related to layers with strong winds (2002 flight); in the troposphere a multistratified structure of the temperature field is observed and discussed (particularly in the 2003 flight) Finally, stability and turbulence of the atmosphere are analysed; the buoyancy N2 parameters for both the flights show lowers value respect to standard tropospheric values corresponding to a lower stability of the atmosphere; still there is a higher stability above the tropopause. The energy spectrum of temperature data is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory: the characteristic k(sup -5/3) behaviour is reproduced.

  20. Proteolytically stabilizing fibronectin without compromising cell and gelatin binding activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy Wangechi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive proteolytic degradation of fibronectin (FN) has been implicated in impaired tissue repair in chronic wounds. We previously reported two strategies for stabilizing FN against proteolytic degradation; the first conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG) through cysteine residues and the second conjugated PEG chains of varying molecular weight on lysine residues. PEGylation of FN via lysine residues resulted in increased resistance to proteolysis with increasing PEG size, but an overall decrease in biological activity, as characterized by cell and gelatin binding. Our latest method to stabilize FN against proteolysis masks functional regions in the protein during lysine PEGylation. FN is PEGylated while it is bound to gelatin Sepharose beads with 2, 5, and 10 kDa PEG precursors. This results in partially PEGylated FN that is more stable than native FN and whose proteolytic stability increases with PEG molecular weight. Unlike completely PEGylated FN, partially PEGylated FN has cell adhesion, gelatin binding, and matrix assembly responses that are comparable to native FN. This is new evidence of how PEGylation variables can be used to stabilize FN while retaining its activity. The conjugates developed herein can be used to dissect molecular mechanisms mediated by FN stability and functionality, and address the problem of FN degradation in chronic wounds.

  1. Effect of surfactant on temperature stability of solid lipid nanoparticles studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sacheen; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2013-06-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are new paradigm of drug delivery system of water insoluble active pharmaceutical ingredient. Paliperidone, an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia is a water insoluble molecule with low bioavailability was studied. Macrogol glyceride surfactant, bile salt based surfactant and sodium dodecyl sulphate were used to stabilize the solid lipid as dispersed nanoparticles form by adsorbing on the surface of the nanoparticles. Anionic surfactants bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate were found to stabilize forming a monomolecular layer of surfactants on the surface of nanoparticles; whereas macrogol glyceride based surfactant have intrusion in the matrix of lipid nanoparticles. So intrusion of macrogol glyceride in matrix was observed by studying the change in size of nanoparticles with respect to temperature with the help of dynamic light scattering. In case of macrogol glyceride size decrease start form 50°C, for bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate size deacrease start at 60°C. So that structural disturbance of nanoparticles by the macrogol glyceride on the surface was found maximum as compared to anionic surfactant.

  2. Mesoporous aluminosilicates with ordered hexagonal structure, strong acidity, and extraordinary hydrothermal stability at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Han, Y; Xiao, F S; Qiu, S; Zhu, L; Wang, R; Yu, Y; Zhang, Z; Zou, B; Wang, Y; Sun, H; Zhao, D; Wei, Y

    2001-05-30

    Highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates (MAS-5) with uniform pore sizes have been successfully synthesized from assembly of preformed aluminosilcate precursors with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. The aluminosilicate precursors were obtained by heating, at 100--140 degrees C for 2--10 h, aluminasilica gels at the Al(2)O(3)/SiO(2)/TEAOH/H(2)O molar ratios of 1.0/7.0--350/10.0--33.0/500--2000. Mesoporous MAS-5 shows extraordinary stability both in boiling water (over 300 h) and in steam (800 degrees C for 2 h). Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia shows that the acidic strength of MAS-5 is much higher than that of MCM-41 and is comparable to that of microporous Beta zeolite. In catalytic cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene and alkylation of isobutane with butene, MAS-5 exhibits greater catalytic activity and selectivity, as compared with MCM-41 and HZSM-5. The MAS-5 samples were characterized with infrared, UV--Raman, and NMR spectroscopy and numerous other techniques. The results suggest that MAS-5 consists of both mesopores and micropores and that the pore walls of MAS-5 contain primary and secondary structural building units, similar to those of microporous zeolites. Such unique structural features might be responsible for the observed strong acidity and high thermal stability of the mesoporous aluminosilicates with well-ordered hexagonal symmetry.

  3. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  4. [Effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal in the ANAMMOX reactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Zheng, Yu-Hui; Yuan, Yi; Li, Da-Peng; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Chun-Lei

    2012-04-01

    The effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal efficiency was investigated in an ANANMMOX reactor by measuring the nitrogen removal rate. The results showed that the nitrogen removal rate changed between 1.51 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) and 1.84 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) when the temperature was between 26 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Compared with gradually degrading temperature (nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude 9.03%), the ladder degrading temperature was more advantageous on the stability of nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude was 4.35%. The nitrogen removal rate dropped quickly, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Moreover, a large number of NO2(-) -N accumulated in the ANAMMOX process, when temperature is below 15 degrees C in the reactor. A strong relationship between temperature and nitrogen removal rate was found, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Based on the effect of temperature on nitrogen removal rate, the strategy about temperature control was proposed to achieve the fast start-up and high efficiency of nitrogen removal under low temperature for the ANANMMOX reactors.

  5. Design of DC-contact RF MEMS switch with temperature stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junfeng; Li, Zhiqun; Zhu, Jian; Yu, Yuanwei; Jiang, Lili

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the temperature stability of DC-contact RF MEMS switch, a thermal buckle-beam structure is implemented. The stability of the switch pull-in voltage versus temperature is not only improved, but also the impact of stress and stress gradient on the drive voltage is suppressed. Test results show that the switch pull-in voltage is less sensitive to temperature between -20 °C and 100 °C. The variable rate of pull-in voltage to temperature is about -120 mV/°C. The RF performance of the switch is stable, and the isolation is almost independent of temperature. After being annealed at 280 °C for 12 hours, our switch samples, which are suitable for packaging, have less than 1.5% change in the rate of pull-in voltage.

  6. Temperature Regulator for Actively Cooled Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max (Inventor); Kelly, H. Neale (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In active cooling of a structure it is beneficial to use a plurality of passages for conducting coolant to various portions of the structure. Since most structures do not undergo isotropic thermal loads it is desirable to allow for variation in coolant flow to each area of the structure. The present invention allows for variable flow by a variation of the area of a portion of each of the coolant passages. Shape memory alloys and bi-material springs are used to produce passages that change flow area as a function of temperature.

  7. On the stability of nonisothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres. II. The effect of gas temperature on the stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, O.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the stability of nonisothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres in the context of a model that includes a self-consistent calculation of the gas temperature. In this way, we can discard the assumption of equality between the dust and gas temperatures and study the stability as the gas temperature changes with the chemical evolution of the cooling species. Methods: We use a gas-grain chemical model to calculate the chemical evolution. The model includes a time-dependent treatment of depletion onto grain surfaces, which strongly influences the gas temperature as the main coolant molecule CO depletes from the gas. The dust and gas temperatures are solved with radiative transfer calculations. For consistent comparison with previous work, we assume that the cores are deeply embedded in a larger external structure, corresponding to visual extinction AVext = 10 mag at the core edge. We also study the effect of lower values of AVext. Results: We find that the critical nondimensional radius ξ1 derived here, which determines the maximum density contrast between the core center and the outer boundary, is similar to our previous work where we assumed Tdust = Tgas. Here, the ξ1 values lie below the isothermal critical value ξ0 ~ 6.45, but the difference is less than 10 %. We find that chemical evolution does not notably affect the stability condition of low-mass cores (< 0.75 M⊙), which have high average densities and a strong gas-grain thermal coupling. In contrast, for higher masses the decrease in cooling due to CO depletion causes substantial temporal changes in the temperature and in the density profiles of the cores. In the mass range 1-2 M⊙, ξ1 decreases with chemical evolution, whereas above 3 M⊙, ξ1 instead increases with chemical evolution. We also find that decreasing AVext strongly increases the gas temperature, especially when the gas is chemically old, and this causes ξ 1 to increase with respect to models with higher AVext. However, the

  8. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Desheng Meng, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA.

  9. RNF4-Dependent Oncogene Activation by Protein Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jane J; Abed, Mona; Heuberger, Julian; Novak, Rostislav; Zohar, Yaniv; Beltran Lopez, Angela P; Trausch-Azar, Julie S; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G; Benhamou, David; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kopan, Raphael; Birchmeier, Walter; Schwartz, Alan L; Orian, Amir

    2016-09-20

    Ubiquitylation regulates signaling pathways critical for cancer development and, in many cases, targets proteins for degradation. Here, we report that ubiquitylation by RNF4 stabilizes otherwise short-lived oncogenic transcription factors, including β-catenin, Myc, c-Jun, and the Notch intracellular-domain (N-ICD) protein. RNF4 enhances the transcriptional activity of these factors, as well as Wnt- and Notch-dependent gene expression. While RNF4 is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, protein stabilization requires the substrate's phosphorylation, rather than SUMOylation, and binding to RNF4's arginine-rich motif domain. Stabilization also involves generation of unusual polyubiquitin chains and docking of RNF4 to chromatin. Biologically, RNF4 enhances the tumor phenotype and is essential for cancer cell survival. High levels of RNF4 mRNA correlate with poor survival of a subgroup of breast cancer patients, and RNF4 protein levels are elevated in 30% of human colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, RNF4-dependent ubiquitylation translates transient phosphorylation signal(s) into long-term protein stabilization, resulting in enhanced oncoprotein activation. PMID:27653698

  10. Phase diagram, thermal stability, and high temperature oxidation of the ternary copper-nickel-iron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella

    Due to the aluminum industry demands, a large effort has recently been devoted to the development of special alloys to be used as inert anodes for a newly designed aluminum reduction cell. The implementation of this new technology aims at the replacement of the graphite anodes that have been used for over 100 years in aluminum smelting, which would reduce fossil carbon consumption, and eliminate the emission of carbon dioxide and of perfluorocarbons. Ternary alloys containing copper, nickel, and iron have been the subject of the research activities. The present research focused on the stability of the Cu-Ni-Fe alloys at high temperatures in oxidizing and fluoridating environments. The experimental methods included thermodynamic calculations of the phase diagram (Thermocalc), optical microscopy and microprobe microstructural and chemical investigations (EMPA), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and air-oxidation studies. The results have led to the optimization of the Cu-Ni-Fe ternary phase diagram and to an extensive study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the spinodal decomposition and discontinuous reactions occurring during ageing as a function of alloy composition. The oxidizing reactions occurring in air at high temperatures at the surface of the alloys have been also discussed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic laws. The phase formation in a fluorine containing environment as encountered in an aluminum electrolytic cell is predicted using principles of physical chemistry.

  11. Stability Assessment of 10 Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Compounded in SyrSpend SF.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The stability of 10 active pharmaceutical ingredients was studied in SyrSpend SF PH4 or SyrSpend SF Alka at room and/or refrigerated temperature (2°C to 8°C). An oral suspension of each active pharmaceutical ingredient was compounded in low actinic plastic bottles at a specific concentration in SyrSpend SF PH4 or SyrSpend SF Alka. Samples were assessed for stability immediately after preparation (day 0) followed by storage at room temperature and/or at refrigerated temperature. At set time points, the samples were removed from storage and assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatographic stability- indicating method. The active pharmaceutical ingredient was considered stable if the suspension retained 90% to 110% of the initial concentration. Furosemide was stable for at least 14 days in SyrSpend SF Alka at refrigerated conditions. Prednisolone sodium phosphate in SyrSpend SF PH4 was stable for at least 30 days at room temperature and refrigerated conditions. Ranitidine hydrochloride suspensions in SyrSpend SF PH4 at room temperature and refrigerated conditions were stable for at least 30 days and 58 days, respectively. Hydrocortisone hemisuccinate and sodium phosphate retained greater than 90% for at least 60 days at both room temperature and refrigerated samples in SyrSpend SF PH4. Amiodarone hydrochloride and nifedipine suspensions at both room temperature and refrigerated conditions retained greater than 90% of the initial concentrations for at least 90 days in SyrSpend SF PH4. Refrigerated samples of simvastatin in SyrSpend SF PH4 were stable for at least 90 days. Spironolactone in SyrSpend SF PH4 at room temperature retained more than 90% of the initial concentration for at least 90 days. Phenobarbital in SyrSpend SF PH4 retained above 90% of initial concentration for at least 154 days at room temperature. This study demonstrated the stability of a wide range of frequently used active pharmaceutical ingredients, tested in SyrSpend SF PH4 and Syr

  12. Activity and stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) entrapped in aerosol OT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Sarcar, S; Jain, T K; Maitra, A

    1992-02-20

    The activity and stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) entrapped in aerosol OT reverse micellar droplets have been investigated spectrophotometrically. Various physical parameters, e.g., water pool size, w(0), pH, and temperature, were optimized for YADH in water/AOT/isooctane reverse micelles. It was found that the enzyme exhibits maximum activity at w(0) = 28 and pH 8.1. It was more active in reverse micelles than in aqueous buffers at a particular temperature and was denatured at about 307 degrees C in both the systems. At a particular temperature YADH entrapped in reverse micelles was less stable than when it was dissolved in aqueous buffer.

  13. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  14. Trading off stability against activity in extremophilic aldolases

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Markus; Weiergräber, Oliver H.; Classen, Thomas; Bisterfeld, Carolin; Bramski, Julia; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding enzyme stability and activity in extremophilic organisms is of great biotechnological interest, but many questions are still unsolved. Using 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) as model enzyme, we have evaluated structural and functional characteristics of different orthologs from psychrophilic, mesophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms. We present the first crystal structures of psychrophilic DERAs, revealing a dimeric organization resembling their mesophilic but not their thermophilic counterparts. Conversion into monomeric proteins showed that the native dimer interface contributes to stability only in the hyperthermophilic enzymes. Nevertheless, introduction of a disulfide bridge in the interface of a psychrophilic DERA did confer increased thermostability, suggesting a strategy for rational design of more durable enzyme variants. Constraint network analysis revealed particularly sparse interactions between the substrate pocket and its surrounding α-helices in psychrophilic DERAs, which indicates that a more flexible active center underlies their high turnover numbers. PMID:26783049

  15. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  16. Synaptic scaling stabilizes persistent activity driven by asynchronous neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Volman, Vladislav; Gerkin, Richard C

    2011-04-01

    Small networks of cultured hippocampal neurons respond to transient stimulation with rhythmic network activity (reverberation) that persists for several seconds, constituting an in vitro model of synchrony, working memory, and seizure. This mode of activity has been shown theoretically and experimentally to depend on asynchronous neurotransmitter release (an essential feature of the developing hippocampus) and is supported by a variety of developing neuronal networks despite variability in the size of populations (10-200 neurons) and in patterns of synaptic connectivity. It has previously been reported in computational models that "small-world" connection topology is ideal for the propagation of similar modes of network activity, although this has been shown only for neurons utilizing synchronous (phasic) synaptic transmission. We investigated how topological constraints on synaptic connectivity could shape the stability of reverberations in small networks that also use asynchronous synaptic transmission. We found that reverberation duration in such networks was resistant to changes in topology and scaled poorly with network size. However, normalization of synaptic drive, by reducing the variance of synaptic input across neurons, stabilized reverberation in such networks. Our results thus suggest that the stability of both normal and pathological states in developing networks might be shaped by variance-normalizing constraints on synaptic drive. We offer an experimental prediction for the consequences of such regulation on the behavior of small networks.

  17. Conserved tyrosine 182 residue in hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1 plays a critical role in stabilizing the active site.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Chung, Hye-Shin; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-03-01

    An aromatic amino acid, Tyr or Trp, located in the esterase active site wall, is highly conserved, with hyperthermophilic esterases showing preference for Tyr and lower temperature esterases showing preference for Trp. In this study, we investigated the role of Tyr(182) in the active site wall of hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1. Mutation of Tyr to Phe or Ala had a moderate effect on EstE1 thermal stability. However, a small-to-large mutation such as Tyr to His or Trp had a devastating effect on thermal stability. All mutant EstE1 enzymes showed reduced catalytic rates and enhanced substrate affinities as compared with wild-type EstE1. Hydrogen bond formation involving Tyr(182) was unimportant for maintaining EstE1 thermal stability, as the EstE1 structure is already adapted to high temperatures via increased intramolecular interactions. However, removal of hydrogen bond from Tyr(182) significantly decreased EstE1 catalytic activity, suggesting its role in stabilization of the active site. These results suggest that Tyr is preferred over a similarly sized Phe residue or bulky His or Trp residue in the active site walls of hyperthermophilic esterases for stabilizing the active site and regulating catalytic activity at high temperatures. PMID:26838013

  18. EFFECT OF STORAGE TEMPERATURE ON THE STABILITY OF TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION ADMIXTURES PREPARED FOR INFANTS.

    PubMed

    Turmezei, Judit; Jávorszky, Eszter; Szabó, Eszter; Dredán, Judit; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2015-01-01

    Physical, chemical and microbiological stability of total parenteral nutrient (TPN) admixtures was studied as a function of storage time and temperature. Particle size analysis and zeta potential measurements were carried out to evaluate the possible changes in the kinetic stability of the emulsions as a function of storage time and temperature. The concentration changes of the applied additives, those of the ascorbic acid and L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were also determined under different storage conditions. Our results indicate that there were no significant differences in the particle size and zeta potential values of admixtures stored at the three examined temperatures. The best results were obtained in the case of admixtures stored at 30°C temperature. Rapid decomposition of vitamin C was found while the glutamine showed adequate stability as a function of storage time and temperature. According to the results of the physicochemical examinations 10-day storage period of this type of TPN admixtures can be accepted at room temperature. Their storage does not require refrigeration (2-8°C) thus they can be administered without special preheating ensuring better physiological tolerance. Ascorbic acid can be added to the system preceding the administration to the patient because of its rapid decomposition.

  19. Ab Initio Simulations of Temperature Dependent Phase Stability and Martensitic Transitions in NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Thompson, Alexander E.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    For NiTi based alloys, the shape memory effect is governed by a transition from a low-temperature martensite phase to a high-temperature austenite phase. Despite considerable experimental and computational work, basic questions regarding the stability of the phases and the martensitic phase transition remain unclear even for the simple case of binary, equiatomic NiTi. We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to describe the temperature-dependent behavior of NiTi and resolve several of these outstanding issues. Structural correlation functions and finite temperature phonon spectra are evaluated to determine phase stability. In particular, we show that finite temperature, entropic effects stabilize the experimentally observed martensite (B19') and austenite (B2) phases while destabilizing the theoretically predicted (B33) phase. Free energy computations based on ab initio thermodynamic integration confirm these results and permit estimates of the transition temperature between the phases. In addition to the martensitic phase transition, we predict a new transition between the B33 and B19' phases. The role of defects in suppressing these phase transformations is discussed.

  20. Concentration and temperature effects on ovostatin activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, Debra M.

    1994-01-01

    Light scattering experiments performed at Mississippi State University using MSFC ovostatin preparations indicated that at low ovostatin concentrations, below 0.2 mg/ml, the protein was dissociating from a tetramer into dimers. Since the proposed mechanism of action involved the tetrameric form of the protein, we hypothesized that perhaps under the conditions of our assays at various O/T ratios the ovostatin was becoming dissociated into an inactive dimer. To examine this possibility we assayed the ovostatin activity as a function of ovostatin concentration and of temperature of the assay. Data are presented that show the results of these assays at 23 C, 30 C, 37 C and 42 C respectively. The data are highly suggestive that there is a decrease in ovostatin activity as the concentration of the protein falls below 0.06 mg/ml. This may not be of any physiological importance, however, since the concentration of ovostatin in the egg is about 0.5 mg/ml. Curiously, the dissociation of the tetramer into dimers does not show a significant temperature dependence as would be expected for an equilibrium reaction. Whether this is in fact the case, or whether the differences are so small as to not be discerned from the current data remains to be seen. Another aspect to consider is that in the egg the primary role of the ovostatin may or may not be as a protease inhibitor. Although the inhibition of collagenase by ovostatin may be an important aspect of embryogenesis, it is also possible that it functions as a binding protein for some substance. In this regard, all ovostatin preparations from MSFC have shown an approximately 88,000 MW protein associated with the ovostatin. The identity of this protein is not currently known and may be the subject of future studies.

  1. Room-temperature charge stability modulated by quantum effects in a nanoscale silicon island.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Lee, J J; Kang, H J; Choi, J B; Yang, S-R Eric; Takahashi, Y; Hasko, D G

    2011-04-13

    We report on transport measurement performed on a room-temperature-operating ultrasmall Coulomb blockade devices with a silicon island of sub5 nm. The charge stability at 300K exhibits a substantial change in slopes and diagonal size of each successive Coulomb diamond, but remarkably its main feature persists even at low temperature down to 5.3K except for additional Coulomb peak splitting. This key feature of charge stability with additional fine structures of Coulomb peaks are successfully modeled by including the interplay between Coulomb interaction, valley splitting, and strong quantum confinement, which leads to several low-energy many-body excited states for each dot occupancy. These excited states become enhanced in the sub5 nm ultrasmall scale and persist even at 300K in the form of cluster, leading to the substantial modulation of charge stability.

  2. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films. PMID:21828794

  3. Effects of crosslinking temperature and time on microstructure and stability of cassava starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Puncha-Arnon, Santhanee; Jiranuntakul, Wittawat; Uttapap, Dudsadee

    2015-12-10

    Starch microspheres (SMs) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion-crosslinking technique at 4 °C and 30 °C for 1, 6, 12 and 24h; the SMs obtained were analyzed for crosslinking density, morphology, crystalline structure, and stability against temperature, pH, and α-amylase hydrolysis. The crosslinking degree at 30 °C was considerably higher than that at 4 °C. SMs prepared at 4 °C for less than 12h incubation had larger size and more porous structure as compared with those prepared at 30 °C, but the morphology became comparable (spherical shape with smooth surface and dense structure) after 24h incubation. All SMs samples displayed amorphous structure. Stability tests revealed that the SMs were very stable under acidic and mild basic pH; however, stability against α-amylase hydrolysis varied depending on incubation temperature and time. PMID:26428134

  4. Effects of crosslinking temperature and time on microstructure and stability of cassava starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Puncha-Arnon, Santhanee; Jiranuntakul, Wittawat; Uttapap, Dudsadee

    2015-12-10

    Starch microspheres (SMs) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion-crosslinking technique at 4 °C and 30 °C for 1, 6, 12 and 24h; the SMs obtained were analyzed for crosslinking density, morphology, crystalline structure, and stability against temperature, pH, and α-amylase hydrolysis. The crosslinking degree at 30 °C was considerably higher than that at 4 °C. SMs prepared at 4 °C for less than 12h incubation had larger size and more porous structure as compared with those prepared at 30 °C, but the morphology became comparable (spherical shape with smooth surface and dense structure) after 24h incubation. All SMs samples displayed amorphous structure. Stability tests revealed that the SMs were very stable under acidic and mild basic pH; however, stability against α-amylase hydrolysis varied depending on incubation temperature and time.

  5. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films.

  6. High-brightness 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot tapered laser with high temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yulian; Ji, Haiming; Xu, Pengfei; Gu, Yongxian; Ma, Wenquan; Yang, Tao

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate high-brightness 1.3 μm tapered lasers with high temperature stability by using p-doped InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) as the active region. It is found that the beam quality factor M(2) for the devices is almost unchanged as the light power and temperature increase. The almost constant M(2) results from the p-doped QD active region.

  7. Structure, electrical characteristics, and high-temperature stability of aerosol jet printed silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; McCloy, John; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Printed electronics has emerged as a versatile eco-friendly fabrication technique to create sintered nanoparticle (NP) films on arbitrary surfaces with an excellent control over the film microstructure. While applicability of such films for high-temperature applications is not explored previously, herein we report the high-temperature electrical stability of silver (Ag) metal NP films fabricated using an Aerosol Jet based printing technique and demonstrate that this behavior is dictated by changes in the film microstructure. In-situ high temperature (24-500 °C) impedance spectroscopy measurements show that the real part of the impedance increases with increasing temperature up to 150 °C, at which point a decreasing trend prevails until 300 °C, followed again by an increase in impedance. The electrical behavior is correlated with the in-situ grain growth of the Ag NP films, as observed afterwards by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and could be tailored by controlling the initial microstructure through sintering conditions. Using combined diffraction and spectroscopic analytical methods, it is demonstrated the Aerosol Jet printed Ag NP films exhibit enhanced thermal stability and oxidation resistance. In addition to establishing the conditions for stability of Ag NP films, the results provide a fundamental understanding of the effect of grain growth and reduction in grain boundary area on the electrical stability of sintered NP films.

  8. High-temperature stabilization by air of a pyrophoric catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Krylova, A.V.; Ustimenko, G.A.

    1982-12-01

    The reaction of a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia with air at 480 to 520/sup 0/C leads to the formation on the surface of a thin protective oxide structure that eliminates its pyrophoric character. High-temperature stabilization by air is a considerably faster process than passivation and leads to the production of catalysts with increased resistance to oxidation.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF SIMILARITY THEORY STABILITY CORRECTION TERMS FOR MOMENTUM AND TEMPERATURE, OVER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AND FORESTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many observations of temperature and wind speed profiles have been taken over "ideal" terrain and analyzed to develop the stability correction terms which are commonly used in the application of similarity theory. Fewer observations have been taken and analyzed in this manner ov...

  10. The role of temperature variability in stabilizing the mountain pine beetle-fungus mutualism.

    PubMed

    Addison, A L; Powell, J A; Six, D L; Moore, M; Bentz, B J

    2013-10-21

    As global climate patterns continue to change and extreme weather events become increasingly common, it is likely that many ecological interactions will be affected. One such interaction is the multipartite symbiosis that exists between the mountain pine beetle and two species of fungi, Grosmannia clavigera and Ophiostoma montium. In this mutualism, the fungi provide nutrition to the beetle, while the fungi benefit by being dispersed to new host trees. Multi-partite mutualisms are predicted to be unstable due to strong direct competition among symbionts or natural selection for superior over inferior mutualists. However, this mutualism has remained stable over long periods of evolutionary time. In this paper, we developed a temperature-based model for the spread of fungi within a tree and connected it to an existing model for mountain pine beetle development. Using this integrated model for fungal growth, we explored the possibility that temperature variability is a stabilizing mechanism for the mountain pine beetle-fungi mutualism. Of the three types of temperature variability we tested: intra-year, inter-year and variability due to transitioning between different thermal habitats (thermal migration), we found that thermal migration was the most robust stabilizing mechanism. Additionally, we found that the MPB attack density or spacing between fungal lesions also had a significant effect on the stability of the system. High attack densities or close lesion spacings also tended to stabilize the system, regardless of temperature.

  11. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  12. Weakly sheared active suspensions: hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: the apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration. PMID:21517529

  13. Weakly sheared active suspensions: Hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: The apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration.

  14. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. PMID:26593560

  15. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical.

  16. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  17. Effect of high-temperature on high-performance liquid chromatography column stability and performance under temperature-programmed conditions.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Jones, Brian A; Felix, W Dale; Clark, Jody

    2004-03-19

    Six commercially available analytical (4.1 or 4.6 mm i.d.) columns were evaluated under temperature-programmed high-temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) conditions to access their stability and performance at extreme temperatures. Seven components consisting of acidic, basic and neutral compounds were analyzed under temperature-programmed conditions and solvent gradient conditions using three different mobile phase compositions (acidic, basic and neutral). Each column was checked with a two-component test mix at various stages of the evaluation to look for signs of stationary phase collapse. Three zirconia based stationary phases studied exhibited column bleed under temperature-programmed conditions. The other three columns, a polydentate silica column, a polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) polymeric column, and a graphitic carbon column performed well with no evidence of stationary phase degradation. The R.S.D. for the retention times and efficiencies were less than 10% for most conditions, and not more than 15% during the course of the evaluation for each column. The polydentate silica stationary phase was temperature programmed to 100 degrees C, the PS-DVB stationary phase was temperature programmed up to 150 degrees C, and the graphitic carbon column was used with temperature programming up to 200 degrees C. Comparable peak capacities and similar retention behaviors were observed under solvent gradient and temperature-programmed conditions. Temperature programming with dynamic mobile phase preheating can replace solvent gradient analysis without a loss of peak capacity when used with 4.1 or 4.6 mm columns. PMID:15043277

  18. Loss of Consciousness Is Associated with Stabilization of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Solovey, Guillermo; Alonso, Leandro M.; Yanagawa, Toru; Fujii, Naotaka; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Cecchi, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    What aspects of neuronal activity distinguish the conscious from the unconscious brain? This has been a subject of intense interest and debate since the early days of neurophysiology. However, as any practicing anesthesiologist can attest, it is currently not possible to reliably distinguish a conscious state from an unconscious one on the basis of brain activity. Here we approach this problem from the perspective of dynamical systems theory. We argue that the brain, as a dynamical system, is self-regulated at the boundary between stable and unstable regimes, allowing it in particular to maintain high susceptibility to stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we performed stability analysis of high-density electrocorticography recordings covering an entire cerebral hemisphere in monkeys during reversible loss of consciousness. We show that, during loss of consciousness, the number of eigenmodes at the edge of instability decreases smoothly, independently of the type of anesthetic and specific features of brain activity. The eigenmodes drift back toward the unstable line during recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, we show that stability is an emergent phenomenon dependent on the correlations among activity in different cortical regions rather than signals taken in isolation. These findings support the conclusion that dynamics at the edge of instability are essential for maintaining consciousness and provide a novel and principled measure that distinguishes between the conscious and the unconscious brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT What distinguishes brain activity during consciousness from that observed during unconsciousness? Answering this question has proven difficult because neither consciousness nor lack thereof have universal signatures in terms of most specific features of brain activity. For instance, different anesthetics induce different patterns of brain activity. We demonstrate that loss of consciousness is universally and reliably associated with stabilization

  19. [Investigation of apomyoglobin stability depending on urea and temperature at two different pH values].

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, E N; Sharanov, M G; Kashparov, I A; Il'ina, N B; Bychkova, V E

    2005-01-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of apomyoglobin by urea was investigated in the temperature range from 5 to 25 degrees C at two pH values. The thermodynamic parameters of the apomyoglobin native-unfolded state transition were determined. Conformational changes in the protein structure were monitored by tryptophan fluorescence and far UV circular dichroism. Apomyoglobin preserves its native conformation at pH 5.7 and 6.2 in the temperature range used. It was shown that the apomyoglobin stability and its unfolding cooperativity are substantially lower at 5 degrees C than at other temperatures. This fact should be taken in account at the investigation of apomyoglobin.

  20. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  1. Chemical stability of glass seal interfaces in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeff W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective, oxidation-resistant, high-temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  2. Stability threshold of ion temperature gradient driven mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S. C.

    2008-12-15

    For the first time in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration, the stability threshold of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode is studied by linear gyrokinetic theory. In comparison with tokamaks, the RFP configuration has a shorter connection length and stronger magnetic curvature drift. These effects result in a stronger instability driving mechanism and a larger growth rate in the fluid limit. However, the kinetic theory shows that the temperature slopes required for the excitation of ITG instability are much steeper than the tokamak ones. This is because the effect of Landau damping also becomes stronger due to the shorter connection length, which is dominant and ultimately determines the stability threshold. The required temperature slope for the instability may only be found in the very edge of the plasma and/or near the border of the dominant magnetic island during the quasi-single helicity state of discharge.

  3. Pharmaceutically active compounds in sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic and aerobic digestion, wastewater stabilization ponds and composting.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2015-01-15

    Sewage sludge disposal onto lands has been stabilized previously but still many pollutants are not efficiently removed. Special interest has been focused on pharmaceutical compounds due to their potential ecotoxicological effects. Nowadays, there is scarce information about their occurrence in different sludge stabilization treatments. In this work, the occurrence of twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds has been studied in sludge from four sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic digestion, aerobic digestion, composting and lagooning. The types of sludge evaluated were primary, secondary, anaerobically-digested and dehydrated, composted, mixed, aerobically-digested and dehydrated and lagoon sludge. Nineteen of the twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds monitored were detected in sewage sludge. The most contaminated samples were primary sludge, secondary sludge and mixed sludge (the average concentrations of studied compounds in these sludges were 179, 310 and 142 μg/kg dm, respectively) while the mean concentrations found in the other types of sewage sludge were 70 μg/kg dm (aerobically-digested sludge), 63 μg/kg dm (lagoon sludge), 12 μg/kg dm (composted sludge) and 8 μg/kg dm (anaerobically-digested sludge). The antibiotics ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were found at the highest concentration levels in most of the analyzed sludge samples (up to 2660 and 4328 μg/kg dm, respectively). Anaerobic-digestion treatment reduced more considerably the concentration of most of the studied compounds than aerobic-digestion (especially in the case of bezafibrate and fluoroquinolones) and more than anaerobic stabilization ponds (in the case of acetaminophen, atenolol, bezafibrate, carbamazepine, 17α-ethinylestradiol, naproxen and salicylic acid). Ecotoxicological risk assessment, of sludge application onto soils, has also been evaluated. Risk quotients, expressed as the ratio between the predicted environmental concentration and the predicted non

  4. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  5. Active Climate Stabilization: Practical Physics-Based Approaches to Prevention of Climate Change

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.; Hyde, T.; Wood, L.

    2002-04-18

    We offer a case for active technical management of the radiative forcing of the temperatures of the Earth's fluid envelopes, rather than administrative management of atmospheric greenhouse gas inputs, in order to stabilize both the global- and time-averaged climate and its mesoscale features. We suggest that active management of radiative forcing entails negligible--indeed, likely strongly negative--economic costs and environmental impacts, and thus best complies with the pertinent mandate of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. We propose that such approaches be swiftly evaluated in sub-scale in the course of an intensive international program.

  6. Reliability and stability of three cryogenic temperature sensor models subjected to accelerated thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Reliability of a cryogenic temperature sensor is important for any experimental application, but even more so for aerospace applications where there is virtually no opportunity to replace a failed sensor. Many factors affect the stability and longevity of a cryogenic temperature sensor, but one of the most detrimental factors is thermal cycling over an extended temperature range. Strains and stresses caused by thermal contraction can affect both the sensing material and its interface with electrical contacts leading to either calibration shift and/or catastrophic failure of the sensor. Depending upon the aerospace application, a temperature sensor may cycle from cryogenic temperature to near room temperature hundreds of times or more during the lifetime of the mission. Sample groups of three sensors types, the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. models CX-1050-SD (23 samples), DT-670-SD (12 samples), and DT-470-SD (11 samples), were subjected to accelerated thermal shocking from room temperature to 77 K one thousand times. Recalibrations of each group were performed from 1.2 K to 325 K after 20, 40, 60, 100, 250, 500 and 1,000 thermal shocks. The resulting reliability and stability data are presented.

  7. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  8. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  9. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox: long-term process stability and effluent quality at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Laureni, Michele; Falås, Per; Robin, Orlane; Wick, Arne; Weissbrodt, David G; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Ternes, Thomas A; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Joss, Adriano

    2016-09-15

    The implementation of autotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes for the removal of nitrogen from municipal wastewater (known as "mainstream anammox") bears the potential to bring wastewater treatment plants close to energy autarky. The aim of the present work was to assess the long-term stability of partial nitritation/anammox (PN/A) processes operating at low temperatures and their reliability in meeting nitrogen concentrations in the range of typical discharge limits below 2  [Formula: see text] and 10 mgNtot·L(-1). Two main 12-L sequencing batch reactors were operated in parallel for PN/A on aerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater (21 ± 5 [Formula: see text] and residual 69 ± 19 mgCODtot·L(-1)) for more than one year, including over 5 months at 15 °C. The two systems consisted of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and a hybrid MBBR (H-MBBR) with flocculent biomass. Operation at limiting oxygen concentrations (0.15-0.18 [Formula: see text] ) allowed stable suppression of the activity of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at 15 °C with a production of nitrate over ammonium consumed as low as 16% in the MBBR. Promising nitrogen removal rates of 20-40 mgN·L(-1)·d(-1) were maintained at hydraulic retention times of 14 h. Stable ammonium and total nitrogen removal efficiencies over 90% and 70% respectively were achieved. Both reactors reached average concentrations of total nitrogen below 10 mgN·L(-1) in their effluents, even down to 6 mgN·L(-1) for the MBBR, with an ammonium concentration of 2 mgN·L(-1) (set as operational threshold to stop aeration). Furthermore, the two PN/A systems performed almost identically with respect to the biological removal of organic micropollutants and, importantly, to a similar extent as conventional treatments. A sudden temperature drop to 11 °C resulted in significant suppression of anammox activity, although this was rapidly recovered after the temperature was increased back to 15 °C. Analyses of 16S

  10. Model of local temperature changes in brain upon functional activation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christopher M; Smith, Michael B; Turner, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Experimental results for changes in brain temperature during functional activation show large variations. It is, therefore, desirable to develop a careful numerical model for such changes. Here, a three-dimensional model of temperature in the human head using the bioheat equation, which includes effects of metabolism, perfusion, and thermal conduction, is employed to examine potential temperature changes due to functional activation in brain. It is found that, depending on location in brain and corresponding baseline temperature relative to blood temperature, temperature may increase or decrease on activation and concomitant increases in perfusion and rate of metabolism. Changes in perfusion are generally seen to have a greater effect on temperature than are changes in metabolism, and hence active brain is predicted to approach blood temperature from its initial temperature. All calculated changes in temperature for reasonable physiological parameters have magnitudes <0.12 degrees C and are well within the range reported in recent experimental studies involving human subjects.

  11. Long-term stability testing of optical fibre Fabry-Perot temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Applications of fibre optic sensors at high temperatures have gained a huge interest recently, as they appeared to be suitable for temperature recording in harsh environments. In this paper, we are demonstrating two intrinsic Fabry-Perot (F-P) fibre optic sensors for high temperature monitoring. The sensors are consisting of a 125μm diameter single mode fibre (SMF28) and a 125μm diameter PCF ESM-12B pure fused silica fibre spliced to a SMF28, respectively. The result was a low finesse optical SMF-Cr-SMF, and SMF-Cr-PCF, sensor with cavity lengths varying from 50μm to 100μm. Both types of Fabry-Perot sensors were tested in a tube furnace over a temperature range from room temperature up to 1100°C. Following a number of annealing cycles, between the above mentioned temperatures range, very good repeatability of the phase response was achieved. During the cycling process, thermal stress relief takes place which makes the sensors suitable for temperature testing at temperatures just in excess of 1000°C. After initial cycling the sensors are subjected to long term stability tests. The phase response is stable, less than 4°C, over a period of 5 days at a temperature of 1050°C for both sensors. The temperature resolution is around 3°C.

  12. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2015-11-01

    A kinetic description is developed for the stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves by a large amplitude whistler wave. Parametric coupling of a whistler wave with the low frequency drift waves can yields whistler sidebands of their sum and difference frequencies. The whistler pump and sidebands can exert a ponderomotive force on electrons and modify the eigen-frequency of drift waves. This coupling process can lead to the stabilization/destabilization of drift waves, depending on the wave numbers of the interacting waves as well as the whistler pump power. The effectiveness of obliquely propagating whistler pump is also examined.

  13. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.

  14. Urease immobilized polymer hydrogel: Long-term stability and enhancement of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kutcherlapati, S N Raju; Yeole, Niranjan; Jana, Tushar

    2016-02-01

    A method has been developed in which an enzyme namely urease was immobilized inside hydrogel matrix to study the stability and enzymatic activity in room temperature (∼27-30°C). This urease coupled hydrogel (UCG) was obtained by amine-acid coupling reaction and this procedure is such that it ensured the wider opening of mobile flap of enzyme active site. A systematic comparison of urea-urease assay and the detailed kinetic data clearly revealed that the urease shows activity for more than a month when stored at ∼27-30°C in case of UCG whereas it becomes inactive in case of free urease (enzyme in buffer solution). The aqueous microenvironment inside the hydrogel, unusual morphological features and thermal behaviour were believed to be the reasons for unexpected behaviour. UCG displayed enzyme activity at basic pH and up to 60°C. UCG showed significant enhancement in activity against thermal degradation compared to free urease. In summary, this method is a suitable process to stabilize the biomacromolecules in standard room temperature for many practical uses.

  15. Urease immobilized polymer hydrogel: Long-term stability and enhancement of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kutcherlapati, S N Raju; Yeole, Niranjan; Jana, Tushar

    2016-02-01

    A method has been developed in which an enzyme namely urease was immobilized inside hydrogel matrix to study the stability and enzymatic activity in room temperature (∼27-30°C). This urease coupled hydrogel (UCG) was obtained by amine-acid coupling reaction and this procedure is such that it ensured the wider opening of mobile flap of enzyme active site. A systematic comparison of urea-urease assay and the detailed kinetic data clearly revealed that the urease shows activity for more than a month when stored at ∼27-30°C in case of UCG whereas it becomes inactive in case of free urease (enzyme in buffer solution). The aqueous microenvironment inside the hydrogel, unusual morphological features and thermal behaviour were believed to be the reasons for unexpected behaviour. UCG displayed enzyme activity at basic pH and up to 60°C. UCG showed significant enhancement in activity against thermal degradation compared to free urease. In summary, this method is a suitable process to stabilize the biomacromolecules in standard room temperature for many practical uses. PMID:26520823

  16. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  17. Stability study of propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine stored at varying temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramagiri, Suma; Kosanam, Hari; Sai Prakash, P K

    2006-06-01

    A stability study has been initiated for propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine samples stored over a period of 60 days at four different temperature conditions (room temperature, 4 degrees C, -20 degrees C, and -80 degrees C). Stability data was established on day 0, 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, and 60. Sample purification was done by solid-phase extraction using a weak cation exchange cartridge (Isolute CBA), and quantitation was carried out by a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method with a photodiode-array UV detector. Propoxur was spiked at two different concentration levels in both blood and urine samples [low concentration (10 microg/L) and high concentration (100 microg/L)]. Isopropoxy phenol was observed as the major degradation product in blood and urine samples and confirmed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. At room temperature, a substantial decrease in concentration of about 95% was observed at the end of the stability study in both blood and urine samples. However, at 4 degrees C, the concentration of propoxur observed after 60 days was around 60% in both samples. A decrease in temperature reduced the degradation, and finally propoxur was found to be stable at -80 degrees C and -20 degrees C for the whole observation period (60 days). The data collected suggests that knowledge about time-dependent decrease of propoxur in urine and blood samples is of considerable significance in forensic toxicology, and, therefore, forensic cases should be interpreted with caution.

  18. A visual physiological temperature sensor developed with gelatin-stabilized luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing; Zou, Hongyan; Liu, Zexi; Gao, Mingxuan; Chen, Binbin; Li, Yuanfang; Huang, Chengzhi

    2015-10-01

    A visual physiological temperature sensor was successfully developed with newly hydrothermally prepared fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) at room temperature using gelatin as the protective and reducing agent. The as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs was water-soluble, uniform and exhibited a narrow distribution with an average size of 1.16 nm, showing a maximum emission band at 552 nm (2.45 eV) when excited at 445 nm (2.79 eV). The large Stokes shift of 110 nm of the gelatin-stabilized AgNCs makes it actually applicable with very low background and light scattering interferences. It was found that the as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs is temperature-sensitive over the range from 5°C to 45°C, and thus a visual physiological temperature sensor could be developed with the gelatin-AgNCs as under the irradiation of visible light. PMID:26078186

  19. A visual physiological temperature sensor developed with gelatin-stabilized luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing; Zou, Hongyan; Liu, Zexi; Gao, Mingxuan; Chen, Binbin; Li, Yuanfang; Huang, Chengzhi

    2015-10-01

    A visual physiological temperature sensor was successfully developed with newly hydrothermally prepared fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) at room temperature using gelatin as the protective and reducing agent. The as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs was water-soluble, uniform and exhibited a narrow distribution with an average size of 1.16 nm, showing a maximum emission band at 552 nm (2.45 eV) when excited at 445 nm (2.79 eV). The large Stokes shift of 110 nm of the gelatin-stabilized AgNCs makes it actually applicable with very low background and light scattering interferences. It was found that the as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs is temperature-sensitive over the range from 5°C to 45°C, and thus a visual physiological temperature sensor could be developed with the gelatin-AgNCs as under the irradiation of visible light.

  20. Mechanical stability analysis on spherical sandwich sheet at low temperature loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshuai; Li, Shuhui; Li, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    The spherical sandwich sheet (S-S-S) is generally used in the aerospace industry, for example, the airplane, the rocket's fairing, the spacecraft and the satellite for the purpose of heat-insulation, weight-saving and dimension-reducing. The stability of the S-S-S is of general concern because of its particularly thin but large size. For some S-S-S used in fuel tank storing liquid oxygen of the rocket, it must be facing low temperature down to about -183 °C. Low temperature condition affects the stability of the S-S-S and then causes buckling of the structure. In this paper, a finite element (FE) model is established for evaluating the stability of the S-S-S via the sequential coupling mode. The material mechanical properties related to temperature are concerned in the FE model. The buckling modes and critical buckling loading are predicted accurately, since the FE model includes heat transfer simulating, thermal stress computing, buckling and post buckling process. It is found that the thermal stress generated from the low temperature loading reduces the critical buckling loading and changes the buckling modes of the S-S-S.

  1. Modelling thermal stability and activity of free and immobilized enzymes as a novel tool for enzyme reactor design.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M P; Oliveira, M G; Maugeri, F

    2007-11-01

    In this work, a novel method is proposed to establish the most suitable operational temperature for an enzyme reactor. The method was based on mathematical modelling of the thermal stability and activity of the enzyme and was developed using thermodynamic concepts and experimental data from free and immobilized inulinases (2,1-beta-D fructan frutanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus, which were used as examples. The model was, therefore, designed to predict the enzyme activity with respect to the temperature and time course of the enzymatic process, as well as its half-life, in a broad temperature range. The knowledge and information provided by the model could be used to design the operational temperature conditions, leading to higher enzyme activities, while preserving acceptable stability levels, which represent the link between higher productivity and lower process costs. For the inulinase used in this study, the optimum temperature conditions leading to higher enzyme activities were shown to be 63 degrees C and 57.5 degrees C for the free and immobilized inulinases, respectively. However, according to the novel method of approach used here, the more appropriate operating temperatures would be 52 degrees C for free and 42 degrees C for immobilized inulinases, showing that the working temperature is not necessarily the same as the maximum reaction rate temperature, but preferably a lower temperature where the enzyme is much more stable.

  2. Remarkable enhancement of O₂ activation on yttrium-stabilized zirconia surface in a dual catalyst bed.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mélissandre; Can, Fabien; Duprez, Daniel; Gil, Sonia; Giroir-Fendler, Anne; Bion, Nicolas

    2014-10-13

    Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been extensively studied as an electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) but its performance in heterogeneous catalysis is also the object of a growing number of publications. In both applications, oxygen activation on the YSZ surface remains the step that hinders utilization at moderate temperature. It was demonstrated by oxygen isotope exchange that a dual catalyst bed system consisting of two successive LaMnO3 and YSZ beds without intimate contact drastically enhances oxygen activation on the YSZ surface at 698 K. It can be concluded that LaMnO3 activates the triplet ground-state of molecular oxygen into a low-lying singlet state, thereby facilitating the activation of the O2 molecule on the YSZ oxygen vacancy sites. This phenomenon is shown to improve the catalytic activity of the LaMnO3-Pd/YSZ system for the partial oxidation of methane.

  3. Stability of cobalt-carbon high temperature fixed points doped with iron and platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kňazovická, L.; Lowe, D.; Machin, G.; Davies, H.; Rani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High temperature fixed points (HTFPs) are stable and repeatable and make comparison of temperature scales possible at a level of uncertainty not previously possible. However, they potentially lack objectivity if the fixed-point temperature is known. Five HTFPs were constructed, one pure Co-C, two Co-C doped with Fe and two Co-C doped with Pt of differing concentrations. The candidate dopants were identified through thermochemical modelling as likely to give maximum temperature shift with minimum increase in melting range. The temperature differences of the doped systems from the pure system were determined and it was found that the addition of Fe depressed the melting temperature and the addition of Pt elevated the melting temperature, qualitatively in line with the thermochemical modelling. The higher concentration doped HTFPs were then aged for approximately 100 h with continuous melting-freezing cycles and the difference to the undoped Co-C HTFP remeasured. These differences were found to agree with those of the unaged results within the measurement uncertainties, confirming artefact stability. It is clear that the doping of HTFPs is a powerful way of constructing stable and reliable high temperature scale comparison artefacts of unknown temperature.

  4. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  5. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  6. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  7. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A.; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A.; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4+ T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell–specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β–induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  8. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  9. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  10. High temperature stability testing of Ge-doped and F-doped Fabry-Perot fibre optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Mathew, Jinesh; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R...

    2016-05-01

    We present high temperature (~1100°C) stability tests of, Ge-doped and F-doped, optical fibre sensors. Our analysis includes the variation in their behaviours within high temperature environments and how the dopant diffusion affects their long term stability.

  11. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:27259687

  12. Effects of Temperature on the Performance and Stability of Recent COTS Silicon Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Silicon oscillators have lately emerged to serve as potential replacement for crystal and ceramic resonators to provide timing and clock signals in electronic systems. These semiconductor-based devices, including those that are based on MEMS technology, are reported to be resistant to vibration and shock (an important criteria for systems to be deployed in space), immune to EMI, consume very low current, require few or no external components, and cover a wide range of frequency for analog and digital circuits. In this work, the performance of five recently-developed COTS silicon oscillator chips from different manufacturers was determined within a temperature range that extended beyond the individual specified range of operation. In addition, restart capability at extreme temperatures, i.e. power switched on while the device was soaking at extreme (hot or cold) temperature, and the effects of thermal cycling under a wide temperature range on the operation of these silicon oscillators were also investigated. Performance characterization of each oscillator was obtained in terms of its output frequency, duty cycle, rise and fall times, and supply current at specific test temperatures. The five different oscillators tested operated beyond their specified temperature region, with some displaying excellent stability throughout the whole test temperature range. Others experienced some instability at certain temperature test points as evidenced by fluctuation in the output frequency. Recovery from temperature-induced changes took place when excessive temperatures were removed. It should also be pointed out that all oscillators were able to restart at the extreme test temperatures and to withstand the limited thermal cycling without undergoing any significant changes in their characteristics. In addition, no physical damage was observed in the packaging material of any of these silicon oscillators due to extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling. It is recommended

  13. Effect of compatible and noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Sepasi Tehrani, H; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Kiany, A; Atri, M S; Ariaeenejad, Sh; Kavousi, K; Saboury, A A

    2013-12-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into harmless water and molecular oxygen. Due to various applications of the enzyme in different sectors of industry as well as medicine, the enhancement of stability of the enzyme is important. Effect of various classes of compatible as well as noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity, disaggregation, and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase have been investigated. Compatible osmolytes, proline, xylitol, and valine destabilize the denatured form of the enzyme and, therefore, increase its disaggregation and thermal stability. The increase in the thermal stability is accompanied with a slight increase of activity in comparison to the native enzyme at 25 °C. On the other hand, histidine, a noncompatible osmolyte stabilizes the denatured form of the protein and hence causes an overall decrease in the thermal stability and enzymatic activity of the enzyme. Chemometric results have confirmed the experimental results and have provided insight into the distribution and number of mole fraction components for the intermediates. The increase in melting temperature (Tm) and enzymatic rate could be further amplified by the intrinsic effect of temperature enhancement on the enzymatic activity for the industrial purposes. PMID:23249140

  14. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep

    1997-01-01

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  15. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  16. STABILITY CONSTANTS OF NP(V) COMPLEXES WITH FLOURIDE AND SULFATE AT VARIABLE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A. Moore; L. Rao

    2005-07-11

    A solvent extraction method was used to determine the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with fluoride and sulfate in 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} from 25 C to 60 C. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride and sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 Np(V)-fluoride complexes and the 1:1 Np(V)-sulfate and 1:2 Np(V)-sulfate complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [F{sup -}] and [SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van't Hoff equation.

  17. Bonding glass to metal with plastic for stability over temperature: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Chris L.; Petrie, Stephen P.

    2002-09-01

    To enable the invention of new optical instruments subjected to a broad range of operating conditions, there is a need to develop improved technology to hold small mirrors and other optical elements with high dimensional stability and low cost. A previous paper described a screening experiment on small face bonded mirrors subjected to an environment of -41 to +70 degree(s)C with the intent of finding factors that influence the bond joint's contribution to angular stability. This paper describes part of the continuing experiment, specifically addressing BK-7 mirrors bonded to Aluminum mounts with a flexible adhesive. The resulting tilt errors in the mirror assemblies were measured, and showed a definite pattern with respect to bond thickness. Flexible bonds between these two CTE mismatched materials did not fail, and exhibited high stability over temperature at 0.002-inch bond thickness.

  18. Nanocrystalline brookite with enhanced stability and photocatalytic activity: influence of lanthanum(III) doping.

    PubMed

    Perego, Céline; Wang, Yu-Heng; Durupthy, Olivier; Cassaignon, Sophie; Revel, Renaud; Jolivet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Metastable TiO(2) polymorphs are more promising materials than rutile for specific applications such as photocatalysis or catalysis support. This was clearly demonstrated for the anatase phase but still under consideration for brookite, which is difficult to obtain as pure phase. Moreover, the surface doping of anatase with lanthanum ions is known to both increase the thermal stability of the metastable phase and improve its photocatalytic activity. In this study, TiO(2) nanoparticles of almost only the brookite structure were prepared by a simple sol-gel procedure in aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were then doped with lanthanum(III) ions. The thermal stability of the nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and kinetic models were successfully applied to quantify phases evolutions. The presence of surface-sorbed lanthanum(III) ions increased the phase stability of at least 200 °C and this temperature shift was attributed to the selective phase stabilization of metastable TiO(2) polymorphs. Moreover, the combination of the surface doping ions and the thermal treatment induces the vanishing of the secondary anatase phase, and the photocatalytic tests on the doped brookite nanoparticles demonstrated that the doping increased photocatalytic activity and that the extent depended on the duration of the sintering treatment.

  19. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar

  20. Alkyl Caffeates Improve the Antioxidant Activity, Antitumor Property and Oxidation Stability of Edible Oil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Shuang-Shuang; Pang, Na; Wang, Fang-Qin; Pang, Fei; Cui, Hong-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Fu-An

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is distributed widely in nature and possesses strong antioxidant activity. However, CA has lower solubility in non-polar media, which limits its application in fat-soluble food. To increase the lipophilicity of natural antioxidant CA, a series of alkyl caffeates were synthesized and their antioxidant and antitumor activities were investigated. The antioxidant parameters, including the induction period, acid value and unsaturated fatty acid content, of the alkyl caffeates in edible oil were firstly investigated. The results indicated that alkyl caffeates had a lower DPPH IC50 (14–23 µM) compared to CA, dibutyl hydroxy toluene (BHT) and Vitamin C (24–51 µM), and significantly inhibited four human cancer cells (SW620, SW480, SGC7901 and HepG2) with inhibition ratio of 71.4–78.0% by a MTT assay. With regard to the induction period and acid value assays, methyl and butyl caffeates had higher abilities than BHT to restrain the oxidation process and improve the stability of edible oil. The addition of ethyl caffeate to oil allowed maintenance of a higher unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester content (68.53%) at high temperatures. Overall, the alkyl caffeats with short chain length (n<5) assessed better oxidative stability than those with long chain length. To date, this is the first report to the correlations among the antioxidant activity, anticancer activity and oxidative stability of alkyl caffeates. PMID:24760050

  1. Alkyl caffeates improve the antioxidant activity, antitumor property and oxidation stability of edible oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Shuang-Shuang; Pang, Na; Wang, Fang-Qin; Pang, Fei; Cui, Hong-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Fu-An

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is distributed widely in nature and possesses strong antioxidant activity. However, CA has lower solubility in non-polar media, which limits its application in fat-soluble food. To increase the lipophilicity of natural antioxidant CA, a series of alkyl caffeates were synthesized and their antioxidant and antitumor activities were investigated. The antioxidant parameters, including the induction period, acid value and unsaturated fatty acid content, of the alkyl caffeates in edible oil were firstly investigated. The results indicated that alkyl caffeates had a lower DPPH IC₅₀ (14-23 µM) compared to CA, dibutyl hydroxy toluene (BHT) and Vitamin C (24-51 µM), and significantly inhibited four human cancer cells (SW620, SW480, SGC7901 and HepG2) with inhibition ratio of 71.4-78.0% by a MTT assay. With regard to the induction period and acid value assays, methyl and butyl caffeates had higher abilities than BHT to restrain the oxidation process and improve the stability of edible oil. The addition of ethyl caffeate to oil allowed maintenance of a higher unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester content (68.53%) at high temperatures. Overall, the alkyl caffeats with short chain length (n<5) assessed better oxidative stability than those with long chain length. To date, this is the first report to the correlations among the antioxidant activity, anticancer activity and oxidative stability of alkyl caffeates. PMID:24760050

  2. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2003-08-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  3. The stability of tin silicon oxide thin-film transistors with different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen; Fu, Ruofan; Han, Yanbing; Meng, Ting; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The influence of annealing temperature on the electrical properties of tin silicon oxide (TSO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) and the corresponding bias stress stability have been investigated. With increasing annealing temperature, the TSO films present a structure which is closer to crystallization, and it is conducive to the improvement of the mobility of TSO TFTs. Meanwhile, the positive bias stress (PBS) stability of TSO TFTs is ameliorated due to the decreasing traps at the interface of dielectric layer and channel layer. The threshold voltage shifts in opposite direction after being stressed under negative bias stress (NBS), which is due to the competition between electrons captured by defects related to oxygen vacancies in the channel layer and water molecule adsorption on the back channel.

  4. Low-temperature electrochemical characterization of sputtered yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ching-Han; Chou, Chen-Chia

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure and electrical conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films with Pt electrodes were evaluated through three configurations in the temperature range from 25 to 500 °C. Using ac-impedance spectra, the contribution of the Si substrate to resistance was separated by an equivalent-circuit analysis. The colossal ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films at temperatures higher than 125 °C was observed parallel to the interface. The total ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films increased significantly in comparison w the bulk YSZ electrolyte. An alternative conductive pathway ascribed to the homogeneous and heterogeneous interfaces with high strain and charge-containing defects was proposed.

  5. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  6. A negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of the earth's surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Hays, P. B.; Kasting, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is suggested that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is buffered, over geological time scales, by a negative feedback mechanism, in which the rate of weathering of silicate minerals (followed by deposition of carbonate minerals) depends on surface temperature, which in turn depends on the carbon dioxide partial pressure through the greenhouse effect. Although the quantitative details of this mechanism are speculative, it appears able to partially stabilize the earth's surface temperature against the steady increase of solar luminosity, believed to have occurred since the origin of the solar system.

  7. Stability of a Crystal Oscillator, Type Si530, Inside and Beyond its Specified Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Data acquisition and control systems depend on timing signals for proper operation and required accuracy. These clocked signals are typically provided by some form of an oscillator set to produce a repetitive, defined signal at a given frequency. Crystal oscillators are commonly used because they are less expensive, smaller, and more reliable than other types of oscillators. Because of the inherent characteristics of the crystal, the oscillators exhibit excellent frequency stability within the specified range of operational temperature. In some cases, however, some compensation techniques are adopted to further improve the thermal stability of a crystal oscillator. Very limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) crystal oscillators at temperatures beyond the manufacturer's specified operating temperature range. This information is very crucial if any of these parts were to be used in circuits designed for use in space exploration missions where extreme temperature swings and thermal cycling are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the operation of Silicon Laboratories crystal oscillator, type Si530, under specified and extreme ambient temperatures.

  8. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  9. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  10. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  11. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  12. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  13. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  14. DNA melting temperature assay for assessing the stability of DNA polyplexes intended for nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Schallon, Anja; Synatschke, Christopher V; Pergushov, Dmitry V; Jérôme, Valérie; Müller, Axel H E; Freitag, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    Many synthetic polycations have the ability to form complexes with the polyanion DNA, yet only a few, most notably poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), are efficient gene-delivery vehicles. Although a common explanation of this observation relies on the buffering capacity of the polycation, the intracellular stability of the complex may also play a role and should not be neglected. Assays typically used to follow complex formation, however, often do not provide the required information on stability. In this article, we propose the change in the DNA melting temperature observable after complex formation to be a significant indicator of complex stability. For a given DNA/polycation ratio, changes in the melting temperature are shown to depend on the polycation chemistry but not on the DNA topology or the polycation architecture. Effects of changes in the DNA/polycation ratio as well as the effect of polycation quaternization can be interpreted using the melting temperature assay. Finally, the assay was used to follow the displacement of DNA from the complexes by poly(methacrylic acid) or short single-stranded DNA sequences as competing polyanions.

  15. Thermal stabilization of chromium slag by sewage sludge: effects of sludge quantity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changlin; Zhang, Hua; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of detoxifying chromium slag by sewage sludge, synthetic chromium slag containing 3% of Cr(VI) was mixed with sewage sludge followed by thermal treatment in nitrogen gas for stabilizing chromium. The effects of slag to sludge ratio (0.5, 1 and 2) and temperature (200, 300, 500, 700 and 900 degrees C) on treatment efficiency were investigated. During the mixing process before thermal treatment, 59.8%-99.7% of Cr(VI) was reduced, but Cr could be easily leached from the reduction product. Increasing heating temperature and decreasing slag to sludge ratio strengthened the reduction and stabilization of Cr(VI). When the slag to sludge ratio was 0.5 and thermal treatment temperature was 300 degrees C, the total leached Cr and Cr(VI) declined to 0.55 mg/L and 0.17 mg/L respectively, and 45.5% of Cr in the thermally treated residue existed as residual fraction. A two-stage mechanism was proposed for the reduction and stabilization of Cr.

  16. Extracellular disulfide bridges stabilize TRPC5 dimerization, trafficking, and activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Kwak, Misun; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Wie, Jinhong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-04-01

    Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in the modulation of protein activity via the modification of thiol (-SH) groups. Among these reactions, disulfide bonds (S-S) play a key role in the folding, stability, and activity of membrane proteins. However, the regulation of extracellular cysteines in classical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels remains controversial. Here, we examine the functional importance of the extracellular disulfide bond in TRPC5 in modulating channel gating and trafficking. Specifically, we investigated TRPC5 activity in transiently transfected HEK293 cells with wild-type (WT) or cysteine (C553 and C558) mutants in the pore loop. Using reducing agents, we determined that a disulfide linkage mediates the tetrameric formation of the TRPC5 channel. By measuring the TRPC5 current, we observed that C553S or C558S mutants completely lose channel activity induced by lanthanides or receptor stimulation. Co-expression of TRPC5 (WT) with mutants demonstrated a dominant-negative function in mutants, which inhibited the activity of TRPC5 (WT). We generated TRPC5-TRPC5 dimers and observed reduced activity of WT-mutant (C553S or C558S) dimers compared to WT-WT dimers. When pretreated with reducing agents for 12 h, the TRPC5 current decreased due to a reduction in membrane TRPC5 distribution. In addition, we identified a reduced expression of C553S mutant in plasma membrane. We analyzed a dimeric interaction of wild-type and mutant TRPC5 using co-immunoprecipitation and FRET method, indicating a weak interaction between dimeric partners. These results indicated that the disulfide bond between conserved extracellular cysteines, especially C553, is essential for functional TRPC5 activity by channel multimerization and trafficking.

  17. Antimicrobial activity and stability of weakly acidified chlorous acid water.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Isanori; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Tamiko; Imaohji, Haruyuki; Murakami, Kazuya; Kino, Yasuhiro; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Fujita, Yatsuka; Goda, Hisataka; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of weakly acidified chlorous acid water (WACAW) against Staphylococcus aureus, non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7), Candida albicans, and spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species was evaluated in vitro. The antiviral activity was also examined using feline calicivirus (FCV). Diluted WACAW (>100 ppm) effectively reduced the number of non-spore-forming bacteria (>4 log10 CFU reductions) within 5 min. Treatment with this sanitizer at 400 ppm for 30 min achieved>5 log10 CFU reductions in spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species while an equivalent concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) resulted in only a 0.98 and 2.72 log10 CFU reduction, respectively. The effect of this sanitizer against FCV was equivalent to that of NaClO. Immersion in WACAW (400 ppm) achieved >4 and 2.26 log10 CFU reductions in Campylobacter jejuni and EHEC, respectively, on artificially contaminated broiler carcass pieces. Finally, theantimicrobial activity of this sanitizer was shown to be maintained for at least 28 d when in contact with nonwoven fabric (100% cotton). This study showed that pH control of chlorous acid is expected to modify its antimicrobial activity and stability. WACAW is expected to have applications in various settings such as the food processing and healthcare industries. PMID:25817812

  18. Structure and stability of pyrophyllite edge surfaces: Effect of temperature and water chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Newton, Aric G.

    2016-10-01

    The surfaces of clay minerals, which are abundant in atmospheric mineral dust, serve as an important medium to catalyze ice nucleation. The lateral edge surface of 2:1 clay minerals is postulated to be a potential site for ice nucleation. However, experimental investigations of the edge surface structure itself have been limited compared to the basal planes of clay minerals. Density functional theory (DFT) computational studies have provided insights into the pyrophyllite edge surface. Pyrophyllite is an ideal surrogate mineral for the edge surfaces of 2:1 clay minerals as it possesses no or little structural charge. Of the two most-common hydrated edge surfaces, the AC edge, (1 1 0) surface in the monoclinic polytype notation, is predicted to be more stable than the B edge, (0 1 0) surface. These stabilities, however, were determined based on the total energies calculated at 0 K and did not consider environmental effects such as temperature and humidity. In this study, atomistic thermodynamics based on periodic DFT electronic calculations was applied to examine the effects of environmental variables on the structure and thermodynamic stability of the common edge surfaces in equilibrium with bulk pyrophyllite and water vapor. We demonstrate that the temperature-dependent vibrational energy of sorbed water molecules at the edge surface is a significant component of the surface free energy and cannot be neglected when determining the surface stability of pyrophyllite. The surface free energies were calculated as a function of temperature from 240 to 600 K and water chemical potential corresponding to conditions from ultrahigh vacuum to the saturation vapor pressure of water. We show that at lower water chemical potentials (dry conditions), the AC and B edge surfaces possessed similar stabilities; at higher chemical potentials (humid conditions) the AC edge surface was more stable than the B edge surface. At high temperatures, both surfaces showed similar stabilities

  19. Immobilization and stabilization of a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase by covalent attachment on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Bolivar, Juan M; Mateo, Cesar; Wilson, Lorena; Guisan, Jose M; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Covalent immobilization of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase on glyoxyl-agarose beads promotes a very high stabilization of the enzyme against any distorting agent (temperature, pH, organic solvents). For example, the optimized immobilized preparation preserves 90% of initial activity when incubated for 22 h in 30% ethanol at pH 7 and 40 degrees C. Other immobilized preparations (obtained via other immobilization protocols) exhibit less than 10% of activity after incubation under similar conditions. Optimized glyoxyl-agarose immobilized preparation expressed a high percentage of catalytic activity (70%). Immobilization using any technique prevents enzyme inactivation by air bubbles during strong stirring of the enzyme. Stabilization of the enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose is higher when using the highest activation degree (75 micromol of glyoxyl per milliliter of support) as well as when performing long enzyme-support incubation times (4 h) at room temperature. Multipoint covalent immobilization seems to be responsible for this very high stabilization associated to the immobilization process on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose. The stabilization of the enzyme against the inactivation by ethanol seems to be interesting to improve cyclodextrin production: ethanol strongly inhibits the enzymatic degradation of cyclodextrin while hardly affecting the cyclodextrin production rate of the immobilized-stabilized preparation.

  20. Reduced Crystallization Temperature Methodology for Polymer Selection in Amorphous Solid Dispersions: Stability Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Chandan; Telang, Chitra; Schwabe, Robert; Zhong, Li

    2016-09-01

    API-polymer interactions, used to select the right polymeric matrix with an aim to stabilize an amorphous dispersion, are routinely studied using spectroscopic and/or calorimetric techniques (i.e., melting point depression). An alternate selection tool has been explored to rank order polymers for formation of stable amorphous dispersions as a pragmatic method for polymer selection. Reduced crystallization temperature of API, a parameter introduced by Zhou et al.,1 was utilized in this study for rank ordering interactions in API-polymeric systems. The trends in reduced crystallization temperature monitored over polymer concentration range of up to 20% polymer loading were utilized to calculate "crystallization parameter" or CP for two model systems (nifedipine and BI ABC). The rank order of CP, i.e., a measure of API-polymer interaction, for nifedipine followed the order PVP > PVP-VA > Soluplus > HPMCAS > PV Ac > PAA. This rank ordering was correlated to published results of molecular interactions and physical stability for nifedipine. A different rank ordering was observed for BI ABC: PAA > PVP > HPMCAS > Soluplus > PVPV-VA > PVAc. Interactions for BI ABC were not as differentiated when compared to nifedipine based on CP trends. BI ABC dispersions at drug loadings between 40 and 60% were physically stable for prolonged periods under ICH conditions as well as accelerated stress. We propose that large CP differences among polymers could be predictive of stability outcomes. Acceptable stability at pharmaceutically relevant drug loadings would suggest that the relative influence of downstream processes, such as polymer solubility in various solvents, process suitability and selection, and more importantly supersaturation potential, should be higher compared to stability considerations while developing compounds like BI ABC. PMID:27414755

  1. Experimentally increased temperature and hypoxia affect stability of social hierarchy and metabolism of the Amazonian cichlid Apistogramma agassizii.

    PubMed

    Kochhann, Daiani; Campos, Derek Felipe; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to understand how changes in temperature and oxygen could influence social behaviour and aerobic metabolism of the Amazonian dwarf cichlid Apistogramma agassizii. Social hierarchies were established over a period of 96h by observing the social interactions, feeding behaviour and shelter use in groups of four males. In the experimental environment, temperature was increased to 29°C in the high-temperature treatment, and oxygen lowered to 1.0mg·L(-1)O2 in the hypoxia treatment. Fish were maintained at this condition for 96h. The control was maintained at 26°C and 6.6mg·L(-1)O2. After the experimental exposure, metabolism was measured as routine metabolic rate (RMR) and electron transport system (ETS) activity. There was a reduction in hierarchy stability at high-temperature. Aggression changed after environmental changes. Dominant and subdominant fish at high temperatures increased their biting, compared with control-dominant. In contrast, hypoxia-dominant fish decreased their aggressive acts compared with all other fish. Shelter use decreased in control and hypoxic dominant fish. Dominant fish from undisturbed environments eat more than their subordinates. There was a decrease of RMR in fish exposed to the hypoxic environment when compared with control or high-temperature fish, independent of social position. Control-dominant fish had higher RMR than their subordinates. ETS activity increased in fish exposed to high temperatures; however, there was no effect on social rank. Our study reinforces the importance of environmental changes for the maintenance of hierarchies and their characteristics and highlights that most of the changes occur in the dominant position. PMID:26387464

  2. Active electrostatic control of liquid bridge dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, David B; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L

    2004-11-01

    Stabilization of cylindrical liquid bridges beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit has been demonstrated in both Plateau-tank experiments and in short-duration low gravity on NASA KC-135 aircraft using an active electrostatic control method. The method controls the (2,0) capillary mode using an optical modal-amplitude detector and mode-coupled electrostatic feedback stress. The application of mode-coupled stresses to a liquid bridge is also a very useful way to study mode dynamics. A pure (2,0)-mode oscillation can be excited by periodic forcing and then the forcing can be turned off to allow for a free decay from which the frequency and damping of the mode is measured. This can be done in the presence or absence of feedback control. Mode-coupled feedback stress applied in proportion to modal amplitude with appropriate gain leads to stiffening of the mode allowing for stabilization beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit. If the opposite sign of gain is applied the mode frequency is reduced. It has also been demonstrated that, by applying feedback in proportion to the modal velocity, the damping of the mode can be increased or decreased depending on the velocity gain. Thus, both the mode frequency and damping can be independently controlled at the same time and this has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) has its own modes of oscillation, some of which are in a low frequency range comparable to the (2,0)-mode frequency of typical liquid bridges. In the event that a vibration mode of the ISS were close to the frequency of a capillary mode it would be possible, with active electrostatic control, to shift the capillary-mode frequency away from that of the disturbance and simultaneously add artificial damping to further reduce the effect of the g-jitter. In principle, this method could be applied to any fluid configuration with a free surface.

  3. Halide-stabilized LiBH4, a room-temperature lithium fast-ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hideki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Takamura, Hitoshi; Ando, Mariko; Noda, Yasuto; Karahashi, Taiki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-28

    Solid state lithium conductors are attracting much attention for their potential applications to solid-state batteries and supercapacitors of high energy density to overcome safety issues and irreversible capacity loss of the currently commercialized ones. Recently, we discovered a new class of lithium super ionic conductors based on lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)). LiBH(4) was found to have conductivity as high as 10(-2) Scm(-1) accompanied by orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition above 115 degrees C. Polarization to the lithium metal electrode was shown to be extremely low, providing a versatile anode interface for the battery application. However, the high transition temperature of the superionic phase has limited its applications. Here we show that a chemical modification of LiBH(4) can stabilize the superionic phase even below room temperature. By doping of lithium halides, high conductivity can be obtained at room temperature. Both XRD and NMR confirmed room-temperature stabilization of superionic phase for LiI-doped LiBH(4). The electrochemical measurements showed a great advantage of this material as an extremely lightweight lithium electrolyte for batteries of high energy density. This material will open alternative opportunities for the development of solid ionic conductors other than previously known lithium conductors. PMID:19119813

  4. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Yu, Xinzhi; Song, Chao; Pang, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Biochar produced by biomass pyrolysis has the advantage of carbon sequestration. However, some of the carbon atoms in biochar are not very stable. In this study, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar was investigated using the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) oxidation spectrophotometric method. The results show that the carbon yield and ratios of H/C and O/C decreased from 71.72%, 0.71, and 0.32 to 38.48%, 0.22, and 0.06, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 300°C to 700°C. Moreover, the main oxygen-containing functional groups gradually decreased, while the degree of aromatization increased accordingly. The biochar showed a better stability at a higher pyrolysis temperature. The proportion of carbon loss, i.e., the amount of oxidized carbon with respect to the total carbon of the biochar, decreased from 16.52% to 6.69% with increasing temperature.

  5. Investigation of the oxygen exchange mechanism on Pt|yttria stabilized zirconia at intermediate temperatures: Surface path versus bulk path

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Alexander K.; Lutz, Alexander; Kubicek, Markus; Kubel, Frank; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen exchange kinetics of platinum on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated by means of geometrically well-defined Pt microelectrodes. By variation of electrode size and temperature it was possible to separate two temperature regimes with different geometry dependencies of the polarization resistance. At higher temperatures (550–700 °C) an elementary step located close to the three phase boundary (TPB) with an activation energy of ∼1.6 eV was identified as rate limiting. At lower temperatures (300–400 °C) the rate limiting elementary step is related to the electrode area and exhibited a very low activation energy in the order of 0.2 eV. From these observations two parallel pathways for electrochemical oxygen exchange are concluded. The nature of these two elementary steps is discussed in terms of equivalent circuits. Two combinations of parallel rate limiting reaction steps are found to explain the observed geometry dependencies: (i) Diffusion through an impurity phase at the TPB in parallel to diffusion of oxygen through platinum – most likely along Pt grain boundaries – as area-related process. (ii) Co-limitation of oxygen diffusion along the Pt|YSZ interface and charge transfer at the interface with a short decay length of the corresponding transmission line (as TPB-related process) in parallel to oxygen diffusion through platinum. PMID:22210951

  6. Investigation of the oxygen exchange mechanism on Pt|yttria stabilized zirconia at intermediate temperatures: Surface path versus bulk path.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander K; Lutz, Alexander; Kubicek, Markus; Kubel, Frank; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2011-11-30

    The oxygen exchange kinetics of platinum on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated by means of geometrically well-defined Pt microelectrodes. By variation of electrode size and temperature it was possible to separate two temperature regimes with different geometry dependencies of the polarization resistance. At higher temperatures (550-700 °C) an elementary step located close to the three phase boundary (TPB) with an activation energy of ∼1.6 eV was identified as rate limiting. At lower temperatures (300-400 °C) the rate limiting elementary step is related to the electrode area and exhibited a very low activation energy in the order of 0.2 eV. From these observations two parallel pathways for electrochemical oxygen exchange are concluded.The nature of these two elementary steps is discussed in terms of equivalent circuits. Two combinations of parallel rate limiting reaction steps are found to explain the observed geometry dependencies: (i) Diffusion through an impurity phase at the TPB in parallel to diffusion of oxygen through platinum - most likely along Pt grain boundaries - as area-related process. (ii) Co-limitation of oxygen diffusion along the Pt|YSZ interface and charge transfer at the interface with a short decay length of the corresponding transmission line (as TPB-related process) in parallel to oxygen diffusion through platinum.

  7. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  8. Stability of cytokines, chemokines and soluble activation markers in unprocessed blood stored under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Quint, Joshua J.; Li, Qian; Gjertson, David; Butch, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarkers such as cytokines, chemokines, and soluble activation markers can be unstable when processing of blood is delayed. The stability of various biomarkers in serum and plasma was investigated when unprocessed blood samples were stored for up to 24 h at room and refrigerator temperature. Methods Blood was collected from 16 healthy volunteers. Unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood was stored at room (20–25 °C) and refrigerator temperature (4–8 °C) for 0.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h after collection before centrifugation and separation of serum and plasma. Samples were batch tested for various biomarkers using commercially available immunoassays. Statistically significant changes were determined using the generalized estimating equation. Results IFN-γ, sIL-2Rα, sTNF-RII and β2-microglobulin were stable in unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood samples stored at either room or refrigerator temperature for up to 24 h. IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1β and RANTES were unstable in heparinized blood at room temperature; TNF-α, and MIP-1β were unstable in unprocessed serum at room temperature; IL-12 was unstable in unprocessed serum at refrigerator temperature; and neopterin was unstable in unprocessed EDTA blood at room temperature. IL-1ra was stable only in unprocessed serum at room temperature. Conclusion All the biomarkers studied, with the exception of IL-1ra, were stable in unprocessed EDTA blood stored at refrigerator temperature for 24 h. This indicates that blood for these biomarkers should be collected in EDTA and if delays in processing are anticipated the unseparated blood should be stored at refrigerator temperature until processing. PMID:27208752

  9. An investigation on actuation behavior of polyacrylonitrile gel fibers as a function of microstructure and stabilization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbaha, Hamideh; Arbab, Shahram; Zeinolebadi, Ahmad; Nourpanah, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel fibers show great potential to be used as actuators due to their mechanical response to chemical stimuli. In this work the response of PAN gel fibers to pH variation is studied. Three commercial grade PAN fibers with different chemical composition are investigated. Fibers are stabilized at temperatures varying from 100 to 275 °C. The stabilized fibers are hydrolyzed in an alkaline solution to obtain gel fibers. Gel fibers are stepwise immersed in solutions with pH varying between 0 and 14. Length/diameter variations are measured by optical microscopy. Results suggest that there is an optimum stabilization temperature at which a maximum response to pH change is obtained. This temperature corresponds to the onset of cyclization reactions, and is determined by the chemical composition of starting material. Thus at low stabilization temperatures (T ≤ 200 °C) only a gel-like shell is formed on the surface of fibers. Fibers stabilized above 200 °C show significant length/diameter variations (up to 325%). Increasing the stabilization temperature above the optimum temperature weakens the response of fibers to pH change. The results also show that the actuation behavior of PAN fibers containing itaconic acid starts at lower stabilization temperatures. This is attributed to the effect of acidic groups in lowering the onset of cyclization reactions.

  10. Distortions and stabilization of simple-cubic calcium at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Wendy L.; Wang, Lin; Ding, Yang; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Wenjun; Kim, Duck Young; Luo, Wei; Ahuja, R.; Meng, Yue; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2010-06-01

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  11. Chemical Stability of Glass Seal Interfaces in Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar SOFC stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective oxidation resistant high temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain ther structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the YSZ electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  12. Temperature dependence of hardness in yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pirouz, Pirouz; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hardness and microcracking in single-crystal 9.5-mol pct-Y2O3-fully-stabilized cubic-ZrO2 was studied as a function of orientation. Crack lengths increased with increased temperature up to 500 C; above 800 C, no cracks were found, indicating an indentation brittle-to-ductile transition of about 800 C. The temperature dependence of hardness was reduced around 500 C. Etching studies to delineate the plastic zone around and below indents identified the operative slip systems. The role of dislocations and their interactions within the plastic zone on the hardness and indentation fracture behavior of cubic-ZrO2 are discussed.

  13. Distortions and Stabilization of Simple Cubic Calcium at High Pressure and Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Alison A.

    2012-04-18

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  14. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ's) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  15. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  16. pH and temperature stability of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex-loaded chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Majeed, Hamid; Antoniou, John; Li, Yue; Ma, Yun; Yokoyama, Wallace; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2016-09-20

    The oxidative stability of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) incorporated as inclusion complexes (ICs) in sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin sodium (SBE-β-CD) and then ionotropically crosslinked with chitosan hydrochloride (CSH) into nanoparticles were investigated. EGCG-loaded CSH-SBE-β-CD nanoparticles (CSNs) were physically unstable at higher pH and temperature. The particle size of CSNs was unchanged in the pH range of 3-5, but the microenvironment of EGCG-IC appeared to be intact until the pH increased to 6.5 by fluorescence spectroscopy. The physical structure of EGCG-ICs was also affected during storage in addition to CSNs, which was further affected as temperature increased from 25 to 55°C. The decrease in antioxidant activities of EGCG-ICs and free EGCG with increasing pH, storage time and temperature were modest compared to the prominent decreases in antioxidant activities of EGCG-loaded CSNs. The extreme entrapment of EGCG-ICs and/or free EGCG in the aggregated CSNs restricted the release of EGCG, thus inhibiting the antioxidant activities.

  17. Roles of subcutaneous fat and thermoregulatory reflexes in determining ability to stabilize body temperature in water.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M G; Keatinge, W R

    1981-11-01

    1. The lowest water temperature in which different young adults could stabilize body temperature was found to vary from 32 degrees C to less than 12 degrees C, because of large differences in both total body insulation and metabolic heat production. 2. Total body insulation per unit surface area, in the coldest water allowing stability, was quite closely determined by mean subcutaneous fat thickness measured ultrasonically (r = 0.92), regardless of differences in distribution of this fat between men and women. 3. Reactive individuals developed high metabolic rates, and often rather high insulations in relation to fat thickness, which enabled them to stabilize their body temperatures in water more than 10 degrees C colder than was possible for less reactive individuals of similar fat thickness. 4. Measurements of heat flux, after stabilization in the coldest water possible, showed that the trunk was the main site of heat loss and that over half of the internal insulation there could be accounted for by subcutaneous fat; by contrast, fat could account for less than a third of higher insulations found in muscular parts of the limbs, and for less than 3% of very high insulations in the hands and feet. 5. After stabilization of body temperature at rest in the coldest possible water, exercise reduced internal insulation only in muscular parts of the limbs. Exercise also increased heat loss elsewhere by exposing skin of protected regions such as flexural surfaces of joints. During exercise total heat production increased rather more than heat loss in unreactive subjects, but less than loss in subjects whose heat production had already risen to a high level when they were at rest in cold water. 6. In warm (37 degrees C) water, tissue insulations were lower and much more uniform between subjects and between different body regions than in the cold. Even in the warm, however, insulations remained rather higher in fat than thin subjects, higher at rest than during exercise

  18. Stability of cable thermocouples at the upper temperature limit of their working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanovskiy, A. A.; Zemba, E. S.; Belenkiy, A. M.; Chibizova, S. I.; Bursin, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental results of EMF stability research are presented for MIMS thermocouples of types K and N of external diameters 1.5; 3.0 and 5.0 mm. All thermocouples had heat resistant sheath and were not used before the tests. They were subjected to every-day cyclic heating and cooling. During each cycle there was 6 h annealing in air at the temperature 1200 °C Results shows, that stability of a cable thermocouple in air at the temperature 1200 °C depends, mainly, on its diameter, instead of on thermocouple type or metal sheath material. Acceptable time of operation in a thermal cycling mode for 1.5 mm cable thermocouples is limited by (15, 16) h, and for 3 mm thermocouples it is equal to (40, 45) h. Besides, the effect of signal shunting is shown in the work for a thermocouple under heating of its average part to the temperature 1200 °C Experiment has shown that use of long cable thermocouple of 1.5 mm diameter at the temperatures above 1000°C can lead to serious errors in temperature measurement. Heating of 400 mm thermocouple length to 1100 °C causes positive EMF in the 1.5 mm cable thermocouple equivalent to +3.4 °C and +18 °C at 1200°C. For 3 mm cable thermocouple EMF at 1200 °C reaches the value equivalent to +2.3 °C, but double increase in heating length makes the value greater to +13.5 °C. The given facts are necessary to consider while using of thin (1, 3) mm cable thermocouples at the temperatures (1100, 1200) °C.

  19. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.

  20. Liposomal encapsulation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase with cofactor for stabilization of the enzyme structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Sato, Mami; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Nakao, Katsumi

    2008-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) with its cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) could be stably encapsulated in liposomes composed of POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine). The YADH- and NAD+-containing liposomes (YADH-NADL) were 100 nm in mean diameter. The liposomal YADH and NAD+ concentrations were 2.3 mg/mL and 3.9 mM, respectively. A synergistic effect of the liposomal encapsulation and the presence of NAD+ was examined on the thermal stability of YADH at 45 and 50 degrees C. The enzyme stability of the YADH-NADL was compared to the stabilities of the liposomal YADH (YADHL) containing 3.3 mg/mL YADH without NAD+ as well as the free YADH with and without NAD+. Free YADH was increasingly deactivated during its incubation at 45 degrees C for 2 h with decrease of the enzyme concentration from 3.3 to 0.01 mg/mL because of the dissociation of tetrameric YADH into its subunits. At that temperature, the coexistence of free NAD+ at 3.9 mM improved the stability of free YADH at 2.3 mg/mL through forming their thermostable complex, although the stabilization effect of NAD+ was lowered at 50 degrees C. The turbidity measurements for the above free YADH solution with and without NAD+ revealed that the change in the enzyme tertiary structure was much more pronounced at 50 degrees C than at 45 degrees C even in the presence of NAD+. This suggests that YADH was readily deactivated in free solution due to a decrease in the inherent affinity of YADH with NAD+. On the other hand, both liposomal enzyme systems, YADH-NADL and YADHL, showed stabilities at both 45 and 50 degrees C much higher than those of the above free enzyme systems, YADH/NAD+ and YADH. These results imply that the liposome membranes stabilized the enzyme tertiary and thus quaternary structures. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of the YADH-NADL showed a stability higher than that of the YADHL with a more remarkable effect of NAD+ at 50 degrees C than at 45 degrees C. This was

  1. Sorption and stability of mercury on activated carbon for emission control.

    PubMed

    Graydon, John W; Zhang, Xinzhi; Kirk, Donald W; Jia, Charles Q

    2009-09-15

    A leading strategy for control of mercury emissions from combustion processes involves removal of elemental mercury from the flue gas by injection of activated carbon sorbent. After particulate capture and disposal in a landfill, it is critical that the captured mercury remains permanently sequestered in the sorbent. The environmental stability of sorbed mercury was determined on two commercial, activated carbons, one impregnated using gaseous sulfur, and on two activated carbons that were impregnated with sulfur by reaction with SO(2). After loading with mercury vapor using a static technique, the stability of the sorbed mercury was characterized by two leaching methods. The standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure showed leachate concentrations well below the limit of 0.2mg/L for all activated carbons. The nature of the sorbed mercury was further characterized by a sequential extraction scheme that was specifically optimized to distinguish clearly among the highly stable phases of mercury. This analysis revealed that there are two forms in which mercury is sequestered. In the sorbent that was impregnated by gaseous sulfur at a relatively low temperature, the mercury is present predominantly as HgS. In the other three sorbents, including two impregnated using SO(2), the mercury is predominantly present in the elemental form, physisorbed and chemisorbed to thiophene groups on the carbon surface. Both forms of binding are sufficiently stable to provide permanent sequestration of mercury in activated carbon sorbents after disposal.

  2. Evaluation of stability of allergen extracts for sublingual immunotherapy during transport under unfavourable temperature conditions with an innovative thermal insulating packaging.

    PubMed

    Puccinelli, P; Natoli, V; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Incorvaia, C; Barbieri, S; Masieri, S; Frati, F

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical and biotechnological products are temperature-sensitive and should normally be kept at a controlled temperature, particularly during transport, in order to prevent the loss of their stability and activity. Therefore, stability studies should be performed for temperature-sensitive products, considering product characteristics, typical environmental conditions, and anticipating environmental extremes that may occur during product transport in a specific country. Staloral products for sublingual immunotherapy are temperature sensitive and are labelled for maintenance under refrigerated conditions (2-8°C). Given the peculiar climatic context of Italy and the great temperature fluctuations that may occur during transport, this study was aimed at evaluating the impact of a new engineered thermal insulating packaging for Staloral. In particular, the purpose was to assess whether the new packaging could create a container condition able to preserve the stability and immunological activity of the product during the transport phase throughout Italy. The results showed that the range of temperatures that can affect the product, in the area surrounding the product packaging, may reach a peak of 63°C during transport under the most unfavourable climatic conditions, i.e. in a non-refrigerated van during the summer season, from the site of production in France to the patient's house in Catania, the city with the highest temperatures in Italy. However, the highest temperature reached inside the vaccine did not exceed 45°C over a period of about 2 h. The ELISA inhibition test on samples subjected to the extreme temperature conditions previously defined (45°C) showed an immunological activity higher than 75% of that initially measured and was comparable to those obtained with samples stored at controlled temperature (5°C). This means that, even in the worst case scenario, the structure of the allergen extracts is not influenced and the vaccine potency is

  3. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-30

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  4. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  5. Differential stability of photosynthetic membranes and fatty acid composition at elevated temperature in Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Almeyda, E.; Thomé, P. E.; El Hafidi, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing surface seawater temperatures resulting from climate change. Reef-building corals symbiotic with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium experience dramatic reductions in algal densities when exposed to temperatures above the long-term local summer average, leading to a phenomenon called coral bleaching. Although the temperature-dependent loss in photosynthetic function of the algal symbionts has been widely recognized as one of the early events leading to coral bleaching, there is considerable debate regarding the actual damage site. We have tested the relative thermal stability and composition of membranes in Symbiodinium exposed to high temperature. Our results show that melting curves of photosynthetic membranes from different symbiotic dinoflagellates substantiate a species-specific sensitivity to high temperature, while variations in fatty acid composition under high temperature rather suggest a complex process in which various modifications in lipid composition may be involved. Our results do not support the role of unsaturation of fatty acids of the thylakoid membrane as being mechanistically involved in bleaching nor as being a dependable tool for the diagnosis of thermal susceptibility of symbiotic reef corals.

  6. High-pressure and high-temperature stability field of hydrous phase delta-AlOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, A.; Ohtani, E.; Kondo, T.; Hirao, N.; Sone, T.; Kikegawa, T.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Stability field of hydrous phases is a key for understanding water concentration in the earth's mantle. δ-AlOOH is a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore (α-AlOOH) and boehmite (γ-AlOOH). The space group of this phase is Pnn2 and it is similar to CaCl2-type SiO2 which is a high-pressure polymorph of stishovite; edge-sharing Al-O octahedra make single-chain along c-axis. Although it has a large stability field in pressure range from 18 GPa to 32 GPa and temperature of up to 1473 K, the high-pressure stability limits has not yet clarified. In this study, we investigated the stability field of δ-AlOOH up to 130 GPa. The high-pressure experiments were performed using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Starting material was gibbsite (Al(OH)3) powder mixed with platinum black as a laser absorber. The sample was sandwiched by pure gibbsite layers and loaded into a rhenium gasket. Pressures were measured with ruby-fluorescence technique before and after heating. The sample was heated from both sides by a Nd:YAG laser operated in multimode. After experiment, stable phase in each condition was determined using the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy method. We also conducted in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under high-pressure and temperature conditions together with the X-ray diffraction of the recovered samples both at BL10XU in SPring-8 and BL-13A in Photon Factory. In these runs, pressures were also calculated using the equation of state of platinum. The experimental conditions were in the pressures between 50-130 GPa and temperatures to 1800 K. X-ray analysis shows the sample recovered from the pressure and temperature range from 40 GPa and 1577 K to 130 GPa and 1800 K consists of δ-AlOOH. In the in-situ experiments, crystallization of δ-AlOOH was observed at 65 GPa and 1300 K and it was stable up to 1700 K. δ-AlOOH is stable in the large pressure range with a dehydration temperature around 1800K. It can be a water reservoir in subducting slabs in the

  7. A single mutation within a Ca(2+) binding loop increases proteolytic activity, thermal stability, and surfactant stability.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuyoshi; Ozawa, Tadahiro; Tohata, Masatoshi; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya

    2013-03-01

    We improved the enzymatic properties of the oxidatively stable alkaline serine protease KP-43 through protein engineering to make it more suitable for use in laundry detergents. To enhance proteolytic activity, the gene encoding KP-43 was mutagenized by error-prone PCR. Screening identified a Tyr195Cys mutant enzyme that exhibited increased specific activity toward casein between pH 7 and 11. At pH 10, the mutant displayed 1.3-fold higher specific activity for casein compared to the wild-type enzyme, but the activity of the mutant was essentially unchanged toward several synthetic peptides. Furthermore, the Tyr195Cys mutation significantly increased thermal stability and surfactant stability of the enzyme under oxidizing conditions. Examination of the crystal structure of KP-43 revealed that Tyr195 is a solvent exposed residue that forms part of a flexible loop that binds a Ca(2+) ion. This residue lies 15-20Å away from the residues comprising the catalytic triad of the enzyme. These results suggest that the substitution at position 195 does not alter the structure of the active center, but instead may affect a substrate-enzyme interaction. We propose that the Tyr195Cys mutation enhances the interaction with Ca(2+) and affects the packing of the Ca(2+) binding loop, consequently increasing protein stability. The simultaneously increased proteolytic activity, thermal stability, and surfactant stability of the Tyr195Cys mutant enzyme make the protein an ideal candidate for laundry detergent application.

  8. Enhanced Raman sensitivity using an actively stabilized external resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David J.; Glugla, Manfred; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter

    2001-04-01

    An enhancement up to 250-fold in laser Raman signals for real-time gas analysis has been achieved within an actively stabilized external resonator (ASER), whose length is actively matched to the single-frequency excitation laser using the Pound-Drever technique. With the Raman cell present, enhancements up to 50-fold are achieved, and the resulting detection limit for hydrogen in ambient-pressure gas mixtures is about ten parts-per-million in a 1 min analysis period at unity signal-to-noise ratio. Based upon the recent development of a fiber-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser with single-frequency output exceeding 5 W at 532 nm, this highly sensitive instrument is applied to detection of tritiated gases, wherein the compactness and low heat of this laser head permit placing the entire optical system, including laser head, charge coupled Raman detector, and ASER, within the glove box necessary for secondary containment of tritium, thereby accomplishing a robust, highly sensitive Raman analytical system for hazardous substances.

  9. Ceramic stabilization of hazardous wastes: a high performance room temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    ANL has developed a room-temperature process for converting hazardous materials to a ceramic structure. It is similar to vitrification but is achieved at low cost, similar to conventional cement stabilization. The waste constituents are both chemically stabilized and physically encapsulated, producing very low leaching levels and the potential for delisting. The process, which is pH-insensitive, is ideal for inorganic sludges and liquids, as well as mixed chemical-radioactive wastes, but can also handle significant percentages of salts and even halogenated organics. High waste loadings are possible and densification occurs,so that volumes are only slightly increased and in some cases (eg, incinerator ash) are reduced. The ceramic product has strength and weathering properties far superior to cement products.

  10. Active and Passive Interferometric Fringe Stabilization for Quantum Communications in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Joseph; Graham, Trent; Kwiat, Paul

    2015-05-01

    In interferometry, the relative phase between the paths is liable to drift over time due to environmental factors, i.e., vibrations in the components and from turbulence and temperature fluctuations in the air. If time-bin encoded photons are received from a moving space platform, e.g., a satellite or the International Space Station, there would be an additional large relative temporal shift because of the movement of the source toward or away from the receiver. This shift would alter the temporal coherence of adjacent timebins-as measured by a suitable temporally-unbalanced interferometer-in addition to the relative phase errors from the environment. To achieve accurate measurements in this situation, the interferometer needs to be stabilized against phase drifts. We have employed an active and passive stabilization scheme for a double unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration; while passive damping reduces most of the phase drift due to vibrations and fluctuations from the air, we designed and implemented an active feedback correction system to stabilize the remaining phase drift and the simulated temporal drift.

  11. Sensory stability of ultra-high temperature milk in polyethylene bottle.

    PubMed

    Petrus, R R; Walter, E H M; Faria, J A F; Abreu, L F

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensory stability of ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk subjected to different heat treatments and stored at room temperature in white high density polyethylene bottles (HDPE) pigmented with titanium dioxide. Two lots of 300 units each were processed, respectively, at 135 and 141 degrees C/10 s using indirect heating and subsequently aseptically filled in an ISO class 7 clean room. These experimental lots were evaluated for appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall appreciation and compared to samples of commercial UHT milk purchased from local commercial stores. The time-temperature combinations investigated did not affect either the acceptability or the shelf life of the milk. Despite the limited light barrier properties of HDPE bottles, the product contained in the package tested exhibited good stability, with a shelf life ranging from 4 to 11 wk. Within this time period, the acceptability of the experimental lots was similar to that of the commercial products. The results achieved in this study contribute to turn the low-cost UHT system investigated into a technically viable option for small-size dairy processing plants. PMID:19200121

  12. Stability of the rate, state and temperature dependent friction model and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arun K.; Singh, Trilok N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study stability of the rate, state and temperature friction (RSTF) model. The Segall and Rice approach is used to model heat transfer at the sliding interface with its surroundings. The effect of pore pressure is not considered in the model to avoid the complex expression for critical stiffness. Linear stability analysis of the spring-mass sliding system is carried out with the ageing law under the quasistatic conditions in order to determine the critical stiffness above which sliding behaviour changes from unstable to stable or vice versa. Our numerical simulations establish that critical stiffness of the heated surface may increase or decrease from corresponding to the critical stiffness of the unheated surface depending on the relative values of two contradictory parameters related with velocity effect and temperature effect. Parametric studies are also carried out to understand shear velocity and temperature of the sliding surface dependence of steady friction. The RSTF model is also used to study the gravity induced failure of a creeping rock slope and the results are justified.

  13. Ab initio phase stability at high temperatures and pressures in the V-Cr system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Yang, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Vanadium metal has seen a surge in research, experimental and theoretical, driven mainly by its importance in applications but also because of its surprising destabilization of the body-centered cubic (bcc) ground-state phase close to 60 GPa. The phase stability of vanadium metal and vanadium-chromium alloys at high temperatures and pressures is explored by means of first-principles electronic-structure calculations. Utilizing the self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics approach in conjunction with density-functional theory, we show that pressure-induced mechanical instability of body-centered cubic vanadium metal, which results in formation of a rhombohedral phase at around 60 GPa at room temperatures, will prevail significant heating and compression. Furthermore, alloying with chromium decreases the temperature at which stabilization of the body-centered cubic phase occurs at elevated pressure. Computing support for this work came from the LLNL Computing Grand Challenge program. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 11-ER-033.

  14. Thermoregulation in rats exposed perinatally to dioxin: core temperature stability to altered ambient temperature, behavioral thermoregulation, and febrile response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Miller, D B

    1998-08-21

    Recent studies have shown that perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) alters thermoregulatory function in adult rats and hamsters, indicated by a reduced body temperature during the animal's nocturnal phase. The present study was designed to assess the behavioral thermoregulation, ability to develop a fever, and thermoregulatory stability as a function of ambient temperature (Ta) in rats exposed perinatally to TCDD. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed on gestational day (GD) 15 to 1 microg TCDD/kg (po). The male offspring were implanted with transmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The 24-h pattern of core temperature was affected by TCDD exposure, characterized by a reduced nocturnal Tc. At some ages, the diurnal Tc of the TCDD group was elevated. This dysfunction in temperature regulation was most apparent at 7 and 11 mo of age. The 24-h pattern of MA was also altered by TCDD. The hypothermic effects of TCDD were most pronounced at cooler Ta values of 10 to 22 degrees C. In contrast, behavioral thermoregulation, assessed by measuring the selected Ta and Tc of rats in a temperature gradient, was unaffected by TCDD. The ability to develop a fever following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin (Escherichia coli; 50 microg/kg) was accentuated in the TCDD-treated animals. The data confirm a nocturnal hypothermia in rats prenatally exposed to TCDD. However, the normal behavioral regulation of Tc suggests that hypothalamic thermoregulatory centers are not permanently altered. The accentuated fever in TCDD animals shows possible functional alterations in the neuroimmune and/or thermoregulatory axes involved in fever. PMID:9726785

  15. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  16. Effect of temperature on Candida antartica lipase B activity in the kinetic resolution of acebutolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajin, Mariani; Kamaruddin, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic studies of free Candida antartica lipase B in kinetic resolution of acebutolol have been carried out to characterize the temperature effects towards enzyme stability and activity. A decreased in reaction rate was observed in temperature above 40oC. Thermodynamic studies on lipase deactivation exhibited a first-order kinetic pattern. The activation and deactivation energies were 39.63 kJ/mol and 54.90 kJ/mol, respectively. The enthalpy and entropy of the lipase deactivation were found to be 52.12 kJ/mol and -0.18 kJ/mol, respectively.

  17. Characterization of the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and detergent: laboratory practicals for studying the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2012-07-01

    This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of α-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test (qualitative) under different conditions (e.g. variations in temperature and alkalinity). This work also proposes the study of enzyme stability in the presence of several surfactants and oxidizing agents using the same technical approach. The proposed laboratory exercises promote the understanding of the physiological function of this enzyme and the biotechnological applications of AAMYs in the detergent industry. The exercises also promote the understanding that the enzymatic stability and performance are dependent on the organism of origin, and if necessary, these properties could be modified by genetic engineering. In addition, this article reinforces the development of laboratory skills, problem-solving capabilities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are proposed primarily as an undergraduate project for advanced students in the biochemical and biotechnological sciences. These laboratory practicals are complementary to the previously published BAMBED article (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 280-290, 2011) on detergent proteases.

  18. Structures and relative stabilities of ammonia clusters at different temperatures: DFT vs. ab initio.

    PubMed

    Malloum, Alhadji; Fifen, Jean Jules; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Engo, Serge Guy Nana; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2015-11-21

    A hydrogen bond network in ammonia clusters plays a key role in understanding the properties of species embedded in ammonia. This network is dictated by the structures of neutral ammonia clusters. In this work, structures of neutral ammonia clusters (NH3)n(=2-10) have been studied at M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++g(d,p) levels of theory. The analysis of the relative stabilities of various hydrogen bond types has also been studied and vibrational spectroscopy of the ammonia pentamer and decamer is investigated. We noted that M06-2X provides lower electronic energies, greater binding energies and higher structural resolution than MP2. We also noted that at the M06-2X level of theory, the binding energy converges to the experimental vaporization enthalpy faster than that at the MP2 level of theory. As a result, it is found that the M06-2X functional could be more suitable than the MP2 ab initio method in the description of structures and energies of ammonia clusters. However, we found that the electronic energy differences obtained at both levels of computation follow a linear relation with n (number of ammonia molecules in a cluster). As far as the structures of ammonia clusters are concerned, we proposed new "significant" isomers that have not been reported previously. The most remarkable is the global minimum electronic energy structure of the ammonia hexamer, which has an inversion centre and confirms experimental observation. Moreover, we reported the relative stabilities of neutral ammonia clusters for temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 K. The stability of isomers changes with the increase of the temperature. As a result, the branched and less bonded isomers are the most favored at high temperatures and disfavored at low temperatures, while compact and symmetric isomers dominate the population of clusters at low temperatures. In fine, from this work, the global minimum energy structures of ammonia clusters are known for the first time at a given temperature

  19. Stability of feline caliciviruses in marine water maintained at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, K; Kadoi, B K

    2001-01-01

    Since human caliciviruses are responsible for viral gastroenteritis transmitted by contaminated foods and the viruses barely propagate in cell culture, feline caliciviruses were employed as a model for the measurement of their stability in marine water. Survival of four strains of feline calicivirus in marine water was measured when the seed viruses were diluted 1/10 with marine water and maintained at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C, and 20 degrees C respectively. Among the virus strains studied, a considerable amount of infective viruses remained at 10 degrees C or lower temperature conditions even for a period of 30 days. PMID:11209839

  20. Stability and partial oligomerization of naphthalene under high pressure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Mimura, Koichi; Nishida, Tamihito; Inoue, Toru; Nakano, Satoshi; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The stability and pressure-induced chemical reactions of naphthalene were investigated at room temperature at pressures up to 23 GPa. In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that naphthalene retained its crystal structure up to ∼20 GPa, whereas a solid amorphous phase was observed in the recovered samples. Based on microanalysis of the recovered samples using Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS), naphthalene dimer and trimer isomers were observed at pressures exceeding 15 GPa. The dimers were classified as products of simple dimerization, naphthylation, and condensation, similar to the case of the pressure-induced dimerization of benzene, indicating a similar dimerization mechanism for naphthalene.

  1. Moduli stabilization in type II Calabi-Yau compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Partouche, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    We consider the type II superstring compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds, at finite temperature. The latter is implemented at the string level by a free action on the Euclidean time circle. We show that all Kähler and complex structure moduli involved in the gauge theories geometrically engineered in the vicinity of singular loci are lifted by the stringy thermal effective potential. The analysis is based on the effective gauged super-gravity at low energy, without integrating out the non-perturbative BPS states becoming massless at the singular loci. The universal form of the action in the weak coupling regime and at low enough temperature is determined in two cases. Namely, the conifold locus, as well as a locus where the internal space develops a genus- g curve of A N -1 singularities, thus realizing an SU( N ) gauge theory coupled to g hypermultiplets in the adjoint. In general, we argue that the favored points of stabilization sit at the intersection of several such loci. As a result, the entire vector multiplet moduli space is expected to be lifted, together with hypermultiplet moduli. The scalars are dynamically stabilized during the cosmological evolution induced by the back-reaction of the thermal effective potential on the originally static background. When the universe expands and the temperature T drops, the scalars converge to minima, with damped oscillations. Moreover, they store an energy density that scales as T 4, which never dominates over radiation. The reason for this is that the mass they acquire at one-loop is of order the temperature scale, which is time-dependent rather than constant. As an example, we analyze the type IIA compactification on a hy-persurface {P}_{{( {1,1,2,2,6} )}}^4 [12], with Hodge numbers h 11 = 2 and h 12 = 128. In this case, both Kähler moduli are stabilized at a point, where the internal space develops a node and an enhanced SU(2) gauge theory coupled to 2 adjoint hypermultiplets. This shows that in the dual thermal

  2. PMN-PT based quaternary piezoceramics with enhanced piezoelectricity and temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nengneng; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; He, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiling; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The phase structure, piezoelectric, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of (0.80 - x)PMN-0.10PFN-0.10PZ-xPT were investigated systematically. The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) was confirmed to be 0.30 < x < 0.34. Both MPB compositions of x = 0.32 and x = 0.33 exhibit high piezoelectric coefficients d33 = 640 pC/N and 580 pC/N, electromechanical couplings kp of 0.53 and 0.52, respectively. Of particular importance is that the composition with x = 0.33 was found to process high field-induced piezoelectric strain coefficient d33* of 680 pm/V, exhibiting a minimal temperature-dependent behavior, being less than 8% in the temperature range of 25-165 °C, which can be further confirmed by d31, with a variation of less than 9%. The temperature-insensitive d33* values can be explained by the counterbalance of the ascending dielectric permittivity and descending polarization with increasing temperature. These features make the PMN-PT based quaternary MPB compositions promising for actuator applications demanding high temperature stability.

  3. Evolution of an Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Constrained by Stability and Activity Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Pressured by antibiotic use, resistance enzymes have been evolving new activities. Does such evolution have a cost? To investigate this question at the molecular level, clinically isolated mutants of the {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 were studied. When purified, mutant enzymes had increased activity against cephalosporin antibiotics but lost both thermodynamic stability and kinetic activity against their ancestral targets, penicillins. The X-ray crystallographic structures of three mutant enzymes were determined. These structures suggest that activity gain and stability loss is related to an enlarged active site cavity in the mutant enzymes. In several clinically isolated mutant enzymes, a secondary substitution is observed far from the active site (Met182 {yields} Thr). This substitution had little effect on enzyme activity but restored stability lost by substitutions near the active site. This regained stability conferred an advantage in vivo. This pattern of stability loss and restoration may be common in the evolution of new enzyme activity.

  4. Preparation of lactoperoxidase incorporated hybrid nanoflower and its excellent activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Altinkaynak, Cevahir; Yilmaz, Ismail; Koksal, Zeynep; Özdemir, Hasan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Özdemir, Nalan

    2016-03-01

    We report a green approach to synthesize lactoperoxidase (LPO) enzyme and metal ions hybrid nanoflowers (HNFs) and investigate mechanism underlying formation and enhanced catalytic activity and stability under different experimental parameters. The HNFs formed of LPO enzyme purified from bovine milk and copper ions (Cu(2+)) were synthesized at two different temperatures (+4 °C and 20 °C) in PBS (pH 7.4). The effects of experimental conditions, pH and storage temperatures, on the activity and stability of LPO-copper phosphate HNFs were evaluated using guaiacol as a substrate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Optimum pHs were determined as pH 8 and pH 6 for LPO-copper phosphate HNF and free LPO, respectively. LPO-copper phosphate HNF has higher activity than free LPO at each pHs. Activities of LPO-copper phosphate HNF at pH 6 and pH 8 were calculated as 70.48 EU/mg, 107.23 EU/mg, respectively while free LPO shows 45.78 EU/mg and 30.12 EU/mg, respectively. Compared with free LPO, LPO-copper phosphate HNFs exhibited ∼160% and ∼360% increase in activities at pH 6 and pH 8, respectively. Additionally, LPO-copper phosphate HNFs displayed perfect reusability after six cycles. Finally, we demonstrated that LPO-copper phosphate HNFs can be utilized as a nanosensor for detection of dopamine and epinephrine.

  5. Structural and mechanical property changes in toughened magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, D.B.; James, M.R.; Porter, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    The mechanical properties of high-toughness magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia were found to be dramatically altered by a single cooling cycle between room temperature and - 196/sup 0/C. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to correlate the changes in mechanical properties with structural changes that occur at temperatures below -- 100/sup 0/C. Most of the the tetragonal precipitates that are responsible for toughening transformed to an orthorhombic phase with unit-cell volume intermediate between those of the tetragonal and monoclinic phases. The orthorhombic phase was stable with heating to 300/sup 0/C, but it transformed back to the tetragonal structure when heated to 400/sup 0/C.

  6. Stability at comminution chopping temperatures of model chicken breast muscle emulsions.

    PubMed

    Perchonok, M H; Regenstein, J M

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of vegetable oil and protein solutions extracted from chicken breast muscle were heated to 10°C, 20°C and 30°C before or after the Omni-mixer step of timed emulsification. Emulsion stability (ES) was determined by placing the extracted cream layer between layers of filter paper and polyester mesh and measuring the weight loss after 96 h at 0-1°C. All natural actomyosin and exhaustively washed chicken breast muscle emulsions lost no more than 50% of their original weight after heating and were defined as being stable. Even excessive chopping temperatures (30°C) failed to effect timed emulsification or ES. This study suggests that any instability of finished commercial sausage-type products is not due to changes in the protein caused by excessively high chopping temperatures generated during comminution.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  8. Tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy; Prospects for low temperature applications to superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, J.; Rice, P. , Boulder, CO . Electromagnetic Technology Div.)

    1991-03-01

    The authors of this paper demonstrate an imaging technique referred to as tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy or TSMFM. TSMFM is performed using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a flexible magnetic, tunneling tip in place of the usual rigid tunneling tip. TSMFM images are therefore combinations of topography and the magnetic forces between the tip and the sample. Room temperature TSMFM images of magnetic bit tracks on a hard disk have 100 nm resolution and are comparable to Bitter patterns made using a ferrofluid. We have built a low temperature STM with the hope of getting TSMFM images of the flux lattice in superconductors. Preliminary TSMFM images of a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub c}O{sub x} (YBCO) film (T{sub c} {minus} 88 K) in a 5Q mT field show that relatively large magnetic forces are acting on the flexible tip while scanning at 48 K.

  9. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  10. Low-temperature performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Ho Keun; Kim, Jun Woo; Bae, Kiho; Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Park, Suk Won; Prestat, Michel; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on the performance of thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at temperatures of 50-525 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for conductivity measurements. Relatively high conductivity values were observed in the low-temperature region when compared to reference values of YSZ synthesized by other methods. To investigate the conduction mechanism, various experimental variables were modified during the electrical measurements, including the ratio of yttria to zirconia in the ALD YSZ films and the atmospheric conditions. To relate the electrical properties to the structural characteristics, the crystallinity and microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the suitability of an ALD YSZ membrane as the electrolyte of micro solid oxide fuel cells was evaluated. An open circuit voltage of almost 1 V and decent power output were successfully measured below 100 °C.

  11. Phase Stability of Epsilon and Gamma HNIW (CL-20) at High-Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, Jared

    2007-06-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements (α, β, γ, ɛ, and ζ). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Theoretical calculations have been performed for a variety of explosive ingredients including CL-20, but it was noted that no experimental measurements existed for comparison with the theoretical bulk modulus calculated for CL-20. Therefore, the phase stabilities of epsilon and gamma CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5GPa and 175^oC, respectively. No phase change (from the starting epsilon phase) was observed under hydrostatic compression up to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. Under ambient pressure the epsilon phase was determined to be stable to a temperature of 120^oC. When heating above 125^oC the gamma phase appeared and it remained stable until thermal decomposition occurred above 150^oC. The gamma phase exhibits a phase change upon compression at both ambient temperature and 140^oC. Pressure -- volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75^oC were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  12. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  13. SUMOylation of Pancreatic Glucokinase Regulates Its Cellular Stability and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise; Negahdar, Maria; Molnes, Janne; Johansson, Bente B.; Müller, Yvonne; Haas, Wilhelm; Gygi, Steven P.; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Njølstad, Pål R.

    2013-01-01

    Glucokinase is the predominant hexokinase expressed in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, with a pivotal role in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, illustrated by glucokinase gene mutations causing monogenic diabetes and congenital hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. A complex tissue-specific network of mechanisms regulates this enzyme, and a major unanswered question in glucokinase biology is how post-translational modifications control the function of the enzyme. Here, we show that the pancreatic isoform of human glucokinase is SUMOylated in vitro, using recombinant enzymes, and in insulin-secreting model cells. Three N-terminal lysines unique for the pancreatic isoform (Lys-12/Lys-13 and/or Lys-15) may represent one SUMOylation site, with an additional site (Lys-346) common for the pancreatic and the liver isoform. SUMO-1 and E2 overexpression stabilized preferentially the wild-type human pancreatic enzyme in MIN6 β-cells, and SUMOylation increased the catalytic activity of recombinant human glucokinase in vitro and also of glucokinase in target cells. Small ubiquitin-like modifier conjugation represents a novel form of post-translational modification of the enzyme, and it may have an important regulatory function in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:23297408

  14. Engineering of protease-resistant phytase from Penicillium sp.: high thermal stability, low optimal temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianqian; Liu, Honglei; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2010-12-01

    Phytase is widely used as a feed additive in industry. It is important to investigate the thermal stability, optimal pH and temperature and protease resistance of phytases in application. We introduced random mutations in a protease-resistance phytase gene of Penicillium sp. using Mn²+-dITP random mutation method, and identified two mutants 2-28 (T11A, G56E, L65F, Q144H and L151S) and 2-249 (T11A, H37Y, G56E, L65F, Q144H, L151S and N354D) with improved thermal stability and optimal temperature and pH. The mutants retained their high resistance to pepsin. The catalytic activity at 37 °C was up to 133.3 U and 136.6 U per mg protein with broad optimal temperature ranges of 37-55 °C and 37-50 °C, respectively. After a heat treatment at 100 °C for 5 min, the two mutant proteins retained about 72.81% and 92.43% of the initial activity, respectively. In addition, the optimal pH of mutant 2-249 was reduced to 4.8. All these improved properties made them more suitable to be used as feed additive in the feed industry than the present commercial phytases. Structure analysis suggested that the replacements of G56E, L65F, Q144H, and L151S improved the thermal stability of the protein by increasing new hydrogen bonds among the adjacent secondary structures. Moreover, the mutation of L151S enhanced the activity in the range of 37-70 °C and pH 2.5-7.0 by facilitating the interaction between the substrate and the catalytic centre. The substitution of N354D influenced the pH profile by weakening the bondage with the side chain of D353, which caused a pKa shift of the catalytic centre. PMID:20826112

  15. Antioxidant Activities and Oxidative Stabilities of Some Unconventional Oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; Ozdemir, Nurhayat

    2012-04-01

    The oils of some unconventional oilseeds (hemp, radish, terebinth, stinging nettle, laurel) were obtained by a cold-press method in which the total oil content, fatty acids, tocopherol isomers, some metal contents (Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu), antioxidant activity and oxidative stability were determined. The total oil content was determined ranging between 30.68 and 43.12%, and the oil samples had large amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, with oleic acid and linoleic acid. Of all the oils, terebinth seed oil had the highest α-tocopherol content (102.21 ± 1.01 mg/kg oil). Laurel oilseed had the highest antiradical activity in both the DPPH and ABTS assays. The peroxide value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.51 and 3.73 mequiv O(2)/kg oil. The TBARS value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.68 ± 0.02 and 6.43 ± 0.48 mmol MA equiv/g oil. At 110 °C, the Rancimat induction period of the oils ranged between 1.32 and 43.44 h. The infrared spectra of the samples were recorded by FTIR spectroscopy. The absorbance values of the spectrum bands were observed and it was determined that some of the chemical groups of oxidized oils caused changes in absorbance. As a result of the present research, the analyzed oils could be evaluated as an alternative to traditionally consumed vegetable oils or as additives to them.

  16. Activity Level from Birth through First Grade: Stability or Inversion of Intensity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined two hypotheses regarding activity level: (1) early appearing stability; and (2) inversion of intensity. Measured behavioral intensity or activity level six times between the neonatal period and first grade. Results indicated that parent ratings supported activity level stability. Observations revealed that intense neonatal activity…

  17. Room Temperature Stabilization of Oral, Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-Vectored Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, DeQi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi ‘Ty21a’ bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log10 CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  18. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ericka L; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J Craig; Nelson, Karen E; Jones, Marcus B

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  19. Influence of temperature and preserving agents on the stability of cornelian cherries anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Bianca; David, Luminiţa

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) fruits are known for their significant amounts of anthocyanins which can be used as natural food colorants. The storage stability of anthocyanins from these fruit extracts, at different temperatures (2 °C, 25 °C and 75 °C), pH 3.02, in the presence of two of the most widely employed food preserving agents (sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate) was investigated. The highest stability was exhibited by the anthocyanin extract stored at 2 °C without any added preservative, with half-life and constant rate values of 1443.8 h and 0.48 × 10(-3) h(-1), respectively. The highest value of the degradation rate constant (82.76 × 10(-3)/h) was obtained in the case of anthocyanin extract stored at 75 °C without any added preservative. Experimental results indicate that the storage degradation of anthocyanins followed first-order reaction kinetics under each of the investigated conditions. In aqueous solution, the food preservatives used were found to have a slight influence on the anthocyanins' stability. PMID:24941341

  20. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ericka L.; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K.; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J. Craig; Nelson, Karen E.; Jones, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  1. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  2. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  3. Size-controllable APTS stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles catalyst for the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zahmakıran, Mehmet; Philippot, Karine; Özkar, Saim; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-14

    Dimethylamine-borane, (CH(3))(2)NHBH(3), has been considered as one of the attractive materials for the efficient storage of hydrogen, which is still one of the key issues in the "Hydrogen Economy". In a recent communication we have reported the synthesis and characterization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles with the preliminary results for their catalytic performance in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature. Herein, we report a complete work including (i) effect of initial [APTS]/[Ru] molar ratio on both the size and the catalytic activity of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, (ii) collection of extensive kinetic data under non-MTL conditions depending on the substrate and catalyst concentrations to define the rate law of Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (iii) determination of activation parameters (E(a), ΔH(#) and ΔS(#)) for Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane; (iv) demonstration of the catalytic lifetime of Ru(0)/APTS nanoparticles in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (v) testing the bottlability and reusability of Ru(0)/APTS nanocatalyst in the room-temperature dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane, (vi) quantitative carbon disulfide (CS(2)) poisoning experiments to find a corrected TTO and TOF values on a per-active-ruthenium-atom basis, (vii) a summary of extensive literature review for the catalysts tested in the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane as part of the results and discussions. PMID:22052298

  4. Validated HPLC method and temperature stabilities for oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in garlic macerated oil.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miyoung; Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Shin, Dongbin

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the utilization of garlic macerated oil as functional foods, oil-soluble organosulfur compounds were investigated using normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. For analysis of compounds, it was simply extracted with 98% n-hexane in 2-propanol followed by sensitive and selective determination of all compounds. These method exhibited excellent linearity for oil-soluble organosulfur compounds with good coefficient (r > 0.999). Average recoveries were in the range of 80.23-106.18%. The limits of quantitation of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds ranged from 0.32 to 9.56 μg mL(-1) and the limits of detection were from 0.11 to 3.16 μg mL(-1). Overall, the precision of the results, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.55 to 11.67%. The proposed method was applied to determining the contents of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in commercial garlic macerated oils. Also, the stability of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in garlic macerated oil were evaluated during 3 months of storage at four difference temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 35°C). The results showed the studied oil-soluble compounds in garlic macerated oil were stable at 4°C and relatively unstable at 35°C with varied extents degradation. Therefore, these validation data and temperature stability may be useful for quality evaluation of garlic macerated oils.

  5. Breadth versus depth: Interactions that stabilize particle assemblies to changes in density or temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-02-01

    We use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to explore trade-offs associated with designing interactions to stabilize self-assembled structures against changes in density or temperature. Specifically, we find isotropic, convex-repulsive pair potentials that maximize the density range for which a two-dimensional square lattice is the stable ground state subject to a constraint on the chemical potential advantage it exhibits over competing structures (i.e., "depth" of the associated minimum on the chemical potential hypersurface). We formulate the design problem as a nonlinear program, which we solve numerically. This allows us to efficiently find optimized interactions for a wide range of possible chemical potential constraints. We find that assemblies designed to exhibit a large chemical potential advantage at a specified density have a smaller overall range of densities for which they are stable. This trend can be understood by considering the separation-dependent features of the pair potential and its gradient required to enhance the stability of the target structure relative to competitors. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we further show that potentials designed with larger chemical potential advantages exhibit higher melting temperatures.

  6. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  7. High temperature stability limit of phase egg, AlSiO3(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shigeaki

    The stability relations of phase egg, AlSiO3(OH), have been investigated at pressures from 7 to 20GPa, and temperatures from 900 to 1700°C in a multi-anvil apparatus. At the lower pressures phase egg breaks down according to the univariant reaction, phase egg=stishovite+topaz-OH, which extends from 1100°C at 11GPa to 1400°C at 13GPa where it terminates at an invariant point involving corundum. At pressures above the invariant point, the stability of phase egg is limited by the breakdown reaction, phase egg=stishovite+corundum+fluid, which extends from the invariant point to 1700°C at 20GPa. Stishovite crystallized in the Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system contains Al2O3, and the amount of Al2O3 increases with increasing temperature. It is inferred that the Al2O3 content is controlled by the charge-balanced substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ and H+. Aluminum-bearing stishovite coexisting with an H2O-rich fluid may contain a certain amount of water. Therefore, phase egg and stishovite in a subducting slab could transport some H2O into the deep Earth.

  8. Size-controlled stabilization of the superionic phase to room temperature in polymer-coated AgI nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Makiura, Rie; Yonemura, Takayuki; Yamada, Teppei; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2009-06-01

    Solid-state ionic conductors are actively studied for their large application potential in batteries and sensors. From the view of future nanodevices, nanoscaled ionic conductors are attracting much interest. Silver iodide (AgI) is a well-known ionic conductor for which the high-temperature alpha-phase shows a superionic conductivity greater than 1 Omega(-1) cm(-1). Below 147 degrees C, alpha-AgI undergoes a phase transition into the poorly conducting beta- and gamma-polymorphs, thereby limiting its applications. Here, we report the facile synthesis of variable-size AgI nanoparticles coated with poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) and the controllable tuning of the alpha- to beta-/gamma-phase transition temperature (Tc). Tc shifts considerably to lower temperatures with decreasing nanoparticle size, leading to a progressively enlarged thermal hysteresis. Specifically, when the size approaches 10-11 nm, the alpha-phase survives down to 30 degrees C--the lowest temperature for any AgI family material. We attribute the suppression of the phase transition not only to the increase of the surface energy, but also to the presence of defects and the accompanying charge imbalance induced by PVP. Moreover, the conductivity of as-prepared 11 nm beta-/gamma-AgI nanoparticles at 24 degrees C is approximately 1.5 x 10(-2) Omega(-1) cm(-1)--the highest ionic conductivity for a binary solid at room temperature. The stabilized superionic phase and the remarkable transport properties at a practical temperature reported here suggest promising applications in silver-ion-based electrochemical devices.

  9. Size-controlled stabilization of the superionic phase to room temperature in polymer-coated AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiura, Rie; Yonemura, Takayuki; Yamada, Teppei; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2009-06-01

    Solid-state ionic conductors are actively studied for their large application potential in batteries and sensors. From the view of future nanodevices, nanoscaled ionic conductors are attracting much interest. Silver iodide (AgI) is a well-known ionic conductor for which the high-temperature α-phase shows a superionic conductivity greater than 1Ω-1cm-1 (ref. 6). Below 147∘C, α-AgI undergoes a phase transition into the poorly conducting β- and γ-polymorphs, thereby limiting its applications. Here, we report the facile synthesis of variable-size AgI nanoparticles coated with poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) and the controllable tuning of the α- to β-/γ-phase transition temperature (Tc↓). Tc↓ shifts considerably to lower temperatures with decreasing nanoparticle size, leading to a progressively enlarged thermal hysteresis. Specifically, when the size approaches 10-11nm, the α-phase survives down to 30∘C-the lowest temperature for any AgI family material. We attribute the suppression of the phase transition not only to the increase of the surface energy, but also to the presence of defects and the accompanying charge imbalance induced by PVP. Moreover, the conductivity of as-prepared 11nm β-/γ-AgI nanoparticles at 24∘C is ~1.5×10-2Ω-1cm-1-the highest ionic conductivity for a binary solid at room temperature. The stabilized superionic phase and the remarkable transport properties at a practical temperature reported here suggest promising applications in silver-ion-based electrochemical devices.

  10. Requisite temperatures for the stabilization of atomic H in solid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1978-01-01

    If an atomic hydrogen/molecular hydrogen propellant containing at least 15% free H atoms by weight may be used, values for the theoretical specific impulse near and above 750 s may be predicted. The tritium-impregnation concept has been applied to manufacturing such an H/H2 propellant, and a phenomenological rate process theory has been derived for the matrix-isolation storage and equilibrium stability of atomic H produced at such ultralow temperatures in tritium-impregnated H2. It is suggested that an energy storage efficiency greater than 0.30 may be obtained at temperatures below 100 mK. So that the storage of atomic H is stable with respect to arbitrary small perturbations, the surface temperature must be less than a critical value dependent on sample volume, tritium weight fraction, and energy storage efficiency. A derivation of the formula for this critical surface temperature is presented, noting that the energy storage efficiency is to be fixed by experiment.

  11. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  12. Clustering behavior of yttrium and scandium dopant ions in cubic stabilized zirconia electrolytes at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Steven Paul

    This work investigates the role that dopant clustering plays in the aging phenomena observed in scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes. Molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted on supercells containing compositions of xSc2O3 + (11 - x)Y 2O3 + 89ZrO2 for x = {0, 1, 2, 11} and also on the composition 8Y2O3 + 92ZrO2 . It was discovered that individual dopant-dopant barriers have a relatively small effect on bulk ionic conductivity when the dopants are arranged in small clusters, as the vacancies rarely migration through the small clusters. However, larger clustering of ions can have a significant impact on ionic conductivity, mostly due to localized destabilization of the high-conductivity cubic phase, which forces oxygen ions to migrate through the remaining dopant-rich cubic matrix. Part of the destabilization occurs due to vacancies becoming trapped within the dopant clusters, which forces the Zr ions in the zirconia-rich regions to assume a higher coordinated state with oxygen. However, the zirconium ions are known to abhor eight-fold coordinated states, and these regions form precipitates of low-conductivity phases. These phases have been identified as tetragonal, and their formation coincides with the simultaneous reduction in ionic conductivity. The tetragonal precipitates are found to be energetically favorable at temperatures of 1073 K, indicating that colloidal stratification of the mixture is inevitable due to cationic migration during long term annealing. However, clustering of dopants appears to reach a limiting point as the dopants exhibit a repulsive interaction that limits the thermodynamic stability of the zirconia precipitates. Therefore, the dopant clusters will reach a certain maximum size at which point clustering is expected to terminate at an equilibrium state. Scandia stabilized zirconia was observed to provide better conductivity, lower zirconium coordination and superior

  13. Daily rhythms of activity and temperature of Macaca nemestrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Sickles, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The activity and temperature rhythms of pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) maintained in LD 16:8 at 25 C in specially designed restraint chairs have been examined. Activity was monitored via a sensor that was attached to the restraint chair. Temperature was monitored at the axilla, ankle and ear. All variables showed prominent day-night variations, and except for ankle temperature, had highest values during the daytime. These results show that the regulation of the daily rhythm of body temperature involves anatomical sites that are utilized in a temporally distinct fashion.

  14. Robust stability analysis of delayed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy Hopfield neural networks with discontinuous activation functions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihong; Zuo, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the global robust stability problem of delayed Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy Hopfield neural networks with discontinuous activation functions (TSFHNNs) is considered. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and M-matrices theory, we derive a stability criterion to guarantee the global robust stability of TSFHNNs. Compared with the existing literature, we remove the assumptions on the neuron activations such as Lipschitz conditions, bounded, monotonic increasing property or the assumption that the right-limit value is bigger than the left one at the discontinuous point. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed stability results. PMID:22132043

  15. High Temperature Stability of Onion-Like Carbon vs Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765–1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of by the ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K−1) and HOPG (8 Pa K−1) where and are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, and values are 95.8 kJ mol−1 and 104.1 JK−1 mol−1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  16. Thermal Stability Study from Room Temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C) in Magnesium Silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanaki, Eleni-Chrysanthi; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides; Vourlias, George; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Kitis, George; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.; Polymeris, George S.

    2016-10-01

    Doped magnesium silicide has been identified as a promising and environmentally friendly advanced thermoelectric material in the temperature range between 500 K and 800 K (227 °C and 527 °C). Besides the plethora of magnesium silicide thermoelectric advantages, it is well known for its high sensitivity to oxidation. Oxidation is one of the primary instability mechanisms of degradation of high-temperature Mg2Si thermoelectric devices, as in the presence of O2, Mg2Si decomposes to form MgO and Si. In this work, commercial magnesium silicide in bulk form was used for thermal stability study from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Various techniques such as DTA-TG, PXRD, and FTIR have been applied. Moreover, the application of thermoluminescence (TL) as an effective and alternative probe for the study of oxidation and decomposition has been exploited. The latter provides qualitative but very helpful hints toward oxidation studies. The low-detection threshold of thermoluminescence, in conjunction with the chemical composition of the oxidation byproducts, consisting of MgO, Mg2SiO4, and SiO2, constitute two powerful motivations for further investigating its viable use as proxy for instability/decomposition studies of magnesium silicide. The partial oxidation reaction has been adopted due to the experimental fact that magnesium silicide is monitored throughout the heating temperature range of the present study. Finally, the role of silicon dioxide to the decomposition procedure, being in amorphous state and gradually crystallizing, has been highlighted for the first time in the literature. Mg2Si oxidation takes place in two steps, including a mild oxidation process with temperature threshold of 573 K (300 °C) and an abrupt one after 773 K (500 °C). Implications on the optimum operational temperature range for practical thermoelectric (TE) applications have also been briefly discussed.

  17. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying materia1 requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  18. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized glucose oxidase on modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Mahboube; Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Kalegh; Ranjbakhsh, Elnaz; Khosropour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-02-01

    Immobilized proteins and enzymes are widely investigated in the medical field as well as the food and environmental fields. In this study, glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently immobilized on the surface of modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MIMNs) to produce a bioconjugate complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to the size, shape and structure characterization of the MIMNs. Binding of GOX to these MIMNs was confirmed by using FT-IR spectroscopy. The stability of the immobilized and free enzyme at different temperature and pH values was investigated by measuring the enzymatic activity. These studies reveal that the enzyme's stability is enhanced by immobilization. Further experiments showed that the storage stability of the enzyme is improved upon binding to the MIMNs. The results of kinetic measurements suggest that the effect of the immobilization process on substrate and product diffusion is small. Such bioconjugates can be considered as a catalytic nanodevice for accelerating the glucose oxidation reaction for biotechnological purposes.

  19. Stability of Pure Hydrous Silica at Geotherm Temperatures up to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisr, C.; Shim, S. H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Prakapenka, V.; Meng, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Stishovite, in the rutile structure with octahedrally coordinated silicon, is expected to exist in silica rich parts of subducted oceanic slabs and crustal fragments in the Earth's mantle, and has been considered for a long time to be essentially anhydrous. However, Spektor et al., (2011) have shown that ~1.3 wt% can be incorporated into pure Al-free stishovite at 10 GPa and 723 K. Yet, the stability and physical properties of hydrous silica at mantle related pressures and temperatures are unknown. We have synthesized hydrous silica samples in the multi anvil press at 9-20 GPa and 700-900 K, and in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at 17-70 GPa and 1400-2100 K. Three different sample setups have been used: dry silica gel in an H2O medium, anhydrous stishovite in an H2O medium, and hydrous silica gel in a Ne or Ar medium. The presence of percent level of water was found by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and Raman and Infrared spectroscopy measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the unit-cell volumes of the recovered stishovite samples are greater by 0.2-3.9 % compared with anhydrous stishovite at 1 bar. The unit-cell volumes show strong linear correlation with their c/a ratio suggesting that the same OH substitution mechanism persists for a wide range of water content. Based on unit-cell volumes vs water content calibration by Spektor et al., (2011), our samples contain 0.3-7.9 wt% H2O. We found that pure silica is capable of containing as much as 4.9 wt% of H2O at temperatures close to those of the mantle geotherm (e.g., sample synthesized at ~1997 K and ~67 GPa). The highest water contents were found at the highest pressures, suggesting that the pressure stabilizes OH in dense silica. X-ray diffraction patterns have also shown several new diffraction lines upon compression and heating which appear from 45 GPa (1500-2100 K) and are observed up to 100 GPa. The peaks appear to belong to a new hydrous silica phase stable at higher pressures and

  20. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  1. Calculation of the Relative Chemical Stabilities of Proteins as a Function of Temperature and Redox Chemistry in a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems. PMID:21853048

  2. Glycosylated a-lactalbumin-based nanocomplex for curcumin: physicochemical stability and DPPH-scavenging activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low stability at high salt concentrations, iso-electric point, and high temperature restricted the application of proteins as stabilizers in nutraceutical encapsulation. Protein-polysaccharide conjugates made with Maillard reaction may be better alternatives. In this study, the characteristics of cu...

  3. Prediction of the maximum temperature for life based on the stability of metabolites to decomposition in water.

    PubMed

    Bains, William; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Changyong

    2015-01-01

    The components of life must survive in a cell long enough to perform their function in that cell. Because the rate of attack by water increases with temperature, we can, in principle, predict a maximum temperature above which an active terrestrial metabolism cannot function by analysis of the decomposition rates of the components of life, and comparison of those rates with the metabolites' minimum metabolic half-lives. The present study is a first step in this direction, providing an analytical framework and method, and analyzing the stability of 63 small molecule metabolites based on literature data. Assuming that attack by water follows a first order rate equation, we extracted decomposition rate constants from literature data and estimated their statistical reliability. The resulting rate equations were then used to give a measure of confidence in the half-life of the metabolite concerned at different temperatures. There is little reliable data on metabolite decomposition or hydrolysis rates in the literature, the data is mostly confined to a small number of classes of chemicals, and the data available are sometimes mutually contradictory because of varying reaction conditions. However, a preliminary analysis suggests that terrestrial biochemistry is limited to environments below ~150-180 °C. We comment briefly on why pressure is likely to have a small effect on this.

  4. Prediction of the maximum temperature for life based on the stability of metabolites to decomposition in water.

    PubMed

    Bains, William; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Changyong

    2015-01-01

    The components of life must survive in a cell long enough to perform their function in that cell. Because the rate of attack by water increases with temperature, we can, in principle, predict a maximum temperature above which an active terrestrial metabolism cannot function by analysis of the decomposition rates of the components of life, and comparison of those rates with the metabolites' minimum metabolic half-lives. The present study is a first step in this direction, providing an analytical framework and method, and analyzing the stability of 63 small molecule metabolites based on literature data. Assuming that attack by water follows a first order rate equation, we extracted decomposition rate constants from literature data and estimated their statistical reliability. The resulting rate equations were then used to give a measure of confidence in the half-life of the metabolite concerned at different temperatures. There is little reliable data on metabolite decomposition or hydrolysis rates in the literature, the data is mostly confined to a small number of classes of chemicals, and the data available are sometimes mutually contradictory because of varying reaction conditions. However, a preliminary analysis suggests that terrestrial biochemistry is limited to environments below ~150-180 °C. We comment briefly on why pressure is likely to have a small effect on this. PMID:25821932

  5. Prediction of the Maximum Temperature for Life Based on the Stability of Metabolites to Decomposition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Bains, William; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Changyong

    2015-01-01

    The components of life must survive in a cell long enough to perform their function in that cell. Because the rate of attack by water increases with temperature, we can, in principle, predict a maximum temperature above which an active terrestrial metabolism cannot function by analysis of the decomposition rates of the components of life, and comparison of those rates with the metabolites’ minimum metabolic half-lives. The present study is a first step in this direction, providing an analytical framework and method, and analyzing the stability of 63 small molecule metabolites based on literature data. Assuming that attack by water follows a first order rate equation, we extracted decomposition rate constants from literature data and estimated their statistical reliability. The resulting rate equations were then used to give a measure of confidence in the half-life of the metabolite concerned at different temperatures. There is little reliable data on metabolite decomposition or hydrolysis rates in the literature, the data is mostly confined to a small number of classes of chemicals, and the data available are sometimes mutually contradictory because of varying reaction conditions. However, a preliminary analysis suggests that terrestrial biochemistry is limited to environments below ~150–180 °C. We comment briefly on why pressure is likely to have a small effect on this. PMID:25821932

  6. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  7. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  8. Cosolvent and Crowding Effects on the Temperature and Pressure Dependent Conformational Dynamics and Stability of Globular Actin.

    PubMed

    Schummel, Paul Hendrik; Haag, Andreas; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Winter, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Actin can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells and is responsible for many different cellular functions. The polymerization process of actin has been found to be among the most pressure sensitive processes in vivo. In this study, we explored the effects of chaotropic and kosmotropic cosolvents, such as urea and the compatible osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and, to mimic a more cell-like environment, crowding agents on the pressure and temperature stability of globular actin (G-actin). The temperature and pressure of unfolding as well as thermodynamic parameters upon unfolding, such as enthalpy and volume changes, have been determined by fluorescence spectroscopy over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, ranging from 10 to 80 °C and from 1 to 3000 bar, respectively. Complementary high-pressure NMR studies revealed additional information on the existence of native-like conformational substates of G-actin as well as a molten-globule-like state preceding the complete pressure denaturation. Different from the chaotropic agent urea, TMAO increases both the temperature and pressure stability for the protein most effectively. The Gibbs free energy differences of most of the native substates detected are not influenced significantly by TMAO. In mixtures of these osmolytes, urea counteracts the stabilizing effect of TMAO to some extent. Addition of the crowding agent Ficoll increases the temperature and pressure stability even further, thereby allowing sufficient stability of the protein at temperature and pressure conditions encountered under extreme environmental conditions on Earth. PMID:27314563

  9. Icosahedral AlCuFe quasicrystal at high pressure and temperature and its implications for the stability of icosahedrite.

    PubMed

    Stagno, Vincenzo; Bindi, Luca; Shibazaki, Yuki; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji; Mao, H-K; Steinhardt, Paul J; Fei, Yingwei

    2014-01-01

    The first natural-occurring quasicrystal, icosahedrite, was recently discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a new CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Its finding raised fundamental questions regarding the effects of pressure and temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the quasicrystal structure relative to possible isochemical crystalline or amorphous phases. Although several studies showed the stability at ambient temperature of synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe up to ~35 GPa, the simultaneous effect of temperature and pressure relevant for the formation of icosahedrite has been never investigated so far. Here we present in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe using multianvil device to explore possible temperature-induced phase transformations at pressures of 5 GPa and temperature up to 1773 K. Results show the structural stability of i-AlCuFe phase with a negligible effect of pressure on the volumetric thermal expansion properties. In addition, the structural analysis of the recovered sample excludes the transformation of AlCuFe quasicrystalline phase to possible approximant phases, which is in contrast with previous predictions at ambient pressure. Results from this study extend our knowledge on the stability of icosahedral AlCuFe at higher temperature and pressure than previously examined, and provide a new constraint on the stability of icosahedrite. PMID:25070248

  10. The effects of time, temperature, and pH on the stability of PDU bacterial microcompartments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are subcellular organelles that are composed of a protein shell and encapsulated metabolic enzymes. It has been suggested that MCPs can be engineered to encapsulate protein cargo for use as in vivo nanobioreactors or carriers for drug delivery. Understanding the stability of the MCP shell is critical for such applications. Here, we investigate the integrity of the propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP shell of Salmonella enterica over time, in buffers with various pH, and at elevated temperatures. The results show that MCPs are remarkably stable. When stored at 4°C or at room temperature, Pdu MCPs retain their structure for several days, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, Pdu MCPs can tolerate temperatures up to 60°C without apparent structural degradation. MCPs are, however, sensitive to pH and require conditions between pH 6 and pH 10. In nonoptimal conditions, MCPs form aggregates. However, within the aggregated protein mass, MCPs often retain their polyhedral outlines. These results show that MCPs are highly robust, making them suitable for a wide range of applications. PMID:25053115

  11. Weldability, strength, and high temperature stability of chemically vapor deposited tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three types of CVD tungsten (fluoride-produced, chloride-produced and the combination of the two which is termed duplex) were evaluated to determine their weldability, high temperature strength and structural stability during 5000 hour exposure to temperatures of 1540 C and 1700 C. Each type of CVD tungsten could be successfully electron beam welded but the results for the chloride product were not as satisfactory as those of the other two materials. The high temperature strength behavior of the three materials did not differ greatly. However a large difference was noted for the grain growth behavior of the two basic CVD tungsten materials. Fluoride tungsten was found to be relatively stable while for the most part the grain size of chloride tungsten increased appreciably. The examination of freshly fractured surfaces with a scanning electron microscope revealed numerous bubbles in the fluoride material following its exposure to 1700 C for 5000 hours. Less severe thermal treatments produced relatively few bubbles in this material. Only at certain locations within the chloride material associated with the interruption of tungsten were bubbles noted.

  12. Pronounced multiferroicity in oleic acid stabilized BiFeO3 nanocrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Dabbugalla; Mandal, Swapan K; Mahato, Bipul K; Rana, Bivas; Barman, Anjan

    2013-06-01

    We report on the experimental observation of pronounced multiferroicity in BiFeO3 nanocrystals (size approximately 40 nm) at room temperature. Large scale BiFeO3 nanocrystals are synthesized using a low temperature chemical route and further stabilized with oleic acid. The nanocrystals exhibit a significant distortion in lattice parameter c compared to the bulk. Oleic acid plays an important role in reducing oxygen vacancies and Fe2+ ions at the nanocrystal surface giving rise to a high resistivity (approximately 10(10) omega-cm at 300 K) of the sample. The direct band gap of nanocrystals is measured to be approximately 4.2 eV (about 1.5 times the bulk value) suggesting a strong quantum confinement effect. The nanocrystals show a remarkably high spontaneous saturation magnetization approximately 4.39 emu/g along with a prominent ferroelectric hysteresis loop at room temperature. Particle size effect leading to the appearance of large number of uncompensated spins and suppression of modulated spin structure have resulted a strong spontaneous magnetization in such nanoscale multiferroic materials. PMID:23862453

  13. Temperature-dependent stability of stacking faults in Al, Cu and Ni: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2014-09-24

    We present comparative analysis of microscopic mechanisms relevant to plastic deformation of the face-centered cubic (FCC) metals Al, Cu, and Ni, through determination of the temperature-dependent free energies of intrinsic and unstable stacking faults along [1 1̄ 0] and [1 2̄ 1] on the (1 1 1) plane using first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. We show that vibrational contribution results in significant decrease in the free energy of barriers and intrinsic stacking faults (ISFs) of Al, Cu, and Ni with temperature, confirming an important role of thermal fluctuations in the stability of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation at elevated temperatures. In contrast to Al and Ni, the vibrational spectrum of the unstable stacking fault (USF[1 2̄ 1]) in Cu reveals structural instabilities, indicating that the energy barrier (γusf) along the (1 1 1)[1 2̄ 1] slip system in Cu, determined by typical first-principles calculations, is an overestimate, and its commonly used interpretation as the energy release rate needed for dislocation nucleation, as proposed by Rice (1992 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 239), should be taken with caution. PMID:25185834

  14. Chain and conformation stability of solid-state DNA: implications for room temperature storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Colotte, Marthe; Coudy, Delphine; Couallier, Vincent; Portier, Joseph; Morin, Bénédicte; Tuffet, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    There is currently wide interest in room temperature storage of dehydrated DNA. However, there is insufficient knowledge about its chemical and structural stability. Here, we show that solid-state DNA degradation is greatly affected by atmospheric water and oxygen at room temperature. In these conditions DNA can even be lost by aggregation. These are major concerns since laboratory plastic ware is not airtight. Chain-breaking rates measured between 70°C and 140°C seemed to follow Arrhenius’ law. Extrapolation to 25°C gave a degradation rate of about 1–40 cuts/105 nucleotides/century. However, these figures are to be taken as very tentative since they depend on the validity of the extrapolation and the positive or negative effect of contaminants, buffers or additives. Regarding the secondary structure, denaturation experiments showed that DNA secondary structure could be preserved or fully restored upon rehydration, except possibly for small fragments. Indeed, below about 500 bp, DNA fragments underwent a very slow evolution (almost suppressed in the presence of trehalose) which could end in an irreversible denaturation. Thus, this work validates using room temperature for storage of DNA if completely protected from water and oxygen. PMID:19969539

  15. Chain and conformation stability of solid-state DNA: implications for room temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Jacques; Colotte, Marthe; Coudy, Delphine; Couallier, Vincent; Portier, Joseph; Morin, Bénédicte; Tuffet, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    There is currently wide interest in room temperature storage of dehydrated DNA. However, there is insufficient knowledge about its chemical and structural stability. Here, we show that solid-state DNA degradation is greatly affected by atmospheric water and oxygen at room temperature. In these conditions DNA can even be lost by aggregation. These are major concerns since laboratory plastic ware is not airtight. Chain-breaking rates measured between 70 degrees C and 140 degrees C seemed to follow Arrhenius' law. Extrapolation to 25 degrees C gave a degradation rate of about 1-40 cuts/10(5) nucleotides/century. However, these figures are to be taken as very tentative since they depend on the validity of the extrapolation and the positive or negative effect of contaminants, buffers or additives. Regarding the secondary structure, denaturation experiments showed that DNA secondary structure could be preserved or fully restored upon rehydration, except possibly for small fragments. Indeed, below about 500 bp, DNA fragments underwent a very slow evolution (almost suppressed in the presence of trehalose) which could end in an irreversible denaturation. Thus, this work validates using room temperature for storage of DNA if completely protected from water and oxygen. PMID:19969539

  16. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 2; Temperature Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Taril; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. LHP's are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the second part of the experimental study, i.e. the effect of an accelerating force on the LHP operating temperature. It has been known that in stationary tests the LHP operating temperature is a function of the evaporator power and the condenser sink temperature when the compensation temperature is not actively controlled. Results of this test program indicate that any change in the accelerating force will result in a chance in the LHP operating temperature through its influence on the fluid distribution in the evaporator, condenser and compensation chamber. However, the effect is not universal, rather it is a function of other test conditions. A steady, constant acceleration may result in an increase or decrease of the operating temperature, while a periodic spin will lead to a quasi-steady operating temperature over a sufficient time interval. In addition, an accelerating force may lead to temperature hysteresis and changes in the temperature oscillation. In spite of all these effects, the LHP continued to operate without any problems in all tests.

  17. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  18. Active structural vibration control: Robust to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek; Sharma, Manu; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-11-01

    d-form augmented piezoelectric constitutive equations which take into account temperature dependence of piezoelectric strain coefficient (d31) and permittivity (∈33), are converted into e-form. Using e-form constitutive equations, a finite element model of a smart two dimensional plate instrumented with piezoelectric patches is derived. Equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's variational principle. Coupled equations of motion are uncoupled using modal analysis. Modal state vectors are estimated using the Kalman observer. The first mode of smart cantilevered plate is actively controlled using negative first modal velocity feedback at various temperatures. Total control effort required to do so is calculated using the electro-mechanical impedance method. The temperature dependence of sensor voltage, control voltage, control effort and Kalman observer equations is shown analytically. Simulation results are presented using MATLAB. Variations in (i) peak sensor voltage, (ii) actual and estimated first modal velocities, (iii) peak control voltage, (iv) total control effort and (v) settling time with respect to temperature are presented. Active vibration control performance is not maintained at temperature away from reference temperature when the temperature dependence of piezoelectric stress coefficient ‘e31' and permittivity ‘∈33' is not included in piezoelectric constitutive equations. Active control of vibrations becomes robust to temperature variations when the temperature dependence of ‘e31' and ‘∈33' is included in piezoelectric constitutive equations.

  19. Formation and decomposition of chemically activated and stabilized hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Rubik; Bozzelli, Joseph W; da Silva, Gabriel; Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2010-06-01

    Recombination of two amidogen radicals, NH(2) (X(2)B1), is relevant to hydrazine formation, ammonia oxidation and pyrolysis, nitrogen reduction (fixation), and a variety of other N/H/X combustion, environmental, and interstellar processes. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the N(2)H(4) potential energy surface, using a variety of theoretical methods, with thermochemical kinetic analysis and master equation simulations used to treat branching to different product sets in the chemically activated NH(2) + NH(2) process. For the first time, iminoammonium ylide (NH(3)NH), the less stable isomer of hydrazine, is involved in the kinetic modeling of N(2)H(4). A new, low-energy pathway is identified for the formation of NH(3) plus triplet NH, via initial production of NH(3)NH followed by singlet-triplet intersystem crossing. This new reaction channel results in the formation of dissociated products at a relatively rapid rate at even moderate temperatures and above. A further novel pathway is described for the decomposition of activated N(2)H(4), which eventually leads to the formation of the simple products N(2) + 2H(2), via H(2) elimination to cis-N(2)H(2). This process, termed as "dihydrogen catalysis", may have significant implications in the formation and decomposition chemistry of hydrazine and ammonia in diverse environments. In this mechanism, stereoselective attack of cis-N(2)H(2) by molecular hydrogen results in decomposition to N(2) with a fairly low barrier. The reverse termolecular reaction leading to the gas-phase formation of cis-N(2)H(2) + H(2) achieves non-heterogeneous catalytic nitrogen fixation with a relatively low activation barrier (77 kcal mol(-1)), much lower than the 125 kcal mol(-1) barrier recently reported for bimolecular addition of H(2) to N(2). This termolecular reaction is an entropically disfavored path, but it does describe a new means of activating the notoriously unreactive N(2). We design heterogeneous analogues of this

  20. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  1. Voluntary muscle activation is impaired by core temperature rather than local muscle temperature.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa M; Cheung, Stephen S; Elder, Geoff C; Sleivert, Gordon G

    2006-04-01

    Fatigue during hyperthermia may be due in part to a failure of the central nervous system to fully activate the working muscles. We investigated the effects of passive hyperthermia on maximal plantar flexor isometric torque (maximal isometric voluntary contraction) and voluntary activation to determine the roles of local skin temperature, core temperature, and peripheral muscle temperature in fatigue. Nine healthy subjects were passively heated from 37.2 to 39.5 degrees C (core temperature) and then cooled back down to 37.9 degrees C using a liquid-conditioning garment, with the right leg kept at a thermoneutral temperature throughout the protocol, whereas the left leg was allowed to heat and cool. Passive heating resulted in significant decreases in torque from [mean (SD)] 172 N x m (SD 39) to 160 N x m (SD 44) and in voluntary activation from 96% (SD 2) to 91% (SD 5) in the heated leg, and maximal isometric voluntary contraction decreased similarly from 178 N xm (SD 37) to 165 N x m (SD 38) and voluntary activation from 97% (SD 2) to 94% (SD 5) in the thermoneutral leg. The initiation of cooling, which produced a rapid decrease in skin temperature and cardiovascular strain [heart rate reserve decreased from 58% (SD 12) to 31% (SD 12)], did not immediately restore either torque or voluntary activation. However, when core temperature was lowered back to normal, torque and voluntary activation were restored to baseline values. It was concluded that an increase in core temperature is a factor responsible for reducing voluntary activation during brief voluntary isometric contractions and that temperature-induced changes in the contractile properties of muscle and local thermal afferent input from the skin do not contribute significantly to the decrement in torque.

  2. Stabilized Alumina/Ethanol Colloidal Dispersion for Seeding High Temperature Air Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Judith H.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Seeding air flows with particles to enable measurements of gas velocities via laser anemometry and/or particle image velocimetry techniques can be quite exasperating. The seeding requirements are compounded when high temperature environments are encountered and special care must be used in selecting a refractory seed material. The pH stabilization techniques commonly employed in ceramic processing are used to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. The technique is not limited to alumina/ethanol and is also demonstrated with an alumina/H2O system. Other ceramic powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(sub pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined.

  3. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  4. Migration-induced field-stabilized polar phase in strontium titanate single crystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzig, Juliane; Zschornak, Matthias; Hanzig, Florian; Mehner, Erik; Stöcker, Hartmut; Abendroth, Barbara; Röder, Christian; Talkenberger, Andreas; Schreiber, Gerhard; Rafaja, David; Gemming, Sibylle; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2013-07-01

    Local reversible structural changes in SrTiO3 single crystals in an external electric field are induced by oxygen redistribution. We present in situ x-ray diffraction measurements during and immediately after electroformation. Several reflections are monitored and show an elongation of the cubic unit cell of strontium titanate. Raman investigations verify that the expansion of the unit cell involves a transition from the centrosymmetric to a lower symmetry phase. During a complete formation cycle, including the hold time of the electric field and relaxation time without field, two different dynamics are observed for the reversible transitions from cubic symmetry to tetragonal distortion: a slow one during the increase of the lattice constant in field direction and a fast one after switching off the electric field. Based on the experimental data, we propose the formation of a polar strontium titanate unit cell at room temperature stabilized by the electric field, which is referred to as migration-induced field-stabilized polar phase.

  5. Active resonance wavelength stabilization for silicon microring resonators with an in-resonator defect-state-absorption-based photodetector.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Poon, Andrew W

    2015-01-12

    We propose and demonstrate active resonance wavelength stabilization for silicon microring resonators with an in-resonator defect-state-absorption (DSA)-based photodetector (PD) for optical interconnects. We integrate an electro-optic (EO) tuner and a thermo-optic (TO) tuner on the microring, which are both feedback-controlled following a photocurrent threshold-detection method. Our BF(2)-ion-implanted DSA-based PIN PD exhibits a cavity-enhanced sub-bandgap responsivity at 1550 nm of 3.3 mA/W upon -2 V, which is 550-fold higher than that exhibited by an unimplanted PIN diode integrated on the same microring. Our experiment reveals active stabilization of the resonance wavelength within a tolerance of 0.07 nm upon a step increment of the stage temperature by 7 °C. Upon temperature modulations between 23 °C and 32 °C and between 18 °C and 23 °C, the actively stabilized resonance exhibits a transmission power fluctuation within 2 dB. We observe open eye diagrams at a data transmission rate of up to 30 Gb/s under the temperature modulations. PMID:25835682

  6. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  7. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  8. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  9. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; Song, Wenqiao; Xiao, Wen; Guo, Yanbing; Ding, Jun; Suib, Steven L.; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. Themore » thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.« less

  10. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; Song, Wenqiao; Xiao, Wen; Guo, Yanbing; Ding, Jun; Suib, Steven L.; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. The thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.

  11. Experimental study of the stability and activity of brines on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheide, Travis S.

    This work contributes to the understanding of liquid water stability, with an emphasis on the role that dissolved solutes may have had on liquid water formation on Mars, past and present. In chapter 2, the stability of liquid water under martian conditions is explored through experiments on ferric sulfate brines. First, it is demonstrated that such brines can be formed starting from typical martian mineralogy. Ferric sulfates are quite soluble, up to 48 wt%, and can form solutions which remain liquid down to 205 +/-1 K at the eutectic. As a result of low water activities, these solutions exhibit evaporation rates 20 times lower than pure water. The combination of a low eutectic point and low evaporation rates allow subsurface liquids to be stable at high martian latitudes, where the majority of gullies and viscous flow features are located. Thus, the characteristics of ferric sulfate brines were further investigated in chapter 3, where the viscous properties of such solutions were measured, with respect to changing temperature and concentration. Using these results, the viscosity of these solutions on the formation of gullies was considered, where calculated fluid flow velocities were found to be in accordance with some estimates from image analyses of gully formations. In chapter 4, other Mars-relevant brines were studied and characterized under martian surface conditions. Magnesium and ferrous sulfate, and magnesium and ferric chloride brines were found to stabilize water, through lower evaporation rates and freezing point depression, much like the ferric sulfate brines. For these sulfate brines, it was found that the thermodynamic process of phase change, i.e. ice formation and/or salt crystallization, can affect the kinetic process of evaporation, through very low water activities in solution. Furthermore, in chapter 5 these studies were extended to recent results from the Phoenix mission, by examining the stability of perchlorate brines under conditions

  12. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    PubMed

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  13. 3D active stabilization system with sub-micrometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Kursu, Olli; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95% attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70% attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  14. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3–Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT–BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT–BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT–BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT–BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  15. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  17. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  18. Adhesion Stabilizes Robust Lipid Heterogeneity in Supercritical Membranes at Physiological Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Jing; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Regions of contact between cells are frequently enriched in or depleted of certain protein or lipid species. Here, we explore a possible physical basis that could contribute to this membrane heterogeneity using a model system of a giant vesicle tethered to a planar supported bilayer. Vesicles contain coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases at low temperatures and are tethered using trace quantities of adhesion molecules that preferentially partition into one liquid phase. We find that the Ld marker DiI-C12 is enriched or depleted in the adhered region when adhesion molecules partition into Ld or Lo phases, respectively. Remarkably, adhesion stabilizes an extended zone enriched or depleted of DiI-C12 even at temperatures >15°C above the miscibility phase transition when membranes have compositions that are in close proximity to a critical point. A stable adhesion zone is also observed in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from living RBL-2H3 cells, and probe partitioning at 37°C is diminished in vesicles isolated from cells with altered cholesterol levels. Probe partitioning is in good quantitative agreement with predictions of the two-dimensional Ising model with a weak applied field for both types of model membranes. These studies experimentally demonstrate that large and stable domain structure can be mediated by lipids in single-phase membranes with supercritical fluctuations. PMID:23442961

  19. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3-Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT-BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT-BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT-BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT-BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  20. Temperature stability of ultra-thin mixed BaSr-oxide layers and their transformation.

    PubMed

    Müller-Sajak, D; Islam, S; Pfnür, H; Hofmann, K R

    2012-08-01

    In the context of investigations of physical, chemical and electrical properties of ultra-thin layers of epitaxial and monocrystalline Sr(0.3)Ba(0.7)O on Si(100), we also investigated their thermal stability with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). At temperatures above 400 °C, transformation into silicate layers sets in. The stoichiometry after complete transformation was determined to be close to (Ba(0.8)Sr(0.2))(2)SiO(4) except for layers of only a few monolayers, where the silicate is not stoichiometric. There are strong indications that this silicate is stable until it desorbs at temperatures above 750 °C. Crystallinity, as seen with LEED, is lost during this transformation. Although transformation into silicate is coupled with metal desorption and compactification of the layers, they seem to remain closed. In addition, traces of Ba silicide at the Si interface were detected after layer desorption. This silicide cannot be desorbed thermally. The silicate layer has a bandgap of 5.9 ± 0.2 eV already for 3 ML thickness. Upon exposure to air, carbon and oxygen containing species, but no hydroxide, are formed irreversibly.

  1. Near-Surface Temperatures on Mercury and the Moon and the Stability of Polar Ice Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Paige, David A.; Wood, Stephen E.

    1999-10-01

    In order to assess the thermal stability of polar ice deposits, we present model calculated temperatures of flat surfaces and surfaces within bowl-shaped and flat-floored polar impact craters on Mercury and the Moon. Our model includes appropriate insolation cycles, realistic crater shapes, multiple scattering of sunlight and infrared radiation, and depth- and temperature-dependent regolith thermophysical properties. Unshaded water ice deposits on the surface of either body are rapidly lost to thermal sublimation. A subsurface water ice deposit is stable within 2° latitude of the Moon's poles. Meter-thick water ice deposits require billions of years to sublime if located in the permanently shaded portions of flat-floored craters within 10° latitude of the poles of Mercury and 13° latitude of the poles of the Moon. Results for craters associated with radar features on Mercury are consistent with the presence of stable water ice deposits if a thin regolith layer thermally insulates deposits at lower latitudes and within smaller craters. A regolith cover would also reduce losses from diffusion, ion sputtering, impact vaporization, and H Lyα and is implied independently by the radar observations. Permanently shaded areas near the Moon's poles are generally colder than those near Mercury's poles, but the Moon's obliquity history, its orbit through Earth's magnetospheric tail, and its radar-opaque regolith may limit the volume and radar detectability of ice deposits there.

  2. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis. PMID:27164865

  3. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis.

  4. Effects of pelvic stabilization on lumbar muscle activity during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jun G; Yaggie, James A; Levy, Susan S; Mooney, Vert; Udermann, Brian E; Mayer, John M

    2005-11-01

    Many commonly utilized low-back exercise devices offer mechanisms to stabilize the pelvis and to isolate the lumbar spine, but the value of these mechanisms remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of pelvic stabilization on the activity of the lumbar and hip extensor muscles during dynamic back extension exercise. Fifteen volunteers in good general health performed dynamic extension exercise in a seated upright position on a lumbar extension machine with and without pelvic stabilization. During exercise, surface electromyographic activity of the lumbar multifidus and biceps femoris was recorded. The activity of the multifidus was 51% greater during the stabilized condition, whereas there was no difference in the activity of the biceps femoris between conditions. This study demonstrates that pelvic stabilization enhances lumbar muscle recruitment during dynamic exercise on machines. Exercise specialists can use these data when designing exercise programs to develop low back strength.

  5. Solid inclusion complexes of vanillin with cyclodextrins: their formation, characterization, and high-temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    This study reports the formation of solid vanillin/cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (vanillin/CD ICs) with the aim to enhance the thermal stability and sustained release of vanillin by inclusion complexation. The solid vanillin/CD ICs with three types of CDs (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD) were prepared using the freeze-drying method; in addition, a coprecipitation method was also used in the case of γ-CD. The presence of vanillin in CD ICs was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies. Moreover, (1)H NMR study elucidated that the complexation stoichiometry for both vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC was a 1:1 molar ratio, whereas it was 0.625:1 for vanillin/α-CD IC. XRD studies have shown channel-type arrangement for CD molecules, and no diffraction peak for free vanillin was observed for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC, indicating that complete inclusion complexation was successfully achieved for these CD ICs. In the case of vanillin/α-CD IC, the sample was mostly amorphous and some uncomplexed vanillin was present, suggesting that α-CD was not very effective for complexation with vanillin compared to β-CD and γ-CD. Furthermore, DSC studies for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC have shown no melting point for vanillin, elucidating the true complex formation, whereas a melting point for vanillin was recorded for vanillin/α-CD IC, confirming the presence of some uncomplexed vanillin in this sample. TGA thermograms indicated that thermal evaporation/degradation of vanillin occurred over a much higher temperature range (150-300 °C) for vanillin/CD ICs samples when compared to pure vanillin (80-200 °C) or vanillin/CD physical mixtures, signifying that the thermal stability of vanillin was increased due to the inclusion complexation with CDs. Moreover, headspace GC-MS analyses indicated that the release of vanillin was sustained at higher temperatures in the case of vanillin/CD ICs due to the inclusion complexation when compared to vanillin

  6. [Effect of heat transfer in the packages on the stability of thiamine nitrate under uncontrolled temperature conditions].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    To accurately predict the stability of thiamine nitrate as a model drug in pharmaceutical products under uncontrolled temperature conditions, the average reaction rate constant was determined, taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product. The stability tests of thiamine nitrate in the three packages with different heat transfers were performed under non-isothermal conditions. The stability data observed were compared with the predictions based on a newly developed method, showing that the stability was well predicted by the method involving the heat transfer. By contrast, there were some deviations observed from the predicted data, without considering heat transfer in the packages with low heat transfer. The above-mentioned result clearly shows that heat transfer should be considered to ensure accurate prediction of the stability of commercial pharmaceutical products under non-isothermal atmospheres.

  7. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  8. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute. PMID:26896315

  9. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  10. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahare, Padmavati; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Agrawal, Vivechana

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine.

  11. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine. PMID:25221454

  12. Nonsmooth finite-time stabilization of neural networks with discontinuous activations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Park, Ju H; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Jinde

    2014-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time stabilization for a class of neural networks (NNs) with discontinuous activations. The purpose of the addressed problem is to design a discontinuous controller to stabilize the states of such neural networks in finite time. Unlike the previous works, such stabilization objective will be realized for neural networks when the activations and controllers are both discontinuous. Based on the famous finite-time stability theorem of nonlinear systems and nonsmooth analysis in mathematics, sufficient conditions are established to ensure the finite-time stability of the dynamics of NNs. Then, the upper bound of the settling time for stabilization can be estimated in two forms due to two different methods of proof. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  13. Aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate: effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and complexation with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mobedi, Hamid; Behnamghader, Aliasghar

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate (LA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium was studied (pH = 2.0-7.4). For this purpose, the effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH on the stability of LA during 35 days was investigated. Results showed that the aqueous stability of LA was higher at low temperatures. Degassing of the PBS medium partially increased the stability of LA at 4 °C, while did not change at 37 °C. The degradation of LA was accelerated at lower pH values. In addition, complexes of LA with different portions of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) were prepared through freeze-drying procedure and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. Studying their aqueous stability at various pH values (2.0-7.4) showed LA/β-CD complexes exhibited higher stability when compared with LA at all pH values. The stability of complexes was also improved by increasing the portion of LA/β-CD up to 1/10.

  14. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  15. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-09-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium.

  16. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi X; Wu, Q; Chen, Xiang R; Geng, Hua Y

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  17. The comparison of abdominal muscle activation on unstable surface according to the different trunk stability exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Da-yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of abdominal muscle activities and the activation ratio related to trunk stabilization to compare the effects between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and lumbar stabilization exercises on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain, who were equally and randomly assigned to either the abdominal drawing-in maneuver group and the lumbar stabilization exercise group. Abdominal muscle activation and ratio was measured using a wireless TeleMyo DTS during right leg raise exercises while sitting on a Swiss ball. [Results] Differences in rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and internal oblique abdominis muscle activation were observed before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the groups in the muscle activation of the external oblique abdominis and internal oblique abdominis, and the muscle activation ratio of external oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis and internal oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis. [Conclusion] Consequently trunk stability exercise enhances internal oblique abdominis activity and increases trunk stabilization. In addition, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver facilitates the deep muscle more than LSE in abdominal muscle. Therefore, abdominal drawing-in maneuver is more effective than lumbar stabilization exercises in facilitating trunk stabilization. PMID:27134401

  18. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, L; Hajat, S; Wilkinson, P; Armstrong, B; Anderson, H R; Monk, V; Harrison, R

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  19. INTRAPULPAL TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING BLEACHING WITH VARIOUS ACTIVATION MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Michida, Sílvia Masae de Araujo; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Marimoto, Ângela Regina Kimie; Garakis, Márcia Carneiro Valera; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. Material and Methods: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12): (G1) Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2) Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3) Bleaching gel + LED, (G4) Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (°C) in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV) values were: 1.5°C (G1), 2.9°C (G2), 1.7°C (G3) and 6.9°C (G4). When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05), but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05) intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05) from each other. Conclusions: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group. PMID:19936522

  20. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Yoneda, Juliana S; Martins, Julia M; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M; Castro, Aline M; Bossolan, Nelma R S; Wallace, B A; Araujo, Ana P U

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  1. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Julia M.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M.; Castro, Aline M.; Bossolan, Nelma R. S.; Wallace, B. A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  2. A binary palladium-bismuth nanocatalyst with high activity and stability for alkaline glucose electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Lan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Binary palladium-bismuth nanocatalysts supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-Bi/C) are synthesized using a one-pot polyol method. The prepared Pd-Bi/C catalysts have a metal particle range from 5.25 to 12.98 nm and are investigated for alkaline electrocatalytic glucose oxidation reaction (GOR). The physical properties of the catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical activities are determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), Tafel analysis and chronoamperomtry (CA) for comparing the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA), GOR onset potential, GOR peak current density, Tafel slope, poisoning rate and cycling stability of the Pd-Bi/C catalysts. It is found that Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) can significantly enhance the electrocatalytic activity on GOR about 40% times higher than Pd/C and as well as has a 3.7-fold lower poisoning rate. The in-use stability of Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) is also remarkably improved, according to the results of the 200 cycling CV test. The effects of the operating temperature and the concentration of glucose and NaOH electrolyte on Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) are further studied in this work. The highest Pd-Bi/C catalyzed GOR current density of 29.5 mA cm-2 is attained in alkaline medium.

  3. Insights into the interactions between enzyme and co-solvents: stability and activity of stem bromelain.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anjeeta; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-02-01

    In present study, an attempt is made to elucidate the effects of various naturally occurring osmolytes and denaturants on BM at pH 7.0. The effects of the varying concentrations of glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, urea and guanidinium chloride (GdnHCl) on structure, stability and activity of BM are explored by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), UV-vis spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Our experimental observations reveal that glycerol and sorbitol are acting as stabilizers at all concentrations while sucrose and trehalose are found to be destabilizers at lower concentrations, however, acted as stabilizers at higher concentrations. On the other hand, urea and GdnHCl are denaturants except at lower concentrations. There is a direct relationship between activity and conformational stability as the activity data are found to be in accordance with conformational stability parameters (ΔGu, Tm, ΔCp) and BM profile on SDS-PAGE.

  4. Activity and stability of catalase in nonionic micellar and reverse micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Jurgas-Grudzinska, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity and stability in the presence of simple micelles of Brij 35 and entrapped in reverse micelles of Brij 30 have been studied. The enzyme retains full activity in aqueous micellar solution of Brij 35. Catalase exhibits "superactivity" in reverse micelles composed of 0.1 M Brij 30 in dodecane, n-heptane or isooctane, and significantly lowers the activity in decaline. The incorporation of catalase into Brij 30 reverse micelles enhances its stability at 50 degrees C. However, the stability of catalase incubated at 37 degrees C in micellar and reverse micellar solutions is lower than that in homogeneous aqueous solution. PMID:15666551

  5. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T <= 35 °C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  6. The distribution of maximum temperatures of coronal active region loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teske, R. G.; Mayfield, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with the integrated emission measure distributions of solar active regions, the distribution of the maximum temperature parameter which characterizes individual plasma loops is determined. The observed emission measure distributions were determined by combining EUV and X-ray data from two separate experiments on ATM/Skylab. The present work sets some limits on such an approach. It is found that the distribution of maximum temperature has approximately the same shape as the integrated emission measure distributions, a result which is expected since most of the loop emission measure is near their maximum temperatures.

  7. Effect of changing the nanoscale environment on activity and stability of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is employed for fabrication of nitrate sensing devices in which the enzyme in immobilized form is used to catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of a suitable cofactor. So far, instability of immobilized NR due to the use of inappropriate immobilization matrices has limited the practical applications of these devices. Present study is an attempt to improve the kinetic properties and stability of NR using nanoscale iron oxide (nFe3O4) and zinc oxide (nZnO) particles. The desired nanoparticles were synthesized, surface functionalized, characterized and affixed onto the epoxy resin to yield two nanocomposite supports (epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO) for immobilizing NR. Epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO support could load as much as 35.8±0.01 and 33.20±0.01μg/cm(2) of NR with retention of about 93.72±0.50 and 84.81±0.80% of its initial activity respectively. Changes in surface morphology and chemical bonding structure of both the nanocomposite supports after addition of NR were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Optimum working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained for free as well as immobilized NR preparations. Further, storage stability at 4°C and thermal stability between 25-50°C were determined for all the NR preparations. Analytical applications of immobilized NR for determination of soil and water nitrates along with reusability data has been included to make sure the usefulness of the procedure. PMID:27233127

  8. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  9. Temperature Dependence and High-Temperature Stability of the Annealed Ni/Au Ohmic Contact to p-Type GaN in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shirong; McFavilen, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ponce, Fernando A.; Arena, Chantal; Goodnick, Stephen; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2016-04-01

    We report on the temperature-dependent contact resistivity and high-temperature stability of the annealed Ni/Au ohmic contacts to p-type GaN in air. As the measure temperature increases from 25°C to 390°C, both the specific contact resistivity (ρ c) and sheet resistance (R sh) decrease by factors ˜10, contributing to the 10-fold increase in current at 390°C compared with that at 25°C. It was also observed that the ρ c was further reduced by 36%, i.e., from 2.2 × 10-3 Ω cm2 to 1.4 × 10-3 Ω cm2, during the 48-h high-temperature stability test at 450°C in air, showing excellent stability of the contacts. An increase in ρ c was observed after the contacts were subjected to 500°C in air. Higher temperature stress led to a significant increase in ρ c. The contacts show rectifying I-V characteristics after being subjected to 700°C for 1 h. The degradation mechanics were analyzed with the assistance of transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of granite and its effects on borehole stability in high temperature and three-dimensional stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Bao-lin; Zhu, Hai-yan; Yan, Chuan-liang; Li, Zhi-jun; Wang, Zhi-qiao

    2014-01-01

    When exploiting the deep resources, the surrounding rock readily undergoes the hole shrinkage, borehole collapse, and loss of circulation under high temperature and high pressure. A series of experiments were conducted to discuss the compressional wave velocity, triaxial strength, and permeability of granite cored from 3500 meters borehole under high temperature and three-dimensional stress. In light of the coupling of temperature, fluid, and stress, we get the thermo-fluid-solid model and governing equation. ANSYS-APDL was also used to stimulate the temperature influence on elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability. In light of the results, we establish a temperature-fluid-stress model to illustrate the granite's stability. The compressional wave velocity and elastic modulus, decrease as the temperature rises, while poisson ratio and permeability of granite increase. The threshold pressure and temperature are 15 MPa and 200 °C, respectively. The temperature affects the fracture pressure more than the collapse pressure, but both parameters rise with the increase of temperature. The coupling of thermo-fluid-solid, greatly impacting the borehole stability, proves to be a good method to analyze similar problems of other formations. PMID:24778592

  11. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Granite and Its Effects on Borehole Stability in High Temperature and Three-Dimensional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bao-lin, Liu; Hai-yan, Zhu; Chuan-liang, Yan; Zhi-jun, Li; Zhi-qiao, Wang

    2014-01-01

    When exploiting the deep resources, the surrounding rock readily undergoes the hole shrinkage, borehole collapse, and loss of circulation under high temperature and high pressure. A series of experiments were conducted to discuss the compressional wave velocity, triaxial strength, and permeability of granite cored from 3500 meters borehole under high temperature and three-dimensional stress. In light of the coupling of temperature, fluid, and stress, we get the thermo-fluid-solid model and governing equation. ANSYS-APDL was also used to stimulate the temperature influence on elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability. In light of the results, we establish a temperature-fluid-stress model to illustrate the granite's stability. The compressional wave velocity and elastic modulus, decrease as the temperature rises, while poisson ratio and permeability of granite increase. The threshold pressure and temperature are 15 MPa and 200°C, respectively. The temperature affects the fracture pressure more than the collapse pressure, but both parameters rise with the increase of temperature. The coupling of thermo-fluid-solid, greatly impacting the borehole stability, proves to be a good method to analyze similar problems of other formations. PMID:24778592

  12. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of granite and its effects on borehole stability in high temperature and three-dimensional stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Bao-lin; Zhu, Hai-yan; Yan, Chuan-liang; Li, Zhi-jun; Wang, Zhi-qiao

    2014-01-01

    When exploiting the deep resources, the surrounding rock readily undergoes the hole shrinkage, borehole collapse, and loss of circulation under high temperature and high pressure. A series of experiments were conducted to discuss the compressional wave velocity, triaxial strength, and permeability of granite cored from 3500 meters borehole under high temperature and three-dimensional stress. In light of the coupling of temperature, fluid, and stress, we get the thermo-fluid-solid model and governing equation. ANSYS-APDL was also used to stimulate the temperature influence on elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability. In light of the results, we establish a temperature-fluid-stress model to illustrate the granite's stability. The compressional wave velocity and elastic modulus, decrease as the temperature rises, while poisson ratio and permeability of granite increase. The threshold pressure and temperature are 15 MPa and 200 °C, respectively. The temperature affects the fracture pressure more than the collapse pressure, but both parameters rise with the increase of temperature. The coupling of thermo-fluid-solid, greatly impacting the borehole stability, proves to be a good method to analyze similar problems of other formations.

  13. Semiconductors for high temperature active devices: silicon, GaAs, and GaP. [For use in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews developments during the past three years in the area of high-temperature active semiconductor devices for use at 275/sup 0/C in instrumentation needed to characterize geothermal resources. Surveys of silicon bipolar, MOS, and JFET devices operated at high temperature and development work on high temperature silicon CMOS logic and DI analog circuits are reviewed. The initial results of developmental work on GaAs and GaP diodes are discussed. These efforts have identified several promising devices for high temperature applications; however, further development is required to resolve such problems as excessive leakage currents, metallization degradation, device stability, and long term aging.

  14. Effects of Metal Ions on Stability and Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrolysin and Further Stabilization of This Enzyme by Modification of a Ca2+-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Gao, Xiaowei; Dai, Zheng; Tang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysin is an extracellular subtilase produced by the marine hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme functions at high temperatures in seawater, but little is known about the effects of metal ions on the properties of pyrolysin. Here, we report that the supplementation of Na+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ salts at concentrations similar to those in seawater destabilizes recombinant pyrolysin but leads to an increase in enzyme activity. The destabilizing effect of metal ions on pyrolysin appears to be related to the disturbance of surface electrostatic interactions of the enzyme. In addition, mutational analysis of two predicted high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites (Ca1 and Ca2) revealed that the binding of Ca2+ is important for the stabilization of this enzyme. Interestingly, Asn substitutions at residues Asp818 and Asp820 of the Ca2 site, which is located in the C-terminal extension of pyrolysin, resulted in improvements in both enzyme thermostability and activity without affecting Ca2+-binding affinity. These effects were most likely due to the elimination of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion at the Ca2 site. Together, these results suggest that metal ions play important roles in modulating the stability and activity of pyrolysin. PMID:24561589

  15. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  16. TEMPERATURE ACTIVATION OF CERTAIN RESPIRATORY ENZYMES OF STENOTHERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaughran, Eugene R. L.

    1949-01-01

    The results of this study of the effect of temperature on the respiratory mechanism of five stenothermophilic bacteria may be summarized as follows:— 1. The respiratory mechanism and its various components of the stenothermophilic bacteria were found to function at temperatures below the minimum temperature for growth of these organisms. In every case the rates of the individual reactions involved in the respiratory chain increased exponentially with temperature until the temperature at which inactivation became apparent was reached. 2. The mean activation energies, calculated from the "best" value for the slope of the straight lines resulting from a plot of log rate against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature were: Dehydrogenases: 28,000 to 28,500 calories per gram molecule. Glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, glycine, β-alanine, monosodium glutamate, (asparagine). 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 15,000 calories per gram molecule. Formate. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome b and c (substrate: p-phenylenediamine): 16,800 calories per gram molecule. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome c (substrate: hydroquinone): 20,200 calories per gram molecule. Catalase: 4,100 calories per gram molecule. Complete aerobic respiratory system (plus added glucose): 29,500 calories per gram molecule. 3. The identity of the energies of activation of the respiratory system and its enzymic components at temperatures above and below the minimum temperature for growth of the stenothermophilic bacteria was demonstrated. 4. An attempt has been made to indicate a relationship between the nature of the substrate and the activation energy by grouping substrates on the basis of common µ values obtained for their dehydrogenation by resting cell preparations of

  17. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Wu; Belieres, Jean-Philippe; Yoshizawa, Masahiro

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  18. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  19. Evaluation of infectious bursal disease virus stability at different conditions of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Rani, Surabhi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is one of the highly pathogenic viral diseases of poultry. The disease poses a serious threat to the economy of many developing countries where agriculture serves as the primary source of national income. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae. The IBDV is well characterized to cause immunosuppression in poultry. The live attenuated vaccine is the only way to protect the chickens from IBDV infection. The ineffectiveness of vaccine is one of the major causes of IBDV outbreaks in field condition. In the present study, we discuss briefly about the biology of IBDV genome and its proteins under different conditions of temperature and pH in order to evaluate its infectivity under adverse physical conditions. Our results indicate that the IBDV is non-infective above 42 °C and unstable above 72 °C. However, the change in pH does not significantly contribute to the IBDV stability. The study will be useful in estimating an optimum storage condition for IBDV vaccines without causing any deterioration in its viability and effectiveness.

  20. Low-Temperature Aging and Phase Stability of U6Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Briant, C L; Chasse, K R

    2003-11-21

    Aging behavior and phase stability of a water-quenched U-6wt%Nb (U-14at%Nb) alloy artificially aged at 200 C and naturally aged at ambient temperature for 15 years have been investigated using Vickers hardness test, X-ray diffraction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Age hardening/softening phenomenon is observed from the artificially aged samples according to microhardness measurement. The age hardening can be rationalized by the occurrence of spinodal decomposition, or fine scale of Nb segregation, which results in the formation of a nano-scale modulated structure within the artificially aged samples. Coarsening of the modulated structure after prolonged aging leads to the age softening. The occurrence of chemical ordering (disorder-order transformation) is found in the naturally aged sample based upon the observations of antiphase domain boundaries (APB's) and superlattice diffraction patterns. A possible superlattice structure is accordingly proposed for the chemically ordered phase observed in the naturally aged alloy sample.

  1. Oxidative stability of waste cooking oil and white diesel upon storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bezergianni, Stella; Chrysikou, Loukia P

    2012-12-01

    Renewable diesel fuels are alternative fuels produced from vegetable oils or animal fats. Catalytic hydrotreating of waste cooking oil (WCO) was carried out at pilot-plant scale and a paraffinic diesel, called "white" diesel was obtained. The white diesel and WCO samples were stored for one year at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions, but not exposed to sunlight. Viscosity, total acid number (TAN), induction period (IP), carbonaceous deposits, density, cold flow properties, distillation and water content were monitored. TAN and density of the white diesel stored in conventional bottles changed from 0 to 0.221 mg KOH/g and from 787 to 838 kg/m(3), respectively. The remaining parameters did not vary significantly. Water content of WCO increased from 482 to 2491 mg/kg, TAN from 0.744 to 0.931 mg KOH/g, whereas viscosity, IP and carbon residues fluctuated mildly. The results are indicative of the white diesel's stability, rendering it suitable for prolonged storage.

  2. Geometric stabilization of the electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient driven instability. I. Nearly axisymmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, A.; Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of a non-axisymmetric (3D) equilibrium magnetic field on the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven mode are investigated. We consider the strongly driven, toroidal branch of the instability in a global (on the magnetic surface) setting. Previous studies have focused on particular features of non-axisymmetric systems, such as strong local shear or magnetic ripple, that introduce inhomogeneity in the coordinate along the magnetic field. In contrast, here we include non-axisymmetry explicitly via the dependence of the magnetic drift on the field line label α, i.e., across the magnetic field, but within the magnetic flux surface. We consider the limit where this variation occurs on a scale much larger than that of the ITG mode, and also the case where these scales are similar. Close to axisymmetry, we find that an averaging effect of the magnetic drift on the flux surface causes global (on the surface) stabilization, as compared to the most unstable local mode. In the absence of scale separation, we find destabilization is also possible, but only if a particular resonance occurs between the magnetic drift and the mode, and finite Larmor radius effects are neglected. We discuss the relative importance of surface global effects and known radially global effects.

  3. Lipase in aqueous-polar organic solvents: Activity, structure, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Md Zahid; Yedavalli, Poornima; Deshmukh, Mandar V; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2013-01-01

    Studying alterations in biophysical and biochemical behavior of enzymes in the presence of organic solvents and the underlying cause(s) has important implications in biotechnology. We investigated the effects of aqueous solutions of polar organic solvents on ester hydrolytic activity, structure and stability of a lipase. Relative activity of the lipase monotonically decreased with increasing concentration of acetone, acetonitrile, and DMF but increased at lower concentrations (upto ∼20% v/v) of dimethylsulfoxide, isopropanol, and methanol. None of the organic solvents caused any appreciable structural change as evident from circular dichorism and NMR studies, thus do not support any significant role of enzyme denaturation in activity change. Change in 2D [15N, 1H]-HSQC chemical shifts suggested that all the organic solvents preferentially localize to a hydrophobic patch in the active-site vicinity and no chemical shift perturbation was observed for residues present in protein's core. This suggests that activity alteration might be directly linked to change in active site environment only. All organic solvents decreased the apparent binding of substrate to the enzyme (increased Km); however significantly enhanced the kcat. Melting temperature (Tm) of lipase, measured by circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, altered in all solvents, albeit to a variable extent. Interestingly, although the effect of all organic solvents on various properties on lipase is qualitatively similar, our study suggest that magnitudes of effects do not appear to follow bulk solvent properties like polarity and the solvent effects are apparently dictated by specific and local interactions of solvent molecule(s) with the protein. PMID:23625694

  4. Delay-dependent robust stabilization and H∞ control for neural networks with various activation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Mathiyalagan, K.; Anthoni, S. Marshal

    2012-04-01

    This paper considers the problem of robust stabilization for a class of uncertain neural networks with various activation functions and mixed time delays. The aim is to derive a H∞ control law to ensure the robust stability of the closed-loop system about its equilibrium with parameter uncertainties. By employing the Lyapunov stability theory and the matrix inequality technique, a new set of sufficient conditions is presented for the existence of the H∞ control problem. The stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be solved easily by the Matlab LMI toolbox. In addition to the requirement of global robust stabilization, for a prescribed H∞ performance level the stabilizing controller gain matrices for all delays to satisfy the upper bound of the time-varying delay are required to be obtained. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Live Soap: Stability, Order, and Fluctuations in Apolar Active Smectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John

    2013-03-01

    We construct a hydrodynamic theory of noisy, apolar active smectics in bulk suspension or on a substrate. Unlike purely orientationally ordered active fluids, active apolar smectics can be dynamically stable in Stokesian bulk suspensions. Smectic order in these systems is quasilong ranged in dimension d=2 and long ranged in d=3. We predict reentrant Kosterlitz-Thouless melting to an active nematic in our simplest model in d=2, a nonzero second-sound speed parallel to the layers in bulk suspensions, and that there are no giant number fluctuations in either case. We also briefly discuss possible instabilities in these systems.

  6. Highly active nanoscale Ni - Yttria stabilized zirconia anodes for micro-solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukaksoy, Aligul; Birss, Viola I.

    2016-03-01

    The optimum operating temperature of micro solid oxide fuel cells (μ-SOFCs) is < 600 °C, which normally results in an undesirably high internal resistance. While the resistance of the electrolyte (most commonly yttria stabilized zirconia, YSZ) can be lowered significantly simply by decreasing its thickness, minimization of the electrode resistance (thus maintaining rapid reaction kinetics) is not as straightforward. In this work, an ethylene glycol based polymeric precursor solution, which promotes the intimate mixing of the Ni, Y and Zr components prior to their crystallization as oxides, was spin-coated onto a YSZ disc, generating a nanocomposite NiO-YSZ thin film. The in-situ reduction of NiO phase within the dense NiO-YSZ film to Ni, in combination with the nanoscale size of the Ni and YSZ particles (ca. 25 nm), resulted in a nanoporous, Ni-YSZ anode morphology (thickness < 1 μm) with a homogeneous distribution of Ni and YSZ and a very high triple phase boundary length. Very small electrode polarization resistances of 0.65 Ω cm2 per electrode were obtained at 550 °C in humidified H2, the lowest values yet reported for SOFCs at this temperature. These highly active anodes are therefore very promising for use in next generation μ-SOFCs.

  7. Stability of the strengthening nanoprecipitates in reduced activation ferritic steels under Fe2+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    The stability of MX-type precipitates is critical to retain mechanical properties of both reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) and conventional FM steels at elevated temperatures. Radiation resistance of TaC, TaN, and VN nanoprecipitates irradiated up to ∼49 dpa at 500 °C using Fe2+ is investigated in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilized in standard and scanning mode (STEM) reveals the non-stoichiometric nature of the nanoprecipitates. Irradiation did not alter their crystalline nature. The radiation resistance of these precipitates, in an order of reduced resistance, is TaC, VN, and TaN. Particle dissolution, growth, and reprecipitation were the modes of irradiation-induced instability. Irradiation also facilitated formation of Fe2W type Laves phase limited to the VN and TaN bearing alloys. This result suggests that nitrogen level should be controlled to a minimal level in alloys to gain greater radiation resistance of the MX-type precipitates at similar temperatures as well as postpone the formation and subsequent coarsening of Laves phase.

  8. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  9. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  10. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  11. Room-Temperature Fluorine-Induced Decrease in the Stability of Bromine and Iodine Intercalated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Upon exposure to room-temperature fluorine, intercalated carbon fibers (containing either bromine alone or iodine and bromine together) become heavier and less stable. For Amoco P-100 graphitized carbon fibers, which were intercalated with 18 wt percent bromine, 1 hour of fluorine exposure resulted in a large weight increase but caused only a small decrease in thermal stability. An additional 89 hours of fluorine exposure time resulted in small additional increases in fiber weight, but significant further decreases in fiber thermal stability. Such phenomena of weight increase and stability decrease do not occur if the intercalated fibers are exposed to 250 C fluorine. These observations suggest that, at room temperature, fluorine is absorbed quickly by the intercalated fibers and is intercalated slowly into the fibers. Most of the original intercalates are replaced by fluorine in the process of fluorine intercalation. In an inert environment, the bromine intercalated fibers are much more thermally stable. After 800 C vacuum heating for 2 weeks, the brominated fibers lost about 45% of their bromine, and their resistivity increased from 64 mu(Omega)-cm to a range of 95-170 mu(Omega)-cm. This is still much lower than the value of 300 mu(Omega)-cm for pristine P-100. For practical purposes, to preserve their thermal stability, brominated fibers need to be protected from exposure to fluorine at room temperature or to any intercalate at a temperature where, upon direct contact with graphite, an intercalation compound can easily be formed.

  12. Nickel(II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; M.A. Goyette

    2003-03-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nanomolal (nm). The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo- and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  13. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  14. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  15. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  16. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  17. The stability of Pyrogenic Organic Matter is dependent upon its wood source and charring temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. D.; Filley, T. R.; Bird, J.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.; Stark, R. E.; Hatton, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fire is a major mediator of carbon (C) cycling in forests and can result in the formation of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM). The biological reactivity of PyOM is largely dependent upon the physiochemical characteristics of source material and production temperature. As a result, PyOM can persist up to centennial time scales after deposition while simultaneously enhancing or suppressing the mineralization of native soil C (NSC). To investigate the interactive effects of PyOM source and production temperature on NSC, we added 13C-enriched red maple (RM) or jack pine (JP) pyrolyzed at 200, 300, 450 or 600°C to a low C (0.5%;), near-surface soil (0-20 cm-depth) at 60% water holding capacity and 11% of native soil C and then incubated the samples in the dark at 25⁰C for 6 months. We found that PyOM mineralization rates decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature for either species while NSC mineralization was suppressed across all treatments with the largest decrease observed in JP 300⁰C. RM mineralization rates were consistently greater (˜5 to ˜25%) than for JP <600⁰C during the first 17 days. Mean residence time (MRT) of PyOM-C was significantly higher in PyOM >300°C resulting in MRT of ~300 - 550 y compared to 8-30 y in lower temperature PyOM (0-300 °C). RM exhibited significantly lower MRT in 300°C PyOM than JP corresponding to differences observed in PyOM and NSC mineralization rates. The modelled active and slow pools of PyOM-C mineralized decreased with increasing combustion temperature. JP 300°C had a 20% smaller active pool when compared to RM suggesting that for both species, 300⁰C - 450⁰C represented a thermal transition point which was most evident in jack pine. These results highlight how differences in PyOM physiochemical characteristics linked to a species thermal transformation threshold may be a predictor in determining its biological reactivity in soil.

  18. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  19. Lower temperature limits for activity of several Ixodid ticks (Acari: Ixodidae): effects of body size and rate of temperature change.

    PubMed

    Clark, D D

    1995-07-01

    Uncoordinated activity threshold temperature, the temperature below which ticks can no longer seek a host in a coordinated manner, and the activity threshold temperature, when all activity ceases, were examined for three species of ticks found in coastal sections of New York. The mean uncoordinated activity threshold and activity threshold temperatures were determined for nymphal, female and male Ixodes scapularis Say, nymphal, female, and male Amblyomma americanum (L.), and for female and male Dermacentor variabilis (Say). Only the uncoordinated activity threshold and activity threshold temperatures for adult I. scapularis were significantly correlated to the rate of temperature decrease. The mean uncoordinated activity threshold and activity threshold temperatures were significantly correlated to the mean size of each tick species.

  20. Local dynamic stability of spine muscle activation and stiffness patterns during repetitive lifting.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ryan B; Brown, Stephen H M

    2014-12-01

    To facilitate stable trunk kinematics, humans must generate appropriate motor patterns to effectively control muscle force and stiffness and respond to biomechanical perturbations and/or neuromuscular control errors. Thus, it is important to understand physiological variables such as muscle force and stiffness, and how these relate to the downstream production of stable spine and trunk movements. This study was designed to assess the local dynamic stability of spine muscle activation and rotational stiffness patterns using Lyapunov analyses, and relationships to the local dynamic stability of resulting spine kinematics, during repetitive lifting and lowering at varying combinations of lifting load and rate. With an increase in the load lifted at a constant rate there was a trend for decreased local dynamic stability of spine muscle activations and the muscular contributions to spine rotational stiffness; although the only significant change was for the full state space muscle activation stability (p < 0.05). With an increase in lifting rate with a constant load there was a significant decrease in the local dynamic stability of spine muscle activations and the muscular contributions to spine rotational stiffness (p ≤ 0.001 for all measures). These novel findings suggest that the stability of motor inputs and the muscular contributions to spine rotational stiffness can be altered by external task demands (load and lifting rate), and therefore are important variables to consider when assessing the stability of the resulting kinematics.

  1. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  2. Nanofiber Air Filters with High-Temperature Stability for Efficient PM2.5 Removal from the Pollution Sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Liu, Chong; Hsu, Po-Chun; Zhang, Chaofan; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Jinsong; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Lu, Yingying; Qiu, Yongcai; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Here, we developed high-efficiency (>99.5%) polyimide-nanofiber air filters for the high temperature PM2.5 removal. The polyimide nanofibers exhibited high thermal stability, and the PM2.5 removal efficiency was kept unchanged when temperature ranged from 25-370 °C. These filters had high air flux with very low pressure drop. They could continuously work for >120 h for PM2.5 index >300. A field-test showed that they could effectively remove >99.5% PM particles from car exhaust at high temperature.

  3. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  4. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  5. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  6. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  7. Beta activity in the premotor cortex is increased during stabilized as compared to normal walking

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Dieën, Jaap H.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Walking on two legs is inherently unstable. Still, we humans perform remarkable well at it, mostly without falling. To gain more understanding of the role of the brain in controlling gait stability we measured brain activity using electro-encephalography (EEG) during stabilized and normal walking. Subjects walked on a treadmill in two conditions, each lasting 10 min; normal, and while being laterally stabilized by elastic cords. Kinematics of trunk and feet, electro-myography (EMG) of neck muscles, as well as 64-channel EEG were recorded. To assess gait stability the local divergence exponent, step width, and trunk range of motion were calculated from the kinematic data. We used independent component (IC) analysis to remove movement, EMG, and eyeblink artifacts from the EEG, after which dynamic imaging of coherent sources beamformers were determined to identify cortical sources that showed a significant difference between conditions. Stabilized walking led to a significant increase in gait stability, i.e., lower local divergence exponents. Beamforming analysis of the beta band activity revealed significant sources in bilateral pre-motor cortices. Projection of sensor data on these sources showed a significant difference only in the left premotor area, with higher beta power during stabilized walking, specifically around push-off, although only significant around contralateral push-off. It appears that even during steady gait the cortex is involved in the control of stability. PMID:26578937

  8. Effects of High Pressure Homogenization on the Activity, Stability, Kinetics and Three-Dimensional Conformation of a Glucose Oxidase Produced by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Tribst, Alline Artigiani Lima; Cota, Júnio; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Cristianini, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    High pressure homogenization (HPH) is a non-thermal method, which has been employed to change the activity and stability of biotechnologically relevant enzymes. This work investigated how HPH affects the structural and functional characteristics of a glucose oxidase (GO) from Aspergillus niger. The enzyme was homogenized at 75 and 150 MPa and the effects were evaluated with respect to the enzyme activity, stability, kinetic parameters and molecular structure. The enzyme showed a pH-dependent response to the HPH treatment, with reduction or maintenance of activity at pH 4.5–6.0 and a remarkable activity increase (30–300%) at pH 6.5 in all tested temperatures (15, 50 and 75°C). The enzyme thermal tolerance was reduced due to HPH treatment and the storage for 24 h at high temperatures (50 and 75°C) also caused a reduction of activity. Interestingly, at lower temperatures (15°C) the activity levels were slightly higher than that observed for native enzyme or at least maintained. These effects of HPH treatment on function and stability of GO were further investigated by spectroscopic methods. Both fluorescence and circular dichroism revealed conformational changes in the molecular structure of the enzyme that might be associated with the distinct functional and stability behavior of GO. PMID:25061935

  9. Elaboration, activity and stability of silica-based nitroaromatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Dimitri; Pereira, Franck; Méthivier, Christophe; Montméat, Pierre; Hairault, Lionel; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2013-08-21

    Functionalized silica-based thin films, modified with hydrophobic groups, were synthesized and used as sensors for nitroaromatic compound (NAC) specific detection. Their performance and behavior, in terms of stability, ageing and regeneration, have been fully characterized by combining chemical characterization techniques and electron microscopy. NAC was efficiently and specifically detected using these silica-based sensors, but showed a great degradation in the presence of humidity. Moreover, the sensor sensitivity seriously decreases with storage time. Methyl- and phenyl-functionalization helped to overcome this humidity sensitivity. Surface characterization enabled us to establish a direct correlation between the appearance, and increasing amount, of adsorbed carbonyl-containing species, and sensor efficiency. This contamination, appearing after only one month, was particularly important when sensors were stored in plastic containers. Rinsing with cyclohexane enables us to recover part of the sensor performance but does not yield a complete regeneration of the sensors. This work led us to the definition of optimized elaboration and storage conditions for nitroaromatic sensors. PMID:23812282

  10. Long-term colloidal stability and metal leaching of single wall carbon nanotubes: effect of temperature and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-02-01

    Long term (90 day) stability, aggregation kinetics in the presence and absence of natural organic materials (NOM), and metal leaching of five commercial single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in waters (e.g. freshwater, seawater, stormwater, wastewater, and groundwater) were studied, as well as the effect of temperature on SWCNT stability and metal leaching. Zeta (ζ) potential of SWCNT decreased in magnitude with increase in temperature. In wastewater, SWCNT sedimented from the water column to below detectable levels after 30 days when kept at 40 °C, but at 20 °C 19% suspension was still observed after the same exposure time. Addition of 0.1 mg-C L(-1) EPS shifted the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of SRNOM-stabilized SWCNT from 15 mM to 54 mM NaCl via additional electrostatic and possibly steric stabilization. Attachment efficiencies (α) of SWCNT in waters ranged from ∼0.001 in DI with 10 mg L(-1) SRNOM to 1 in seawater. However, sedimentation of SWCNT in seawater (and other high ionic strength conditions) was not as fast as expected due to improved buoyancy and/or drag. Purified forms of SWCNTs exhibited better dispersibility and stability in most waters, but as expected, the total metal leached out was higher in the raw variants. Metal leaching from CNT in these studies was controlled by metal and water chemistries, CNT pretreatment, leachable metal fraction, exposure time, and presence of NOM.

  11. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

  12. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  13. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  14. The stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Morden-Moore, A. L.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    Separate experiments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) independently assessed the stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures. The USGS experiment represented a test of sample stability under a diverse range of conditions, whereas the CAL experiment was a controlled test of sample stability. In the experiment by the USGS, a statistically significant (?? = 0.05) relation between [H+] and time was found for the composited filtered, natural, wet-deposition solution when all reported values are included in the analysis. However, if two outlying pH values most likely representing measurement error are excluded from the analysis, the change in [H+] over time was not statistically significant. In the experiment by the CAL, randomly selected samples were reanalyzed between July 1984 and February 1991. The original analysis and reanalysis pairs revealed that [H+] differences, although very small, were statistically different from zero, whereas specific-conductance differences were not. Nevertheless, the results of the CAL reanalysis project indicate there appears to be no consistent, chemically significant degradation in sample integrity with regard to [H+] and specific conductance while samples are stored at room temperature at the CAL. Based on the results of the CAL and USGS studies, short-term (45-60 day) stability of [H+] and specific conductance in natural filtered wet-deposition samples that are shipped and stored unchilled at ambient temperatures was satisfactory.

  15. Positive regulation of p53 stability and activity by the deubiquitinating enzyme Otubain 1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Xin; Challagundla, Kishore B; Dai, Mu-Shui

    2012-02-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of p53 protein stability and activity. p53 is ubiquitinated and destabilized by MDM2 and several other Ub E3s, whereas it is deubiquitinated and stabilized by Ub-specific protease (USP)7 and USP10. Here we show that the ovarian tumour domain-containing Ub aldehyde-binding protein 1 (Otub1) is a novel p53 regulator. Otub1 directly suppresses MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination in cells and in vitro. Overexpression of Otub1 drastically stabilizes and activates p53, leading to apoptosis and marked inhibition of cell proliferation in a p53-dependent manner. These effects are independent of its catalytic activity but require residue Asp88. Mutation of Asp88 to Ala (Otub1(D88A)) abolishes activity of Otub1 to suppress p53 ubiquitination. Further, wild-type Otub1 and its catalytic mutant (Otub1(C91S)), but not Otub1(D88A), bind to the MDM2 cognate E2, UbcH5, and suppress its Ub-conjugating activity in vitro. Overexpression of Otub1(D88A) or ablation of endogenous Otub1 by siRNA markedly impaired p53 stabilization and activation in response to DNA damage. Together, these results reveal a novel function for Otub1 in regulating p53 stability and activity.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted butyl acetate synthesis catalyzed by Novozym 435: enhanced activity and operational stability.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa B; Schein, Mirela F; Friedrich, John L R; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Ayub, Marco A Z; Rodrigues, Rafael C

    2013-09-01

    The influence of low-frequency ultrasound (40 kHz) in the esterification reaction between acetic acid and butanol for flavor ester synthesis catalyzed by the commercial immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435) was evaluated. A central composite design and the response surface methodology were used to analyze the effects of the reaction parameters (temperature, substrate molar ratio, enzyme content and added water) and their response (yields of conversion in 2.5 h of reaction). The reaction was carried out using n-hexane as solvent. The optimal conditions for ultrasound-assisted butyl acetate synthesis were found to be: temperature of 46 °C; substrate molar ratio of 3.6:1 butanol:acetic acid; enzyme content of 7%; added water of 0.25%, conditions that are slightly different from those found using mechanical mixing. Over 94% of conversion was obtained in 2.5h under these conditions. The optimal acid concentration for the reaction was determined to be 2.0 M, compared to 0.3 M without ultrasound treatment. Enzyme productivity was significantly improved to around 7.5-fold for each batch when comparing ultrasound and standard mechanical agitation. The biocatalyst could be directly reused for 14 reactions cycles keeping around 70% of its original activity, while activity was virtually zeroed in the third cycle using the standard mixing system. Thus, compared to the traditional mechanical agitation, ultrasound technology not only improves the process productivity, but also enhances enzyme recycling and stability in the presence of acetic acid, being a powerful tool to improve biocatalyst performance in this type of reaction. PMID:23453821

  17. Ballistic abdominal exercises: muscle activation patterns during three activities along the stability/mobility continuum.

    PubMed

    McGill, Stuart M; Karpowicz, Amy; Fenwick, Chad M J

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the muscle activity and spine motion during several tasks requiring rapid abdominal contraction. Eight healthy men from a university population were instrumented to obtain surface electromyography of selected trunk and hip muscles, together with video analysis to calculate joint moments and electromagnetic lumbar spine position sensor to track spine posture. Exercises included a punch, throw, and a ballistic torso-stiffening maneuver. This study found that no muscle turned on significantly before any other muscle during both the 1-in. punch and ballistic torso-stiffening maneuver. Conversely, there was a significant order or muscle onset during the baseball throw. Muscles reached peak activation significantly before any other muscle during the baseball throw and 1-in. punch, but there were no significant differences for the torso-stiffening maneuver. The exercises quantified in this study demonstrated how muscle contraction dynamics change to meet differing demands for stiffening, for force/moment production, and for rapid movements. Specifically, it seems that there is an order of contraction when movement is the goal but not when just spine stability is required. Thus, a different intensity of abdominal bracing is required to achieve the different objectives of sports tasks and exercises.

  18. High temperature thermo-mechanical stability of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) Ti-49Al-2V

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, S.; Rack, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    The high temperature thermo-mechanical stability of lamellar two phase {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} Ti-49Al-2V has been examined. At low temperatures and high rates the flow behavior exhibited initial strain hardening, followed by flow softening and steady-state behavior at high strains. As the temperature increased and/or the strain rate decreased, strain hardening was eliminated, flow softening commencing upon yielding. Dynamic material modeling showed that two stable flow regions exist in this alloy and microstructural condition, both stable regimes being associated with dynamic spheroidization of the lamellar {gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2} structure. At higher temperatures and lower rates, dynamic spheroidization involved both the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae, while at lower temperatures and/or higher rates the {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae remained essentially unchanged, all deformation occurring within the {gamma} phase. Finally, unstable flow is related to lamellae kinking, flow localization and surface cracking.

  19. Kinetics of the stability of broccoli (Brassica oleracea Cv. Italica) myrosinase and isothiocyanates in broccoli juice during pressure/temperature treatments.

    PubMed

    Van Eylen, D; Oey, I; Hendrickx, M; Van Loey, A

    2007-03-21

    The Brassicaceae plant family contains high concentrations of glucosinolates, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase yielding products having an anticarcinogenic activity. The pressure and temperature stabilities of endogenous broccoli myrosinase, as well as of the synthetic isothiocyanates sulforaphane and phenylethyl isothiocyanate, were studied in broccoli juice on a kinetic basis. At atmospheric pressure, kinetics of thermal (45-60 degrees C) myrosinase inactivation could be described by a consecutive step model. In contrast, only one phase of myrosinase inactivation was observed at elevated pressure (100-600 MPa) combined with temperatures from 10 up to 60 degrees C, indicating inactivation according to first-order kinetics. An antagonistic effect of pressure (up to 200 MPa) on thermal inactivation (50 degrees C and above) of myrosinase was observed indicating that pressure retarded the thermal inactivation. The kinetic parameters of myrosinase inactivation were described as inactivation rate constants (k values), activation energy (Ea values), and activation volume (Va values). On the basis of the kinetic data, a mathematical model describing the pressure and temperature dependence of myrosinase inactivation rate constants was constructed. The stability of isothiocyanates was studied at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range from 60 to 90 degrees C and at elevated pressures in the combined pressure-temperature range from 600 to 800 MPa and from 30 to 60 degrees C. It was found that isothiocyanates were relatively thermolabile and pressure stable. The kinetics of HP/T isothiocyanate degradation could be adequately described by a first-order kinetic model. The obtained kinetic information can be used for process evaluation and optimization to increase the health effect of Brassicaceae.

  20. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  1. Self-Activated Healable Hydrogels with Reversible Temperature Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruixue; Wang, Xuemeng; Li, Xu; An, Heng; Qin, Jianglei

    2016-09-28

    The self-healable polymer hydrogel along with reversible temperature responsiveness was prepared through self-catalyzed dynamic acylhydrazone formation and exchange without any additional stimulus or catalyst. The hydrogel was prepared from a copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide and acylhydrazine P(NIPAM-co-AH) cross-linked by PEO dialdehyde. Besides self-healed under catalysis of acid and aniline, the hydrogel can also self-heal activated by excess of acylhydrazine groups. Without interference of catalyst during the hydrogel formation and self-healing, this kind of hydrogel prepared from biocompatible polymers can be used in more areas including biotechnology and be more persistent. The hydrogel with a large part of the PNIPAM segment also showed temperature responsiveness around body temperature influenced by the variation in group ratio. This self-healable hydrogel has great potential application in areas related to bioscience and biotechnology. PMID:27589014

  2. High Temperature Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Oswald, Jay J.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanically actuated blade tip clearance control concept was evaluated in a nonrotating test rig to quantify secondary seal leakage at elevated temperatures. These tests were conducted to further investigate the feasibility of actively controlling the clearance between the rotor blade tips and the surrounding shroud seal in the high pressure turbine (HPT) section of a turbine engine. The test environment simulates the state of the back side of the HPT shroud seal with pressure differentials as high as 120 psig and temperatures up to 1000 F. As expected, static secondary seal leakage decreased with increasing temperature. At 1000 F, the test rig's calculated effective clearance (at 120 psig test pressure) was 0.0003 in., well within the industry specified effective clearance goal.

  3. A new preparation technique for Pd/alumina membranes with enhanced high-temperature stability

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieri, S.N.; Foo, K.Y.; Way, J.D.; Collins, J.P.; Harper-Nixon, D.L.

    1999-05-01

    Pd membranes have the potential for making more efficient use of energy in the chemical process industry or in vehicular and stationary fuel cell applications. Pd/alumina composite membranes were fabricated using the generally practiced electroless plating process involving two-step activation of a symmetric 0.2 {micro}m {alpha}-alumina microfilter with tin (Sn) chloride sensitizer (containing SnCl{sub 2} and SnCl{sub 4}) and palladium(II) chloride (PdCl{sub 2}). Pd films were deposited on these activated supports with a hydrazine- (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}-) and PdCl{sub 2}-containing electroless plating bath. When these membranes were tested at 823 K for several days, the ideal H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation factor (pure gas permeability ratio) declined substantially, depending on the membrane thickness. Modifications to the activation procedure minimized the amount of Sn chloride used in the sensitizing step. This reduced the selectivity decline, although the problem was not eliminated. The amount of Sn present at the Pd/ceramic interface was qualitatively related to the high-temperature performance. Possible routes for pore formation and selectivity decline are suggested. Sn chloride was removed from the process entirely with a new activation technique utilizing palladium(II) acetate (Pd(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}). Prior to electroless plating, substrates were dip-coated in a chloroform solution of Pd acetate, dried, calcined, and then reduced in flowing H{sub 2}. At 973 K, nitrogen flux through these membranes remained constant for a period of at least a week. However, hydrogen permeability decreased at 873 K and above because of annealing.

  4. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  5. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  6. Temperature effects on stocks and stability of a phytoplankton-zooplankton model and the dependence on light and nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norberg, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a closed phytoplankton—zooplankton ecosystem was analyzed for effects of temperature on stocks and stability and the dependence of these effects on light and total nutrient concentration of the system. An analysis of the steady state equations showed that the effect of temperature on zooplankton and POM biomass was levelled when primary production is nutrient limited. Temperature increase had a generally negative effect on all biomasses at high nutrient levels due to increased maintenance costs. Nutrient limitation of net primary production is the main factor governing the effect of stocks and flows as well as the stability of the system. All components of the system, except for phytoplankton biomass, are proportional to net production and thus to the net effect of light on photosynthesis. However, temperature determines the slope of that relationship. The resilience of the system was measured by calculating the eigenvalues of the steady state. Under oligotrophic conditions, the system can be stable, but an increase in temperature can cause instability or a decrease in resilience. This conclusion is discussed in the face of recent models that take spatial heterogeneity into account and display far more stable behavior, in better agreement to empirical data. Using simulations, we found that the amplitude of fluctuations of the herbivore stock increases with temperature while the mean biomass and minimum values decrease in comparison with steady state predictions

  7. Reciprocal Regulation of ERα and ERβ Stability and Activity by Diptoindonesin G.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; James, Taryn; Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon; Tan, Renxiang; Hoffmann, F Michael; Xu, Wei

    2015-12-17

    ERβ is regarded as a "tumor suppressor" in breast cancer due to its anti-proliferative effects. However, unlike ERα, ERβ has not been developed as a therapeutic target in breast cancer due to loss of ERβ in aggressive cancers. In a small-molecule library screen for ERβ stabilizers, we identified Diptoindonesin G (Dip G), which significantly increases ERβ protein stability while decreasing ERα protein levels. Dip G enhances the transcription and anti-proliferative activities of ERβ, while attenuating the transcription and proliferative effects of ERα. Further investigation revealed that instead of targeting ER, Dip G targets the CHIP E3 ubiquitin ligase shared by ERα and ERβ. Thus, Dip G is a dual-functional moiety that reciprocally controls ERα and ERβ protein stability and activities via an indirect mechanism. The ERβ stabilization effects of Dip G may enable the development of ERβ-targeted therapies for human breast cancers. PMID:26670079

  8. Enhancing the stability and antibiofilm activity of DspB by immobilization on carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Ma, Su; Liu, Chenguang; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2015-09-01

    A β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (DspB) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CU1000 has been proved to inhibit and detach the biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the application of this enzyme is limited by its poor stability. In the present study, a β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase encoding gene, dspB, was cloned from A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant DspB was loaded on hydrogel nanoparticles, which was prepared by using linoleic acid (LA) modified carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) after sonication. The nanoparticles were almost saturated by DspB at 0.3 mg/ml, which gave a loading capacity of 76.7%. The immobilization enhanced thermal stability, storage stability and reusability of DspB significantly. Moreover, it also increased antibiofilm activity due to the dual mechanism, including the improvement of the enzyme stability and the antibiofilm activity of CMCS nanoparticles. PMID:26302845

  9. Active temperature and velocity correlations produced by a swimmer suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2013-05-01

    The agitation produced in a fluid by a suspension of microswimmers in the low Reynolds number limit is studied. In this limit, swimmers are modeled as force dipoles all with equal strength. The agitation is characterized by the active temperature defined, as in kinetic theory, as the mean square velocity, and by the equal-time spatial correlations. Considering the phase in which the swimmers are homogeneously and isotropically distributed in the fluid, it is shown that the active temperature and velocity correlations depend on a single scalar correlation function of the dipole-dipole correlation function. By making a simple medium-range order model, in which the dipole-dipole correlation function is characterized by a single correlation length k0-1 it is possible to make quantitative predictions. It is found that the active temperature depends on the system size, scaling as L4-d at large correlation lengths L≪k0-1, while in the opposite limit it saturates in three dimensions and diverges logarithmically with the system size in two dimensions. In three dimensions the velocity correlations decay as 1/r for small correlation lengths, while at large correlation lengths the transverse correlation function becomes negative at maximum separation r˜L/2, an effect that disappears as the system increases in size.

  10. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  11. Stabilized metal nanoparticles from organometallic precursors for low temperature fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Meneses, E; Dominguez-Crespo, M A; Torres-Huerta, A M

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a review of articles and patents related to the utilization of colloidal metal nanoparticles produced by the decomposition of organometallic precursors as supported electrocatalysts in different electrochemical reactions including hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) is discussed. In the case of stabilized metal nanoparticles, the kind of functional group contained in the stabilizer as well as the metal/stabilizer ratio, to evaluate the effect of particle size on the electrochemical performance, were also debated. Potential applications and perspectives of these electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are contended with reference to the role played by the coordination compounds and costs.

  12. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Along with the growing interest in water quality during the last decade, the need for data on all types of water-quality parameters has also increased. One parameter of particular interest, because of its many ramifications, is temperature. It influences many of the chemical and physical processes that take place in water. The solubility of gases--for example, oxygen and carbon dioxide--and the solution of mineral matter in water are functions of temperature. Such physical properties as density and viscosity vary with temperature. Oxidation of organic materials, as well as algal and bacterial growth, is promoted or retarded by favorable or unfavorable temperatures. Further, temperature bears on the utility of water: as a source of public water supplies; for industrial use, particularly if the water is used for cooling; and in the field of recreation involving contact sports, fishing, and fish culture. In recent years, temperature changes resulting from inflow of heated industrial waste, particularly effluent from power generating plants, have increased the need for temperature data to determine the degree of change, its effect on ecology, and the effect of any remedial action. Thus, because of the many extensive and intensive effects, a large amount of temperature data is collected on surface and ground waters by many agencies throughout the country. Moreover, because of its importance, there is a widespread interest in temperature even by those who are not active collectors of the data themselves. The industrialist, the manager, the public official, and others at one time or another may have need for temperature data and may well raise the questions: Who is collecting temperature data? What is the extent of the activity? Where are the data being collected? The purpose of this report is to answer these questions. The information in the report is confined to the activities of Federal and non-Federal agencies. It is based on information furnished to the Office of

  13. Catalytic Activity and Stability of Oxides: The Role of Near-Surface Atomic Structures and Compositions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hong, Wesley T; Fong, Dillon D; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Yacoby, Yizhak; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-05-17

    Electrocatalysts play an important role in catalyzing the kinetics for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions for many air-based energy storage and conversion devices, such as metal-air batteries and fuel cells. Although noble metals have been extensively used as electrocatalysts, their limited natural abundance and high costs have motivated the search for more cost-effective catalysts. Oxides are suitable candidates since they are relatively inexpensive and have shown reasonably high activity for various electrochemical reactions. However, a lack of fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanisms has been a major hurdle toward improving electrocatalytic activity. Detailed studies of the oxide surface atomic structure and chemistry (e.g., cation migration) can provide much needed insights for the design of highly efficient and stable oxide electrocatalysts. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in characterizing strontium (Sr) cation segregation and enrichment near the surface of Sr-substituted perovskite oxides under different operating conditions (e.g., high temperature, applied potential), as well as their influence on the surface oxygen exchange kinetics at elevated temperatures. We contrast Sr segregation, which is associated with Sr redistribution in the crystal lattice near the surface, with Sr enrichment, which involves Sr redistribution via the formation of secondary phases. The newly developed coherent Bragg rod analysis (COBRA) and energy-modulated differential COBRA are uniquely powerful ways of providing information about surface and interfacial cation segregation at the atomic scale for these thin film electrocatalysts. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) studies under electrochemical operating conditions give additional insights into cation migration. Direct COBRA and APXPS evidence for surface Sr segregation was found for La1-xSrxCoO3-δ and (La1-ySry)2CoO4±δ/La1-xSrxCoO3-δ oxide thin films, and

  14. The formin mDia2 stabilizes microtubules independently of its actin nucleation activity

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Francesca; Moseley, James B.; Schmoranzer, Jan; Cassimeris, Lynne; Goode, Bruce L.; Gundersen, Gregg G.

    2008-01-01

    A critical microtubule (MT) polarization event in cell migration is the Rho/mDia-dependent stabilization of a subset of MTs oriented toward the direction of migration. Although mDia nucleates actin filaments, it is unclear whether this or a separate activity of mDia underlies MT stabilization. We generated two actin mutants (K853A and I704A) in a constitutively active version of mDia2 containing formin homology domains 1 and 2 (FH1FH2) and found that they still induced stable MTs and bound to the MT TIP proteins EB1 and APC, which have also been implicated in MT stabilization. A dimerization-impaired mutant of mDia2 (W630A) also generated stable MTs in cells. We examined whether FH1FH2mDia2 had direct activity on MTs in vitro and found that it bound directly to MTs, stabilized MTs against cold- and dilution-induced disassembly, and reduced the rates of growth and shortening during MT assembly and disassembly, respectively. These results indicate that mDia2 has a novel MT stabilization activity that is separate from its actin nucleation activity. PMID:18458159

  15. Chemical modification of turnip peroxidase with methoxypolyethylene glycol enhances activity and stability for phenol removal using the immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Guerrero, F; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; Tinoco, R; Gómez-Suárez, M; García-Almendárez, B E; Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Regalado, C

    2008-09-10

    Peroxidase from turnip roots (TP) was isolated followed by modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG). The catalytic activity of the modified TP (MTP) on ABTS increased 2.5 times after 80 min of reaction. MTP showed a KM similar value to that of TP, but a significantly greater kcat for ABTS oxidation, in aqueous buffer. Chemical modification produced an enhanced stability in organic solvents and increased thermal stability of about 4 times that of TP, in aqueous buffer at 70 degrees C. Circular dichroism showed that MPEG modification decreased TP alpha-helical structure from 26 to 16% and increased beta-turns from 26 to 34%, resulting in an enhanced conformational stability. The temperature at the midpoint of thermal denaturation (melting temperature) increased from 57 to 63 degrees C after modification. MTP was immobilized in alginate beads (IMTP) and tested for oxidative polymerization of concentrated phenolic synthetic solutions, achieving 17 effective contact cycles removing >65% phenols. IMTP may be useful for the development of an enzymatic process for wastewater effluent treatment. PMID:18698787

  16. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  17. High-Temperature Stability of Cobalt Grafted on Low-Loading Incorporated Mo-MCM-41 Catalyst for Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    S Lee; C Zoican Loebick; L Pfefferle; G Haller

    2011-12-31

    Cobalt metal is a good catalyst for CO disproportionation to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) when particle size is stabilized on the nanometer scale. With reaction temperatures in the range of 973-1123 K, stabilization of nanometer Co particles against sintering requires a chemical bonding and/or occlusion of the Co particles. Catalysts with Co-grafted Mo-incorporated MCM-41 with different Mo loadings (<1 wt %) have been synthesized. Incorporation of Mo cations in the silica framework of MCM-41 provides different species as grafting sites. These grafting sites affect the strength of the metal-support interaction that controls sintering of active Co metal. The stability of Co at high temperature has been investigated by TPR and in situ/ex-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The reduced Co metal particle size, after hydrogen prereduction, is independent of Mo loading. However, the Co particle size after SWNT synthesis is greatly affected by Mo anchoring and varied with loading. The Co particle size of low-Mo-loading samples after SWNT synthesis is little changed (from 0.88 nm after prereduction to 0.85 nm after SWNT synthesis), but the Co particle size difference of high-Mo-loading samples is gradually increased as the Mo loading is increased.

  18. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  19. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  20. Relationship between protein stability and functional activity in the presence of macromolecular crowding agents alone and in mixture: An insight into stability-activity trade-off.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Sumra; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul

    2015-10-15

    The cellular environment is crowded with different kinds of molecules with varying sizes, shapes and compositions. Most of the experiments studying the nature and behaviour of a protein have been done on the isolated protein in dilute buffer solutions which actually do not imitate the in vivo situation. To understand the consequences of such crowded environment, we investigated the effect of macromolecular crowding on the stability and activity of hen egg white lysozyme. Two crowding agents, dextran 70 and ficoll 70 which have different shapes and composition, have been employed in this study. To mimic the cellular condition from physiological point of view, the effect of mixtures of both the crowding agents has been also studied. The results indicate that owing to volume exclusion, lysozyme is stabilized while its activity decays with the increasing concentration of both the crowders elucidating the hypothesis of stability-activity trade-off. Mixed macromolecular crowding exerts greater effect than the sum of constituent crowding agents (dextran 70 and ficoll 70).

  1. Stability of In-Ga-Zn-O metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors under bias, illumination, and temperature stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Giang T.; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Furuta, Mamoru; Saxena, Saurabh; Allen, Martin W.

    2015-10-01

    The stability of metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MESFETs) with silver oxide Schottky gates on In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) channels, grown by mist chemical-vapor-deposition, was examined under different combinations of positive and negative bias, illumination, and temperature stress. These devices were remarkably stable, even under the most severe condition of negative-bias-illumination-temperature-stress (NBITS), where the threshold voltage shift after 10 h NBITS was only +0.12 V and was mainly attributed to a decrease in the carrier density of the channel. The stability of these IGZO MESFETs is associated with the use of a conducting Schottky gate that significantly reduces charge trapping at the gate-channel interface.

  2. Stabilization of lower hybrid drift modes by finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farengo, R.; Guzdar, P. N.; Lee, Y. C.

    1989-08-01

    The effect of finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients on the lower hybrid drift instability is studied in the parameter regime corresponding to the TRX-2 device [Fusion Technol. 9, 48 (1986)]. Perturbations in the electrostatic potential and all three components of the vector potential are considered and finite beta electron orbit modifications are included. The electron temperature gradient decreases the growth rate of the instability but, for kz=0, unstable modes exist for ηe(=T'en0/Ten0)>6. Since finite kz effects completely stabilize the mode at small values of kz/ky(≂5×10-3), magnetic shear could be responsible for stabilizing the lower hybrid drift instability in field-reversed configurations.

  3. Crystal structure of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in an active conformation with normal thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Thompson, Lawrence C; Bucci, Joel C; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G W; Peterson, Cynthia B; Andreasen, Peter A; Morth, J Preben

    2011-08-26

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 3(10)-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1.

  4. Crystal Structure of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in an Active Conformation with Normal Thermodynamic Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan K.; Thompson, Lawrence C.; Bucci, Joel C.; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Peterson, Cynthia B.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Morth, J. Preben

    2011-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 310-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1. PMID:21697084

  5. Healing and sliding stability of simulated anhydrite fault gouge: effects of water, temperature and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluymakers, Anne; Niemeijer, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Anhydrite-bearing faults are currently of interest to 1) CO2-storage sites capped by anhydrite caprocks (such as found in the North Sea) and 2) seismically active faults in evaporite formations (such as the Italian Apennines). In order to assess the likelihood of fault reactivation, the mode of fault slip and/or fault leakage, it is important to understand the evolution of frictional strength during periods of no slip and upon reloading (healing and relaxation behavior) and of the velocity dependence of friction of anhydrite fault gouge. Therefore, we performed slide-hold-slide experiments combined with a velocity-stepping sequence using simulated anhydrite fault gouge (>95wt% CaSO4). Vacuum-dry and wet experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-150°C, an effective normal stress of 25 MPa, and if pore fluid was present, a fluid pressure of 15 MPa. We also performed tests using dry CO2, water-wetted CO2 and CO2-saturated water as pore fluid, but only at 120°C. Our results show healing even for vacuum-dry samples, but healing is significantly enhanced in wet samples. Dry samples exhibit velocity-weakening behavior at T≥120°C, and wet samples exhibit velocity-strengthening behavior over the full temperature range. The presence of CO2 does not influence the healing behavior or the velocity-dependence of friction. Samples containing water-wetted CO2 exhibit behavior similar to wet samples. We infer that the healing in dry samples is controlled by plastic asperity creep (Dieterich-type), probably through dislocation creep. In wet samples healing is inferred to be controlled by pressure solution. Extrapolation of the experimental results to natural reservoir conditions for wet anhydrite fault gouges using a pressure solution rate law shows that complete healing will occur within (tens of) days.

  6. Stability of spironolactone in rat plasma: strict temperature control of blood and plasma samples is required in rat pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, Tadakazu; Muraoka, Atsushi; Masutomi, Takashi; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2005-06-01

    The stability of spironolactone (SPN) in rat plasma was studied and its degradation was found to be an apparent first-order reaction. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(obs)) at 37, 23.5 and 0 degrees C were 3.543+/-0.261 (h-1, mean+/-S.D., n=3), 6.278+/-0.045 (x10(-1) h-1), and 7.336+/-0.843 (x10(-2) h-1), respectively. The half-lives were 0.20 h, 1.10 h, and 9.53 h. The degradation rate of SPN in rat plasma was markedly decreased when NaF, an esterase inhibitor, was added to the plasma, and the degradation was catalyzed by esterase in the plasma. These results indicated that not only plasma but also blood and serum samples in rat pharmacokinetic studies should be cooled to 0 degrees C, the temperature maintained, and treated as soon as possible. In pharmacokinetic studies reported previously, the temperature control of plasma, blood, and serum samples was not described. The pharmacokinetic study in rats after intravenous administration of SPN at 20 mg/kg was performed with strict temperature control of plasma and blood samples. The AUC, MRT, CL and Vd(ss) values (mean+/-S.E. of 4 rats) for SPN were 4100.8+/-212.9 ng h/ml, 0.29+/-0.01 h, 4915.7+/-248.0 ml/h/kg, and 1435.4+/-48.4 ml/kg, respectively. The AUC value was much larger than that previously reported. The AUC, MRT, Cmax and Tmax values (mean+/-S.E. of 4 rats) of canrenone, an active metabolite of SPN, after the administration of SPN were 4196.1+/-787.5 ng h/ml, 1.99+/-0.13 h, 1546.3+/-436.4 ng/ml and 1.0+/-0.0 h, respectively. This AUC value was almost identical to the value previously reported. PMID:15930762

  7. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed.

  8. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed. PMID:26526675

  9. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein

    PubMed Central

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  10. High-temperature stability of thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinks, P.; Rijnders, G.; Huijben, M.; Van Nong, N.; Pryds, N.

    2015-04-06

    An enhanced thermal stability in thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films up to 550 °C in an oxygen rich environment was demonstrated by high-temperature electrical and X-ray diffraction measurements. In contrast to generally performed heating in helium gas, it is shown that an oxygen/helium mixture provides sufficient thermal contact, while preventing the previously disregarded formation of oxygen vacancies. Combining thermal cycling with electrical measurements proves to be a powerful tool to study the real intrinsic thermoelectric behaviour of oxide thin films at elevated temperatures.

  11. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  12. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-29

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  13. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2010-09-15

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

  14. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  15. Determination of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) stability using a kinetic colorimetric DNase I activity assay.

    PubMed

    Lichtinghagen, Ralf

    2006-07-01

    An enzymatic activity assay was developed for the determination of dornase alpha human recombinant desoxyribonuclease (DNase I) stability. The method was adapted from a colorimetric endpoint enzyme activity assay for DNase I based on the degradation of a DNA/methyl green complex. With the described modifications the kinetic measurement of enzyme activity is feasible on an automated analyzer system within a rather short time. The development of this assay was based on the need for reliable detection of a possible loss of enzyme activity after transferring the commercial therapeutic agent into sealed glass vials required for a placebo-controlled study. The measuring range of this stability test was from 0 to 3000 U/L corresponding to 0-120% of the original enzyme activity; CV values of control solutions inside the measuring range were between 3% and 5%. The enzyme activity decreased less than 15% during the observation period of 180 days. In conclusion the current kinetic assay is a reliable method for a simple time-saving determination of DNase I activity to test Pulmozyme stability as required for quality control. As dornase alpha is used for inhalation, this method also proved its reliability in testing DNase stability during aerosolization with new inhalation devices (e-flow). PMID:16682175

  16. Effect of copper on soil functional stability measured by relative soil stability index (RSSI) based on two enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Marylène; Bécaert, Valérie; François, Matthieu; Sauvé, Sébastien; Deschênes, Louise

    2008-06-01

    Copper can affect essential processes in soils, often for long periods. Enzyme activity is considered a sensitive indicator to evaluate soil health and the potential toxic impact of a soil contaminant. Nevertheless, there is heterogeneity in the responses from enzyme activity assays because of the influence of pH and other physicochemical parameters on both enzyme activity and metal speciation. This leads to complications when comparing soils and limits the validity of the results. To overcome these problems, this paper evaluates resistance and recovery, quantified by using a relative soil stability index (RSSI), of the beta-glucosidase and protease activities towards an additional heat disturbance (17 h at 60 degrees C) in soils where soil organic matter, pH and Cu content were modified in a factorial setup. Chemical analyses (dissolved Cu, pCu(2+), dissolved organic carbon, pH) were performed both before the heat-perturbation and after the enzyme activity monitoring period. Results show that soil pH did not interfere with the RSSI scores of both enzymes. beta-glucosidase RSSI scores were scarcely affected by copper, making it inappropriate for evaluating copper-induced stress to soils. Protease activity shows stimulations of up to 2.5 times the activity of the unperturbed control in uncontaminated samples only. Thus, the protease RSSI score seems a good indicator for soil health relative to copper contamination given that all samples were affected by the presence of copper and high correlations were observed between RSSI scores and the different copper forms.

  17. Unfolding stabilities of two structurally similar proteins as probed by temperature-induced and force-induced molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Biswajit; Prabhavadhni, Arasu; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2015-09-01

    Unfolding stabilities of two homologous proteins, cardiotoxin III and short-neurotoxin (SNTX) belonging to three-finger toxin (TFT) superfamily, have been probed by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined analysis of data obtained from steered MD and all-atom MD simulations at various temperatures in near physiological conditions on the proteins suggested that overall structural stabilities of the two proteins were different from each other and the MD results are consistent with experimental data of the proteins reported in the literature. Rationalization for the differential structural stabilities of the structurally similar proteins has been chiefly attributed to the differences in the structural contacts between C- and N-termini regions in their three-dimensional structures, and the findings endorse the 'CN network' hypothesis proposed to qualitatively analyse the thermodynamic stabilities of proteins belonging to TFT superfamily of snake venoms. Moreover, the 'CN network' hypothesis has been revisited and the present study suggested that 'CN network' should be accounted in terms of 'structural contacts' and 'structural strengths' in order to precisely describe order of structural stabilities of TFTs.

  18. Temperature- and pH-dependent effect of lactate on in vitro redox stability of red meat myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Nair, M N; Suman, S P; Li, S; Ramanathan, R; Mancini, R A

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the influence of lactate on in vitro redox stability and thermostability of beef, horse, pork, and sheep myoglobins. Lactate (200 mM) had no effect (P>0.05) on redox stability at physiological (pH7.4, 37°C) and meat (pH 5.6, 4°C) conditions. However, lactate increased (P<0.05) metmyoglobin formation at a condition simulating stressed live skeletal muscle (pH 6.5, 37°C). The redox stability of myoglobins at stressed live skeletal muscle and meat conditions was species-specific (P<0.05). Myoglobin thermostability at 71°C was lower (P<0.05) in the presence of lactate compared with controls and was influenced (P<0.05) by species. The results of the present study indicate that the effects of lactate on myoglobin are temperature and pH dependent. The observed lack of influence of lactate on myoglobin redox stability at meat condition suggests that the color stability of lactate-enhanced fresh meat is not due to direct interactions between the ingredient and the heme protein.

  19. A novel ferromagnetic thermo-stent for plaque stabilization that self-regulates the temperature.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Matsumura, Kouji; Hagisawa, Kousuke; Ishihara, Masayuki; Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kurita, Akira; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the vascular wall with a thermally self-regulating, cylindrical stent made of a low Curie temperature ferromagnetic alloy. Physiologic saline was circulated in the silicone model vessel implanted with the stent. The stent-temperature remained nearly constant for variable saline flows, saline temperatures, and magnetic flux densities. Stent implants of this type in human blood vessels could potentially enable thermotherapy and temperature determination without catheterization.

  20. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2011-01-01

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  1. Temperature rise during experimental light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface and intrapulpal temperatures after treatments with different bleaching gels subjected to different types of light activation. A K-type thermocouple and infrared thermometer were used to measure the temperature increase during the 15- or 30-min treatment period. Light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 405 nm (LED405), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and femtosecond laser were tested and compared to ZOOM2. The tooth surface was treated with five bleaching agents and Vaseline which served as a control.The generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was applied for testing the differences in temperature increase. The ZOOM2 light source led to the largest increase in mean pulpal and tooth surface temperatures of 21.1 and 22.8 °C, followed by focused femtosecond laser which increased the pulpal and surface temperatures by up to 15.7 and 16.8 °C. Treatments with unfocused femtosecond laser, LED405, and OLED induced significantly lower mean temperature increases (p < 0.001 for each comparison with ZOOM2 and focused femtosecond laser), both in the pulp chamber (up to 2.7, 2.5, and 1.4 °C) and at the tooth surface (up to 3.2, 3.4, and 1.8 °C). Significant differences between pulp chamber and tooth surface measurements were obtained for all types of bleaching gel, during treatments with ZOOM2 (p < 0.001), LED405 (p < 0.001), and unfocused (p < 0.001) and focused femtosecond laser (p ≤ 0.002). Different bleaching agents or Vaseline can serve as an isolating layer. Focused femtosecond laser and ZOOM2 produced large temperature increases in the pulp chamber and at the tooth surface. Caution is advised when using these types of light activation, while LED405, OLED, and unfocused femtosecond laser could be safely used.

  2. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  3. Design of an activity and stability improved carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Jakoblinnert, Andre; van den Wittenboer, Anne; Shivange, Amol V; Bocola, Marco; Heffele, Lora; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    The carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR2) is an industrially attractive biocatalyst for producing chiral alcohols from ketones. The homodimeric enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and an excellent stereoselectivity, but is rapidly inactivated at aqueous-organic interfaces. The latter limits CPCR2's application in biphasic reaction media. Reengineering the protein surface of CPCR2 yielded a variant CPCR2-(A275N, L276Q) with 1.5-fold increased activity, 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability (cyclohexane/buffer system), and increased thermal resistance (ΔT50=+2.7 °C). Site-directed and site-saturation mutagenesis studies discovered that position 275 mainly influences stability and position 276 governs activity. After single site-saturation of position 275, amino acid exchanges to asparagine and threonine were discovered to be stabilizing. Interestingly, both positions are located at the dimer interface and close to the active site and computational analysis identified an inter-subunit hydrogen bond formation at position 275 to be responsible for stabilization. Finally, the variant CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) was found by simultaneous site-saturation of positions 275 and 276. CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) has compared to wtCPCR2 a 1.4-fold increased activity, a 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability, and improved thermal resistance (ΔT50=+5.2 °C). PMID:23471075

  4. Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Rasch, Philip; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Kettles, Laura; Gadian, Alan; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom

    2008-11-13

    An assessment is made herein of the proposal that controlled global cooling sufficient to balance global warming resulting from increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations might be achieved by seeding low-level, extensive maritime clouds with seawater particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby activating new droplets and increasing cloud albedo (and possibly longevity). This paper focuses on scientific and meteorological aspects of the scheme. Associated technological issues are addressed in a companion paper. Analytical calculations, cloud modelling and (particularly) GCM computations suggest that, if outstanding questions are satisfactorily resolved, the controllable, globally averaged negative forcing resulting from deployment of this scheme might be sufficient to balance the positive forcing associated with a doubling of CO2 concentration. This statement is supported quantitatively by recent observational evidence from three disparate sources. We conclude that this technique could thus be adequate to hold the Earth's temperature constant for many decades. More work--especially assessments of possible meteorological and climatological ramifications--is required on several components of the scheme, which possesses the advantages that (i) it is ecologically benign--the only raw materials being wind and seawater, (ii) the degree of cooling could be controlled, and (iii) if unforeseen adverse effects occur, the system could be immediately switched off, with the forcing returning to normal within a few days (although the response would take a much longer time). PMID:18757272

  5. Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Rasch, Philip; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Kettles, Laura; Gadian, Alan; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom

    2008-11-13

    An assessment is made herein of the proposal that controlled global cooling sufficient to balance global warming resulting from increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations might be achieved by seeding low-level, extensive maritime clouds with seawater particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby activating new droplets and increasing cloud albedo (and possibly longevity). This paper focuses on scientific and meteorological aspects of the scheme. Associated technological issues are addressed in a companion paper. Analytical calculations, cloud modelling and (particularly) GCM computations suggest that, if outstanding questions are satisfactorily resolved, the controllable, globally averaged negative forcing resulting from deployment of this scheme might be sufficient to balance the positive forcing associated with a doubling of CO2 concentration. This statement is supported quantitatively by recent observational evidence from three disparate sources. We conclude that this technique could thus be adequate to hold the Earth's temperature constant for many decades. More work--especially assessments of possible meteorological and climatological ramifications--is required on several components of the scheme, which possesses the advantages that (i) it is ecologically benign--the only raw materials being wind and seawater, (ii) the degree of cooling could be controlled, and (iii) if unforeseen adverse effects occur, the system could be immediately switched off, with the forcing returning to normal within a few days (although the response would take a much longer time).

  6. Stability and photochemistry of ClO dimers formed at low temperature in the gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Hayman, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    The recent observations of elevated concentrations of the ClO radical in the austral spring over Antarctica have implicated catalytic destruction by chlorine in the large depletions seen in the total ozone column. One of the chemical theories consistent with an elevated concentration of the ClO is a cycle involving the formation of the ClO dimer through the association reaction: ClO + ClO = Cl2O2 and the photolysis of the dimer to give the active Cl species necessary for O3 depletion. Here, researchers report experimental studies designed to characterize the dimer of ClO formed by the association reaction at low temperatures. ClO was produced by static photolysis of several different precursor systems: Cl sub 2 + O sub 3; Cl sub 2 O sub 2; OClO + Cl sub 2 O spectroscopy in the U.V. region, which allowed the time dependence of Cl sub 2, Cl sub 2 O, ClO, OClO, O sub 3 and other absorbing molecules to be determined.

  7. Long-term-high temperature stability of alloy 803 in the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sizek, H.W.; Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1999-11-01

    Alloy 803 is used in the chemical process industry for its high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. Knowledge of the microstructural characteristics as a function of time and temperature are essential for accurate rationalization of mechanical property performance under actual service conditions. This paper seeks to determine the microstructure of alloy 803 as a function of time and temperature for times up to 34,000 hours and temperatures ranging from 595 C to 1095 C. Post-exposure room temperature tensile data are also presented as an indication of the alloy`s tolerance to downtime strains. Intermediate temperature mechanical strength can be attributed primarily to gamma prime ({gamma}{prime}) and higher temperature strength to M{sub 23}C{sub 6} content.

  8. Active Wireless Temperature Sensors for Aerospace Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active wireless sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor sub-surface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuitry to enable acquisition and non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 2.54-cm square integrated circuit.

  9. Effect of ionic liquids on the structure, stability and activity of two related α-amylases.

    PubMed

    Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Daneshjou, Sara; Sepahi, Abbas Akhavan; Ranjbar, Bijan; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Gill, Pooria; Heydari, Akbar; Khajeh, Khosro

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids are recognized as green solvents for carbohydrates dissolution. However, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to investigate their effect on carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. We have investigated the influence of two water miscible ionic liquids on the activity, stability and structure of two related α-amylases from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus lichiniformis. Upon changes in ionic liquids concentrations, both enzymes activity and stability were reduced. Associated thermodynamic and conformational changes were observed using differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence techniques. Thermal denaturation was accompanied by aggregation in both aqueous buffer and [BMIm][Cl] but [HMIm][Cl] significantly suppressed aggregation.

  10. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, bu