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Sample records for active temperature stabilization

  1. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  2. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Soil Carbon Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; van Diepen, L.; Wixon, D.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Giardina, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties on the importance of environmental controls on soil C stabilization and turnover limit accurate predictions of the rate and magnitude of the response of soils to climate change. Here we report results from a study of interactions among vegetation and soil microbial communities in North American forests across a highly constrained, 22OC gradient mean annual temperature (MAT) as a proxy for understanding changes with climate. Previous work indicated that turnover and amount of labile SOC responded negatively to MAT, whereas stable SOC was insensitive to temperature variation. Hardwood forests stored a larger amount of stable SOC, but with shorter mean residence times than paired pine forests. Our findings suggest that the interaction between vegetation composition and microbial communities may affect SOC accumulation and stabilization responses to rising temperature. To investigate these relationships, we characterized the microbial communities with Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA analyses indicate complex microbial responses to increased MAT and vegetation composition. Microbial biomass declined with MAT in conifer forests and increased in hardwood forests. Relative abundance of actinomycetes increased with MAT for both forest types, and was correlated with amount and turnover of active SOC. The relative abundance of fungi decreased with increasing MAT, while gram+ bacteria increased, such that fungi:bacteria ratio decreased with MAT, with this trend being more pronounced for hardwood cover type. These results are consistent with a long-term warming experiment in a hardwood forest at the Harvard Forest LTER site, where after 12 years of warming the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes increased, while fungal biomass decreased. In contrast, relationships between microbial groups and the stable fraction of SOC along the gradient were only observed in conifers. Increases in mean residence time of stable SOC were

  3. Temperature stabilized phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The construction, tests, and performance of a temperature stabilized phase detector are discussed. It has a frequency stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power at 100 MHz, with a temperature step of 20 C (15 to 35 C).

  4. Activity-stability relationships revisited in blue oxidases catalyzing electron transfer at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Roulling, Frédéric; Godin, Amandine; Cipolla, Alexandre; Collins, Tony; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Feller, Georges

    2016-09-01

    Cuproxidases are a subset of the blue multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of toxic Cu(I) ions into less harmful Cu(II) in the bacterial periplasm. Cuproxidases from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria display the canonical features of temperature adaptation, such as increases in structural stability and apparent optimal temperature for activity with environmental temperature as well as increases in the binding affinity for catalytic and substrate copper ions. In contrast, the oxidative activities at 25 °C for both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are similar, suggesting that the nearly temperature-independent electron transfer rate does not require peculiar adjustments. Furthermore, the structural flexibilities of both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are also similar, indicating that the firm and precise bindings of the four catalytic copper ions are essential for the oxidase function. These results show that the requirements for enzymatic electron transfer, in the absence of the selective pressure of temperature on electron transfer rates, produce a specific adaptive pattern, which is distinct from that observed in enzymes possessing a well-defined active site and relying on conformational changes such as for the induced fit mechanism. PMID:27315165

  5. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  6. Temperature-Stabilized Phase Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeeman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Precise temperature stabilized phase detector for clock signal distribution maintains 100-MHz signal with stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power even for step changes of 20 degrees C in ambient temperature. Stabilization achieved by heating unit to 45 degrees C and maintaining temperature through bridge circuit.

  7. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  8. Stability and activity of Dictyoglomus thermophilum GH11 xylanase and its disulphide mutant at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Voutilainen, Sanni; Ojamo, Heikki; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-03-01

    The functional properties of extremophilic Dictyoglomus thermophilum xylanase (XYNB) and the N-terminal disulphide-bridge mutant (XYNB-DS) were studied at high pressure and temperature. The enzymes were quite stable even at the pressure of 500MPa at 80°C. The half-life of inactivation in these conditions was over 30h. The inactivation at 80°C in atmospheric pressure was only 3-times slower. The increase of pressure up to 500MPa at 80°C decreased only slightly the enzyme's stability, whereas in 500MPa the increase of temperature from 22 to 80°C decreased significantly more the enzyme's stability. While the high temperature (80-100°C) decreased the enzyme reaction with short xylooligosaccharides (xylotetraose and xylotriose), the high pressure (100-300MPa) had an opposite effect. The temperature of 100°C strongly increased the Km but did not affect the kcat to the same extent, thus indicating that the interaction of the substrate with the active site suffers before the catalytic reaction begins to decrease as the temperature rises. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed the high structural stability of XYNB and XYNB-DS at 93°C. PMID:25659634

  9. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  10. Effects of Drying Temperature on Antioxidant Activities of Tomato Powder and Storage Stability of Pork Patties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Sang; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of oven-dried tomato powder (OTP) as affected by drying temperature and the effect of OTP on the product quality of pork patties. Three OTP products were obtained by drying of fresh tomato at 60, 80 and 100℃ oven until constant weight was obtained. Total phenolic content of three kinds of OTPs ranged from 1.95 to 5.94 g/100 g. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was observed in OTP dried at 100℃. Antioxidant activity of three kinds of OTPs was measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-radical scavenging activity, iron chelating ability, reducing power and measurement of lipid peroxide in linoleic acid emulsion system. In all parameters, OTP at 100℃ showed the higher antioxidant activity than other temperatures (p<0.05). Based on the model study, the physicochemical properties, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of pork patties containing 1% OTP were measured. Redness of pork patties were increased with the addition of OTPs (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values of raw pork patties containing OTPs were lower than those of control (CTL) until 7 d of storage, regardless of drying temperatures (p<0.05). Peroxide values of pork patties made with OTP (1%) were lower than those of CTL until the end of storage time (p<0.05). However, no antimicrobial activities were observed among the treatments (p>0.05). Therefore, OTPs could be used as a natural antioxidant in meat products. PMID:27499664

  11. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  12. An A-site-deficient perovskite offers high activity and stability for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinlong; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Shanshan; Zou, Jin; Shao, Zongping

    2013-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) directly convert fossil and/or renewable fuels into electricity and/or high-quality heat in an environmentally friendly way. However, high operating temperatures result in high cost and material issues, which have limited the commercialization of SOFCs. To lower their operating temperatures, highly active and stable cathodes are required to maintain a reasonable power output. Here, we report a layer-structured A-site deficient perovskite Sr0.95 Nb0.1 Co0.9 O3-δ (SNC0.95) prepared by solid-state reactions that shows not only high activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at operating temperatures below 600 °C, but also offers excellent structural stability and compatibility, and improved CO2 resistivity. An anode-supported fuel cell with SNC0.95 cathode delivers a peak power density as high as 1016 mW cm(-2) with an electrode-area-specific resistance of 0.052 Ω cm(2) at 500 °C. PMID:24155098

  13. High temperature drilling MUD stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.

    1985-10-15

    Aqueous drilling fluids containing a hydroxy containing alumina component such as AlO(OH) and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reaction product such as an aldehyde reacted PVA are stabilized for use at temperatures as high as 350/sup 0/ F. (177/sup 0/ C.) by adding stabilizer anions such as sulfate, tartrate and citrate to the resulting drilling fluid. The anions can be added as an acid or in the salt form with sodium and potassium salts being preferred. The salts are preferably added in 0.2 to 10% by weight of the drilling fluid. These stabilized drilling fluids can also be used in seawater.

  14. Assessment of two immobilized lipases activity and stability to low temperatures in organic solvents under ultrasound-assisted irradiation.

    PubMed

    Batistella, Luciane; Ustra, Mara K; Richetti, Aline; Pergher, Sibele B C; Treichel, Helen; Oliveira, J V; Lerin, Lindomar; de Oliveira, Débora

    2012-03-01

    Both stability and catalytic activity of two commercial immobilized lipases were investigated in the presence of different organic solvents in ultrasound-assisted system. In a general way, for Novozym 435, the use of ethanol as solvent led to a loss of activity of 35% after 10 h of contact. The use of iso-octane conducted to a gradual increase in lipase activity in relation to the contact time, reaching a maximum value of relative activity of 126%. For Lipozyme RM IM, after 5 h of exposure, the enzyme presented no residual activity when ethanol was used as solvent. The solvents tert-butanol and iso-octane showed an enhancement of about 20 and 17% in the enzyme activity in 6 h of exposure, respectively. Novozym 435 and Lipozyme IM presented high stability to storage after treatment under ultrasound-assisted system using n-hexane and tert-butanol as solvents. PMID:21779888

  15. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectinase enzyme from guava (Psidium guajava) peel: Enzyme recovery, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Murshid, Fara Syazana; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Islam Sarker, Zaidul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions on the yield, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability of the pectinase enzyme from guava peel. The ultrasound variables studied were sonication time (10-30 min), ultrasound temperature (30-50 °C), pH (2.0-8.0), and solvent-to-sample ratio (2:1 mL/g to 6:1 mL/g). The main goal was to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions to maximize the recovery of pectinase from guava peel with the most desirable enzyme-specific activity and stability. Under the optimum conditions, a high yield (96.2%), good specific activity (18.2 U/mg), temperature stability (88.3%), and storage stability (90.3%) of the extracted enzyme were achieved. The optimal conditions were 20 min sonication time, 40 °C temperature, at pH 5.0, using a 4:1 mL/g solvent-to-sample ratio. The study demonstrated that optimization of ultrasound-assisted process conditions for the enzyme extraction could improve the enzymatic characteristics and yield of the enzyme. PMID:25844554

  16. Temperature Stabilization Requirements for Unchopped Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, Marc C.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature stabilization requirements of unchopped thermistor bolometers and thermopile detectors are analyzed. The detector temperature, on which the bolometer output signal depends, is quite sensitive to changes in instrument temperature but relatively insensitive to changes in scene temperature. In contrast, the difference in temperature between detector and substrate (instrument), on which the thermopile signal depends, is equally sensitive to changes in instrument and scene temperature. Expressions for these dependencies are derived based on a simplified instrument model. It is shown that for a typical uncooled thermal imager, the temperature stabilization requirements for a bolometer are two orders of magnitude more stringent than those for a thermopile detector. Keywords: thermistor, bolometer, thermopile, detector, IR, thermal, temperature stabilization

  17. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  18. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2012-04-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  19. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2011-11-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  20. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  1. Influence of stabilizing agent and synthesis temperature on the optical properties of silver nanoparticles as active materials in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudin, Lufsyi; Suharyadi, Edi; Utomo, Agung Bambang Setio; Abraha, Kamsul

    2016-04-01

    It has been successfully carried out the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction method. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as metal precursors and trisodium citrate as the reducing agent. In the synthesis process, were varied the stabilizing agent of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and heating temperature. The formation of silver nanoparticles was observed visually with discoloration (yellowish). The formation and the structure of silver nanoparticles in colloidal solution were further examined through their optical properties by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The wavelength absorption spectrum of colloidal silver nanoparticles shows that maximum surface plasmon absorption for the trisodium citrate-synthesized nanoparticles was at 429.43 nm for temperature of 90°C. The addition of the stabilizer sharpened spectrum curves and caused red shift in the maximum absorption peak of 429.01 nm and 427.09 nm for PVA and PVP respectively. Meanwhile, the addition of the synthesis temperature also sharpened the maximum surface plasmon absorption band and the red shift the maximum absorption peak of 428.79 nm and 428.58 nm for temperature of 110°C and 120°C respectively. Red shift of the maximum absorption peak indicates a smaller particle size. The maximum surface plasmon absorption band in the range of 427.09 nm to 429.43 nm indicates the presence of spherical or roughly spherical silver nanoparticles and TEM imaging confirmed this shape. TEM imaging results show that the diameter size of the silver nanoparticles range of 10 nm to 60 nm as well as the morphology (crystallites) of silver nanoparticles have spherical geometry with particle distribution which quite dispersive. The dispersibility of nanoparticles such as this could potentially be used as an active material of SPR biosensor.

  2. Temperature Stability of the Sky Quality Meter

    PubMed Central

    Schnitt, Sabrina; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of −15°C to 35°C, and during temperature changes of −33°C/h and +70°C/h. This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%, indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions. PMID:24030682

  3. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g‑1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g‑1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective.

  4. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rajendra C; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g(-1)) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g(-1)). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  5. Room-temperature synthesis of nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rajendra C.; Kang, Suhee; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-ho; Ahn, Sunghoon; Lee, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure having a porous network is an exceptional photocatalytic material to generate hydrogen (H2) and decontaminate wastewater using solar energy. In this report, we synthesized nanoporous 1D microrods of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) via a facile and template-free chemical approach at room temperature. The use of concentrated acids induced etching and lift-off because of strong oxidation and protonation. Compared with the bulk g-C3N4, the porous 1D microrod structure showed five times higher photocatalytic degradation performance toward methylene blue dye (MB) under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic H2 evolution of the 1D nanostructure (34 μmol g−1) was almost 26 times higher than that of the bulk g-C3N4 structure (1.26 μmol g−1). Additionally, the photocurrent stability of this nanoporous 1D morphology over 24 h indicated remarkable photocorrosion resistance. The improved photocatalytic activities were attributed to prolonged carrier lifetime because of its quantum confinement effect, effective separation and transport of charge carriers, and increased number of active sites from interconnected nanopores throughout the microrods. The present 1D nanostructure would be highly suited for photocatalytic water purification as well as water splitting devices. Finally, this facile and room temperature strategy to fabricate the nanostructures is very cost-effective. PMID:27498979

  6. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  7. Xanthan stability at elevated temperatures. [xanthan

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, R.S. ); Henrici, B.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Xanthan stability is examined to define more clearly the polymer's temperature limitations as a mobility-control agent. Experiments were performed to probe the relative importance of hydrolysis, oxidation, and helix-coil transitions in xanthan degradation. In the absence of oxidizing agents (i.e., dissolved oxygen), results indicate that free-radical, oxidation/reduction reactions are not the dominant mechanism for xanthan degradation. Depending on the pH, acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and base-catalyzed fragmentation reactions may play important roles. With Arrhenius calculations, it was estimated that under ideal conditions (no dissolved oxygen, pH 7 to 8, and moderate to high salinities), a xanthan solution could maintain at least half of its original viscosity for a period of 5 years if the temperature does not exceed 75 to 80{degrees}C (167 to 176{degrees}F). New polymers will be needed for chemical floods where xanthan does not have sufficient stability.

  8. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  9. Synthesis and characterizations of palladium catalysts with high activity and stability for formic acid oxidation by hydrogen reduction in ethylene glycol at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meixia; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Li, Yuexia; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, a Pd/C catalyst with high activity as well as excellent stability has been prepared by hydrogen gas reduction of Pd(II) precursor in ethylene glycol solution with the assistance of appropriate amount of sodium citrate. Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of 3.8 nm and excellent uniformity are obtained. The Pd/C catalyst synthesized in this work shows an electrochemical surface area of 68.6 m2 g-1 and displays activities of 819 A g-1. Strikingly, the Pd/C catalyst also exhibits excellent stability, which has been confirmed by its slow activity decay under repeated potential cycles as well as chronoamperometric test. The activity for Pd/C at the 300th and 500th cycle remains at 5.5 and 2.4 mA cm-2, respectively, which is 25% and 11% of its initial value, respectively. The oxidation currents at the Pd/C and Pd/C-Citrate (control) at 0 V decrease to 44% and 25% of their initial values. Transmission electron microscopy observations on the Pd/C catalyst after 1000 potential cycles reveal that, in addition to carbon support corrosion, Pd agglomeration together with more serious Pd dissolution occur at the same time, leading to a decrease of the electrocatalytic performance.

  10. Chemical stability of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the available studies on the chemical stability of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) in various environments was made. The La(1.8)Ba(0.2)CuO4 HTS is unstable in the presence of H2O, CO2, and CO. The YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor is highly susceptible to degradation in different environments, especially water. The La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO4 and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O HTS are relatively less reactive than the YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Processing of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) HTS in purified oxygen, rather than in air, using high purity noncarbon containing starting materials is recommended. Exposure of this HTS to the ambient atmosphere should also be avoided at all stages during processing and storage. Devices and components made out of these oxide superconductors would have to be protected with an impermeable coating of a polymer, glass, or metal to avoid deterioration during use.

  11. A Physics-Based Temperature Stabilization Criterion for Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft testing specifications differ greatly in the criteria they specify for stability in thermal balance tests. Some specify a required temperature stabilization rate (the change in temperature per unit time, dT/dt), some specify that the final steady-state temperature be approached to within a specified difference, delta T , and some specify a combination of the two. The particular values for temperature stabilization rate and final temperature difference also vary greatly between specification documents. A one-size-fits-all temperature stabilization rate requirement does not yield consistent results for all test configurations because of differences in thermal mass and heat transfer to the environment. Applying a steady-state temperature difference requirement is problematic because the final test temperature is not accurately known a priori, especially for powered configurations. In the present work, a simplified, lumped-mass analysis has been used to explore the applicability of these criteria. A new, user-friendly, physics-based approach is developed that allows the thermal engineer to determine when an acceptable level of temperature stabilization has been achieved. The stabilization criterion can be predicted pre-test but must be refined during test to allow verification that the defined level of temperature stabilization has been achieved.

  12. Structure and Stability of Jarosite at High Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D. D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Daemen, L. L.; Hartl, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Jarosite, KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and its related sulfates commonly occur in acid drainage environments as the weathering products of sulfide ore deposits. They can also precipitate from aqueous sulfates due to oxidation of H2S in epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activities. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and thus life) on Mars. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and thermodynamic stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 650 K and/or pressures up to 8 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  13. [Stability of CaF2 at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Qi, Qingjie; Liu, Jianzhong; Cao, Xinyu; Zhou, Junhu; Zhang, Shuxin; Kefa, Cen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of CaF2 in atmosphere, dry and moist air at elevated temperatures were studied by gaseous fluorides direct absorption and fluoride ion-selective electrode (ISE) measurements technique supplemented by differential thermal analysis (DTA), chemical analysis (pyrohydrolysis-ISE method) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The principal reaction was shown to be hydrolysis of CaF2 at high temperature and CaF2 were actually hydrolyzed appreciably at about 830 +/- 10 degrees C in moist atmospheres. Kinetics calculation showed that hydrolysis reaction was first order and the activation energy for the hydrolysis was 115 +/- 2 kJ/mol, applicable over the range 850 degrees C-1350 degrees C. The research results will be of significance for fluoride pollution control during coal combustion and clay-brickmaking. PMID:12145925

  14. Thermoelectric refrigerator having improved temperature stabilization means

    DOEpatents

    Falco, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    A control system for thermoelectric refrigerators is disclosed. The thermoelectric refrigerator includes at least one thermoelectric element that undergoes a first order change at a predetermined critical temperature. The element functions as a thermoelectric refrigerator element above the critical temperature, but discontinuously ceases to function as a thermoelectric refrigerator element below the critical temperature. One example of such an arrangement includes thermoelectric refrigerator elements which are superconductors. The transition temperature of one of the superconductor elements is selected as the temperature control point of the refrigerator. When the refrigerator attempts to cool below the point, the metals become superconductors losing their ability to perform as a thermoelectric refrigerator. An extremely accurate, first-order control is realized.

  15. Unraveling protein stabilization mechanisms: vitrification and water replacement in a glass transition temperature controlled system.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, N; Stankovic, M; de Waard, H; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the two main mechanisms used to explain the stabilization of proteins by sugar glasses during drying and subsequent storage: the vitrification and the water replacement theory. Although in literature protein stability is often attributed to either vitrification or water replacement, both mechanisms could play a role and they should be considered simultaneously. A model protein, alkaline phosphatase, was incorporated in either inulin or trehalose by spray drying. To study the storage stability at different glass transition temperatures, a buffer which acts as a plasticizer, ammediol, was incorporated in the sugar glasses. At low glass transition temperatures (<50°C), the enzymatic activity of the protein strongly decreased during storage at 60°C. Protein stability increased when the glass transition temperature was raised considerably above the storage temperature. This increased stability could be attributed to vitrification. A further increase of the glass transition temperature did not further improve stability. In conclusion, vitrification plays a dominant role in stabilization at glass transition temperatures up to 10 to 20°C above storage temperature, depending on whether trehalose or inulin is used. On the other hand, the water replacement mechanism predominantly determines stability at higher glass transition temperatures. PMID:23360765

  16. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  17. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  18. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  19. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-09-11

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower. 1 fig.

  20. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower.

  1. Effect of stabilization on biomass activity.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Okutman Tas, Didem; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Insel, Guclu

    2012-02-20

    The study aimed to compare aerobic and aerobic/anoxic stabilization processes in terms of organic matter and the biomass removal efficiencies using a municipal sludge sample. The efficiency of stabilization process was assessed monitoring suspended solids (SS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC, DOC), nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate parameters. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements were conducted to determine active biomass concentration. On the 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, the SS, VSS and TOC removal efficiencies were 22%, 28% and 55%, respectively. Under aerobic/anoxic conditions, removal efficiencies for SS, VSS and TOC were 25%, 27% and 67%. On the 17th day of the stabilization, SS and VSS removal rates were 60 mg SS/L day and 47 mg VSS/L day for aerobic and 102 mg SS/L day and 63 mg VSS/L day for aerobic/anoxic conditions, respectively. These findings reflected the higher stabilization performance of the aerobic/anoxic conditions. Based on respirometric results, the ratios of the active biomass were decreased to 30% and 24% for the 17th and 30th day of the aerobic stabilization, respectively. Such results have significant implications relative to the activity decrease quantification of the biomass as well as its further application potentials after aerobic or aerobic/anoxic sludge stabilization. PMID:21791229

  2. Thermal stability of high temperature structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Rasefske, R.K.; Castagna, A.

    1999-03-01

    High temperature structural alloys were evaluated for suitability for long term operation at elevated temperatures. The effect of elevated temperature exposure on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a number of alloys was characterized. Fe-based alloys (330 stainless steel, 800H, and mechanically alloyed MA 956), and Ni-based alloys (Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, Alloy 718, and mechanically alloyed MA 758) were evaluated for room temperature tensile and impact toughness properties after exposure at 750 C for 10,000 hours. Of the Fe-based alloys evaluated, 330 stainless steel and 800H showed secondary carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) precipitation and a corresponding reduction in ductility and toughness as compared to the as-received condition. Within the group of Ni-based alloys tested, Alloy 718 showed the most dramatic structure change as it formed delta phase during 10,000 hours of exposure at 750 C with significant reductions in strength, ductility, and toughness. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy X showed significant M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitation and a resulting reduction in ductility and toughness. Haynes 230 was also evaluated after 10,000 hours of exposure at 850, 950, and 1050 C. For the 750--950 C exposures the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in Haynes 230 coarsened. This resulted in large reductions in impact strength and ductility for the 750, 850 and 950 C specimens. The 1050 C exposure specimens showed the resolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} secondary carbides, and mechanical properties similar to the as-received solution annealed condition.

  3. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, T.; Wittenberg, J. S.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag2Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ˜2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag2Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required.

  4. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag₂Se.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Wittenberg, J S; Lindenberg, A M

    2014-10-17

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag₂Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ∼2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag₂Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required. PMID:25249347

  5. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  6. Localized temperature stability in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC).

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steven Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa.

    2012-04-01

    The base dielectrics of commercial low temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) systems have a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ({tau}{sub f}) in the range -50 {approx} -80 ppm/C. In this research we explored a method to realize zero or near zero {tau}{sub f} resonators by incorporating {tau}{sub f} compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC structure. To select composition for {tau}{sub f} adjustment, {tau}{sub f} compensating materials with different amount of titanates were formulated, synthesized, and characterized. Chemical interactions and physical compatibility between the {tau}{sub f} modifiers and the host LTCC dielectrics were investigated. Studies on stripline (SL) resonator panels with multiple compensating dielectrics revealed that: 1) compositions using SrTiO{sub 3} provide the largest {tau}{sub f} adjustment among titanates, 2) the {tau}{sub f} compensation is proportional to the amount of SrTiO{sub 3} in compensating materials, as well as the thickness of the compensating layer, and 3) the most effective {tau}{sub f} compensation is achieved when the compensating dielectric is integrated next to the SL. Using the effective dielectric constant of a heterogeneous layered dielectric structure, results from Method of Momentum (MoM) electromagnetic simulations are consistent with the experimental observations.

  7. Temperature dependent stability model for graphene nanoribbon interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Waikhom Mona; Das, Debaprasad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a temperature dependent equivalent circuit model for graphene nanoribbon (GNR) interconnects is proposed. The stability analysis of GNR interconnects is performed using this proposed model and its performance is compared with respect to that of the copper based interconnects. The analysis is performed for different interconnect systems for 16nm ITRS technology node. With increase in the length of interconnects, the relative stability increases. GNR interconnect shows less increase of resistance with the increase in temperature as compared to Cu interconnects.

  8. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  9. On the temperature stability of NaI(Tl) scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gektin, A.V.; Brinev, B.V.; Serebrayannyi, V.Y.; Vinograd, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    The development of scintillation detectors able to operate at elevated temperatures is a major challenge of instrument engineering for geophysical applications. The main problem consists of the fact that with increasing temperature the quenching of the luminescence sharply decreases the sensitivity of the detector. Here, the temperature stability of NaI(Tl) scintillators is studied for crystals with various Tl{sup +} impurity content. It is shown that supersaturation of the Tl{sup +} ions and regulation of solid solution decomposition increase the light output at elevated temperatures. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  10. Temperature sensitive stability of feedback controllers for MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterbee, D. C.; Sims, N. D.

    2008-03-01

    Smart fluid dampers can undergo large temperature changes due to the heating associated with energy dissipation. Such heating will alter the fluid's properties and could degrade control system performance. For example, previous work by the authors has shown that the stability of an MR damper under feedback control is dependent on the fluid's compressibility and viscosity. In the present study, a temperature dependent model of a magnetorheological damper is developed from experimental data, and it is shown that the fluid's yield stress, viscosity and compressibility parameters vary significantly. An experimental and numerical control study is then performed to investigate the resulting effects of temperature on the stability of two feedback controllers - a PID controller, and a proportional controller. Experimental results indicate that both controllers can exhibit a reduction in stability with increasing temperature, particularly if the controller gains are not suitably chosen. The temperature dependent MR damper model predicts this behaviour well, and it is shown that the change in viscosity has the most significant effect on stability. Future work could focus on the resulting effect on a complete vibration system, devices with different modes of operation, and alternative controllers.

  11. Liquid phase stability under an extreme temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-27

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the "bulk" driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid. PMID:24329454

  12. Liquid Phase Stability Under an Extreme Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the “bulk” driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid.

  13. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-05-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  14. High temperature stability multilayers for EUV condenser optics

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Stearns, D G

    2005-05-03

    We investigate the thermal stability of Mo/SiC multilayer coatings at elevated temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies show that upon annealing a thermally-induced structural relaxation occurs that transforms the polycrystalline Mo and amorphous SiC layers in as-deposited multilayers into amorphous Mo-Si-C alloy and crystalline SiC, respectively. After this relaxation process is complete the multilayer is stable at temperatures up to 400 C.

  15. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  16. Studies of noble-metal thermocouple stability at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeze, P.; Thomas, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Two investigatory studies on performance characteristics of noble-metal thermocouples are described. (1) thermoelectric stability as affected by preferential oxidation of iridium in the system iridium-40% rhodium versus iridium, and (2) the effects of temperature gradients on the emf stability of the systems platinum-13% rhodium versus platinum and iridium-40% rhodium versus iridium, operating in air. The stability investigation was carried out at three temperatures - 1700, 1850, and 2000 C - by comparing the output of the test thermocouple in air with the output of an identically constructed reference thermocouple in nitrogen. The results show that no calibration shift was observed producing a change in output greater than that corresponding to a 2.0% change in the indicated temperature for all samples tested. The investigation of gradient effects was carried out by subjecting test thermocouples to both severe and mild gradients for periods up to 200 hours. For the platinum system, the operating temperature was 1500 C with gradients of 1475 and 700 C/cm; for the iridium system, 2000 C with gradients of 700, 1500, and 1975 C/cm. Exposure to temperature gradients was found to introduce significant changes in calibration for both systems. In both investigations, the thermoelements were examined by means of electron-probe analysis and by metallographic methods to detect chemical and structural changes. Data and micrographs are presented.

  17. Finite-temperature stability of a trapped dipolar Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, R. N.; Baillie, D.; Blakie, P. B.

    2011-06-15

    We calculate the stability diagram for a trapped normal Bose gas with dipole-dipole interactions. Our study characterizes the roles of trap geometry, temperature, and short-range interactions on the stability. We predict a robust double instability feature in oblate trapping geometries arising from the interplay of thermal gas saturation and the anisotropy of the interaction. Our results are relevant to current experiments with polar molecules and will be useful in developing strategies to obtain a polar molecule Bose-Einstein condensate.

  18. Activation and stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2010-06-28

    As environmentally benign "green" solvents, room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have been used as solvents or (co)solvents in biocatalytic reactions and processes for a decade. The technological utility of enzymes can be enhanced greatly by their use in ionic liquids (ILs) rather than in conventional organic solvents or in their natural aqueous reaction media. In fact, the combination of green properties and unique tailor-made physicochemical properties make ILs excellent non-aqueous solvents for enzymatic catalysis with numerous advantages over other solvents, including high conversion rates, high selectivity, better enzyme stability, as well as better recoverability and recyclability. However, in many cases, particularly in hydrophilic ILs, enzymes show relative instability and/or lower activity compared with conventional solvents. To improve the enzyme activity as well as stability in ILs, various attempts have been made by modifying the form of the enzymes. Examples are enzyme immobilization onto support materials via adsorption or multipoint attachment, lyophilization in the presence of stabilizing agents, chemical modification with stabilizing agents, formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates, pretreatment with polar organic solvents or enzymes combined with suitable surfactants to form microemulsions. The use of these enzyme preparations in ILs can dramatically increase the solvent tolerance, enhance activity as well as stability, and improve enantioselectivity. This perspective highlights a number of pronounced strategies being used successfully for activation and stabilization of enzymes in non-aqueous ILs media. This review is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to present a general overview of the potential approaches to activate enzymes for diverse enzymatic processes and biotransformations in ILs. PMID:20445940

  19. Aqueous foams stabilized by temperature-sensitive hairy polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Yusa, S; Nakamura, Y; Fujii, S

    2015-12-21

    Submicrometer-sized polystyrene (PS) particles carrying poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairs (PDEA-PS particles) were synthesized by free radical dispersion polymerization. The hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance of the PDEA could be tuned by varying the temperature at near neutral pH (a lower critical solution temperature of PDEA at pH 6.86, 41 °C) and therefore these sterically-stabilized particles acted as temperature-sensitive stabilizers for aqueous foams. At 25 °C, where the PDEA hairs were hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were colloidally stable in aqueous media, foams were formed which coalesced with time and the size of the bubble increased. At 40 and 45 °C, where the PDEA hairs were partially non-hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were close to flocculation or weakly flocculated, foams were formed and bubble coalescence and size increase speeds were slower than those observed at 25 °C. At and above 50 °C, where the PDEA hairs were non-hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were heavily flocculated in aqueous media, the more stable cream-like foams whose volume was almost the same for 1 week were formed. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the particles mainly adsorbed at the air-water interface as monolayers at 25 °C and as multilayers at and above 40 °C. The foam stability and structure could be controlled by changing the temperature. PMID:26418034

  20. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  1. Phase stability in processing of high temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Perepezko, J.H.; Nunes, C.A.; Yi, S.H.; Thoma, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    In the development of high temperature intermetallics involving various aluminides, silicides and Laves phases, it has become evident that it is essential to consider the strong influence of materials processing throughout all stages. The underlying basis for alloy synthesis, processing and the assessment of thermal stability is established by the relevant phase equilibria, the characteristic diffusivities and the possible solidification reaction pathways. In almost all cases the microstructures of the most useful metallic alloys are multiphase assemblies in which the relative phase fractions, compositions and morphologies play key roles in optimizing the performance under high temperature conditions. The microstructure designs are usually tailored for strength, toughness, creep resistance and environmental stability and involve a balance of features derived from mixtures of a ductile phase and intermetallic phases. There is a clear experience that the level of materials processing can only be as sophisticated as the level of knowledge of the phase equilibria and the underlying kinetics. In many of the contemporary intermetallic alloys the phase stability must be considered in terms of multicomponent equilibria and non-stoichiometric intermetallic compositions. Recent developments in several important intermetallic alloy classes illustrate the guidance into alloy design and processing options provided by systematic studies of phase stability. 58 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Diamond stabilization of ice multilayers at human body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2007-08-01

    Diamond is a promising material for wear-resistant medical coatings. Here we report a remarkable increase in the melting point of ice resting on a diamond (111) surface modified with a submonolayer of Na+ . Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the interfacial ice bilayer melts at a temperature 130K higher than in free ice, and relatively thick ice films ( 2.6nm at 298K and 2.2nm at 310K ) are stabilized by dipole interactions with the substrate. This unique physical effect may enable biocompatibility-enhancing ice overcoatings for diamond at human body temperature.

  3. Recent developments with high temperature stabilized-zirconia pH sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, M.J.; Koski, O.H.; Meyers, J.

    1985-02-01

    The pH response of 8 weight percent yttria-stabilized zirconia sensors is examined over a temperature range of 373-573 K. Good pH response was found throughout the temperature range. The internal half-cell was discovered to be poised by oxygen, which permits some simplification in the calibration of the sensor. Activation energy measurements imply that the primary conduction process involves the oxide ion. An improved electrical/mechanica seal is also discussed.

  4. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  5. High temperature stability of aluminide-coated Inconel 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun; Lee, Byeong Woo

    2015-03-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings were applied to the Inconel 617 by a pack cementation. The effect of coatings on the thermal stability and wear resistance of the Inconel alloy after heat-treatment under an air and a helium atmosphere at 1000°C, 48 h has been studied. The aluminide-coated Inconel specimens are prepared at 850°C and 1000°C for 1 h. An aluminiding layer indexed as AlxNi1-x (x = 0.4-0.6) was formed near the surface region and it played a role as a barrier layer against the surface diffusion of Cr. The thin Cr2O3 film formed in situ on the alloy surface is protective inhibiting further oxidation at moderate temperatures. As the temperature increases further, the thermal stability of the Inconel alloy is limited by the instability of the Cr2O3 scale. The aluminide-coated Inconel 617 samples showed the better performances, the enhanced thermal stability and improved wear resistance, most likely due to the barrier layer formation with the reduced amount of Cr2O3 scale formation.

  6. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  7. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  8. Steric stabilization of modified nanoclays triggered by temperature.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana; Parisi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Halloysite clay nanotubes were modified through the adsorption of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-amine terminated (PNIPA-NH2) onto the external surface by exploiting electrostatic interactions at pH=6. In spite the amount of attached polymer is rather low (1 wt%), the properties of the nanotubes are deeply modified. The apparent specific volume and isentropic compressibilities of the hybrid nanomaterial dispersed in water evidenced the transferring of the termosensitive property from the polymer to halloysite. The hydrodynamic radius as well as the ζ-potential of the nanohybrid are consistent with the attachment of a positively charged polymer onto the negative surface of the nanotube. The colloidal stability was strongly enhanced in the temperature domain below the lower critical solution temperature. This methodology endowed to obtain hollow nanotubes with a stimuli-responsive corona. PMID:26409004

  9. Strategies to increase the stability of intermediate moisture foods towards Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: the effect of temperature, ethanol, pH and water activity, with or without the influence of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Marvig, C L; Daelman, J; Xhaferi, R; Nielsen, D S; Devlieghere, F

    2015-02-01

    Intermediate moisture foods (IMF) are in general microbiologically stable products. However, due to health concerns consumer demands are increasingly forcing producers to lower the fat, sugar and preservatives content, which impede the stability of the IMF products. One of the strategies to counteract these problems is the storage of IMF products at lower temperatures. Thorough knowledge on growth/no growth boundaries of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in IMF products, also at different storage temperatures is an important tool for ensuring microbiologically stability. In this study, growth/no growth models for Z. rouxii, developed by Vermeulen et al. (2012) were further extended by incorporating the factor temperature. Three different data sets were build: (i) without organic acids, (ii) with acetic acid (10,000 ppm on product basis) and (iii) with sorbic acid (1500 ppm on product basis). For each of these data sets three different growth/no growth models were developed after 30, 60 and 90 days. The results show that the influence of temperature is only significant in the lower temperature range (8-15 °C). Also, the effect of pH is negligible (pH 5.0-6.2) unless organic acids are present. More specific, acetic acid had only an additive effect to ethanol and aw at low pH, whereas sorbic acid had also an additive effect at the higher pH values. For incubation periods longer than 30 days the growth/no growth boundary remained stable but enlarged gradually between day 60 and 90, except for the lower temperature range (<12 °C) where the boundary shifts to more stringent environmental conditions. PMID:25481068

  10. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-08-09

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  11. Topical formulations with superoxide dismutase: influence of formulation composition on physical stability and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Di Mambro, Valéria M; Borin, Maria F; Fonseca, Maria J V

    2003-04-24

    Three different topical formulations were supplemented with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and evaluated concerning physical and chemical stabilities in order to determine the most stable formulation that would maintain SOD activity. Physical stability was evaluated by storing the formulation at room temperature, and at 37 and 45 degrees C for 28 days. Samples were collected at 7-day intervals for assessment of rheological behavior. Chemical stability was evaluated by the measurement of enzymatic activity in formulations stored at room temperature and at 45 degrees C for 75 days. The formulations showed a pseudoplastic behavior, with a flow index of less than 1. There was no significant difference in the initial values of flow index, hysteresis loop or minimum apparent viscosity. The simple emulsion and the one stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed decreased viscosity by the 21st day and with higher temperature, but no significant changes concerning the presence of SOD. Although there were no significant changes concerning storage time or temperature, the formulation stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose showed a marked loss of SOD activity. The addition of SOD to the formulations studied did not affect their physical stability. Simple emulsions or emulsions stabilized with carboxypolymethylene seem to be better bases for enzyme addition than emulsion stabilized with hydroxyethylcellulose. PMID:12852452

  12. Investigation of aluminium interferences using the stabilized temperature platform furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, D. C.; Slavin, Walter; Carnrick, G. R.

    Al was determined in the stabilized temperature platform furnace with very few interferences. No interferences were found for several metal nitrates, sulfates or phosphates, or for NaCl. The Al absorbance signal was delayed in the presence of MgCl 2 but there was no interference. This led to the use of 50 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 as a matrix modifier for Al. There were no interferences for CaCl 2 but it was particularly important to use new pyrolytically coated tubes to avoid "aging" effects. CuCl 2 provided a very persistent interference that was reduced when the Mg(NO 3) 2 matrix modifier was used that permitted a char temperature of 1700°C. Perchloric acid interferences were severe with improperly coated graphite tubes but did not exist up to 0.5 M HClO 4 when the new pyrolytically coated tubes were used. A serum Al method was tested briefly and no problems were found. Al was determined in seawater with no influence from the salinity of the sample and less than 0.6 μg/1 Al in seawater could be detected.

  13. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Glen A.; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-10-26

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (~500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko–Scheffler van der Waals corrections. Additionally, the embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ~0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Furthermore, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are

  14. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Glen A; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Nimlos, Mark R; Curtiss, Larry A; Beckham, Gregg T

    2015-11-19

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (∼500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko-Scheffler van der Waals corrections. The embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ∼0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Moreover, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are possible at

  15. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes. PMID:26619225

  16. High Temperature Superconducting RF Resonators for Resonator Stabilized Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    Electromagnetic resonators made of superconducting materials show unusually sharp resonances because resistive losses are minimized. The availability of high quality thin films of YB_2CU_3 O_{7-delta} (YBCO) with superconducting transitions at 92K has aroused interest in thin film resonators at microwave frequencies for use in filters and oscillators in communication and radar systems. I have investigated the design and radio frequency (rf) properties of superconducting resonators in microstrip geometries (in which the resonant element and a single ground plane are on opposite faces of the LaAlO_3 substrates). This monolithic approach minimizes vibration sensitivity, but exposes the resonators to interactions with the packaging structure. I used niobium (Nb) superconducting 2 GHz resonators at 4.2K to investigate the geometry dependence of the quality factor Q and the high frequency phase noise S_ {y}(f). Q's in excess of 250,000 and S_{y}(1 Hz) = -227 were achieved. Desirable geometries were then fabricated in YBCO thin films produced by coevaporation or sputtering. They typically showed Q's that are a factor of four lower than the comparable Nb resonator, but retained their usefulness to substantially higher temperatures ( ~60K). One of these YBCO resonators was successfully operated to stabilize an oscillator operating at 2 GHz with overall single-sideband phase noise }(1 Hz) = -30 dBc/Hz comparable to the best available competing technologies.

  17. Thermal Design to Meet Stringent Temperature Gradient/Stability Requirements of SWIFT BAT Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is an instrument on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) SWIFT spacecraft. It is designed to detect gamma ray burst over a broad region of the sky and quickly align the telescopes on the spacecraft to the gamma ray source. The thermal requirements for the BAT detector arrays are very stringent. The maximum allowable temperature gradient of the 256 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors is PC. Also, the maximum allowable rate of temperature change of the ASICs of the 256 Detector Modules (DMs) is PC on any time scale. The total power dissipation of the DMs and Block Command & Data Handling (BCDH) is 180 W. This paper presents a thermal design that uses constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) to minimize the temperature gradient of the DMs, and loop heat pipes (LHPs) to transport the waste heat to the radiator. The LHPs vary the effective thermal conductance from the DMs to the radiator to minimize heater power to meet the heater power budget, and to improve the temperature stability. The DMs are cold biased, and active heater control is used to meet the temperature gradient and stability requirements.

  18. Magnetic-divertor stabilization of an axisymmetric plasma with anisotropic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagawa, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Cho, T.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2006-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic stabilization of an axisymmetric mirror plasma with a magnetic divertor is studied. An equation is found for the flute modes, which includes the stabilizing influence of ion temperature anisotropy and nonparaxial magnetic fields, as well as a finite ion Larmor radius. It is shown that if the density profile is sufficiently gentle, then the nonparaxial configuration can stabilize all modes as long as ion temperature is radially uniform. This can be demonstrated even when the density vanishes on the separatrix and even for small ion Larmor radii. It is found, however, that the ion temperature gradient makes the unstable region wider; high ion temperature is required to stabilize the flute mode.

  19. Structural stability and catalytic activity of lanthanum-based perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Lucia M. Petkovic

    2011-05-01

    Perovskite-type oxide materials with a general formula La(1-x)A(x)Fe(1-y)Co(y)O(3-delta), where A is an alkaline earth metal Sr or Ba have been studied as cathode materials for catalytic reduction of oxygen in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), as well as combustion catalysts. In this study, we use a combination of temperature programmed reduction measurements, X-ray diffraction, carbon black catalytic oxidation measurements, and first-principles, density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations to elucidate the main processes that contribute into the structural stability and catalytic activity for soot oxidation of these materials. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of the structure reconstruction with oxygen loss during the regulated increase of the temperature. The calculations are in good qualitative agreement with catalytic experiments and allow identify special combinations of the perovskite chemical composition and local surface structures for which one could expect the highest catalytic activity for the soot oxidation process.

  20. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  1. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  2. Density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y; Kaye, S M; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann, N C; Smith, D R; Yuh, H

    2011-04-22

    In this Letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k(⊥)ρ(s) ≲ 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of 2 decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity. PMID:21599377

  3. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  4. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  5. Supported Gold and Platinum Clusters: Stability under Vacuum and Hydrogen at Elevated Temperatures; Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, Stefan; Winans, Randall; Ballentine, Gregory; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Elam, Jeffrey; Lee, Byeongdu; Pellin, Michael; Seifert, Soenke; Tikhonov, George; Wiederrecht, Gary

    2006-03-01

    The Achilles heal of supported clusters remains their low stability at elevated temperatures or when exposed to reactive gases. In this paper, the stability of Aun and Ptn clusters (n=6-10) supported on SiO2, Al2O3 & TiO2 films is addressed. The clusters were heated in vacuum and in H2 atmosphere, their stability monitored by synchrotron grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering. Pt clusters supported on Al2O3 did not undergo sintering in vacuum and when exposed to hydrogen during a lengthy heat treatment reaching 400C; Au clusters on SiO2 remained stable up to 350C. These temperatures are considerably higher than those characteristic for the onset of the catalytic activity of these clusters. Results on heat-induced structural isomerization of clusters will be shown. Single-particle UV-VIS spectra of Au-particles obtained by dark-field microscopy will be presented as well.

  6. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  7. A facile approach to enhance the high temperature stability of magnetite nanoparticles with improved magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of Zn2+ doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties, blocking and Curie temperatures, and the high temperature phase stability of magnetite nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. The Zn2+ doped nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6) are prepared by simple co-precipitation technique and are characterized by high temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HTXRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. Our HTXRD studies show that the decomposition temperature of pure magnetite (Fe3O4) in vacuum is increased by 300 °C (from 700 to 1000 °C), with 0.2 fraction of Zn2+ doping. The DSC studies under air environment also show that the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature increases with the zinc fraction. The increase in transition temperature is attributed to the increase in the activation energy of the maghemite to hematite phase transition after the replacement of Fe3+ with larger diameter Zn2+ in the A site. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization increases from 61 to 69 emu/g upon 0.2 fraction of Zn2+, which augments the utility of the doped compound for practical applications. While the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping concentration, the blocking temperature shows an opposite trend. The blocking temperature values were found to be 262, 196, 144, and 153 K for 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 fraction of zinc, respectively. The reduction in TB is attributed to weak dipole-dipole interactions and local exchange coupling between nanoparticles. All the Zn2+ doped samples show superparamagnetic nature. These findings are extremely useful in producing superparamagnetic nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for high temperature applications.

  8. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  9. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  10. Synthesis, thermal stability, and photocatalytic activity of nanocrystalline titanium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youjian; Zhang, Hong; Ma, DeKun; Ma, Jianhua; Ye, Hongnan; Qian, Gaojin; Ye, Yi

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The synthesized temperature is lower than some conventional methods. {yields} These raw materials are safe; all manipulations are rather safe and convenient. {yields} The product exhibits photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B. -- Abstract: Titanium carbide (TiC) was prepared via one simple route by the reaction of metallic magnesium powders with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and potassium acetate (CH{sub 3}COOK) in an autoclave at 600 {sup o}C and 8 h. Phase structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the product was cubic TiC, which consisted of particles with an average size of about 100 nm in diameter. The product was also studied by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its photocatalysis. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 350 {sup o}C in air. In addition, we discovered that the cubic TiC powders exhibited photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) under 500 W mercury lamp light irradiation.

  11. High temperature stability of lanthanum silicate dielectric on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jur, J. S.; Lichtenwalner, D. J.; Kingon, A. I.

    2007-03-05

    Integration of a high-{kappa} dielectric into complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices requires thermal stability of the amorphous dielectric phase and chemical compatibility with silicon. The stability of amorphous lanthanum silicate on Si (001) is investigated by means of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor measurements, back side secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) after a 1000 deg. C, 10 s anneal in nitrogen ambient. Back side SIMS depth profiling of the TaN/LaSiO{sub x}/Si gate stack reveals no detectable lanthanum in the silicon substrate, and HRTEM shows stability of the amorphous LaSiO{sub x}. An effective work function near 4.0 eV is obtained for these gate stacks, making the stack design ideal for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication.

  12. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  13. On the pH-optimum of activity and stability of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kemper; Alexov, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Biological macromolecules evolved to perform their function in specific cellular environment (subcellular compartments or tissues); therefore, they should be adapted to the biophysical characteristics of the corresponding environment, one of them being the characteristic pH. Many macromolecular properties are pH dependent, such as activity and stability. However, only activity is biologically important, while stability may not be crucial for the corresponding reaction. Here we show that the pH-optimum of activity (the pH of maximal activity) is correlated with the pH-optimum of stability (the pH of maximal stability) on a set of 310 proteins with available experimental data. We speculate that such a correlation is needed to allow the corresponding macromolecules to tolerate small pH fluctuations that are inevitable with cellular function. Our findings rationalize the efforts of correlating the pH of maximal stability and the characteristic pH of subcellular compartments, since only pH of activity is subject of evolutionary pressure. In addition, our analysis confirmed the previous observation that pH-optimum of activity and stability are not correlated with the isoelectric point, pI, or with the optimal temperature. PMID:20589630

  14. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  15. WWOX guards genome stability by activating ATM

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) tend to break upon replication stress and have been suggested to be “hot spots” for genomic instability. Recent evidence, however, implies that in the wake of DNA damage, WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX, the gene product of the FRA16D fragile site), associates with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and regulates its activation to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:27308504

  16. Effect of temperature on oil stability index (OSI) of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is primarily composed of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid alkyl esters. Fuel suppliers, terminal operators and users are becoming more concerned with monitoring and maintaining good biodiesel fuel quality with respect to oxidative degradation during storage. Oil stability index (OSI)...

  17. Experimental Study of the Stability of Aircraft Fuels at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of fuel stability was conducted in an apparatus which simulated an aircraft gas turbine fuel system. Two fuels were tested: Jet A and Number 2 Home Heating oil. Jet A is an aircraft gas turbine fuel currently in wide use. No. 2HH was selected to represent the properties of future turbine fuels, particularly experimental Reference Broad Specification, which, under NASA sponsorship, was considered as a possible next-generation fuel. Tests were conducted with varying fuel flow rates, delivery pressures and fuel pretreatments (including preheating and deoxygenation). Simulator wall temperatures were varied between 422K and 672K at fuel flows of 0.022 to 0.22 Kg/sec. Coking rate was determined at four equally-spaced locations along the length of the simulator. Fuel samples were collected for infrared analysis. The dependence of coking rate in Jet A may be correlated with surface temperature via an activation energy of 9 to 10 kcal/mole, although the results indicate that both bulk fluid and surface temperature affect the rate of decomposition. As a consequence, flow rate, which controls bulk temperature, must also be considered. Taken together, these results suggest that the decomposition reactions are initiated on the surface and continue in the bulk fluid. The coking rate data for No. 2 HH oil are very highly temperature dependent above approximately 533K. This suggests that bulk phase reactions can become controlling in the formation of coke.

  18. Plasma shape and finite {beta} effects on stability thresholds of the ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Jhowry, B.; Andersson, J.; Dastgeer, S.

    2004-12-01

    The stability of electromagnetic ion temperature gradient driven modes with emphasis on the lower and upper stability thresholds is investigated by a collisionless magnetized plasma in both circular and noncircular geometry. The stability properties are discussed and the results are compared for finite {beta} effects, arbitrary elongation, and Shafranov shift rate parameters. It has been found that the lower stability thresholds are weakly dependent on the (combined) effects of Shafranov shift rate, finite {beta}, and elongation whereas the second (upper) stability regime shows substantial dependence depending on parameter regimes.

  19. Stabilization of solar films against hi temperature deactivation

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, Clinton F.

    1984-03-20

    A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a solar absorptive film consisting essentially of copper oxide, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide; (2) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass or a stainless steel; and (3) an interlayer of platinum, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of platinum to obtain a stable conductor-dielectric tandem.

  20. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  1. Modeling Physical Stability of Amorphous Solids Based on Temperature and Moisture Stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua Alan; Zografi, George; Gao, Ping; Gong, Yuchuan; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry was utilized to monitor the crystallization process of amorphous ritonavir (RTV) and its hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate-based amorphous solid dispersion under various stressed conditions. An empirical model was developed: ln(τ)=ln(A)+EaRT-b⋅wc, where τ is the crystallization induction period, A is a pre-exponential factor, Ea is the apparent activation energy, b is the moisture sensitivity parameter, and wc is water content. To minimize the propagation of errors associated with the estimates, a nonlinear approach was used to calculate mean estimates and confidence intervals. The physical stability of neat amorphous RTV and RTV in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate solid dispersions was found to be mainly governed by the nucleation kinetic process. The impact of polymers and moisture on the crystallization process can be quantitatively described by Ea and b in this Arrhenius-type model. The good agreement between the measured values under some less stressful test conditions and those predicted, reflected by the slope and R(2) of the correlation plot of these 2 sets of data on a natural logarithm scale, indicates its predictability of long-term physical stability of amorphous RTV in solid dispersions. To further improve the model, more understanding of the impact of temperature and moisture on the amorphous physical stability and fundamentals regarding nucleation and crystallization is needed. PMID:27185539

  2. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  3. Temperature controlled nanoparticle stability in concentrated polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2015-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water is known to display a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and a closed loop at high temperature. When silica nanoparticles are suspended in concentrated PEG solution, we observe temperature dependent phase separation even below the 60C which is much lower temperature than the LCST for the lowest PEG reported. Depending on the conditions, nanoparticles form clusters and show gelation and both can be reversible. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to characterize microstructure of nanoparticle dispersion and diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) and other light scattering techniques are employed to understand particle correlations in dense systems. Polymer dynamics near particle substrate is discussed with NMR Free Induction decay experiment. These combined experimental studies help to understand the detailed mechanism of nanoparticle gelation in polymer solutions.

  4. Investigating the Stability of eLiposomes at Elevated Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G; Javadi, Marjan

    2015-08-01

    eLiposomes encapsulate a perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion droplet inside a liposome. Ultrasound is then used as a trigger mechanism to vaporize the perfluorocarbon, break the liposome, and release the desired drug to the tumor tissue. The purpose of this research is to show that eLiposomes synthesized using perfluoropentane are stable above the normal boiling point of the perfluoropentane and at body temperature and thus has potential for use in vivo. Experiments involving the release of fluorescent calcein molecules were performed on eLiposomes to measure the release of calcein at various temperatures in the absence of ultrasound. Results showed that eLiposomes are stable at body temperatures and that as the temperature increases above 40°C, calcein release from these novel nanocarriers increases. PMID:25261070

  5. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiena, C.; Coviello, V.; Arattano, M.; Chiarle, M.; Morra di Cella, U.; Pirulli, M.; Pogliotti, P.; Scavia, C.

    2012-07-01

    The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps). In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007-2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs. In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence. The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  6. Oxide layer stability in lead-bismuth at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, F. J.; Soler, L.; Hernández, F.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2004-11-01

    Materials protection by 'in situ' oxidation has been studied in stagnant lead-bismuth, with different oxygen levels (H 2/H 2O ratios of 0.3 and 0.03), at temperatures from 535 °C to 600 °C and times from 100 to 3000 h. The materials tested were the martensitic steels F82Hmod, EM10 and T91 and the austenitic stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 304L. The results obtained point to the existence of an apparent threshold temperature above which corrosion occurs and the formation of a protective and stable oxide layer is not possible. This threshold temperature depends on material composition, oxygen concentration in the liquid lead-bismuth and time. The threshold temperature is higher for the austenitic steels, especially for the AISI 304L, and it increases with the oxygen concentration in the lead-bismuth. The oxide layer formed disappear with time and, after 3000 h all the materials, except AISI 304L, suffer corrosion, more severe for the martensitic steels and at the highest temperature tested.

  7. Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil-based lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil (PSO)-based lubricants have been investigated by the pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) method. It was found that PSO samples have lower oxidative stability than their precursor, soybean oil. The main reason for the...

  8. Temperature, activity, and lizard life histories

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, S.C.; Porter, W.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Lizard life-history characteristics vary widely among species and populations. Most authors seek adaptive or phylogenetic explanations for life-history patterns, which are usually presumed to reflect genetic differences. However, lizard life histories are often phenotypically plastic, varying in response to temperature, food availability, and other environmental factors. Despite the importance of temperature to lizard ecology and physiology, its effects on life histories have received relatively little attention. The authors present a theoretical model predicting the proximate consequences of the thermal environment for lizard life histories. Temperature, by affecting activity times, can cause variation in annual survival rate and fecundity, leading to a negative correlation between survival rate and fecundity among populations in different thermal environments. Thus, physiological and evolutionary models predict the same qualitative pattern of life-history variation in lizards. They tested their model with published life-history data from field studies of the lizard Sceloporus undulatus, using climate and geographical data to reconstruct estimated annual activity seasons. Among populations, annual activity times were negatively correlated with annual survival rate and positively correlated with annual fecundity. Proximate effects of temperature may confound comparative analyses of lizard life-history variation and should be included in future evolutionary models. 125 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  10. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, M Luisa; Risso, Valeria A; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm's, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm's are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV's but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm's for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  11. Stability limit of room air temperature of a VAV system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kamimura, Kazuyuki; Kasahara, Masato; Kimbara, Akiomi; Kurosu, Shigeru; Murasawa, Itaru; Hashimoto, Yukihiko

    1998-12-31

    To control heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, it has been necessary to accept an analog system controlled mainly by proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) action. However, when conventional PID controllers are replaced with new digital controllers by selecting the same PID parameters as before, the control loops have often got into hunting phenomena, which result in undamped oscillations. Unstable control characteristics (such as huntings) are thought to be one of the crucial problems faced by field operators. The PID parameters must be carefully selected to avoid instabilities. In this study, a room space is simulated as a thermal system that is air-conditioned by a variable-air-volume (VAV) control system. A dynamic room model without infiltration or exfiltration, which is directly connected to a simple air-handling unit without an economizer, is developed. To explore the possible existence of huntings, a numerical system model is formulated as a bilinear system with time-delayed feedback, and a parametric analysis of the stability limit is presented. Results are given showing the stability region affected by the selection of control and system parameters. This analysis was conducted to help us tune the PID controllers for optimal HVAC control.

  12. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  13. Low Temperature Properties and Thermal Stability of Oligomerized Soybean Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil polymers with lower molecular weight prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) by cationic polymerization were investigated for their applications as lubricants and hydraulic fluids. The low-temperature properties were studied by measuring their cloud and pour points; while therm...

  14. BCNU stability as a function of ethanol concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Tepe, P; Hassenbusch, S J; Benoit, R; Anderson, J H

    1991-04-01

    BCNU is increasingly used in low ethanol (ETOH) concentrations, 5% dextrose-water (D5W), or normal saline (NS) solutions, especially for intra-arterial and prolonged (e.g., 3 day) intravenous (IV) infusions. Little work, however, has been done to evaluate BCNU decomposition rates in concentrations, diluents, and temperatures similar to those employed clinically. This study examined BCNU solutions in ETOH, NS, and D5W to evaluate, conclusively, initial recovery and decomposition rates in these three diluents. Initial BCNU recovery rates were: 95.6 +/- 0.3% (100% D5W), 89.6 +/- 0.5% (15% ETOH), and 85.2 +/- 0.5% (NS) (P less than 0.001). Study of all solutions revealed no measurable BCNU decomposition over 24 hrs (0 degrees C) and no significant difference in decomposition rates between any of the diluents (19.5 degrees C). At 37 degrees C, the solutions showed different half-lives: 14.3 +/- 0.19 hrs (15% ETOH), 10.6 +/- 0.02 hrs (10% ETOH), 8.2 +/- 0.21 hrs (5% ETOH), 7.3 +/- 0.06 hrs (NS), and 6.8 +/- 0.07 hrs (D5W) (P less than 0.001). Decomposition rates between all three temperatures (19.5 degrees C, 37 degrees C, and 50 degrees C) were significantly different (P less than 0.01) for each diluent. Dissolving BCNU powder into either D5W or NS required only 5 min when hand-shaken at body temperature. This study of initial recovery and decomposition rates suggests that, although BCNU decomposition rates were significantly increased at body temperature (37 degrees C), it was quite low and essentially unaffected by different diluents at room temperature (i.e., 19.5 degrees C).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1895160

  15. Temperature stability improvement of a QVGA uncooled infrared radiation FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Koichi; Honda, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Ikuo; Sasaki, Keita; Yagi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kwon, Honam; Atsuta, Masaki; Funaki, Hideyuki

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a low-cost uncooled infrared radiation focal plane array (FPA) requiring no thermoelectric cooler (TEC), which has 320 x 240 detection pixels with 22 um pitch. The silicon single-crystal series p-n junction diodes and the low-noise readout circuit on the same SOI wafer fabricated by 0.13 um CMOS technology were utilized for infrared (IR) detection. The temperature dependence in the readout circuit was eliminated by correlated double sampling (CDS) operation with reference pixel that was insensitive to infrared radiation. In order to reduce the temperature dependence, we improved the reference pixel and the readout circuit. Although the reference pixels should be completely insensitive to IR radiation, prior reference pixels showed measurable sensitivity. The improved reference pixel was formed by partially releasing with bulk-micromachining and was verified to be insensitive to IR radiation by an object of 400°C. The readout circuit had a differential amplifier instead of a singletransistor amplifier and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In each portion, CDS was applied to reduce temperature dependence. The first CDS operation was used for eliminating the pixel output variation and the second operation was used for canceling the variation of the differential amplifier. The output variation referred to input was reduced to 1/30 compared with that of the prior circuit. Moreover, the residual variation of output voltage was reduced by CDS operation in ADC and stable output data was obtained with ambient temperature variation. With these improvements, the sensitivity variation of the FPA was improved to 10% in the range of -30 degrees to 80 degrees and noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 40 mK was achieved.

  16. Stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes with alkali-activated cements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Caijun; Fernández-Jiménez, A

    2006-10-11

    This paper reviews progresses on the use of alkali-activated cements for stabilization/solidification of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Alkali-activated cements consist of an alkaline activator and cementing components, such as blast furnace slag, coal fly ash, phosphorus slag, steel slag, metakaolin, etc., or a combination of two or more of them. Properly designed alkali-activated cements can exhibit both higher early and later strengths than conventional portland cement. The main hydration product of alkali-activated cements is calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) with low Ca/Si ratios or aluminosilicate gel at room temperature; CSH, tobmorite, xonotlite and/or zeolites under hydrothermal condition, no metastable crystalline compounds such as Ca(OH)(2) and calcium sulphoaluminates exist. Alkali-activated cements also exhibit excellent resistance to corrosive environments. The leachability of contaminants from alkali-activated cement stabilized hazardous and radioactive wastes is lower than that from hardened portland cement stabilized wastes. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-activated cements are better matrix for solidification/stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes than Portland cement. PMID:16787699

  17. Active and passive stabilization of body pitch in insect flight

    PubMed Central

    Ristroph, Leif; Ristroph, Gunnar; Morozova, Svetlana; Bergou, Attila J.; Chang, Song; Guckenheimer, John; Wang, Z. Jane; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Flying insects have evolved sophisticated sensory–motor systems, and here we argue that such systems are used to keep upright against intrinsic flight instabilities. We describe a theory that predicts the instability growth rate in body pitch from flapping-wing aerodynamics and reveals two ways of achieving balanced flight: active control with sufficiently rapid reactions and passive stabilization with high body drag. By glueing magnets to fruit flies and perturbing their flight using magnetic impulses, we show that these insects employ active control that is indeed fast relative to the instability. Moreover, we find that fruit flies with their control sensors disabled can keep upright if high-drag fibres are also attached to their bodies, an observation consistent with our prediction for the passive stability condition. Finally, we extend this framework to unify the control strategies used by hovering animals and also furnish criteria for achieving pitch stability in flapping-wing robots. PMID:23697713

  18. Stabilization of a formate dehydrogenase by covalent immobilization on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan M; Wilson, Lorena; Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, Jose M; Mateo, Cesar

    2006-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is a stable enzyme that may be readily inactivated by the interaction with hydrophobic interfaces (e.g., due to strong stirring). This may be avoided by immobilizing the enzyme on a porous support by any technique. Thus, even if the enzyme is going to be used in an ultra-membrane reactor, the immobilization presents some advantages. Immobilization on supports activated with bromocianogen, polyethylenimine, glutaraldehyde, etc., did not promote any stabilization of the enzyme under thermal inactivation. However, the immobilization of FDH on highly activated glyoxyl agarose has permitted increasing the enzyme stability against any distorting agent: pH, T, organic solvent, etc. The time of support-enzyme reaction, the temperature of immobilization, and the activation of the support need to be optimized to get the optimal stability-activity properties. Optimized biocatalyst retained 50% of the offered activity and became 50 times more stable at high temperature and neutral pH. Moreover, the quaternary structure of this dimeric enzyme becomes stabilized by immobilization under optimized conditions. Thus, at acidic pH (conditions where the subunit dissociation is the first step in the enzyme inactivation), the immobilization of both subunits of the enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose has allowed the enzyme to be stabilized by hundreds of times. Moreover, the optimal temperature of the enzyme has been increased (even by 10 degrees C at pH 4.5). Very interestingly, the activity with NAD(+)-dextran was around 60% of that observed with free cofactor. PMID:16529396

  19. Unforeseen high temperature and humidity stability of FeCl3 intercalated few layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wehenkel, Dominique Joseph; Bointon, Thomas Hardisty; Booth, Tim; Bøggild, Peter; Craciun, Monica Felicia; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the stability of the structure and electrical properties of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene to high levels of humidity and high temperature. Complementary experimental techniques such as electrical transport, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy conclusively demonstrate the unforseen stability of this transparent conductor to a relative humidity up to 100% at room temperature for 25 days, to a temperature up to 150°C in atmosphere and to a temperature as high as 620°C in vacuum, that is more than twice higher than the temperature at which the intercalation is conducted. The stability of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene together with its unique values of low square resistance and high optical transparency, makes this material an attractive transparent conductor in future flexible electronic applications. PMID:25567796

  20. Unforeseen high temperature and humidity stability of FeCl3 intercalated few layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wehenkel, Dominique Joseph; Bointon, Thomas Hardisty; Booth, Tim; Bøggild, Peter; Craciun, Monica Felicia; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the stability of the structure and electrical properties of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene to high levels of humidity and high temperature. Complementary experimental techniques such as electrical transport, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy conclusively demonstrate the unforseen stability of this transparent conductor to a relative humidity up to 100% at room temperature for 25 days, to a temperature up to 150°C in atmosphere and to a temperature as high as 620°C in vacuum, that is more than twice higher than the temperature at which the intercalation is conducted. The stability of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene together with its unique values of low square resistance and high optical transparency, makes this material an attractive transparent conductor in future flexible electronic applications. PMID:25567796

  1. Active stabilization to prevent surge in centrifugal compression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Greitzer, Edward M.; Simon, Jon S.; Valavani, Lena

    1993-01-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the active stabilization of surge in a centrifugal engine. The aims of the research were to extend the operating range of a compressor as far as possible and to establish the theoretical framework for the active stabilization of surge from both an aerodynamic stability and a control theoretic perspective. In particular, much attention was paid to understanding the physical limitations of active stabilization and how they are influenced by control system design parameters. Previously developed linear models of actively stabilized compressors were extended to include such nonlinear phenomena as bounded actuation, bandwidth limits, and robustness criteria. This model was then used to systematically quantify the influence of sensor-actuator selection on system performance. Five different actuation schemes were considered along with four different sensors. Sensor-actuator choice was shown to have a profound effect on the performance of the stabilized compressor. The optimum choice was not unique, but rather shown to be a strong function of some of the non-dimensional parameters which characterize the compression system dynamics. Specifically, the utility of the concepts were shown to depend on the system compliance to inertia ratio ('B' parameter) and the local slope of the compressor speedline. In general, the most effective arrangements are ones in which the actuator is most closely coupled to the compressor, such as a close-coupled bleed valve inlet jet, rather than elsewhere in the flow train, such as a fuel flow modulator. The analytical model was used to explore the influence of control system bandwidth on control effectiveness. The relevant reference frequency was shown to be the compression system's Helmholtz frequency rather than the surge frequency. The analysis shows that control bandwidths of three to ten times the Helmholtz frequency are required for larger increases in the compressor flow range

  2. Dual-mode temperature compensation technique for laser stabilization to a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Fescenko, I; Alnis, J; Schliesser, A; Wang, C Y; Kippenberg, T J; Hänsch, T W

    2012-08-13

    Frequency stabilization of a diode laser locked to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) reference resonator made of a MgF2 single crystal is demonstrated. The strong thermal dependence of the difference frequency between two orthogonally polarized TE an TM modes (dual-mode frequency) of the optically anisotropic crystal material allows sensitive measurement of the resonator's temperature within the optical mode volume. This dual-mode signal was used as feedback for self-referenced temperature stabilization to nanokelvin precision, resulting in frequency stability of 0.3 MHz/h at 972 nm, which was measured by comparing with an independent ultrastable laser. PMID:23038559

  3. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  4. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim’s first order perturbation theory, and use Flory–Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation.

  5. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; da Gama, Margarida M Telo

    2016-06-22

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim's first order perturbation theory, and use Flory-Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation. PMID:27115118

  6. IgY stability in eggs stored at room temperature or at +4°C.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, E; Stålberg, J; Larsson, A

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of immunoglobulin-Y (IgY) in stored eggs from immunised hens. 2. Eggs from individual hens were randomised and stored for up to one month at room temperature, or for up to 6 months at +4°C. IgY was extracted from the egg yolks and the antibody activities were tested by ELISA. 3. There was no significant reduction in antibody titres with egg storage under these conditions. 4. Egg yolks of immunised chickens provide an inexpensive source of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies for use in immunotherapy and immunoassays. By collecting eggs from different immunised hens and pooling their yolks, it should be possible to reduce batch-to-batch variation. PMID:22404803

  7. Effect of temperature change on anammox activity.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal appears as a prerequisite for the implementation of energy autarchic municipal wastewater treatment plants. Whilst the application of anammox-related technologies in the side-stream is at present state of the art, the feasibility of this energy-efficient process in main-stream conditions is still under investigation. Lower operating temperatures and ammonium concentrations, together with a demand for high and stable nitrogen removal efficiency, represent the main challenges to overcome for this appealing new frontier of the wastewater treatment field. In this study, we report the short-term effect of temperature on the maximum biomass specific activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria as evaluated by means of batch tests. The experiments were performed on anammox biomass sampled from two full-scale reactors and two lab-scale reactors, all characterized by different reactor configurations and operating conditions. The results indicate that for the anammox conversion, the temperature dependency cannot be accurately modeled by one single Arrhenius coefficient (i.e., θ) as typically applied for other biological processes. The temperature effect is increasing at lower temperatures. Adaptation of anammox bacteria after long-term cultivation at 20 and 10°C was observed. Implications for modeling and process design are finally discussed. PMID:25042674

  8. Solar activity and the mean global temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    The variation with time from 1956 to 2002 of the globally averaged rate of ionization produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere is deduced and shown to have a cyclic component of period roughly twice the 11 year solar cycle period. Long term variations in the global average surface temperature as a function of time since 1956 are found to have a similar cyclic component. The cyclic variations are also observed in the solar irradiance and in the mean daily sun spot number. The cyclic variation in the cosmic ray rate is observed to be delayed by 2-4 years relative to the temperature, the solar irradiance and daily sun spot variations suggesting that the origin of the correlation is more likely to be direct solar activity than cosmic rays. Assuming that the correlation is caused by such solar activity, we deduce that the maximum recent increase in the mean surface temperature of the Earth which can be ascribed to this activity is {\\lesssim }14% of the observed global warming.

  9. High temperature stability of a 316 austenitic stainless steel coated with cerium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Del Angel, Humberto

    Cerium oxide (CeO2-x) nanoparticles were used for coating protection on a 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel (Aust. SS) to enhance the thermal stability of the oxide films formed at high temperatures. Three simple coating methods were used, dipping, spraying and spinning in order to explore the coating film morphology, nanoparticle distribution and its effect on thermal stability of the steel substrates. Experimentally, the selected steel was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. The cerium oxide nanoparticles used on the three methods were synthesized in the laboratory obtaining nanoparticles in the range of 3.5 to 6.2 nanometers. It was found that cerium oxide particle size is affected by temperature. In this case, the activation energy for particle growth was estimated to be around 21,1 kJ/mol. Characterization of the film morphologies before and after oxidation were carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Surface Profilometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). A comparison of the three coating methods was carried out for the particular case of the 316 Aust. SS coupons. In addition, the oxidation kinetics was experimentally investigated for the coated samples. For this purpose thermal gravimetric determinations were made at 800°C, 900°C, and 1000°C and oxidation rate constants were calculated at each temperature.

  10. Responsive Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Extreme Salinity and High-Temperature Reservoir Applications.

    PubMed

    Ranka, Mikhil; Brown, Paul; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal stabilization of nanoparticles under extreme salinity and high temperature conditions is a key challenge in the development of next generation technologies for subsurface reservoir characterization and oil recovery. Polyelectrolytes have been investigated as nanoparticle stabilizers, but typically fail at high ionic strengths and elevated temperatures due to excessive charge screening and dehydration. We report an approach to nanoparticle stabilization that overcomes these limitations, and exploits the antipolyelectrolyte phenomenon, in which screening of intrachain electrostatic interactions causes a polyzwitterion chain to undergo a structural transition from a collapsed globule to a more open coil-like regime with increases in ionic strength and temperature. Small-angle neutron scattering on a model zwitterionic polymer in solution indicated an increase in both radius of gyration and excluded volume parameter of the polymer with increases in ionic strength and temperature. The model zwitterion was subsequently incorporated within a polymeric stabilizer for nanoparticles under harsh reservoir conditions, and used to functionalize hydrophilic (silica) as well as hydrophobic (polystyrene) nanoparticles. Long-term colloidal stability was achieved at salt concentrations up to 120,000 mg/dm3 at 90 °C, approximately twice the stability limit previously reported in the literature. The approach can be broadly generalized to a large class of synthetic polyzwitterions, and can be adapted to a wide variety of other colloidal systems in which demands placed by extreme salinity and temperature conditions must be met. PMID:26278070

  11. THE STABILITY AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PROTON CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K.

    2010-07-06

    The morphological and electrical properties of Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Ce{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} with x varying from 0 to 1 prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors. Dense microstructures were achieved for all the samples upon sintering at 1500 C for 5 h. The phase structure analysis indicated that perovskite phase was formed for 0 {le} x {le} 0.2, while for x larger than 0.5, impurity phases of Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} appeared. The tolerance to H{sub 2}O for the samples improved with the increase in Sr content when exposed to boiling water, while the electrical conductivity decreased from x = 0 to 1. However, the resistance to CO{sub 2} attack at elevated temperatures was not improved within the whole x range studied.

  12. Sensing disks for slug-type calorimeters have higher temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Graphite sensing disk for slug-type radiation calorimeters exhibits better performance at high temperatures than copper and nickel disks. The graphite is heat-soaked to stabilize its emittance and the thermocouple is protected from the graphite so repeated temperature cycling does not change its sensitivity.

  13. Miniature high stability high temperature space rated blackbody radiance source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Beswick, A. G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test performance of a conical cavity type blackbody radiance source that will meet the requirements of the Halogen Occultation Experiment on the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite program. The thrust of this design effort was to minimize the heat losses, in order to keep the power usage under 7.5 watts, and to minimize the amount of silica in the materials. Silica in the presence of the platinum heater winding used in this design would cause the platinum to erode, changing the operating temperature set-point. The design required the development of fabrication techniques which would provide very small, close tolerance parts from extremely difficult-to-machine materials. Also, a space rated ceramic core and unique, low thermal conductance, ceramic-to-metal joint was developed, tested and incorporated in this design. The completed flight qualification hardware has undergone performance, environmental and life testing. The design configuration and test results are discussed in detail.

  14. Atmospheric Stability & Turbulence from Temperature Profiles over Sicily During Summer 2002 & 2003 HASI Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretation of the temperature measurements data retrieved during the balloon campaigns (in 2002 and in 2003) for testing HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument), launched from the Italian Space Agency Base in Trapani (Sicily), are presented. Both ascending and descending phases are analysed; data reveal interesting features near the tropopause (present in the region between 11km-14km), where temperature cooling can be related to layers with strong winds (2002 flight); in the troposphere a multistratified structure of the temperature field is observed and discussed (particularly in the 2003 flight) Finally, stability and turbulence of the atmosphere are analysed; the buoyancy N2 parameters for both the flights show lowers value respect to standard tropospheric values corresponding to a lower stability of the atmosphere; still there is a higher stability above the tropopause. The energy spectrum of temperature data is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory: the characteristic k(sup -5/3) behaviour is reproduced.

  15. Effect of surfactant on temperature stability of solid lipid nanoparticles studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sacheen; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2013-06-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are new paradigm of drug delivery system of water insoluble active pharmaceutical ingredient. Paliperidone, an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia is a water insoluble molecule with low bioavailability was studied. Macrogol glyceride surfactant, bile salt based surfactant and sodium dodecyl sulphate were used to stabilize the solid lipid as dispersed nanoparticles form by adsorbing on the surface of the nanoparticles. Anionic surfactants bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate were found to stabilize forming a monomolecular layer of surfactants on the surface of nanoparticles; whereas macrogol glyceride based surfactant have intrusion in the matrix of lipid nanoparticles. So intrusion of macrogol glyceride in matrix was observed by studying the change in size of nanoparticles with respect to temperature with the help of dynamic light scattering. In case of macrogol glyceride size decrease start form 50°C, for bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate size deacrease start at 60°C. So that structural disturbance of nanoparticles by the macrogol glyceride on the surface was found maximum as compared to anionic surfactant.

  16. Performance and stability of a liquid anode high-temperature metal-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otaegui, L.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Wang, L.; Laresgoiti, A.; Tsukamoto, H.; Han, M. H.; Tsai, C.-L.; Laresgoiti, I.; López, C. M.; Rojo, T.

    2014-02-01

    A High-Temperature Metal-Air Battery (HTMAB) that operates based on a simple redox reaction between molten metal and atmospheric oxygen at 600-1000 °C is presented. This innovative HTMAB concept combines the technology of conventional metal-air batteries with that of solid oxide fuel cells to provide a high energy density system for many applications. Electrochemical reversibility is demonstrated with 95% coulomb efficiency. Cell sealing has been identified as a key issue in order to determine the end-of-charge voltage, enhance coulomb efficiency and ensure long term stability. In this work, molten Sn is selected as anode material. Low utilization of the stored material due to precipitation of the SnO2 on the electrochemically active area limits the expected capacity, which should theoretically approach 903 mAh g-1. Nevertheless, more than 1000 charge/discharge cycles are performed during more than 1000 h at 800 °C, showing highly promising results of stability, reversibility and cyclability.

  17. Mesoporous aluminosilicates with ordered hexagonal structure, strong acidity, and extraordinary hydrothermal stability at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Han, Y; Xiao, F S; Qiu, S; Zhu, L; Wang, R; Yu, Y; Zhang, Z; Zou, B; Wang, Y; Sun, H; Zhao, D; Wei, Y

    2001-05-30

    Highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates (MAS-5) with uniform pore sizes have been successfully synthesized from assembly of preformed aluminosilcate precursors with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. The aluminosilicate precursors were obtained by heating, at 100--140 degrees C for 2--10 h, aluminasilica gels at the Al(2)O(3)/SiO(2)/TEAOH/H(2)O molar ratios of 1.0/7.0--350/10.0--33.0/500--2000. Mesoporous MAS-5 shows extraordinary stability both in boiling water (over 300 h) and in steam (800 degrees C for 2 h). Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia shows that the acidic strength of MAS-5 is much higher than that of MCM-41 and is comparable to that of microporous Beta zeolite. In catalytic cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene and alkylation of isobutane with butene, MAS-5 exhibits greater catalytic activity and selectivity, as compared with MCM-41 and HZSM-5. The MAS-5 samples were characterized with infrared, UV--Raman, and NMR spectroscopy and numerous other techniques. The results suggest that MAS-5 consists of both mesopores and micropores and that the pore walls of MAS-5 contain primary and secondary structural building units, similar to those of microporous zeolites. Such unique structural features might be responsible for the observed strong acidity and high thermal stability of the mesoporous aluminosilicates with well-ordered hexagonal symmetry. PMID:11457329

  18. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  19. Personality predictors of longevity: Activity, Emotional Stability, and Conscientiousness

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between personality traits and longevity. Methods Using the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey, personality traits were assessed in 2359 participants (38% women; age: 17 to 98 years, M = 50) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), starting in 1958. Over the duration of the study, 943 (40%) participants died, on average 18 years after their personality assessment. The association of each trait with longevity was examined by Cox regression controlling for demographic variables. Results In preliminary analyses among the deceased, those who scored one SD above the mean on General Activity (a facet of Extraversion), Emotional Stability (low Neuroticism), or Conscientiousness lived on average two to three years longer than those scoring one SD below the mean. Survival analyses on the full sample confirmed the association of General Activity, Emotional Stability, and Conscientiousness with lower risk of death, such that every one SD increase was related to about 13%, 15%, and 27% risk reduction, respectively. The association of personality traits with longevity was largely independent from the influence of smoking and obesity. Personality predictors of longevity did not differ by sex, except for Ascendance (a facet of Extraversion). Emotional Stability was a significant predictor when the analyses were limited to deaths due to cardiovascular disease, with comparable effect sizes for General Activity and Conscientiousness. Conclusions In a large sample of generally healthy individuals followed for almost five decades, longevity was associated with being conscientious, emotionally stable, and active. PMID:18596250

  20. High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

  1. Trading off stability against activity in extremophilic aldolases

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Markus; Weiergräber, Oliver H.; Classen, Thomas; Bisterfeld, Carolin; Bramski, Julia; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding enzyme stability and activity in extremophilic organisms is of great biotechnological interest, but many questions are still unsolved. Using 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) as model enzyme, we have evaluated structural and functional characteristics of different orthologs from psychrophilic, mesophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms. We present the first crystal structures of psychrophilic DERAs, revealing a dimeric organization resembling their mesophilic but not their thermophilic counterparts. Conversion into monomeric proteins showed that the native dimer interface contributes to stability only in the hyperthermophilic enzymes. Nevertheless, introduction of a disulfide bridge in the interface of a psychrophilic DERA did confer increased thermostability, suggesting a strategy for rational design of more durable enzyme variants. Constraint network analysis revealed particularly sparse interactions between the substrate pocket and its surrounding α-helices in psychrophilic DERAs, which indicates that a more flexible active center underlies their high turnover numbers. PMID:26783049

  2. Trading off stability against activity in extremophilic aldolases.

    PubMed

    Dick, Markus; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Classen, Thomas; Bisterfeld, Carolin; Bramski, Julia; Gohlke, Holger; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding enzyme stability and activity in extremophilic organisms is of great biotechnological interest, but many questions are still unsolved. Using 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) as model enzyme, we have evaluated structural and functional characteristics of different orthologs from psychrophilic, mesophilic and hyperthermophilic organisms. We present the first crystal structures of psychrophilic DERAs, revealing a dimeric organization resembling their mesophilic but not their thermophilic counterparts. Conversion into monomeric proteins showed that the native dimer interface contributes to stability only in the hyperthermophilic enzymes. Nevertheless, introduction of a disulfide bridge in the interface of a psychrophilic DERA did confer increased thermostability, suggesting a strategy for rational design of more durable enzyme variants. Constraint network analysis revealed particularly sparse interactions between the substrate pocket and its surrounding α-helices in psychrophilic DERAs, which indicates that a more flexible active center underlies their high turnover numbers. PMID:26783049

  3. Stability Assessment of 10 Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Compounded in SyrSpend SF.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The stability of 10 active pharmaceutical ingredients was studied in SyrSpend SF PH4 or SyrSpend SF Alka at room and/or refrigerated temperature (2°C to 8°C). An oral suspension of each active pharmaceutical ingredient was compounded in low actinic plastic bottles at a specific concentration in SyrSpend SF PH4 or SyrSpend SF Alka. Samples were assessed for stability immediately after preparation (day 0) followed by storage at room temperature and/or at refrigerated temperature. At set time points, the samples were removed from storage and assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatographic stability- indicating method. The active pharmaceutical ingredient was considered stable if the suspension retained 90% to 110% of the initial concentration. Furosemide was stable for at least 14 days in SyrSpend SF Alka at refrigerated conditions. Prednisolone sodium phosphate in SyrSpend SF PH4 was stable for at least 30 days at room temperature and refrigerated conditions. Ranitidine hydrochloride suspensions in SyrSpend SF PH4 at room temperature and refrigerated conditions were stable for at least 30 days and 58 days, respectively. Hydrocortisone hemisuccinate and sodium phosphate retained greater than 90% for at least 60 days at both room temperature and refrigerated samples in SyrSpend SF PH4. Amiodarone hydrochloride and nifedipine suspensions at both room temperature and refrigerated conditions retained greater than 90% of the initial concentrations for at least 90 days in SyrSpend SF PH4. Refrigerated samples of simvastatin in SyrSpend SF PH4 were stable for at least 90 days. Spironolactone in SyrSpend SF PH4 at room temperature retained more than 90% of the initial concentration for at least 90 days. Phenobarbital in SyrSpend SF PH4 retained above 90% of initial concentration for at least 154 days at room temperature. This study demonstrated the stability of a wide range of frequently used active pharmaceutical ingredients, tested in SyrSpend SF PH4 and Syr

  4. Design of DC-contact RF MEMS switch with temperature stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junfeng; Li, Zhiqun; Zhu, Jian; Yu, Yuanwei; Jiang, Lili

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the temperature stability of DC-contact RF MEMS switch, a thermal buckle-beam structure is implemented. The stability of the switch pull-in voltage versus temperature is not only improved, but also the impact of stress and stress gradient on the drive voltage is suppressed. Test results show that the switch pull-in voltage is less sensitive to temperature between -20 °C and 100 °C. The variable rate of pull-in voltage to temperature is about -120 mV/°C. The RF performance of the switch is stable, and the isolation is almost independent of temperature. After being annealed at 280 °C for 12 hours, our switch samples, which are suitable for packaging, have less than 1.5% change in the rate of pull-in voltage.

  5. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Desheng Meng, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA.

  6. Phase diagram, thermal stability, and high temperature oxidation of the ternary copper-nickel-iron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella

    Due to the aluminum industry demands, a large effort has recently been devoted to the development of special alloys to be used as inert anodes for a newly designed aluminum reduction cell. The implementation of this new technology aims at the replacement of the graphite anodes that have been used for over 100 years in aluminum smelting, which would reduce fossil carbon consumption, and eliminate the emission of carbon dioxide and of perfluorocarbons. Ternary alloys containing copper, nickel, and iron have been the subject of the research activities. The present research focused on the stability of the Cu-Ni-Fe alloys at high temperatures in oxidizing and fluoridating environments. The experimental methods included thermodynamic calculations of the phase diagram (Thermocalc), optical microscopy and microprobe microstructural and chemical investigations (EMPA), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and air-oxidation studies. The results have led to the optimization of the Cu-Ni-Fe ternary phase diagram and to an extensive study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the spinodal decomposition and discontinuous reactions occurring during ageing as a function of alloy composition. The oxidizing reactions occurring in air at high temperatures at the surface of the alloys have been also discussed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic laws. The phase formation in a fluorine containing environment as encountered in an aluminum electrolytic cell is predicted using principles of physical chemistry.

  7. Effects of temperature and relative humidity on the stability of paper-immobilized antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyun; Yiu, Brian; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Filipe, Carlos D M; Brennan, John D; Pelton, Robert

    2012-02-13

    The stability of a paper-immobilized antibody was investigated over a range of temperatures (40-140 °C) and relative humidities (RH, 30-90%) using both unmodified filter paper and the same paper impregnated with polyamide-epichlorohydrin (PAE) as supports. Antibody stability decreased with increasing temperature, as expected, but also decreased with increasing RH. At 40 °C, the half-life was more than 10 days, with little dependence on RH. However, at 80 °C, the half-life varied from ~3 days at low RH to less than half an hour at 90% RH, demonstrating that hydration of the antibody promotes unfolding. Antibody stability was not influenced by the PAE paper surface treatment. This work shows that antibodies are good candidates for development of bioactive paper as they have sufficient stability at high temperature to withstand printing and other roll-to-roll processing steps, and sufficient low temperature stability to allow long-term storage of bioactive paper materials. PMID:22257068

  8. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  9. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  10. Detergent Isolation Stabilizes and Activates the Shigella Type III Secretion System Translocator Protein IpaC.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abram R; Duarte, Shari M; Kumar, Prashant; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2016-07-01

    Shigella rely on a type III secretion system as the primary virulence factor for invasion and colonization of human hosts. Although there are an estimated 90 million Shigella infections, annually responsible for more than 100,000 deaths worldwide, challenges isolating and stabilizing many type III secretion system proteins have prevented a full understanding of the Shigella invasion mechanism and additionally slowed progress toward a much needed Shigella vaccine. Here, we show that the non-denaturing zwitterionic detergent N, N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) and non-ionic detergent n-octyl-oligo-oxyethylene efficiently isolated the hydrophobic Shigella translocator protein IpaC from the co-purified IpaC/IpgC chaperone-bound complex. Both detergents resulted in monomeric IpaC that exhibits strong membrane binding and lysis characteristics while the chaperone-bound complex does not, suggesting that the stabilizing detergents provide a means of following IpaC "activation" in vitro. Additionally, biophysical characterization found that LDAO provides significant thermal and temporal stability to IpaC, protecting it for several days at room temperature and brief exposure to temperatures reaching 90°C. In summary, this work identified and characterized conditions that provide stable, membrane active IpaC, providing insight into key interactions with membranes and laying a strong foundation for future vaccine formulation studies taking advantage of the native immunogenicity of IpaC and the stability provided by LDAO. PMID:27297397

  11. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  12. Effect of temperature and temperature shock on the stability of continuous cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Watanabe, Ryoya; Li, Yu-You

    2013-08-01

    Three continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated under mesophilic (37 ± 1°C), thermophilic (55 ± 1°C) and hyper-thermophilic (80 ± 1°C) temperatures for 164 days to investigate the effect of temperature and temperature shock on the cellulosic-dark hydrogen fermentation by mixed microflora. During steady state condition, the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature occurred twice in each condition for 24h. The results show that the 55 ± 1 and 80 ± 1°C presented stable hydrogen yields of 12.28 and 9.72 mmol/g cellulose, respectively. However, the 37 ± 1°C presented low hydrogen yield of 3.56 mmol/g cellulose and methane yield of 5.4 mmol/g cellulose. The reactor performance under 55 ± 1 or 80 ± 1°C appeared to be more resilient to the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature than 37 ± 1°C. The experimental analysis results indicated that the changing in soluble by-products could explain the effect of temperature and temperature shock, and the thermophilic temperature is expected having a better economic performance for cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation. PMID:23747441

  13. Influence of substrate temperature on the stability of glasses prepared by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Kenneth L.; Swallen, Stephen F.; Ediger, M. D.; Wu Tian; Yu Lian

    2007-10-21

    Physical vapor deposition of indomethacin (IMC) was used to prepare glasses with unusual thermodynamic and kinetic stability. By varying the substrate temperature during the deposition from 190 K to the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}=315 K), it was determined that depositions near 0.85T{sub g} (265 K) resulted in the most stable IMC glasses regardless of substrate. Differential scanning calorimetry of samples deposited at 265 K indicated that the enthalpy was 8 J/g less than the ordinary glass prepared by cooling the liquid, corresponding to a 20 K reduction in the fictive temperature. Deposition at 265 K also resulted in the greatest kinetic stability, as indicated by the highest onset temperature. The most stable vapor-deposited IMC glasses had thermodynamic stabilities equivalent to ordinary glasses aged at 295 K for 7 months. We attribute the creation of stable IMC glasses via vapor deposition to enhanced surface mobility. At substrate temperatures near 0.6T{sub g}, this mobility is diminished or absent, resulting in low stability, vapor-deposited glasses.

  14. Low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation enhance the biocathode functioning stability for antibiotics detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Kong, Deyong; Ma, Jincai; Wen, Chongqing; Yuan, Tong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2016-09-01

    Improvement of the stability of functional microbial communities in wastewater treatment system is critical to accelerate pollutants detoxification in cold regions. Although biocathode communities could accelerate environmental pollutants degradation, how to acclimate the cold stress and to improve the catalytic stability of functional microbial communities are remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the structural and functional responses of antibiotic chloramphenicol (CAP) reducing biocathode communities to constant low temperature 10 °C (10-biocathode) and temperature elevation from 10 °C to 25 °C (S25-biocathode). Our results indicated that the low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation obviously enhanced the CAP nitro group reduction efficiency when comparing the aromatic amine product AMCl2 formation efficiency with the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode under the opened and closed circuit conditions. The 10-biocathode generated comparative AMCl maximum as the S25-biocathode but showed significant lower dehalogenation rate of AMCl2 to AMCl. The continuous low temperature and temperature elevation both enriched core functional community in the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode, respectively. The 10-biocathode functioning stability maintained mainly through selectively enriching cold-adapted functional species, coexisting metabolically similar nitroaromatics reducers and maintaining the relative abundance of key electrons transfer genes. This study provides new insights into biocathode functioning stability for accelerating environmental pollutants degradation in cold wastewater system. PMID:27183211

  15. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  16. Weakly sheared active suspensions: hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: the apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration. PMID:21517529

  17. Weakly sheared active suspensions: Hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: The apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration.

  18. High temperature stability of nanocrystalline anatase powders prepared by chemical vapour synthesis under varying process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Md. Imteyaz; Fasel, Claudia; Mayer, Thomas; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Hahn, Horst

    2011-05-01

    Systematic variation in the high temperature stability of nanocrystalline anatase powders prepared by chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) using titanium (IV) isopropoxide under varying flow rates of oxygen and helium was obtained by progressively shifting the decomposition product from C 3H 6 to CO 2. The as-synthesised powders were characterised by high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), simultaneous thermo-gravimetric analyses (STA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the anatase to rutile transformation temperature progressively increased for samples synthesised at higher O 2/He flow rate ratios. The improved anatase stability was attributed to the presence of incorporated carbon within the titania structure and confirmed by a high temperature carbon desorption peak.

  19. Polymer-based protein engineering can rationally tune enzyme activity, pH-dependence, and stability.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hironobu; Cummings, Chad S; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2013-06-10

    The attachment of inert polymers, such as polyethylene glycol, to proteins has driven the emergence of a multibillion dollar biotechnology industry. In all cases, proteins have been stabilized or altered by covalently coupling the pre-existing polymer to the surface of the protein. This approach is inherently limited by a lack of exquisite control of polymer architecture, site and density of attachment. Using a novel water-soluble atom transfer radical polymerization initiator, we have grown temperature- and pH-responsive polymers from the surface of a model protein, the enzyme chymotrypsin. Poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) changes in conformation with altered temperature and pH. Growing the polymer from the surface of chymotrypsin we were able to demonstrate that changes in temperature or pH can change predictably the conformation of the polymer surrounding the enzyme, which in turn enabled the rational tailoring of enzyme activity and stability. Using what we now term "Polymer-Based Protein Engineering", we have increased the activity and stability of chymotrypsin by an order of magnitude at pHs where the enzyme is usually inactive or unstable. PMID:23600667

  20. Active capture and stabilization of temporal solitons in microresonators.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Youl Yang, Ki; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-05-01

    Soliton mode locking and femtosecond pulse generation have recently been demonstrated in high-Q optical microcavities and provide a new way to miniaturize frequency comb systems, as well as create integrated comb systems on a chip. However, triggering the mode-locking process is complicated by a well-known thermal hysteresis that can destabilize the solitons. Moreover, on a longer time scale, thermal drifting of the cavity resonant frequency relative to the pumping frequency causes loss of mode locking. In this Letter, an active feedback method is used both to capture specific soliton states and to stabilize the states indefinitely. The capture and stabilization method provides a reliable way to overcome thermal effects during soliton formation and to excite a desired number of circulating cavity solitons. It is also used to demonstrate a low pumping power of 22 mW for generation of microwave-repetition-rate solitons on a chip. PMID:27128068

  1. The effect of annealing temperature on the stability of gallium tin zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc; McCall, Briana; Alston, Robert; Collis, Ward; Iyer, Shanthi

    2015-10-01

    With the growing need for large area display technology and the push for a faster and cheaper alternative to the current amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) as the active channel layer for pixel-driven thin film transistors (TFTs) display applications, gallium tin zinc oxide (GSZO) has shown to be a promising candidate due to the similar electronic configuration of Sn4+ and In3+. In this work TFTs of GSZO sputtered films with only a few atomic % of Ga and Sn have been fabricated. A systematic and detailed comparison has been made of the properties of the GSZO films annealed at two temperatures: 140 °C and 450 °C. The electrical and optical stabilities of the respective devices have been studied to gain more insight into the degradation mechanism and are correlated with the initial TFT performance prior to the application of stress. Post deposition annealing at 450 °C of the films in air was found to lead to a higher atomic concentration of Sn4+ in these films and a superior quality of the film, as attested by the higher film density and less surface and interface roughness in comparison to the lower annealed temperature device. These result in significantly reduced shallow and deep interface traps with improved performance of the device exhibiting VON of -3.5 V, ION/IOFF of 108, field-effect mobility (μFE) of 4.46 cm2 V-1s-1, and sub-threshold swing of 0.38 V dec-1. The device is stable under both electrical and optical bias for wavelengths of 550 nm and above. Thus, this work demonstrates GSZO-based TFTs as a promising viable option to the IGZO TFTs by further tailoring the film composition and relevant processing temperatures.

  2. Concentration and temperature effects on ovostatin activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, Debra M.

    1994-01-01

    Light scattering experiments performed at Mississippi State University using MSFC ovostatin preparations indicated that at low ovostatin concentrations, below 0.2 mg/ml, the protein was dissociating from a tetramer into dimers. Since the proposed mechanism of action involved the tetrameric form of the protein, we hypothesized that perhaps under the conditions of our assays at various O/T ratios the ovostatin was becoming dissociated into an inactive dimer. To examine this possibility we assayed the ovostatin activity as a function of ovostatin concentration and of temperature of the assay. Data are presented that show the results of these assays at 23 C, 30 C, 37 C and 42 C respectively. The data are highly suggestive that there is a decrease in ovostatin activity as the concentration of the protein falls below 0.06 mg/ml. This may not be of any physiological importance, however, since the concentration of ovostatin in the egg is about 0.5 mg/ml. Curiously, the dissociation of the tetramer into dimers does not show a significant temperature dependence as would be expected for an equilibrium reaction. Whether this is in fact the case, or whether the differences are so small as to not be discerned from the current data remains to be seen. Another aspect to consider is that in the egg the primary role of the ovostatin may or may not be as a protease inhibitor. Although the inhibition of collagenase by ovostatin may be an important aspect of embryogenesis, it is also possible that it functions as a binding protein for some substance. In this regard, all ovostatin preparations from MSFC have shown an approximately 88,000 MW protein associated with the ovostatin. The identity of this protein is not currently known and may be the subject of future studies.

  3. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  4. Loss of Consciousness Is Associated with Stabilization of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Solovey, Guillermo; Alonso, Leandro M.; Yanagawa, Toru; Fujii, Naotaka; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Cecchi, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    What aspects of neuronal activity distinguish the conscious from the unconscious brain? This has been a subject of intense interest and debate since the early days of neurophysiology. However, as any practicing anesthesiologist can attest, it is currently not possible to reliably distinguish a conscious state from an unconscious one on the basis of brain activity. Here we approach this problem from the perspective of dynamical systems theory. We argue that the brain, as a dynamical system, is self-regulated at the boundary between stable and unstable regimes, allowing it in particular to maintain high susceptibility to stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we performed stability analysis of high-density electrocorticography recordings covering an entire cerebral hemisphere in monkeys during reversible loss of consciousness. We show that, during loss of consciousness, the number of eigenmodes at the edge of instability decreases smoothly, independently of the type of anesthetic and specific features of brain activity. The eigenmodes drift back toward the unstable line during recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, we show that stability is an emergent phenomenon dependent on the correlations among activity in different cortical regions rather than signals taken in isolation. These findings support the conclusion that dynamics at the edge of instability are essential for maintaining consciousness and provide a novel and principled measure that distinguishes between the conscious and the unconscious brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT What distinguishes brain activity during consciousness from that observed during unconsciousness? Answering this question has proven difficult because neither consciousness nor lack thereof have universal signatures in terms of most specific features of brain activity. For instance, different anesthetics induce different patterns of brain activity. We demonstrate that loss of consciousness is universally and reliably associated with stabilization

  5. Effects of crosslinking temperature and time on microstructure and stability of cassava starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Puncha-Arnon, Santhanee; Jiranuntakul, Wittawat; Uttapap, Dudsadee

    2015-12-10

    Starch microspheres (SMs) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion-crosslinking technique at 4 °C and 30 °C for 1, 6, 12 and 24h; the SMs obtained were analyzed for crosslinking density, morphology, crystalline structure, and stability against temperature, pH, and α-amylase hydrolysis. The crosslinking degree at 30 °C was considerably higher than that at 4 °C. SMs prepared at 4 °C for less than 12h incubation had larger size and more porous structure as compared with those prepared at 30 °C, but the morphology became comparable (spherical shape with smooth surface and dense structure) after 24h incubation. All SMs samples displayed amorphous structure. Stability tests revealed that the SMs were very stable under acidic and mild basic pH; however, stability against α-amylase hydrolysis varied depending on incubation temperature and time. PMID:26428134

  6. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films. PMID:21828794

  7. Error trends in SASS winds as functions of atmospheric stability and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    Wind speed measurements obtained with the scatterometer instrument aboard the Seasat satellite are compared equivalent neutral wind measurements obtained from ship reports in the western N. Atlantic and eastern N. Pacific where the concentration of ship reports are high and the ranges of atmospheric stability and sea surface temperature are large. It is found that at low wind speeds the difference between satellite measurements and surface reports depends on sea surface temperature. At wind speeds higher than 8 m/s the dependence was greatly reduced. The removal of systematic errors due to fluctuations in atmospheric stability reduced the r.m.s. difference from 1.7 m/s to 0.8 m/s. It is suggested that further clarification of the effects of fluctuations in atmospheric stability on Seasat wind speed measurements should increase their reliability in the future.

  8. Pharmaceutically active compounds in sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic and aerobic digestion, wastewater stabilization ponds and composting.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2015-01-15

    Sewage sludge disposal onto lands has been stabilized previously but still many pollutants are not efficiently removed. Special interest has been focused on pharmaceutical compounds due to their potential ecotoxicological effects. Nowadays, there is scarce information about their occurrence in different sludge stabilization treatments. In this work, the occurrence of twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds has been studied in sludge from four sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic digestion, aerobic digestion, composting and lagooning. The types of sludge evaluated were primary, secondary, anaerobically-digested and dehydrated, composted, mixed, aerobically-digested and dehydrated and lagoon sludge. Nineteen of the twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds monitored were detected in sewage sludge. The most contaminated samples were primary sludge, secondary sludge and mixed sludge (the average concentrations of studied compounds in these sludges were 179, 310 and 142 μg/kg dm, respectively) while the mean concentrations found in the other types of sewage sludge were 70 μg/kg dm (aerobically-digested sludge), 63 μg/kg dm (lagoon sludge), 12 μg/kg dm (composted sludge) and 8 μg/kg dm (anaerobically-digested sludge). The antibiotics ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were found at the highest concentration levels in most of the analyzed sludge samples (up to 2660 and 4328 μg/kg dm, respectively). Anaerobic-digestion treatment reduced more considerably the concentration of most of the studied compounds than aerobic-digestion (especially in the case of bezafibrate and fluoroquinolones) and more than anaerobic stabilization ponds (in the case of acetaminophen, atenolol, bezafibrate, carbamazepine, 17α-ethinylestradiol, naproxen and salicylic acid). Ecotoxicological risk assessment, of sludge application onto soils, has also been evaluated. Risk quotients, expressed as the ratio between the predicted environmental concentration and the predicted non

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF SIMILARITY THEORY STABILITY CORRECTION TERMS FOR MOMENTUM AND TEMPERATURE, OVER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AND FORESTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many observations of temperature and wind speed profiles have been taken over "ideal" terrain and analyzed to develop the stability correction terms which are commonly used in the application of similarity theory. Fewer observations have been taken and analyzed in this manner ov...

  10. Stability of aberrations with temperature in fast thermal imaging zoom telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, R. C.; Blaine, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to illustrate the application of the athermalization technique, the paper describes an approach adopted for the stabilization of an IR zoom objective. The mechanism devised to introduce the adjustment is discussed. The objective, employing germanium and zinc selenide refracting elements, was designed for use in the 8-13-micron band, with an operating temperature range in excess of 130 C.

  11. IMPROVED TEMPERATURE STABILITY OF SULFUR DIOXIDE SAMPLES COLLECTED BY THE FEDERAL REFERENCE METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an examination of the reagents present in the SO2 Federal Reference Method (FRM) to determine if any change in reagent concentration or condition could bring about substantial, if not complete, retardation of the effect of temperature on the stability of col...

  12. Active Climate Stabilization: Practical Physics-Based Approaches to Prevention of Climate Change

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.; Hyde, T.; Wood, L.

    2002-04-18

    We offer a case for active technical management of the radiative forcing of the temperatures of the Earth's fluid envelopes, rather than administrative management of atmospheric greenhouse gas inputs, in order to stabilize both the global- and time-averaged climate and its mesoscale features. We suggest that active management of radiative forcing entails negligible--indeed, likely strongly negative--economic costs and environmental impacts, and thus best complies with the pertinent mandate of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. We propose that such approaches be swiftly evaluated in sub-scale in the course of an intensive international program.

  13. Unusually high thermal stability and peroxidase activity of cytochrome c in ionic liquid colloidal formulation.

    PubMed

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-11

    Ionic liquid (IL) surfactant choline dioctylsulfosuccinate, [Cho][AOT], formed polydispersed vesicular structures in the IL, ethylmethylimidazolium ethylsulfate, [C2mim][C2OSO3]. Cytochrome c dissolved in such a colloidal medium has shown very high peroxidase activity (∼2 times to that in neat IL and ∼4 times to that in an aqueous buffer). Significantly, the enzyme retained both structural stability and functional activity in IL colloidal solutions up to 180 °C, demonstrating the suitability of the system as a high temperature bio-catalytic reactor. PMID:26529242

  14. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    The cylindrical liquid bridge of arbitrary size surrounded by air or vacuum is a fluid configuration that is essentially unique to the zero-gravity environment. An associated technology, which is enhanced in zero gravity, is the float-zone process of crystal growth, which involves a molten liquid bridge between a feed rod and the growing cylindrical crystal. There are several advantages to the crystal growth process in using long molten zones. Unfortunately, long liquid bridges are more susceptible to g-jitter. Also, a cylindrical liquid bridge in zero gravity is unstable if its length exceeds its circumference, or stated in another way, when the slenderness, defined as the length to diameter ratio, exceeds pi. This is the well-known Rayleigh-Plateau (RP) instability involving the growth of a varicose mode leading to breaking of the bridge. Stabilization of liquid bridges in air in the low-gravity environment of NASA's KC-135 aircraft has been demonstrated for slenderness values in excess of 4.0 using two techniques, passive acoustic stabilization (PAS) and active electrostatic stabilization (AES). The PAS method is theoretically capable of stabilizing a bridge of any length, provided a sound field of appropriate dimension is available. The AES method in its current form controls only the (2,0) mode of the bridge, which is the varicose mode that becomes unstable when the slenderness (S) exceeds pi. By controlling only the (2,0) mode, the current form of the AES method cannot stabilize cylindrical bridges beyond S=4.493 at which point the (3,0) mode becomes unstable. At present, the longest bridge stabilized on the KC-135 by the AES method had a slenderness of 4.4 3. The AES method has the advantage that it can be used to control both the frequency and damping of the (2,0) mode of the bridge. This would be useful in reducing the susceptibility of a long molten zone to g-jitter in that the (2,0) mode frequency could be shifted away from a particularly noisy vibration

  15. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  16. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. PMID:26593560

  17. Absolutely Exponential Stability and Temperature Control for Gas Chromatograph System Under Dwell Time Switching Techniques.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Ming; Wang, Xue-Fang; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a design strategy for temperature control of the gas chromatograph. Usually gas chromatograph is modeled by a simple first order system with a time-delay, and a proportion integration (PI) controller is widely used to regulate the output of the gas chromatograph to the desired temperature. As the characteristics of the gas chromatograph varies at the different temperature range, the single-model based PI controller cannot work well when output temperature varies from one range to another. Moreover, the presence of various disturbance will further deteriorate the performance. In order to improve the accuracy of the temperature control, multiple models are used at the different temperature ranges. With a PI controller designed for each model accordingly, a delay-dependent switching control scheme using the dwell time technique is proposed to ensure the absolute exponential stability of the closed loop. Experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed switching technique. PMID:26316283

  18. Evaluation of pancreatin stability through enzyme activity determination.

    PubMed

    Terra, Gleysson De Paula; Vinícius De Farias, Marcus; Trevisan, Marcello Garcia; Garcia, Jerusa Simone

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatin is a biotechnological product containing an enzyme complex, obtained from porcine pancreas, that is employed in treating pancreatic diseases. Experiments regarding the stability of the pharmaceutical formulation containing pancreatin were performed using standard binary mixtures with 6 excipients in a 1:1 ratio (m/m) and a commercial formulation. To accomplish these goals, samples were stored for 1, 3 and 6 months at 40 ± 1 °C and 75 ± 5 % relative humidity (RH) and 40 ± 1 °C and 0 % RH. Stress testing was also performed. All samples were analyzed to evaluate the α-amylase, lipase and protease activities through UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The results revealed that the excipient proprieties and the storage conditions affected enzyme stability. Humidity was a strong influencing factor in the reduction of α-amylase and protease activities. Stress testing indicated that pH 9.0 and UV light did not induce substantial alterations in enzyme activity. PMID:27383890

  19. Peptide fibrils with altered stability, activity, and cell selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides have some unique and superior features compared to proteins. However, the use of peptides as therapeutics is hampered by their low stability and cell selectivity. In this study, a new lytic peptide (CL-1, FLGALFRALSRLL) was constructed. Under the physiological condition, peptide CL-1 self-assembled into dynamically stable aggregates with fibrils-like structures. Aggregated CL-1 demonstrated dramatically altered activity and stability in comparison with single molecule CL-1 and other lytic peptides: when incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, CL-1 aggregates killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells; CL-1 aggregates kept intact in human serum for more than five hours. Peptide-cell interaction studies performed on lipid monolayers and live human tissue cells revealed that in comparison with monomeric CL-1, aggregated CL-1 had decreased cell affinity and membrane insertion capability on tissue cells. A dynamic process involving aggregate dissociation and rearrangement seemed to be an essential step for membrane bound CL-1 aggregates to realize its cytotoxicity to tissue cells. Our study suggests that peptide aggregation could be as important as the charge and secondary structure of a peptide in affecting peptide-cell interactions. Controlling peptide self-assembly represents a new way to increase the stability and cell selectivity of bioactive peptides for wide biomedical applications. PMID:23713839

  20. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  1. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.

  2. Stability threshold of ion temperature gradient driven mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S. C.

    2008-12-15

    For the first time in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration, the stability threshold of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode is studied by linear gyrokinetic theory. In comparison with tokamaks, the RFP configuration has a shorter connection length and stronger magnetic curvature drift. These effects result in a stronger instability driving mechanism and a larger growth rate in the fluid limit. However, the kinetic theory shows that the temperature slopes required for the excitation of ITG instability are much steeper than the tokamak ones. This is because the effect of Landau damping also becomes stronger due to the shorter connection length, which is dominant and ultimately determines the stability threshold. The required temperature slope for the instability may only be found in the very edge of the plasma and/or near the border of the dominant magnetic island during the quasi-single helicity state of discharge.

  3. Heat Sinking, Cross Talk, and Temperature Stability for Large, Close-Packed Arrays of Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imoto, Naoko; Bandler, SImon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Felicano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, Frederick; Sadleir, Jack; Smith, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    We are developing large, close-packed arrays of x-ray transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters. In such a device, sufficient heat sinking is important to to minimize thermal cross talk between pixels and to stabilize the bath temperature for all pixels. We have measured cross talk on out 8 x 8 arrays and studied the shape and amount of thermal crosstalk as a function of pixel location and efficiency of electrothermal feedback. In this presentation, we will compare measurements made on arrays with and without a backside, heat-sinking copper layer, as well as results of devices on silicon-nitride membranes and on solid substrates, and we will discuss the implications for energy resolution and maximum count rate. We will also discuss the dependence of pulse height upon bath temperature, and the measured and required stability of the bath temperature.

  4. Chemical stability of glass seal interfaces in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeff W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective, oxidation-resistant, high-temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  5. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  6. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  7. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox: long-term process stability and effluent quality at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Laureni, Michele; Falås, Per; Robin, Orlane; Wick, Arne; Weissbrodt, David G; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Ternes, Thomas A; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Joss, Adriano

    2016-09-15

    The implementation of autotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes for the removal of nitrogen from municipal wastewater (known as "mainstream anammox") bears the potential to bring wastewater treatment plants close to energy autarky. The aim of the present work was to assess the long-term stability of partial nitritation/anammox (PN/A) processes operating at low temperatures and their reliability in meeting nitrogen concentrations in the range of typical discharge limits below 2  [Formula: see text] and 10 mgNtot·L(-1). Two main 12-L sequencing batch reactors were operated in parallel for PN/A on aerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater (21 ± 5 [Formula: see text] and residual 69 ± 19 mgCODtot·L(-1)) for more than one year, including over 5 months at 15 °C. The two systems consisted of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and a hybrid MBBR (H-MBBR) with flocculent biomass. Operation at limiting oxygen concentrations (0.15-0.18 [Formula: see text] ) allowed stable suppression of the activity of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at 15 °C with a production of nitrate over ammonium consumed as low as 16% in the MBBR. Promising nitrogen removal rates of 20-40 mgN·L(-1)·d(-1) were maintained at hydraulic retention times of 14 h. Stable ammonium and total nitrogen removal efficiencies over 90% and 70% respectively were achieved. Both reactors reached average concentrations of total nitrogen below 10 mgN·L(-1) in their effluents, even down to 6 mgN·L(-1) for the MBBR, with an ammonium concentration of 2 mgN·L(-1) (set as operational threshold to stop aeration). Furthermore, the two PN/A systems performed almost identically with respect to the biological removal of organic micropollutants and, importantly, to a similar extent as conventional treatments. A sudden temperature drop to 11 °C resulted in significant suppression of anammox activity, although this was rapidly recovered after the temperature was increased back to 15 °C. Analyses of 16S

  8. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  9. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A; Lio, Chan-Wang J; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2016-03-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4(+) T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell-specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β-induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  10. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A.; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A.; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4+ T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell–specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β–induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  11. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  12. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  13. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  14. NEW RENIN-INHIBITORS--STABILITY AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION. PART III.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Winiecka, Iwona; Jaworski, Paweł; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2016-01-01

    A series of new four potential renin inhibitors containing pseudodipeptides were synthesized. Stability for all compounds (1-4) in homogenates of liver, kidney, lung and in serum, gastric, intestinal juice and in the presence of α-chymotrypsin was determined. Compound 1 was unstable, compounds 2, 3 were stable, compound 4 was partly unstable, (liver and kidney homogenates, (α-chymotrypsin solution). Inhibitory activity of the compounds was measured in vitro by HPLC determination of lowering concentration of substrate (angiotensinogen) in the presence of renin and the potential renin inhibitor (compounds 1-4). Compound 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity (1.7 x 10(-6), 9.6 x 10(-7), 1.05 x 10(-9) and 1.31 x 10(-7)M, respectively). PMID:27180425

  15. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:27259687

  16. High-temperature earth-storable propellant acoustic cavity technology. [for combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.; Hines, W. S.; Falk, A. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Design criteria, methods and data, were developed to permit effective design of acoustic cavities for use in regeneratively cooled OME-type engines. This information was developed experimentally from two series of motor firings with high-temperature fuel during which the engine stability was evaluated under various conditions and with various cavity configurations. Supplementary analyses and acoustic model testing were used to aid cavity design and interpretation of results. Results from this program clearly indicate that dynamic stability in regeneratively cooled OME-type engines can be ensured through the use of acoustic cavities. Moreover, multiple modes of instability were successfully suppressed with the cavity.

  17. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar

  18. Effect of compatible and noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Sepasi Tehrani, H; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Kiany, A; Atri, M S; Ariaeenejad, Sh; Kavousi, K; Saboury, A A

    2013-12-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into harmless water and molecular oxygen. Due to various applications of the enzyme in different sectors of industry as well as medicine, the enhancement of stability of the enzyme is important. Effect of various classes of compatible as well as noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity, disaggregation, and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase have been investigated. Compatible osmolytes, proline, xylitol, and valine destabilize the denatured form of the enzyme and, therefore, increase its disaggregation and thermal stability. The increase in the thermal stability is accompanied with a slight increase of activity in comparison to the native enzyme at 25 °C. On the other hand, histidine, a noncompatible osmolyte stabilizes the denatured form of the protein and hence causes an overall decrease in the thermal stability and enzymatic activity of the enzyme. Chemometric results have confirmed the experimental results and have provided insight into the distribution and number of mole fraction components for the intermediates. The increase in melting temperature (Tm) and enzymatic rate could be further amplified by the intrinsic effect of temperature enhancement on the enzymatic activity for the industrial purposes. PMID:23249140

  19. Nanocrystalline brookite with enhanced stability and photocatalytic activity: influence of lanthanum(III) doping.

    PubMed

    Perego, Céline; Wang, Yu-Heng; Durupthy, Olivier; Cassaignon, Sophie; Revel, Renaud; Jolivet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Metastable TiO(2) polymorphs are more promising materials than rutile for specific applications such as photocatalysis or catalysis support. This was clearly demonstrated for the anatase phase but still under consideration for brookite, which is difficult to obtain as pure phase. Moreover, the surface doping of anatase with lanthanum ions is known to both increase the thermal stability of the metastable phase and improve its photocatalytic activity. In this study, TiO(2) nanoparticles of almost only the brookite structure were prepared by a simple sol-gel procedure in aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were then doped with lanthanum(III) ions. The thermal stability of the nanoparticles was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and kinetic models were successfully applied to quantify phases evolutions. The presence of surface-sorbed lanthanum(III) ions increased the phase stability of at least 200 °C and this temperature shift was attributed to the selective phase stabilization of metastable TiO(2) polymorphs. Moreover, the combination of the surface doping ions and the thermal treatment induces the vanishing of the secondary anatase phase, and the photocatalytic tests on the doped brookite nanoparticles demonstrated that the doping increased photocatalytic activity and that the extent depended on the duration of the sintering treatment. PMID:22201282

  20. Alkyl Caffeates Improve the Antioxidant Activity, Antitumor Property and Oxidation Stability of Edible Oil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Shuang-Shuang; Pang, Na; Wang, Fang-Qin; Pang, Fei; Cui, Hong-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Fu-An

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is distributed widely in nature and possesses strong antioxidant activity. However, CA has lower solubility in non-polar media, which limits its application in fat-soluble food. To increase the lipophilicity of natural antioxidant CA, a series of alkyl caffeates were synthesized and their antioxidant and antitumor activities were investigated. The antioxidant parameters, including the induction period, acid value and unsaturated fatty acid content, of the alkyl caffeates in edible oil were firstly investigated. The results indicated that alkyl caffeates had a lower DPPH IC50 (14–23 µM) compared to CA, dibutyl hydroxy toluene (BHT) and Vitamin C (24–51 µM), and significantly inhibited four human cancer cells (SW620, SW480, SGC7901 and HepG2) with inhibition ratio of 71.4–78.0% by a MTT assay. With regard to the induction period and acid value assays, methyl and butyl caffeates had higher abilities than BHT to restrain the oxidation process and improve the stability of edible oil. The addition of ethyl caffeate to oil allowed maintenance of a higher unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester content (68.53%) at high temperatures. Overall, the alkyl caffeats with short chain length (n<5) assessed better oxidative stability than those with long chain length. To date, this is the first report to the correlations among the antioxidant activity, anticancer activity and oxidative stability of alkyl caffeates. PMID:24760050

  1. A visual physiological temperature sensor developed with gelatin-stabilized luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing; Zou, Hongyan; Liu, Zexi; Gao, Mingxuan; Chen, Binbin; Li, Yuanfang; Huang, Chengzhi

    2015-10-01

    A visual physiological temperature sensor was successfully developed with newly hydrothermally prepared fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) at room temperature using gelatin as the protective and reducing agent. The as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs was water-soluble, uniform and exhibited a narrow distribution with an average size of 1.16 nm, showing a maximum emission band at 552 nm (2.45 eV) when excited at 445 nm (2.79 eV). The large Stokes shift of 110 nm of the gelatin-stabilized AgNCs makes it actually applicable with very low background and light scattering interferences. It was found that the as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs is temperature-sensitive over the range from 5°C to 45°C, and thus a visual physiological temperature sensor could be developed with the gelatin-AgNCs as under the irradiation of visible light. PMID:26078186

  2. Practical engineering: control of active systems using the stagnation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lunde, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    Solar active systems with flat plate collectors are discussed with reference to the temperature at which the system should be activated. It is concluded that the system should be activated when the stagnation temperature (temperature under the absorber plate when no fluid is circulating) equals the temperature of the fluid in storage. A thermistor Wheatstone bridge control system is described which will eliminate pump relay chatter and the permissible control differential is calculated from the collector efficiency curve. To avoid dedication of an entire collector to house the control system, a method is described for determining the stagnation temperature using a portion of an active collector. For an active solar hot water system, a calculation is carried out to show that a 2/sup 0/F temperature differential (stagnation temperature-storage temperature) is satisfactory. (MJJ)

  3. Radiation, temperature, and vacuum effects on piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Postolache, Cristian; Tudose, Mihai

    2016-03-01

    The effect of radiation, temperature, and vacuum (RTV) on piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWASs) is discussed. This study is relevant for extending structural health monitoring (SHM) methods to space vehicle applications that are likely to be subjected to harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures (hot and cold), cosmic radiation, and interplanetary vacuums. This study contains both theoretical and experimental investigations with the use of electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS). In the theoretical part, analytical models of circular PWAS resonators were used to derive analytical expressions for the temperature sensitivities of EMIS resonance and antiresonance behavior. Closed-form expressions for frequency and peak values at resonance and antiresonance were derived as functions of the coefficients of thermal expansion, {α }1, {α }2, {α }3; the Poisson ratio, ν and its sensitivity, \\partial ν /\\partial T; the relative compliance gradient (\\partial {s}11E/\\partial T)/{s}11E; and the Bessel function root, z and its sensitivity, \\partial z/\\partial T. In the experimental part, tests were conducted to subject the PWAS transducers to RTV conditions. In one set of experiments, several RTV exposure, cycles were applied with EMIS signatures recorded at the beginning and after each of the repeated cycles. In another set of experiments, PWAS transducers were subjected to various temperatures and the EMIS signatures were recorded at each temperature after stabilization. The processing of measured EMIS data from the first set of experiments revealed that the resonance and antiresonance frequencies changed by less than 1% due to RTV exposure, whereas the resonance and antiresonance amplitudes changed by around 15%. After processing an individual set of EMIS data from the second set of experiments, it was determined that the relative temperature sensitivity of the antiresonance frequency ({f}{{AR}}/{f}{{AR}}) is approximately 63.1× {10

  4. Piezoelectric properties and temperature stability of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluorethylene) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Stack, G M; Ting, R Y

    1989-01-01

    Piezoelectric measurements were made on several copolymers of vinylidene fluoride and trifluorethylene having a vinylidene fluoride concentration in the range of 65-70%. The hydrostatic g constant showed only a slight dependence on pressure, and pressures up to 35 MPa caused no apparent loss of the piezoelectric activity. A significant increase in the value of the hydrostatic g constant was observed both at temperatures above and considerably below the room temperature. The anomalous result obtained upon cooling below the room temperature can be attributed to the glass transition temperature of the trifluoroethylene comonomer. Temperature aging studies were performed at high temperatures using films of these copolymers. A significant loss of piezoelectric activity occurred after long-time exposure. Isothermal studies at various aging temperatures revealed that this decay continued over a long time span. The aging behavior characteristically followed a linear dependence on the logarithm of aging time. PMID:18285001

  5. High temperature stability testing of Ge-doped and F-doped Fabry-Perot fibre optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Mathew, Jinesh; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R...

    2016-05-01

    We present high temperature (~1100°C) stability tests of, Ge-doped and F-doped, optical fibre sensors. Our analysis includes the variation in their behaviours within high temperature environments and how the dopant diffusion affects their long term stability.

  6. Stability of cobalt-carbon high temperature fixed points doped with iron and platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kňazovická, L.; Lowe, D.; Machin, G.; Davies, H.; Rani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High temperature fixed points (HTFPs) are stable and repeatable and make comparison of temperature scales possible at a level of uncertainty not previously possible. However, they potentially lack objectivity if the fixed-point temperature is known. Five HTFPs were constructed, one pure Co-C, two Co-C doped with Fe and two Co-C doped with Pt of differing concentrations. The candidate dopants were identified through thermochemical modelling as likely to give maximum temperature shift with minimum increase in melting range. The temperature differences of the doped systems from the pure system were determined and it was found that the addition of Fe depressed the melting temperature and the addition of Pt elevated the melting temperature, qualitatively in line with the thermochemical modelling. The higher concentration doped HTFPs were then aged for approximately 100 h with continuous melting-freezing cycles and the difference to the undoped Co-C HTFP remeasured. These differences were found to agree with those of the unaged results within the measurement uncertainties, confirming artefact stability. It is clear that the doping of HTFPs is a powerful way of constructing stable and reliable high temperature scale comparison artefacts of unknown temperature.

  7. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  8. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep

    1997-01-01

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  9. Stability Constants of Np(V) Complexes with Phosphate at Variable Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Rao, Linfeng

    2006-05-04

    A solvent extraction method was used to determine the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with phosphate in 1.0 M NaClO4 from 25o C to 55o C. A morpholine-4-ethanesulfonic acid buffer was used to maintain pH at about 5 in the Np(V)-H2PO4- system. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of phosphate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 Np(V)-H2PO4- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [H2PO4-] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van’t Hoff equation.

  10. Effects of Temperature on the Performance and Stability of Recent COTS Silicon Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Silicon oscillators have lately emerged to serve as potential replacement for crystal and ceramic resonators to provide timing and clock signals in electronic systems. These semiconductor-based devices, including those that are based on MEMS technology, are reported to be resistant to vibration and shock (an important criteria for systems to be deployed in space), immune to EMI, consume very low current, require few or no external components, and cover a wide range of frequency for analog and digital circuits. In this work, the performance of five recently-developed COTS silicon oscillator chips from different manufacturers was determined within a temperature range that extended beyond the individual specified range of operation. In addition, restart capability at extreme temperatures, i.e. power switched on while the device was soaking at extreme (hot or cold) temperature, and the effects of thermal cycling under a wide temperature range on the operation of these silicon oscillators were also investigated. Performance characterization of each oscillator was obtained in terms of its output frequency, duty cycle, rise and fall times, and supply current at specific test temperatures. The five different oscillators tested operated beyond their specified temperature region, with some displaying excellent stability throughout the whole test temperature range. Others experienced some instability at certain temperature test points as evidenced by fluctuation in the output frequency. Recovery from temperature-induced changes took place when excessive temperatures were removed. It should also be pointed out that all oscillators were able to restart at the extreme test temperatures and to withstand the limited thermal cycling without undergoing any significant changes in their characteristics. In addition, no physical damage was observed in the packaging material of any of these silicon oscillators due to extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling. It is recommended

  11. Role of conserved Met112 residue in the catalytic activity and stability of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jang, Do Soo; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Hong, Bee Hak; Yun, Young Sung; Shin, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-10-01

    Ketosteroid isomerase (3-oxosteroid Δ(5)-Δ(4)-isomerase, KSI) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes allylic rearrangement of the 5,6-double bond of Δ(5)-3-ketosteroid to 4,5-position by stereospecific intramolecular transfer of a proton. The active site of KSI is formed by several hydrophobic residues and three catalytic residues (Tyr14, Asp38, and Asp99). In this study, we investigated the role of a hydrophobic Met112 residue near the active site in the catalysis, steroid binding, and stability of KSI. Replacing Met112 with alanine (yields M112A) or leucine (M112L) decreased the kcat by 20- and 4-fold, respectively. Compared with the wild type (WT), M112A and M112L KSIs showed increased KD values for equilenin, an intermediate analogue; these changes suggest that loss of packing at position 112 might lead to unfavorable steroid binding, thereby resulting in decreased catalytic activity. Furthermore, M112A and M112L mutations reduced melting temperature (Tm) by 6.4°C and 2.5°C, respectively. These changes suggest that favorable packing in the core is important for the maintenance of stability in KSI. The M112K mutation decreased kcat by 2000-fold, compared with the WT. In M112K KSI structure, a new salt bridge was formed between Asp38 and Lys112. This bridge could change the electrostatic potential of Asp38, and thereby contribute to the decreased catalytic activity. The M112K mutation also decreased the stability by reducing Tm by 4.1°C. Our data suggest that the Met112 residue may contribute to the catalytic activity and stability of KSI by providing favorable hydrophobic environments and compact packing in the catalytic core. PMID:27375051

  12. High-Temperature Stability and Grain Boundary Complexion Formation in a Nanocrystalline Cu-Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Cu-3 at.% Zr powders with ~20 nm average grain size were created with mechanical alloying and their thermal stability was studied from 550-950°C. Annealing drove Zr segregation to the grain boundaries, which led to the formation of amorphous intergranular complexions at higher temperatures. Grain growth was retarded significantly, with 1 week of annealing at 950°C, or 98% of the solidus temperature, only leading to coarsening of the average grain size to 54 nm. The enhanced thermal stability can be connected to both a reduction in grain boundary energy with doping as well as the precipitation of ZrC particles. High mechanical strength is retained even after these aggressive heat treatments, showing that complexion engineering may be a viable path toward the fabrication of bulk nanostructured materials with excellent properties.

  13. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2003-08-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  14. Novel emulsions stabilized by pH and temperature sensitive microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, To; Auweter, Helmut; Behrens, Sven

    2006-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) (PNIPAM-MAA) microgel particles in aqueous solution exhibit a volume phase transition that can be induced by changes of either pH or temperature. In the swollen state, these microgels self-assemble at an octanol-water interface and can be used to stabilize surfactant-free oil-in-water emulsions. This stabilizing efficiency is retained even in the collapsed state, provided that the microgels are fully charged. At very low charge (low pH), on the other hand, the microgels migrate completely into the oil phase, and the emulsion breaks. In an intermediate regime of practical interest the emulsion stability can be tuned by small adjustments of pH or temperature. Because of this unprecedented stability control, we believe that such stimulus-responsive charged microgels have a great potential for applications in the field of cosmetic or pharmaceutical formulations. Conceptually they belong to a new class of emulsifiers combining properties of both classical surfactants and solid particles.

  15. Low-temperature electrochemical characterization of sputtered yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ching-Han; Chou, Chen-Chia

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure and electrical conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films with Pt electrodes were evaluated through three configurations in the temperature range from 25 to 500 °C. Using ac-impedance spectra, the contribution of the Si substrate to resistance was separated by an equivalent-circuit analysis. The colossal ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films at temperatures higher than 125 °C was observed parallel to the interface. The total ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films increased significantly in comparison w the bulk YSZ electrolyte. An alternative conductive pathway ascribed to the homogeneous and heterogeneous interfaces with high strain and charge-containing defects was proposed.

  16. Effects of fan inlet temperature disturbances on the stability of a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of steady-state and time-dependent fan inlet total temperature disturbances on the stability of a TF30-P-3 turbofan engine were determined. Disturbances were induced by a gaseous-hydrogen-fueled burner system installed upstream of the fan inlet. Data were obtained at a fan inlet Reynolds number index of 0.50 and at a low-pressure-rotor corrected speed of 90 percent of military speed. All tests were conducted with a 90 deg extent of the fan inlet circumference exposed to above-average temperatures.

  17. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  18. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  19. Supplementary active stabilization of nonrigid gravity gradient satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of active control for stability augmentation of passive gravity gradient satellites is investigated. The reaction jet method of control is the main interest. Satellite nonrigidity is emphasized. The reduction in the Hamiltonian H is used as a control criteria. The velocities, relative to local vertical, of the jets along their force axes are shown to be of fundamental significance. A basic control scheme which satisfies the H reduction criteria is developed. Each jet is fired when its velocity becomes appropriately large. The jet is de-energized when velocity reaches zero. Firing constraints to preclude orbit alteration may be needed. Control is continued until H has been minimized. This control policy is investigated using impulse and rectangular pulse models of the jet outputs.

  20. Effect of temperature on studtite stability: Thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, A.; Casas, I.; Giménez, J.; Quiñones, J.; de Pablo, J.

    2009-03-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the influence of temperature on the stability of the uranyl peroxide tetrahydrate (UO2O2 · 4H2O) studtite, which may form on the spent nuclear fuel surface as a secondary solid phase. Preliminary results on the synthesis of studtite in the laboratory at different temperatures have shown that the solid phases formed when mixing hydrogen peroxide and uranyl nitrate depends on temperature. Studtite is obtained at 298 K, meta-studtite (UO2O2 · 2H2O) at 373 K, and meta-schoepite (UO3 · nH2O, with n < 2) at 423 K. Because of the temperature effect on the stability of uranyl peroxides, a thermogravimetric (TG) study of studtite has been performed. The main results obtained are that three transformations occur depending on temperature. At 403 K, studtite transforms to meta-studtite, at 504 K, meta-studtite transforms to meta-schoepite, and, finally, at 840 K, meta-schoepite transforms to U3O8. By means of the differential scanning calorimetry the molar enthalpies of the transformations occurring at 403 and 504 K have been determined to be -42 ± 10 and -46 ± 2 kJ mol-1, respectively.

  1. The temperature effect on the adsorption mechanism of polyacrylamide on the silica surface and its stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the adsorption mechanism of polyacrylamide (PAM) on the silica surface was studied in the temperature range 15-35 °C. The structure of polymer adsorption layer was determined from spectrophotometric, viscosity, surface charge and zeta potential measurements. These methods enable determination of the following parameters: adsorbed amount of polymer, macromolecules conformation in the solution and thickness of the polymer adsorption layer, surface charge density and zeta potential of SiO2 particles in the absence and presence of PAM. The measurements of stability of silica suspension without and with adsorbed polyacrylamide were also carried out. The obtained results indicate that temperature influences the conformation of PVA chains in the solution and the structure of polymer adsorption layer. The temperature rise causes polymer coils developing which results in: the decrease of polymer adsorption, the increase of linear dimensions of PAM chains in the solution, the creation of thicker adsorption layer of the polymer on the solid surface and the slight lowering of zeta potential of solid particles. Taking into account the conformational changes of polymer chains with the increasing temperature main reasons responsible for stability of the investigated system were given.

  2. Stability of a Crystal Oscillator, Type Si530, Inside and Beyond its Specified Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Data acquisition and control systems depend on timing signals for proper operation and required accuracy. These clocked signals are typically provided by some form of an oscillator set to produce a repetitive, defined signal at a given frequency. Crystal oscillators are commonly used because they are less expensive, smaller, and more reliable than other types of oscillators. Because of the inherent characteristics of the crystal, the oscillators exhibit excellent frequency stability within the specified range of operational temperature. In some cases, however, some compensation techniques are adopted to further improve the thermal stability of a crystal oscillator. Very limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) crystal oscillators at temperatures beyond the manufacturer's specified operating temperature range. This information is very crucial if any of these parts were to be used in circuits designed for use in space exploration missions where extreme temperature swings and thermal cycling are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the operation of Silicon Laboratories crystal oscillator, type Si530, under specified and extreme ambient temperatures.

  3. Stabilized composite membranes and membrane electrode assemblies for elevated temperature/low relative humidity PEFC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Vijay; Kunz, H. R.; Fenton, J. M.

    An approach is presented to combine existing heteropolyacid (HPA) additive and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) stabilization techniques to yield a stabilized MEA for operation at 120 °C and 35% relative humidity (RH). MEAs were prepared using Nafion ®/phosphotungstic acid composite membranes with a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) particle size of 30-50 nm. The PTA additive was stabilized by substituting its protons with cesium counter ions. The Nafion ® in the membrane and electrodes was simultaneously converted to the Cs + form by an ion-exchange process. The melt processability of the Nafion ® in the Cs + form permitted the MEA to be heat treated at 200 °C and 30 atm, promoting the development of a durable membrane/electrode interface. The prior stabilization of the PTA permitted MEA re-protonation with minimal additive loss. FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to present evidence of ion-exchange and protonation. In situ electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements confirmed ion-exchange and protonation within the active portion of the stabilized MEA. The stabilization process did not affect the integrity of the MEA, with the hydrogen crossover currents through the membrane remaining unchanged at 2 mA cm -2. The MEA was evaluated at 120 °C and 35% relative humidity in an operating fuel cell environment and yielded respectable performance under these conditions.

  4. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  5. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Oh, Jong-Suk

    2012-12-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  6. Active electrostatic control of liquid bridge dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, David B; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L

    2004-11-01

    Stabilization of cylindrical liquid bridges beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit has been demonstrated in both Plateau-tank experiments and in short-duration low gravity on NASA KC-135 aircraft using an active electrostatic control method. The method controls the (2,0) capillary mode using an optical modal-amplitude detector and mode-coupled electrostatic feedback stress. The application of mode-coupled stresses to a liquid bridge is also a very useful way to study mode dynamics. A pure (2,0)-mode oscillation can be excited by periodic forcing and then the forcing can be turned off to allow for a free decay from which the frequency and damping of the mode is measured. This can be done in the presence or absence of feedback control. Mode-coupled feedback stress applied in proportion to modal amplitude with appropriate gain leads to stiffening of the mode allowing for stabilization beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit. If the opposite sign of gain is applied the mode frequency is reduced. It has also been demonstrated that, by applying feedback in proportion to the modal velocity, the damping of the mode can be increased or decreased depending on the velocity gain. Thus, both the mode frequency and damping can be independently controlled at the same time and this has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) has its own modes of oscillation, some of which are in a low frequency range comparable to the (2,0)-mode frequency of typical liquid bridges. In the event that a vibration mode of the ISS were close to the frequency of a capillary mode it would be possible, with active electrostatic control, to shift the capillary-mode frequency away from that of the disturbance and simultaneously add artificial damping to further reduce the effect of the g-jitter. In principle, this method could be applied to any fluid configuration with a free surface. PMID:15644377

  7. A method to stabilize the temperature dependent performance of G-APD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Yoonsuk; Choi, Yong; Ho Jung, Jin; Jung, Jiwoong

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a compensation method to stabilize the temperature dependent performance of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) arrays for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The compensation method is used to identify the bias voltage range that provides stable performance even at different temperatures using the G-APD's characteristics, and to control the photo-peak variation as a function of temperature using the preamplifier gain within the identified bias voltage range. A pair of G-APD detectors and temperature sensors were located in the temperature chamber and the preamplifiers which can control the gain of the detectors using the digital potentiometer were positioned outside the chamber. The performance of the G-APD detector, especially energy resolution and coincidence timing resolution, was characterized as a function of bias voltage at different temperatures from 20 °C to 40 °C at 5 °C increments; the energy resolution, coincidence timing resolution, and photo-peak position of all channels of G-APD PET detectors before and after the preamplifier gain correction were then measured and compared. The results of this study demonstrated that the optimal bias voltage range providing the good energy and coincidence timing resolution, 12.1±1.2% and 1.30±0.09 ns, respectively, could be identified at the temperature range and the photo-peak variation and the performance at different temperatures could be stabilized by adjusting the preamplifier gain within the identified bias voltage range. We concluded the proposed method to be reliable and useful for the development of the PET system using G-APD arrays.

  8. Thermal stabilization of chromium slag by sewage sludge: effects of sludge quantity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changlin; Zhang, Hua; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of detoxifying chromium slag by sewage sludge, synthetic chromium slag containing 3% of Cr(VI) was mixed with sewage sludge followed by thermal treatment in nitrogen gas for stabilizing chromium. The effects of slag to sludge ratio (0.5, 1 and 2) and temperature (200, 300, 500, 700 and 900 degrees C) on treatment efficiency were investigated. During the mixing process before thermal treatment, 59.8%-99.7% of Cr(VI) was reduced, but Cr could be easily leached from the reduction product. Increasing heating temperature and decreasing slag to sludge ratio strengthened the reduction and stabilization of Cr(VI). When the slag to sludge ratio was 0.5 and thermal treatment temperature was 300 degrees C, the total leached Cr and Cr(VI) declined to 0.55 mg/L and 0.17 mg/L respectively, and 45.5% of Cr in the thermally treated residue existed as residual fraction. A two-stage mechanism was proposed for the reduction and stabilization of Cr. PMID:21175004

  9. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  10. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  11. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Steven; Wu, Jiunn-Jeng; Trimble, Curtis A.

    1992-06-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  12. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.; La Haye, R.J.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A.S.

    2006-05-15

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500 ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1 cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an

  13. Shoulder Musculature Activity and Stabilization During Upper Extremity Weight-Bearing Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pontillo, Marisa; Kremenic, Ian J.; McHugh, Malachy P.; Mullaney, Michael J.; Tyler, Timothy F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Upper extremity weight-bearing exercises are routinely used in physical therapy for patients with shoulder pathology. However, little evidence exists regarding the demand on the shoulder musculature. Objective To examine changes in shoulder muscle activity and center of pressure during upper extremity weight-bearing exercises of increasing difficulty. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) and kinetic data were recorded from both shoulders of 15 healthy subjects (10 male and 5 female). Participants were tested in a modified tripod position under three conditions of increasing difficulty: (1) hand directly on the force plate, (2) on a green Stability Trainer™ and (3) on a blue Stability Trainer™. Ground reaction forces were recorded for each trial. Surface EMG was recorded from the serratus anterior, pectoralis major, upper trapezius, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, anterior deltoid, posterior deltoid, and the lateral head of the triceps muscles. Results Mean deviation from center of pressure significantly increased when using the Stability Trainer™ pads. The activities of the triceps, serratus anterior, and anterior deltoid muscles significantly increased as each trial progressed, irrespective of stability condition. Additionally, activity in the anterior deltoid, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles significantly decreased with increasing difficulty, whereas activity in the triceps muscles significantly increased. Discussion and Conclusion Balancing on a foam pad made it more difficult to maintain the upper extremity in a stable position. However, this activity did not alter the proprioceptive stimulus enough to elicit an increase in shoulder muscle activation. While the results on this study support the use of different level Stability Trainers™ to facilitate neuromuscular re-education, a less compliant unstable surface may produce larger training effects. PMID:21522206

  14. Enhanced thermostability of mesophilic endoglucanase Z with a high catalytic activity at active temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jung; Joo, Ji Eun; Jeon, Sang Duck; Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Um, Young Soon; Han, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This is the first study for therrmostable mutants of mesophilic endoglucanase EngZ from Clostridium cellulovorans using by site-directed mutagenesis. K94R, S365P and their double mutant K94R/S365P had a wide range of active temperatures (30-60°C). In addition, the optimal temperature of K94R/S365P was increased by 7.5°C. K94R/S365P retained 78.3% relative activity at 70°C, while the wild type retained only 5.8%. Especially, K94R/S365P remained 45.1-fold higher activity than the wild type at 70°C. In addition, K94R/S365P was 3.1-fold higher activity than the wild type at 42.5°C, which is the optimal temperature of the wild type. K94R/S365P showed also stimulated in 2.5-fold lower concentration of CaCl2 and delayed aggregation temperature in the presence of CaCl2 compared to the wild type. In pH stability, K94R/S365P was not influenced, but the optimum pH was transferred from pH 7 to pH 6. In long-term hydrolysis, K94R/S365P reduced the newly released reducing sugar yields after 12h reaction; however, the yields consistently increased until 72h. Finally, the total reducing sugar of K94R/S365P was 5.0-fold higher than the wild type at 50°C, pH6. EngZ (K94R/S365P) can support information to develop thermostability of GH9 endoglucanase with a high catalytic efficiency as the potential industrial bioprocess candidate. PMID:26808019

  15. Stability of cytokines, chemokines and soluble activation markers in unprocessed blood stored under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Quint, Joshua J.; Li, Qian; Gjertson, David; Butch, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarkers such as cytokines, chemokines, and soluble activation markers can be unstable when processing of blood is delayed. The stability of various biomarkers in serum and plasma was investigated when unprocessed blood samples were stored for up to 24 h at room and refrigerator temperature. Methods Blood was collected from 16 healthy volunteers. Unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood was stored at room (20–25 °C) and refrigerator temperature (4–8 °C) for 0.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h after collection before centrifugation and separation of serum and plasma. Samples were batch tested for various biomarkers using commercially available immunoassays. Statistically significant changes were determined using the generalized estimating equation. Results IFN-γ, sIL-2Rα, sTNF-RII and β2-microglobulin were stable in unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood samples stored at either room or refrigerator temperature for up to 24 h. IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1β and RANTES were unstable in heparinized blood at room temperature; TNF-α, and MIP-1β were unstable in unprocessed serum at room temperature; IL-12 was unstable in unprocessed serum at refrigerator temperature; and neopterin was unstable in unprocessed EDTA blood at room temperature. IL-1ra was stable only in unprocessed serum at room temperature. Conclusion All the biomarkers studied, with the exception of IL-1ra, were stable in unprocessed EDTA blood stored at refrigerator temperature for 24 h. This indicates that blood for these biomarkers should be collected in EDTA and if delays in processing are anticipated the unseparated blood should be stored at refrigerator temperature until processing. PMID:27208752

  16. Reduced Crystallization Temperature Methodology for Polymer Selection in Amorphous Solid Dispersions: Stability Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Chandan; Telang, Chitra; Schwabe, Robert; Zhong, Li

    2016-09-01

    API-polymer interactions, used to select the right polymeric matrix with an aim to stabilize an amorphous dispersion, are routinely studied using spectroscopic and/or calorimetric techniques (i.e., melting point depression). An alternate selection tool has been explored to rank order polymers for formation of stable amorphous dispersions as a pragmatic method for polymer selection. Reduced crystallization temperature of API, a parameter introduced by Zhou et al.,1 was utilized in this study for rank ordering interactions in API-polymeric systems. The trends in reduced crystallization temperature monitored over polymer concentration range of up to 20% polymer loading were utilized to calculate "crystallization parameter" or CP for two model systems (nifedipine and BI ABC). The rank order of CP, i.e., a measure of API-polymer interaction, for nifedipine followed the order PVP > PVP-VA > Soluplus > HPMCAS > PV Ac > PAA. This rank ordering was correlated to published results of molecular interactions and physical stability for nifedipine. A different rank ordering was observed for BI ABC: PAA > PVP > HPMCAS > Soluplus > PVPV-VA > PVAc. Interactions for BI ABC were not as differentiated when compared to nifedipine based on CP trends. BI ABC dispersions at drug loadings between 40 and 60% were physically stable for prolonged periods under ICH conditions as well as accelerated stress. We propose that large CP differences among polymers could be predictive of stability outcomes. Acceptable stability at pharmaceutically relevant drug loadings would suggest that the relative influence of downstream processes, such as polymer solubility in various solvents, process suitability and selection, and more importantly supersaturation potential, should be higher compared to stability considerations while developing compounds like BI ABC. PMID:27414755

  17. Experimentally increased temperature and hypoxia affect stability of social hierarchy and metabolism of the Amazonian cichlid Apistogramma agassizii.

    PubMed

    Kochhann, Daiani; Campos, Derek Felipe; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to understand how changes in temperature and oxygen could influence social behaviour and aerobic metabolism of the Amazonian dwarf cichlid Apistogramma agassizii. Social hierarchies were established over a period of 96h by observing the social interactions, feeding behaviour and shelter use in groups of four males. In the experimental environment, temperature was increased to 29°C in the high-temperature treatment, and oxygen lowered to 1.0mg·L(-1)O2 in the hypoxia treatment. Fish were maintained at this condition for 96h. The control was maintained at 26°C and 6.6mg·L(-1)O2. After the experimental exposure, metabolism was measured as routine metabolic rate (RMR) and electron transport system (ETS) activity. There was a reduction in hierarchy stability at high-temperature. Aggression changed after environmental changes. Dominant and subdominant fish at high temperatures increased their biting, compared with control-dominant. In contrast, hypoxia-dominant fish decreased their aggressive acts compared with all other fish. Shelter use decreased in control and hypoxic dominant fish. Dominant fish from undisturbed environments eat more than their subordinates. There was a decrease of RMR in fish exposed to the hypoxic environment when compared with control or high-temperature fish, independent of social position. Control-dominant fish had higher RMR than their subordinates. ETS activity increased in fish exposed to high temperatures; however, there was no effect on social rank. Our study reinforces the importance of environmental changes for the maintenance of hierarchies and their characteristics and highlights that most of the changes occur in the dominant position. PMID:26387464

  18. Iron Metallodrugs: Stability, Redox Activity and Toxicity against Artemia salina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron metallodrugs comprise mineral supplements, anti-hypertensive agents and, more recently, magnetic nanomaterials, with both therapeutic and diagnostic roles. As biologically-active metal compounds, concern has been raised regarding the impact of these compounds when emitted to the environment and associated ecotoxicological effects for the fauna. In this work we assessed the relative stability of several iron compounds (supplements based on glucoheptonate, dextran or glycinate, as well as 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl (TMH) derivatives of ferrocene) against high affinity models of biological binding, calcein and aprotransferrin, via a fluorimetric method. Also, the redox-activity of each compound was determined in a physiologically relevant medium. Toxicity toward Artemia salina at different developmental stages was measured, as well as the amount of lipid peroxidation. Our results show that polymer-coated iron metallodrugs are stable, non-redox-active and non-toxic at the concentrations studied (up to 300 µM). However, TMH derivatives of ferrocene were less stable and more redox-active than the parent compound, and TMH-ferrocene displayed toxicity and lipid peroxidation to A. salina, unlike the other compounds. Our results indicate that iron metallodrugs based on polymer coating do not present direct toxicity at low levels of emission; however other iron species (eg. metallocenes), may be deleterious for aquatic organisms. We suggest that ecotoxicity depends more on metal speciation than on the total amount of metal present in the metallodrugs. Future studies with discarded metallodrugs should consider the chemical speciation of the metal present in the composition of the drug. PMID:25849743

  19. Halide-stabilized LiBH4, a room-temperature lithium fast-ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hideki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Takamura, Hitoshi; Ando, Mariko; Noda, Yasuto; Karahashi, Taiki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-28

    Solid state lithium conductors are attracting much attention for their potential applications to solid-state batteries and supercapacitors of high energy density to overcome safety issues and irreversible capacity loss of the currently commercialized ones. Recently, we discovered a new class of lithium super ionic conductors based on lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)). LiBH(4) was found to have conductivity as high as 10(-2) Scm(-1) accompanied by orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition above 115 degrees C. Polarization to the lithium metal electrode was shown to be extremely low, providing a versatile anode interface for the battery application. However, the high transition temperature of the superionic phase has limited its applications. Here we show that a chemical modification of LiBH(4) can stabilize the superionic phase even below room temperature. By doping of lithium halides, high conductivity can be obtained at room temperature. Both XRD and NMR confirmed room-temperature stabilization of superionic phase for LiI-doped LiBH(4). The electrochemical measurements showed a great advantage of this material as an extremely lightweight lithium electrolyte for batteries of high energy density. This material will open alternative opportunities for the development of solid ionic conductors other than previously known lithium conductors. PMID:19119813

  20. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Yu, Xinzhi; Song, Chao; Pang, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Biochar produced by biomass pyrolysis has the advantage of carbon sequestration. However, some of the carbon atoms in biochar are not very stable. In this study, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar was investigated using the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) oxidation spectrophotometric method. The results show that the carbon yield and ratios of H/C and O/C decreased from 71.72%, 0.71, and 0.32 to 38.48%, 0.22, and 0.06, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 300°C to 700°C. Moreover, the main oxygen-containing functional groups gradually decreased, while the degree of aromatization increased accordingly. The biochar showed a better stability at a higher pyrolysis temperature. The proportion of carbon loss, i.e., the amount of oxidized carbon with respect to the total carbon of the biochar, decreased from 16.52% to 6.69% with increasing temperature. PMID:27481469

  1. Ultrasonic waste activated sludge disintegration for improving anaerobic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tiehm, A; Nickel, K; Zellhorn, M; Neis, U

    2001-06-01

    The pretreatment of waste activated sludge by ultrasonic disintegration was studied in order to improve the anaerobic sludge stabilization. The ultrasound frequency was varied within a range from 41 to 3217 kHz. The impact of different ultrasound intensities and treatment times was examined. Sludge disintegration was most significant at low frequencies. Low-frequency ultrasound creates large cavitation bubbles which upon collapse initiate powerful jet streams exerting strong shear forces in the liquid. The decreasing sludge disintegration efficiency observed at higher frequencies was attributed to smaller cavitation bubbles which do not allow the initiation of such strong shear forces. Short sonication times resulted in sludge floc deagglomeration without the destruction of bacteria cells. Longer sonication brought about the break-up of cell walls, the sludge solids were distintegrated and dissolved organic compounds were released. The anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge following ultrasonic pretreatment causing microbial cell lysis was significantly improved. There was an increase in the volatile solids degradation as well as an increase in the biogas production. The increase in digestion efficiency was proportional to the degree of sludge disintegration. To a lesser degree the deagglomeration of sludge flocs also augmented the anaerobic volatile solids degradation. PMID:11337847

  2. pH and temperature stability of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex-loaded chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Majeed, Hamid; Antoniou, John; Li, Yue; Ma, Yun; Yokoyama, Wallace; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2016-09-20

    The oxidative stability of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) incorporated as inclusion complexes (ICs) in sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin sodium (SBE-β-CD) and then ionotropically crosslinked with chitosan hydrochloride (CSH) into nanoparticles were investigated. EGCG-loaded CSH-SBE-β-CD nanoparticles (CSNs) were physically unstable at higher pH and temperature. The particle size of CSNs was unchanged in the pH range of 3-5, but the microenvironment of EGCG-IC appeared to be intact until the pH increased to 6.5 by fluorescence spectroscopy. The physical structure of EGCG-ICs was also affected during storage in addition to CSNs, which was further affected as temperature increased from 25 to 55°C. The decrease in antioxidant activities of EGCG-ICs and free EGCG with increasing pH, storage time and temperature were modest compared to the prominent decreases in antioxidant activities of EGCG-loaded CSNs. The extreme entrapment of EGCG-ICs and/or free EGCG in the aggregated CSNs restricted the release of EGCG, thus inhibiting the antioxidant activities. PMID:27261758

  3. An investigation on actuation behavior of polyacrylonitrile gel fibers as a function of microstructure and stabilization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbaha, Hamideh; Arbab, Shahram; Zeinolebadi, Ahmad; Nourpanah, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel fibers show great potential to be used as actuators due to their mechanical response to chemical stimuli. In this work the response of PAN gel fibers to pH variation is studied. Three commercial grade PAN fibers with different chemical composition are investigated. Fibers are stabilized at temperatures varying from 100 to 275 °C. The stabilized fibers are hydrolyzed in an alkaline solution to obtain gel fibers. Gel fibers are stepwise immersed in solutions with pH varying between 0 and 14. Length/diameter variations are measured by optical microscopy. Results suggest that there is an optimum stabilization temperature at which a maximum response to pH change is obtained. This temperature corresponds to the onset of cyclization reactions, and is determined by the chemical composition of starting material. Thus at low stabilization temperatures (T ≤ 200 °C) only a gel-like shell is formed on the surface of fibers. Fibers stabilized above 200 °C show significant length/diameter variations (up to 325%). Increasing the stabilization temperature above the optimum temperature weakens the response of fibers to pH change. The results also show that the actuation behavior of PAN fibers containing itaconic acid starts at lower stabilization temperatures. This is attributed to the effect of acidic groups in lowering the onset of cyclization reactions.

  4. Active and Passive Interferometric Fringe Stabilization for Quantum Communications in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Joseph; Graham, Trent; Kwiat, Paul

    2015-05-01

    In interferometry, the relative phase between the paths is liable to drift over time due to environmental factors, i.e., vibrations in the components and from turbulence and temperature fluctuations in the air. If time-bin encoded photons are received from a moving space platform, e.g., a satellite or the International Space Station, there would be an additional large relative temporal shift because of the movement of the source toward or away from the receiver. This shift would alter the temporal coherence of adjacent timebins-as measured by a suitable temporally-unbalanced interferometer-in addition to the relative phase errors from the environment. To achieve accurate measurements in this situation, the interferometer needs to be stabilized against phase drifts. We have employed an active and passive stabilization scheme for a double unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration; while passive damping reduces most of the phase drift due to vibrations and fluctuations from the air, we designed and implemented an active feedback correction system to stabilize the remaining phase drift and the simulated temporal drift.

  5. Distortions and Stabilization of Simple Cubic Calcium at High Pressure and Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Alison A.

    2012-04-18

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  6. Distortions and stabilization of simple-cubic calcium at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Wendy L.; Wang, Lin; Ding, Yang; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Wenjun; Kim, Duck Young; Luo, Wei; Ahuja, R.; Meng, Yue; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2010-06-01

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  7. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50-80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss.

  8. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  9. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ's) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  10. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Du, L-X; Sun, G-S; Xie, H; Misra, R D K

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50-80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  11. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adnet, Frederic; Le Moyec, Laurence; Smith, Charles E; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4 degrees C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37 degrees C. If a 10% loss of potency is considered acceptable, then the 20 and 50 mg/ml succinylcholine solutions can be stored in emergency resuscitation carts at room temperature for 8.3 and 4.8 months, respectively. PMID:17351219

  12. Temperature dependence of hardness in yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pirouz, Pirouz; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hardness and microcracking in single-crystal 9.5-mol pct-Y2O3-fully-stabilized cubic-ZrO2 was studied as a function of orientation. Crack lengths increased with increased temperature up to 500 C; above 800 C, no cracks were found, indicating an indentation brittle-to-ductile transition of about 800 C. The temperature dependence of hardness was reduced around 500 C. Etching studies to delineate the plastic zone around and below indents identified the operative slip systems. The role of dislocations and their interactions within the plastic zone on the hardness and indentation fracture behavior of cubic-ZrO2 are discussed.

  13. pH- and temperature-responsive aqueous foams stabilized by hairy latex particles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Akiyama, Ko; Nakayama, Saori; Hamasaki, Sho; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-21

    Polystyrene (PS) particles carrying pH- and temperature-responsive poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMA) hairs (PDMA-PS particles) were synthesized by dispersion polymerization. The diameter, diameter distribution, morphology, chemical composition and surface chemistry of the particles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental microanalysis, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. The hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance of the PDMA could be tuned by varying both pH and temperature and therefore these sterically stabilized particles acted as doubly stimuli-responsive stabilizers for aqueous foams by adsorption and desorption to/from the air-water interface. At and above pH 6.0, in which range the PDMA hairs were either non-protonated or partially protonated, particle-stabilized foams were formed at both 23 and 55 °C. The foam prepared at 55 °C was the more stable of the two, lasting for at least 24 h, whereas the 23 °C foam destabilized within 24 h. SEM studies indicated that the particles adsorbed at the air-water interface as monolayers at 23 °C and as multilayers at 55 °C. At and below pH 5, in which range the hairs were cationic, hydrophilic and water-soluble, no foam was formed irrespective of temperature. Rapid defoaming could be induced by lowering the solution pH at both temperatures, due to rapid in situ protonation of the PDMA hairs, prompting the PDMA-PS particles to desorb from the air-water interface. The foaming and defoaming cycles could be repeated at least five times. PMID:25426611

  14. Zirconium phosphate waste forms for low-temperature stabilization of cesium-137-containing waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Tlustochowicz

    1996-04-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics are being developed and fabricated for low-temperature stabilization and solidification of waste streams that are not amenable to conventional high-temperature stabilization processes because volatiles are present in the wastes. A composite of zirconium-magnesium phosphate has been developed and shown to stabilize ash waste contaminated with a radioactive surrogate of {sup 137}Cs. Excellent retainment of cesium in the phosphate matrix system was observed in Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure tests. This was attributed to the capture of cesium in the layered zirconium phosphate structure by intercalation ion-exchange reaction. But because zirconium phosphate has low strength, a novel zirconium/magnesium phosphate composite waste form system was developed. The performance of these final waste forms, as indicated by compression strength and durability in aqueous environments, satisfy the regulatory criteria. Test results indicate that zirconium-magnesium-phosphate-based final waste forms present a viable technology for treatment and solidification of cesium-contaminated wastes.

  15. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.

  16. Evaluation of stability of allergen extracts for sublingual immunotherapy during transport under unfavourable temperature conditions with an innovative thermal insulating packaging.

    PubMed

    Puccinelli, P; Natoli, V; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Incorvaia, C; Barbieri, S; Masieri, S; Frati, F

    2013-01-01

    Many pharmaceutical and biotechnological products are temperature-sensitive and should normally be kept at a controlled temperature, particularly during transport, in order to prevent the loss of their stability and activity. Therefore, stability studies should be performed for temperature-sensitive products, considering product characteristics, typical environmental conditions, and anticipating environmental extremes that may occur during product transport in a specific country. Staloral products for sublingual immunotherapy are temperature sensitive and are labelled for maintenance under refrigerated conditions (2-8°C). Given the peculiar climatic context of Italy and the great temperature fluctuations that may occur during transport, this study was aimed at evaluating the impact of a new engineered thermal insulating packaging for Staloral. In particular, the purpose was to assess whether the new packaging could create a container condition able to preserve the stability and immunological activity of the product during the transport phase throughout Italy. The results showed that the range of temperatures that can affect the product, in the area surrounding the product packaging, may reach a peak of 63°C during transport under the most unfavourable climatic conditions, i.e. in a non-refrigerated van during the summer season, from the site of production in France to the patient's house in Catania, the city with the highest temperatures in Italy. However, the highest temperature reached inside the vaccine did not exceed 45°C over a period of about 2 h. The ELISA inhibition test on samples subjected to the extreme temperature conditions previously defined (45°C) showed an immunological activity higher than 75% of that initially measured and was comparable to those obtained with samples stored at controlled temperature (5°C). This means that, even in the worst case scenario, the structure of the allergen extracts is not influenced and the vaccine potency is

  17. Evolution of an Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Constrained by Stability and Activity Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Pressured by antibiotic use, resistance enzymes have been evolving new activities. Does such evolution have a cost? To investigate this question at the molecular level, clinically isolated mutants of the {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 were studied. When purified, mutant enzymes had increased activity against cephalosporin antibiotics but lost both thermodynamic stability and kinetic activity against their ancestral targets, penicillins. The X-ray crystallographic structures of three mutant enzymes were determined. These structures suggest that activity gain and stability loss is related to an enlarged active site cavity in the mutant enzymes. In several clinically isolated mutant enzymes, a secondary substitution is observed far from the active site (Met182 {yields} Thr). This substitution had little effect on enzyme activity but restored stability lost by substitutions near the active site. This regained stability conferred an advantage in vivo. This pattern of stability loss and restoration may be common in the evolution of new enzyme activity.

  18. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-30

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  19. Differential stability of photosynthetic membranes and fatty acid composition at elevated temperature in Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Almeyda, E.; Thomé, P. E.; El Hafidi, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing surface seawater temperatures resulting from climate change. Reef-building corals symbiotic with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium experience dramatic reductions in algal densities when exposed to temperatures above the long-term local summer average, leading to a phenomenon called coral bleaching. Although the temperature-dependent loss in photosynthetic function of the algal symbionts has been widely recognized as one of the early events leading to coral bleaching, there is considerable debate regarding the actual damage site. We have tested the relative thermal stability and composition of membranes in Symbiodinium exposed to high temperature. Our results show that melting curves of photosynthetic membranes from different symbiotic dinoflagellates substantiate a species-specific sensitivity to high temperature, while variations in fatty acid composition under high temperature rather suggest a complex process in which various modifications in lipid composition may be involved. Our results do not support the role of unsaturation of fatty acids of the thylakoid membrane as being mechanistically involved in bleaching nor as being a dependable tool for the diagnosis of thermal susceptibility of symbiotic reef corals.

  20. Effect of temperature on Candida antartica lipase B activity in the kinetic resolution of acebutolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajin, Mariani; Kamaruddin, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic studies of free Candida antartica lipase B in kinetic resolution of acebutolol have been carried out to characterize the temperature effects towards enzyme stability and activity. A decreased in reaction rate was observed in temperature above 40oC. Thermodynamic studies on lipase deactivation exhibited a first-order kinetic pattern. The activation and deactivation energies were 39.63 kJ/mol and 54.90 kJ/mol, respectively. The enthalpy and entropy of the lipase deactivation were found to be 52.12 kJ/mol and -0.18 kJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Ceramic stabilization of hazardous wastes: a high performance room temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    ANL has developed a room-temperature process for converting hazardous materials to a ceramic structure. It is similar to vitrification but is achieved at low cost, similar to conventional cement stabilization. The waste constituents are both chemically stabilized and physically encapsulated, producing very low leaching levels and the potential for delisting. The process, which is pH-insensitive, is ideal for inorganic sludges and liquids, as well as mixed chemical-radioactive wastes, but can also handle significant percentages of salts and even halogenated organics. High waste loadings are possible and densification occurs,so that volumes are only slightly increased and in some cases (eg, incinerator ash) are reduced. The ceramic product has strength and weathering properties far superior to cement products.

  2. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection at ambient temperature and 4 deg C in polypropylene syringes.

    PubMed

    Storms, Meredith L; Stewart, James T; Warren, Flynn W

    2003-01-01

    The stability of 20-mg/mL succinylcholine chloride injection in 12-mL polypropylene syringes stored at ambient temperature and 4 deg C for up to 90 days was investigated. Concentration levels of succinylcholine chloride injection were determined at 0, 1, 4, 7, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90 days after preparation of the syringes by means of a high-performance liquid chromatographic stability-indicating assay. Methylparaben, which was added as a preservative, did not interfere with the assay. The loss in potency was less than 10% after 45 days of storage at 25 deg C and less than 1% after 90 days of storage at 4 deg C. The pH of succinylcholine chloride injection did not change appreciably during the 90-day study period. PMID:23979509

  3. Alkali-Stabilized Pt-OHx Species Catalyze Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Pierre, D; Si, R; Deng, W; Ferrin, P; Nilekar, A; Peng, G; Herron, J; Bell, D; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    We report that alkali ions (sodium or potassium) added in small amounts activate platinum adsorbed on alumina or silica for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (H{sub 2}O + CO {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) used for producing H{sub 2}. The alkali ion-associated surface OH groups are activated by CO at low temperatures ({approx}100 C) in the presence of atomically dispersed platinum. Both experimental evidence and density functional theory calculations suggest that a partially oxidized Pt-alkali-O{sub x}(OH){sub y} species is the active site for the low-temperature Pt-catalyzed WGS reaction. These findings are useful for the design of highly active and stable WGS catalysts that contain only trace amounts of a precious metal without the need for a reducible oxide support such as ceria.

  4. Stability of methylcellulose-based films after being subjected to different conservation and processing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tavera Quiroz, M J; Lecot, J; Bertola, N; Pinotti, A

    2013-07-01

    Methylcellulose films with and without sorbitol addition were developed. The major objective of this study was to attempt insights into the stability of the methylcellulose-based film properties after having been subjected to freezing, storage or a combination of both procedures. The importance of the sorbitol concentration and process temperature was also to be elucidated. As-prepared film solubility decreased at 100 °C, as a result of the methylcellulose thermogelation property when the samples were exposed to high temperatures. By analyzing the film pattern behavior and its properties 0.25% w/v sorbitol concentration turned out to be an inflexion point. The moisture content as well as the mechanical and thermal properties made this fact evident. Moreover the elastic modulus (Ec) and glass transition temperature (Tg) did not undergo significant changes for higher plasticizer concentrations. The methylcellulose film properties remained more stable in the presence of sorbitol, which would act as a protective agent due to its hydrogen bonding capacity. This stability is crucial for film and coating applications in the food industry. PMID:23623115

  5. High-temperature stability and selective thermal emission of polycrystalline tantalum photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Chan, Walker R; Senkevich, Jay J; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of extensive characterization of selective emitters at high temperatures, including thermal emission measurements and thermal stability testing at 1000 °C for 1h and 900 °C for up to 144 h. The selective emitters were fabricated as 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) on polycrystalline tantalum (Ta), targeting large-area applications in solid-state heat-to-electricity conversion. We characterized spectral emission as a function of temperature, observing very good selectivity of the emission as compared to flat Ta, with the emission of the PhC approaching the blackbody limit below the target cut-off wavelength of 2 μm, and a steep cut-off to low emission at longer wavelengths. In addition, we study the use of a thin, conformal layer (20 nm) of HfO(2) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a surface protective coating, and confirm experimentally that it acts as a diffusion inhibitor and thermal barrier coating, and prevents the formation of Ta carbide on the surface. Furthermore, we tested the thermal stability of the nanostructured emitters and their optical properties before and after annealing, observing no degradation even after 144 h (6 days) at 900 °C, which demonstrates the suitability of these selective emitters for high-temperature applications. PMID:23670005

  6. Stability of the rate, state and temperature dependent friction model and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arun K.; Singh, Trilok N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study stability of the rate, state and temperature friction (RSTF) model. The Segall and Rice approach is used to model heat transfer at the sliding interface with its surroundings. The effect of pore pressure is not considered in the model to avoid the complex expression for critical stiffness. Linear stability analysis of the spring-mass sliding system is carried out with the ageing law under the quasistatic conditions in order to determine the critical stiffness above which sliding behaviour changes from unstable to stable or vice versa. Our numerical simulations establish that critical stiffness of the heated surface may increase or decrease from corresponding to the critical stiffness of the unheated surface depending on the relative values of two contradictory parameters related with velocity effect and temperature effect. Parametric studies are also carried out to understand shear velocity and temperature of the sliding surface dependence of steady friction. The RSTF model is also used to study the gravity induced failure of a creeping rock slope and the results are justified.

  7. Sensory stability of ultra-high temperature milk in polyethylene bottle.

    PubMed

    Petrus, R R; Walter, E H M; Faria, J A F; Abreu, L F

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensory stability of ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk subjected to different heat treatments and stored at room temperature in white high density polyethylene bottles (HDPE) pigmented with titanium dioxide. Two lots of 300 units each were processed, respectively, at 135 and 141 degrees C/10 s using indirect heating and subsequently aseptically filled in an ISO class 7 clean room. These experimental lots were evaluated for appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall appreciation and compared to samples of commercial UHT milk purchased from local commercial stores. The time-temperature combinations investigated did not affect either the acceptability or the shelf life of the milk. Despite the limited light barrier properties of HDPE bottles, the product contained in the package tested exhibited good stability, with a shelf life ranging from 4 to 11 wk. Within this time period, the acceptability of the experimental lots was similar to that of the commercial products. The results achieved in this study contribute to turn the low-cost UHT system investigated into a technically viable option for small-size dairy processing plants. PMID:19200121

  8. Thermoregulation in rats exposed perinatally to dioxin: core temperature stability to altered ambient temperature, behavioral thermoregulation, and febrile response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Miller, D B

    1998-08-21

    Recent studies have shown that perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) alters thermoregulatory function in adult rats and hamsters, indicated by a reduced body temperature during the animal's nocturnal phase. The present study was designed to assess the behavioral thermoregulation, ability to develop a fever, and thermoregulatory stability as a function of ambient temperature (Ta) in rats exposed perinatally to TCDD. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed on gestational day (GD) 15 to 1 microg TCDD/kg (po). The male offspring were implanted with transmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The 24-h pattern of core temperature was affected by TCDD exposure, characterized by a reduced nocturnal Tc. At some ages, the diurnal Tc of the TCDD group was elevated. This dysfunction in temperature regulation was most apparent at 7 and 11 mo of age. The 24-h pattern of MA was also altered by TCDD. The hypothermic effects of TCDD were most pronounced at cooler Ta values of 10 to 22 degrees C. In contrast, behavioral thermoregulation, assessed by measuring the selected Ta and Tc of rats in a temperature gradient, was unaffected by TCDD. The ability to develop a fever following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin (Escherichia coli; 50 microg/kg) was accentuated in the TCDD-treated animals. The data confirm a nocturnal hypothermia in rats prenatally exposed to TCDD. However, the normal behavioral regulation of Tc suggests that hypothalamic thermoregulatory centers are not permanently altered. The accentuated fever in TCDD animals shows possible functional alterations in the neuroimmune and/or thermoregulatory axes involved in fever. PMID:9726785

  9. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  10. Multifunctional phosphine stabilized gold nanoparticles: an active catalytic system for three-component coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Borah, Bibek Jyoti; Borah, Subrat Jyoti; Dutta, Dipak Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Multifunctional phosphine based ligands, 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane [CH3C(CH2 PPh2)3][P3] and 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane trisulphide [CH3C(CH2P(S)Ph2)3][P3S3] have been introduced to stabilize Au(o)-nanoparticles having small core diameter and narrow size distribution. The Au(o)-nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of HAuCl4 precursor with NaBH4 in the presence of ligand P3 or P3S3 using two phases, one pot reaction at room temperature. The Au(o)-nanoparticles exhibit face centered cubic (fcc) lattice having different crystalline shape i.e., single crystallite stabilized by P3 while P3S3 forms decahedral shapes. Surface plasmon bands at -520 nm and TEM study indicate particle size below 2 and 4 nm for Au(o)-nanoparticles stabilized by P3 and P3S3 respectively, which are attributable to the stronger interaction of Au(o) (Soft) with P (Soft) than Au(o) (Soft) with S (less Softer than P). Au(o)-nanoparticles stabilized by P3S3 shows higher thermal stability than that of P3. The synthesized Au(o)-nanoparticles serve as an efficient catalyst for one-pot, three-component (A3) coupling of an aldehyde, an amine and an alkyne via C-H alkyne-activation to synthesize propargylamines (85-96%) without any additives and precaution to exclude air. PMID:23901533

  11. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  12. Coq7p relevant residues for protein activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cleverson; Ferreira-Júnior, José Ribamar; Paulela, Janaina A; Bleicher, Lucas; Demasi, Marilene; Barros, Mario H

    2015-12-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is an isoprenylated benzoquinone electron carrier required for electronic transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, shuttling electrons from complexes I and II to complex III. Q synthesis requires proteins termed Coq (Coq1-Coq11). Coq7p is part of the multimeric complex involved in Q synthesis catalyzing the hydroxylation of demethoxy-Q6 (DMQ6), the last monooxygenase step in Q synthesis with a catalytic center containing a carboxylate-bridged di-iron at the active site of the enzyme. Here we indicate a group of Coq7p residues that modulate protein activity: D53, R57, V111 and S114. R57, V111 and S114 are very conserved residues; V111 and S114 are present in separated communities of amino acid correlation analysis. The coq7 double mutant V111G/S114A and S114E show respiratory deficiency at non permissive temperature, DMQ6 accumulation and lower content of Q6. Therefore we conclude that phosphomimetic S114E inhibit Coq7p activity, and propose that S114 phosphorylation is required to move a non-structured loop of 25 amino acids between helix 2 and 3, and that affects the di-iron coordination in Coq7p catalytic center. PMID:26497406

  13. Antioxidant Activities and Oxidative Stabilities of Some Unconventional Oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; Ozdemir, Nurhayat

    2012-04-01

    The oils of some unconventional oilseeds (hemp, radish, terebinth, stinging nettle, laurel) were obtained by a cold-press method in which the total oil content, fatty acids, tocopherol isomers, some metal contents (Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu), antioxidant activity and oxidative stability were determined. The total oil content was determined ranging between 30.68 and 43.12%, and the oil samples had large amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, with oleic acid and linoleic acid. Of all the oils, terebinth seed oil had the highest α-tocopherol content (102.21 ± 1.01 mg/kg oil). Laurel oilseed had the highest antiradical activity in both the DPPH and ABTS assays. The peroxide value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.51 and 3.73 mequiv O(2)/kg oil. The TBARS value of the non-oxidized oils ranged between 0.68 ± 0.02 and 6.43 ± 0.48 mmol MA equiv/g oil. At 110 °C, the Rancimat induction period of the oils ranged between 1.32 and 43.44 h. The infrared spectra of the samples were recorded by FTIR spectroscopy. The absorbance values of the spectrum bands were observed and it was determined that some of the chemical groups of oxidized oils caused changes in absorbance. As a result of the present research, the analyzed oils could be evaluated as an alternative to traditionally consumed vegetable oils or as additives to them. PMID:22467958

  14. Stability and activity of mesophilic subtilisin E and its thermophilic homolog: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, G.; Merz, K.M. Jr.

    1999-07-28

    This report examines the origin of the high-temperature (250 K) behavior of a thermophilic mutant enzyme (labeled at 5-3H5; see Zhao and Arnold Prot. Eng. 1999, 12, 47--53) derived from subtilisin E by eight amino acid substitutions. Through the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the authors have provided molecular-level insights into how point mutations can affect protein structure and dynamics. From simulations the authors observed a reduced rmsd in several key regions, an increased overall flexibility, an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds, and an increase in the number of stabilizing interactions in the thermophilic system. It was shown that it is not a necessary requirement that thermophilic enzymes be less flexible than their mesophilic counterparts at low temperatures. However, thermophilic enzymes must retain their three-dimensional structures and flexibility at high temperatures in order to retain activity. Furthermore, the authors have been able to point out the effects of some of the single substitutions. Even if it is not possible yet to give general rules for rational protein design, the authors are able to make some predictions on how a protein should be stabilized in order to be thermophilic. In particular, the authors suggest that a promising strategy toward speeding up the design of thermally stable proteins would be to identify fluxional regions within a protein through the use of MD simulations (or suitable experiments). Presumably these regions allow for autocatalytic reactions to occur and are also involved in allowing water to gain access to the interior of the protein and initiate protein unfolding. These fluxional regions could also adversely affect the positioning of the catalytic machinery, thereby decreasing catalytic efficiency. Thus, once these locations have been identified, focused directed evolution studies could be designed that stabilize these fluxional regions.

  15. Long-term stability at high temperatures for birefringence in PAZO/PAH layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Quirina; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Raposo, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Optical memories with long-term stability at high temperatures have long been pursued in azopolymers with photoinduced birefringence. In this study, we show that the residual birefringence in layer-by-layer (LbL) films made with poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) alternated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) can be tuned by varying the extent of electrostatic interactions with film fabrication at different pHs for PAH. The dynamics of both writing and relaxation processes could be explained with a two-stage mechanism involving the orientation of the chromophores per se and the chain movement. Upon calculating the activation energies for these processes, we demonstrate semiquantitatively that reduced electrostatic interactions in films prepared at higher pH, for which PAH is less charged, are responsible for the longer stability at high temperatures. This is attributed to orientation of PAZO chromophores via cooperative aggregation, where the presence of counterions hindered relaxation. PMID:22335565

  16. Transport properties of ligand-stabilized gold nanocluster structures at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, L.; Wybourne, M. N.; Brown, L. O.; Hutchison, J. E.; Yan, Mingdi; Cai, S. X.; Keana, J. F. W.

    1998-03-01

    Ligand-stabilized gold nanoclusters are of suitable size to exhibit Coulomb blockade effects at room temperature.(G. Schon and U. Simon, Colloid. Polym. Sci. 273), 101 (1995). We have studied disordered arrays of Au_55[P(C_6H_5)_3]_12Cl_6(L. Clarke, M. N. Wybourne, Mingdi Yan, S. X. Cai and J.F. W. Keana, Appl. Phys. Lett. 71), 617 (1997). and similar clusters. We will discuss the observed transport properties including threshold voltage, scaling of the current above threshold and behavior under the application of an RF signal.

  17. Moduli stabilization in type II Calabi-Yau compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Partouche, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    We consider the type II superstring compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds, at finite temperature. The latter is implemented at the string level by a free action on the Euclidean time circle. We show that all Kähler and complex structure moduli involved in the gauge theories geometrically engineered in the vicinity of singular loci are lifted by the stringy thermal effective potential. The analysis is based on the effective gauged super-gravity at low energy, without integrating out the non-perturbative BPS states becoming massless at the singular loci. The universal form of the action in the weak coupling regime and at low enough temperature is determined in two cases. Namely, the conifold locus, as well as a locus where the internal space develops a genus- g curve of A N -1 singularities, thus realizing an SU( N ) gauge theory coupled to g hypermultiplets in the adjoint. In general, we argue that the favored points of stabilization sit at the intersection of several such loci. As a result, the entire vector multiplet moduli space is expected to be lifted, together with hypermultiplet moduli. The scalars are dynamically stabilized during the cosmological evolution induced by the back-reaction of the thermal effective potential on the originally static background. When the universe expands and the temperature T drops, the scalars converge to minima, with damped oscillations. Moreover, they store an energy density that scales as T 4, which never dominates over radiation. The reason for this is that the mass they acquire at one-loop is of order the temperature scale, which is time-dependent rather than constant. As an example, we analyze the type IIA compactification on a hy-persurface {P}_{{( {1,1,2,2,6} )}}^4 [12], with Hodge numbers h 11 = 2 and h 12 = 128. In this case, both Kähler moduli are stabilized at a point, where the internal space develops a node and an enhanced SU(2) gauge theory coupled to 2 adjoint hypermultiplets. This shows that in the dual thermal

  18. PMN-PT based quaternary piezoceramics with enhanced piezoelectricity and temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nengneng; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; He, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiling; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The phase structure, piezoelectric, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of (0.80 - x)PMN-0.10PFN-0.10PZ-xPT were investigated systematically. The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) was confirmed to be 0.30 < x < 0.34. Both MPB compositions of x = 0.32 and x = 0.33 exhibit high piezoelectric coefficients d33 = 640 pC/N and 580 pC/N, electromechanical couplings kp of 0.53 and 0.52, respectively. Of particular importance is that the composition with x = 0.33 was found to process high field-induced piezoelectric strain coefficient d33* of 680 pm/V, exhibiting a minimal temperature-dependent behavior, being less than 8% in the temperature range of 25-165 °C, which can be further confirmed by d31, with a variation of less than 9%. The temperature-insensitive d33* values can be explained by the counterbalance of the ascending dielectric permittivity and descending polarization with increasing temperature. These features make the PMN-PT based quaternary MPB compositions promising for actuator applications demanding high temperature stability.

  19. Blocking temperature distribution and long-term stability of spin-valve structures with Mn-based antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozières, J. P.; Jaren, S.; Zhang, Y. B.; Zeltser, A.; Pentek, K.; Speriosu, V. S.

    2000-04-01

    We have determined the blocking temperature distribution Tb(T) in spin-valve sheet films with FeMn, IrMn, PtMn, NiMn and CrPdMn antiferromagnetic layers (AFM). We find a clear dependence of Tb(T) on the field applied during the measurement, which we link to the reversal state of the pinned layer through the torque applied on the AFM. Using fields large enough to fully reverse the pinned layer, NiMn and PtMn show little or no components of the blocking temperature below 150 °C, whereas both IrMn and CrPdMn (the latter in a "synthetic" AFM design) exhibit important low-temperature trailing edges of the distribution. Accelerated annealing experiments in a low reversed field equivalent to the self-demagnetizing field in a micron-size head allows us to access the time to failure and the failure activation energy from which the expected lifetime can be assessed. We find a general correlation between the expected lifetime and the fraction of loose (e.g., unblocked) AFM spins at any given temperature. Accordingly, only NiMn and PtMn are found to exhibit a sufficient long-term stability for disk-drive operations.

  20. Porous Dendritic Platinum Nanotubes with Extremely High Activity and Stability for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaixia; Sun, Shuhui; Cai, Mei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Porous dendritic Pt nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a facile, cost-effective aqueous solution method at room temperature in large scale. These unique structures are porous, hollow, hierarchical, and single crystalline, which not only gives them a large surface area with high catalyst utilization, but also improves mass transport and gas diffusion. These novel Pt structures exhibited significantly improved catalytic activity (4.4 fold) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and greatly enhanced durability (6.1 fold) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. This work provides a promising approach to the design of highly efficient next-generation electrocatalysts. PMID:23524665

  1. Insertion of Endocellulase Catalytic Domains into Thermostable Consensus Ankyrin Scaffolds: Effects on Stability and Cellulolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Eva S.; Hatem, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of cellulose for biofuels production holds promise in solving important environmental and economic problems. However, the low activities (and thus high enzyme-to-substrate ratios needed) of hydrolytic cellulase enzymes, which convert cellulose into simple sugars, remain a major barrier. As a potential strategy to stabilize cellulases and enhance their activities, we have embedded cellulases of extremophiles into hyperstable α-helical consensus ankyrin domain scaffolds. We found the catalytic domains CelA (CA, GH8; Clostridium thermocellum) and Cel12A (C12A, GH12; Thermotoga maritima) to be stable in the context of the ankyrin scaffold and to be active against both soluble and insoluble substrates. The ankyrin repeats in each fusion are folded, although it appears that for the C12A catalytic domain (CD; where the N and C termini are distant in the crystal structure), the two flanking ankyrin domains are independent, whereas for CA (where termini are close), the flanking ankyrin domains stabilize each other. Although the activity of CA is unchanged in the context of the ankyrin scaffold, the activity of C12A is increased between 2- and 6-fold (for regenerated amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose substrates) at high temperatures. For C12A, activity increases with the number of flanking ankyrin repeats. These results showed ankyrin arrays to be a promising scaffold for constructing designer cellulosomes, preserving or enhancing enzymatic activity and retaining thermostability. This modular architecture will make it possible to arrange multiple cellulase domains at a precise spacing within a single polypeptide, allowing us to search for spacings that may optimize reactivity toward the repetitive cellulose lattice. PMID:23974146

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  3. Low-temperature performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Ho Keun; Kim, Jun Woo; Bae, Kiho; Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Park, Suk Won; Prestat, Michel; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on the performance of thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at temperatures of 50-525 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for conductivity measurements. Relatively high conductivity values were observed in the low-temperature region when compared to reference values of YSZ synthesized by other methods. To investigate the conduction mechanism, various experimental variables were modified during the electrical measurements, including the ratio of yttria to zirconia in the ALD YSZ films and the atmospheric conditions. To relate the electrical properties to the structural characteristics, the crystallinity and microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the suitability of an ALD YSZ membrane as the electrolyte of micro solid oxide fuel cells was evaluated. An open circuit voltage of almost 1 V and decent power output were successfully measured below 100 °C.

  4. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  5. Engineering of protease-resistant phytase from Penicillium sp.: high thermal stability, low optimal temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianqian; Liu, Honglei; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2010-12-01

    Phytase is widely used as a feed additive in industry. It is important to investigate the thermal stability, optimal pH and temperature and protease resistance of phytases in application. We introduced random mutations in a protease-resistance phytase gene of Penicillium sp. using Mn²+-dITP random mutation method, and identified two mutants 2-28 (T11A, G56E, L65F, Q144H and L151S) and 2-249 (T11A, H37Y, G56E, L65F, Q144H, L151S and N354D) with improved thermal stability and optimal temperature and pH. The mutants retained their high resistance to pepsin. The catalytic activity at 37 °C was up to 133.3 U and 136.6 U per mg protein with broad optimal temperature ranges of 37-55 °C and 37-50 °C, respectively. After a heat treatment at 100 °C for 5 min, the two mutant proteins retained about 72.81% and 92.43% of the initial activity, respectively. In addition, the optimal pH of mutant 2-249 was reduced to 4.8. All these improved properties made them more suitable to be used as feed additive in the feed industry than the present commercial phytases. Structure analysis suggested that the replacements of G56E, L65F, Q144H, and L151S improved the thermal stability of the protein by increasing new hydrogen bonds among the adjacent secondary structures. Moreover, the mutation of L151S enhanced the activity in the range of 37-70 °C and pH 2.5-7.0 by facilitating the interaction between the substrate and the catalytic centre. The substitution of N354D influenced the pH profile by weakening the bondage with the side chain of D353, which caused a pKa shift of the catalytic centre. PMID:20826112

  6. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  7. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized glucose oxidase on modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Mahboube; Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Kalegh; Ranjbakhsh, Elnaz; Khosropour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-02-01

    Immobilized proteins and enzymes are widely investigated in the medical field as well as the food and environmental fields. In this study, glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently immobilized on the surface of modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MIMNs) to produce a bioconjugate complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to the size, shape and structure characterization of the MIMNs. Binding of GOX to these MIMNs was confirmed by using FT-IR spectroscopy. The stability of the immobilized and free enzyme at different temperature and pH values was investigated by measuring the enzymatic activity. These studies reveal that the enzyme's stability is enhanced by immobilization. Further experiments showed that the storage stability of the enzyme is improved upon binding to the MIMNs. The results of kinetic measurements suggest that the effect of the immobilization process on substrate and product diffusion is small. Such bioconjugates can be considered as a catalytic nanodevice for accelerating the glucose oxidation reaction for biotechnological purposes.

  8. Stability of waterflood diverting agents at elevated temperatures in reservoir brines

    SciTech Connect

    Nagra, S.S.; Batycky, J.P.; Nieman, R.E.; Bodeux, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    Water channelling is a significant problem in oil producing reservoirs. One way to improve sweep is by diverting water to unswept zones through the placement of polymeric gels as diverting agents. The key to successful application of these materials is the amount of time over which the gels will be effective at reservoir conditions. Gel stabilities of a range of polymer compounds were tested in reservoir brines with salinities up to 10% TDS and at temperatures up to 90/sup 0/C. One characterization of gel stability was the amount of time (half-life) required for a gel to shrink to half its initial volume. Results at 90/sup 0/C with polyacrylamide, cellulosic and xanthan gels showed short half-lives ranging from less than a day (complete syneresis) up to 45 days depending on concentration and polymer type. Intermediate stabilities were observed with scleroglucan while the most stable gels with hlf-lives of more than a year were observed at 90/sup 0/C with lignosulphonate and phenoformaldehyde materials. Based on this screening procedure, phenoformaldehyde gels were tested for permeability reduction in both homogeneous and fractured cores after which the products were field tested. Preliminary results from a number of field tests provide optimism to continue a cautious program to develop placement and evaluation techniques.

  9. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ericka L.; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K.; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J. Craig; Nelson, Karen E.; Jones, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  10. Temporal stability of solid oxidizers at high temperature and humidity. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Dotson, D.A.

    1985-09-30

    Chemical Warfare/Biological Warfare (CW/BW) decontamination operations may rely on aqueous solutions prepared from stored solid oxidizers. Needed are data defining the shipboard storage stability of candidate oxidizers. Therefore, the stability of a series of potential decontaminants has been examined at high temperature (90 + C) and humidity (95 + % R.H.). The loss of oxidizing capacity in aliquots of the oxidizers was followed with time by iodometric titration. Calcium hypochlorite lost over 99% of its oxidizing capacity in less than two days, whereas lithium hypochlorite retained one-third oxidizing capacity for approximately twenty days. Sodium perborate, and sodium persulfate were very hygroscopic and unstable with time. H-48 decomposed in approximately two days, while sodium isocyanurate lost about 80% of its oxidizing capacity in two weeks. The data presented documents severe stability problems of one sort or another with all the materials tested, although overall the sodium isocyanurate appeared to be the more stable candidate undr extreme conditions. In any case, packaging and storage considerations are shown to be important for any potential decontaminant to be stored under environmentally severe conditions.

  11. Room temperature stabilization of oral, live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-vectored vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, Deqi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-03-24

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi 'Ty21a' bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log(10)CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long-term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  12. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ericka L; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J Craig; Nelson, Karen E; Jones, Marcus B

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  13. Room Temperature Stabilization of Oral, Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-Vectored Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, DeQi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi ‘Ty21a’ bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log10 CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  14. Size-controllable APTS stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles catalyst for the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zahmakıran, Mehmet; Philippot, Karine; Özkar, Saim; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-14

    Dimethylamine-borane, (CH(3))(2)NHBH(3), has been considered as one of the attractive materials for the efficient storage of hydrogen, which is still one of the key issues in the "Hydrogen Economy". In a recent communication we have reported the synthesis and characterization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles with the preliminary results for their catalytic performance in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature. Herein, we report a complete work including (i) effect of initial [APTS]/[Ru] molar ratio on both the size and the catalytic activity of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, (ii) collection of extensive kinetic data under non-MTL conditions depending on the substrate and catalyst concentrations to define the rate law of Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (iii) determination of activation parameters (E(a), ΔH(#) and ΔS(#)) for Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane; (iv) demonstration of the catalytic lifetime of Ru(0)/APTS nanoparticles in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (v) testing the bottlability and reusability of Ru(0)/APTS nanocatalyst in the room-temperature dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane, (vi) quantitative carbon disulfide (CS(2)) poisoning experiments to find a corrected TTO and TOF values on a per-active-ruthenium-atom basis, (vii) a summary of extensive literature review for the catalysts tested in the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane as part of the results and discussions. PMID:22052298

  15. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  16. Breadth versus depth: Interactions that stabilize particle assemblies to changes in density or temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-02-01

    We use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to explore trade-offs associated with designing interactions to stabilize self-assembled structures against changes in density or temperature. Specifically, we find isotropic, convex-repulsive pair potentials that maximize the density range for which a two-dimensional square lattice is the stable ground state subject to a constraint on the chemical potential advantage it exhibits over competing structures (i.e., "depth" of the associated minimum on the chemical potential hypersurface). We formulate the design problem as a nonlinear program, which we solve numerically. This allows us to efficiently find optimized interactions for a wide range of possible chemical potential constraints. We find that assemblies designed to exhibit a large chemical potential advantage at a specified density have a smaller overall range of densities for which they are stable. This trend can be understood by considering the separation-dependent features of the pair potential and its gradient required to enhance the stability of the target structure relative to competitors. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we further show that potentials designed with larger chemical potential advantages exhibit higher melting temperatures.

  17. Ac susceptibility of a coated conductor with high-temperature superconducting film and covered copper stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.

    2014-07-01

    The ac susceptibility, χ=χ‧-jχ″, of a nearly square sample, cut from a coated conductor tape consisting of a high-temperature superconducting film and a covered copper stabilizer, is measured as a function of temperature, T, at several values of frequency, f. It is found that the χ(f) at T>Tc can be well simulated by a modeling eddy-current susceptibility of the stabilizer, and there is an extra low-T stage, where χ is not constant as expected and may be separated into two parts. The T-independent part is contributed by Meissner currents in the film with over-low |χ‧|, indicating that the film edge was damaged by cutting during tape and sample preparation. The T-dependent part is contributed by both eddy-currents and supercurrents, having a special f dependence with unknown mechanism. Both currents are interacted to each other in a complex way in the T range below and near Tc, resulting in interesting features in χ(T,f).

  18. Structure and Spectroscopy of Hydrated Sodium Ions at Different Temperatures and the Cluster Stability Rules.

    PubMed

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Agmon, Noam

    2016-04-12

    The sodium cation plays an important role in several physiological processes. Understanding its solvation may help understanding ion selectivity in sodium channels that are pivotal for nerve impulses. This paper presents a thorough investigation of over 75 isomers of gas-phase Na(+)(H2O)(n=1-8) clusters, whose optimized structures, energies, and (harmonic) vibrational frequencies were computed quantum mechanically at the full MP2/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. From these data, we have calculated the temperature effects on the cluster thermodynamic functions, and thus the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution for each n. For a selected number of isomers, we have corrected the calculations for basis set superposition error (BSSE) to obtain accurate clustering energies, in excellent agreement with experiment. The computed clusters are overwhelmingly 4-coordinated, as opposed to bulk liquid water, where sodium cations are believed to be mostly 5- or 6-coordinated. To explain this, we suggest the "cluster stability rules", a set of coordination-number-dependent hydrogen-bond (HB) strengths that can be obtained using a single BSSE correction. Assuming additivity and transferability, these reproduce the relative stability of most of our computed isomers. These rules enable us to elucidate the trends in HB strengths, outlining the major determinants of cluster stability. For n = 4 and 5, we have also performed anharmonic vibrational calculations (VPT2) to compare with available photodissociation infrared spectra of these gas-phase clusters. The comparison suggests that the experiments actually monitor a mixture of predominantly 3-coordinated isomers, which is quite remote from the computed Boltzmann distribution, particularly at low temperatures. Surprisingly, for these experiments, water evaporation pathways can rationalize the non-equilibrium isomer distribution. The equilibrium isomer distribution is, in turn, rationalized by the entropy of internal rotations of "dangling

  19. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  20. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  1. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  2. High-temperature stability of electron transport in semiconductors with strong spin-orbital interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaka, G.; Grendysa, J.; ŚliŻ, P.; Becker, C. R.; Polit, J.; Wojnarowska, R.; Stadler, A.; Sheregii, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental results of the magnetotransport measurements (longitudinal magnetoresistance Rx x and the Hall resistance Rx y) are presented over a wide interval of temperatures for several samples of Hg1 -xCdxTe (x ≈0.13 -0.15 ) grown by MBE—thin layers (thickness about 100 nm) strained and not strained and thick ones with thickness about 1 μ m . An amazing temperature stability of the SdH-oscillation period and amplitude is observed in the entire temperature interval of measurements up to 50 K. Moreover, the quantum Hall effect (QHE) behavior of the Hall resistance is registered in the same temperature interval. These peculiarities of the Rx x and Rx y for strained thin layers are interpreted using quantum Hall conductivity (QHC) on topologically protected surface states (TPSS) [C. Brüne et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 126803 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.126803]. In the case of not strained layers it is assumed that the QHC on the TPSS (or on the resonant interface states) contributes also to the conductance of the bulk samples.

  3. Requisite temperatures for the stabilization of atomic H in solid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1978-01-01

    If an atomic hydrogen/molecular hydrogen propellant containing at least 15% free H atoms by weight may be used, values for the theoretical specific impulse near and above 750 s may be predicted. The tritium-impregnation concept has been applied to manufacturing such an H/H2 propellant, and a phenomenological rate process theory has been derived for the matrix-isolation storage and equilibrium stability of atomic H produced at such ultralow temperatures in tritium-impregnated H2. It is suggested that an energy storage efficiency greater than 0.30 may be obtained at temperatures below 100 mK. So that the storage of atomic H is stable with respect to arbitrary small perturbations, the surface temperature must be less than a critical value dependent on sample volume, tritium weight fraction, and energy storage efficiency. A derivation of the formula for this critical surface temperature is presented, noting that the energy storage efficiency is to be fixed by experiment.

  4. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  5. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  6. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying materia1 requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  7. High Temperature Stability of Onion-Like Carbon vs Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765–1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of by the ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K−1) and HOPG (8 Pa K−1) where and are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, and values are 95.8 kJ mol−1 and 104.1 JK−1 mol−1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  8. Stability of Pure Hydrous Silica at Geotherm Temperatures up to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisr, C.; Shim, S. H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Prakapenka, V.; Meng, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Stishovite, in the rutile structure with octahedrally coordinated silicon, is expected to exist in silica rich parts of subducted oceanic slabs and crustal fragments in the Earth's mantle, and has been considered for a long time to be essentially anhydrous. However, Spektor et al., (2011) have shown that ~1.3 wt% can be incorporated into pure Al-free stishovite at 10 GPa and 723 K. Yet, the stability and physical properties of hydrous silica at mantle related pressures and temperatures are unknown. We have synthesized hydrous silica samples in the multi anvil press at 9-20 GPa and 700-900 K, and in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at 17-70 GPa and 1400-2100 K. Three different sample setups have been used: dry silica gel in an H2O medium, anhydrous stishovite in an H2O medium, and hydrous silica gel in a Ne or Ar medium. The presence of percent level of water was found by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and Raman and Infrared spectroscopy measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the unit-cell volumes of the recovered stishovite samples are greater by 0.2-3.9 % compared with anhydrous stishovite at 1 bar. The unit-cell volumes show strong linear correlation with their c/a ratio suggesting that the same OH substitution mechanism persists for a wide range of water content. Based on unit-cell volumes vs water content calibration by Spektor et al., (2011), our samples contain 0.3-7.9 wt% H2O. We found that pure silica is capable of containing as much as 4.9 wt% of H2O at temperatures close to those of the mantle geotherm (e.g., sample synthesized at ~1997 K and ~67 GPa). The highest water contents were found at the highest pressures, suggesting that the pressure stabilizes OH in dense silica. X-ray diffraction patterns have also shown several new diffraction lines upon compression and heating which appear from 45 GPa (1500-2100 K) and are observed up to 100 GPa. The peaks appear to belong to a new hydrous silica phase stable at higher pressures and

  9. Glycosylated a-lactalbumin-based nanocomplex for curcumin: physicochemical stability and DPPH-scavenging activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low stability at high salt concentrations, iso-electric point, and high temperature restricted the application of proteins as stabilizers in nutraceutical encapsulation. Protein-polysaccharide conjugates made with Maillard reaction may be better alternatives. In this study, the characteristics of cu...

  10. Stabilization of different conformers of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion in ammonium-based ionic liquids at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vitucci, F M; Trequattrini, F; Palumbo, O; Brubach, J-B; Roy, P; Navarra, M A; Panero, S; Paolone, A

    2014-09-25

    The infrared absorption spectra of two ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TFSI) as an anion and ammonium with different alkyl chains as cations are reported as a function of temperature. Using the comparison with ab initio calculations of the infrared-active intramolecular vibrations, the experimental lines were ascribed to the various ions composing the ionic liquids. In the liquid state of the samples, both conformers of the TFSI ion are present. In the solid state, however, the two conformers survive in N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI), while only cis-TFSI is retained in N-trimethyl-N-hexylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMHA-TFSI). We suggest that the longer alkyl chains of the former compound stabilize the less stable conformer of TFSI by means of stronger interactions between anions and cations. PMID:25188394

  11. Strength and stability of frictional sliding of gabbro gouge at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Changrong; Yao, Wenming; Wang, Zeli; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the strength of frictional sliding and stability of mafic lower crust, we conducted experiments on oven-dried gabbro gouge of 1 mm thick sandwiched between country rock pieces (with gouge inclined 35° to the sample axis) at slip rates of 1.22 × 10 - 3 mm/s and 1.22 × 10 - 4 mm/s and elevated temperatures up to 615 °C. Special attention has been paid to whether transition from velocity weakening to velocity strengthening occurs due to the elevation of temperature. Two series of experiments were conducted with normal stresses of 200 MPa and 300 MPa, respectively. For both normal stresses, the friction strengths are comparable at least up to 510 °C, with no significant weakening effect of increasing temperature. Comparison of our results with Byerlee's rule on a strike slip fault with a specific temperature profile in the Zhangbei region of North China shows that the strength given by experiments are around that given by Byerlee's rule and a little greater in the high temperature range. At 200 MPa normal stress, the steady-state rate dependence a - b shows only positive values, probably still in the "run-in" process where velocity strengthening is a common feature. With a normal stress of 300 MPa, the values of steady-state rate dependence decreases systematically with increasing temperature, and stick-slip occurred at 615 °C. Considering the limited displacement, limited normal stress applied and the effect of normal stress for the temperatures above 420 °C, it is inferred here that velocity weakening may be the typical behaviour at higher normal stress for temperature above 420 °C and at least up to 615 °C, which covers most of the temperature range in the lower crust of geologically stable continental interior. For a dry mafic lower crust in cool continental interiors where frictional sliding prevails over plastic flow, unstable slip nucleation may occur to generate earthquakes.

  12. Calculation of the Relative Chemical Stabilities of Proteins as a Function of Temperature and Redox Chemistry in a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems. PMID:21853048

  13. Activation energies and temperature effects from electrical spectra of soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent permittivity often has soil-specific temperature responses as well as soil water responses. These variations affect dielectric sensors, often requiring site-specific calibrations. Variations of permittivity as a function of frequency and temperature can be used to calculate activation energ...

  14. Prediction of the Maximum Temperature for Life Based on the Stability of Metabolites to Decomposition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Bains, William; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Changyong

    2015-01-01

    The components of life must survive in a cell long enough to perform their function in that cell. Because the rate of attack by water increases with temperature, we can, in principle, predict a maximum temperature above which an active terrestrial metabolism cannot function by analysis of the decomposition rates of the components of life, and comparison of those rates with the metabolites’ minimum metabolic half-lives. The present study is a first step in this direction, providing an analytical framework and method, and analyzing the stability of 63 small molecule metabolites based on literature data. Assuming that attack by water follows a first order rate equation, we extracted decomposition rate constants from literature data and estimated their statistical reliability. The resulting rate equations were then used to give a measure of confidence in the half-life of the metabolite concerned at different temperatures. There is little reliable data on metabolite decomposition or hydrolysis rates in the literature, the data is mostly confined to a small number of classes of chemicals, and the data available are sometimes mutually contradictory because of varying reaction conditions. However, a preliminary analysis suggests that terrestrial biochemistry is limited to environments below ~150–180 °C. We comment briefly on why pressure is likely to have a small effect on this. PMID:25821932

  15. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  16. Biaxially oriented poly(ethylene-2,6 naphthalate) under discharge activity at various temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Danikas, M.; Guastavino, J.; Krause, E.; Mayoux, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with a polymer quite new in the domain of electrical insulation and its behavior under corona discharge activity. Results on the stability of discharge regime, all along of two hours of experiments, under three different temperatures are presented. A FTIR analysis gives the evolution of the polymer structure and the bulk conductivity measurements reveal the threshold of electrical properties modifications, likely related to trapped charges. It is found that PEN is more sensible to temperature than to chemical modification due to discharge species.

  17. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  18. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  19. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  20. Amphibole stability in primitive arc magmas: effects of temperature, H2O content, and oxygen fugacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Michael J.; Grove, Timothy L.; Behrens, Harald

    2012-08-01

    The water-saturated phase relations have been determined for a primitive magnesian andesite (57 wt% SiO2, 9 wt% MgO) from the Mt. Shasta, CA region over the pressure range 200-800 MPa, temperature range of 915-1,070 °C, and oxygen fugacities varying from the nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) buffer to three log units above NNO (NNO+3). The phase diagram of a primitive basaltic andesite (52 wt% SiO2, 10.5 wt% MgO) also from the Mt. Shasta region (Grove et al. in Contrib Miner Petrol 145:515-533; 2003) has been supplemented with additional experimental data at 500 MPa. Hydrous phase relations for these compositions allow a comparison of the dramatic effects of dissolved H2O on the crystallization sequence. Liquidus mineral phase stability and appearance temperatures vary sensitively in response to variation in pressure and H2O content, and this information is used to calibrate magmatic barometers-hygrometers for primitive arc magmas. H2O-saturated experiments on both compositions reveal the strong dependence of amphibole stability on the partial pressure of H2O. A narrow stability field is identified where olivine and amphibole are coexisting phases in the primitive andesite composition above 500 MPa and at least until 800 MPa, between 975-1,025 °C. With increasing H2O pressure ({P}_{{H}_2O}), the temperature difference between the liquidus and amphibole appearance decreases, causing a change in chemical composition of the first amphibole to crystallize. An empirical calibration is proposed for an amphibole first appearance barometer-hygrometer that uses Mg# of the amphibole and f_{{O}_2}: P_{{H}2O}(MPa)=[{Mg#/52.7}-0.014 * Updelta NNO]^{15.12} This barometer gives a minimum {P}_{{H}2O} recorded by the first appearance of amphibole in primitive arc basaltic andesite and andesite. We apply this barometer to amphibole antecrysts erupted in mixed andesite and dacite lavas from the Mt. Shasta, CA stratocone. Both high H2O pressures (500-900 MPa) and high pre-eruptive magmatic

  1. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  2. Icosahedral AlCuFe quasicrystal at high pressure and temperature and its implications for the stability of icosahedrite.

    PubMed

    Stagno, Vincenzo; Bindi, Luca; Shibazaki, Yuki; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji; Mao, H-K; Steinhardt, Paul J; Fei, Yingwei

    2014-01-01

    The first natural-occurring quasicrystal, icosahedrite, was recently discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a new CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Its finding raised fundamental questions regarding the effects of pressure and temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the quasicrystal structure relative to possible isochemical crystalline or amorphous phases. Although several studies showed the stability at ambient temperature of synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe up to ~35 GPa, the simultaneous effect of temperature and pressure relevant for the formation of icosahedrite has been never investigated so far. Here we present in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe using multianvil device to explore possible temperature-induced phase transformations at pressures of 5 GPa and temperature up to 1773 K. Results show the structural stability of i-AlCuFe phase with a negligible effect of pressure on the volumetric thermal expansion properties. In addition, the structural analysis of the recovered sample excludes the transformation of AlCuFe quasicrystalline phase to possible approximant phases, which is in contrast with previous predictions at ambient pressure. Results from this study extend our knowledge on the stability of icosahedral AlCuFe at higher temperature and pressure than previously examined, and provide a new constraint on the stability of icosahedrite. PMID:25070248

  3. Cosolvent and Crowding Effects on the Temperature and Pressure Dependent Conformational Dynamics and Stability of Globular Actin.

    PubMed

    Schummel, Paul Hendrik; Haag, Andreas; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Winter, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Actin can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells and is responsible for many different cellular functions. The polymerization process of actin has been found to be among the most pressure sensitive processes in vivo. In this study, we explored the effects of chaotropic and kosmotropic cosolvents, such as urea and the compatible osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and, to mimic a more cell-like environment, crowding agents on the pressure and temperature stability of globular actin (G-actin). The temperature and pressure of unfolding as well as thermodynamic parameters upon unfolding, such as enthalpy and volume changes, have been determined by fluorescence spectroscopy over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, ranging from 10 to 80 °C and from 1 to 3000 bar, respectively. Complementary high-pressure NMR studies revealed additional information on the existence of native-like conformational substates of G-actin as well as a molten-globule-like state preceding the complete pressure denaturation. Different from the chaotropic agent urea, TMAO increases both the temperature and pressure stability for the protein most effectively. The Gibbs free energy differences of most of the native substates detected are not influenced significantly by TMAO. In mixtures of these osmolytes, urea counteracts the stabilizing effect of TMAO to some extent. Addition of the crowding agent Ficoll increases the temperature and pressure stability even further, thereby allowing sufficient stability of the protein at temperature and pressure conditions encountered under extreme environmental conditions on Earth. PMID:27314563

  4. Weldability, strength, and high temperature stability of chemically vapor deposited tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three types of CVD tungsten (fluoride-produced, chloride-produced and the combination of the two which is termed duplex) were evaluated to determine their weldability, high temperature strength and structural stability during 5000 hour exposure to temperatures of 1540 C and 1700 C. Each type of CVD tungsten could be successfully electron beam welded but the results for the chloride product were not as satisfactory as those of the other two materials. The high temperature strength behavior of the three materials did not differ greatly. However a large difference was noted for the grain growth behavior of the two basic CVD tungsten materials. Fluoride tungsten was found to be relatively stable while for the most part the grain size of chloride tungsten increased appreciably. The examination of freshly fractured surfaces with a scanning electron microscope revealed numerous bubbles in the fluoride material following its exposure to 1700 C for 5000 hours. Less severe thermal treatments produced relatively few bubbles in this material. Only at certain locations within the chloride material associated with the interruption of tungsten were bubbles noted.

  5. Temperature-dependent stability of stacking faults in Al, Cu and Ni: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2014-09-24

    We present comparative analysis of microscopic mechanisms relevant to plastic deformation of the face-centered cubic (FCC) metals Al, Cu, and Ni, through determination of the temperature-dependent free energies of intrinsic and unstable stacking faults along [1 1̄ 0] and [1 2̄ 1] on the (1 1 1) plane using first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. We show that vibrational contribution results in significant decrease in the free energy of barriers and intrinsic stacking faults (ISFs) of Al, Cu, and Ni with temperature, confirming an important role of thermal fluctuations in the stability of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation at elevated temperatures. In contrast to Al and Ni, the vibrational spectrum of the unstable stacking fault (USF[1 2̄ 1]) in Cu reveals structural instabilities, indicating that the energy barrier (γusf) along the (1 1 1)[1 2̄ 1] slip system in Cu, determined by typical first-principles calculations, is an overestimate, and its commonly used interpretation as the energy release rate needed for dislocation nucleation, as proposed by Rice (1992 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 239), should be taken with caution. PMID:25185834

  6. Temperature-dependent stability of stacking faults in Al, Cu and Ni: first-principles analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U.; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-09-01

    We present comparative analysis of microscopic mechanisms relevant to plastic deformation of the face-centered cubic (FCC) metals Al, Cu, and Ni, through determination of the temperature-dependent free energies of intrinsic and unstable stacking faults along [1 \\bar{1} 0] and [1 \\bar{2} 1] on the (1 1 1) plane using first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. We show that vibrational contribution results in significant decrease in the free energy of barriers and intrinsic stacking faults (ISFs) of Al, Cu, and Ni with temperature, confirming an important role of thermal fluctuations in the stability of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation at elevated temperatures. In contrast to Al and Ni, the vibrational spectrum of the unstable stacking fault (USF_{[1\\,\\bar{2}\\,1]}) in Cu reveals structural instabilities, indicating that the energy barrier (γusf) along the (1 1 1)[1 \\bar{2} 1] slip system in Cu, determined by typical first-principles calculations, is an overestimate, and its commonly used interpretation as the energy release rate needed for dislocation nucleation, as proposed by Rice (1992 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 239), should be taken with caution.

  7. Chain and conformation stability of solid-state DNA: implications for room temperature storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Colotte, Marthe; Coudy, Delphine; Couallier, Vincent; Portier, Joseph; Morin, Bénédicte; Tuffet, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    There is currently wide interest in room temperature storage of dehydrated DNA. However, there is insufficient knowledge about its chemical and structural stability. Here, we show that solid-state DNA degradation is greatly affected by atmospheric water and oxygen at room temperature. In these conditions DNA can even be lost by aggregation. These are major concerns since laboratory plastic ware is not airtight. Chain-breaking rates measured between 70°C and 140°C seemed to follow Arrhenius’ law. Extrapolation to 25°C gave a degradation rate of about 1–40 cuts/105 nucleotides/century. However, these figures are to be taken as very tentative since they depend on the validity of the extrapolation and the positive or negative effect of contaminants, buffers or additives. Regarding the secondary structure, denaturation experiments showed that DNA secondary structure could be preserved or fully restored upon rehydration, except possibly for small fragments. Indeed, below about 500 bp, DNA fragments underwent a very slow evolution (almost suppressed in the presence of trehalose) which could end in an irreversible denaturation. Thus, this work validates using room temperature for storage of DNA if completely protected from water and oxygen. PMID:19969539

  8. Surface chemistry of surfactant AOT-stabilized SnO(2) nanoparticles and effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Luwang, Meitram N; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S; Singh, Naorem S; Tewari, Raghvendra; Srivastava, Sri K; Vatsa, Rajesh K

    2010-09-01

    SnO(2).xH(2)O nanoparticles were prepared at room temperature by the microemulsion route. Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) was used as a surfactant to stabilize the nanoparticles. These nanoparticles show green luminescence at 510nm, which has been assigned to oxygen vacancies. Infrared spectra of samples heated in the temperature range 500-900 degrees C show bond formation between SnO(2) nanoparticles and SO(4)(2-), which arises from oxidation of SO(3)(-) present in AOT. This was further supported by X-ray diffraction. Shape transformations of the particles from triangular to spherical and then to rectangular was observed as the heat-treatment temperature was increased, and this is related to the surface energy of particles. An enhancement in emission intensity of Eu(3+) was observed when Eu(3+) ions were doped into the SnO(2) nanoparticles due to significant energy transfer from SnO(2) (or Eu-O) to Eu(3+) through surface-mediated energy transfer as compared to direct excitation of Eu(3+) at 397nm. Interestingly, these nanoparticles are dispersible in water, and can be incorporated into polymer-based materials such as polyvinyl alcohol to give homogeneous films, giving rise to blue and red emissions. PMID:20557894

  9. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  10. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 2; Temperature Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Taril; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. LHP's are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the second part of the experimental study, i.e. the effect of an accelerating force on the LHP operating temperature. It has been known that in stationary tests the LHP operating temperature is a function of the evaporator power and the condenser sink temperature when the compensation temperature is not actively controlled. Results of this test program indicate that any change in the accelerating force will result in a chance in the LHP operating temperature through its influence on the fluid distribution in the evaporator, condenser and compensation chamber. However, the effect is not universal, rather it is a function of other test conditions. A steady, constant acceleration may result in an increase or decrease of the operating temperature, while a periodic spin will lead to a quasi-steady operating temperature over a sufficient time interval. In addition, an accelerating force may lead to temperature hysteresis and changes in the temperature oscillation. In spite of all these effects, the LHP continued to operate without any problems in all tests.

  11. Experimental study of the stability and activity of brines on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheide, Travis S.

    This work contributes to the understanding of liquid water stability, with an emphasis on the role that dissolved solutes may have had on liquid water formation on Mars, past and present. In chapter 2, the stability of liquid water under martian conditions is explored through experiments on ferric sulfate brines. First, it is demonstrated that such brines can be formed starting from typical martian mineralogy. Ferric sulfates are quite soluble, up to 48 wt%, and can form solutions which remain liquid down to 205 +/-1 K at the eutectic. As a result of low water activities, these solutions exhibit evaporation rates 20 times lower than pure water. The combination of a low eutectic point and low evaporation rates allow subsurface liquids to be stable at high martian latitudes, where the majority of gullies and viscous flow features are located. Thus, the characteristics of ferric sulfate brines were further investigated in chapter 3, where the viscous properties of such solutions were measured, with respect to changing temperature and concentration. Using these results, the viscosity of these solutions on the formation of gullies was considered, where calculated fluid flow velocities were found to be in accordance with some estimates from image analyses of gully formations. In chapter 4, other Mars-relevant brines were studied and characterized under martian surface conditions. Magnesium and ferrous sulfate, and magnesium and ferric chloride brines were found to stabilize water, through lower evaporation rates and freezing point depression, much like the ferric sulfate brines. For these sulfate brines, it was found that the thermodynamic process of phase change, i.e. ice formation and/or salt crystallization, can affect the kinetic process of evaporation, through very low water activities in solution. Furthermore, in chapter 5 these studies were extended to recent results from the Phoenix mission, by examining the stability of perchlorate brines under conditions

  12. Novel active stabilization technology in highly crosslinked UHMWPEs for superior stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, Ebru; Neils, Andrew L.; Wannomae, Keith K.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2014-12-01

    Radiation cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the bearing of choice in joint arthroplasty. The demands on the longevity of this polymer are likely to increase with the recently advancing deterioration of the performance of alternative metal-on-metal implants. Vitamin E-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPEs are considered the next generation of improved UHMWPE bearing surfaces for improving the oxidation resistance of the polymer. It was recently discovered that in the absence of radiation-induced free radicals, lipids absorbed into UHMWPE from the synovial fluid can initiate oxidation and result in new free radical-mediated oxidation mechanisms. In the presence of radiation-induced free radicals, it is possible for the polymer to oxidize through both existing free radicals at the time of implantation and through newly formed free radicals in vivo. Thus, we showed that reducing the radiation-induced free radicals in vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE would increase its oxidative stability and presumably lead to improved longevity. We describe mechanical annealing and warm irradiation of irradiated vitamin E blends as novel methods to eliminate 99% of radiation-induced free radicals without sacrificing crystallinity. These are significant improvements in the processing of highly cross-linked UHMWPE for joint implants with improved longevity.

  13. Stabilization of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) spectra from NaI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, W. A.; Gardner, R. P.

    2004-06-01

    NaI detectors are still used frequently in industrial Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis applications such as in bulk material analysis. They have the advantages of being efficient for high-energy gamma rays, being relatively rugged, and being able to be used without cooling. When using NaI detectors, and consequently photomultiplier tubes, the quality of the data can drastically deteriorate through gain and zero shifts that result in spectral smearing due to temperature and/or counting rate changes. A new offline approach is presented to stabilize the NaI spectral drift. The approach is not sensitive to the cause of the drift and takes into account the NaI and ADC non-linearities. Peak resolution is improved substantially when this approach is used in the presence of spectral drift.

  14. 3D active stabilization system with sub-micrometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Kursu, Olli; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95% attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70% attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  15. 3D Active Stabilization System with Sub-Micrometer Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95 % attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70 % attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  16. High-temperature temporal stability of selected oxidizers as solids and in aqueous solutions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Smiroldo

    1986-08-08

    Various potential decontamination agents were examined as solids and in aqueous solutions for long-term stability at high temperatures. The following oxidizers were assayed iodometrically: the hypochlorite salts of calcium and lithium, sodium dischloroisocyanurate (PACE) and the preoxygen compounds sodium perborate, sodium peroxydisulfate, sodium percarbonate, and magnesium monoperoxyphthalate (H-48). The inorganic peroxide solids and the solid sodium dischloroisoyanurate were stable at 80 C, while the organic peroxide solids and the hypochlorite salts deteriorated markedly within 72 hours. In freshwater solutions of 0.01 N or less, the inorganic hypochlorite and peroxide salts decomposed slowly at 60 c. Conversely, the sodium dischloroisocyanurate, magnesium monoperoxyphthalate, and sodium percarbonate solutions exhibited near complete decomposition in 24 hours.

  17. Stabilized Alumina/Ethanol Colloidal Dispersion for Seeding High Temperature Air Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Judith H.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Seeding air flows with particles to enable measurements of gas velocities via laser anemometry and/or particle image velocimetry techniques can be quite exasperating. The seeding requirements are compounded when high temperature environments are encountered and special care must be used in selecting a refractory seed material. The pH stabilization techniques commonly employed in ceramic processing are used to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. The technique is not limited to alumina/ethanol and is also demonstrated with an alumina/H2O system. Other ceramic powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(sub pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined.

  18. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  19. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-06-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  20. High resolution depiction of atmospheric moisture, stability and surface temperature from combined MAMS and VAS radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, C. C.; Strabala, K. I.; Menzel, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate mesoscale variability of the earth-atmosphere system, aircraft-borne Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), 100-meter-resolution radiometric data, and geostationary-borne VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) 8-km-resolution radiometric data are used together in a physical retrieval method to produce 100-m-resolution depictions of atmospheric moisture, stability, and skin temperature. The VAS, with its IR-sounding capability, provides the vertical information to the retrieval while the MAMS, with its 100-m resolution, provides the horizontal information. The retrievals show mesoscale features, including a moist tongue intrusion and an urban heat island. Mesogamma-scale gradients are found to exceed mesobeta-scale gradients, and significant mesogamma-scale variability is not captured in current geostationary sounding data. It is suggested that improvements to the spatial resolution of operating sounding data will yield improved information on atmospheric and surface gradients, especially at the mesogamma scale.

  1. Mode signature and stability for a Hamiltonian model of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Tassi, E.; Morrison, P. J.

    2011-03-15

    Stability properties and mode signature for equilibria of a model of electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by Hamiltonian techniques. After deriving new infinite families of Casimir invariants, associated with the noncanonical Poisson bracket of the model, a sufficient condition for stability is obtained by means of the Energy-Casimir method. Mode signature is then investigated for linear motions about homogeneous equilibria. Depending on the sign of the equilibrium 'translated' pressure gradient, stable equilibria can either be energy stable, i.e., possess definite linearized perturbation energy (Hamiltonian), or spectrally stable with the existence of negative energy modes. The ETG instability is then shown to arise through a Krein-type bifurcation, due to the merging of a positive and a negative energy mode, corresponding to two modified drift waves admitted by the system. The Hamiltonian of the linearized system is then explicitly transformed into normal form, which unambiguously defines mode signature. In particular, the fast mode turns out to always be a positive energy mode, whereas the energy of the slow mode can have either positive or negative sign. A reduced model with stable equilibria shear flow that possess a continuous spectrum is also analyzed and brought to normal form by a special integral transform. In this way it is seen how continuous spectra can have signature as well.

  2. Determining the Stability of Asphalt Concrete at Varying Temperatures and Exposure Times Using Destructive and Non-Destructive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgan, Ercan

    This study examined the effect of varying temperatures and varying exposure times on the stability of asphalt concrete using destructive and non-destructive methods. The study also looked at the relationship between destructive and non-destructive methods. In order to investigate the stability according to exposure time and environment temperature, exposure times of 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6 h and temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C were selected. The results showed that at the environment temperature of 17°C the stability of the asphalt core samples decreased by 40.16% at 30°C after 1.5 h and 62.39% after 6 h. At 40°C the decrease was 74.31% after 1.5 and 78.10% after 6 h. At 50°C the stability of the asphalt decreased by 83.22% after 1.5 h and 88.66% after 6 h. The results also pointed to a moderate negative relationship (R = -0.533) between second ultrasound and stability indicating that non-destructive ultrasound method can be used to predict stability.

  3. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; Song, Wenqiao; Xiao, Wen; Guo, Yanbing; Ding, Jun; Suib, Steven L.; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. Themore » thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.« less

  4. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; Song, Wenqiao; Xiao, Wen; Guo, Yanbing; Ding, Jun; Suib, Steven L.; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. The thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.

  5. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis. PMID:27164865

  6. Temperature systematically modifies neural activity for sweet taste

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Temperature can modify neural and behavioral responses to taste stimuli that elicit “sweetness,” a perception linked to intake of calorie-laden foods. However, the role of temperature in the neural representation of sweet taste is poorly understood. Here we made electrophysiological recordings from gustatory neurons in the medulla of inbred mice to study how adjustments in taste solution temperature to cool (18°C), ambient (22°C), and warm (30°C and 37°C) values changed the magnitude and latency of gustatory activity to sucrose (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.17, 0.31, and 0.56 M). Analysis of 22 sucrose-best neurons revealed that temperature markedly influenced responses to sucrose, which, across concentrations, were largest when solutions were warmed to 30°C. However, reducing solution temperature from warm to ambient to cool progressively steepened the slope of the sucrose concentration-response function computed across cells (P < 0.05), indicating that mean activity to sucrose increased more rapidly with concentration steps under cooling than with warming. Thus the slope of the sucrose concentration-response function shows an inverse relation with temperature. Temperature also influenced latency to the first spike of the sucrose response. Across neurons, latencies were shorter when sucrose solutions were warmed and longer, by hundreds of milliseconds, when solutions were cooled (P < 0.05), indicating that temperature is also a temporal parameter of sucrose activity. Our findings reveal that temperature systematically modifies the timing of gustatory activity to sucrose in the mammalian brain and how this activity changes with concentration. Results further highlight how oral somatosensory cues function as physiological modulators of gustatory processing. PMID:24966301

  7. Active Layer Thermal Response to Stream Water Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzetto, K.; McKnight, D.

    2004-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is comprised of sediments below and adjacent to a stream through which stream water flows in and out. In polar regions, the shape, dimensions, physical and chemical characteristics of this zone are affected by the seasonal freezing and thawing of the active layer. One factor that may influence the active layer temperature regime is stream water temperature, both its absolute value and cyclic variations in its value. Many of the glacial meltwater streams in Taylor Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, exhibit daily temperature patterns with lows of 0 or 1° C and highs of 10 or, on occasion, 15° C. Because the viscosity of water decreases significantly with increasing temperature, these daily maxima may increase infiltration and the exchange of water and heat between the stream and the hyporheic zone. To investigate the influence of stream water temperature and flow paths on the active layer temperature regime and vice versa, two conservative tracer injection experiments were conducted. Both took place in the same 200-meter reach, which was instrumented with temperature and conductivity probes. Both also took place at the same time of day during which the stream reaches its temperature maximum. However, in one experiment snow from a nearby patch was added to the stream to suppress the temperature maximum by 3° C from 10 to 7° C. The temperature data show that the snow addition slowed the rate of hyporheic zone warming and suppressed temperature increases in the hyporheic zone by 1-3° C when compared with the non-perturbation experiment. The electrical conductivity data indicate that during the snow addition experiment, the stream neither gained nor lost water while during the non-perturbation experiment, the stream lost water. These results suggest that the stream water cooling decreased infiltration and heat transfer into the hyporheic zone.

  8. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute. PMID:26896315

  9. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahare, Padmavati; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Agrawal, Vivechana

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine.

  10. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine. PMID:25221454

  11. The comparison of abdominal muscle activation on unstable surface according to the different trunk stability exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Da-yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of abdominal muscle activities and the activation ratio related to trunk stabilization to compare the effects between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and lumbar stabilization exercises on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain, who were equally and randomly assigned to either the abdominal drawing-in maneuver group and the lumbar stabilization exercise group. Abdominal muscle activation and ratio was measured using a wireless TeleMyo DTS during right leg raise exercises while sitting on a Swiss ball. [Results] Differences in rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and internal oblique abdominis muscle activation were observed before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the groups in the muscle activation of the external oblique abdominis and internal oblique abdominis, and the muscle activation ratio of external oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis and internal oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis. [Conclusion] Consequently trunk stability exercise enhances internal oblique abdominis activity and increases trunk stabilization. In addition, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver facilitates the deep muscle more than LSE in abdominal muscle. Therefore, abdominal drawing-in maneuver is more effective than lumbar stabilization exercises in facilitating trunk stabilization. PMID:27134401

  12. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    PubMed

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  13. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  14. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3–Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT–BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT–BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT–BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT–BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  15. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  16. Stability of Levothyroxine, Doxycycline, Hydrocortisone, and Pravastatin in Liquid Dosage Forms Stored at Two Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nahata, Milap C

    2015-01-01

    Extemporaneously prepared liquid dosage forms are needed to administer required medications in infants and young children. The goal of this study was to evaluate the stability of levothyroxine, doxycycline, hydrocortisone, and pravastatin in extemporaneously prepared suspensions stored in plastic prescription bottles under refrigeration and room temperature. Levothyroxine (25 mcg/mL), doxycycline (5 mg/mL), hydrocortisone (2 mg/mL), and pravastatin (10 mg/mL) were each prepared in two groups of suspensions. All of these suspensions were stored in plastic prescription bottles under refrigeration and at room temperature. Levothyroxine was stable for two weeks at 4°C but only one week at 25°C in both suspensions. Doxycycline was stable for two weeks in both suspensions at 4°C and 25°C. Hydrocortisone was stable for the entire two-week study period in both suspensions at both 4°C and 25°C. Pravastatin was stable for the one-week study period in both suspensions at both 4°C and 25°C. These results can be used to offer age-appropriate extemporaneously prepared medications to infants and young children when no suitable commercially available liquid formulations are available. PMID:26775450

  17. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  18. Near-Surface Temperatures on Mercury and the Moon and the Stability of Polar Ice Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Paige, David A.; Wood, Stephen E.

    1999-10-01

    In order to assess the thermal stability of polar ice deposits, we present model calculated temperatures of flat surfaces and surfaces within bowl-shaped and flat-floored polar impact craters on Mercury and the Moon. Our model includes appropriate insolation cycles, realistic crater shapes, multiple scattering of sunlight and infrared radiation, and depth- and temperature-dependent regolith thermophysical properties. Unshaded water ice deposits on the surface of either body are rapidly lost to thermal sublimation. A subsurface water ice deposit is stable within 2° latitude of the Moon's poles. Meter-thick water ice deposits require billions of years to sublime if located in the permanently shaded portions of flat-floored craters within 10° latitude of the poles of Mercury and 13° latitude of the poles of the Moon. Results for craters associated with radar features on Mercury are consistent with the presence of stable water ice deposits if a thin regolith layer thermally insulates deposits at lower latitudes and within smaller craters. A regolith cover would also reduce losses from diffusion, ion sputtering, impact vaporization, and H Lyα and is implied independently by the radar observations. Permanently shaded areas near the Moon's poles are generally colder than those near Mercury's poles, but the Moon's obliquity history, its orbit through Earth's magnetospheric tail, and its radar-opaque regolith may limit the volume and radar detectability of ice deposits there.

  19. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  20. MnOx-CeO2-Al2O3 mixed oxides for soot oxidation: activity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Liu, Shuang; Weng, Duan; Lin, Fan; Ran, Rui

    2011-03-15

    MnO(x)-CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) mixed oxides were prepared by impregnating manganese acetate and cerium nitrate on alumina powders using the sol-gel method. The thermal stabilities of MnO(x)-CeO(2) and Al(2)O(3)-modified mixed oxides were evaluated by treating at 800 °C in dry air flow for 20h. The introduction of Al(2)O(3) markedly increases the textural stability of the catalyst with a relatively high dispersion of MnO(x) and CeO(2), remaining a strong synergistic effect between these two oxides. The NO oxidation activity of the ternary oxides experiences a smaller loss after high-temperature calcination, and a low soot oxidation temperature is attained in the presence of NO. PMID:21276659

  1. Insights into the interactions between enzyme and co-solvents: stability and activity of stem bromelain.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anjeeta; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-02-01

    In present study, an attempt is made to elucidate the effects of various naturally occurring osmolytes and denaturants on BM at pH 7.0. The effects of the varying concentrations of glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, urea and guanidinium chloride (GdnHCl) on structure, stability and activity of BM are explored by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), UV-vis spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Our experimental observations reveal that glycerol and sorbitol are acting as stabilizers at all concentrations while sucrose and trehalose are found to be destabilizers at lower concentrations, however, acted as stabilizers at higher concentrations. On the other hand, urea and GdnHCl are denaturants except at lower concentrations. There is a direct relationship between activity and conformational stability as the activity data are found to be in accordance with conformational stability parameters (ΔGu, Tm, ΔCp) and BM profile on SDS-PAGE. PMID:25434803

  2. Activity and stability of catalase in nonionic micellar and reverse micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Jurgas-Grudzinska, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity and stability in the presence of simple micelles of Brij 35 and entrapped in reverse micelles of Brij 30 have been studied. The enzyme retains full activity in aqueous micellar solution of Brij 35. Catalase exhibits "superactivity" in reverse micelles composed of 0.1 M Brij 30 in dodecane, n-heptane or isooctane, and significantly lowers the activity in decaline. The incorporation of catalase into Brij 30 reverse micelles enhances its stability at 50 degrees C. However, the stability of catalase incubated at 37 degrees C in micellar and reverse micellar solutions is lower than that in homogeneous aqueous solution. PMID:15666551

  3. Impact of active material surface area on thermal stability of LiCoO2 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geder, Jan; Hoster, Harry E.; Jossen, Andreas; Garche, Jürgen; Yu, Denis Y. W.

    2014-07-01

    Thermal stability of charged LiCoO2 cathodes with various surface areas of active material is investigated in order to quantify the effect of LiCoO2 surface area on thermal stability of cathode. Thermogravimetric analyses and calorimetry have been conducted on charged cathodes with different active material surface areas. Besides reduced thermal stability, high surface area also changes the active material decomposition reaction and induces side reactions with additives. Thermal analyses of LiCoO2 delithiated chemically without any additives or with a single additive have been conducted to elaborate the effect of particle size on side reactions. Stability of cathode-electrolyte system has been investigated by accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC). Arrhenius activation energy of cathode decomposition has been calculated as function of conversion at different surface area of active material.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of calcite, hydrate and the temperature effect on CO2 transport and adsorption stability in geological formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cuong, Phan; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Jensen, Bjørnar

    2012-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at several different temperatures were run to investigate the transport, adsorption, and stability of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water phases in contact with a ? calcite surface. All simulated systems showed evidence of CO2 transport and interface stability heavily affected by the presence of calcite and the simulation temperature. The number of CO2 molecules that successfully traversed the water layer and adsorbed on the calcite surface increased with temperature, while the adsorption stability (indicated by the adsorption energy) decreased. It was found that the short-range potential has a significant impact on the preferred CO2 orientation and adsorption selectivity. Carbon dioxide tended to fill partial hydrate cavities at the water-hydrate interface, potentially promoting the formation of new hydrate. These findings indicate the need to consider the implications that CO2 injection will have for reservoirs with pre-existing clathrate hydrates.

  5. A binary palladium-bismuth nanocatalyst with high activity and stability for alkaline glucose electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Lan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Binary palladium-bismuth nanocatalysts supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-Bi/C) are synthesized using a one-pot polyol method. The prepared Pd-Bi/C catalysts have a metal particle range from 5.25 to 12.98 nm and are investigated for alkaline electrocatalytic glucose oxidation reaction (GOR). The physical properties of the catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical activities are determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), Tafel analysis and chronoamperomtry (CA) for comparing the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA), GOR onset potential, GOR peak current density, Tafel slope, poisoning rate and cycling stability of the Pd-Bi/C catalysts. It is found that Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) can significantly enhance the electrocatalytic activity on GOR about 40% times higher than Pd/C and as well as has a 3.7-fold lower poisoning rate. The in-use stability of Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) is also remarkably improved, according to the results of the 200 cycling CV test. The effects of the operating temperature and the concentration of glucose and NaOH electrolyte on Pd-Bi/C (1:0.14) are further studied in this work. The highest Pd-Bi/C catalyzed GOR current density of 29.5 mA cm-2 is attained in alkaline medium.

  6. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Julia M.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M.; Castro, Aline M.; Bossolan, Nelma R. S.; Wallace, B. A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  7. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Yoneda, Juliana S; Martins, Julia M; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M; Castro, Aline M; Bossolan, Nelma R S; Wallace, B A; Araujo, Ana P U

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  8. Effect of changing the nanoscale environment on activity and stability of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is employed for fabrication of nitrate sensing devices in which the enzyme in immobilized form is used to catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of a suitable cofactor. So far, instability of immobilized NR due to the use of inappropriate immobilization matrices has limited the practical applications of these devices. Present study is an attempt to improve the kinetic properties and stability of NR using nanoscale iron oxide (nFe3O4) and zinc oxide (nZnO) particles. The desired nanoparticles were synthesized, surface functionalized, characterized and affixed onto the epoxy resin to yield two nanocomposite supports (epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO) for immobilizing NR. Epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO support could load as much as 35.8±0.01 and 33.20±0.01μg/cm(2) of NR with retention of about 93.72±0.50 and 84.81±0.80% of its initial activity respectively. Changes in surface morphology and chemical bonding structure of both the nanocomposite supports after addition of NR were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Optimum working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained for free as well as immobilized NR preparations. Further, storage stability at 4°C and thermal stability between 25-50°C were determined for all the NR preparations. Analytical applications of immobilized NR for determination of soil and water nitrates along with reusability data has been included to make sure the usefulness of the procedure. PMID:27233127

  9. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  10. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi X; Wu, Q; Chen, Xiang R; Geng, Hua Y

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  11. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  12. INTRAPULPAL TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING BLEACHING WITH VARIOUS ACTIVATION MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Michida, Sílvia Masae de Araujo; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Marimoto, Ângela Regina Kimie; Garakis, Márcia Carneiro Valera; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. Material and Methods: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12): (G1) Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2) Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3) Bleaching gel + LED, (G4) Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (°C) in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV) values were: 1.5°C (G1), 2.9°C (G2), 1.7°C (G3) and 6.9°C (G4). When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05), but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05) intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05) from each other. Conclusions: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group. PMID:19936522

  13. Stability and activity of lipase in subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a).

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Xue, Yong; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xue, Chang Hu

    2007-12-01

    The stability and activity of commercial immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435) in subcritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) was investigated. The esterification of oleic acid with glycerol was studied as a model reaction in subcritical R134a and in solvent-free conditions. The results indicated that subcritical R134a treatment led to significant increase of activity of Novozym 435, and a maximum residual activity of 300% was measured at 4 MPa, 30 degrees C after 7 h incubation. No deactivation of Novozym 435 treated with subcritical R134a under different operation factors (pressure 2-8 MPa, temperature 30-60 degrees C, incubation time 1-12 h, water content 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 enzyme/water, depressurization rate 4 MPa/1 min, 4 MPa/30 min, 4 MPa/90 min) was observed. While the initial reaction rate was high in subcritical R134a, higher conversion was obtained in solvent-free conditions. Though the apparent conversion of the reaction is lower in subcritical R134a, it is more practicable, especially at low enzyme concentrations desired at commercial scales. PMID:17909872

  14. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure. PMID:18434422

  15. Stability and structure of activated macrocyles. Ligand with biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Motekaitis, R.J.; Martell, A.E.

    1996-06-19

    Single p-toluic acid pendant groups were attached to 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane (15aneN5) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam) to prepare bifunctional reagents for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies with {sup 64, 67}Cu. The ligands are 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (PCBA) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (CPTA). For the parent macrocycles and their pendant arm derivatives, the 1:1 Cu{sup 2+} complexes dissociate only below pH 2. At pH 0.0 and 25 {degrees}C the CPTA-Cu complex has a half-life toward complete dissociation of 24 days. A new approach was developed for the estimation of the Cu{sup 2+} stability constant for the kinetically robust CPTA. All other formation constants were determined at 25.0 {degrees}C with batch spectrophotometric techniques. Potentiometric titrations were used to determine the protonation constants of the macrocyclic ligands as well as of the metal chelates. The protonation constants, stability constants, and pM`s are discussed in terms of both molecular mechanics calculations and the ligands` potential applicability as copper(II) radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Lipase in aqueous-polar organic solvents: Activity, structure, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Md Zahid; Yedavalli, Poornima; Deshmukh, Mandar V; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2013-01-01

    Studying alterations in biophysical and biochemical behavior of enzymes in the presence of organic solvents and the underlying cause(s) has important implications in biotechnology. We investigated the effects of aqueous solutions of polar organic solvents on ester hydrolytic activity, structure and stability of a lipase. Relative activity of the lipase monotonically decreased with increasing concentration of acetone, acetonitrile, and DMF but increased at lower concentrations (upto ∼20% v/v) of dimethylsulfoxide, isopropanol, and methanol. None of the organic solvents caused any appreciable structural change as evident from circular dichorism and NMR studies, thus do not support any significant role of enzyme denaturation in activity change. Change in 2D [15N, 1H]-HSQC chemical shifts suggested that all the organic solvents preferentially localize to a hydrophobic patch in the active-site vicinity and no chemical shift perturbation was observed for residues present in protein's core. This suggests that activity alteration might be directly linked to change in active site environment only. All organic solvents decreased the apparent binding of substrate to the enzyme (increased Km); however significantly enhanced the kcat. Melting temperature (Tm) of lipase, measured by circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, altered in all solvents, albeit to a variable extent. Interestingly, although the effect of all organic solvents on various properties on lipase is qualitatively similar, our study suggest that magnitudes of effects do not appear to follow bulk solvent properties like polarity and the solvent effects are apparently dictated by specific and local interactions of solvent molecule(s) with the protein. PMID:23625694

  17. Live Soap: Stability, Order, and Fluctuations in Apolar Active Smectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John

    2013-03-01

    We construct a hydrodynamic theory of noisy, apolar active smectics in bulk suspension or on a substrate. Unlike purely orientationally ordered active fluids, active apolar smectics can be dynamically stable in Stokesian bulk suspensions. Smectic order in these systems is quasilong ranged in dimension d=2 and long ranged in d=3. We predict reentrant Kosterlitz-Thouless melting to an active nematic in our simplest model in d=2, a nonzero second-sound speed parallel to the layers in bulk suspensions, and that there are no giant number fluctuations in either case. We also briefly discuss possible instabilities in these systems.

  18. Investigating the Impact of Polymer Functional Groups on the Stability and Activity of Lysozyme-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lucius, Melissa; Falatach, Rebecca; McGlone, Cameron; Makaroff, Katherine; Danielson, Alex; Williams, Cameron; Nix, Jay C; Konkolewicz, Dominik; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A

    2016-03-14

    Polymers are often conjugated to proteins to improve stability; however, the impact of polymer chain length and functional groups on protein structure and function is not well understood. Here we use RAFT polymerization to grow polymers of different lengths and functionality from a short acrylamide oligomer with a RAFT end group conjugated to lysozyme. We show by X-ray crystallography that enzyme structure is minimally impacted by modification with the RAFT end group. Significant activity toward the negatively charged Micrococcus lysodeicticus cell wall was maintained when lysozyme was modified with cationic polymers. Thermal and chemical stability of the conjugates was characterized using differential scanning fluorimetry and tryptophan fluorescence. All conjugates had a lower melting temperature; however, conjugates containing ionic or substrate mimicking polymers were more resistant to denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride. Our results demonstrate that tailoring polymer functionality can improve conjugate activity and minimize enzymatic inactivation by denaturants. PMID:26866284

  19. Transition temperature range of thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires

    PubMed Central

    SPINI, Tatiana Sobottka; VALARELLI, Fabrício Pinelli; CANÇADO, Rodrigo Hermont; de FREITAS, Karina Maria Salvatore; VILLARINHO, Denis Jardim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The shape memory resulting from the superelasticity and thermoelastic effect is the main characteristic of thermally activated NiTi archwires and is closely related to the transition temperature range (TTR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the TTR of thermally activated NiTi archwires commercially available. Material and Methods Seven different brands of 0.019"x0.025" thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires were tested as received by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range from -100°C to 150°C at 10°C/min. Results All thermally activated NiTi archwires analyzed presented stage transformation during thermal scanning with final austenitic temperature (Af) ranging from 20.39°C to 45.42°C. Three brands of NiTi archwires presented Af close to the room temperature and, this way, do not present properties of shape memory and pseudoelasticity that are desirable in clinical applications. Conclusions The thermally activated NiTi archwires present great variability in the TTR and the elastic parameters of each NiTi archwire should be provided by the manufacturers, to allow achievement of the best clinical performance possible. PMID:24676581

  20. Hot corrosion and high-temperature deformation of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zun

    The effect of V2O5 melt infiltration on the phase stability, thermal and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed 7 wt% Y 2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ) was assessed by infiltration experiments at temperatures of 750°-1200°. Based on SEM and TEM observations combined with EDS, reactions between molten V2O'5 and YSZ were found to occur concomitantly with the infiltration process at all temperatures investigated. Near the surface, the reaction front proceeds in a planar fashion presumably via dissolution and precipitation, while the V2O5 melt infiltrates along the interconnected pores and reacts with the YSZ deep inside the coating. Typically, two different morphologies could be distinguished in the cross-section of the infiltrated coating that corresponds to the planar reacted zone (PRZ) and the melt infiltrated reaction zone (MIRZ). PRZ is a fine-grained surface reacted region where the vanadium concentration is higher or comparable to the yttrium concentration and MIRZ is a dense infiltrated region which displays abrupt vanadium concentration changes along the thickness direction. Temperature as well as morphological parameters, such as pore size and connectivity, was found to influence the dissolution/infiltration kinetics. In-situ XRD was employed to clarify the reaction mechanism between V 2O5 melt and YSZ. Concurrent formation of zirconium vanadate and yttrium vanadate were observed at 700°C and 750°C, suggesting a similar reactivity of yttrium and zirconia with vanadium oxide. The zirconium vanadate phase decomposed subsequently after 150 and 60 minutes at 700° and 750°C, respectively. The t'-ZrO2 phase transformed to a monoclinic phase through the formation of ZrV2O7, without gradually losing yttrium in t'-ZrO2 or partitioning into a cubic zirconia phase as previously thought. Therefore, zirconia-based ceramics have very limited resistance to vanadium oxide because of the zirconia. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) analysis based on the in-situ X-ray results at

  1. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  2. Stability of the strengthening nanoprecipitates in reduced activation ferritic steels under Fe2+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    The stability of MX-type precipitates is critical to retain mechanical properties of both reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) and conventional FM steels at elevated temperatures. Radiation resistance of TaC, TaN, and VN nanoprecipitates irradiated up to ∼49 dpa at 500 °C using Fe2+ is investigated in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilized in standard and scanning mode (STEM) reveals the non-stoichiometric nature of the nanoprecipitates. Irradiation did not alter their crystalline nature. The radiation resistance of these precipitates, in an order of reduced resistance, is TaC, VN, and TaN. Particle dissolution, growth, and reprecipitation were the modes of irradiation-induced instability. Irradiation also facilitated formation of Fe2W type Laves phase limited to the VN and TaN bearing alloys. This result suggests that nitrogen level should be controlled to a minimal level in alloys to gain greater radiation resistance of the MX-type precipitates at similar temperatures as well as postpone the formation and subsequent coarsening of Laves phase.

  3. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  4. Temperature Dependence and High-Temperature Stability of the Annealed Ni/Au Ohmic Contact to p-Type GaN in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shirong; McFavilen, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ponce, Fernando A.; Arena, Chantal; Goodnick, Stephen; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2016-04-01

    We report on the temperature-dependent contact resistivity and high-temperature stability of the annealed Ni/Au ohmic contacts to p-type GaN in air. As the measure temperature increases from 25°C to 390°C, both the specific contact resistivity (ρ c) and sheet resistance (R sh) decrease by factors ˜10, contributing to the 10-fold increase in current at 390°C compared with that at 25°C. It was also observed that the ρ c was further reduced by 36%, i.e., from 2.2 × 10-3 Ω cm2 to 1.4 × 10-3 Ω cm2, during the 48-h high-temperature stability test at 450°C in air, showing excellent stability of the contacts. An increase in ρ c was observed after the contacts were subjected to 500°C in air. Higher temperature stress led to a significant increase in ρ c. The contacts show rectifying I-V characteristics after being subjected to 700°C for 1 h. The degradation mechanics were analyzed with the assistance of transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Granite and Its Effects on Borehole Stability in High Temperature and Three-Dimensional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bao-lin, Liu; Hai-yan, Zhu; Chuan-liang, Yan; Zhi-jun, Li; Zhi-qiao, Wang

    2014-01-01

    When exploiting the deep resources, the surrounding rock readily undergoes the hole shrinkage, borehole collapse, and loss of circulation under high temperature and high pressure. A series of experiments were conducted to discuss the compressional wave velocity, triaxial strength, and permeability of granite cored from 3500 meters borehole under high temperature and three-dimensional stress. In light of the coupling of temperature, fluid, and stress, we get the thermo-fluid-solid model and governing equation. ANSYS-APDL was also used to stimulate the temperature influence on elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability. In light of the results, we establish a temperature-fluid-stress model to illustrate the granite's stability. The compressional wave velocity and elastic modulus, decrease as the temperature rises, while poisson ratio and permeability of granite increase. The threshold pressure and temperature are 15 MPa and 200°C, respectively. The temperature affects the fracture pressure more than the collapse pressure, but both parameters rise with the increase of temperature. The coupling of thermo-fluid-solid, greatly impacting the borehole stability, proves to be a good method to analyze similar problems of other formations. PMID:24778592

  6. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of granite and its effects on borehole stability in high temperature and three-dimensional stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Bao-lin; Zhu, Hai-yan; Yan, Chuan-liang; Li, Zhi-jun; Wang, Zhi-qiao

    2014-01-01

    When exploiting the deep resources, the surrounding rock readily undergoes the hole shrinkage, borehole collapse, and loss of circulation under high temperature and high pressure. A series of experiments were conducted to discuss the compressional wave velocity, triaxial strength, and permeability of granite cored from 3500 meters borehole under high temperature and three-dimensional stress. In light of the coupling of temperature, fluid, and stress, we get the thermo-fluid-solid model and governing equation. ANSYS-APDL was also used to stimulate the temperature influence on elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability. In light of the results, we establish a temperature-fluid-stress model to illustrate the granite's stability. The compressional wave velocity and elastic modulus, decrease as the temperature rises, while poisson ratio and permeability of granite increase. The threshold pressure and temperature are 15 MPa and 200 °C, respectively. The temperature affects the fracture pressure more than the collapse pressure, but both parameters rise with the increase of temperature. The coupling of thermo-fluid-solid, greatly impacting the borehole stability, proves to be a good method to analyze similar problems of other formations. PMID:24778592

  7. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  8. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  9. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  10. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  11. Stabilization of nickel-laden sludge by a high-temperature NiCr2O4 synthesis process.

    PubMed

    Li, Nien-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsin; Hu, Ching-Yao; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2011-12-30

    The feasibility of stabilizing nickel-laden sludge by a high-temperature NiCr(2)O(4) synthesis process was investigated with different sintering temperatures, salt contents, molar ratios, and reaction atmospheres. The crystalline phases of species were investigated by using an X-ray diffraction, and the surface characteristics of particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The leaching behavior of the stabilized sludge was evaluated by Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The results indicated that NiCr(2)O(4) was formed at around 800°C by transforming NiO and Cr(2)O(3) into a spinel structure. Leaching concentrations of both nickel and chromium decreased with an increase in the sintering temperature. The existence of salt in the sludge disturbed the formation of spinel, but a moderate salt content contributed to stabilization efficiency. A Cr/Ni molar ratio >2 also contributed to the stabilization efficiency of heavy metals after the thermal process. NiCr(2)O(4) was transformed from simulated sludge under both an N(2) and air atmosphere. The sintering strategy designed for nickel-laden sludge was proven to be beneficial in stabilizing nickel and chromium. PMID:22079188

  12. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  13. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Wu; Belieres, Jean-Philippe; Yoshizawa, Masahiro

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  14. Low-Temperature Aging and Phase Stability of U6Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Briant, C L; Chasse, K R

    2003-11-21

    Aging behavior and phase stability of a water-quenched U-6wt%Nb (U-14at%Nb) alloy artificially aged at 200 C and naturally aged at ambient temperature for 15 years have been investigated using Vickers hardness test, X-ray diffraction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Age hardening/softening phenomenon is observed from the artificially aged samples according to microhardness measurement. The age hardening can be rationalized by the occurrence of spinodal decomposition, or fine scale of Nb segregation, which results in the formation of a nano-scale modulated structure within the artificially aged samples. Coarsening of the modulated structure after prolonged aging leads to the age softening. The occurrence of chemical ordering (disorder-order transformation) is found in the naturally aged sample based upon the observations of antiphase domain boundaries (APB's) and superlattice diffraction patterns. A possible superlattice structure is accordingly proposed for the chemically ordered phase observed in the naturally aged alloy sample.

  15. Evaluation of infectious bursal disease virus stability at different conditions of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Rani, Surabhi; Kumar, Sachin

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is one of the highly pathogenic viral diseases of poultry. The disease poses a serious threat to the economy of many developing countries where agriculture serves as the primary source of national income. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) belongs to the family Birnaviridae. The IBDV is well characterized to cause immunosuppression in poultry. The live attenuated vaccine is the only way to protect the chickens from IBDV infection. The ineffectiveness of vaccine is one of the major causes of IBDV outbreaks in field condition. In the present study, we discuss briefly about the biology of IBDV genome and its proteins under different conditions of temperature and pH in order to evaluate its infectivity under adverse physical conditions. Our results indicate that the IBDV is non-infective above 42 °C and unstable above 72 °C. However, the change in pH does not significantly contribute to the IBDV stability. The study will be useful in estimating an optimum storage condition for IBDV vaccines without causing any deterioration in its viability and effectiveness. PMID:26265229

  16. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau-Luchaire, C.; Moutafis, C.; Reyren, N.; Sampaio, J.; Vaz, C. A. F.; van Horne, N.; Bouzehouane, K.; Garcia, K.; Deranlot, C.; Warnicke, P.; Wohlhüter, P.; George, J.-M.; Weigand, M.; Raabe, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m–2 in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future.

  17. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moreau-Luchaire, C; Mouta S, C; Reyren, N; Sampaio, J; Vaz, C A F; Van Horne, N; Bouzehouane, K; Garcia, K; Deranlot, C; Warnicke, P; Wohlhüter, P; George, J-M; Weigand, M; Raabe, J; Cros, V; Fert, A

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m(-2) in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future. PMID:26780660

  18. Oxidative stability of waste cooking oil and white diesel upon storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bezergianni, Stella; Chrysikou, Loukia P

    2012-12-01

    Renewable diesel fuels are alternative fuels produced from vegetable oils or animal fats. Catalytic hydrotreating of waste cooking oil (WCO) was carried out at pilot-plant scale and a paraffinic diesel, called "white" diesel was obtained. The white diesel and WCO samples were stored for one year at room temperature under normal atmospheric conditions, but not exposed to sunlight. Viscosity, total acid number (TAN), induction period (IP), carbonaceous deposits, density, cold flow properties, distillation and water content were monitored. TAN and density of the white diesel stored in conventional bottles changed from 0 to 0.221 mg KOH/g and from 787 to 838 kg/m(3), respectively. The remaining parameters did not vary significantly. Water content of WCO increased from 482 to 2491 mg/kg, TAN from 0.744 to 0.931 mg KOH/g, whereas viscosity, IP and carbon residues fluctuated mildly. The results are indicative of the white diesel's stability, rendering it suitable for prolonged storage. PMID:23131312

  19. Stability of very-high pressure arc discharges against perturbations of the electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Hechtfischer, U.

    2012-04-01

    We study the stability of the energy balance of the electron gas in very high-pressure plasmas against longitudinal perturbations, using a local dispersion analysis. After deriving a dispersion equation, we apply the model to a very high-pressure (100 bar) xenon plasma and find instability for electron temperatures, T{sub e}, in a window between 2400 K and 5500-7000 K x 10{sup 3} K, depending on the current density (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2}). The instability can be traced back to the Joule heating of the electron gas being a growing function of T{sub e}, which is due to a rising dependence of the electron-atom collision frequency on T{sub e}. We then analyze the T{sub e} range occurring in very high-pressure xenon lamps and conclude that only the near-anode region exhibits T{sub e} sufficiently low for this instability to occur. Indeed, previous experiments have revealed that such lamps develop, under certain conditions, voltage oscillations accompanied by electromagnetic interference, and this instability has been pinned down to the plasma-anode interaction. A relation between the mechanisms of the considered instability and multiple anodic attachments of high-pressure arcs is discussed.

  20. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  1. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  2. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  3. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  4. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  5. Nickel(II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; M.A. Goyette

    2003-03-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nanomolal (nm). The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo- and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  6. Room-Temperature Fluorine-Induced Decrease in the Stability of Bromine and Iodine Intercalated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Upon exposure to room-temperature fluorine, intercalated carbon fibers (containing either bromine alone or iodine and bromine together) become heavier and less stable. For Amoco P-100 graphitized carbon fibers, which were intercalated with 18 wt percent bromine, 1 hour of fluorine exposure resulted in a large weight increase but caused only a small decrease in thermal stability. An additional 89 hours of fluorine exposure time resulted in small additional increases in fiber weight, but significant further decreases in fiber thermal stability. Such phenomena of weight increase and stability decrease do not occur if the intercalated fibers are exposed to 250 C fluorine. These observations suggest that, at room temperature, fluorine is absorbed quickly by the intercalated fibers and is intercalated slowly into the fibers. Most of the original intercalates are replaced by fluorine in the process of fluorine intercalation. In an inert environment, the bromine intercalated fibers are much more thermally stable. After 800 C vacuum heating for 2 weeks, the brominated fibers lost about 45% of their bromine, and their resistivity increased from 64 mu(Omega)-cm to a range of 95-170 mu(Omega)-cm. This is still much lower than the value of 300 mu(Omega)-cm for pristine P-100. For practical purposes, to preserve their thermal stability, brominated fibers need to be protected from exposure to fluorine at room temperature or to any intercalate at a temperature where, upon direct contact with graphite, an intercalation compound can easily be formed.

  7. Investigation on the near-infrared-emitting thermal stability of Bi activated alkaline-earth aluminoborosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ronghua; Song, Zhiguo; Li, Yongjin; Zhou, Yuting; Liu, Qun; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi

    2015-02-01

    Stability of near-infrared (NIR) emission form Bi doped 42.5SiO2-12.5B2O3-25Al2O3-20RO (SBAR, R = Ca, Sr, Ba) glasses under treatment between annealing and softening temperature were studied. Results show that the thermal stability of Bi-NIR-emitting centers in SBAR glasses generally decreases with the increase of the radius of modifier cations but is greatly higher that in similar alkali glasses. Comparative experiments indicate these phenomena can be understood by the tendency that the smaller and higher charged alkaline earth ions as higher field strength modifier cations will increase the concentration of negative charge on non-bridging oxygens and also help to stabilize the non-bridging oxygens, which can restrain the thermally activated diffusion and valence change of Bi-activated centers, respectively. The results can provide an improved understanding for the NIR-emitting thermal stability of Bi doped glasses and a scientific reference for composition design of Bi-doped optical fiber.

  8. HERC2/USP20 coordinates CHK1 activation by modulating CLASPIN stability.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhao, Hongchang; Liao, Ji; Xu, Xingzhi

    2014-12-01

    CLASPIN is an essential mediator in the DNA replication checkpoint, responsible for ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein)-dependent activation of CHK1 (checkpoint kinase 1). Here we found a dynamic signaling pathway that regulates CLASPIN turn over. Under unperturbed conditions, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HERC2 regulates the stability of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP20 by promoting ubiquitination-mediated proteasomal degradation. Under replication stress, ATR-mediated phosphorylation of USP20 results in the disassociation of HERC2 from USP20. USP20 in turn deubiquitinates K48-linked-polyubiquitinated CLASPIN, stabilizing CLASPIN and ultimately promoting CHK1 phosphorylation and CHK1-directed checkpoint activation. Inhibition of USP20 expression promotes chromosome instability and xenograft tumor growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrated a novel function of HERC2/USP20 in coordinating CHK1 activation by modulating CLASPIN stability, which ultimately promotes genome stability and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25326330

  9. Effect of Hofmeister anions and protein concentration on the activity and stability of some immobilized made-independent dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Bovara, R.; Pasta, P.; Cremonesi, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of several factors on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, both free and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, was investigated. Enzymes were immobilized under different conditions including various degrees of matrix activation, variable amounts of protein, in the presence, or in the absence of, additives (coenzymes, dithiothreitol, salts). Activity recovery was in general satisfactorily high with 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, low with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and markedly linked to the concentration of immobilized protein with alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case the advantageous stabilizing effect of high enzyme concentrations was notably diminished by the paralled decrease of the effectiveness factor. The effect of high concentrations of anions of the Hofmeister series was examined. It was found that 1M phosphate and 0.5M sulfate dramatically stabilize both free and immobilized enzymes against inactivation by temperature and urea. Km values of apolar substrates were considerably lowered by the two anions while Km values of polar substrates were not affected. In some cases Vmax values also were influenced by high concentrations of these anions. The present results appear of interest particularly in view of enzyme utilization for analytical as well as for preparative purposes. (Refs. 13).

  10. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  11. Beta activity in the premotor cortex is increased during stabilized as compared to normal walking

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Dieën, Jaap H.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Walking on two legs is inherently unstable. Still, we humans perform remarkable well at it, mostly without falling. To gain more understanding of the role of the brain in controlling gait stability we measured brain activity using electro-encephalography (EEG) during stabilized and normal walking. Subjects walked on a treadmill in two conditions, each lasting 10 min; normal, and while being laterally stabilized by elastic cords. Kinematics of trunk and feet, electro-myography (EMG) of neck muscles, as well as 64-channel EEG were recorded. To assess gait stability the local divergence exponent, step width, and trunk range of motion were calculated from the kinematic data. We used independent component (IC) analysis to remove movement, EMG, and eyeblink artifacts from the EEG, after which dynamic imaging of coherent sources beamformers were determined to identify cortical sources that showed a significant difference between conditions. Stabilized walking led to a significant increase in gait stability, i.e., lower local divergence exponents. Beamforming analysis of the beta band activity revealed significant sources in bilateral pre-motor cortices. Projection of sensor data on these sources showed a significant difference only in the left premotor area, with higher beta power during stabilized walking, specifically around push-off, although only significant around contralateral push-off. It appears that even during steady gait the cortex is involved in the control of stability. PMID:26578937

  12. Characterization of the activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Marcelo S.; Santos, Rudye K. S.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    This paper reports results of studies of the catalytic activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol. Co/Al 2O 3, Co/SiO 2, and Co/MgO catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The results showed the presence of Co 3O 4 and CoO x species interacting with Al 2O 3 or MgO and formed after a calcination step. It was evident that only Co 0 sites are active for the steam reforming of ethanol. All materials showed high levels of ethanol conversion, with molar yields of about 70% of hydrogen and 30% of CO+CO 2+CH 4 in the gaseous mixture. The Co/Al 2O 3 catalyst also produced ethylene through a dehydration reaction of ethanol. It is proposed that the methane formation on Co/SiO 2 catalysts occurs by methanation of CO and by ethanol decomposition. After 9 h of reaction, 14-24% (w/w) of carbon was deposited on all catalysts, indicating that a well characterized deactivation of the materials is due to coke deposition.

  13. The stability of Pyrogenic Organic Matter is dependent upon its wood source and charring temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. D.; Filley, T. R.; Bird, J.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.; Stark, R. E.; Hatton, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fire is a major mediator of carbon (C) cycling in forests and can result in the formation of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM). The biological reactivity of PyOM is largely dependent upon the physiochemical characteristics of source material and production temperature. As a result, PyOM can persist up to centennial time scales after deposition while simultaneously enhancing or suppressing the mineralization of native soil C (NSC). To investigate the interactive effects of PyOM source and production temperature on NSC, we added 13C-enriched red maple (RM) or jack pine (JP) pyrolyzed at 200, 300, 450 or 600°C to a low C (0.5%;), near-surface soil (0-20 cm-depth) at 60% water holding capacity and 11% of native soil C and then incubated the samples in the dark at 25⁰C for 6 months. We found that PyOM mineralization rates decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature for either species while NSC mineralization was suppressed across all treatments with the largest decrease observed in JP 300⁰C. RM mineralization rates were consistently greater (˜5 to ˜25%) than for JP <600⁰C during the first 17 days. Mean residence time (MRT) of PyOM-C was significantly higher in PyOM >300°C resulting in MRT of ~300 - 550 y compared to 8-30 y in lower temperature PyOM (0-300 °C). RM exhibited significantly lower MRT in 300°C PyOM than JP corresponding to differences observed in PyOM and NSC mineralization rates. The modelled active and slow pools of PyOM-C mineralized decreased with increasing combustion temperature. JP 300°C had a 20% smaller active pool when compared to RM suggesting that for both species, 300⁰C - 450⁰C represented a thermal transition point which was most evident in jack pine. These results highlight how differences in PyOM physiochemical characteristics linked to a species thermal transformation threshold may be a predictor in determining its biological reactivity in soil.

  14. Elaboration, activity and stability of silica-based nitroaromatic sensors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Dimitri; Pereira, Franck; Méthivier, Christophe; Montméat, Pierre; Hairault, Lionel; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2013-08-21

    Functionalized silica-based thin films, modified with hydrophobic groups, were synthesized and used as sensors for nitroaromatic compound (NAC) specific detection. Their performance and behavior, in terms of stability, ageing and regeneration, have been fully characterized by combining chemical characterization techniques and electron microscopy. NAC was efficiently and specifically detected using these silica-based sensors, but showed a great degradation in the presence of humidity. Moreover, the sensor sensitivity seriously decreases with storage time. Methyl- and phenyl-functionalization helped to overcome this humidity sensitivity. Surface characterization enabled us to establish a direct correlation between the appearance, and increasing amount, of adsorbed carbonyl-containing species, and sensor efficiency. This contamination, appearing after only one month, was particularly important when sensors were stored in plastic containers. Rinsing with cyclohexane enables us to recover part of the sensor performance but does not yield a complete regeneration of the sensors. This work led us to the definition of optimized elaboration and storage conditions for nitroaromatic sensors. PMID:23812282

  15. Effects of High Pressure Homogenization on the Activity, Stability, Kinetics and Three-Dimensional Conformation of a Glucose Oxidase Produced by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Tribst, Alline Artigiani Lima; Cota, Júnio; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Cristianini, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    High pressure homogenization (HPH) is a non-thermal method, which has been employed to change the activity and stability of biotechnologically relevant enzymes. This work investigated how HPH affects the structural and functional characteristics of a glucose oxidase (GO) from Aspergillus niger. The enzyme was homogenized at 75 and 150 MPa and the effects were evaluated with respect to the enzyme activity, stability, kinetic parameters and molecular structure. The enzyme showed a pH-dependent response to the HPH treatment, with reduction or maintenance of activity at pH 4.5–6.0 and a remarkable activity increase (30–300%) at pH 6.5 in all tested temperatures (15, 50 and 75°C). The enzyme thermal tolerance was reduced due to HPH treatment and the storage for 24 h at high temperatures (50 and 75°C) also caused a reduction of activity. Interestingly, at lower temperatures (15°C) the activity levels were slightly higher than that observed for native enzyme or at least maintained. These effects of HPH treatment on function and stability of GO were further investigated by spectroscopic methods. Both fluorescence and circular dichroism revealed conformational changes in the molecular structure of the enzyme that might be associated with the distinct functional and stability behavior of GO. PMID:25061935

  16. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  17. Nanofiber Air Filters with High-Temperature Stability for Efficient PM2.5 Removal from the Pollution Sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Liu, Chong; Hsu, Po-Chun; Zhang, Chaofan; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Jinsong; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Lu, Yingying; Qiu, Yongcai; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Here, we developed high-efficiency (>99.5%) polyimide-nanofiber air filters for the high temperature PM2.5 removal. The polyimide nanofibers exhibited high thermal stability, and the PM2.5 removal efficiency was kept unchanged when temperature ranged from 25-370 °C. These filters had high air flux with very low pressure drop. They could continuously work for >120 h for PM2.5 index >300. A field-test showed that they could effectively remove >99.5% PM particles from car exhaust at high temperature. PMID:27167892

  18. Prediction of long-term stability of ionic liquids at elevated temperatures by means of non-isothermal thermogravimetrical analysis.

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Andreas; Andresen, Ann-Kathrin; Jess, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    The thermal stability of an ionic liquid (IL) is an important parameter and limits the maximum operation temperature. However, the definition of stability and of the maximum operation temperature, respectively, is still an open question. Typically, non-isothermal thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) is used to determine the stability, which is then mostly defined by the onset temperature, i.e. by the temperature where a certain mass loss of e.g. 1% is reached. Unfortunately, the rate of mass loss depends on the apparatus and conditions (e.g. heating rate), and may be governed by evaporation or by thermal decomposition or by a combination of both. In this work, isothermal as well as non-isothermal TG/DTG measurements at different heating rates were used as basis to model the combined kinetics of evaporation and decomposition, thereby taking 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [BMIM][BTA] as an example. The measured and predicted mass losses are in good agreement, and the simulation of TG/DTG experiments by the methods outlined in this work leads to a reliable estimation of the evaporation (as shown by comparison with literature data) as well as of the decomposition rate. For a closed system, where the mass loss by evaporation is negligible, a novel criterion (1% mass loss by thermal decomposition within one year) is presented to estimate the maximum operation temperature of ILs. PMID:19830320

  19. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  20. Polymers with high-temperature stability structured by ion irradiation: irradiation parameters and optical characterization of resulting waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueck, Dorothee M.; Schulz, Joachim; Frank, Werner F.

    1996-09-01

    Besides the advantage of acrylic glass as material for passive optical components (easy structure, acceptable loss, low cost) there is a limited stability against elevated temperatures and humidity. Therefore it is necessary to search for other polymers which avoid especially this disadvantage. Two new materials have been studied: poly- (methacryl-methyl-imide), a copolymer from Roehm Darmstadt consisting of methyl-methacrylate and imide with a glass transition temperature of more than 150 degrees C, depending on the imide concentration, and Benzenecylobutane, a material from Dow Chemical.First developed for coating material in electronics it exhibits excellent optical properties and a temperature stability of more than 350 degrees C. The obtained neff values as a function of ion energy, fluence and accumulated ion dose are reported.

  1. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  2. Metabolic stabilization of acetylcholine receptors in vertebrate neuromuscular junction by muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rotzler, S; Brenner, H R

    1990-08-01

    The effects of muscle activity on the growth of synaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) accumulations and on the metabolic AChR stability were investigated in rat skeletal muscle. Ectopic end plates induced surgically in adult soleus muscle were denervated early during development when junctional AChR number and stability were still low and, subsequently, muscles were either left inactive or they were kept active by chronic exogenous stimulation. AChR numbers per ectopic AChR cluster and AChR stabilities were estimated from the radioactivity and its decay with time, respectively, of end plate sites whose AChRs had been labeled with 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-butx). The results show that the metabolic stability of the AChRs in ectopic clusters is reversibly increased by muscle activity even when innervation is eliminated very early in development. 1 d of stimulation is sufficient to stabilize the AChRs in ectopic AChR clusters. Muscle stimulation also produced an increase in the number of AChRs at early denervated end plates. Activity-induced cluster growth occurs mainly by an increase in area rather than in AChR density, and for at least 10 d after denervation is comparable to that in normally developing ectopic end plates. The possible involvement of AChR stabilization in end plate growth is discussed. PMID:2380246

  3. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage. PMID:25010206

  4. Rheological Properties of Nanoparticle Silica-Surfactant Stabilized Crude Oil Emulsions: Influence of Temperature, Nanoparticle Concentration and Water Volume Fraction"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Erin; Pales, Ashley; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Oil in water emulsions occur during oil extraction due to the presence of water, naturally-occurring surface-active agents and mechanical mixing in pipelines or from oil spillage. Emulsions present difficulties for use of oil in fuel and their rheological properties are important to treat environmental impacts of spills. The objective of this study is to assess the rheological characteristics of oil in water emulsions stabilized by 5% NaCl brine, Tween 20 surfactant and silica nanoparticles to gain knowledge about the behavior of oil flow in pipelines and characterize them for environmental applications. Rheological behaviors such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity of Prudhoe Bay crude oil emulsions were analyzed with varying percent of water volume fractions (12.5, 25 and 50%), varying weight percent of silica nanoparticles (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 weight %), with and without 2 CMC Tween 20 nonionic surfactant. Emulsions with varying water volume fractions were analyzed at 20, 40 and 60 degrees Celsius. Flow curve analysis of the emulsions was performed using an Anton-Paar rheometer. Preliminary findings indicate that increased temperature and increasing the concentration of nanoparticles both produced lower shear stress and that the addition of surfactant decreased the viscosity and shear stress of the emulsions.

  5. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

  6. The stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Morden-Moore, A. L.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    Separate experiments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) independently assessed the stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures. The USGS experiment represented a test of sample stability under a diverse range of conditions, whereas the CAL experiment was a controlled test of sample stability. In the experiment by the USGS, a statistically significant (?? = 0.05) relation between [H+] and time was found for the composited filtered, natural, wet-deposition solution when all reported values are included in the analysis. However, if two outlying pH values most likely representing measurement error are excluded from the analysis, the change in [H+] over time was not statistically significant. In the experiment by the CAL, randomly selected samples were reanalyzed between July 1984 and February 1991. The original analysis and reanalysis pairs revealed that [H+] differences, although very small, were statistically different from zero, whereas specific-conductance differences were not. Nevertheless, the results of the CAL reanalysis project indicate there appears to be no consistent, chemically significant degradation in sample integrity with regard to [H+] and specific conductance while samples are stored at room temperature at the CAL. Based on the results of the CAL and USGS studies, short-term (45-60 day) stability of [H+] and specific conductance in natural filtered wet-deposition samples that are shipped and stored unchilled at ambient temperatures was satisfactory.

  7. Enhancing the stability and antibiofilm activity of DspB by immobilization on carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Ma, Su; Liu, Chenguang; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2015-09-01

    A β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (DspB) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CU1000 has been proved to inhibit and detach the biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the application of this enzyme is limited by its poor stability. In the present study, a β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase encoding gene, dspB, was cloned from A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant DspB was loaded on hydrogel nanoparticles, which was prepared by using linoleic acid (LA) modified carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) after sonication. The nanoparticles were almost saturated by DspB at 0.3 mg/ml, which gave a loading capacity of 76.7%. The immobilization enhanced thermal stability, storage stability and reusability of DspB significantly. Moreover, it also increased antibiofilm activity due to the dual mechanism, including the improvement of the enzyme stability and the antibiofilm activity of CMCS nanoparticles. PMID:26302845

  8. Reciprocal regulation of ERα and ERβ stability and activity by Diptoindonesin G

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Summary ERβ is regarded as a “tumor suppressor” in breast cancer due to its anti-proliferative effects. However, unlike ERα, ERβ has not been developed as a therapeutic target in breast cancer due to loss of ERβ in aggressive cancers. In a small molecule library screen for ERβ stabilizers, we identified Diptoindonesin G (Dip G) which significantly increases ERβ protein stability, while decreasing ERα protein levesl. Dip G enhances the transcription and anti-proliferative activities of ERβ, while attenuating the transcription and proliferative effects of ERα. Further investigation revealed that instead of targeting ER, Dip G targets the CHIP E3 ubiquitin ligase shared by ERα and ERβ. Thus, Dip G is a dual functional moiety that reciprocally controls ERα and ERβ protein stability and activities via an indirect mechanism. The ERβ stabilization effects of Dip G may enable the development of ERβ-targeted therapies for human breast cancers. PMID:26670079

  9. Reciprocal Regulation of ERα and ERβ Stability and Activity by Diptoindonesin G.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; James, Taryn; Jung, Youngeun; Kim, Ikyon; Tan, Renxiang; Hoffmann, F Michael; Xu, Wei

    2015-12-17

    ERβ is regarded as a "tumor suppressor" in breast cancer due to its anti-proliferative effects. However, unlike ERα, ERβ has not been developed as a therapeutic target in breast cancer due to loss of ERβ in aggressive cancers. In a small-molecule library screen for ERβ stabilizers, we identified Diptoindonesin G (Dip G), which significantly increases ERβ protein stability while decreasing ERα protein levels. Dip G enhances the transcription and anti-proliferative activities of ERβ, while attenuating the transcription and proliferative effects of ERα. Further investigation revealed that instead of targeting ER, Dip G targets the CHIP E3 ubiquitin ligase shared by ERα and ERβ. Thus, Dip G is a dual-functional moiety that reciprocally controls ERα and ERβ protein stability and activities via an indirect mechanism. The ERβ stabilization effects of Dip G may enable the development of ERβ-targeted therapies for human breast cancers. PMID:26670079

  10. High Temperature Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Oswald, Jay J.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanically actuated blade tip clearance control concept was evaluated in a nonrotating test rig to quantify secondary seal leakage at elevated temperatures. These tests were conducted to further investigate the feasibility of actively controlling the clearance between the rotor blade tips and the surrounding shroud seal in the high pressure turbine (HPT) section of a turbine engine. The test environment simulates the state of the back side of the HPT shroud seal with pressure differentials as high as 120 psig and temperatures up to 1000 F. As expected, static secondary seal leakage decreased with increasing temperature. At 1000 F, the test rig's calculated effective clearance (at 120 psig test pressure) was 0.0003 in., well within the industry specified effective clearance goal.

  11. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  12. Effect of the phytochemicals curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, thymol and carvacrol on the oxidative stability of corn and palm oils at frying temperatures.

    PubMed

    İnanç Horuz, Tuğba; Maskan, Medeni

    2015-12-01

    Several active components naturally available in plants are strongly considered as good antioxidants to retard the lipid oxidation. Response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects of frying temperature (150-180 °C) and concentration of four plant-based active components (60-350 mg/kg oil); curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, thymol and carvacrol on oxidative stability of corn and palm oils. According to induction time values, the stability of oils drastically decreased with increasing temperature. Curcumin and cinnamaldehyde showed no significant effect (p > 0.05) on both oils. Carvacrol significantly increased induction times of corn and palm oils, but thymol was effective in palm oil only (p < 0.05). An actual frying experiment was carried out with only corn oil to confirm efficiency of carvacrol. The free fatty acid (%), peroxide value (meq/kg), para-anisidine, and total polar component values (%) of the fresh oil were 0.080, 2.55, 2.85, and 7.5, respectively. These values changed to 0.144, 1.47, 12.01, 10.0, respectively for the control oil; 0.138, 2.27, 11.49, 10.0 for BHT-added oil; 0.132, 1.42, 5.66, 9.5 for carvacrol-added oil after 30 frying cycles. Therefore, carvacrol could be considered as a good alternative to BHT for preservation of oils at frying temperatures. PMID:26604376

  13. Catalytic Activity and Stability of Oxides: The Role of Near-Surface Atomic Structures and Compositions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hong, Wesley T; Fong, Dillon D; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Yacoby, Yizhak; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-05-17

    Electrocatalysts play an important role in catalyzing the kinetics for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions for many air-based energy storage and conversion devices, such as metal-air batteries and fuel cells. Although noble metals have been extensively used as electrocatalysts, their limited natural abundance and high costs have motivated the search for more cost-effective catalysts. Oxides are suitable candidates since they are relatively inexpensive and have shown reasonably high activity for various electrochemical reactions. However, a lack of fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanisms has been a major hurdle toward improving electrocatalytic activity. Detailed studies of the oxide surface atomic structure and chemistry (e.g., cation migration) can provide much needed insights for the design of highly efficient and stable oxide electrocatalysts. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in characterizing strontium (Sr) cation segregation and enrichment near the surface of Sr-substituted perovskite oxides under different operating conditions (e.g., high temperature, applied potential), as well as their influence on the surface oxygen exchange kinetics at elevated temperatures. We contrast Sr segregation, which is associated with Sr redistribution in the crystal lattice near the surface, with Sr enrichment, which involves Sr redistribution via the formation of secondary phases. The newly developed coherent Bragg rod analysis (COBRA) and energy-modulated differential COBRA are uniquely powerful ways of providing information about surface and interfacial cation segregation at the atomic scale for these thin film electrocatalysts. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) studies under electrochemical operating conditions give additional insights into cation migration. Direct COBRA and APXPS evidence for surface Sr segregation was found for La1-xSrxCoO3-δ and (La1-ySry)2CoO4±δ/La1-xSrxCoO3-δ oxide thin films, and

  14. ATPase activity and its temperature compensation of the cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Reiko; Miyake, Ayumi; Iwase, Ryo; Hayashi, Fumio; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2008-04-01

    KaiA, KaiB and KaiC constitute the circadian clock machinery in cyanobacteria. KaiC is a homohexamer; its subunit contains duplicated halves, each with a set of ATPase motifs. Here, using highly purified KaiC preparations of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 produced in Escherichia coli, we found that the N- and C-terminal domains of KaiC had extremely weak ATPase activity. ATPase activity showed temperature compensation in wild-type KaiC, but not in KaiC(S431A/T432A), a mutant that lacks two phosphorylation sites. We concluded that KaiC phosphorylation is involved in the ATPase temperature-compensation mechanism-which is probably critical to the stability of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria-and we hypothesized the following temperature-compensation mechanism: (i) The C-terminal phosphorylation sites of a KaiC hexamer subunit are phosphorylated by the C-terminal domain of an adjacent KaiC subunit; (ii) the phosphorylation suppresses the ATPase activity of the C-terminal domain; and (iii) the phosphorylated KaiC spontaneously dephosphorylates, resulting in the recover of ATPase activity. PMID:18363969

  15. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant concentrations less than 1% of saturated vapor. In addition, maps of activated glomeruli changed dramatically as odorant concentration was reduced. Thus perceptual stability exists in the face of dramatic changes in both the amplitude and the maps of the input to the olfactory bulb. The data for the concentration dependence of the response of the most sensitive glomeruli for each of five odorants was fitted with a Michaelis-Menten (Hill) equation. The fitted curves were extrapolated to odorant concentrations several orders of magnitude lower the smallest observed signals and suggest that the calcium response at low odorant concentrations is more than 1000 times smaller than the response at saturating odorant concentrations. We speculate that only a few spikes in olfactory sensory neurons may be sufficient for correct odorant identification. PMID:19291227

  16. Stability of narrow emission line clouds in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, W.G.; Veilleux, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the lateral flow and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on clouds in the narrow-line region of active galaxies are considered using cloud densities and velocities based on observations. A simplified model for the lateral flow instability governed only by overpressures is discussed. The associated radiative acceleration is considered, and parameters describing the narrow-line region and the central nonstellar continuum are presented. It is shown that many otherwise acceptable narrow-line clouds are unstable to lateral flows, particularly if their column depths are small. It is argued that the most likely narrow-line clouds have column densities of about 10 to the 23rd/sq cm and that these clouds are accelerated by winds in the intercloud medium. Arguments are made against models in which narrow-line clouds move inward. 22 references.

  17. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  18. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Along with the growing interest in water quality during the last decade, the need for data on all types of water-quality parameters has also increased. One parameter of particular interest, because of its many ramifications, is temperature. It influences many of the chemical and physical processes that take place in water. The solubility of gases--for example, oxygen and carbon dioxide--and the solution of mineral matter in water are functions of temperature. Such physical properties as density and viscosity vary with temperature. Oxidation of organic materials, as well as algal and bacterial growth, is promoted or retarded by favorable or unfavorable temperatures. Further, temperature bears on the utility of water: as a source of public water supplies; for industrial use, particularly if the water is used for cooling; and in the field of recreation involving contact sports, fishing, and fish culture. In recent years, temperature changes resulting from inflow of heated industrial waste, particularly effluent from power generating plants, have increased the need for temperature data to determine the degree of change, its effect on ecology, and the effect of any remedial action. Thus, because of the many extensive and intensive effects, a large amount of temperature data is collected on surface and ground waters by many agencies throughout the country. Moreover, because of its importance, there is a widespread interest in temperature even by those who are not active collectors of the data themselves. The industrialist, the manager, the public official, and others at one time or another may have need for temperature data and may well raise the questions: Who is collecting temperature data? What is the extent of the activity? Where are the data being collected? The purpose of this report is to answer these questions. The information in the report is confined to the activities of Federal and non-Federal agencies. It is based on information furnished to the Office of

  19. Temperature effects on stocks and stability of a phytoplankton-zooplankton model and the dependence on light and nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norberg, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a closed phytoplankton—zooplankton ecosystem was analyzed for effects of temperature on stocks and stability and the dependence of these effects on light and total nutrient concentration of the system. An analysis of the steady state equations showed that the effect of temperature on zooplankton and POM biomass was levelled when primary production is nutrient limited. Temperature increase had a generally negative effect on all biomasses at high nutrient levels due to increased maintenance costs. Nutrient limitation of net primary production is the main factor governing the effect of stocks and flows as well as the stability of the system. All components of the system, except for phytoplankton biomass, are proportional to net production and thus to the net effect of light on photosynthesis. However, temperature determines the slope of that relationship. The resilience of the system was measured by calculating the eigenvalues of the steady state. Under oligotrophic conditions, the system can be stable, but an increase in temperature can cause instability or a decrease in resilience. This conclusion is discussed in the face of recent models that take spatial heterogeneity into account and display far more stable behavior, in better agreement to empirical data. Using simulations, we found that the amplitude of fluctuations of the herbivore stock increases with temperature while the mean biomass and minimum values decrease in comparison with steady state predictions

  20. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  1. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein

    PubMed Central

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  2. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed. PMID:26526675

  3. Active targets for the study of nuclei far from stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro-Novo, S.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Mittig, W.

    2015-09-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron-to-proton ratios are used to understand the properties of these systems. Radioactive beams with energies from below the Coulomb barrier up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon are now available, and with these beams, a broad variety of studies of nuclei near the drip-line can be performed. To compensate for the low intensity of secondary beams as compared to primary beams, thick targets and high efficiency detection is necessary. In this context, a new generation of detectors was developed, called active target detectors: the detector gas is used as target, and the determination of the reaction vertex in three dimensions allows for good resolution even with thick targets. The reaction products can be measured over essentially 4 π. The physics explored with these detectors together with the technology developed will be described.

  4. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  5. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  6. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  7. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  8. High-Temperature Stability of Cobalt Grafted on Low-Loading Incorporated Mo-MCM-41 Catalyst for Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    S Lee; C Zoican Loebick; L Pfefferle; G Haller

    2011-12-31

    Cobalt metal is a good catalyst for CO disproportionation to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) when particle size is stabilized on the nanometer scale. With reaction temperatures in the range of 973-1123 K, stabilization of nanometer Co particles against sintering requires a chemical bonding and/or occlusion of the Co particles. Catalysts with Co-grafted Mo-incorporated MCM-41 with different Mo loadings (<1 wt %) have been synthesized. Incorporation of Mo cations in the silica framework of MCM-41 provides different species as grafting sites. These grafting sites affect the strength of the metal-support interaction that controls sintering of active Co metal. The stability of Co at high temperature has been investigated by TPR and in situ/ex-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The reduced Co metal particle size, after hydrogen prereduction, is independent of Mo loading. However, the Co particle size after SWNT synthesis is greatly affected by Mo anchoring and varied with loading. The Co particle size of low-Mo-loading samples after SWNT synthesis is little changed (from 0.88 nm after prereduction to 0.85 nm after SWNT synthesis), but the Co particle size difference of high-Mo-loading samples is gradually increased as the Mo loading is increased.

  9. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  10. Stability of In-Ga-Zn-O metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors under bias, illumination, and temperature stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Giang T.; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Furuta, Mamoru; Saxena, Saurabh; Allen, Martin W.

    2015-10-01

    The stability of metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MESFETs) with silver oxide Schottky gates on In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) channels, grown by mist chemical-vapor-deposition, was examined under different combinations of positive and negative bias, illumination, and temperature stress. These devices were remarkably stable, even under the most severe condition of negative-bias-illumination-temperature-stress (NBITS), where the threshold voltage shift after 10 h NBITS was only +0.12 V and was mainly attributed to a decrease in the carrier density of the channel. The stability of these IGZO MESFETs is associated with the use of a conducting Schottky gate that significantly reduces charge trapping at the gate-channel interface.

  11. Stabilization of lower hybrid drift modes by finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients in field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farengo, R.; Guzdar, P. N.; Lee, Y. C.

    1989-08-01

    The effect of finite parallel wavenumber and electron temperature gradients on the lower hybrid drift instability is studied in the parameter regime corresponding to the TRX-2 device [Fusion Technol. 9, 48 (1986)]. Perturbations in the electrostatic potential and all three components of the vector potential are considered and finite beta electron orbit modifications are included. The electron temperature gradient decreases the growth rate of the instability but, for kz=0, unstable modes exist for ηe(=T'en0/Ten0)>6. Since finite kz effects completely stabilize the mode at small values of kz/ky(≂5×10-3), magnetic shear could be responsible for stabilizing the lower hybrid drift instability in field-reversed configurations.

  12. Molecular Insights into the Thermal Stability of mAbs with Variable-Temperature Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pacholarz, Kamila J; Peters, Shirley J; Garlish, Rachel A; Henry, Alistair J; Taylor, Richard J; Humphreys, David P; Barran, Perdita E

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of protein-based therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can affect the efficacy of the treatment and can even induce effects that are adverse to the patient. Protein engineering is used to shift the mAb away from an aggregation-prone state by increasing the thermodynamic stability of the native fold, which might in turn alter conformational flexibility. We have probed the thermal stability of three types of intact IgG molecules and two Fc-hinge fragments by using variable-temperature ion-mobility mass spectrometry (VT-IM-MS). We observed changes in the conformations of isolated proteins as a function of temperature (300-550 K). The observed differences in thermal stability between IgG subclasses can be rationalized in terms of changes to higher-order structural organization mitigated by the hinge region. VT-IM-MS provides insights into mAbs structural thermodynamics and is presented as a promising tool for thermal-stability studies for proteins of therapeutic interest. PMID:26534882

  13. Complex domain interactions regulate stability and activity of closely related proneural transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Gary S.; Hardwick, Laura J.A.; Philpott, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Characterising post-translational regulation of key transcriptional activators is crucial for understanding how cell division and differentiation are coordinated in developing organisms and cycling cells. One important mode of protein post-translational control is by regulation of half-life via ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Two key basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors, Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and NeuroD, play central roles in development of the central nervous system but despite their homology, Ngn2 is a highly unstable protein whilst NeuroD is, by comparison, very stable. The basis for and the consequences of the difference in stability of these two structurally and functionally related proteins has not been explored. Here we see that ubiquitylation alone does not determine Ngn2 or NeuroD stability. By making chimeric proteins, we see that the N-terminus of NeuroD in particular has a stabilising effect, whilst despite their high levels of homology, the most conserved bHLH domains of these proneural proteins alone can confer significant changes in protein stability. Despite widely differing stabilities of Ngn2, NeuroD and the chimeric proteins composed of domains of both, there is little correlation between protein half-life and ability to drive neuronal differentiation. Therefore, we conclude that despite significant homology between Ngn2 and NeuroD, the regulation of their stability differs markedly and moreover, stability/instability of the proteins is not a direct correlate of their activity. PMID:24998442

  14. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved, depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus providing mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins-may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than random noncancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models, assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  15. Topside electron temperature models for low and high solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, V. K.; Sethi, N. K.; Mahajan, K. K.

    It is now well known that in the topside ionosphere thermal conduction from the protonosphere becomes the dominant factor over the heating and loss terms in shaping the ionospheric electron temperature (Te) profile. By analyzing a limited database of incoherent scatter (IS) Te measurements, Mahajan and Pandey [J. Geophys. Res. 85 (1980) 213] reported a correlation between the electron heat flux and electron density in the topside ionosphere. Since attention has been steadily mounting for the empirical modeling of Te, we now exploit the large database of IS measurements of Te and Ne at Arecibo during 1989-1990 (high solar activity), as well as during 1975-1976 (low solar activity) for this purpose. We again find a functional relationship between heat flux and electron density in the topside ionosphere during both the solar activities. These functional relationships are used to generate topside Te profiles.

  16. Temperature rise during experimental light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface and intrapulpal temperatures after treatments with different bleaching gels subjected to different types of light activation. A K-type thermocouple and infrared thermometer were used to measure the temperature increase during the 15- or 30-min treatment period. Light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 405 nm (LED405), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and femtosecond laser were tested and compared to ZOOM2. The tooth surface was treated with five bleaching agents and Vaseline which served as a control.The generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was applied for testing the differences in temperature increase. The ZOOM2 light source led to the largest increase in mean pulpal and tooth surface temperatures of 21.1 and 22.8 °C, followed by focused femtosecond laser which increased the pulpal and surface temperatures by up to 15.7 and 16.8 °C. Treatments with unfocused femtosecond laser, LED405, and OLED induced significantly lower mean temperature increases (p < 0.001 for each comparison with ZOOM2 and focused femtosecond laser), both in the pulp chamber (up to 2.7, 2.5, and 1.4 °C) and at the tooth surface (up to 3.2, 3.4, and 1.8 °C). Significant differences between pulp chamber and tooth surface measurements were obtained for all types of bleaching gel, during treatments with ZOOM2 (p < 0.001), LED405 (p < 0.001), and unfocused (p < 0.001) and focused femtosecond laser (p ≤ 0.002). Different bleaching agents or Vaseline can serve as an isolating layer. Focused femtosecond laser and ZOOM2 produced large temperature increases in the pulp chamber and at the tooth surface. Caution is advised when using these types of light activation, while LED405, OLED, and unfocused femtosecond laser could be safely used. PMID:23780710

  17. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  18. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-29

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  19. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  20. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb 2+) with chloride Pb+nCl↔PbCln2-nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO 4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0-6 m) and temperature (15-45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations:

  1. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2010-09-15

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

  2. Biaxial Strain in the Hexagonal Plane of MnAs Thin Films: The Key to Stabilize Ferromagnetism to Higher Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V.; Sidis, Y.; Marangolo, M.; Vidal, F.; Eddrief, M.; Bourges, P.; Maccherozzi, F.; Ott, F.; Panaccione, G.; Etgens, V. H.

    2007-09-01

    The α-β magnetostructural phase transition in MnAs/GaAs(111) epilayers is investigated by elastic neutron scattering. The in-plane parameter of MnAs remains almost constant with temperature from 100 to 420 K, following the thermal evolution of the GaAs substrate. This induces a temperature dependent biaxial strain that is responsible for an α-β phase coexistence and, more importantly, for the stabilization of the ferromagnetic α phase at a higher temperature than in the bulk. We explain the premature appearance of the β phase at 275 K and the persistence of the ferromagnetic α phase up to 350 K with thermodynamical arguments based on the MnAs phase diagram. It results that the biaxial strain in the hexagonal plane is the key parameter to extend the ferromagnetic phase well over room temperature.

  3. Biaxial strain in the hexagonal plane of MnAs thin films: the key to stabilize ferromagnetism to higher temperature.

    PubMed

    Garcia, V; Sidis, Y; Marangolo, M; Vidal, F; Eddrief, M; Bourges, P; Maccherozzi, F; Ott, F; Panaccione, G; Etgens, V H

    2007-09-14

    The alpha-beta magnetostructural phase transition in MnAs/GaAs(111) epilayers is investigated by elastic neutron scattering. The in-plane parameter of MnAs remains almost constant with temperature from 100 to 420 K, following the thermal evolution of the GaAs substrate. This induces a temperature dependent biaxial strain that is responsible for an alpha-beta phase coexistence and, more importantly, for the stabilization of the ferromagnetic alpha phase at a higher temperature than in the bulk. We explain the premature appearance of the beta phase at 275 K and the persistence of the ferromagnetic alpha phase up to 350 K with thermodynamical arguments based on the MnAs phase diagram. It results that the biaxial strain in the hexagonal plane is the key parameter to extend the ferromagnetic phase well over room temperature. PMID:17930469

  4. Influence of defects on the high temperature mechanical behaviour of yttria fully-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, D.; Gallardo-López, A.; Martínez-Fern&Ández, J.; Domínguez-Rodríguez, A.

    This work is focused on the study of the influence of high temperature heat treatments given prior to deformation in yttria fully-stabilized zirconia single crystals (YFSZ). Experimental results show that the yield stress found in constant-strain tests performed in heat-treated samples is remarkably dependent on the annealing time when the treatment is given under a very low oxygen pressure atmosphere. This phenomenon has been explained through the analysis of the thermodynamics of complex defects found at high temperature, as well as the interaction between mobile dislocations with them during plastic deformation.

  5. High-temperature stability of thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brinks, P.; Rijnders, G.; Huijben, M.; Van Nong, N.; Pryds, N.

    2015-04-06

    An enhanced thermal stability in thermoelectric Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films up to 550 °C in an oxygen rich environment was demonstrated by high-temperature electrical and X-ray diffraction measurements. In contrast to generally performed heating in helium gas, it is shown that an oxygen/helium mixture provides sufficient thermal contact, while preventing the previously disregarded formation of oxygen vacancies. Combining thermal cycling with electrical measurements proves to be a powerful tool to study the real intrinsic thermoelectric behaviour of oxide thin films at elevated temperatures.

  6. The Helicase Activity of Hyperthermophilic Archaeal MCM is Enhanced at High Temperatures by Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yisui; Niu, Yanling; Cui, Jiamin; Fu, Yang; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Lou, Huiqiang; Cao, Qinhong

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methylation and methyltransferases are widespread in the third domain of life, archaea. Nevertheless, the effects of methylation on archaeal proteins wait to be defined. Here, we report that recombinant sisMCM, an archaeal homolog of Mcm2-7 eukaryotic replicative helicase, is methylated by aKMT4 in vitro. Mono-methylation of these lysine residues occurs coincidently in the endogenous sisMCM protein purified from the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus islandicus cells as indicated by mass spectra. The helicase activity of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) is stimulated by methylation, particularly at temperatures over 70°C. The methylated MCM shows optimal DNA unwinding activity after heat-treatment between 76 and 82°C, which correlates well with the typical growth temperatures of hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus. After methylation, the half life of MCM helicase is dramatically extended at 80°C. The methylated sites are located on the accessible protein surface, which might modulate the intra- and inter- molecular interactions through changing the hydrophobicity and surface charge. Furthermore, the methylation-mimic mutants of MCM show heat resistance helicase activity comparable to the methylated MCM. These data provide the biochemical evidence that posttranslational modifications such as methylation may enhance kinetic stability of proteins under the elevated growth temperatures of hyperthermophilic archaea. PMID:26617586

  7. Influence of Temperature on the Colloidal Stability of Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Cell Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Honold, Tobias; Carregal-Romero, Susana; Kantner, Karsten; Karg, Matthias; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-04-01

    The temperature-dependence of the hydrodynamic diameter and colloidal stability of gold-polymer core-shell particles with temperature-sensitive (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) and temperature-insensitive shells (polyallylaminine hydrochloride/polystyrensulfonate, poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride)-graft-dodecyl) are investigated in various aqueous media. The data demonstrate that for all nanoparticle agglomeration, i.e., increase in effective nanoparticle size, the presence of salts or proteins in the dispersion media has to be taken into account. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coated nanoparticles show a reversible temperature-dependent increase in size above the volume phase transition of the polymer shell when they are dispersed in phosphate buffered saline or in media containing protein. In contrast, the nanoparticles coated with temperature-insensitive polymers show a time-dependent increase in size in phosphate buffered saline or in medium containing protein. This is due to time-dependent agglomeration, which is particularly strong in phosphate buffered saline, and induces a time-dependent, irreversible increase in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanoparticles. This demonstrates that one has to distinguish between temperature- and time-induced agglomerations. Since the size of nanoparticles regulates their uptake by cells, temperature-dependent uptake of thermosensitive and non-thermosensitive nanoparticles by cells lines is compared. No temperature-specific difference between both types of nanoparticles could be observed. PMID:26835654

  8. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters Tuned by Oligonucleotide Sequence.

    PubMed

    Javani, Siamak; Lorca, Romina; Latorre, Alfonso; Flors, Cristina; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Somoza, Álvaro

    2016-04-27

    Silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) stabilized by DNA are promising materials with tunable fluorescent properties, which have been employed in a plethora of sensing systems. In this report, we explore their antimicrobial properties in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. After testing 9 oligonucleotides with different sequence and length, we found that the antibacterial activity depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide employed. The sequences tested yielded fluorescent AgNCs, which can be grouped in blue, yellow, and red emitters. Interestingly, blue emitters yielded poor antibacterial activity, whereas yellow and red emitters afforded an activity similar to silver nitrate. Furthermore, structural studies using circular dichroism indicate the formation of complexes with different stability and structure, which might be one of the factors that modulate their activity. Finally, we prepared a trimeric structure containing the sequence that afforded the best antimicrobial activity, which inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and negative bacteria in the submicromolar range. PMID:27058628

  10. Postural stability of older female Scottish country dancers in comparison with physically active controls.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Susan; Peacock, Leslie; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity assists older individuals' functional ability and postural stability. Recently, Scottish country dance (SCD) was reported as being a beneficial form of physical activity for functional ability in older females. This study aims to examine the effect of SCD on postural stability. Scottish country dancers (n = 20) were compared with physically active controls (n = 33) for static postural sway measured on a force platform. The Romberg and Tandem stances were used under 'eyes open' and 'eyes closed' conditions. Ninety-five percent ellipse area and sway velocity were calculated from the center of pressure displacement. Ninety-five percent ellipse area was the same for both groups in all tests. The control group had greater sway velocity for all tests (P < .01) except Tandem eyes closed. SCD participation resulted in similar postural sway as participation in other physical activities, however nondancers may need a greater amount of regulatory activity to maintain balance. PMID:24515979

  11. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2011-01-01

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  12. Stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers on plasma-activated mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liberelle, Benoît; Banquy, Xavier; Giasson, Suzanne

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the effect of physical and chemical modifications of mica surfaces induced by water vapor-based plasma treatments on the stability of silanols and grafted alkylsilane monolayers. The plasma-activated substrates were characterized using XPS, TOF-SIMS, and contact angle measurements. They revealed a large surface coverage of silanol groups (Si-OH) and a loss of aluminum atoms compared to freshly cleaved mica surfaces. The stability of plasma-induced silanol groups was investigated by contact angle measurements using ethylene glycol as a probe liquid. The Si-OH surface coverage decreased rapidly under vacuum or thermal treatment to give rise to hydrophobic dehydrated surfaces. The stability of end-grafted monofunctionalized n-alkylsilanes was investigated in different solvents and at different pH using water contact angle measurements. The degrafting of alkylsilanes from the activated mica was promoted in acidic aqueous solutions. This detachment was associated with the hydrolysis of covalent bonds between the alkylsilanes and the mica surface. The monolayer stability was enhanced by increasing the length of the alkyl chains that probably act as a hydrophobic protective layer against hydrolysis reactions. Stable alkylsilane monolayers in water with pH greater than 5.5 were obtained on mica surfaces activated at low plasma pressure. We attributed this stability to the loss of surface Al atoms induced by the plasma treatment. PMID:18303926

  13. Average Potential Temperature of the Upper Mantle and Excess Temperatures Beneath Regions of Active Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2006-05-01

    The question as to whether any particular oceanic island is the result of a thermal mantle plume, is a question of whether volcanism is the result of passive upwelling, as at mid-ocean ridges, or active upwelling, driven by thermally buoyant material. When upwelling is passive, mantle temperatures reflect average or ambient upper mantle values. In contrast, sites of thermally driven active upwellings will have elevated (or excess) mantle temperatures, driven by some source of excess heat. Skeptics of the plume hypothesis suggest that the maximum temperatures at ocean islands are similar to maximum temperatures at mid-ocean ridges (Anderson, 2000; Green et al., 2001). Olivine-liquid thermometry, when applied to Hawaii, Iceland, and global MORB, belie this hypothesis. Olivine-liquid equilibria provide the most accurate means of estimating mantle temperatures, which are highly sensitive to the forsterite (Fo) contents of olivines, and the FeO content of coexisting liquids. Their application shows that mantle temperatures in the MORB source region are less than temperatures at both Hawaii and Iceland. The Siqueiros Transform may provide the most precise estimate of TpMORB because high MgO glass compositions there have been affected only by olivine fractionation, so primitive FeOliq is known; olivine thermometry yields TpSiqueiros = 1430 ±59°C. A global database of 22,000 MORB show that most MORB have slightly higher FeOliq than at Siqueiros, which translates to higher calculated mantle potential temperatures. If the values for Fomax (= 91.5) and KD (Fe-Mg)ol-liq (= 0.29) at Siqueiros apply globally, then upper mantle Tp is closer to 1485 ± 59°C. Averaging this global estimate with that recovered at Siqueiros yields TpMORB = 1458 ± 78°C, which is used to calculate plume excess temperatures, Te. The estimate for TpMORB defines the convective mantle geotherm, and is consistent with estimates from sea floor bathymetry and heat flow (Stein and Stein, 1992), and

  14. Active wireless temperature sensors for aerospace thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K. S. G.

    2003-07-01

    Vehicle system health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint effort by NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active "wireless" sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor subsurface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuits to enable non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 25-mm square integrated circuit and can communicate through 7 to 10 cm thickness of thermal protection materials.

  15. Active Wireless Temperature Sensors for Aerospace Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active wireless sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor sub-surface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuitry to enable acquisition and non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 2.54-cm square integrated circuit.

  16. Low Temperature Nitridation of Si Oxide Utilizing Activated Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uraoka, Yukiharu; Yano, Hiroshi; Hatayama, Tomoaki; Fuyuki, Takashi

    2002-06-01

    Oxynitride or nitride films are promising materials as a substitute for silicon dioxide because of their high dielectric constant and blocking effect on B penetration. The purpose of this work is to fabricate ultrathin oxynitride films by nitridation of thermal oxide utilizing activated nitrogen at very low temperature. We analyzed nitrogen concentration in the films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was confirmed that 9.6 at.%nitrogen was introduced, and that NSi2O was dominant in nitrided films at temperatures as low as 400°C. We succeeded in decreasing the leakage current by one order of magnitude by nitridation of films with thicknesses of 40-60 nm.

  17. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S.; Petersen, D. H.; Hansen, O.; Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F.; Doyle, B. L.; Kontos, A.

    2012-12-15

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

  18. Temperature Activated Diffusion of Radicals through Ion Implanted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Davies, Michael J; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising technique for immobilizing biomolecules on the surface of polymers. Radicals generated in a subsurface layer by PIII treatment diffuse throughout the substrate, forming covalent bonds to molecules when they reach the surface. Understanding and controlling the diffusion of radicals through this layer will enable efficient optimization of this technique. We develop a model based on site to site diffusion according to Fick's second law with temperature activation according to the Arrhenius relation. Using our model, the Arrhenius exponential prefactor (for barrierless diffusion), D0, and activation energy, EA, for a radical to diffuse from one position to another are found to be 3.11 × 10(-17) m(2) s(-1) and 0.31 eV, respectively. The model fits experimental data with a high degree of accuracy and allows for accurate prediction of radical diffusion to the surface. The model makes useful predictions for the lifetime over which the surface is sufficiently active to covalently immobilize biomolecules and it can be used to determine radical fluence during biomolecule incubation for a range of storage and incubation temperatures so facilitating selection of the most appropriate parameters. PMID:26562064

  19. Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Rasch, Philip; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Kettles, Laura; Gadian, Alan; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom

    2008-11-13

    An assessment is made herein of the proposal that controlled global cooling sufficient to balance global warming resulting from increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations might be achieved by seeding low-level, extensive maritime clouds with seawater particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby activating new droplets and increasing cloud albedo (and possibly longevity). This paper focuses on scientific and meteorological aspects of the scheme. Associated technological issues are addressed in a companion paper. Analytical calculations, cloud modelling and (particularly) GCM computations suggest that, if outstanding questions are satisfactorily resolved, the controllable, globally averaged negative forcing resulting from deployment of this scheme might be sufficient to balance the positive forcing associated with a doubling of CO2 concentration. This statement is supported quantitatively by recent observational evidence from three disparate sources. We conclude that this technique could thus be adequate to hold the Earth's temperature constant for many decades. More work--especially assessments of possible meteorological and climatological ramifications--is required on several components of the scheme, which possesses the advantages that (i) it is ecologically benign--the only raw materials being wind and seawater, (ii) the degree of cooling could be controlled, and (iii) if unforeseen adverse effects occur, the system could be immediately switched off, with the forcing returning to normal within a few days (although the response would take a much longer time). PMID:18757272

  20. Stability and photochemistry of ClO dimers formed at low temperature in the gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Hayman, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    The recent observations of elevated concentrations of the ClO radical in the austral spring over Antarctica have implicated catalytic destruction by chlorine in the large depletions seen in the total ozone column. One of the chemical theories consistent with an elevated concentration of the ClO is a cycle involving the formation of the ClO dimer through the association reaction: ClO + ClO = Cl2O2 and the photolysis of the dimer to give the active Cl species necessary for O3 depletion. Here, researchers report experimental studies designed to characterize the dimer of ClO formed by the association reaction at low temperatures. ClO was produced by static photolysis of several different precursor systems: Cl sub 2 + O sub 3; Cl sub 2 O sub 2; OClO + Cl sub 2 O spectroscopy in the U.V. region, which allowed the time dependence of Cl sub 2, Cl sub 2 O, ClO, OClO, O sub 3 and other absorbing molecules to be determined.

  1. Long-term-high temperature stability of alloy 803 in the chemical process industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sizek, H.W.; Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1999-11-01

    Alloy 803 is used in the chemical process industry for its high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. Knowledge of the microstructural characteristics as a function of time and temperature are essential for accurate rationalization of mechanical property performance under actual service conditions. This paper seeks to determine the microstructure of alloy 803 as a function of time and temperature for times up to 34,000 hours and temperatures ranging from 595 C to 1095 C. Post-exposure room temperature tensile data are also presented as an indication of the alloy`s tolerance to downtime strains. Intermediate temperature mechanical strength can be attributed primarily to gamma prime ({gamma}{prime}) and higher temperature strength to M{sub 23}C{sub 6} content.

  2. Impact of cysteine variants on the structure, activity, and stability of recombinant human α-galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Honey, Denise M; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Park, Anna; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Wei, Ronnie R; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal) is a homodimeric glycoprotein deficient in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. In this study, each cysteine residue in rhαGal was replaced with serine to understand the role each cysteine plays in the enzyme structure, function, and stability. Conditioned media from transfected HEK293 cells were assayed for rhαGal expression and enzymatic activity. Activity was only detected in the wild type control and in mutants substituting the free cysteine residues (C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S). Cysteine-to-serine substitutions at the other sites lead to the loss of expression and/or activity, consistent with their involvement in the disulfide bonds found in the crystal structure. Purification and further characterization confirmed that the C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S mutants are enzymatically active, structurally intact and thermodynamically stable as measured by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. The purified inactive C142S mutant appeared to have lost part of its alpha-helix secondary structure and had a lower apparent melting temperature. Saturation mutagenesis study on Cys90 and Cys174 resulted in partial loss of activity for Cys174 mutants but multiple mutants at Cys90 with up to 87% higher enzymatic activity (C90T) compared to wild type, suggesting that the two free cysteines play differential roles and that the activity of the enzyme can be modulated by side chain interactions of the free Cys residues. These results enhanced our understanding of rhαGal structure and function, particularly the critical roles that cysteines play in structure, stability, and enzymatic activity. PMID:26044846

  3. Long-term colloidal stability and metal leaching of single wall carbon nanotubes: effect of temperature and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-02-01

    Long term (90 day) stability, aggregation kinetics in the presence and absence of natural organic materials (NOM), and metal leaching of five commercial single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in waters (e.g. freshwater, seawater, stormwater, wastewater, and groundwater) were studied, as well as the effect of temperature on SWCNT stability and metal leaching. Zeta (ζ) potential of SWCNT decreased in magnitude with increase in temperature. In wastewater, SWCNT sedimented from the water column to below detectable levels after 30 days when kept at 40 °C, but at 20 °C 19% suspension was still observed after the same exposure time. Addition of 0.1 mg-C L(-1) EPS shifted the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of SRNOM-stabilized SWCNT from 15 mM to 54 mM NaCl via additional electrostatic and possibly steric stabilization. Attachment efficiencies (α) of SWCNT in waters ranged from ∼0.001 in DI with 10 mg L(-1) SRNOM to 1 in seawater. However, sedimentation of SWCNT in seawater (and other high ionic strength conditions) was not as fast as expected due to improved buoyancy and/or drag. Purified forms of SWCNTs exhibited better dispersibility and stability in most waters, but as expected, the total metal leached out was higher in the raw variants. Metal leaching from CNT in these studies was controlled by metal and water chemistries, CNT pretreatment, leachable metal fraction, exposure time, and presence of NOM. PMID:24342047

  4. Nanoporous gold as an active low temperature catalyst toward CO oxidation in hydrogen-rich stream

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongwei; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Hui; Ding, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Preferential CO oxidation (PROX) was investigated by using dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) catalyst under ambient conditions. Systematic investigations were carried out to characterize its catalytic performance by varying reaction parameters such as temperature and co-existence of CO2 and H2O, which revealed that NPG was a highly active and selective catalyst for PROX, especially at low temperature. At 20°C, the exit CO concentration could be reduced to less than 2 ppm with a turnover frequency of 4.1 × 10−2 s−1 at a space velocity of 120,000 mL h−1 g−1cat. and its high activity could retain for more than 24 hours. The presence of residual Ag species in the structure did not seem to improve the intrinsic activity of NPG for PROX; however, they contributed to the stabilization of the NPG structure and apparent catalytic activity. These results indicated that NPG might be readily applicable for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. PMID:24145317

  5. Nanoporous gold as an active low temperature catalyst toward CO oxidation in hydrogen-rich stream.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongwei; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Hui; Ding, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Preferential CO oxidation (PROX) was investigated by using dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) catalyst under ambient conditions. Systematic investigations were carried out to characterize its catalytic performance by varying reaction parameters such as temperature and co-existence of CO2 and H2O, which revealed that NPG was a highly active and selective catalyst for PROX, especially at low temperature. At 20°C, the exit CO concentration could be reduced to less than 2 ppm with a turnover frequency of 4.1 × 10(-2) s(-1) at a space velocity of 120,000 mL h(-1) g(-1)cat. and its high activity could retain for more than 24 hours. The presence of residual Ag species in the structure did not seem to improve the intrinsic activity of NPG for PROX; however, they contributed to the stabilization of the NPG structure and apparent catalytic activity. These results indicated that NPG might be readily applicable for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. PMID:24145317

  6. Effect of cationic surfactant on transport of surface-active and non-surface-active model drugs and emulsion stability in triphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, N; Burgess, D J

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the effect of excess surfactant on transport kinetics in emulsions, using surface-active (phenobarbital, barbital) and non-surface-active (phenylazoaniline, benzocaine) model drugs (pH 7.0). Mineral oil was chosen as the oil phase, and the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was chosen as the emulsifier. The effect of nonionic surfactant Brij 97 on transport kinetics of these model drugs were determined by authors elsewhere. Model drug transport in the triphasic systems was investigated using side-by-side diffusion cells mounted with hydrophilic dialysis membranes (molecular weight cutoffs 1 kD and 50 kD) and a novel bulk equilibrium reverse dialysis bag technique. Emulsion stability was determined by droplet size analysis as a function of time, temperature, and the presence of model drugs using photon correlation spectroscopy. Mineral oil/water partition coefficients and aqueous solubilities were determined in the presence of surfactant. The droplet size of the CTAB-stabilized emulsion system is bigger than that of the Brij 97-stabilized system because of the relatively less dense interfacial packing of the cationic surfactant. CTAB forms a complex with the model drugs because of ionic interaction between CTAB and the aromatic and azo groups of the model drugs. This complexation is expected to increase emulsion stability and affect model drug transport kinetics. The transport rates of model drugs in emulsions increased with increases in CTAB micellar concentrations up to 0.5% w/v and then decreased at higher surfactant concentrations. Total transport rates of phenobarbital and barbital were faster than those of phenylazoaniline and benzocaine. Excess surfactant affected the transport rates of the model drugs in the emulsions depending on drug surface activity and lipophilicity. The transport profiles of the model drugs appeared to be governed by model drug oil/water partition coefficient values and by

  7. High viscosity to highly dispersed PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals for enhanced catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jie; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Wei, Hao; Xiao, Yu-Xuan; Janiak, Christoph; Mu, Shi-Chun; Tian, Ge; Pan, Mu; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-07-01

    A facile high-viscosity-solvent method is presented to synthesize PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals highly dispersed in different mesostructures (2D and 3D structures), porosities (large and small pore sizes), and compositions (silica and carbon). Further, highly catalytic activity, stability and durability of the nanometals have been proven in different catalytic reactions. PMID:27222099

  8. Effect of active arm swing to local dynamic stability during walking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Li, Yue; Liu, An-Min; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yin-Zhi; Hu, Fei; Chen, Jin-Ling; Dai, Ke-Rong; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Arm swing is an essential component in regulating dynamic stability of the whole body during walking, while the contribution of active arm swing to local dynamic stability of different motion segments remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of arm swing under natural arm swing condition and active arm swing condition on local dynamic stability and gait variability of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) and lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint). The local divergence exponents (λs) and mean standard deviation over strides (MeanSD) of 24 young healthy adults were calculated while they were walking on treadmill with two arm swing conditions at their preferred walking speed (PWS). We found that in medial-lateral direction, both λs and MeanSD values of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) in active arm swing condition were significantly lower than those in natural arm swing condition (p<0.05), while no significant difference of λs or MeanSD in lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint) was found between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). In anterior-posterior and vertical direction, neither λs nor MeanSD values of all body segments showed significant difference between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). These findings indicate that active arm swing may help to improve the local dynamic stability of the trunk segments in medial-lateral direction. PMID:26615477

  9. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R; Bower, Benjamin; Caspi, Jonathan; Estell, David A; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus W.J.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johan; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Wallace, Louise; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-03-25

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  10. 17 CFR 242.104 - Stabilizing and other activities in connection with an offering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stabilizing and other activities in connection with an offering. 242.104 Section 242.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER...

  11. The study of the antimicrobial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles prepared using food stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Balandin, G V; Suvorov, O A; Shaburova, L N; Podkopaev, D O; Frolova, Yu V; Ermolaeva, G A

    2015-06-01

    The bactericidal effect of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles based on food stabilizers, gum arabic and chitosan, against bacterial cultures of microorganisms in food production is described. The antibacterial activity of nanotechnology products containing different amounts of stabilizing additives when applied to solid pH-neutral substrates is studied. For its evaluation a method making it possible to take into account the capability of nanoparticles to diffuse in solid media was applied. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of nanoparticles used against Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina flava were found. A suggestion was made concerning the influence of the spatial structure of bacteria on the antibacterial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles. The data concerning the antibacterial activity and minimal inhibiting concentrations of nanoparticles may be used for development of products suppressing activity of microorganisms hazardous for food production. PMID:26028773

  12. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  13. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  14. Thermal-Mechanical Stability of Single Crystal Oxide Refractive Concentrators for High-Temperature Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystal oxides such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO) and sapphire (Al2O3) are candidate refractive secondary concentrator materials for high temperature solar propulsion applications. However, thermo-mechanical reliability of these components in severe thermal environments during the space mission sun/shade transition is of great concern. Simulated mission tests are important for evaluating these candidate oxide materials under a variety of transient and steady-state heat flux conditions, and thus provide vital information for the component design. In this paper, a controlled heat flux thermal shock test approach is established for the single crystal oxide materials using a 3.0 kW continuous wave CO2 laser, with a wavelength 10.6 micron. Thermal fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of these oxide materials are investigated and critical temperature gradients are determined under various temperature and heating conditions. The test results show that single crystal sapphire is able to sustain the highest temperature gradient and heating-cooling rate, and thus exhibit the best thermal shock resistance, as compared to the yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium aluminum garnet and magnesium oxide.

  15. Thermal-Mechanical Stability of Single Crystal Oxide Refractive Concentrators for High-Temperature Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystal oxides such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO) and sapphire (Al2O3) are candidate refractive secondary concentrator materials for high temperature solar propulsion applications. However, thermo-mechanical reliability of these components in severe thermal environments during the space mission sun/shade transition is of great concern. Simulated mission tests are important for evaluating these candidate oxide materials under a variety of transient and steady-state heat flux conditions, and thus provide vital information for the component design. In this paper, a controlled heat flux thermal shock test approach is established for the single crystal oxide materials using a 3.0 kW continuous wave CO2 laser, with a wavelength 10.6 micron. Thermal fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of these oxide materials are investigated and critical temperature gradients are determined under various temperature and heating conditions. The test results show that single crystal sapphire is able to sustain the highest temperature gradient and heating-cooling rate, and thus exhibit the best thermal shock resistance, as compared to the yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium aluminum garnet, and magnesium oxide.

  16. Pressure-temperature stability, Ca2+ binding, and pressure-temperature phase diagram of cod parvalbumin: Gad m 1.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo; Smeller, László

    2012-07-31

    Fish allergy is associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to parvalbumins, which are small calcium-binding muscle proteins and represent the major and sole allergens for 95% of fish-allergic patients. We performed Fourier transform infrared and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to explore the pressure-temperature (p-T) phase diagram of cod parvalbumin (Gad m 1) and to elucidate possible new ways of pressure-temperature inactivation of this food allergen. Besides the secondary structure of the protein, the Ca(2+) binding to aspartic and glutamic acid residues was detected. The phase diagram was found to be quite complex, containing partially unfolded and molten globule states. The Ca(2+) ions were essential for the formation of the native structure. A molten globule conformation appears at 50 °C and atmospheric pressure, which converts into an unordered aggregated state at 75 °C. At >200 MPa, only heat unfolding, but no aggregation, was observed. A pressure of 500 MPa leads to a partially unfolded state at 27 °C. The complete pressure unfolding could only be reached at an elevated temperature (40 °C) and pressure (1.14 GPa). A strong correlation was found between Ca(2+) binding and the protein conformation. The partially unfolded state was reversibly refolded. The completely unfolded molecule, however, from which Ca(2+) was released, could not refold. The heat-unfolded protein was trapped either in the aggregated state or in the molten globule state without aggregation at elevated pressures. The heat-treated and the combined heat- and pressure-treated protein samples were tested with sera of allergic patients, but no change in allergenicity was found. PMID:22765301

  17. AMOLED (active matrix OLED) functionality and usable lifetime at temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Prache, Olivier; Jones, Susan

    2005-05-01

    Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) displays are known to exhibit high levels of performance, and these levels of performance have continually been improved over time with new materials and electronics design. eMagin Corporation developed a manually adjustable temperature compensation circuit with brightness control to allow for excellent performance over a wide temperature range. Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (US Army) tested the performance and survivability of a number of AMOLED displays in a temperature chamber over a range from -55°C to +85°C. Although device performance of AMOLEDs has always been its strong suit, the issue of usable display lifetimes for military applications continues to be an area of discussion and research. eMagin has made improvements in OLED materials and worked towards the development of a better understanding of usable lifetime for operation in a military system. NVESD ran luminance degradation tests of AMOLED panels at 50°C and at ambient to characterize the lifetime of AMOLED devices. The result is a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military systems: where good fits are made, and where further development is needed.

  18. Temperature affects microbial abundance, activity and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Temperature is a major factor determining the performance of the anaerobic digestion process. The microbial abundance, activity and interactional networks were investigated under a temperature gradient from 25°C to 55°C through amplicon sequencing, using 16S ribosomal RNA and 16S rRNA gene-based approaches. Comparative analysis of past accumulative elements presented by 16S rRNA gene-based analysis, and the in-situ conditions presented by 16S rRNA-based analysis, provided new insights concerning the identification of microbial functional roles and interactions. The daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. Increased methanogenesis and hydrolysis at 50°C were main factors causing higher methane production which was also closely related with more well-defined methanogenic and/or related modules with comprehensive interactions and increased functional orderliness referred to more microorganisms participating in interactions. This research demonstrated the importance of evaluating functional roles and interactions of microbial community. PMID:26970926

  19. A Coexisting Fungal-Bacterial Community Stabilizes Soil Decomposition Activity in a Microcosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ushio, Masayuki; Miki, Takeshi; Balser, Teri C.

    2013-01-01

    How diversity influences the stability of a community function is a major question in ecology. However, only limited empirical investigations of the diversity–stability relationship in soil microbial communities have been undertaken, despite the fundamental role of microbial communities in driving carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a microcosm experiment to investigate the relationship between microbial diversity and stability of soil decomposition activities against changes in decomposition substrate quality by manipulating microbial community using selective biocides. We found that soil respiration rates and degradation enzyme activities by a coexisting fungal and bacterial community (a taxonomically diverse community) are more stable against changes in substrate quality (plant leaf materials) than those of a fungi-dominated or a bacteria-dominated community (less diverse community). Flexible changes in the microbial community composition and/or physiological state in the coexisting community against changes in substrate quality, as inferred by the soil lipid profile, may be the mechanism underlying this positive diversity–stability relationship. Our experiment demonstrated that the previously found positive diversity–stability relationship could also be valid in the soil microbial community. Our results also imply that the functional/taxonomic diversity and community ecology of soil microbes should be incorporated into the context of climate–ecosystem feedbacks. Changes in substrate quality, which could be induced by climate change, have impacts on decomposition process and carbon dioxide emission from soils, but such impacts may be attenuated by the functional diversity of soil microbial communities. PMID:24260368

  20. Anti-Oxidative Activity of Pectin and Its Stabilizing Effect on Retinyl Palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jieun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kim, Hyeongmin; Jang, Soung Baek; Lee, Hyun Joo; Chakma, Suharto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the anti-oxidative activity of pectin and other polysaccharides in order to develop a cosmeceutical base having anti-oxidative effects towards retinyl palmitate (RP). The anti-oxidative stabilizing effects of pectin and other polysaccharides on RP were evaluated by DPPH assay and then the stabilizing effect of pectin on RP was examined as a function of time. Among the polysaccharides we examined, pectin exhibited a considerably higher anti-oxidative activity, with an approximately 5-fold greater DPPH radical scavenging effect compared to other polysaccharides. The DPPH radical scavenging effect of pectin increased gradually with increasing concentrations of pectin. At two different RP concentrations, 0.01 and 0.1% in ethanol, addition of pectin improved the stability of RP in a concentration dependent manner. The stabilizing effect of pectin on RP was more effective for the lower concentration of RP (0.01%, v/v). Further, degradation of RP was reduced following the addition of pectin as measured over 8 hours. From the results obtained, it can be suggested that pectin may be a promising ingredient for cosmeceutical bases designed to stabilize RP or other pharmacological agents subject to degradation by oxidation. PMID:23776395