Science.gov

Sample records for active tensegrity structure

  1. Active control of tensegrity structures under random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Raja, M.; Narayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we consider vibration control of tensegrity structures under stationary and nonstationary random excitations. These excitations may be representative of many physical loading conditions, such as earthquake, wind, aerodynamic and acoustic excitations. The optimal control theory based on H2 and \\mathrm {H}_{\\infty } controller with full state and limited state feedback is used for the control. The response of the tensegrity structure is represented by the zero lag covariance matrix and the same is obtained by solving the matrix Lyapunov equation. The force generated by the electro-mechanical coupling of the piezoelectric actuator is used in the formulation. A tensegrity structure of class-1 comprising of two modules, with 24 pretension cables and six struts with piezoelectric actuators, is considered.

  2. Active vibration control of a three-stage tensegrity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Leung; Arbelaez, Diego; Bossens, Frederic; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This experimental study demonstrates the efficiency of simple control strategies to damp a 3-stage tensegrity tower structure. The tower is mounted on a moving support which is excited with a limited bandwidth random signal (filtered white noise) by a shaker. Our goal is to minimize the tansmissibility between base acceleration and top plate acceleration using piezoelectric displacement actuators and force sensors collocated at the bottom stage of vertical strings. Two types of controllers have been designed, namely, it local integral force feedback control and acceleration feedback control. It can be shown that both controllers can effectively damp the first 2 bending modes by about 20 dB, and the acceleration feedback controller performs even better as it can also reduce the amplitude of the next 2 bending modes by about 5-10 dB.

  3. Hydrodynamic loading of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroldsen, Anders S.; Johansen, Vegar; Skelton, Robert E.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces hydrodynamic loads for tensegrity structures, to examine their behavior in marine environments. Wave compliant structures are of general interest when considering large marine structures, and we are motivated by the aquaculture industry where new concepts are investigated in order to make offshore installations for seafood production. This paper adds to the existing models and software simulations of tensegrity structures exposed to environmental loading from waves and current. A number of simulations are run to show behavior of the structure as a function of pretension level and string stiffness for a given loading condition.

  4. Design methods of rhombic tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Yue; Cao, Yan-Ping; Yu, Shou-Wen; Gu, Yuan-Tong

    2010-08-01

    As a special type of novel flexible structures, tensegrity holds promise for many potential applications in such fields as materials science, biomechanics, civil and aerospace engineering. Rhombic systems are an important class of tensegrity structures, in which each bar constitutes the longest diagonal of a rhombus of four strings. In this paper, we address the design methods of rhombic structures based on the idea that many tensegrity structures can be constructed by assembling one-bar elementary cells. By analyzing the properties of rhombic cells, we first develop two novel schemes, namely, direct enumeration scheme and cell-substitution scheme. In addition, a facile and efficient method is presented to integrate several rhombic systems into a larger tensegrity structure. To illustrate the applications of these methods, some novel rhombic tensegrity structures are constructed.

  5. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  6. Static and dynamic analyses of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka

    Tensegrity structures are a class of truss structures consisting of a continuous set of tension members (cables) and a discrete set of compression members (bars). Since tensegrity structures are light weight and can be compactly stowed and deployed, cylindrical tensegrity modules have been proposed for space structures. From a view point of structural dynamics, tensegrity structures pose a new set of problems, i.e., initial shape finding. Initial configurations of tensegrity structures must be computed by imposing a pre-stressability condition to initial equilibrium equations. There are ample qualitative statements regarding the initial geometry of cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. Quantitative initial shape anlyses have only been performed on one-stage and two-stage cylindrical modules. However, analytical expressions for important geometrical parameters such as twist angles and overlap ratios lack the definition of the initial shape of both cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. In response to the above needs, a set of static and dynamic characterization procedures for tensegrity modules was first developed. The procedures were subsequently applied to Buckminster Fuller's spherical tensegrity modules. Both the initial shape and the corresponding pre-stress mode were analytically obtained by using the graphs of the tetrahedral, octahedral (cubic), and icosahedral (dodecahedral) groups. For pre-stressed configurations, modal analyses were conducted to classify a large number of infinitesimal mechanism modes. The procedures also applied tocyclic cylindrical tensegrity modules with an arbitrary number of stages. It was found that both the Maxwell number and the number of infinitesimal mechanism modes are independent of the number of stages in the axial direction. A reduced set of equilibrium equations was derived by incorporating cyclic symmetry and the flip, or quasi-flip, symmetry of the cylindrical modules. For multi-stage modules with more than

  7. Evolutionary development of tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Daniel; Vico, Francisco J

    2010-09-01

    Contributions from the emerging fields of molecular genetics and evo-devo (evolutionary developmental biology) are greatly benefiting the field of evolutionary computation, initiating a promise of renewal in the traditional methodology. While direct encoding has constituted a dominant paradigm, indirect ways to encode the solutions have been reported, yet little attention has been paid to the benefits of the proposed methods to real problems. In this work, we study the biological properties that emerge by means of using indirect encodings in the context of form-finding problems. A novel indirect encoding model for artificial development has been defined and applied to an engineering structural-design problem, specifically to the discovery of tensegrity structures. This model has been compared with a direct encoding scheme. While the direct encoding performs similarly well to the proposed method, indirect-based results typically outperform the direct-based results in aspects not directly linked to the nature of the problem itself, but to the emergence of properties found in biological organisms, like organicity, generalization capacity, or modularity aspects which are highly valuable in engineering. PMID:20619314

  8. Genetic Optimization of a Tensegrity Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is charged with developing advanced technologies for space telescopes. The next generation of space optics will be very large and lightweight. Tensegrity structures are built of compressive members (bars), and tensile members (strings). For most materials, the tensile strength of a longitudinal member is larger than its buckling strength; therefore a large stiffness to mass ratio can be achieved by increasing the use of tensile members. Tensegrities are the epitome of lightweight structures, since they take advantage of the larger tensile strength of materials. The compressive members of tensegrity structures are disjoint allowing compact storage of the structure. The structure has the potential to eliminate the requirement for assembly by man in space; it can be deployed by adjustments in its cable tension. A tensegrity structure can be more reliably modeled since none of the individual members experience bending moments. (Members that experience deformation in more than one dimension are much harder to model.) A. Keane and S. Brown designed a satellite boom truss system with an enhanced vibration performance. They started with a standard truss system, then used a genetic algorithm to alter the design, while optimizing the vibration performance. An improvement of over 20,000% in frequency-averaged energy levels was obtained using this approach. In this report an introduction to tensegrity structures is given, along with a description of how to generate the nodal coordinates and connectivity of a multiple stage cylindrical tensegrity structure. A description of how finite elements can be used to develop a stiffness and mass matrix so that the modes of vibration can be determined from the eigenvalue problem is shown. A brief description of a micro genetic algorithm is then presented.

  9. Simultaneous structure and control optimization of tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper concerns optimization of prestress of a tensegrity structure to achieve the optimal mixed dynamic and control performance. A linearized dynamic model of the structure is derived. The force density variables that parameterize prestress of the structure appear linearly in the model. The feasible region of these parameters is defined in terms of the extreme directions of the prestress cone. Several properties of the problem are established inside the feasible region of the parameters. The problem is solved using a gradient method that provides a monotonic decrease of the objective function inside the feasible region. A numerical example of a cantilevered planar tensegrity beam is shown.

  10. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  11. On the use of tensegrity structures for kinetic solar facades of smart buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; De Chiara, E.; Skelton, R. E.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the use of tensegrity structures with morphing and prestress-stability capabilities for the design of active solar façades of smart buildings. Morphing tensegrity lattices are used to design shading screens composed of umbrella-shaped ‘eyes’ that are opened and closed by adjusting the elongation in a limited number of cables. Prestressable lattices are instead employed to design superstable Venetian blinds that are composed of orientable slats. Future use of tensegrity solutions for next-generation smart buildings are outlined, with the aim of designing kinetic solar façades that combine morphing abilities with prestress-stability.

  12. Dynamics Modelling of Tensegrity Structures with Expanding Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkareem, Musa; Mahfouf, M.; Theilliol, D.

    Given the prestress level of a tensegrity structural system obtained from any form-finding method, an important step in the design process is to develop mathematical models that describe the behaviour of the system. Moreover, tensegrity structures are strongly dependent on their geometric, or kinematic, configurations. As such, except for small scale tensegrity structures with a few structural members, resorting to the use of computational techniques for analysis is a necessity. Because tensegrity structures are kinematically and statically indeterminate structures, a free standing tensegrity structure has at least one rigid body mode apart from the six rigid body modes that can be eliminated, for example, by applying boundary conditions assuming the structure is attached to a base. In this paper, a new general tool (applicable to small and large systems) for systematic and efficient formulation of structural models for tensegrity systems is proposed. Current tools are limited to structures with a few degrees of freedom (DOF), however, this new tool simplifies the analyses of tensegrity structures with several DOFs and provides a new insight into the behaviour of these interesting and yet challenging structures, at least from a control systems' viewpoint.

  13. Minimal mass design of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kenji; Skelton, R. E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides a unified framework for minimal mass design of tensegrity systems. For any given configuration and any given set of external forces, we design force density (member force divided by length) and cross-section area to minimize the structural mass subject to an equilibrium condition and a maximum stress constraint. The answer is provided by a linear program. Stability is assured by a positive definite stiffness matrix. This condition is described by a linear matrix inequality. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the proposed method.

  14. Monte Carlo Form-Finding Method for Tensegrity Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cao, Yan-Ping

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a Monte Carlo-based approach to solve tensegrity form-finding problems. It uses a stochastic procedure to find the deterministic equilibrium configuration of a tensegrity structure. The suggested Monte Carlo form-finding (MCFF) method is highly efficient because it does not involve complicated matrix operations and symmetry analysis and it works for arbitrary initial configurations. Both regular and non-regular tensegrity problems of large scale can be solved. Some representative examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of this versatile method.

  15. A reconfigurable robot with tensegrity structure using nylon artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; de Andrade, Monica Jung; Brahme, Tarang; Tadesse, Yonas; Baughman, Ray H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental investigation of a self-reconfigurable icosahedral robot for locomotion. The robot consists of novel and modular tensegrity structures, which can potentially maneuver in unstructured environments while carrying a payload. Twisted and Coiled Polymer (TCP) muscles were utilized to actuate the tensegrity structure as needed. The tensegrity system has rigid struts and flexible TCP muscles that allow keeping a payload in the central region. The TCP muscles provide large actuation stroke, high mechanical power per fiber mass and can undergo millions of highly reversible cycles. The muscles are electrothermally driven, and, upon stimulus, the heated muscles reconfigure the shape of the tensegrity structure. Here, we present preliminary experimental results that determine the rolling motion of the structure.

  16. Modeling of caterpillar crawl using novel tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Orki, O; Ayali, A; Shai, O; Ben-Hanan, U

    2012-12-01

    Caterpillars are soft-bodied animals. They have a relatively simple nervous system, and yet are capable of exhibiting complex movement. This paper presents a 2D caterpillar simulation which mimics caterpillar locomotion using Assur tensegrity structures. Tensegrity structures are structures composed of a set of elements always under compression and a set of elements always under tension. Assur tensegrities are a novel sub-group of tensegrity structures. In the model, each caterpillar segment is represented by a 2D Assur tensegrity structure called a triad. The mechanical structure and the control scheme of the model are inspired by the biological caterpillar. The unique engineering properties of Assur tensegrity structures, together with the suggested control scheme, provide the model with a controllable degree of softness-each segment can be either soft or rigid. The model exhibits several characteristics which are analogous to those of the biological caterpillar. One such characteristic is that the internal pressure of the caterpillar is not a function of its size. During growth, body mass is increased 10 000-fold, while internal pressure remains constant. In the same way, the model is able to maintain near constant internal forces regardless of size. The research also suggests that caterpillars do not invest considerably more energy while crawling than while resting. PMID:22872665

  17. Tensegrity I. Cell structure and hierarchical systems biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993, a Commentary in this journal described how a simple mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture can help to explain how cell shape, movement and cytoskeletal mechanics are controlled, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces (J. Cell Sci. 104, 613-627). The cellular tensegrity model can now be revisited and placed in context of new advances in our understanding of cell structure, biological networks and mechanoregulation that have been made over the past decade. Recent work provides strong evidence to support the use of tensegrity by cells, and mathematical formulations of the model predict many aspects of cell behavior. In addition, development of the tensegrity theory and its translation into mathematical terms are beginning to allow us to define the relationship between mechanics and biochemistry at the molecular level and to attack the larger problem of biological complexity. Part I of this two-part article covers the evidence for cellular tensegrity at the molecular level and describes how this building system may provide a structural basis for the hierarchical organization of living systems--from molecule to organism. Part II, which focuses on how these structural networks influence information processing networks, appears in the next issue.

  18. Geometric and material nonlinear analysis of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hoang Chi; Lee, Jaehong

    2011-12-01

    A numerical method is presented for the large deflection in elastic analysis of tensegrity structures including both geometric and material nonlinearities. The geometric nonlinearity is considered based on both total Lagrangian and updated Lagrangian formulations, while the material nonlinearity is treated through elastoplastic stress-strain relationship. The nonlinear equilibrium equations are solved using an incremental-iterative scheme in conjunction with the modified Newton-Raphson method. A computer program is developed to predict the mechanical responses of tensegrity systems under tensile, compressive and flexural loadings. Numerical results obtained are compared with those reported in the literature to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed program. The flexural behavior of the double layer quadruplex tensegrity grid is sufficiently good for lightweight large-span structural applications. On the other hand, its bending strength capacity is not sensitive to the self-stress level.

  19. Modeling, design, and control of tensegrity structures with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    Classical flexible structures dynamics and control suffer from several major deficiencies. First, reliable mathematical models involve partial differential equations which are difficult to deal with analytically as well as numerically. A partial differential equations mathematical model of a system's dynamics is not practical for control system design, since most of the modern control systems design methodologies assume a state space representation. Second, from a practical perspective, the control of classical truss structures involves the use of expensive and short life mechanisms like telescopic struts. Third, the control of classical truss structures involves high energy, massive, hydraulic actuators. Fourth, classical controllable structures have many, complicated, bar to bar joints, which make the control task difficult. This thesis proposes a class of lightweight, space structures, called tensegrity structures, which can be reliably modeled using ordinary differential equations. Tensegrity structures offer excellent opportunities for physically integrated structure and control system design since their members can serve simultaneously as sensors, actuators, and load carrying elements. The actuating functions can be carried by tendons, controlled by electric motors. Thus, telescopic struts and hydraulic actuators can be eliminated. Additionally, tensegrity structures can be built without any bar to bar connections. The general prestressability conditions for tensegrity structures are derived from the principle of virtual work. In several cases these conditions are analytically solved, allowing for the parameterization of certain classes of prestressable configurations. A general methodology for the investigation of the prestressability conditions is also developed. The methodology uses symbolic and numeric computation, and it is meant to significantly reduce the complexity of the prestressability conditions for certain prestressable configurations

  20. Smart tensegrity structures for the Swiss Expo 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, Mauro

    1998-07-01

    The Swiss Expo 2001 will be held in 2001 on the three lakes of Neuchatel, Bienne and Morat. The main events of this exhibition will take place on four platforms protruding from the seashore to the lake and with dimensions of about 400m X 100m. The covering 'deck' of these platforms will be created using the Tensegrity concept and will be dismantled and recycled after the event. This kind of structures is composed by a network of cables, struts and reinforced membranes. The resulting structural behavior is highly geometrically non-linear and is relatively complicated to calculate and simulate. This pointed to the necessity of extensive testing and permanent monitoring of the structures as well as to the introduction of active elements able to compensate for quasi-static variable loads such as temperature variations, snow on the membranes, successive construction phases and additional weight of scenic elements. This data will be continuously analyzed and, when corrective actions are necessary, hydraulic actuators placed at key locations will optimize the shape and the tensile state of the whole structure. Tests of this concept are now carried out on 1:10 scale models.

  1. Locomotion without a brain: physical reservoir computing in tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Caluwaerts, K; D'Haene, M; Verstraeten, D; Schrauwen, B

    2013-01-01

    Embodiment has led to a revolution in robotics by not thinking of the robot body and its controller as two separate units, but taking into account the interaction of the body with its environment. By investigating the effect of the body on the overall control computation, it has been suggested that the body is effectively performing computations, leading to the term morphological computation. Recent work has linked this to the field of reservoir computing, allowing one to endow morphologies with a theory of universal computation. In this work, we study a family of highly dynamic body structures, called tensegrity structures, controlled by one of the simplest kinds of "brains." These structures can be used to model biomechanical systems at different scales. By analyzing this extreme instantiation of compliant structures, we demonstrate the existence of a spectrum of choices of how to implement control in the body-brain composite. We show that tensegrity structures can maintain complex gaits with linear feedback control and that external feedback can intrinsically be integrated in the control loop. The various linear learning rules we consider differ in biological plausibility, and no specific assumptions are made on how to implement the feedback in a physical system. PMID:23186351

  2. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  3. Designing structures for dynamical properties via natural frequencies separation. Application to tensegrity structures design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2009-05-01

    The design of structures for dynamic properties is addressed by placing conditions on the separation between natural frequencies. Additional constraints, like lower and upper bounds on the natural frequencies, are also included. A fast numerical algorithm that exploits the mathematical structure of the resulting problem is developed. Examples of the algorithm's application to tensegrity structures design are presented and the connection between natural frequencies separation and proportional damping approximation is analyzed.

  4. Self-assembly of 3D prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA

    PubMed Central

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E.; Shih, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Tensegrity or tensional integrity is a property of a structure that relies on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or in pure tension for its stability [1,2]. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture [3,4]. Here we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin [5,6]. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be employed to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction, and other fundamental biological processes. PMID:20562873

  5. Self-assembly of three-dimensional prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA.

    PubMed

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E; Shih, William M

    2010-07-01

    Tensegrity, or tensional integrity, is a property of a structure indicating a reliance on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or pure tension for stability. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture. Here, we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be used to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction and other fundamental biological processes. PMID:20562873

  6. Self-assembly of three-dimensional prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E.; Shih, William M.

    2010-07-01

    Tensegrity, or tensional integrity, is a property of a structure indicating a reliance on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or pure tension for stability. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture. Here, we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be used to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction and other fundamental biological processes.

  7. Dynamic Stability of a #D Tensegrity Structure Carrying a Top Mass: Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Joris; Fey, Rob H. B.; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-07-01

    The static and dynamic stability of a 3D tensegrity structure carrying a top mass is investigated both theoretically and experimentally by studying static and linear dynamic responses, (nonlinear) frequency-amplitude plots, and Poincaré maps. A good correspondence between numerical and experimental results is obtained for the eigenfrequencies, FRFs, and frequency-amplitude plots.

  8. Deployable tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul

    The design of a complete tensegrity system involves the analysis of static equilibria, the mechanical properties of the configuration, the deployment of the structure, and the regulation and dynamics of the system. This dissertation will explore these steps for two different types of structures. The first structure is the traditional Snelson Tower, where struts are disjointed, and is referred to as a Class 1 tensegrity. The second structure of interest is referred to as a Class 2 structure, where two struts come in contact at a joint. The first part of the thesis involves the dynamics of these tensegrity structures. Two complete nonlinear formulations for the dynamics of tensegrity systems are derived. In addition, a general formulation for the statics for an arbitrary tensegrity structure resulted from one of the dynamic formulations and is presented with symmetric and nonsymmetric tensegrity configurations. The second part of the thesis involves statics. The analysis of static equilibria and the implementation of this analysis into an open loop control law that will deploy the tensegrity structures along an equilibrium manifold are derived. The analysis of small stable tensegrity units allow for a modular design, where a collection of these units can be assembled into a larger structure that obeys the same control laws for deployment concepts. In addition, a loaded structure is analyzed to determine the optimal number of units required to obtain a minimal mass configuration. The third part of the thesis involves laboratory hardware that demonstrates the practical use of the methodology presented. A Class 2 symmetric structure is constructed, deployed, and stowed using the analysis from part two. In addition, the static equilibria of a Class 1 structure is computed to obtain nonsymmetric reconfigurations. The final part of the thesis involves the attenuation of white noise disturbances acting on nodes of both structures. The structures are simulated using linear

  9. The analysis of tensegrity structures for the design of a morphing wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moored, Keith W., III; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2005-05-01

    Tensegrity structures have become of engineering interest in recent years, but very few have found practical use. This lack of integration is attributed to the lack of a well formulated design procedure. In this paper, a preliminary procedure is presented for developing morphing tensegrity structures that include actuating elements. To do this, the virtual work method has been modified to allow for individual actuation of struts and cables. A generalized connectivity matrix for a cantilever beam constructed from either a single 4-strut cell or multiple 4-strut cells has been developed. Global deflections resulting from actuation of specific elements have been calculated. Furthermore, the force density method is expanded to include a necessary upper bound condition such that a physically feasible structure can be designed. Finally, the importance of relative force density values on the overall shape of a structure comprising of multiple unit cells is discussed.

  10. Complexity of the tensegrity structure for dynamic energy and force distribution of cytoskeleton during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Tang, Ming-Jer; Huang, Jong-Shin; Su, Fong-Chin

    2010-01-01

    Cytoskeleton plays important roles in intracellular force equilibrium and extracellular force transmission from/to attaching substrate through focal adhesions (FAs). Numerical simulations of intracellular force distribution to describe dynamic cell behaviors are still limited. The tensegrity structure comprises tension-supporting cables and compression-supporting struts that represent the actin filament and microtubule respectively, and has many features consistent with living cells. To simulate the dynamics of intracellular force distribution and total stored energy during cell spreading, the present study employed different complexities of the tensegrity structures by using octahedron tensegrity (OT) and cuboctahedron tensegrity (COT). The spreading was simulated by assigning specific connection nodes for radial displacement and attachment to substrate to form FAs. The traction force on each FA was estimated by summarizing the force carried in sounding cytoskeletal elements. The OT structure consisted of 24 cables and 6 struts and had limitations soon after the beginning of spreading by declining energy stored in struts indicating the abolishment of compression in microtubules. The COT structure, double the amount of cables and struts than the OT structure, provided sufficient spreading area and expressed similar features with documented cell behaviors. The traction force pointed inward on peripheral FAs in the spread out COT structure. The complex structure in COT provided further investigation of various FA number during different spreading stages. Before the middle phase of spreading (half of maximum spreading area), cell attachment with 8 FAs obtained minimized cytoskeletal energy. The maximum number of 12 FAs in the COT structure was required to achieve further spreading. The stored energy in actin filaments increased as cells spread out, while the energy stored in microtubules increased at initial spreading, peaked in middle phase, and then declined as

  11. A peridynamic model for the nonlinear static analysis of truss and tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Hongwu; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    A peridynamic model is developed in this paper for the nonlinear static analysis of truss and tensegrity structures. In the present model, the motion equations of material points are established on the current configuration and the pairwise forces are functions of extension and direction of the bonds. The peridynamic parameters are obtained based on the equivalence between the strain energy densities of the peridynamic and classical continuum models. The present model is applied to the mechanical analysis of bimodular truss and tensegrity structures, in which the compressive modulus is set to be zero for the cables. Several representative examples are carried out and the results verify the validity and efficiency of the developed model by comparing with the conventional nonlinear finite element method.

  12. Form-finding of complex tensegrity structures: application to cell cytoskeleton modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudriller, Haïmad; Maurin, Bernard; Cañadas, Patrick; Montcourrier, Philippe; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Bettache, Nadir

    2006-11-01

    The ability to model the mechanical behaviour of the cell cytoskeleton as realistically as possible is a key point in understanding numerous biological mechanisms. Tensegrity systems have already demonstrated their pertinence for this purpose. However, the structures considered until now are based only on models with simplified geometry and topology compared to the true complexity of cytoskeleton architecture. The aim of this Note is to propose a form-finding method for generating nonregular tensegrity shapes of higher diversity and complexity. The process relies on the use of the dynamic relaxation method. Further improvements have made it possible to control the computed morphologies and to modify them to approach experimentally observed configurations. Various examples illustrate the use of the method and the results obtained for different cell typologies. To cite this article: H. Baudriller et al., C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  13. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  14. Convex analysis and ideal tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceri, Franco; Marino, Michele; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on convex analysis is formulated and developed to study tensegrity structures under steady-state loads. Many classical results for ideal tensegrities are rationally deduced from subdifferentiable models in a novel mechanical perspective. Novel energy-based criteria for rigidity and pre-stressability are provided, allowing to formulate numerical algorithms for computations.

  15. Solitary waves on tensegrity lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; Senatore, L.; Daraio, C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the dynamics of lattices formed by masses connected through tensegrity prisms. By employing analytic and numerical arguments, we show that such structures support two limit dynamic regimes controlled by the prisms' properties: (i) in the low-energy (sonic) regime the system supports the formation and propagation of solitary waves which exhibit sech2 shape and (ii) in the high-energy (ultrasonic) regime the system supports atomic-scale localization. Such peculiar features found in periodic arrays of tensegrity structures suggest their use for the creation of new composite materials (here called "tensegrity materials") of potential interest for applications in impact absorption, energy localization and in new acoustic devices.

  16. [USE OF THE STRUCTURAL TENSEGRATION CONCEPT IN THE STECCO FASCIAL MANIPULATION METHOD].

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Anna; Kocięcki, Marek; Zaklukiewicz, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Mariusz; Gębska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Low therapeutic efficacy in a number of cases involving the musculoskeletal system may be caused by a wrong diagnosis, the misunderstanding of the essence of the problem, pathogen or improper treatment. Therapy may be applied to the wrong area (at the site of pain) or may cover an area that is too small. The paper presents the theory of structural tensegrity (along with the anatomical and physiological grounds), which is based on a number of modern holistic therapies. One such method is the method of fascial manipulation by Stecco, described in outline in this article. This article also describes the structure and functions of the fascia since understanding of this structure was the cause of the emergence of new concepts and therapies. PMID:26591110

  17. Self-equilibrium and stability of regular truncated tetrahedral tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Ohsaki, M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents analytical conditions of self-equilibrium and super-stability for the regular truncated tetrahedral tensegrity structures, nodes of which have one-to-one correspondence to the tetrahedral group. These conditions are presented in terms of force densities, by investigating the block-diagonalized force density matrix. The block-diagonalized force density matrix, with independent sub-matrices lying on its leading diagonal, is derived by making use of the tetrahedral symmetry via group representation theory. The condition for self-equilibrium is found by enforcing the force density matrix to have the necessary number of nullities, which is four for three-dimensional structures. The condition for super-stability is further presented by guaranteeing positive semi-definiteness of the force density matrix.

  18. A deployable telescope imaging system with coilable tensegrity structure for microsatellite application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Chuang; Zhou, Nan

    2013-08-01

    Microsatellites will be widely applied as an earth-observing platform in coming future for their low costs. Such satellite missions require optical payloads with low cost, low mass and small volume. In order to meet these requirements, one way is to develop deployable telescopes. They not only maintain the capabilities of the traditional non-deployable telescopes, but also have compacter launch volume and lighter weight. We investigate a telescope with precise deployable structure based on coilable tensegrity. Before launch, the secondary mirror support structure is coiled, and when the satellite is in orbit, the secondary mirror is deployed with the elastic strain energy from the coiled longerons. There are mainly three parts in this paper. Firstly, the telescope optics is presented. A Ritchey-Chretien (RC) type optical system with 150mm aperture is designed. Secondly, the deployable telescope structure is designed for the RC system. The deployable structure mainly consists of coilable longerons, batten rings, and diagonal stringers. The finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze the dynamics of the unfolded telescope structure. Thirdly, the adjusting mechanism for secondary mirror is discussed. Piezoelectric actuators can be used to achieve remote alignment to improve the performance of the imaging system.

  19. Fibre cables in the lacunae of Typha leaves contribute to a tensegrity structure

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Allan; Wayne, Randy

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cables composed of long, non-lignified fibre cells enclosed in a cover of much shorter thin-walled, crystal-containing cells traverse the air chambers (lacunae) in leaves of the taller species of Typha. The non-lignified fibre cables are anchored in diaphragms composed of stellate cells of aerenchyma tissue that segment the long air chambers into smaller compartments. Although the fibre cables are easily observed and can be pulled free from the porous-to-air diaphragms, their structure and function have been ignored or misinterpreted. Methods Leaves of various species of Typha were dissected and fibre cables were pulled free and observed with a microscope using bright-field and polarizing optics. Maximal tensile strength of freshly removed cables was measured by hanging weights from fibre cables, and Instron analysis was used to produce curves of load versus extension until cables broke. Key Results and Conclusions Polarized light microscopy revealed that the cellulose microfibrils that make up the walls of the cable fibres are oriented parallel to the long axis of the fibres. This orientation ensures that the fibre cables are mechanically stiff and strong under tension. Accordingly, the measured stiffness and tensile strength of the fibre cables were in the gigapascal range. In combination with the dorsal and ventral leaf surfaces and partitions that contain lignified fibre bundles and vascular strands that are strong in compression, the very fine fibre cables that are strong under tension form a tensegrity structure. The tensegrity structure creates multiple load paths through which stresses are redistributed throughout the 1–3 m tall upright leaves of Typha angustifolia, T. latifolia, T. × glauca, T. domingensis and T. shuttleworthii. The length of the fibre cables relative to the length of the leaf blades is reduced in the last-formed leaves of flowering individuals. Fibre cables are absent in the shorter leaves of Typha minima and, if

  20. The interphase mammalian chromosome as a structural system based on tensegrity.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2016-03-21

    Each mammalian chromosome is constituted by a DNA fiber of macroscopic length that needs to be fitted in a microscopic nucleus. The DNA fiber is subjected at physiological temperature to random thermal bending and looping that must be constrained so as achieve structural stability thus avoiding spontaneous rupturing of the fiber. Standard textbooks assume that chromatin proteins are primarily responsible for the packaging of DNA and so of its protection against spontaneous breakage. Yet the dynamic nature of the interactions between chromatin proteins and DNA is unlikely to provide the necessary long-term structural stability for the chromosomal DNA. On the other hand, longstanding evidence indicates that stable interactions between DNA and constituents of a nuclear compartment commonly known as the nuclear matrix organize the chromosomal DNA as a series of topologically constrained, supercoiled loops during interphase. This results in a primary level of DNA condensation and packaging within the nucleus, as well as in protection against spontaneous DNA breakage, independently of chromatin proteins which nevertheless increase and dynamically modulate the degree of DNA packaging and its role in the regulation of DNA function. Thus current evidence, presented hereunder, supports a model for the organization of the interphase chromosome as resilient system that satisfies the principles of structural tensegrity. PMID:26780650

  1. Control/structure optimization approach for minimum-time reconfiguration of tensegrity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrich, Jack B.; Skelton, Robert E.

    2003-07-01

    For a new class of tendon-driven robotic systems that is generalized to include tensegrity structures, this paper focuses on a method to jointly optimize the control law and the structural complexity for a given point-to-point maneuvering task. By fixing external geometry, the number of identical stages within the domain is varied until a minimal mass design is achieved. For the deployment phase, a new method is introduced which determines the tendon force inputs from a set of admissible, non-saturating inputs, that will reconfigure each kinematically invertible unit along its own path in minimum time. The approach utilizes the existence conditions and solution of a linear algebra problem that describe how the set of admissible tendon forces is mapped onto the set of path-dependent torques. Since this mapping is not one-to-one, free parameters in the control law always exist. An infinity-norm minimization with respect to these free parameters is responsible for saturation avoidance. In addition to the required time to deploy, the expended control energy during the post-movement phase is also minimized with respect to the total number of stages. Conditions under which these independent minimizations yield the same robot illustrate the importance of considering control/structure interaction within this new robotics paradigm.

  2. On tensegrity in cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2011-09-01

    All models are wrong, but some are useful. This famous saying mirrors the situation in cell mechanics as well. It looks like no particular model of the cell deformability can be unconditionally preferred over others and different models reveal different aspects of the mechanical behavior of living cells. The purpose of the present work is to discuss the so-called tensegrity models of the cell cytoskeleton. It seems that the role of the cytoskeleton in the overall mechanical response of the cell was not appreciated until Donald Ingber put a strong emphasis on it. It was fortunate that Ingber linked the cytoskeletal structure to the fascinating art of tensegrity architecture. This link sparked interest and argument among biologists, physicists, mathematicians, and engineers. At some point the enthusiasm regarding tensegrity perhaps became overwhelming and as a reaction to that some skepticism built up. To demystify Ingber's ideas the present work aims at pinpointing the meaning of tensegrity and its role in our understanding of the importance of the cytoskeleton for the cell deformability and motility. It should be noted also that this paper emphasizes basic ideas rather than carefully follows the chronology of the development of tensegrity models. The latter can be found in the comprehensive review by Dimitrije Stamenovic (2006) to which the present work is complementary. PMID:21977516

  3. Tensegrity: the architectural basis of cellular mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Physical forces of gravity, hemodynamic stresses, and movement play a critical role in tissue development. Yet, little is known about how cells convert these mechanical signals into a chemical response. This review attempts to place the potential molecular mediators of mechanotransduction (e.g. stretch-sensitive ion channels, signaling molecules, cytoskeleton, integrins) within the context of the structural complexity of living cells. The model presented relies on recent experimental findings, which suggests that cells use tensegrity architecture for their organization. Tensegrity predicts that cells are hard-wired to respond immediately to mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix (e.g. integrins) or to other cells (cadherins, selectins, CAMs). Many signal transducing molecules that are activated by cell binding to growth factors and extracellular matrix associate with cytoskeletal scaffolds within focal adhesion complexes. Mechanical signals, therefore, may be integrated with other environmental signals and transduced into a biochemical response through force-dependent changes in scaffold geometry or molecular mechanics. Tensegrity also provides a mechanism to focus mechanical energy on molecular transducers and to orchestrate and tune the cellular response.

  4. Controlling Tensegrity Robots Through Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscen, Atil; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2013-01-01

    Tensegrity structures (built from interconnected rods and cables) have the potential to offer a revolutionary new robotic design that is light-weight, energy-efficient, robust to failures, capable of unique modes of locomotion, impact tolerant, and compliant (reducing damage between the robot and its environment). Unfortunately robots built from tensegrity structures are difficult to control with traditional methods due to their oscillatory nature, nonlinear coupling between components and overall complexity. Fortunately this formidable control challenge can be overcome through the use of evolutionary algorithms. In this paper we show that evolutionary algorithms can be used to efficiently control a ball-shaped tensegrity robot. Experimental results performed with a variety of evolutionary algorithms in a detailed soft-body physics simulator show that a centralized evolutionary algorithm performs 400 percent better than a hand-coded solution, while the multi-agent evolution performs 800 percent better. In addition, evolution is able to discover diverse control solutions (both crawling and rolling) that are robust against structural failures and can be adapted to a wide range of energy and actuation constraints. These successful controls will form the basis for building high-performance tensegrity robots in the near future.

  5. Wireframe and tensegrity DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Simmel, Stephanie S; Nickels, Philipp C; Liedl, Tim

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Not only can triangulated wireframe network and tensegrity design be found in architecture, but it is also essential for the stability and organization of biological matter. Whether the scaffolding material is metal as in Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes and Kenneth Snelson's floating compression sculptures or proteins like actin or spectrin making up the cytoskeleton of biological cells, wireframe and tensegrity construction can provide great stability while minimizing the material required. Given the mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA, it is not surprising to find many variants of wireframe and tensegrity constructions in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology, in which structures of almost arbitrary shape can be built with nanometer precision. The success of DNA self-assembly relies on the well-controlled hybridization of complementary DNA strands. Consequently, understanding the fundamental physical properties of these molecules is essential. Many experiments have shown that double-stranded DNA (in its most commonly occurring helical form, the B-form) behaves in a first approximation like a relatively stiff cylindrical beam with a persistence length of many times the length of its building blocks, the base pairs. However, it is harder to assign a persistence length to single-stranded DNA. Here, normally the Kuhn length is given, a measure that describes the length of individual rigid segments in a freely jointed chain. This length is on the order of a few nucleotides. Two immediate and important consequences arise from this high flexibility: single-stranded DNA is almost always present in a coiled conformation, and it behaves, just like all flexible polymers in solution, as an entropic spring. In this Account, we review the relation between the mechanical properties of DNA and design considerations for wireframe and tensegrity structures built from DNA. We illustrate various aspects of the successful evolution of DNA

  6. Deployment of a class 2 tensegrity boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Jean-Paul; Solari, Soren; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    Tensegrity structures are special truss structures composed of bars in compression and cables in tension. Most tensegrity structures under investigation, to date, have been of Class 1, where bars do not touch. In this article, however, we demonstrate the hardware implementation of a 2 stage symmetric Class 2 tensegrity structure, where bars do connect to each other at a pivot. The open loop control law for tendon lengths to accomplish the desired geometric reconfiguration are computed analytically. The velocity of the structure's height is chosen and reconfiguration is accomplished in a quasi-static manner, ignoring dynamic effects. The main goal of this research was to design, build, and test the capabilities of the Class 2 structure for deployment concepts and to further explore the possibilities of multiple stage structures using the same design and components.

  7. Optimization of class 2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns the optimal mass-to-stiffness ratio design of class-2 tensegrity towers. For different loading scenarios, the procedure seeks the topology and geometry of the structure that yields an optimal design satisfying common constraints. The domain of feasible tensegrity geometries is defined by imposing tensegrity equilibrium conditions on both unloaded and loaded structure. Remaining constraints include strength constraints for all elements of the structure and buckling constraints for bars. The symmetry of the design is imposed by restricting the domain of geometric variables and element parameters. The static response of the structure is computed by using a nonlinear large displacement model. The problem is cast in the form of a nonlinear program. The influence of material parameters on the optimal shape of the structure is investigated.

  8. Computational model for the cell-mechanical response of the osteocyte cytoskeleton based on self-stabilizing tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Kardas, Dieter; Nackenhorst, Udo; Balzani, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which mechanical stimulation on osteocytes results in biochemical signals that initiate the remodeling process inside living bone tissue is largely unknown. Even the type of stimulation acting on these cells is not yet clearly identified. However, the cytoskeleton of osteocytes is suggested to play a major role in the mechanosensory process due to the direct connection to the nucleus. In this paper, a computational approach to model and simulate the cell structure of osteocytes based on self-stabilizing tensegrity structures is suggested. The computational model of the cell consists of the major components with respect to mechanical aspects: the integrins that connect the cell with the extracellular bone matrix, and different types of protein fibers (microtubules and intermediate filaments) that form the cytoskeleton, the membrane-cytoskeleton (microfilaments), the nucleus and the centrosome. The proposed geometrical cell models represent the cell in its physiological environment which is necessary in order to give a statement on the cell behavior in vivo. Studies on the mechanical response of osteocytes after physiological loading and in particular the mechanical response of the nucleus show that the load acting on the nucleus is rising with increasing deformation applied to the integrins. PMID:22527364

  9. A Multimodular Tensegrity Model of an Actin Stress Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yaozhi; Xu, Xian; Lele, Tanmay; Kumar, Sanjay; Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile bundles in the cytoskeleton that stabilize cell structure by exerting traction forces on extracellular matrix. Individual stress fibers are molecular bundles composed of parallel actin and myosin filaments linked by various actin-binding proteins, which are organized end-on-end in a sarcomere-like pattern within an elongated three-dimensional network. While measurements of single stress fibers in living cells show that they behave like tensed viscoelastic fibers, precisely how this mechanical behavior arises from this complex supramolecular arrangement of protein components remains unclear. Here we show that computationally modeling a stress fiber as a multi-modular tensegrity network can predict several key behaviors of stress fibers measured in living cells, including viscoelastic retraction, fiber splaying after severing, non-uniform contraction, and elliptical strain of a puncture wound within the fiber. The tensegrity model also can explain how they simultaneously experience passive tension and generate active contraction forces; in contrast, a tensed cable net model predicts some, but not all, of these properties. Thus, tensegrity models may provide a useful link between molecular and cellular scale mechanical behaviors, and represent a new handle on multi-scale modeling of living materials. PMID:18632107

  10. Design and control of compliant tensegrity robots through simulation and hardware validation

    PubMed Central

    Caluwaerts, Ken; Despraz, Jérémie; Işçen, Atıl; Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Schrauwen, Benjamin; SunSpiral, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the role of tensegrity structures in biological systems and their application to robotics, the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, USA, has developed and validated two software environments for the analysis, simulation and design of tensegrity robots. These tools, along with new control methodologies and the modular hardware components developed to validate them, are presented as a system for the design of actuated tensegrity structures. As evidenced from their appearance in many biological systems, tensegrity (‘tensile–integrity’) structures have unique physical properties that make them ideal for interaction with uncertain environments. Yet, these characteristics make design and control of bioinspired tensegrity robots extremely challenging. This work presents the progress our tools have made in tackling the design and control challenges of spherical tensegrity structures. We focus on this shape since it lends itself to rolling locomotion. The results of our analyses include multiple novel control approaches for mobility and terrain interaction of spherical tensegrity structures that have been tested in simulation. A hardware prototype of a spherical six-bar tensegrity, the Reservoir Compliant Tensegrity Robot, is used to empirically validate the accuracy of simulation. PMID:24990292

  11. Design and control of compliant tensegrity robots through simulation and hardware validation.

    PubMed

    Caluwaerts, Ken; Despraz, Jérémie; Işçen, Atıl; Sabelhaus, Andrew P; Bruce, Jonathan; Schrauwen, Benjamin; SunSpiral, Vytas

    2014-09-01

    To better understand the role of tensegrity structures in biological systems and their application to robotics, the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, USA, has developed and validated two software environments for the analysis, simulation and design of tensegrity robots. These tools, along with new control methodologies and the modular hardware components developed to validate them, are presented as a system for the design of actuated tensegrity structures. As evidenced from their appearance in many biological systems, tensegrity ('tensile-integrity') structures have unique physical properties that make them ideal for interaction with uncertain environments. Yet, these characteristics make design and control of bioinspired tensegrity robots extremely challenging. This work presents the progress our tools have made in tackling the design and control challenges of spherical tensegrity structures. We focus on this shape since it lends itself to rolling locomotion. The results of our analyses include multiple novel control approaches for mobility and terrain interaction of spherical tensegrity structures that have been tested in simulation. A hardware prototype of a spherical six-bar tensegrity, the Reservoir Compliant Tensegrity Robot, is used to empirically validate the accuracy of simulation. PMID:24990292

  12. Tensegrity and mechanoregulation: from skeleton to cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate how mechanical stresses that are applied to the whole organism are transmitted to individual cells and transduced into a biochemical response. DESIGN: In this article, we describe fundamental design principles that are used to stabilize the musculoskeletal system at many different size scales and show that these design features are embodied in one particular form of architecture that is known as tensegrity. RESULTS: Tensegrity structures are characterized by use of continuous tension and local compression; architecture, prestress (internal stress prior to application of external force), and triangulation play the most critical roles in terms of determining their mechanical stability. In living organisms, use of a hierarchy of tensegrity networks both optimizes structural efficiency and provides a mechanism to mechanically couple the parts with the whole: mechanical stresses applied at the macroscale result in structural rearrangements at the cell and molecular level. CONCLUSION: Due to use of tensegrity architecture, mechanical stress is concentrated and focused on signal transducing molecules that physically associate with cell surface molecules that anchor cells to extracellular matrix, such as integrins, and with load-bearing elements within the internal cytoskeleton and nucleus. Mechanochemical transduction may then proceed through local stress-dependent changes in molecular mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics within the cell. In this manner, the entire cellular response to stress may be orchestrated and tuned by altering the prestress in the cell, just as changing muscular tone can alter mechanical stability and structural coordination throughout the whole musculoskeletal system.

  13. Tensegrity-Based Mechanosensing from Macro to Micro

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    This article is a summary of a lecture on cellular mechanotransduction that was presented at a symposium on “Cardiac Mechano-Electric Feedback and Arrhythmias” that convened at Oxford, England in April 2007. Although critical mechanosensitive molecules and cellular components, such as integrins, stretch-activated ion channels, and cytoskeletal filaments, have been shown to contribute to the response by which cells convert mechanical signals into a biochemical response, little is known about how they function in the structural context of living cells, tissues and organs to produce orchestrated changes in cell behavior in response to stress. Here, studies are reviewed that suggest our bodies use structural hierarchies (systems within systems) composed of interconnected extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal networks that span from the macroscale to the nanoscale to focus stresses on specific mechanotransducer molecules. A key feature of these networks is that they are in a state of isometric tension (i.e., experience a tensile prestress), which ensures that various molecular-scale mechanochemical transduction mechanisms proceed simultaneously and produce a concerted response. These features of living architecture are the same principles that govern tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, and mathematical models based on tensegrity are beginning to provide new and useful descriptions of living materials, including mammalian cells. This article reviews how the use of tensegrity at multiple size scales in our bodies guides mechanical force transfer from the macro to the micro, as well as how it facilitates conversion of mechanical signals into changes in ion flux, molecular binding kinetics, signal transduction, gene transcription, cell fate switching and developmental patterning. PMID:18406455

  14. Integrins, tensegrity, and mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Physical forces, such as those due to gravity, play an important role in tissue development and remodeling. Yet, little is known about how individual cells sense mechanical signals or how they transduce them into a chemical response. Rather than listing the numerous signal pathways that have been found to be sensitive to mechanical stimulation, we need to place potential molecular signaling mechanisms within the context of the entire cell. The model presented is based on the concept that cells use tensegrity architecture to organize their cytoskeleton and stabilize their form. Studies with stick and string tensegrity cell models predict that living cells are hard-wired to respond immediately to external mechanical stresses. This hard-wiring exists in the form of discrete cytoskeletal filament networks that mechanically couple specific cell surface receptors, such as integrins, to nuclear matrix scaffolds and to potential transducing molecules that physically associate with the cytoskeleton. If these signaling molecules do function in a "solid-state", then mechanical stresses may be transduced into biochemical responses through force-dependent changes in cytoskeletal geometry or through local alterations in thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. Changes in cytoskeletal tension (prestress) also may play a role in signal amplification and adaptation. Recent experimental results are described which provide direct support for the tensegrity theory.

  15. Design and Control of Compliant Tensegrity Robots Through Simulation and Hardware Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caluwaerts, Ken; Despraz, Jeremie; Iscen, Atil; Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Sunspiral, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the role of tensegrity structures in biological systems and their application to robotics, the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab at NASA Ames Research Center has developed and validated two different software environments for the analysis, simulation, and design of tensegrity robots. These tools, along with new control methodologies and the modular hardware components developed to validate them, are presented as a system for the design of actuated tensegrity structures. As evidenced from their appearance in many biological systems, tensegrity ("tensile-integrity") structures have unique physical properties which make them ideal for interaction with uncertain environments. Yet these characteristics, such as variable structural compliance, and global multi-path load distribution through the tension network, make design and control of bio-inspired tensegrity robots extremely challenging. This work presents the progress in using these two tools in tackling the design and control challenges. The results of this analysis includes multiple novel control approaches for mobility and terrain interaction of spherical tensegrity structures. The current hardware prototype of a six-bar tensegrity, code-named ReCTeR, is presented in the context of this validation.

  16. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  17. Numerical simulation of turbulence over tensegrity fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    In this research we aim to reduce turbulent skin friction by designing and optimizing tensegrity fabrics. Such fabrics form a new class of compliant surfaces consisting of a weave of both members under tension and members under compression. Boundary conditions on the flow are handled with a time-dependent coordinate transformation. We first note that, when designing the numerical algorithm for approximating the Navier-Stokes equation in the flow domain (with moving boundaries), special care (intrinsic differentiation of a contravariant vector) is needed to handle the temporal differentiation of the momentum term when using a contravariant formulation. A Cartesian-based formulation may also be used, and has proven to be more tractable in the 3D setting. The spectral DNS flow code is coupled with a tensegrity simulation code to compute the flow/structure interaction; recent simulation results will be presented. A complex-step derivative (CSD) technique may then be used to optimize the response characteristics of the tensegrity structure in order to minimize the drag at the flow/structure interface; this strategy will also be discussed.

  18. Stiffening response of a cellular tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    Wendling, S; Oddou, C; Isabey, D

    1999-02-01

    Living cells exhibit, as most biological tissues, a stiffening (strain-hardening) response which reflects the nonlinearity of the stress-strain relationship. Tensegrity structures have been proposed as a comprehensive model of such a cell's mechanical response. Based on a theoretical model of a 30-element tensegrity structure, we propose a quantitative analysis of its nonlinear mechanical behavior under static conditions and large deformations. This study provides theoretical foundation to the passage from large-scale tensegrity models to microscale living cells, as well as the comparison between results obtained in biological specimens of different sizes. We found two non-dimensional parameters (L*-normalized element length and T*-normalized elastic tension) which govern the mechanical response of the structure for three types of loading tested (extension, compression and shear). The linear strain-hardening is uniquely observed for extension but differed for the two other types of loading tested. The stiffening response of the theoretical model was compared and discussed with the living cells stiffening response observed by different methods (shear flow experiments, micromanipulation and magnetocytometry). PMID:10049624

  19. Tensegrity and its role in guiding engineering sciences in the development of bio-inspired materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, David M.; Chen, Er-Ping; Klein, Patrick A.

    2004-01-01

    Tensegrity is the word coined by Buckminster Fuller as a contraction of tensional integrity. A tensegrity system is established when a set of discontinuous compressive components interacts with a set of continuous tensile components to define a stable volume in space. Tensegrity structures are mechanically stable not because of the strength of individual members but because of the way the entire structure distributes and balances mechanical loads. Tensile forces naturally transmit themselves over the shortest distance between two points, so the members of a tensegrity system are precisely positioned to best withstand stress. Thus, tensegrity systems offer a maximum amount of strength for a given amount of material. Man-made structures have traditionally been designed to avoid developing large tensile stresses. In contrast, nature always uses a balance of tension and compression. Tensegrity principles apply at essentially every size-scale in the human body. Macroscopically, the bones that constitute our skeleton are pulled up against the force of gravity and stabilized in a vertical form by the pull of tensile muscles, tendons and ligaments. Microscopically, a tensegrity structure has been proposed for the skeleton of cells. This report contains the results of a feasibility study and literature survey to explore the potential of applying tensegrity principles in designing materials with desired functionalities. The goal is to assess if further study of the principles of tensegrity may be exploited as an avenue for producing new materials that have intrinsic capabilities for adapting to changing loads (self-healing), as with the ongoing reconstruction of living bone under loading. This study contains a collection of literature that has been categorized into the areas of structures, mathematics, mechanics, and, biology. The topics addressed in each area are discussed. Ultimately, we conclude that because tensegrity is fundamentally a description of structure, it may

  20. Hardware Design and Testing of SUPERball, A Modular Tensegrity Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Caluwaerts, Ken; Chen, Yangxin; Lu, Dizhou; Liu, Yuejia; Agogino, Adrian K.; SunSpiral, Vytas; Agogino, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a system of modular, autonomous "tensegrity end-caps" to enable the rapid exploration of untethered tensegrity robot morphologies and functions. By adopting a self-contained modular approach, different end-caps with various capabilities (such as peak torques, or motor speeds), can be easily combined into new tensegrity robots composed of rods, cables, and actuators of different scale (such as in length, mass, peak loads, etc). As a first step in developing this concept, we are in the process of designing and testing the end-caps for SUPERball (Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot), a project at the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab (DTRL) within NASA Ames's Intelligent Robotics Group. This work discusses the evolving design concepts and test results that have gone into the structural, mechanical, and sensing aspects of SUPERball. This representative tensegrity end-cap design supports robust and repeatable untethered mobility tests of the SUPERball, while providing high force, high displacement actuation, with a low-friction, compliant cabling system.

  1. Open-loop control of class-2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns open-loop control laws for reconfiguration of tensegrity towers. By postulating the control strategy as an equilibrium tracking control, very little control energy is required. Several different reconfiguration scenarios are possible for different string connectivity schemes. This includes unit radius control, twist angle control and truncation parameter control. All these control laws allow a nonuniform distribution of the control parameters among units. By defining a wave--like reference signal and injecting it in the open--loop control law, we demonstrate the concept of self--propelled tensegrity structure that are capable of locomotion.

  2. State Estimation for Tensegrity Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caluwaerts, Ken; Bruce, Jonathan; Friesen, Jeffrey M.; Sunspiral, Vytas

    2016-01-01

    Tensegrity robots are a class of compliant robots that have many desirable traits when designing mass efficient systems that must interact with uncertain environments. Various promising control approaches have been proposed for tensegrity systems in simulation. Unfortunately, state estimation methods for tensegrity robots have not yet been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of a state estimator for tensegrity robots. This state estimator will enable existing and future control algorithms to transfer from simulation to hardware. Our approach is based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and combines inertial measurements, ultra wideband time-of-flight ranging measurements, and actuator state information. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method on the SUPERball, a tensegrity based planetary exploration robotic prototype. In particular, we conduct tests for evaluating both the robot's success in estimating global position in relation to fixed ranging base stations during rolling maneuvers as well as local behavior due to small-amplitude deformations induced by cable actuation.

  3. Trusses Of Tensegrity Type In A Concept Of Train Station Renovation In Żary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechocka, Paulina

    2015-09-01

    The first railway station in Żary was built in 1843 in Germany. After the Second World War and years of socialism in Poland the meaning of railway decreased and its technical condition deteriorated. Now the building needs renovation and change of function. Tensegrity structures may be useful in renovation of platforms shelter. They are strut and tie construction, in which there is self-stabilization between compressed and tensioned elements. Conception of new platform shelter is based on exemplary tensegrity module consist of three struts and nine cables (called "Simplex"). Tensegrity would make railway station more modern, but not cover its original elevation.

  4. Non linear behaviour of cell tensegrity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Conclusio, D.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2012-05-01

    Tensegrity models for the cytoskeleton structure of living cells is largely used nowadays for interpreting the biochemical response of living tissues to mechanical stresses. Microtubules, microfilaments and filaments are the microscopic cell counterparts of struts (microtubules) and cables (microfilaments and filaments) in the macroscopic world: the formers oppose to compression, the latters to tension, thus yielding an overall structure, light and highly deformable. Specific cell surface receptors, such as integrins, act as the coupling elements that transmit the outside mechanical stress state into the cell body. Reversible finite deformations of tensegrity structures have been widely demonstrated experimentally and in a number of living cell simulations. In the present paper, the bistability behaviour of two general models, the linear bar oscillator and the icosahedron, is studied, as they are both obtained from mathematical simulation, the former, and from larger scale experiments, the latter. The discontinuity in the frequency response of the oscillation amplitude and the lateral bending of the resonance curves are put in evidence, as it grows larger as the driving amplitude increases, respectively.

  5. A new topology of tensegrity towers with uniform force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Mauricio C.; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This work investigates the design of a new class of three dimensional tensegrity tower structures with nodes lying on a cylinder. The novel aspect of the proposed topology is the fact that all bars in all stages are oriented in the same way, clockwise or counterclockwise. We investigate the existence of conditions for static equilibrium of such towers with an arbitrary number of stages and uniform force distribution.

  6. Unstable-unit tensegrity plate: modeling and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, Ron; de Oliveira, Mauricio C.; Skelton, Robert E.

    2003-08-01

    A new topology for a prestressed tensegrity plate, the unstable-unit tensegrity plate (UUTP), is introduced, together with a detailed algorithm for its design. The plate is a truss made of strings (flexible elements) and bars (rigid elements), which are loaded in tension and compression, respectively, where bars do not touch each other. Given the outline dimensions of the desired plate, and the number of bars along the plate's width and length, the algorithm solves for the nodes' positions and the prestress forces that make a plate in equilibrium. This is done by solving a non-linear matrix equation via Newton's method. This equation reflects static equilibrium conditions. We've designed several such plates, proving the feasibility of the proposed topology and the effectiveness of its design algorithm. Two such plates are characterized in detail, both statically and dynamically (via simulation). The proposed algorithm may be extended to solve for other tensegrity structures having different topologies and/or different shapes. The UUTP may be used as a building block of many types of structures, both uncontrolled and controlled, either large-scale or miniature-scale.

  7. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  8. Design, modeling, and optimization of compliant tensegrity fabrics for the reduction of turbulent skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2003-07-01

    In this project, we have designed a new type of flexible surface, which we call a tensegrity fabric, and simulated the interaction of this flexible surface with a near-wall turbulent flow. The fabric is constructed by weaving together both members in tension (tendons) and members in compression (bars) to form a plate-class tensegrity structure, then covering this discrete flexible structure with a continuous flexible membrane. We have modeled the flow/structure interaction by coupling a spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code resolving the (continuous) turbulent flow system and an efficient structural dynamics code which simulates direclty the motion of the (discrete) extensive, small-scale, and interconnected tensegrity structure. The structural dynamics code used was developed by Prof. Robert Skelton's lab at UC San Diego. An immersed boundary method is used to capture the effect of the moving boundary in the DNS, and a simple tessellation strategy is used to lump the distributed fluid forces (skin friction and pressure) acting on the membrane onto the nearby nodes of the tensegrity structure. Our ultimate goal is to use this new simulation tool to optimize the design of the tensegrity structure (specifically, the orientation, stiffness, mass, and damping of each of the individual tendons and bars in the unit cell upon which the tensegrity structure is based). Our objective in this optimization is to tune the compliance properties of the fabric in such a way as to reduce the skin-friction drag induced at teh flow/structure interface by weakening the vortices near the wall in the overlying turbulent flow.

  9. Design of Mao Tensegrity Triangles -- Successful Prediction of Stable DNA Nanostructures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, William B.; Kopatsch, Jens; Constantinou, Pamela E.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2006-03-01

    One of the most promising motifs for crystal formation is the tensegrity triangle first developed by Mao and co-workers. This structure consists of three duplex domains ``woven'' across each other. Because the three edges of the triangle are not coplanar, it can serve as a fundamentally three-dimensional motif. This nonplanarity, however, makes the design of tensegrity triangles more complicated than most of the other DNA motifs built to date. We present a geometry-based method for estimating the strain associated with various tensegrity triangle edge lengths. Experiments confirm that the predicted low-strain structures form stably, while structures with strain larger than about 5% tend to form multimers easily.

  10. Tensegrity and Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Anyone who is skilled in the art of physical therapy knows that the mechanical properties, behavior and movement of our bodies are as important for human health as chemicals and genes. However, only recently have scientists and physicians begun to appreciate the key role that mechanical forces play in biological control at the molecular and cellular levels. This article provides a brief overview of a lecture presented at the 1st International Fascia Research Congress that convened at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA on October 4, 2007. (see figure 1) In this lecture, I described what we have learned over the past thirty years as a result of our research focused on the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry and gene expression – a process called “mechanotransduction”. This work has revealed that molecules, cells, tissues, organs, and our entire bodies use “tensegrity” architecture to mechanically stabilize their shape, and to seamlessly integrate structure and function at all size scales. Through use of this tension-dependent building system, mechanical forces applied at the macroscale produce changes in biochemistry and gene expression within individual living cells. This structure-based system provides a mechanistic basis to explain how application of physical therapies might influence cell and tissue physiology. PMID:19083675

  11. Efficient dynamic models of tensegrity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Robert

    2009-03-01

    The multi-body dynamics appear in a new form, as a matrix differential equation, rather than the traditional vector differential equation. The model has a constant mass matrix, and the equations are non-minimal. A specific focus of this paper is tensegrity systems. A tensegrity system requires prestress for stabilization of the configuration of rigid bodies and tensile members. This paper provides an efficient model for both static and dynamic behavior of such systems, specialized for the case when the rigid bodies are axi-symmetric rods.

  12. Optimization of a tensegrity wing for biomimetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moored, Keith W., III; Taylor, Stuart A.; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2006-03-01

    Current attempts to build fast, efficient, and maneuverable underwater vehicles have looked to nature for inspiration. However, they have all been based on traditional propulsive techniques, i.e. rotary motors. In the current study a promising and potentially revolutionary approach is taken that overcomes the limitations of these traditional methods-morphing structure concepts with integrated actuation and sensing. Inspiration for this work comes from the manta ray (Manta birostris) and other batoid fish. These creatures are highly maneuverable but are also able to cruise at high speeds over long distances. In this paper, the structural foundation for the biomimetic morphing wing is a tensegrity structure. A preliminary procedure is presented for developing morphing tensegrity structures that include actuating elements. A shape optimization method is used that determines actuator placement and actuation amount necessary to achieve the measured biological displacement field of a ray. Lastly, an experimental manta ray wing is presented that measures the static and dynamic pressure field acting on the ray's wings during a normal flapping cycle.

  13. Learning tensegrity locomotion using open-loop control signals and coevolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Iscen, Atil; Caluwaerts, Ken; Bruce, Jonathan; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2015-01-01

    Soft robots offer many advantages over traditional rigid robots. However, soft robots can be difficult to control with standard control methods. Fortunately, evolutionary algorithms can offer an elegant solution to this problem. Instead of creating controls to handle the intricate dynamics of these robots, we can simply evolve the controls using a simulation to provide an evaluation function. In this article, we show how such a control paradigm can be applied to an emerging field within soft robotics: robots based on tensegrity structures. We take the model of the Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball), an icosahedron tensegrity robot under production at NASA Ames Research Center, develop a rolling locomotion algorithm, and study the learned behavior using an accurate model of the SUPERball simulated in the NASA Tensegrity Robotics Toolkit. We first present the historical-average fitness-shaping algorithm for coevolutionary algorithms to speed up learning while favoring robustness over optimality. Second, we use a distributed control approach by coevolving open-loop control signals for each controller. Being simple and distributed, open-loop controllers can be readily implemented on SUPERball hardware without the need for sensor information or precise coordination. We analyze signals of different complexities and frequencies. Among the learned policies, we take one of the best and use it to analyze different aspects of the rolling gait, such as lengths, tensions, and energy consumption. We also discuss the correlation between the signals controlling different parts of the tensegrity robot. PMID:25951199

  14. New strategies for optimization of compliant tensegrity surfaces for drag reduction in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Bewley, T. R.

    2002-11-01

    The present project is inspired by two observations from nature: 1) the incredible strength of spider fibers (derived essentially from a tensegrity-based configuration of proteins), and 2) the efficient swimming motion of dolphins (perhaps derived in part from the compliant nature of their skin). Motivated by such observations, we are exploring a new design for a tensegrity-based ``fabric'' consisting of a weave of both members in tension and members designed to support compressive loads. In particular, we are attempting to optimize the surface compliance of such a fabric, that is, the response of the surface of the fabric to externally-applied friction and pressure forces, in order to reduce the drag induced by an overlying turbulent flow at the flow/structure interface. As the first stage of the research, we developed the software simulating the interaction of the two-part system. Direct numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of the flow part. To account for the moving walls, we use an immersed-boundary technique which simulates the presence of a moving boundary. In collaboration with another research group, we developed object-oriented software for computation of the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric part. The two codes written in two different languages run in parallel and communicate data at each time step. In this presentation, we will outline the numerical method used, present recent simulation results demonstrating the flow/surface interaction, and outline our ongoing efforts to optimize the compliance properties of the tensegrity fabric.

  15. Tensegrity finite element models of mechanical tests of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Bursa, Jiri; Lebis, Radek; Holata, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of a vascular smooth muscle cell is based on models published recently; it comprehends elements representing cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, and a complex tensegrity structure representing the cytoskeleton. In contrast to previous models of eucaryotic cells, this tensegrity structure consists of several parts. Its external and internal parts number 30 struts, 60 cables each, and their nodes are interconnected by 30 radial members; these parts represent cortical, nuclear and deep cytoskeletons, respectively. This arrangement enables us to simulate load transmission from the extracellular space to the nucleus or centrosome via membrane receptors (focal adhesions); the ability of the model was tested by simulation of some mechanical tests with isolated vascular smooth muscle cells. Although material properties of components defined on the basis of the mechanical tests are ambiguous, modelling of different types of tests has shown the ability of the model to simulate substantial global features of cell behaviour, e.g. "action at a distance effect" or the global load-deformation response of the cell under various types of loading. Based on computational simulations, the authors offer a hypothesis explaining the scatter of experimental results of indentation tests. PMID:22508025

  16. Design and Evolution of a Modular Tensegrity Robot Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Jonathan; Caluwaerts, Ken; Iscen, Atil; Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; SunSpiral, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is developing a compliant modular tensegrity robotic platform for planetary exploration. In this paper we present the design and evolution of the platform's main hardware component, an untethered, robust tensegrity strut, with rich sensor feedback and cable actuation. Each strut is a complete robot, and multiple struts can be combined together to form a wide range of complex tensegrity robots. Our current goal for the tensegrity robotic platform is the development of SUPERball, a 6-strut icosahedron underactuated tensegrity robot aimed at dynamic locomotion for planetary exploration rovers and landers, but the aim is for the modular strut to enable a wide range of tensegrity morphologies. SUPERball is a second generation prototype, evolving from the tensegrity robot ReCTeR, which is also a modular, lightweight, highly compliant 6-strut tensegrity robot that was used to validate our physics based NASA Tensegrity Robot Toolkit (NTRT) simulator. Many hardware design parameters of the SUPERball were driven by locomotion results obtained in our validated simulator. These evolutionary explorations helped constrain motor torque and speed parameters, along with strut and string stress. As construction of the hardware has finalized, we have also used the same evolutionary framework to evolve controllers that respect the built hardware parameters.

  17. Accurate simulation of near-wall turbulence over a compliant tensegrity fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents a new class of compliant surfaces, dubbed tensegrity fabrics, for the problem of reducing the drag induced by near-wall turbulent flows. The substructure upon which this compliant surface is built is based on the "tensegrity" structural paradigm, and is formed as a stable pretensioned network of compressive members ("bars") interconnected by tensile members ("tendons"). Compared with existing compliant surface studies, most of which are based on spring-supported plates or membranes, tensegrity fabrics appear to be better configured to respond to the shear stress fluctuations (in addition to the pressure fluctuations) generated by near-wall turbulence. As a result, once the several parameters affecting the compliance characteristics of the structure are tuned appropriately, the tensegrity fabric might exhibit an improved capacity for dampening the fluctuations of near-wall turbulence, thereby reducing drag. This paper improves our previous work (SPIE Paper 5049-57) and uses a 3D time-dependent coordinate transformation in the flow simulations to account for the motion of the channel walls, and the Cartesian components of the velocity are used as the flow variables. For the spatial discretization, a dealiased pseudospectral scheme is used in the homogeneous directions and a second-order finite difference scheme is used in the wall-normal direction. The code is first validated with several benchmark results that are available in the published literature for flows past both stationary and nonstationary walls. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows at Re_tau=150 over the compliant tensegrity fabric are then presented. It is found that, when the stiffness, mass, damping, and orientation of the members of the the unit cell defining the tensegrity fabric are selected appropriately, the near-wall statistics of the turbulence are altered significantly. The flow/structure interface is found to form streamwise-travelling waves reminiscent of those

  18. On the mechanical modeling of the extreme softening/stiffening response of axially loaded tensegrity prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, Fernando; Carpentieri, Gerardo; Amendola, Ada

    2015-01-01

    We study the geometrically nonlinear behavior of uniformly compressed tensegrity prisms through fully elastic and rigid-elastic models. The given models predict a variety of mechanical behaviors in the regime of large displacements, including an extreme stiffening-type response, already known in the literature, and a newly discovered, extreme softening behavior. The latter may lead to a snap buckling event producing an axial collapse of the structure. The switching from one mechanical regime to another depends on the aspect ratio of the structure, the magnitude of the applied prestress, and the material properties of the constituent elements. We discuss potential mechanical and acoustic applications of such behaviors, which are related to the design and manufacture of tensegrity lattices and innovative metamaterials.

  19. Life on the wire: on tensegrity and force balance in cells.

    PubMed

    Galli, Carlo; Guizzardi, Stefano; Passeri, Giovanni; Macaluso, Guido Maria; Scandroglio, Renato

    2005-04-01

    Since cell mechanics has attracted the attention of a growing number of researchers, several models have been proposed to explain cell mechanical behavior, among which tensegrity is certainly the most convincing one. Originally developed by the architect Buckminster Fuller, tensegrity structures are based on the presence of discontinuous compression elements that balance the force generated by continuous tension elements, thus reaching an equilibrium that is completely independent of gravity. This model is a useful tool to predict cell spreading, motility and especially mechanotransduction, i.e. the capability to transform mechanical stresses into biochemical responses, a key process in homeostasis of many tissues that must continuously withstand mechanical forces, like bone, but which is still poorly understood. PMID:16116819

  20. Nonlinear control of non-minimal tensegrity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, R.; Mirats-Tur, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    The simplest form for the dynamics of constrained tensegrity system is a non-minimal realization. This paper gives a control law to force the tensegrity system to modify its shape to a pre-specified shape, using the smallest control force. The approach is similar to a multi-Lyapunov approach. We create a vector of Lyapunov functions, chosen to force the desired shape change, as well as other performance properties that may be selected. This vector is forced by the control system to satisfy a linear stable differential equation. Some tensegrity examples illustrate the ideas.

  1. A microstructural approach to cytoskeletal mechanics based on tensegrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Wang, N.; Butler, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells are commonly described in terms of the laws of continuum mechanics. The purpose of this report is to consider the implications of an alternative approach that emphasizes the discrete nature of stress bearing elements in the cell and is based on the known structural properties of the cytoskeleton. We have noted previously that tensegrity architecture seems to capture essential qualitative features of cytoskeletal shape distortion in adherent cells (Ingber, 1993a; Wang et al., 1993). Here we extend those qualitative notions into a formal microstructural analysis. On the basis of that analysis we attempt to identify unifying principles that might underlie the shape stability of the cytoskeleton. For simplicity, we focus on a tensegrity structure containing six rigid struts interconnected by 24 linearly elastic cables. Cables carry initial tension ("prestress") counterbalanced by compression of struts. Two cases of interconnectedness between cables and struts are considered: one where they are connected by pin-joints, and the other where the cables run through frictionless loops at the junctions. At the molecular level, the pinned structure may represent the case in which different cytoskeletal filaments are cross-linked whereas the looped structure represents the case where they are free to slip past one another. The system is then subjected to uniaxial stretching. Using the principal of virtual work, stretching force vs. extension and structural stiffness vs. stretching force relationships are calculated for different prestresses. The stiffness is found to increase with increasing prestress and, at a given prestress, to increase approximately linearly with increasing stretching force. This behavior is consistent with observations in living endothelial cells exposed to shear stresses (Wang & Ingber, 1994). At a given prestress, the pinned structure is found to be stiffer than the looped one, a result consistent with data on

  2. Interaction of a turbulent channel flow with a compliant tensegrity fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    A non-trivial influence of the compliant surface on the statistics of near-wall turbulence has been found by direct numerical simulations of a channel flow at Re_τ=150 passing over a ``tensegrity fabric'' surface. Inspired from nature, this compliant surface model is special truss system having tensile members distinguished from the compressive members, as we have presented at previous APS meetings. Validated by a variety of flows, a pseudospectral/finite-difference flow solver with a 3D coordinate transformation is coupled with a C++ code calculating the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric to simulate the flow/structure interaction. Simulation results show that, when the structure has high stiffness and damping, the flow acts as if the interface were a solid flat wall. When the structure's stiffness and damping are reduced, it may resonate under the excitation of the flow disturbances. The resonating flow/structure interface forms a streamwise wave reminiscent of air-water interface but traveling at a much faster phase speed, a few times of the viscous velocity u_τ. Although the wave's amplitude is small, y_w^+≈ 2, it changes the near-wall turbulence significantly. Drag on the compliant surface is increased by about 17% where form drag accounts for only one third of the drag increase due to the small wall deformation. Various domain sizes have been tried in order to make sure that the structure's vibration mode is correct.

  3. Tensile-integrity structural concepts for the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaroya, H.; Ettouney, M.

    This paper suggests the use of tension cable structures of a particular type, Tensegrity structures, for a lunar base. Tensegric shells can be a system of bars and cable net. The shell attains its topology and stiffness when the bars are prestressed against the cable net. In its final configuration, no bar is in contact with another. Tensegric shells and other configurations are self sustaining. Unlike inflatable structures, they do not depend on internal pressurization for their integrity.

  4. How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model.

    PubMed

    De Santis, G; Lennon, A B; Boschetti, F; Verhegghe, B; Verdonck, P; Prendergast, P J

    2011-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell attaches and spreads on substrates, whether it is the extracellular matrix naturally produced by the cell itself, or artificial materials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds. Attachment and spreading require the cell to apply forces in the nN range to the substrate via adhesion sites, and these forces are balanced by the elastic response of the substrate. This mechanical interaction is one determinant of cell morphology and, ultimately, cell phenotype. In this paper we use a finite element model of a cell, with a tensegrity structure to model the cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules, to explore the way cells sense the stiffness of the substrate and thereby adapt to it. To support the computational results, an analytical 1D model is developed for comparison. We find that (i) the tensegrity hypothesis of the cytoskeleton is sufficient to explain the matrix-elasticity sensing, (ii) cell sensitivity is not constant but has a bell-shaped distribution over the physiological matrix-elasticity range, and (iii) the position of the sensitivity peak over the matrix-elasticity range depends on the cytoskeletal structure and in particular on the F-actin organisation. Our model suggests that F-actin reorganisation observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to change of matrix elasticity is a structural-remodelling process that shifts the sensitivity peak towards the new value of matrix elasticity. This finding discloses a potential regulatory role of scaffold stiffness for cell differentiation. PMID:22048898

  5. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingber, Donald E.; Wang, Ning; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2014-04-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life—from individual molecules to whole living organisms—to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level.

  6. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems.

    PubMed

    Ingber, Donald E; Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2014-04-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life—from individual molecules to whole living organisms—to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level. PMID:24695087

  7. Tensegrity, cellular biophysics, and the mechanics of living systems

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.; Wang, Ning; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2014-01-01

    The recent convergence between physics and biology has led many physicists to enter the fields of cell and developmental biology. One of the most exciting areas of interest has been the emerging field of mechanobiology that centers on how cells control their mechanical properties, and how physical forces regulate cellular biochemical responses, a process that is known as mechanotransduction. In this article, we review the central role that tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture, which depends on tensile prestress for its mechanical stability, plays in biology. We describe how tensional prestress is a critical governor of cell mechanics and function, and how use of tensegrity by cells contributes to mechanotransduction. Theoretical tensegrity models are also described that predict both quantitative and qualitative behaviors of living cells, and these theoretical descriptions are placed in context of other physical models of the cell. In addition, we describe how tensegrity is used at multiple size scales in the hierarchy of life — from individual molecules to whole living organisms — to both stabilize three-dimensional form and to channel forces from the macroscale to the nanoscale, thereby facilitating mechanochemical conversion at the molecular level. PMID:24695087

  8. System Design and Locomotion of Superball, an Untethered Tensegrity Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Caluwaerts, Ken; Manovi, Pavlo; Firoozi, Roya Fallah; Dobi, Sarah; Agogino, Alice M.; Sunspiral, Vytas

    2015-01-01

    The Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball) is an ongoing project within NASA Ames Research Center's Intelligent Robotics Group and the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab (DTRL). The current SUPERball is the first full prototype of this tensegrity robot platform, eventually destined for space exploration missions. This work, building on prior published discussions of individual components, presents the fully-constructed robot. Various design improvements are discussed, as well as testing results of the sensors and actuators that illustrate system performance. Basic low-level motor position controls are implemented and validated against sensor data, which show SUPERball to be uniquely suited for highly dynamic state trajectory tracking. Finally, SUPERball is shown in a simple example of locomotion. This implementation of a basic motion primitive shows SUPERball in untethered control.

  9. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009
    ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  10. The medium of haptic perception: a tensegrity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Michael T; Fonseca, Sérgio T

    2014-01-01

    For any given animal, the sources of mechanical disturbances inducing tissue deformation define environment from the perspective of the animal's haptic perceptual system. The system's achievements include perceiving the body, attachments to the body, and the surfaces and substances adjacent to the body. Among the perceptual systems, it stands alone in having no defined medium. There is no articulated functional equivalent to air and water, the media that make possible the energy transmissions and diffusions underpinning the other perceptual systems. To identify the haptic system's medium the authors focus on connective tissue and the conjunction of muscular, connective tissue net, and skeletal (MCS) as the body's proper characterization. The challenge is a biophysical formulation of MCS as a continuum that, similar to air and water, is homogeneous and isotropic. The authors hypothesized a multifractal tensegrity (MFT) with the shape and stability of the constituents of each scale, from individual cell to whole body, derivative of continuous tension and discontinuous compression. Each component tensegrity of MFT is an adjustive-receptive unit, and the array of tensions in MFT is information about MCS. The authors extend the MFT hypothesis to body-brain linkages, and to limb perception phenomena attendant to amputation, vibration, anesthesia, neuropathy, and microgravity. PMID:24628057

  11. Geometry of Prismatic Tensegrity Constructions Composed of Three and Four-strut Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejníková, Tatiana

    2014-11-01

    In the paper there is described geometry of double layer tensegrity constructions composed of prismatic cells with rhombic configuration of three or four strut bases so-called prismatic Tensegrity constructions. There are described bi-dimensional assemblies creating double layer grids of three or four-strut cells with a node-on-node junction. The grids can be planar, of one or two curvature constructions.

  12. Biomechanics and Biotensegrity: Study Method and Frequency Response of the Simplex and 3-bar-SVD Tensegrity Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Arenas, C.; Ghersi, I.; Miralles, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the frequency response of 3D tensegrity structures. These are structures that have been used, since the 80’s, to model biological systems of different scales. This fact led to the origin of the field of biotensegrity, which includes biomechanics as a natural field of application. In this work: a) A simple method for the analysis of frequency response of different nodes in 3D tensegrity structures was set up and tuned. This method is based on a video-analysis algorithm, which was applied to the structures, as they were vibrated along their axis of symmetry, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 60 Hz. b) Frequency-response analyses were performed, for the simplest 3D structure, the Simplex module, as well as for two towers, formed by stacking two and three Simplex modules, respectively. Resonant frequencies were detected for the Simplex module at (19.2±0.1) Hz and (50.2±0.1) Hz (the latter being an average of frequencies between homologous nodes). For the towers with two and three modules, each selected node presented a characteristic frequency response, modulated by their spatial placement in each model. Resonances for the two-stage tower were found at: (12±0.1) Hz; (16.2±0.1) Hz; (29.4±0.1) Hz and (37.2±0.1) Hz. For the tower with three Simplex modules, the main resonant frequencies were found at (12.0±0.1) Hz and (21.0±0.1) Hz. Results show that the proposed method is adequate for the study (2D) of any 3D tensegrity structure, with the potential of being generalized to the study of oscillations in three dimensions. A growing complexity and variability in the frequency response of the nodes was observed, as modules were added to the structures. These findings were compared to those found in the available literature.

  13. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanical models for cytoskeletal assembly: Towards understanding tensegrity in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-10-01

    The cytoskeleton is not an equilibrium structure. To develop theoretical tools to investigate such nonequilibrium assemblies, we study a statistical physical model of motorized spherical particles. Though simple, it captures some of the key nonequilibrium features of the cytoskeletal networks. Variational solutions of the many-body master equation for a set of motorized particles accounts for their thermally induced Brownian motion as well as for the motorized kicking of the structural elements. These approximations yield stability limits for crystalline phases and for frozen amorphous structures. The methods allow one to compute the effects of nonequilibrium behavior and adhesion (effective cross-linking) on the mechanical stability of localized phases as a function of density, adhesion strength, and temperature. We find that nonequilibrium noise does not necessarily destabilize mechanically organized structures. The nonequilibrium forces strongly modulate the phase behavior and have comparable effect as the adhesion due to cross-linking. Modeling transitions such as these allows the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton to rapidly and adaptively change. The present model provides a statistical mechanical underpinning for a tensegrity picture of the cytoskeleton.

  14. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  15. Activities report in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    A stiffened plate macro-element; a macro-element of elastic pipe filled with liquid; modeling of the structural fuzzy in medium frequency computations; unsteady aerodynamic forces on jet engine air intakes; prediction of buffeting vibrations from unsteady pressure measurements taken in a wind tunnel; aeroelastic behavior of fan blades in the unstarted supersonic domain; wind tunnel study of a helicopter blade stall control; computer-controlled generator of turbulence in a wind tunnel; atmospheric turbulence statistics; adaptation of Neuber's theory to viscoplastic stress concentration; computation of a jet engine disk/flange assembly; and analysis of the damage done to a perforated composite plate under biaxial monotonic and cyclic loading are described.

  16. Spectacularly robust! Tensegrity principle explains the mechanical strength of the avian lung.

    PubMed

    Maina, J N

    2007-01-15

    Among the air-breathing vertebrates, the respiratory system of birds, the lung-air sac system, is remarkably complex and singularly efficient. The most perplexing structural property of the avian lung pertains to its exceptional mechanical strength, especially that of the minuscule terminal respiratory units, the air- and the blood capillaries. In different species of birds, the air capillaries range in diameter from 3 to 20 micro m: the blood capillaries are in all cases relatively smaller. Over and above their capacity to withstand enormous surface tension forces at the air-tissue interface, the air capillaries resist mechanical compression (parabronchial distending pressure) as high as 20 cm H(2)O (2 kPa). The blood capillaries tolerate a pulmonary arterial vascular pressure of 24.1 mmHg (3.2 kPa) and vascular resistance of 22.5 mmHg (3 kPa) without distending. The design of the avian respiratory system fundamentally stems from the rigidity (strength) of the lung. The gas exchanger (the lung) is uncoupled from the ventilator (the air sacs), allowing the lung (the paleopulmonic parabronchi) to be ventilated continuously and unidirectionally by synchronized bellows like action of the air sacs. Since during the ventilation of the lung the air capillaries do not have to be distended (dilated), i.e., surface tension force does not have to be overcome (as would be the case if the lung was compliant), extremely intense subdivision of the exchange tissue was possible. Minuscule terminal respiratory units developed, producing a vast respiratory surface area in a limited lung volume. I make a case that a firm (rigid) rib cage, a lung tightly held by the ribs and the horizontal septum, a lung directly attached to the trunk, specially formed and compactly arranged parabronchi, intertwined atrial muscles, and tightly set air capillaries and blood capillaries form an integrated hierarchy of discrete network system of tension and compression, a tensegrity (tensional integrity

  17. FLPP NGL Structural Subsystems Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaredson, D.; Ramusat, G.; Appel, S.; Cardone, T.; Persson, J.; Baiocco, P.; Lavelle, F.; Bouilly, Th.

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP) is the basis for new paradigms, investigating the key elements, logic and roadmaps to prepare the development of the safe, reliable and low cost next European Launch Vehicle (LV) for access to space (dubbed NGL - Next Generation LV), with an initial operational capability mid-next decade. In addition to carry cargo to conventional GTO or SSO, the European NGL has to be flexible enough to cope with new pioneering institutional missions as well as the evolving commercial payloads market. This achievement is broached studying three main areas relevant to ELVs: System concepts, Propulsion and Core Technology During the preliminary design activity, a number of design alternatives concerning NGL main structural subsystems have been investigated. Technology is one of the ways to meet the NGL challenges to either improve the performances or to reduce the cost or both. The relevant requirements allow to steer a ‘top-down’ approach for their conception and to propose the most effective technologies. Furthermore, all these technology developments represent a significant ‘bottom-up’ approach investment and concern a large range of activities. The structural subsystems portfolio of the FLPP ‘Core Technology’ activity encompasses major cutting-edge challenges for maturation of the various subsystems leading to reduce overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic propellants, significantly reducing fabrication and operations cost, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of concurrent engineering methods will allow developments of performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost yielding to safe, low-risk technical approaches for a future development. Potential ability of these advanced structural LV technologies to satisfy the system requirements of the NGL and their current

  18. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  19. DNS of turbulent flow past a bluff body with a compliant tensegrity surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karandikar, Anish; Bewley, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study turbulent incompressible flow past a bluff body with a compliant surface. We use a 3D time-dependent coordinate transformation to account for the motion of the bluff body surface. Spatially, the flow domain is discretized using a dealiased pseudospectral method in the axial and azimuthal directions, while the radial (wall-normal) direction is discretized using a finite difference scheme. The grid is stretched in the azimuthal direction, which is handled spectrally. This leads to a unique challenge when solving the Poisson equation in the fractional step method for the time march, which we address with both multigrid and preconditioned BiCGStab algorithms. We are presently extending this flow code with a model for the compliant bluff body surface based on the ``tensegrity fabric'' paradigm which combines compressive members (bars) and tensile members (tendons) in a stable, flexible network.

  20. The absence of tertiary interactions in a self-assembled DNA crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam; Birktoft, Jens J; Sha, Ruojie; Wang, Tong; Zheng, Jianping; Constantinou, Pamela E; Ginell, Stephan L; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-04-01

    DNA is a highly effective molecule for controlling nanometer-scale structure. The convenience of using DNA lies in the programmability of Watson-Crick base-paired secondary interactions, useful both to design branched molecular motifs and to connect them through sticky-ended cohesion. Recently, the tensegrity triangle motif has been used to self-assemble three-dimensional crystals whose structures have been determined; sticky ends were reported to be the only intermolecular cohesive elements in those crystals. A recent communication in this journal suggested that tertiary interactions between phosphates and cytosine N(4) groups are responsible for intermolecular cohesion in these crystals, in addition to the secondary and covalent interactions programmed into the motif. To resolve this issue, we report experiments challenging this contention. Gel electrophoresis demonstrates that the tensegrity triangle exists in conditions where cytosine-PO(4) tertiary interactions seem ineffective. Furthermore, we have crystallized a tensegrity triangle using a junction lacking the cytosine suggested for involvement in tertiary interactions. The unit cell is isomorphous with that of a tensegrity triangle crystal reported earlier. This structure has been solved by molecular replacement and refined. The data presented here leave no doubt that the tensegrity triangle crystal structures reported earlier depend only on base pairing and covalent interactions for their formation. PMID:22434713

  1. Tensegrity applied to modelling the motion of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simona-Mariana, Cretu; Gabriela-Catalina, Brinzan

    2011-02-01

    A considerable number of viruses' structures have been discovered and more are expected to be identified. Different viruses' symmetries can be observed at the nanoscale level. The mechanical models of some viruses realised by scientists are described in this paper, none of which has taken into consideration the internal deformation of subsystems. The authors' models for some viruses' elements are introduced, with rigid and flexible links, which reproduce the movements of viruses including internal deformations of the subunits.

  2. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  3. Active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Blackwood, G. H.; Chu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure. These experiments are directed toward the development of high performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction program at JPL. Order of magnitude reductions in dynamic response are achieved with relatively simple control techniques. The practical implementation of high stiffness, high bandwidth active-members in a precision structure highlights specific issues of importance relating to the modelling and implementation of active-member control.

  4. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, B. C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and X ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  5. Structural models for nickel electrode active mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, Bahne C.; Karjala, P. J.; Loyselle, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data allow one to distinguish nickel electrode active mass, alpha and beta phase materials. Discharges active mass is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. This is contrary to the generally accepted model for the discharged beta phase of active mass. It is concluded that charged active mass displays a disordered and nonstoichiometric, nonclose packed structure of the R3 bar m, NiOOH structure type. Raman spectral data and x ray diffraction data are analyzed and shown to be consistent with this structural model.

  6. Membrane Elastegrities: A New Model Viscoelastic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlides, Eleftherios; Pearce, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new class of structures, membrane elastegrities, a network of rigid and elastic members maintaining shape through elastic forces, named by analogy to tensegrities that maintain shape through tension alone. Numerous researchers have proposed tensegrities as models to biological structure. Elastegrities expand tensegrity properties primarily by suggesting a mechanism for containing and pumping non-Newtonian fluids in living organisms. The chiral icosahedral elastegrity compared to the 6-strut tensegrity have identical symmetry, negative Poisson Ratio, and the reaction force to external forces is distributed throughout the elastic members causing reversible deformation. They also have important differences: a) elastic hinge connections enable containment and pumping of fluids versus nodal connections, b) simple assembly by folding a flat shape-memory material versus assembly requiring scaffolding, c) hinge connections limit freedom of movement resulting in isometric forces as members rotate cooperatively contracting versus large freedom of movement with unpredictable deformation. d) The chiral icosahedral elastegrity can contain liquid and requires increased force for equal displacement as it rotates towards a zero volume octahedron suggesting a mechanism for a non-Newtonian pump.

  7. Structure-Activity Relationship of Azaindole-Based Glucokinase Activators.

    PubMed

    Paczal, Attila; Bálint, Balázs; Wéber, Csaba; Szabó, Zoltán B; Ondi, Levente; Theret, Isabelle; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Bernard, Catherine; Ktorza, Alain; Perron-Sierra, Francoise; Kotschy, András

    2016-01-28

    7-Azaindole has been identified as a novel bidentate anchor point for allosteric glucokinase activators. A systematic investigation around three principal parts of the new small molecule glucokinase activators led to a robust SAR in agreement with structural data that also helped to assess the conformational flexibility of the allosteric activation site. The increase in glucose uptake resulting from glucokinase activation in hepatocytes in vitro translated into the efficient lowering of glucose levels in vivo with the best compounds. PMID:26685731

  8. Structural Continuities in Protest Activity: The Legacy of Sixties Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdam, Doug

    Although recent research suggests that individuals active in social protest in the 1960's maintain their activist identities, the structural links which allow the continuity have yet to be identified. A review of research reveals that the continuity of self-identification, political attitudes and activities, and occupational choices is influenced…

  9. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  10. Quinonaphthothiazines, syntheses, structures and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleń, M.; Pluta, K.; Suwińska, K.; Morak-Młodawska, B.; Latocha, M.; Shkurenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    Two new types of pentacyclic azaphenothiazines being quinonaphthothiazines were obtaining from the reactions of dichlorodiquinolinyl disulfide with 1- and 2-naphthylamines. As the reactions could proceed in many ways, the proper structure elucidation was crucial. The structure determination was based on the 2D NMR spectra (NOESY, HSQC and HMBC) of the methyl derivatives. The final structure evidences came from X-ray analysis of the monocrystals. The new quinonaphthothiazines represent angularly fused pentacyclic ring systems which is folded along the N-S axis. The parent NH-compounds were transformed into the N-derivatives. Some quinonaphthothiazines exhibited promising anticancer activity against glioblastoma SNB-19, melanoma C-32 and human ductal breast epithelial tumor T47D cell lines. The anticancer activity dependent on the nature of the substituents and the ring fusion between the thiazine and naphthalene moieties. Two compounds were more active than the reference drug, cisplatin.

  11. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  12. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here. PMID:26265354

  13. Structural relationships and vasorelaxant activity of monoterpenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structure-activity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 μM of phenylephine (Phe) in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively) were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+)-limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+)-pulegone) and non-oxygenated terpene ((+)-limonene) exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity. PMID:23351149

  14. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  15. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  16. Active controls technology to maximize structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, J. M.; Arnold, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The implication of the dependence on active controls technology during the design phase of transport structures is considered. Critical loading conditions are discussed along with probable ways of alleviating these loads. Why fatigue requirements may be critical and can only be partially alleviated is explained. The significance of certain flutter suppression system criteria is examined.

  17. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  18. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  19. Dynamics and Emergent Structures in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Aparna

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we consider an active fluid of colloidal sized particles, with the primary manifestation of activity being a self-replenishing velocity along one body axis of the particle. This is a minimal model for varied systems such as bacterial colonies, cytoskeletal filament motility assays vibrated granular particles and self propelled diffusophoretic colloids, depending on the nature of interaction among the particles. Using microscopic Brownian dynamics simulations, coarse-graining using the tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and analysis of macroscopic hydrodynamic theories, we characterize emergent structures seen in these systems, which are determined by the symmetry of the interactions among the active units, such as propagating density waves, dense stationary bands, asters and phase separated isotropic clusters. We identify a universal mechanism, termed ``self-regulation,'' as the underlying physics that leads to these structures in diverse systems. Support from NSF through DMR-1149266 and DMR-0820492.

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls as hormonally active structural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, J.D. ); Waller, C.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Among the environmental chemicals that may be able to disrupt the endocrine systems of animals and humans, the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a chemical class of considerable concern. One possible mechanism by which PCBs may interfere with endocrine function is their ability to mimic natural hormones. These actions reflect a close relationship between the physicochemical properties encoded in the PCB molecular structure and the responses they evoke in biological systems. These physiocochemical properties determine the molecular reactivities of PCBs and are responsible for their recognition as biological acceptors and receptors, as well as for triggering molecular mechanisms that lead to tissue response. [open quotes]Coplanarity[close quotes] of PCB phenyl rings and [open quotes]laterality[close quotes] of chlorine atoms are important structural features determining specific binding behavior with proteins and certain toxic responses in biological systems. We compare qualitative structure-activity relationships for PCBs with the limited information on the related non-coplanar chlorinated diphenyl ethers, providing further insights into the nature of the molecular recognition processes and support for the structural relationship of PCBs to thyroid hormones. Steriodlike activity requires conformational restriction and possibility hydroxylation. We offer some simple molecular recognition models to account for the importance of these different structural features in the structure-activity relationships that permit one to express PCB reactivities in terms of dioxin, thyroxine, and estradiol equivalents. The available data support the involvement of PCBs as mimics of thyroid and other steroidal hormones. The potential for reproductive and developmental toxicity associated with human exposure to PCBs is of particular concern. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Morphological communication: exploiting coupled dynamics in a complex mechanical structure to achieve locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, John A.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Lipson, Hod

    2010-01-01

    Traditional engineering approaches strive to avoid, or actively suppress, nonlinear dynamic coupling among components. Biological systems, in contrast, are often rife with these dynamics. Could there be, in some cases, a benefit to high degrees of dynamical coupling? Here we present a distributed robotic control scheme inspired by the biological phenomenon of tensegrity-based mechanotransduction. This emergence of morphology-as-information-conduit or ‘morphological communication’, enabled by time-sensitive spiking neural networks, presents a new paradigm for the decentralized control of large, coupled, modular systems. These results significantly bolster, both in magnitude and in form, the idea of morphological computation in robotic control. Furthermore, they lend further credence to ideas of embodied anatomical computation in biological systems, on scales ranging from cellular structures up to the tendinous networks of the human hand. PMID:19776146

  2. Activation energy of water structural transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmanskiy, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the nature of molecular motions that dominate in the thermodynamics of anomalies of liquid water properties in the range of 0-100 °C has been studied. Temperature dependencies of water properties have been approximated by exponential functions and the activation energies for water structure transitions have been evaluated. The activation energy values were compared with the energy spectra of characteristic vibrations and with those of cooperative molecular motion in the lattice-type structure of hydrogen bonds. It has been found that it is the reaction of hydrogen bond breaking that mainly limits the abnormal dynamics of water viscosity, self-diffusion, dielectric relaxation time and electric conductivity. It has been assumed that the thermodynamics of cooperative motion and resonance phenomena in water clusters form a basis for the differentiation mechanism of extrema points in temperature dependencies of water density, isobaric heat capacity, sound velocity, surface tension coefficient and compressibility.

  3. Betulin Phosphonates; Synthesis, Structure, and Cytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Chrobak, Elwira; Bębenek, Ewa; Kadela-Tomanek, Monika; Latocha, Małgorzata; Jelsch, Christian; Wenger, Emmanuel; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Betulin derivatives are a widely studied group of compounds of natural origin due to their wide spectrum of biological activities. This paper describes new betulin derivatives, containing a phosphonate group. The allyl-vinyl isomerization and synthesis of acetylenic derivatives have been reported. Structural identification of products as E and Z isomers has been carried out using ¹H-, (13)C-, (31)P-NMR, and crystallographic analysis. The crystal structure in the orthorhombic space group and analysis of crystal packing contacts for 29-diethoxyphosphoryl-28-cyclopropylpropynoyloxy-lup-20E(29)-en-3β-ol 8a are reported. All new compounds were tested in vitro for their antiproliferative activity against human T47D (breast cancer), SNB-19 (glioblastoma), and C32 (melanoma) cell lines. PMID:27571057

  4. Structure-activity relationship of anthelmintic cyclooctadepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Makoto; Okada, Yumiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Sakanaka, Osamu; Matsumoto, Maki; Atsumi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between cyclooctadepsipeptides and their anthelmintic efficacy was examined by converting the natural products, PF1022A, PF1022E and PF1022H. Some analogues substituted at the para position of the phenyllactate moiety showed higher or equivalent activity against the parasitic nematode, Ascaridia galli in chicken when compared with the parent compounds. It is suggested that lipophilicity and the polar surface area, in addition to structural requirements of the derivatives, influenced the anthelmintic efficacy in vivo. PMID:21737929

  5. Active isolation of vibrations with adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigou, C.; Fuller, C. R.; Wagstaff, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration transmission in structures is controlled by means of a technique which employs distributed arrays of piezoelectric transducers bonded to the supporting structure. Distributed PVDF piezoelectric strips are employed as error sensors, and a two-channel feedforward adaptive LMS algorithm is used for minimizing error signals and thereby controlling the structure. A harmonic force input excites a thick plate, and a receiving plate is configured with three pairs of piezoelectric actuators. Modal analyses are performed to determine the resonant frequencies of the system, and a scanning laser vibrometer is used to study the shape of the response of the receiving plate during excitation with and without the control algorithm. Efficient active isolation of the vibrations is achieved with modal suppression, and good control is noted in the on-resonance cases in which increased numbers of PVDF sensors and piezoelectric actuators are employed.

  6. Methylglyoxal can modify GAPDH activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyon Jae; Howell, Scott K; Sanford, Rebecca J; Beisswenger, Paul J

    2005-06-01

    The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) can play an important role in regulating multiple upstream pathways relating to the development of diabetic complications. GAPDH can be modified by a number of metabolic factors, including oxidative and glycation products. To study the effect of glycation on GAPDH we have measured GAPDH structure and activity after exposure of the enzyme to the potent alpha dicarbonyl sugar methylglyoxal (MG). Rabbit GAPDH was incubated with 10-1000 microM MG for 96 hours, and enzyme activity was measured at intervals by a spectrophotometric assay. Isoelectric focusing of purified and cellular GAPDH was performed with a PROTEAN IEF system and the bands visualized by Western blotting. The mass of glycated and native GAPDH was determined by MALDI with a Applied Biosystems Voyager System 6235. GAPDH activity (at 96 h) was decreased by 20% with 1.0 micromolar MG and showed progressively greater suppression of activity with increasing concentrations up to 1 mM, where activity was decreased by 97%. Reduction in GAPDH activity was rapidly decreasing by 69.2% by two hours with 1 mM MG. IEF showed an isoelectric point (IEP) of 8.5 for native GAPDH, while measurable changes were seen with modification by MG levels of 1 mM (IEP 7.5) and 50 microM (IEP 8.0). With MALDI, GAPDH mass increased from 36.012 kDa to 37.071 after exposure to 50 microM MG and to 40.625 following 1 mM MG. This indicates addition of 12.75 and 55.6 MG residues, respectively, to GAPDH. GAPDH can be modified by methylglyoxal intracellular concentrations close to those previously observed in vivo, with measurable changes in isoelectric point and mass. These modifications can lead to decreased enzyme activity, suggesting that conditions associated with elevated intracellular MG could modify GAPDH activity in vivo. PMID:16037232

  7. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  8. Structural requirements of bitter taste receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Niv, Masha Y.; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    An important question in taste research is how 25 receptors of the human TAS2R family detect thousands of structurally diverse compounds. An answer to this question may arise from the observation that TAS2Rs in general are broadly tuned to interact with numerous substances. Ultimately, interaction with chemically diverse agonists requires architectures of binding pockets tailored to combine flexibility with selectivity. The present study determines the structure of hTAS2R binding pockets. We focused on a subfamily of closely related hTAS2Rs exhibiting pronounced amino acid sequence identities but unique agonist activation spectra. The generation of chimeric and mutant receptors followed by calcium imaging analyses identified receptor regions and amino acid residues critical for activation of hTAS2R46, -R43, and -R31. We found that the carboxyl-terminal regions of the investigated receptors are crucial for agonist selectivity. Intriguingly, exchanging two residues located in transmembrane domain seven between hTAS2R46, activated by strychnine, and hTAS2R31, activated by aristolochic acid, was sufficient to invert agonist selectivity. Further mutagenesis revealed additional positions involved in agonist interaction. The transfer of functionally relevant amino acids identified in hTAS2R46 to the corresponding positions of hTAS2R43 and -R31 resulted in pharmacological properties indistinguishable from the parental hTAS2R46. In silico modeling of hTAS2R46 allowed us to visualize the putative mode of interaction between agonists and hTAS2Rs. Detailed structure-function analyses of hTAS2Rs may ultimately pave the way for the development of specific antagonists urgently needed for more sophisticated analyses of human bitter taste perception. PMID:20534469

  9. Antioxidant activity of taxifolin: an activity-structure relationship.

    PubMed

    Topal, Fevzi; Nar, Meryem; Gocer, Hulya; Kalin, Pınar; Kocyigit, Umit M; Gülçin, İlhami; Alwasel, Saleh H

    2016-08-01

    Taxifolin is a kind of flavanonol, whose biological ability. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antioxidants and antiradical activities of taxifolin by using different in vitro bioanalytical antioxidant methods including DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, the total antioxidant influence, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating activities. Taxifolin demonstrated 81.02% inhibition of linoleic acid emulsion peroxidation at 30 µg/mL concentration. At the same concentration, standard antioxidants including trolox, α-tocopherol, BHT, and BHA exhibited inhibitions of linoleic acid emulsion as 88.57, 73.88, 94.29, and 90.12%, respectively. Also, taxifolin exhibited effective DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating effects. The results obtained from this study clearly showed that taxifolin had marked antioxidant, reducing ability, radical scavenging and metal-chelating activities. Also, this study exhibits a scientific shore for the significant antioxidant activity of taxifolin and its structure-activity insight. PMID:26147349

  10. Active Control Of Structure-Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.

    1994-11-01

    The successful practical application of active noise control requires an understanding of both its acoustic limitations and the limitations of the electrical control strategy used. This paper is concerned with the active control of sound in enclosures. First, a review is presented of the fundamental physical limitations of using loudspeakers to achieve either global or local control. Both approaches are seen to have a high frequency limit, due to either the acoustic modal overlap, or the spatial correlation function of the pressure field. These physical performance limits could, in principle, be achieved with either a feedback or a feedforward control strategy. These strategies are reviewed and the use of adaptive digital filters is discussed for both approaches. The application of adaptive feedforward control in the control of engine and road noise in cars is described. Finally, an indirect approach to the active control of sound is discussed, in which the vibration is suppressed in the structural paths connecting the source of vibration to the enclosure. Two specific examples of this strategy are described, using an active automotive engine mount and the incorporation of actuators into helicopter struts to control gear-meshing tones. In both cases good passive design can minimize the complexity of the active controller.

  11. Structural Basis for Plexin Activation and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Youxin; Janssen, Bert J C; Malinauskas, Tomas; Vangoor, Vamshidhar R; Coles, Charlotte H; Kaufmann, Rainer; Ni, Tao; Gilbert, Robert J C; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-08-01

    Class A plexins (PlxnAs) act as semaphorin receptors and control diverse aspects of nervous system development and plasticity, ranging from axon guidance and neuron migration to synaptic organization. PlxnA signaling requires cytoplasmic domain dimerization, but extracellular regulation and activation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we present crystal structures of PlxnA (PlxnA1, PlxnA2, and PlxnA4) full ectodomains. Domains 1-9 form a ring-like conformation from which the C-terminal domain 10 points away. All our PlxnA ectodomain structures show autoinhibitory, intermolecular "head-to-stalk" (domain 1 to domain 4-5) interactions, which are confirmed by biophysical assays, live cell fluorescence microscopy, and cell-based and neuronal growth cone collapse assays. This work reveals a 2-fold role of the PlxnA ectodomains: imposing a pre-signaling autoinhibitory separation for the cytoplasmic domains via intermolecular head-to-stalk interactions and supporting dimerization-based PlxnA activation upon ligand binding. More generally, our data identify a novel molecular mechanism for preventing premature activation of axon guidance receptors. PMID:27397516

  12. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  13. Synthetic retinoids: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Jonathan H; Collings, Jonathan C; Whiting, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan A; Marder, Todd B

    2009-11-01

    Retinoid signalling pathways are involved in numerous processes in cells, particularly those mediating differentiation and apoptosis. The endogenous ligands that bind to the retinoid receptors, namely all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid, are prone to double-bond isomerisation and to oxidation by metabolic enzymes, which can have significant and deleterious effects on their activities and selectivities. Many of these problems can be overcome through the use of synthetic retinoids, which are often much more stable, as well as being more active. Modification of their molecular structures can result in retinoids that act as antagonists, rather than agonists, or exhibit a large degree of selectivity for particular retinoid-receptor isotypes. Several such selective retinoids are likely to be of value as pharmaceutical agents with reduced toxicities, particularly in cancer therapy, as reagents for controlling cell differentiation, and as tools for elucidating the precise roles that specific retinoid signalling pathways play within cells. PMID:19821467

  14. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-02-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g-1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g-1 (95 F cc-1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors.

  15. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  16. THE PRACTICE OF STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (SAR) IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both qualitative and quantitative modeling methods relating chemical structure to biological activity, called structure-activity relationship analyses or SAR, are applied to the prediction and characterization of chemical toxicity. This minireview will discuss some generic issue...

  17. The Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We are continuing our systematic investigation of the nuclear structure of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN). Upon completion, our study will characterize hypothetical constructs such as narrow-line clouds, obscuring tori, nuclear gas disks. and central black holes with physical measurements for a complete sample of nearby AGN. The major scientific goals of our program are: (1) the morphology of the NLR; (2) the physical conditions and dynamics of individual clouds in the NLR; (3) the structure and physical conditions of the warm reflecting gas; (4) the structure of the obscuring torus; (5) the population and morphology of nuclear disks/tori in AGN; (6) the physical conditions in nuclear disks; and (7) the masses of central black holes in AGN. We will use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain high-resolution images and spatially resolved spectra. Far-UV spectroscopy of emission and absorption in the nuclear regions using HST/FOS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) will help establish physical conditions in the absorbing and emitting gas. By correlating the dynamics and physical conditions of the gas with the morphology revealed through our imaging program, we will be able to examine mechanisms for fueling the central engine and transporting angular momentum. The kinematics of the nuclear gas disks may enable us to measure the mass of the central black hole. Contemporaneous X-ray observations using ASCA will further constrain the ionization structure of any absorbing material. Monitoring of variability in the UV and X-ray absorption will be used to determine the location of the absorbing gas, possibly in the outflowing warm reflecting gas, or the broad-line region, or the atmosphere of the obscuring torus. Supporting ground-based observations in the optical, near-IR, imaging polarimetry, and the radio will complete our picture of the nuclear structures. With a comprehensive survey of these characteristics in a complete sample of nearby AGN, our

  18. The spatial structure of transnational human activity.

    PubMed

    Deutschmann, Emanuel

    2016-09-01

    Starting from conflictive predictions of hitherto disconnected debates in the natural and social sciences, this article examines the spatial structure of transnational human activity (THA) worldwide (a) across eight types of mobility and communication and (b) in its development over time. It is shown that the spatial structure of THA is similar to that of animal displacements and local-scale human motion in that it can be approximated by Lévy flights with heavy tails that obey power laws. Scaling exponent and power-law fit differ by type of THA, being highest in refuge-seeking and tourism and lowest in student exchange. Variance in the availability of resources and opportunities for satisfying associated needs appears to explain these differences. Over time (1960-2010), the Lévy-flight pattern remains intact and remarkably stable, contradicting the popular notion that socio-technological trends lead to a "death of distance." Humans have not become more "global" over time, they rather became more mobile in general, i.e. they move and communicate more at all distances. Hence, it would be more adequate to speak of "mobilization" than of "globalization." Longitudinal change occurs only in some types of THA and predominantly at short distances, indicating regional rather than global shifts. PMID:27480376

  19. Latent TGF-[beta] structure and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Minlong; Zhu, Jianghai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xing; Mi, Lizhi; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A.

    2011-09-16

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} is stored in the extracellular matrix as a latent complex with its prodomain. Activation of TGF-{beta}1 requires the binding of {alpha}v integrin to an RGD sequence in the prodomain and exertion of force on this domain, which is held in the extracellular matrix by latent TGF-{beta} binding proteins. Crystals of dimeric porcine proTGF-{beta}1 reveal a ring-shaped complex, a novel fold for the prodomain, and show how the prodomain shields the growth factor from recognition by receptors and alters its conformation. Complex formation between {alpha}v{beta}6 integrin and the prodomain is insufficient for TGF-{beta}1 release. Force-dependent activation requires unfastening of a 'straitjacket' that encircles each growth-factor monomer at a position that can be locked by a disulphide bond. Sequences of all 33 TGF-{beta} family members indicate a similar prodomain fold. The structure provides insights into the regulation of a family of growth and differentiation factors of fundamental importance in morphogenesis and homeostasis.

  20. Structural Requirements for CNS Active Opioid Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lefever, Mark; Li, Yingxue; Anglin, Bobbi; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Giuvelis, Denise; Lowery, John J; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2015-08-13

    Glycopeptides related to β-endorphin penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of mice to produce antinociception. Two series of glycopeptides were assessed for opioid receptor binding affinity. Attempts to alter the mu-selectivity of [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO)-related glycopeptides by altering the charged residues of the amphipathic helical address were unsuccessful. A series of pan-agonists was evaluated for antinociceptive activity (55 °C tail flick) in mice. A flexible linker was required to maintain antinociceptive activity. Circular dichroism (CD) in H2O, trifluoroethanol (TFE), and SDS micelles confirmed the importance of the amphipathic helices (11s → 11sG → 11) for antinociception. The glycosylated analogues showed only nascent helices and random coil conformations in H2O. Chemical shift indices (CSI) and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) with 600 MHz NMR and CD confirmed helical structures in micelles, which were rationalized by molecular dynamics calculations. Antinociceptive studies with mice confirm that these glycosylated endorphin analogues are potential drug candidates that penetrate the BBB to produce potent central effects. PMID:26125201

  1. Active structural waveguide for sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Karol; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    In the article a microstructural active optical fiber for sensing application was presented. Construction consists of three hexagonal rings and a core made of SiO2 - Al2O3 - Sb2O3 glass co-doped with 1Yb2O3/0.1Tm2O3 [mol%]. Developed optical fiber is characterized by upconversion luminescence (λp=980nm) at 480nm (Tm3+: 1G4→3H6) and 650 nm (Tm3+ : 1G4→3F4). Population of thulium levels was attained in result of the Yb 3+→Tm3+ upconversion energy transfer. Sensing application of elaborated active photonic structure was presented on the example of aqueous fluorescein solution. Fabricated microstructural optical fiber enables to measure of the fluorescein solutions with the concentration of (0.25 - 5.42)·10-4 [mol%]. Sensitivity of the elaborated measurement setup is 1.51·104 [1/mol%].

  2. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  3. Optimum optical structures for active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. R.; Richard, R. M.; Hansen, J. G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN structural analysis of a lightweight mirror structure has been completed and is compared with previous experimental measurements. A preliminary design for a 4 meter aperture, 6 meter focal length primary mirror is presented.

  4. Active versus passive damping in large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Gary L.; Mclaren, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal passive and active damping control can be considered in the context of a general control/structure optimization problem. Using a mean square output response approach, it is shown that the weight sensitivity of the active and passive controllers can be used to determine an optimal mix of active and passive elements in a flexible structure.

  5. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Exemptions for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure....

  6. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  7. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  8. 40 CFR 725.238 - Activities conducted outside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... structure. 725.238 Section 725.238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Research and Development Activities § 725.238 Activities conducted outside a structure. (a... test. (3) Certification of the following: (i) Compliance with the conditions of the exemption...

  9. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T.

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  10. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  11. The biological activity of structurally defined inositol glycans

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Meenakshi; Azev, Viatcheslav N; d’Alarcao, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background The inositol glycans (IGs) are glycolipid-derived carbohydrates produced by insulin-sensitive cells in response to insulin treatment. IGs exhibit an array of insulin-like activities including stimulation of lipogenesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis, suggesting that they may be involved in insulin signal transduction. However, because the natural IGs are structurally heterogeneous and difficult to purify to homogeneity, an understanding of the relationship between structure and biological activity has relied principally on synthetic IGs of defined structure. Discussion This article briefly describes what is known about the role of IGs in signal transduction and reviews the specific biological activities of the structurally defined IGs synthesized and tested to date. Conclusion A pharmacophore for IG activity begins to emerge from the reviewed data and the structural elements necessary for activity are summarized. PMID:20390053

  12. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  13. Active longitudes: Structure, dynamics, and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. V.

    Greenwich data for 1879-2005 (cycles 12-23) are used to study the longitude distribution of sunspot group areas summed over a Carrington rotation s(CR) separately in the southern and northern hemispheres. The zones of active longitudes (AL) are identified, and their behaviour (location, shift, and intensity variations) is analyzed over the time interval under consideration. In particular, we have studied the active longitudes in two reference frames corresponding to the rotation periods T = 27.2753 and T = 27.00 days. The AL zones are shown to consist of a set of individual narrow sunspot formation zones rotating rigidly with the Carrington period T ˜ 27.2753 days. The lifetime of the sunspot formation zones exceeds significantly that of individual sunspots and may reach 15-20 rotations. Besides the rigidly rotating active longitudes we have revealed the active longitudes that migrate in the Carrington reference frame at different (greater and smaller than Carrington) angular velocities. Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) of the total sunspot areas in the northern and southern longitudinal sectors corresponding to AL zones are studied for the period 1879-2004 using the spectral and correlation analysis methods. The relationships between the antipodal, symmetric about the equator, and adjoining AL zones are analyzed.

  14. Structure of Thermally Activated TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensation is important for adaptation and survival of organisms. While temperature has the potential to affect all biological macromolecules, organisms have evolved specific thermosensitive molecular detectors that are able to transduce temperature changes into physiologically relevant signals. Among these thermosensors are ion channels from the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. Prime candidates include TRPV1–4, TRPA1, and TRPM8 (the so-called “thermoTRP” channels), which are expressed in sensory neurons and gated at specific temperatures. Electrophysiological and thermodynamic approaches have been employed to determine the nature by which thermoTRPs detect temperature and couple temperature changes to channel gating. To further understand how thermoTRPs sense temperature, high-resolution structures of full-length thermoTRPs channels will be required. Here, we will discuss current progress in unraveling the structures of thermoTRP channels. PMID:25366237

  15. Active healing of delaminated composite structure using piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-03-01

    Recently, light weight structure becomes an object of attention because increase of energy efficiency becomes the most important global hot issue. Then, composite structures, which have inherent high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, are in the limelight for light weight structures. However, complex failure modes of composite structure are still remains unsolved problem and become main obstacle of wide application of composite structures. Delamination is one of frequent damage phenomenon of laminated composite structure. Delamination can cause reduction of structural stiffness and decrement of natural frequencies. This might induce increase of structural vibration and resonant phenomenon of operating structures. Then, delamination should be detected and complemented. In this work, active control scheme and piezoelectric actuators are used to reduce the delamination effect of damaged composite structure. At first, finite element model for delaminated composite structure is constructed based on improved layerwise theory and then state space control model is established. After design and implementation of active controller, dynamic characteristics and structural performances of damaged composite structure are investigated and effectiveness of active healing is evaluated.

  16. Tensegrity and motor-driven effective interactions in a model cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2012-04-01

    Actomyosin networks are major structural components of the cell. They provide mechanical integrity and allow dynamic remodeling of eukaryotic cells, self-organizing into the diverse patterns essential for development. We provide a theoretical framework to investigate the intricate interplay between local force generation, network connectivity, and collective action of molecular motors. This framework is capable of accommodating both regular and heterogeneous pattern formation, arrested coarsening and macroscopic contraction in a unified manner. We model the actomyosin system as a motorized cat's cradle consisting of a crosslinked network of nonlinear elastic filaments subjected to spatially anti-correlated motor kicks acting on motorized (fibril) crosslinks. The phase diagram suggests there can be arrested phase separation which provides a natural explanation for the aggregation and coalescence of actomyosin condensates. Simulation studies confirm the theoretical picture that a nonequilibrium many-body system driven by correlated motor kicks can behave as if it were at an effective equilibrium, but with modified interactions that account for the correlation of the motor driven motions of the actively bonded nodes. Regular aster patterns are observed both in Brownian dynamics simulations at effective equilibrium and in the complete stochastic simulations. The results show that large-scale contraction requires correlated kicking.

  17. Tensegrity and motor-driven effective interactions in a model cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2012-04-14

    Actomyosin networks are major structural components of the cell. They provide mechanical integrity and allow dynamic remodeling of eukaryotic cells, self-organizing into the diverse patterns essential for development. We provide a theoretical framework to investigate the intricate interplay between local force generation, network connectivity, and collective action of molecular motors. This framework is capable of accommodating both regular and heterogeneous pattern formation, arrested coarsening and macroscopic contraction in a unified manner. We model the actomyosin system as a motorized cat's cradle consisting of a crosslinked network of nonlinear elastic filaments subjected to spatially anti-correlated motor kicks acting on motorized (fibril) crosslinks. The phase diagram suggests there can be arrested phase separation which provides a natural explanation for the aggregation and coalescence of actomyosin condensates. Simulation studies confirm the theoretical picture that a nonequilibrium many-body system driven by correlated motor kicks can behave as if it were at an effective equilibrium, but with modified interactions that account for the correlation of the motor driven motions of the actively bonded nodes. Regular aster patterns are observed both in Brownian dynamics simulations at effective equilibrium and in the complete stochastic simulations. The results show that large-scale contraction requires correlated kicking. PMID:22502548

  18. Experimental evaluation of active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James; Blackwood, Gary; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1989-01-01

    The results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure are described. These experiments are directed toward the development of high-performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction (CSI) program at JPL. The focus of CSI activity at JPL is to develop the technology necessary to accurately control both the shape and vibration levels in the precision structures from which proposed large space-based observatories will be built. Structural error budgets for these types of structures will likely be in the sub-micron regime; optical tolerances will be even tighter. In order to achieve system level stability and local positioning at this level, it is generally expected that some form of active control will be required.

  19. Origami-inspired active structures: a synthesis and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Hartl, Darren J.; Malak, Richard J., Jr.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-09-01

    Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, has inspired the design of engineering devices and structures for decades. The underlying principles of origami are very general, which has led to applications ranging from cardboard containers to deployable space structures. More recently, researchers have become interested in the use of active materials (i.e., those that convert various forms of energy into mechanical work) to effect the desired folding behavior. When used in a suitable geometry, active materials allow engineers to create self-folding structures. Such structures are capable of performing folding and/or unfolding operations without being kinematically manipulated by external forces or moments. This is advantageous for many applications including space systems, underwater robotics, small scale devices, and self-assembling systems. This article is a survey and analysis of prior work on active self-folding structures as well as methods and tools available for the design of folding structures in general and self-folding structures in particular. The goal is to provide researchers and practitioners with a systematic view of the state-of-the-art in this important and evolving area. Unifying structural principles for active self-folding structures are identified and used as a basis for a quantitative and qualitative comparison of numerous classes of active materials. Design considerations specific to folded structures are examined, including the issues of crease pattern identification and fold kinematics. Although few tools have been created with active materials in mind, many of them are useful in the overall design process for active self-folding structures. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of open questions for the field of origami-inspired engineering.

  20. Structural interpretation of activity cliffs revealed by systematic analysis of structure-activity relationships in analog series.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Mihiret T; Peltason, Lisa; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Discontinuity in structure-activity relationships (SARs) is caused by so-called activity cliffs and represents one of the major caveats in SAR modeling and lead optimization. At activity cliffs, small structural modifications of compounds lead to substantial differences in potency that are essentially unpredictable using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods. In order to better understand SAR discontinuity at the molecular level of detail, we have analyzed different compound series in combinatorial analog graphs and determined substitution patterns that introduce activity cliffs of varying magnitude. So identified SAR determinants were then analyzed on the basis of complex crystal structures to enable a structural interpretation of SAR discontinuity and underlying activity cliffs. In some instances, SAR discontinuity detected within analog series could be well rationalized on the basis of structural data, whereas in others a structural explanation was not possible. This reflects the intrinsic complexity of small molecule SARs and suggests that the analysis of short-range receptor-ligand interactions seen in X-ray structures is insufficient to comprehensively account for SAR discontinuity. However, in other cases, SAR information extracted from ligands was incomplete but could be deduced taking X-ray data into account. Thus, taken together, these findings illustrate the complementarity of ligand-based SAR analysis and structural information. PMID:19761254

  1. Structural Determinants of Sleeping Beauty Transposase Activity.

    PubMed

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here, we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein coevolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, coevolving residues into elements called "sectors", which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that (i) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; (ii) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; (iii) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. (iv) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold. PMID:27401040

  2. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  3. Structure-activity relationship of indoloquinoline analogs anti-MRSA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Kamada, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Aya; Nishioka, Hiromi; Kuroda, Teruo; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2015-12-01

    Indolo[3,2-b]quinoline analogs (3a-3s), 4-(acridin-9-ylamino) phenol hydrochloride (4), benzofuro[3,2-b]quinoline (3t), indeno[1,2-b]quinolines (3u and 3v) have been synthesized. Those compounds were found to exhibit anti-bacterial activity towards Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). Structure-activity relationship studies were conducted that indoloquinoline ring, benzofuroquinoline ring and 4-aminophenol group are essential structure for anti-MRSA activity. PMID:26522949

  4. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A; Vos, Matthijn R; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-05-01

    Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. Although their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that, at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex-vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and 3D variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  5. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V.; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A.; Vos, Matthijn R.; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. While their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and three-dimensional variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements. PMID:25957688

  6. Active damping of spacecraft structural appendage vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An active vibration damper system, for bending in two orthogonal directions and torsion, in each of three mutually perpendicular axes is located at the extremities of the flexible appendages of a space platform. The system components for each axis includes: an accelerometer, filtering and signal processing apparatus, and a DC motor-inertia wheel torquer. The motor torquer, when driven by a voltage proportional to the relative vibration tip velocity, produces a reaction torque for opposing and therefore damping a specific modal velocity of vibration. The relative tip velocity is obtained by integrating the difference between the signal output from the accelerometer located at the end of the appendage with the output of a usually carried accelerometer located on a relatively rigid body portion of the space platform. A selector switch, with sequential stepping logic or highest modal vibration energy logic, steps to another modal tip velocity channel and receives a signal voltage to damp another vibration mode. In this manner, several vibration modes can be damped with a single sensor/actuator pair. When a three axis damper is located on each of the major appendages of the platform, then all of the system vibration modes can be effectively damped.

  7. Development of magnetostrictive active members for control of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Avakian, Kevin M.; Fenn, Ralph C.; Gaffney, Monique S.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Boudreau, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Phase 2 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project was to determine the technical feasibility of developing magnetostrictive active members for use as truss elements in space structures. Active members control elastic vibrations of truss-based space structures and integrate the functions of truss structure element, actively controlled actuator, and sensor. The active members must control structural motion to the sub-micron level and, for many proposed space applications, work at cryogenic temperatures. Under this program both room temperature and cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive active members were designed, fabricated, and tested. The results of these performance tests indicated that room temperature magnetostrictive actuators feature higher strain, stiffness, and force capability with lower amplifier requirements than similarly sized piezoelectric or electrostrictive active members, at the cost of higher mass. Two different cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive materials were tested at liquid nitrogen temperatures, both with larger strain capability than the room temperature magnetostrictive materials. The cryogenic active member development included the design and fabrication of a cryostat that allows operation of the cryogenic active member in a space structure testbed.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL RISKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the field of environmental toxicology, structure activity relationships (SARs) have developed as scientifically-credible tools for predicting the effects of chemicals when little or no empirical data are available.

  9. Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

    2014-05-01

    Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

  10. Structure-Activity Relationships in Nitro-Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. A.; Rahman, S.; Crespo-Hernández, C. E.

    Many nitro-aromatic compounds show mutagenic and carcinogenic properties, posing a potential human health risk. Despite this potential health hazard, nitro-aromatic compounds continue to be emitted into ambient air from municipal incinerators, motor vehicles, and industrial power plants. As a result, understanding the structural and electronic factors that influence mutagenicity in nitro-aromatic compounds has been a long standing objective. Progress toward this goal has accelerated over the years, in large part due to the synergistic efforts among toxicology, computational chemistry, and statistical modeling of toxicological data. The concerted influence of several structural and electronic factors in nitro-aromatic compounds makes the development of structure-activity relationships (SARs) a paramount challenge. Mathematical models that include a regression analysis show promise in predicting the mutagenic activity of nitro-aromatic compounds as well as in prioritizing compounds for which experimental data should be pursued. A major challenge of the structure-activity models developed thus far is their failure to apply beyond a subset of nitro-aromatic compounds. Most quantitative structure-activity relationship papers point to statistics as the most important confirmation of the validity of a model. However, the experimental evidence shows the importance of the chemical knowledge in the process of generating models with reasonable applicability. This chapter will concisely summarize the structural and electronic factors that influence the mutagenicity in nitro-aromatic compounds and the recent efforts to use quantitative structure-activity relationships to predict those physicochemical properties.

  11. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  12. C-SiC Composite Structures for Active Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. B.; Cox, B. N.; Berbon, M. Z.; Porter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of research being conducted on the use of C-SiC composite structures for actively cooling rocket nozzles. Potential payoffs and design constraints are discussed. Other topics covered include: testing parameters, material selection, thermal analysis of joined tube structure, pressure containment, H2O2 combustion testing, and cooled re-entry.

  13. The Ups and Downs of Structure-Activity Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the landscape view of structure-activity relationships (SARs). The motivation for such a view is that SARs come in a variety of forms, such as those where small changes in structure lead to small changes in activity or where small structural lead to significant changes in activity (also termed activity cliffs). Thus, an SAR dataset is viewed as landscape comprised of smooth plains, rolling hills and jagged gorges. We review the history of this view and early quantitative approaches that attempted to encode the landscape. We then discuss some recent developments that directly characterize structure-activity landscapes, in one case with the goal of higlighting activity cliffs while the other allows one to resolve different types of SAR that may be present in a dataset. We highlight some applications of these approaches, such as predictive model development and SAR elucidation, to SAR datasets obtained from the literatur. Finally, we conclude with a sumary of the landscape approach and why it provides an intuitive and rigorous alternative to standard views of structure-activity data. PMID:20838965

  14. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  15. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations. PMID:27445713

  16. Dialogic Activity Structures for Project-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph L.

    2004-01-01

    Activity structures such as classroom lessons and initiation-reply-evaluation sequences are important cultural tools that help students and teachers accomplish everyday activity, but they are not well adapted to open-ended inquiry conducted by students in small groups with teacher guidance. In this research, I identified alternative activity…

  17. Structure-Based Simulations Reveal Concerted Dynamics of GPCR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Suresh, Pooja; Romo, Tod D.; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vital class of proteins that transduce biological signals across the cell membrane. However, their allosteric activation mechanism is not fully understood; crystal structures of active and inactive receptors have been reported, but the functional pathway between these two states remains elusive. Here, we employ structure-based (Gō-like) models to simulate activation of two GPCRs, rhodopsin and the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We used data-derived reaction coordinates that capture the activation mechanism for both proteins, showing that activation proceeds through quantitatively different paths in the two systems. Both reaction coordinates are determined from the dominant concerted motions in the simulations so the technique is broadly applicable. There were two surprising results. First, the main structural changes in the simulations were distributed throughout the transmembrane bundle, and not localized to the obvious areas of interest, such as the intracellular portion of helix 6. Second, the activation (and deactivation) paths were distinctly non-monotonic, populating states that were not simply interpolations between the inactive and active structures. These transitions also suggest a functional explanation for β2AR’s basal activity: it can proceed through a more broadly defined path during the observed transitions. PMID:24889093

  18. Topological structure dynamics revealing collective evolution in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xia-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects frequently emerge in active matter like bacterial colonies, cytoskeleton extracts on substrates, self-propelled granular or colloidal layers and so on, but their dynamical properties and the relations to large-scale organization and fluctuations in these active systems are seldom touched. Here we reveal, through a simple model for active nematics using self-driven hard elliptic rods, that the excitation, annihilation and transportation of topological defects differ markedly from those in non-active media. These dynamical processes exhibit strong irreversibility in active nematics in the absence of detailed balance. Moreover, topological defects are the key factors in organizing large-scale dynamic structures and collective flows, resulting in multi-spatial temporal effects. These findings allow us to control the self-organization of active matter through topological structures. PMID:24346733

  19. Structure-cardiac activity relationship of C19-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xi-Xian; Tang, Pei; Liu, Xiu-Xiu; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; She, Xue-Ke; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-06-01

    Thirty three C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, twenty-two prepared from known C19-diterpenoid alkaloids and eleven isolated from Aconitum and Delphinium spp. were evaluated for their cardiac activity in the isolated bullfrog heart assay. Among them, eleven compounds exhibited cardiac activity, with average rate of amplitude increase in the range of 16-118%. Compound 7, mesaconine (17), hypaconine (25), and beiwutinine (26) exhibited strong cardiac activities relative to the reference drug. The structure-activity relationship data acquired indicated that an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-15, a hydroxyl group at C-8, an alpha-methoxyl or hydroxyl group at C-1, and a secondary amine or N-methyl group in ring A are important structure features necessary for the cardiac activities of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any ester groups. In addition, an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-3 is also helpful for the cardiac activity of these alkaloids. PMID:22816290

  20. The dimeric structure of factor XI and zymogen activation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yipeng; Verhamme, Ingrid M.; Smith, Stephen B.; Sun, Mao-fu; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Factor XI (fXI) is a homodimeric zymogen that is converted to a protease with 1 (1/2-fXIa) or 2 (fXIa) active subunits by factor XIIa (fXIIa) or thrombin. It has been proposed that the dimeric structure is required for normal fXI activation. Consistent with this premise, fXI monomers do not reconstitute fXI-deficient mice in a fXIIa-dependent thrombosis model. FXI activation by fXIIa or thrombin is a slow reaction that can be accelerated by polyanions. Phosphate polymers released from platelets (poly-P) can enhance fXI activation by thrombin and promote fXI autoactivation. Poly-P increased initial rates of fXI activation 30- and 3000-fold for fXIIa and thrombin, respectively. FXI monomers were activated more slowly than dimers by fXIIa in the presence of poly-P. However, this defect was not observed when thrombin was the activating protease, nor during fXI autoactivation. The data suggest that fXIIa and thrombin activate fXI by different mechanisms. FXIIa may activate fXI through a trans-activation mechanism in which the protease binds to 1 subunit of the dimer, while activating the other subunit. For activation by thrombin, or during autoactivation, the data support a cis-activation mechanism in which the activating protease binds to and activates the same fXI subunit. PMID:23515926

  1. A structural pathway for activation of the kinesin motor ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Mikyung; Zhang, Xiaohua; Park, Cheon-Gil; Park, Hee-Won; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors move along actin or microtubules by rapidly hydrolyzing ATP and undergoing changes in filament-binding affinity with steps of the nucleotide hydrolysis cycle. It is generally accepted that motor binding to its filament greatly increases the rate of ATP hydrolysis, but the structural changes in the motor associated with ATPase activation are not known. To identify the conformational changes underlying motor movement on its filament, we solved the crystal structures of three kinesin mutants that decouple nucleotide and microtubule binding by the motor, and block microtubule-activated, but not basal, ATPase activity. Conformational changes in the structures include a disordered loop and helices in the switch I region and a visible switch II loop, which is disordered in wild-type structures. Switch I moved closer to the bound nucleotide in two mutant structures, perturbing water-mediated interactions with the Mg2+. This could weaken Mg2+ binding and accelerate ADP release to activate the motor ATPase. The structural changes we observe define a signaling pathway within the motor for ATPase activation that is likely to be essential for motor movement on microtubules. PMID:11387196

  2. Selection of active member locations in adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Bruno, R.; Salama, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effective use of multiple passive and active members in adaptive structures necessitates that these members be optimally distributed throughout the structure. In truss structures, the problem falls into the class of combinatorial optimization for which the solution becomes exceedingly intractable as the problem size increases. This is overcome by using the simulated annealing algorithm to obtain near optimal locations for passive and/or active members. The maximization of the rate of energy dissipation over a finite time period as the measure of optimality is adopted. The selection of optimal locations for both passive and active members is consistently treated through the use of the energy dissipation rate criterion within the simulated annealing algorithm. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology for large truss structures.

  3. Control of resonance phenomenon in flexible structures via active support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolpour Saleh, A. R.; Mailah, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of active support to cope with the resonance phenomenon in the flexible structures. A valid computational platform for the flexible structure was first presented via a finite difference (FD) approach. Then, the active support mechanism was applied to the simulation algorithm through which the performance of the proposed methodology in suppressing the resonance phenomenon was evaluated. The flexible structure was thus excited with the external disturbance and the system response with and without the effect of the active support was investigated through a simulation study. The simulation outcomes clearly demonstrated effective resonance suppression in the flexible structure. Finally, an experimental rig was developed to investigate the validity of the proposed technique. The experimental results revealed an acceptable agreement with the simulation outcomes through which the validity of the proposed control method was affirmed.

  4. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  5. Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphotyrosyl Phosphatase Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,Y.; Xing, Y.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Jeffrey, P.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as PP2A phosphatase activator, is a conserved protein from yeast to human. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of human PTPA, which reveals a previously unreported fold consisting of three subdomains: core, lid, and linker. Structural analysis uncovers a highly conserved surface patch, which borders the three subdomains, and an associated deep pocket located between the core and the linker subdomains. The conserved surface patch and the deep pocket are responsible for binding to PP2A and ATP, respectively. PTPA and PP2A A-C dimer together constitute a composite ATPase. PTPA binding to PP2A results in a dramatic alteration of substrate specificity, with enhanced phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity and decreased phosphoserine phosphatase activity. This function of PTPA strictly depends on the composite ATPase activity. These observations reveal significant insights into the function and mechanism of PTPA and have important ramifications for understanding PP2A function.

  6. Quantitative Structure-Antifungal Activity Relationships for cinnamate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Laura M; Ruiz, Diego; Romanelli, Gustavo P; Duchowicz, Pablo R

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) are established with the aim of analyzing the fungicidal activities of a set of 27 active cinnamate derivatives. The exploration of more than a thousand of constitutional, topological, geometrical and electronic molecular descriptors, which are calculated with Dragon software, leads to predictions of the growth inhibition on Pythium sp and Corticium rolfsii fungi species, in close agreement to the experimental values extracted from the literature. A set containing 21 new structurally related cinnamate compounds is prepared. The developed QSAR models are applied to predict the unknown fungicidal activity of this set, showing that cinnamates like 38, 28 and 42 are expected to be highly active for Pythium sp, while this is also predicted for 28 and 34 in C. rolfsii. PMID:26410195

  7. Structural basis of AMPK regulation by small molecule activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Sanders, Matthew J.; Carmena, David; Bright, Nicola J.; Haire, Lesley F.; Underwood, Elizabeth; Patel, Bhakti R.; Heath, Richard B.; Walker, Philip A.; Hallen, Stefan; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Martin, Stephen R.; Carling, David; Gamblin, Steven J.

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a major role in regulating cellular energy balance by sensing and responding to increases in AMP/ADP concentration relative to ATP. Binding of AMP causes allosteric activation of the enzyme and binding of either AMP or ADP promotes and maintains the phosphorylation of threonine 172 within the activation loop of the kinase. AMPK has attracted widespread interest as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and, more recently, cancer. A number of direct AMPK activators have been reported as having beneficial effects in treating metabolic diseases, but there has been no structural basis for activator binding to AMPK. Here we present the crystal structure of human AMPK in complex with a small molecule activator that binds at a site between the kinase domain and the carbohydrate-binding module, stabilising the interaction between these two components. The nature of the activator-binding pocket suggests the involvement of an additional, as yet unidentified, metabolite in the physiological regulation of AMPK. Importantly, the structure offers new opportunities for the design of small molecule activators of AMPK for treatment of metabolic disorders.

  8. Active Piezoelectric Structures for Tip Clearance Management Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Managing blade tip clearance in turbomachinery stages is critical to developing advanced subsonic propulsion systems. Active casing structures with embedded piezoelectric actuators appear to be a promising solution. They can control static and dynamic tip clearance, compensate for uneven deflections, and accomplish electromechanical coupling at the material level. In addition, they have a compact design. To assess the feasibility of this concept and assist the development of these novel structures, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed in-house computational capabilities for composite structures with piezoelectric actuators and sensors, and subsequently used them to simulate candidate active casing structures. The simulations indicated the potential of active casings to modify the blade tip clearance enough to improve stage efficiency. They also provided valuable design information, such as preliminary actuator configurations (number and location) and the corresponding voltage patterns required to compensate for uneven casing deformations. An active ovalization of a casing with four discrete piezoceramic actuators attached on the outer surface is shown. The center figure shows the predicted radial displacements along the hoop direction that are induced when electrostatic voltage is applied at the piezoceramic actuators. This work, which has demonstrated the capabilities of in-house computational models to analyze and design active casing structures, is expected to contribute toward the development of advanced subsonic engines.

  9. Structural analogues of diosgenyl saponins: synthesis and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kaskiw, Matthew J; Tassotto, Mary Lynn; Mok, Mac; Tokar, Stacey L; Pycko, Roxanne; Th'ng, John; Jiang, Zi-Hua

    2009-11-15

    Saponins display various biological activities including anti-tumor activity. Recently intensive research has been focused on developing saponins for tumor therapies. The diosgenyl saponin dioscin is one of the most common steroidal saponins and exhibits potent anticancer activity in several human cancer cells through apoptosis-inducing pathways. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of several diosgenyl saponin analogues containing either a 2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue or an alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-2-amino-2-deoxy-beta-d-glucopyranosyl residue with different acyl substituents on the amino group. The cytotoxic activity of these compounds was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Structure-activity relationship studies show that the disaccharide saponin analogues are in general less active than their corresponding monosaccharide analogues. The incorporation of an aromatic nitro functionality into these saponin analogues does not exhibit significant effect on their cytotoxic activity. PMID:19819703

  10. Database of Active Structures From the Indo-Asian Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard; Taylor, Michael; Okoronkwo, Kelechi

    2010-05-01

    The ongoing collision of India and Asia has produced a vast system of folds and faults, many of which are active today, as evidenced by such recent deadly earthquakes as the 12 May 2008 Sichuan quake [Parsons et al., 2008]. Understanding these events requires knowledge of the region’s geologic structures. Taylor and Yin [2009] have assembled HimaTibetMap-1.0, a multiformat, comprehensive database of first-order active structures in central Asia that may aid researchers, educators, and students in their studies of Indo-Asian tectonics. For example, this database may be used by seismologists, geodesists, and modelers to identify structures in particular locations that contribute to active deformation, or it may be used by teachers to illustrate concepts such as continental collision or distributed deformation of continents.

  11. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  12. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  13. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  14. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  15. Penoxsulam--structure-activity relationships of triazolopyrimidine sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy C; Martin, Timothy P; Mann, Richard K; Pobanz, Mark A

    2009-06-15

    The discovery of the sulfonamide herbicides, which inhibit the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS), has resulted in many investigations to exploit their herbicidal activity. One area which proved particularly productive was the N-aryltriazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine sulfonamides, providing three commercial herbicides, cloransulam-methyl, diclosulam and florasulam. Additional structure-activity investigations by reversing the sulfonamide linkage resulted in the discovery of triazolopyrimidine sulfonamides with cereal crop selectivity and high levels of grass and broadleaf weed control. Research efforts to exploit these high levels of weed activity ultimately led to the discovery of penoxsulam, a new herbicide developed for grass, sedge and broadleaf weed control in rice. Synthetic efforts and structure-activity relationships leading to the discovery of penoxsulam will be discussed. PMID:19464188

  16. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  17. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Carmen E; Méndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25386117

  18. Structure-Activity Relationship of Fluoroquinolones Against K. pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rui-zhou; Cheng, Xin-lu; Yang, Xiang-dong

    2007-04-01

    The structure-activity relationship of fluoroquinolones, which show anti-K. pneumoniae activity, was studied by using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The PCA results showed that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, energy difference between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, dipole moment, net atomic charge on atom I, molecular polarizability, partition coefficient and molecular refractivity of these compounds are responsible for the separation between high-activity and low-activity groups. The HCA results were similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA, and three of them are proposed as active molecules against K. pneumoniae which is consistent with the results of clinical experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new fluoroquinolones with anti-K. pneumoniae activity.

  19. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mps1 kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Gao, Yuefeng; Xu, Quanbin; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Songcheng; Old, William; Resing, Katheryn; Ahn, Natalie; Lei, Ming; Liu, Xuedong

    2010-11-05

    Mps1 is one of the several essential kinases whose activation is required for robust mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. The activity of Mps1 is tightly regulated and increases dramatically during mitosis or in response to spindle damage. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying Mps1 regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Mps1. The 2.7-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure shows that the Mps1 kinase domain adopts a unique inactive conformation. Intramolecular interactions between the key Glu residue in the {alpha}C helix of the N-terminal lobe and the backbone amides in the catalytic loop lock the kinase in the inactive conformation. Autophosphorylation appears to be a priming event for kinase activation. We identified Mps1 autophosphorylation sites in the activation and the P+1 loops. Whereas activation loop autophosphorylation enhances kinase activity, autophosphorylation at the P+1 loop (T686) is associated with the active kinase. Mutation of T686 autophosphorylation site impairs both autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of T676 may be a priming event for phosphorylation at T686. Finally, we identified two critical lysine residues in the loop between helices {alpha}EF and {alpha}F that are essential for substrate recruitment and maintaining high levels of kinase activity. Our studies reveal critical biochemical mechanisms for Mps1 kinase regulation.

  1. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  2. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  3. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed. PMID:27192825

  4. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  5. Synthesis, Antifungal Activity, and Structure Activity Relationships of Coruscanone A Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Babu, K. Suresh; Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Zhang, Qifeng; Khan, Shabana I.; Ferreira, Daneel; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Coruscanone A, a plant derived cyclopentenedione derivative, showed potent in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, comparable to amphotericin B and fluconazole. A series of analogs have been synthesized by modification of the cyclopentenedione ring, the enolic methoxy functionality, and the side chain styryl moiety of this natural product lead. A structurally close 1,4-benzoquinone analog was also prepared. All the compounds were examined for their in vitro activity against major opportunistic fungal pathogens including C. albicans, C. neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus, and fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strains, with several analogs demonstrating potent antifungal activity. Structure activity relationship studies indicate that the 2-methoxymethylene-cyclopent-4-ene-1,3-dione structural moiety is the pharmacophore responsible for the antifungal activity of this class of compounds, while the side chain styryl-like moiety plays an important complementary role, presumably contributing to target binding. PMID:17181171

  6. Structural active cooling applications for the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, R. V.; Niblock, G. A.; Huneidi, F.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic and experimental studies have been conducted to evaluate a number of active cooling approaches to structural thermal protection for the Space Shuttle. The primary emphasis was directed toward the thermal protection system. Trade study results are presented for various heat shield material and TPS arrangements. Both metallic and reusable surface insulation (RSI) concepts were considered. Active systems heat sinks consisted of hydrogen, phase change materials, and expendable water. If consideration is given only to controlling the surface temperature, passive TPS was found to provide the most efficient system. Use of active cooling which incorporates some interior temperature control made the thermally less efficient RSI system more attractive.

  7. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  8. The structure-activity relationships of the antiviral chemotherapeutic activity of isatin β-thiosemicarbazone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, D. J.; Sadler, P. W.

    1960-01-01

    As part of an investigation devoted to the development of new antiviral agents a compound of established antiviral activity has been subjected to systematic structural modification. The structure-activity data so obtained have been used in the design of new compounds, some of which are described. The compound chosen was isatin β-thiosemicarbazone, which has high activity against neurovaccinia infection in mice, and a 4-point parallel-line assay of in vivo chemotherapeutic activity has been developed, which has enabled the activity of the derivatives to be determined against isatin β-thiosemicarbazone as a standard. The overall dimensions of the isatin β-thiosemicarbazone molecule appear to be nearly maximal for the retention of high activity, as all substituents in the aromatic ring decrease the activity irrespective of their nature or position. The projection of the -CS.NH2 group in relation to the ring nitrogen was found to be critical, as the α-thiosemicarbazone was inactive. A number of modifications of the side-chain were investigated:all led to reduction or loss of antiviral activity. The antiviral activity showed a positive correlation with chloroform solubility over a considerable range. The most active compound encountered was 1-ethylisatin β-thiosemicarbazone, with an activity of 286 (isatin β-thiosemicarbazone≡100). Isatin β-thiosemicarbazone showed no activity against 15 other viruses, and 20 related compounds showed on activity against ectromelia. PMID:13797622

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for fluoroelastomer/chlorofluorocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paciorek, K.J.L.; Masuda, S.R.; Nakahara, J.H. ); Snyder, C.E. Jr.; Warner, W.M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on swell, tensile, and modulus data that were determined for a fluoroelastomer after exposure to a series of chlorofluorocarbon model fluids. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed for the swell as a function of the number of carbons and chlorines and for tensile strength as a function of carbon number and chlorine positions in the chlorofluorocarbons.

  10. MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN SEMIARID AGRICULTURAL SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of management on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of three semiarid soils from Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in cotton -peanut (Arachis h...

  11. Relating Concepts and Applications through Structured Active Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Leonard

    The central research question in this study was whether structured active learning affects the abilities of science and engineering undergraduates to relate abstract concepts and realistic applications more than a relatively traditional instructional method. More specifically, the research was designed to determine whether differences in the…

  12. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  13. Distributed active control of large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Baz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work performed at the Catholic University of America on the research grant entitled Distributed Active Control of Large Flexible Space Structures, funded by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, under grant number NAG5-749, during the period of March 15, 1986 to September 15, 1986.

  14. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  15. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  16. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  17. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  18. 40 CFR 725.234 - Activities conducted inside a structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities conducted inside a structure. 725.234 Section 725.234 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS...

  19. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultralightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered, as follows: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventual in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft, and experimental R&D work such as this is required now to validate new analytical prediction methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments, conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  20. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  1. Actively cooled plate fin sandwich structural panels for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.; Beuyukian, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    An unshielded actively cooled structural panel was designed for application to a hypersonic aircraft. The design was an all aluminum stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich structure which used a 60/40 mixture of ethylene glycol/water as the coolant. Eight small test specimens of the basic platefin sandwich concept and three fatigue specimens from critical areas of the panel design was fabricated and tested (at room temperature). A test panel representative of all features of the panel design was fabricated and tested to determine the combined thermal/mechanical performance and structural integrity of the system. The overall findings are that; (1) the stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich actively cooling concept results in a low mass design that is an excellent contender for application to a hypersonic vehicle, and (2) the fabrication processes are state of the art but new or modified facilities are required to support full scale panel fabrication.

  2. Longitudinal structure of solar activity: Regular and stochastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The ratio of regular and stochastic components in the behavior of the longitudinal-temporal distribution of solar activity is studied with the use of correlation and spectral analysis of data on sunspot groups for 12 solar cycles. It was found that data samples of about 10 years in length often (in 50% of cases) show the presence of regular structures in the longitudinal distribution of sunspot groups. However, these structures are nonstationary; their characteristic scales and rotation periods vary when changing from one 10-year interval to another. The behavior of the longitudinal structure of sunspot activity is mainly stochastic on a long time scale (50-100 years); it is characterized by a wide spectrum of spatial scales and a continuous spectrum of rotation periods, which takes a period from 25.6 to 28.5 days.

  3. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  4. Structure of a bacterial toxin-activating acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nicholas P.; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Secreted pore-forming toxins of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) insert into host–cell membranes to subvert signal transduction and induce apoptosis and cell lysis. Unusually, these toxins are synthesized in an inactive form that requires posttranslational activation in the bacterial cytosol. We have previously shown that the activation mechanism is an acylation event directed by a specialized acyl-transferase that uses acyl carrier protein (ACP) to covalently link fatty acids, via an amide bond, to specific internal lysine residues of the protoxin. We now reveal the 2.15-Å resolution X-ray structure of the 172-aa ApxC, a toxin-activating acyl-transferase (TAAT) from pathogenic Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. This determination shows that bacterial TAATs are a structurally homologous family that, despite indiscernible sequence similarity, form a distinct branch of the Gcn5-like N-acetyl transferase (GNAT) superfamily of enzymes that typically use acyl-CoA to modify diverse bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic substrates. A combination of structural analysis, small angle X-ray scattering, mutagenesis, and cross-linking defined the solution state of TAATs, with intermonomer interactions mediated by an N-terminal α-helix. Superposition of ApxC with substrate-bound GNATs, and assay of toxin activation and binding of acyl-ACP and protoxin peptide substrates by mutated ApxC variants, indicates the enzyme active site to be a deep surface groove. PMID:26016525

  5. An active control strategy for achieving weak radiator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, K. . Acoustics and Radar Technology Lab.); Koopmann, G.H. . Center for Acoustics and Vibration)

    1994-01-01

    A general control strategy is presented for active suppression of total radiated sound power from harmonically excited structures based on the measurement of their response. Using the measured response of the structure together with knowledge of its structural mobility, and equivalent primary excitation force is found at discrete points along the structure. Using this equivalent primary force and performing a quadratic optimization of the power radiated form the structure, a set of control forces is found at selected points on the structure that results in minimum radiated sound power. A numerical example of this strategy is presented for a simply supported beam in a rigid baffle excited by a harmonic plane wave incident at an oblique angle. A comparison of the response of the beam with and without control forces shows a large reduction in the controlled response displacement magnitude. In addition, as the result of the action of the control forces, the magnitude of the wave number spectrum of the beam's response in the supersonic region is decreased substantially. The effect of the number and location of the actuators on reductions in sound power level is also studied. The actuators located at the anti-nodes of structural modes within the supersonic region together with those located near boundaries are found to be the most effective in controlling the radiation of sound from a structure.

  6. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  7. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  8. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  9. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  10. Structured variability in Purkinje cell activity during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Britton A.; Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a prominent vertebrate brain structure that is critically involved in sensorimotor function. During locomotion, cerebellar Purkinje cells are rhythmically active, shaping descending signals and coordinating commands from higher brain areas with the step cycle. However, the variation in this activity across steps has not been studied, and its statistical structure, afferent mechanisms, and relationship to behavior remain unknown. Here, using multi-electrode recordings in freely moving rats, we show that behavioral variables systematically influence the shape of the step-locked firing rate. This effect depends strongly on the phase of the step cycle and reveals a functional clustering of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, we find a pronounced disassociation between patterns of variability driven by the parallel and climbing fibers. These results suggest that Purkinje cell activity not only represents step phase within each cycle, but is also shaped by behavior across steps, facilitating control of movement under dynamic conditions. PMID:26291165

  11. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  12. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  13. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  14. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component is compensated by the lateral extrusion of the central Eastern Alps. The Periadriatic (Insubric) line east of the triple junction and the mid-Hungarian fault zone have relatively recently lost their role as first-order active structures. We favor the idea that the Pannonian fragment and the TISZA block merged to a "soft" microplate surrounded by the Eastern and Southern Alpine, Carpathian, and Dinaric orogens.

  15. Partitioning and lipophilicity in quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, J C

    1985-01-01

    The history of the relationship of biological activity to partition coefficient and related properties is briefly reviewed. The dominance of partition coefficient in quantitation of structure-activity relationships is emphasized, although the importance of other factors is also demonstrated. Various mathematical models of in vivo transport and binding are discussed; most of these involve partitioning as the primary mechanism of transport. The models describe observed quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) well on the whole, confirming that partitioning is of key importance in in vivo behavior of a xenobiotic. The partition coefficient is shown to correlate with numerous other parameters representing bulk, such as molecular weight, volume and surface area, parachor and calculated indices such as molecular connectivity; this is especially so for apolar molecules, because for polar molecules lipophilicity factors into both bulk and polar or hydrogen bonding components. The relationship of partition coefficient to chromatographic parameters is discussed, and it is shown that such parameters, which are often readily obtainable experimentally, can successfully supplant partition coefficient in QSARs. The relationship of aqueous solubility with partition coefficient is examined in detail. Correlations are observed, even with solid compounds, and these can be used to predict solubility. The additive/constitutive nature of partition coefficient is discussed extensively, as are the available schemes for the calculation of partition coefficient. Finally the use of partition coefficient to provide structural information is considered. It is shown that partition coefficient can be a valuable structural tool, especially if the enthalpy and entropy of partitioning are available. PMID:3905374

  16. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  17. Method for the evaluation of structure-activity relationship information associated with coordinated activity cliffs.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-14

    Activity cliffs are generally defined as pairs of active compounds having a large difference in potency. Although this definition of activity cliffs focuses on compound pairs, the vast majority of cliffs are formed in a coordinated manner. This means that multiple highly and weakly potent compounds form series of activity cliffs, which often overlap. In activity cliff networks, coordinated cliffs emerge as disjoint activity cliff clusters. Recently, we have identified all cliff clusters from current bioactive compounds and analyzed their topologies. For structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, activity cliff clusters are of high interest, since they contain more SAR information than cliffs that are individually considered. For medicinal chemistry applications, a key question becomes how to best extract SAR information from activity cliff clusters. This represents a challenging problem, given the complexity of many activity cliff configurations. Herein we introduce a generally applicable methodology to organize activity cliff clusters on the basis of structural relationships, prioritize clusters, and systematically extract SAR information from them. PMID:25014781

  18. Structure-antimicrobial activity relationship between pleurocidin and its enantiomer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juneyoung

    2008-01-01

    To develop novel antibiotic peptides useful as therapeutic drugs, the enantiomeric analogue of pleurocidin (Ple), which is a well known 25-mer antimicrobial peptide, was designed for proteolytic resistance by D-amino acids substitution. The proteolytic resistance was confirmed by using HPLC after the digestion with various proteases. To investigate the antibiotic effect of L- and D-Ple, the antibacterial activity and hemolytic effect were tested against human erythrocytes. The D-Ple showed a decreased antibacterial activity and a dramatically decreased hemolytic activity compared with L-Ple. The hemolytic effect of analogue was further confirmed by using calcein leakage measurement with liposome. To elucidate these results, the secondary structure of the peptides was investigated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results revealed that D-Ple, as well as L-Ple, had typical α-helical structures which were mirror images, with a different helicity. These results suggested that the discrepancy of the structure between the two peptides made their antibacterial activity distinct. PMID:18779649

  19. Association between Family Structure and Physical Activity of Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijuan; Qi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study examines the association between family structure and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of adolescents in China. Methods. The participants included 612 adolescents (317 boys and 295 girls) from Shanghai with ages ranging from 10 to 16 years. Accelerometers were used to measure the duration of MVPA of adolescents, and questionnaires on family structure were completed by the parents of these adolescents. Results. Findings suggested that family structure significantly increased the likelihood of adolescents engaging in physical activity (PA) and explained 6% of MPVA variance. Adolescents living in single-parent households and step families were more physically active than those living in two-parent homes and with biological parents, respectively. However, adolescents residing with grandparents were less active than those living with neither grandparent. No significant difference was found in MVPA time between adolescents living with one sibling and those without siblings. Conclusion. Family environment may be considered in the development of PA interventions and policies, and adolescents living with their grandparents may be targeted in PA promotion. PMID:27123446

  20. Structure and activity of the acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Thomas W.; Frey, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of complex behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. ASICs have also been implicated in neuronal degeneration accompanying ischemia and multiple sclerosis. As a whole, ASICs represent novel therapeutic targets for several clinically important disorders. An understanding of the correlation between ASIC structure and function will help to elucidate their mechanism of action and identify potential therapeutics that specifically target these ion channels. Despite the seemingly simple nature of proton binding, multiple studies have shown that proton-dependent gating of ASICs is quite complex, leading to activation and desensitization through distinct structural components. This review will focus on the structural aspects of ASIC gating in response to both protons and the newly discovered activators GMQ and MitTx. ASIC modulatory compounds and their action on proton-dependent gating will also be discussed. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dale Benos, who made a substantial contribution to our understanding of ASIC activity. PMID:22843794

  1. Sensitivity of actively damped structures to imperfections and modeling errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of actively damped response of structures with respect to errors in the structural modeling is studied. Two ways of representing errors are considered. The first approach assumes errors in the form of spatial variations (or imperfections) in the assumed mass and stiffness properties of the structures. The second approach assumes errors due to such factors as unknown joint stiffnesses, discretization errors, and nonlinearities. These errors are represented here as discrepancies between experimental and analytical mode shapes and frequencies. The actively damped system considered here is a direct-rate feedback regulator based on a number of colocated velocity sensors and force actuators. The response of the controlled structure is characterized by the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. The effects of the modeling errors are thus presented as the sensitivity of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system. Results are presented for two examples: (1) a three-span simply supported beam controlled by three sensors and actuators, and (2) a laboratory structure consisting of a cruciform beam supported by cables.

  2. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of titania microspheres with hierarchical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Qian-Qian; Cao, Ying; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Wang, Kui; Wang, Hua-Jie

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Lauryl alcohol directs the formation of titania with hierarchical structures. {yields} Hierarchical structures endow the higher specific area to titania. {yields} Titania had a higher photocatalytic activity than commercial Degussa P25. {yields} The synthesis process of the target product is low-cost. -- Abstract: A combined sol-gel and solvothermal process was introduced to fabricate the titania microspheres with hierarchical structures by using lauryl alcohol as the structure-directing agent. Scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrograph and powder X-ray powder diffraction indicated that the molar ratio of lauryl alcohol, water and tetra-n-butyl titanate was the key factor for the formation of the mono-dispersed titania with anatase phase and the optimal ratio was 1.2:4:1. The diameter of the end-product was 523 {+-} 74 nm and it was composed of smaller nanoparticles with about 6.8 nm size in diameter. Photocatalytic activity of the end-product was investigated by employing Rhodamine B and Methylene blue as the model compounds. The target microspheres exhibited the higher photocatalytic efficiency compared with commercial Degussa P25 titania and this result might be due to the hierarchical structures of microspheres according to the analysis of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface areas.

  3. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  4. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  5. A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A state-of-the-art assessment of active structures with emphasis towards the applications in aeronautics and space is presented. It is felt that since this technology area is growing at such a rapid pace in many different disciplines, it is not feasible to cover all of the current research but only the relevant work as relates to aeronautics and space. Research in smart actuation materials, smart sensors, and control of smart/intelligent structures is covered. In smart actuation materials, piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, shape memory, electrorheological, and electrostrictive materials are covered. For sensory materials, fiber optics, dielectric loss, and piezoelectric sensors are examined. Applications of embedded sensors and smart sensors are discussed.

  6. Chlorotoxin: Structure, activity, and potential uses in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Paola G; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a disulfide-rich stable peptide from the venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus, which has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of cancer. Its ability to preferentially bind to tumor cells has been harnessed to develop an imaging agent to help visualize tumors during surgical resection. In addition, chlorotoxin has attracted interest as a vehicle to deliver anti-cancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. Given its interesting structural and biological properties, chlorotoxin also has the potential to be used in a variety of other biotechnology and biomedical applications. Here, we review the structure, activity and potential applications of chlorotoxin as a drug design scaffold. PMID:26418522

  7. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Structure Determination and Trends in Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbing; Lohith, Katheryn; Rosario, Margaret; Pulliam, Thomas H; O'Connor, Robert D; Bell, Lori J; Bewley, Carole A

    2016-07-22

    Antibacterial-guided fractionation of the Dictyoceratid sponges Lamellodysidea sp. and two samples of Dysidea granulosa yielded 14 polybrominated, diphenyl ethers including one new methoxy-containing compound (8). Their structures were elucidated by interpretation of spectroscopic data of the natural product and their methoxy derivatives. Most of the compounds showed strong antimicrobial activity with low- to sub-microgram mL(-1) minimum inhibitory concentrations against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, and two compounds inhibited Escherichia coli in a structure-dependent manner. PMID:27399938

  8. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  9. Structural heterogeneity regarding local Shwartzman activity of lipid A.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, J; Tanaka, C; Arata, S; Akiyama, Y; Hata, S; Hirayama, T; Egawa, K; Kasai, N

    1988-01-01

    The relation of chemical structure to local Shwartzman activity of lipid A preparations purified by thin-layer chromatography from five bacterial strains was examined. Two lipid A fractions from E. coli F515--Ec-A2 and Ec-A3--exhibited strong activity, similar to that of previous synthetic E. coli-type lipid A (compound 506 or LA-15-PP). The Ec-A3 fraction contained a component that appeared to be structurally identical to compound 506, and the main component of Ec-A2 fraction was structurally similar to compound 506 except that it carried a 3-hydroxytetradecanoyl group at the C-3' position of the backbone in place of a 3-tetradecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Free lipid A (12 C) and purified lipid A fractions, Ec-A2 (12 C) and Ec-A3 (12 C), respectively, obtained from bacteria grown at 12 C, exhibited activity comparable to Ec-A2 or Ec-A3. In these preparations, a large part of the 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoyl group might be replaced by 3-hexadecenoyloxytetradecanoyl group. Salmonella minnesota R595 free lipid A also contained at least two active lipid A components as seen in E. coli lipid A, but the third component corresponding to the synthetic Salmonella-type lipid A (compound 516 or LA-16-PP) exhibited low activity. A lipid A fraction, Cv-A4 from Chromobacterium violaceum IFO 12614, which was proposed to have two acyloxyacyl groups at the C-2 and C-2' positions with other acyl groups, exhibited weaker activity than the free lipid A or LPS. The purified lipid A fractions from Pseudomonas diminuta JCM 2788 and Pseudomonas vesicularis JCM 1477 contained an unusual backbone with 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose disaccharide phosphomonoester, and these lipid A (Pd-A3 and Pv-A3) exhibited strong activity comparable to the E. coli lipid A. Thus, the present results show that the local Shwartzman reaction can be expressed by partly different lipid A structures in both hydrophilic backbone and fatty acyl residues; when they have the same backbone the potency varies

  10. Inositolphosphoglycan mediators structurally related to glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors: synthesis, structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lomas, M; Khiar, N; García, S; Koessler, J L; Nieto, P M; Rademacher, T W

    2000-10-01

    The preparation of the pseudopentasaccharide 1a, an inositol-phosphoglycan (IPG) that contains the conserved linear structure of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors (GPI anchors), was carried out by using a highly convergent 2+3-block synthesis approach which involves imidate and sulfoxide glycosylation reactions. The preferred solution conformation of this structure was determined by using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations prior to carrying out quantitative structure--activity relationship studies in connection with the insulin signalling process. The ability of 1a to stimulate lipogenesis in rat adipocytes as well as to inhibit cAMP dependent protein kinase and to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase was investigated. Compound 1a did not show any significant activity, which may be taken as a strong indication that the GPI anchors are not the precursors of the IPG mediators. PMID:11072827

  11. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  12. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  13. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  14. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships for the Antifungal Activity of Selective Estrogen Receptor Antagonists Related to Tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Arielle; Martin, Jennifer A.; DiDone, Louis; Bradley, Erin K.; Mutz, Mitchell; Krysan, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is one of the most important invasive fungal infections and is a significant contributor to the mortality associated with HIV/AIDS. As part of our program to repurpose molecules related to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen as anti-cryptococcal agents, we have explored the structure-activity relationships of a set of structurally diverse SERMs and tamoxifen derivatives. Our data provide the first insights into the structural requirements for the antifungal activity of this scaffold. Three key molecular characteristics affecting anti-cryptococcal activity emerged from our studies: 1) the presence of an alkylamino group tethered to one of the aromatic rings of the triphenylethylene core; 2) an appropriately sized aliphatic substituent at the 2 position of the ethylene moiety; and 3) electronegative substituents on the aromatic rings modestly improved activity. Using a cell-based assay of calmodulin antagonism, we found that the anti-cryptococcal activity of the scaffold correlates with calmodulin inhibition. Finally, we developed a homology model of C. neoformans calmodulin and used it to rationalize the structural basis for the activity of these molecules. Taken together, these data and models provide a basis for the further optimization of this promising anti-cryptococcal scaffold. PMID:26016941

  16. Structure and Activity of Tryptophan-rich TSPO Translocator Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    TSPO translocator proteins bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are fhighly conserved from bacteria to mammals. We report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  17. Relation of tropical cyclone structure with thundersorm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, B. M.; Permyakov, M. S.; Potalova, E. Yu.; Cherneva, N. V.; Holzworth, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Synoptic and mesoscale cyclone systems over an ocean and seas are often accompanied by thunderstorm activity, which intensity and spatial distribution are modulated by the dynamic structure of these systems. The paper considers a method connecting the parameters of this thunderstorm activity with weather system structures over oceans and seas with mesoscale formation intensities and forms in these systems determined by driving wind vortex fields of scatterometers and by satellite images in visible and infrared ranges. On the example of separate tropical cyclones (TC) of 2005-2013, the relation of lightning discharge frequency and density in the TC area of influence and spatial distribution of driving wind vortex is shown. The work was supported by the Russian-American Grant RUG1-7084-PA- 13 in the area of fundamental researches of FEB RAS and CRDF.

  18. Structural alerts for predicting clastogenic activity of pro-oxidant flavonoid compounds: quantitative structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Yordi, Estela Guardado; Pérez, Enrique Molina; Matos, Maria Joao; Villares, Eugenio Uriarte

    2012-02-01

    Flavonoids have been reported to exert multiple biological effects that include acting as pro-oxidants at very high doses. The authors determined a structural alert to identify the clastogenic activity of a series of flavonoids with pro-oxidant activity. The methodology was based on a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. Specifically, the authors developed a virtual screening method for a clastogenic model using the topological substructural molecular design (TOPS-MODE) approach. It represents a useful platform for the automatic generation of structural alerts, based on the calculation of spectral moments of molecular bond matrices appropriately weighted, taking into account the hydrophobic, electronic, and steric molecular features. Therefore, it was possible to establish the structural criteria for maximal clastogenicity of pro-oxidant flavonoids: the presence of a 3-hydroxyl group and a 4-carbonyl group in ring C, the maximal number of hydroxyl groups in ring B, the presence of methoxyl and phenyl groups, the absence of a 2,3-double bond in ring C, and the presence of 5,7 hydroxyl groups in ring A. The presented clastogenic model may be useful for screening new pro-oxidant compounds. This alert could help in the design of new and efficient flavonoids, which could be used as bioactive compounds in nutraceuticals and functional food. PMID:21940715

  19. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  20. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed. PMID:26624010

  1. Structure and activation of pro-activin A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelu; Fischer, Gerhard; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Activins are growth factors with multiple roles in the development and homeostasis. Like all TGF-β family of growth factors, activins are synthesized as large precursors from which mature dimeric growth factors are released proteolytically. Here we have studied the activation of activin A and determined crystal structures of the unprocessed precursor and of the cleaved pro-mature complex. Replacing the natural furin cleavage site with a HRV 3C protease site, we show how the protein gains its bioactivity after proteolysis and is as active as the isolated mature domain. The complex remains associated in conditions used for biochemical analysis with a dissociation constant of 5 nM, but the pro-domain can be actively displaced from the complex by follistatin. Our high-resolution structures of pro-activin A share features seen in the pro-TGF-β1 and pro-BMP-9 structures, but reveal a new oligomeric arrangement, with a domain-swapped, cross-armed conformation for the protomers in the dimeric protein. PMID:27373274

  2. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  3. Structure and activation of pro-activin A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelu; Fischer, Gerhard; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Activins are growth factors with multiple roles in the development and homeostasis. Like all TGF-β family of growth factors, activins are synthesized as large precursors from which mature dimeric growth factors are released proteolytically. Here we have studied the activation of activin A and determined crystal structures of the unprocessed precursor and of the cleaved pro-mature complex. Replacing the natural furin cleavage site with a HRV 3C protease site, we show how the protein gains its bioactivity after proteolysis and is as active as the isolated mature domain. The complex remains associated in conditions used for biochemical analysis with a dissociation constant of 5 nM, but the pro-domain can be actively displaced from the complex by follistatin. Our high-resolution structures of pro-activin A share features seen in the pro-TGF-β1 and pro-BMP-9 structures, but reveal a new oligomeric arrangement, with a domain-swapped, cross-armed conformation for the protomers in the dimeric protein. PMID:27373274

  4. Analysis of the crystal structure of an active MCM hexamer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Justin M; Arachea, Buenafe T; Epling, Leslie B; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    In a previous Research article (Froelich et al., 2014), we suggested an MCM helicase activation mechanism, but were limited in discussing the ATPase domain because it was absent from the crystal structure. Here we present the crystal structure of a nearly full-length MCM hexamer that is helicase-active and thus has all features essential for unwinding DNA. The structure is a chimera of Sulfolobus solfataricus N-terminal domain and Pyrococcus furiosus ATPase domain. We discuss three major findings: 1) a novel conformation for the A-subdomain that could play a role in MCM regulation; 2) interaction of a universally conserved glutamine in the N-terminal Allosteric Communication Loop with the AAA+ domain helix-2-insert (h2i); and 3) a recessed binding pocket for the MCM ssDNA-binding motif influenced by the h2i. We suggest that during helicase activation, the h2i clamps down on the leading strand to facilitate strand retention and regulate ATP hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03433.001 PMID:25262915

  5. Active cells for redundant and configurable articulated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, John P.; Nawroj, Ahsan I.; Pounds, Paul E. I.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2014-10-01

    The proposed research effort explores the development of active cells—simple contractile electro-mechanical units that can be used as the material basis for larger articulable structures. Each cell, which might be considered a ‘muscle unit,’ consists of a contractile Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) core with conductive terminals. Large numbers of these cells might be combined and externally powered to change phase, contracting to either articulate with a large strain or increase the stiffness of the ensemble, depending on the cell design. Unlike traditional work in modular robotics, the approach presented here focuses on cells that have a simplistic design and function, are inexpensive to fabricate, and are eventually scalable to sub-millimeter sizes, working toward our vision of articulated and robotic structures that can be custom-fabricated from large numbers of general cell units, similar to biological structures. In this paper, we present the design of the active cells and demonstrate their usage with three articulated structures built with them.

  6. Structure and Biochemical Activities of Escherichia coli MgsA

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Asher N.; George, Nicholas P.; Marceau, Aimee H.; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-02-27

    Bacterial 'maintenance of genome stability protein A' (MgsA) and related eukaryotic enzymes play important roles in cellular responses to stalled DNA replication processes. Sequence information identifies MgsA enzymes as members of the clamp loader clade of AAA{sup +} proteins, but structural information defining the family has been limited. Here, the x-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli MgsA is described, revealing a homotetrameric arrangement for the protein that distinguishes it from other clamp loader clade AAA{sup +} proteins. Each MgsA protomer is composed of three elements as follows: ATP-binding and helical lid domains (conserved among AAA{sup +} proteins) and a tetramerization domain. Although the tetramerization domains bury the greatest amount of surface area in the MgsA oligomer, each of the domains participates in oligomerization to form a highly intertwined quaternary structure. Phosphate is bound at each AAA{sup +} ATP-binding site, but the active sites do not appear to be in a catalytically competent conformation due to displacement of Arg finger residues. E. coli MgsA is also shown to form a complex with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein through co-purification and biochemical studies. MgsA DNA-dependent ATPase activity is inhibited by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Together, these structural and biochemical observations provide insights into the mechanisms of MgsA family AAA{sup +} proteins.

  7. Structural control by the use of piezoelectric active members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Chen, J.-C.

    1987-01-01

    Large Space Structures (LSS) exhibit characteristics which make the LSS control problem different form other control problems. LSS will most likely exhibit low frequency, densely spaced and lightly damped modes. In theory, the number of these modes is infinite. Because these structures are flexible, Vibration Suppression (VS) is an important aspect of LSS operation. In terms of VS, the control actuators should be as low mass as possible, have infinite bandwidth, and be electrically powered. It is proposed that actuators be built into the structure as dual purpose structural elements. A piezoelectric active member is proposed for the control of LSS. Such a device would consist of a piezoelectric actuator and sensor for measuring strain, and screwjack actuator in series for use in quasi-static shape control. An experiment simulates an active member using piezoelectric ceramic thin sheet material on a thin, uniform cantilever beam. The feasibility of using the piezoelectric materials for VS on LSS was demonstrated. Positive positive feedback as a VS control strategy was implemented. Multi-mode VS was achieved with dramatic reduction in dynamic response.

  8. Autotaxin Structure Activity Relationships Revealed through Lysophosphatidylcholine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    North, E. Jeffrey; Osborne, Daniel A.; Bridson, Peter K.; Baker, Daniel L.; Parrill, Abby L.

    2009-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) catalyzes the hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to form the bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). LPA stimulates cell proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration and is involved in obesity, rheumatoid arthritis, neuropathic pain, atherosclerosis and various cancers, suggesting that ATX inhibitors have broad therapeutic potential. Product feedback inhibition of ATX by LPA has stimulated structure activity studies focused on LPA analogs. However, LPA displays mixed mode inhibition, indicating it can bind to both the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex. This suggests that LPA may not interact solely with the catalytic site. In this report we have prepared LPC analogs to help map out substrate structure activity relationships. The structural variances include length and unsaturation of the fatty tail, choline and polar linker presence, acyl versus ether linkage of the hydrocarbon chain, and methylene and nitrogen replacement of the choline oxygen. All LPC analogs were assayed in competition with the synthetic substrate, FS-3, to show the preference ATX has for each alteration. Choline presence and methylene replacement of the choline oxygen were detrimental to ATX recognition. These findings provide insights into the structure of the enzyme in the vicinity of the catalytic site as well as suggesting that ATX produces rate enhancement, at least in part, by substrate destabilization. PMID:19345587

  9. Mitigation of Chatter Instabilities in Milling by Active Structural Control

    SciTech Connect

    DOHNER, JEFFREY L.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; HINNERICHS, TERRY D.; KWAN, CHI-MAN; XU, ROGER; SHANKAR, NATARAJAN; WINTERBAUER, BILL; REGELBRUGGE, MARK; BRIDGER, KEITH

    2001-09-01

    This report documents how active structural control was used to significantly enhance the metal removal rate of a milling machine. An active structural control system integrates actuators, sensors, a control law and a processor into a structure for the purpose of improving the dynamic characteristics of the structure. Sensors measure motion, and the control law, implemented in the processor, relates this motion to actuator forces. Closed-loop dynamics can be enhanced by proper control law design. Actuators and sensors were imbedded within a milling machine for the purpose of modifying dynamics in such a way that mechanical energy, produced during cutting, was absorbed. This limited the on-set of instabilities and allowed for greater depths of cut. Up to an order of magnitude improvement in metal removal rate was achieved using this system. Although demonstrations were very successful, the development of an industrial prototype awaits improvements in the technology. In particular, simpler system designs that assure controllability and observability and control algorithms that allow for adaptability need to be developed.

  10. Effects of CO 2 activation on porous structures of coconut shell-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shenghui; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Kunbin; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shimin; Xia, Hongying

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, textural characterization of an activated carbon derived from carbonized coconut shell char obtained at carbonization temperature of 600 °C for 2 h by CO 2 activation was investigated. The effects of activation temperature, activation time and flow rate of CO 2 on the BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield of activated carbons prepared were evaluated systematically. The results showed that: (i) enhancing activation temperature was favorable to the formation of pores, widening of pores and an increase in mesopores; (ii) increasing activation time was favorable to the formation of micropores and mesopores, and longer activation time would result in collapsing of pores; (iii) increasing flow rate of CO 2 was favorable to the reactions of all active sites and formation of pores, further increasing flow rate of CO 2 would lead carbon to burn out and was unfavorable to the formation of pores. The degree of surface roughness of activated carbon prepared was measured by the fractal dimension which was calculated by FHH (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill) theory. The fractal dimensions of activated carbons prepared were greater than 2.6, indicating the activated carbon samples prepared had very irregular structures, and agreed well with those of average micropore size.

  11. Active member control of a precision structure with an H(infinity) performance objective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.; Anderson, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the noncollocated control of active structures using active structural elements. A top level architecture for active structures is presented, and issues pertaining to robust control of structures are discussed. Controllers optimized for an H sub inf performance specification are implemented on a test structure and the results are compared with analytical predictions. Directions for further research are identified.

  12. Synthesis, structure, theoretical calculations and biological activity of sulfonate active ester new derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazzali, Mohamed; Khattab, Sherine A. N.; Elnakady, Yasser A.; Al-Mekhlafi, Fahd A.; Al-Farhan, Khalid; El-Faham, Ayman

    2013-08-01

    A series of naphthyl and tolyl sulfonate ester were synthesized and characterized by H NMR. X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments established the molecular structure of three new sulfonate esters derivatives, and spectral data agree with these in solution. The observed hydrogen bonding is discussed on the basis of crystal structural analyses and DFT/MP2 geometry optimization quantum calculations. Antimicrobial activities were screened for selected compounds against three human cancer cell lines and Mosquito Culex pipiens larvae.

  13. Structure dependence of biological activities for primate cathelicidins.

    PubMed

    Tomasinsig, Linda; Morgera, Francesca; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Pacor, Sabrina; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Zanetti, Margherita; Tossi, Alessandro

    2009-09-01

    We have analysed the effects of variations in orang-utan (ppy), rhesus macaque (mmu) and leaf eater (pob) monkey orthologues of the human cathelicidin LL-37, on a range of relevant biological activities. These host defence peptides range in cationicity from +4 to +10, and while the more cationic pob and mmuRL-37 are in a monomeric and unstructured form in bulk solution (F-form), the human and ppyLL-37 are in an aggregated/helical form (A-form). The in vitro antibacterial activity depended strongly on both the structural form and the charge. F-form peptides were more potent against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and less salt, medium or serum sensitive than A-form ones. CD studies suggested that A- and F-form peptides interact with LPS in different manners, but the ability to detoxify it did not correlate directly with either the charge or structure. Toxicity towards eukaryotic cells also showed a varied dependence on the peptides' physical characteristics. Haemolytic activity was similar for all the tested peptides while other cytotoxicity assays revealed the highly cationic, F-form pobRL-37 as the most toxic, followed by the A-form human LL-37. As shown with the human peptide, toxicity depended markedly on the nature and metabolic state of the target cell. Our results suggest that different evolutionary trajectories for each orthologue lead to distinct sets of physical characteristics, which significantly differentiates their biological activities. PMID:19472166

  14. Structural Effects on Arthrobacter Methylene Hydroxylase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Steven; Klein, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Arthrobacter 4-44-2 (ATCC 25581), capable of subterminal oxidation of n-hexadecane to 2-, 3-, and 4-alcoholic and ketonic products, was examined for the ability of this methylene hydroxylase capability to be induced and repressed and for structural relationships influencing methylene function oxidation. Induction was best carried out by use of n-alkanes from 10 to 16 carbons in length and was especially strong with methylcyclohexane among cyclic compounds tested. Induction was not observed with several related alcohols, 1-unsaturated compounds, or methoxy and ethoxy compounds tested. After induction, n-alkanes 14 and 16 carbons in length were transformed to the corresponding internal oxidation products; however, no activity was observed with even-carbon alkanes of shorter chain length. Hexadecene-1 and all alcohols tested, including cyclododecanol, were transformed to corresponding ketonic or aldehydic products. Cyclic compounds tested, including cyclododecane, were not oxidized by induced cells, suggesting that a methyl group plays a role in orientation of the substrate for the methylene hydroxylation but that the methyl function was not as critical after completion of the hydroxylation step regardless of structural configuration. Acetate strongly repressed induction of n-hexadecane methylene hydroxylase activity. Inducibility of methylene hydroxylase activity was confirmed by use of cell-free systems with methylcyclohexane as an inducer. A stimulation of methylene hydroxylase activity by addition of reduced pyridine nucleotides and ferrous ion was indicated. PMID:5139534

  15. Oxyresveratrol: Structural Modification and Evaluation of Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Chatsumpun, Nutputsorn; Chuanasa, Taksina; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Jongbunprasert, Vichien; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Ploypradith, Poonsakdi; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Oxyresveratrol (2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxystilbene, 1), a phytoalexin present in large amounts in the heartwood of Artocarpus lacucha Buch.-Ham., has been reported to possess a wide variety of biological activities. As part of our continuing studies on the structural modification of oxyresveratrol, a library of twenty-six compounds was prepared via O-alkylation, aromatic halogenation, and electrophilic aromatic substitution. The two aromatic rings of the stilbene system of 1 can be chemically modulated by exploiting different protecting groups. Such a strategy allows for selective and exclusive modifications on either ring A or ring B. All compounds were evaluated in vitro for a panel of biological activities, including free radical scavenging activity, DNA protective properties, antiherpetic activity, inhibition of α-glucosidase and neuraminidase, and cytotoxicity against some cancer cell lines. Several derivatives were comparably active or even more potent than the parent oxyresveratrol and/or the appropriate positive controls. The partially etherified analogs 5'-hydroxy-2,3',4-trimethoxystilbene and 3',5'-dihydroxy-2,4-dimethoxystilbene demonstrated promising anti-herpetic and DNA protective activities, offering new leads for neuropreventive agent research, whereas 5'-hydroxy-2,3',4,-triisopropoxystilbene displayed anti-α-glucosidase effects, providing a new lead molecule for anti-diabetic drug development. 3',5'-Diacetoxy-2,4-diisopropoxystilbene showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against HeLa cancer cells, but the compound still needs further in vivo investigation to verify its anticancer potential. PMID:27104505

  16. Mitigation of chatter instabilities in milling by active structural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.; Lauffer, James P.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Shankar, Natarajan; Regelbrugge, Mark; Kwan, Chi-Man; Xu, Roger; Winterbauer, Bill; Bridger, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This paper documents the experimental validation of an active control approach for mitigating chatter in milling. To the authors knowledge, this is the first successful hardware demonstration of this approach. This approach is very different from many existing approaches that avoid instabilities by varying process parameters to seek regions of stability or by altering the regenerative process. In this approach, the stability lobes of the machine and tool are actively raised. This allows for machining at spindle speeds that are more representative of those used in existing machine tools. An active control system was implemented using actuators and sensors surrounding a spindle and tool. Due to the complexity of controlling from a stationary co-ordinate system and sensing from a rotating system, a telemetry system was used to transfer structural vibration data from the tool to a control processor. Closed-loop experiments produced up to an order of magnitude improvement in metal removal rate.

  17. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  18. Mechanisms of active control in cylindrical fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes ongoing efforts to understand and exploit active control techniques for low frequency noise suppression in aerospace applications. Analytical models are utilized in an effort to understand the mechanisms that govern noise transmission into acoustic spaces enclosed by lightweight structures and to examine the results of experimental implementations of active control schemes. Emphasis is placed on attaining global noise reductions using a minimum number of actuators rather than localized control over many subregions. This program has demonstrated the effect of synchrophasing and interface modal filtering, in limiting the modal density within the acoustic space, and how strong reactive effects may occur in two dimensional geometries. Finally, the performance of active control systems utilizing acoustic and vibration actuators is evaluated. Suppressions of 10 to 30 dB are demonstrated in practice, and performance is discussed in relation to the physical mechanisms and parameters of the system.

  19. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  20. Chemical structure and immunobiological activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipid A.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiko; Asai, Yasuyuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Tamai, Riyoko

    2007-01-01

    In 1933, Boivin et al. extracted an endotoxin from Salmonella typhimurium for the first time, after which a variety of chemical and biological studies on endotoxins have been performed. In 1952, the structural and functional properties of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), extracted by a hot phenol and water method devised by Westphal et al., were reported, which led to a number of studies of Gram-negative bacteria in regards to the host defense mechanism. Since 1960, the unique chemical structure and biological activity of Bacteroides species LPS have received a great deal of attention, and there is a long history of such studies. In addition, among oral bacterial strains that have received attention as causative periodontopathic bacteria, many have been classified as Bacteroides species. In particular, a number of researchers have investigated whether LPS of Porphyromonas gingivalis (formerly Bacteroides gingivalis), a black-pigmented oral anaerobic rod, is a virulent factor of the bacterium. The active center of the LPS of these Bacteroides species, the lipid A molecule, is known to be an active participant in endotoxic activation, though its other biological activities are weak, due to its unique chemical structure and action as an antagonist of LPS. On the other hand, many reports have noted that the LPS of those species activate cells in C3H/HeJ mice, which generally do not respond to LPS. We were the first to reveal the chemical structure of P. gingivalis lipid A and, together with other researchers, reported that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A have activities toward C3H/HeJ mice. Since that time, because of the popularity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) studies, a great deal of evidence has been reported indicating that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A are ligands that act on TLR2. In order to solve such problems as heterogeneity and contamination of the biologically active components of P. gingivalis lipid A, we produced a chemical synthesis counterpart

  1. Antimicrobial profile of some novel keto esters: Synthesis, crystal structures and structure-activity relationship studies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imtiaz; Saeed, Aamer; Arshad, Mohammad Ifzan; White, Jonathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid increase in bacterial resistance has become a major public concern by escalating alongside a lack of development of new anti-infective drugs. Novel remedies in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains are urgently needed. So, in this context, the present work is towards the investigation of antimicrobial efficacy of some novel keto ester derivatives, which are prepared by the condensation of substituted benzoic acids with various substituted phenacyl bromides in dimethylformamide at room temperature using triethylamine as a catalyst. The structural build-up of the target compounds was accomplished by spectroscopic techniques including FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The purity of the synthesized compounds was ascertained by elemental analysis. The molecular structures of compounds (4b) and (4l) were established by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The prepared analogues were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus leuteus) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas picketti, Salmonella setuball) bacteria and two fungal pathogenic strains (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus), respectively. Among the screened derivatives, several compounds were found to possess significant activity but (4b) and (4l) turned out to be lead molecules with remarkable antimicrobial efficacy. The structure-activity relationship analysis of this study also revealed that structural modifications on the basic skeleton affected the antimicrobial activity of the synthesized compounds. PMID:26826838

  2. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2012-05-24

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.

  3. Synthesis, biological activities, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of novel camptothecin analogues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Liu, Ying-Qian; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Liu, Huan-Xiang; Chen, An-Liang

    2015-01-01

    In continuation of our program aimed at the development of natural product-based pesticidal agents, three series of novel camptothecin derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their biological activities against T. Cinnabarinus, B. brassicae, and B. xylophilus. All of the derivatives showed good-to-excellent activity against three insect species tested, with LC50 values ranging from 0.00761 to 0.35496 mmol/L. Remarkably, all of the compounds were more potent than CPT against T. Cinnabarinus, and compounds 4d and 4c displayed superior activity (LC50 0.00761 mmol/L and 0.00942 mmol/L, respectively) compared with CPT (LC50 0.19719 mmol/L) against T. Cinnabarinus. Based on the observed bioactivities, preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations were also discussed. Furthermore, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was built. The model gave statistically significant results with the cross-validated q2 values of 0.580 and correlation coefficient r2 of 0.991 and  of 0.993. The QSAR analysis indicated that the size of the substituents play an important in the activity of 7-modified camptothecin derivatives. These findings will pave the way for further design, structural optimization, and development of camptothecin-derived compounds as pesticidal agents. PMID:25985362

  4. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  5. Synthesis, insecticidal activity, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of anthranilic diamides analogs containing oxadiazole rings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Zhu, Hongjun; Chen, Kai; Liu, Rui; Khallaf, Abdalla; Zhang, Xiangning; Ni, Jueping

    2013-06-28

    A series of anthranilic diamides analogs (3–11, 16–24) containing 1,2,4- or 1,3,4-oxadiazole rings were synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, MS and elemental analyses. The structure of 3-bromo-N-(2-(3-(4-bromophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-4-chloro-6-methylphenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (18, CCDC-) was determined by X-ray diffraction crystallography. The insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella and Spodoptera exigua were evaluated. The results showed that most of title compounds displayed good larvicidal activities against P. xylostella, especially compound 3-bromo-N-(4-chloro-2-methyl-6-(5-(methylthio)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (6), which displayed 71.43% activity against P. xylostella at 0.4 μg mL(-1) and 33.33% against S. exigua at 1 μg mL(-1). The structure-activity relationship showed that compounds decorated with a 1,3,4-oxadiazole were more potent than compounds decorated with a 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and different substituents attached to the oxadiazole ring also affected the insecticidal activity. This work provides some hints for further structure modification and the enhancement of insecticidal activity. PMID:23657615

  6. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUIDES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING AND INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and their Role in Predicting and Investigating Chemical Toxicity

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) represent attempts to generalize chemical information relative to biological activity for the twin purposes of generating insigh...

  7. CONSIDERATION OF REACTION INTERMEDIATES IN STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of Reaction Intermediates in Structure- Activity Relationships: A Key to Understanding and Prediction

    A structure-activity relationship (SAR) represents an empirical means for generalizing chemical information relative to biological activity, and is frequent...

  8. Structural stability and catalytic activity of lanthanum-based perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Lucia M. Petkovic

    2011-05-01

    Perovskite-type oxide materials with a general formula La(1-x)A(x)Fe(1-y)Co(y)O(3-delta), where A is an alkaline earth metal Sr or Ba have been studied as cathode materials for catalytic reduction of oxygen in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), as well as combustion catalysts. In this study, we use a combination of temperature programmed reduction measurements, X-ray diffraction, carbon black catalytic oxidation measurements, and first-principles, density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations to elucidate the main processes that contribute into the structural stability and catalytic activity for soot oxidation of these materials. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of the structure reconstruction with oxygen loss during the regulated increase of the temperature. The calculations are in good qualitative agreement with catalytic experiments and allow identify special combinations of the perovskite chemical composition and local surface structures for which one could expect the highest catalytic activity for the soot oxidation process.

  9. Structural basis for activation of calcineurin by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Rumi-Masante, Julie; Rusinga, Farai I; Lester, Terrence E; Dunlap, Tori B; Williams, Todd D; Dunker, A Keith; Weis, David D; Creamer, Trevor P

    2012-01-13

    The highly conserved phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) plays vital roles in numerous processes including T-cell activation, development and function of the central nervous system, and cardiac growth. It is activated by the calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM). CaM binds to a regulatory domain (RD) within CaN, causing a conformational change that displaces an autoinhibitory domain (AID) from the active site, resulting in activation of the phosphatase. This is the same general mechanism by which CaM activates CaM-dependent protein kinases. Previously published data have hinted that the RD of CaN is intrinsically disordered. In this work, we demonstrate that the RD is unstructured and that it folds upon binding CaM, ousting the AID from the catalytic site. The RD is 95 residues long, with the AID attached to its C-terminal end and the 24-residue CaM binding region toward the N-terminal end. This is unlike the CaM-dependent protein kinases that have CaM binding sites and AIDs immediately adjacent in sequence. Our data demonstrate that not only does the CaM binding region folds but also an ∼25- to 30-residue region between it and the AID folds, resulting in over half of the RD adopting α-helical structure. This appears to be the first observation of CaM inducing folding of this scale outside of its binding site on a target protein. PMID:22100452

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  11. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  12. Novel spiropyrazolone antitumor scaffold with potent activity: Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanchao; Li, Yu; Xu, Guixia; Chen, Shuqiang; Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Na; Dong, Guoqiang; Miao, Chaoyu; Su, Hua; Zhang, Wannian; Sheng, Chunquan

    2016-06-10

    Phenotypic screening of high quality compound library is an effective strategy to discover novel bioactive molecules. Previously, we developed the divergent organocatalytic cascade approach to efficiently construct a focused library with scaffold diversity and successfully identified a novel spiropyrazolone antitumor scaffold. Herein, a series of spiropyrazolone derivatives were designed, synthesized and assayed. Most of them showed good in vitro antitumor activity with a broad spectrum. Preliminary structure-activity relationship for the substitutions and the stereo configuration were obtained. Compound 5k showed good antitumor activity and could effectively induce cancer cell apoptosis, which represents a good starting point for the development of novel antitumor agents. PMID:27016707

  13. Inhibition of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity by Flavonoids: Structure-Activity Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Ligia; Castillo, Julián; Quiñones, Mar; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Arola, Lluis; Pujadas, Gerard; Muguerza, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that certain flavonoids can have an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, which plays a key role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. In the present study, 17 flavonoids belonging to five structural subtypes were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit ACE in order to establish the structural basis of their bioactivity. The ACE inhibitory (ACEI) activity of these 17 flavonoids was determined by fluorimetric method at two concentrations (500 µM and 100 µM). Their inhibitory potencies ranged from 17 to 95% at 500 µM and from 0 to 57% at 100 µM. In both cases, the highest ACEI activity was obtained for luteolin. Following the determination of ACEI activity, the flavonoids with higher ACEI activity (i.e., ACEI >60% at 500 µM) were selected for further IC50 determination. The IC50 values for luteolin, quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, rhoifolin and apigenin K were 23, 43, 64, 178, 183 and 196 µM, respectively. Our results suggest that flavonoids are an excellent source of functional antihypertensive products. Furthermore, our structure-activity relationship studies show that the combination of sub-structures on the flavonoid skeleton that increase ACEI activity is made up of the following elements: (a) the catechol group in the B-ring, (b) the double bond between C2 and C3 at the C-ring, and (c) the cetone group in C4 at the C-ring. Protein-ligand docking studies are used to understand the molecular basis for these results. PMID:23185345

  14. A curved piezo-structure model: implications on active structural acoustic control.

    PubMed

    Henry, J K; Clark, R L

    1999-09-01

    Current research in Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) relies heavily upon accurately capturing the application physics associated with the structure being controlled. The application of ASAC to aircraft interior noise requires a greater understanding of the dynamics of the curved panels which compose the skin of an aircraft fuselage. This paper presents a model of a simply supported curved panel with attached piezoelectric transducers. The model is validated by comparison to previous work. Further, experimental results for a simply supported curved panel test structure are presented in support of the model. The curvature is shown to affect substantially the dynamics of the panel, the integration of transducers, and the bandwidth required for structural acoustic control. PMID:10489701

  15. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  16. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  17. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  18. Current trends in the structure-activity relationships of sialyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Audry, Magali; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Imberty, Anne; Harduin-Lepers, Anne; Delannoy, Philippe; Breton, Christelle

    2011-06-01

    Sialyltransferases (STs) represent an important group of enzymes that transfer N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from cytidine monophosphate-Neu5Ac to various acceptor substrates. In higher animals, sialylated oligosaccharide structures play crucial roles in many biological processes but also in diseases, notably in microbial infection and cancer. Cell surface sialic acids have also been found in a few microorganisms, mainly pathogenic bacteria, and their presence is often associated with virulence. STs are distributed into five different families in the CAZy database (http://www.cazy.org/). On the basis of crystallographic data available for three ST families and fold recognition analysis for the two other families, STs can be grouped into two structural superfamilies that represent variations of the canonical glycosyltransferase (GT-A and GT-B) folds. These two superfamilies differ in the nature of their active site residues, notably the catalytic base (a histidine or an aspartate residue). The observed structural and functional differences strongly suggest that these two structural superfamilies have evolved independently. PMID:21098518

  19. Osteogenic activity of titanium surfaces with nanonetwork structures

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Helin; Komasa, Satoshi; Taguchi, Yoichiro; Sekino, Tohru; Okazaki, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Background Titanium surfaces play an important role in affecting osseointegration of dental implants. Previous studies have shown that the titania nanotube promotes osseointegration by enhancing osteogenic differentiation. Only relatively recently have the effects of titanium surfaces with other nanostructures on osteogenic differentiation been investigated. Methods In this study, we used NaOH solutions with concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 M to develop a simple and useful titanium surface modification that introduces the nanonetwork structures with titania nanosheet (TNS) nanofeatures to the surface of titanium disks. The effects of such a modified nanonetwork structure, with different alkaline concentrations on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), were evaluated. Results The nanonetwork structures with TNS nanofeatures induced by alkali etching markedly enhanced BMMSC functions of cell adhesion and osteogenesis-related gene expression, and other cell behaviors such as proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix deposition, and mineralization were also significantly increased. These effects were most pronounced when the concentration of NaOH was 10.0 M. Conclusion The results suggest that nanonetwork structures with TNS nanofeatures improved BMMSC proliferation and induced BMMSC osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the surfaces formed with 10.0 M NaOH suggest the potential to improve the clinical performance of dental implants. PMID:24741311

  20. Structural mechanism of glutamate receptor activation and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; Kumar, Janesh; Chittori, Sagar; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Mayer, Mark L; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-10-16

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. To gain a better understanding of how structural changes gate ion flux across the membrane, we trapped rat AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and kainate receptor subtypes in their major functional states and analysed the resulting structures using cryo-electron microscopy. We show that transition to the active state involves a 'corkscrew' motion of the receptor assembly, driven by closure of the ligand-binding domain. Desensitization is accompanied by disruption of the amino-terminal domain tetramer in AMPA, but not kainate, receptors with a two-fold to four-fold symmetry transition in the ligand-binding domains in both subtypes. The 7.6 Å structure of a desensitized kainate receptor shows how these changes accommodate channel closing. These findings integrate previous physiological, biochemical and structural analyses of glutamate receptors and provide a molecular explanation for key steps in receptor gating. PMID:25119039

  1. Neurosteroid Structure-Activity Relationships for Functional Activation of Extrasynaptic δGABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic GABAA receptors are primary mediators of rapid inhibition in the brain and play a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and other neurologic disorders. The δ-subunit GABAA receptors are expressed extrasynaptically in the dentate gyrus and contribute to tonic inhibition, promoting network shunting as well as reducing seizure susceptibility. However, the neurosteroid structure-function relationship at δGABA(A) receptors within the native hippocampus neurons remains unclear. Here we report a structure-activity relationship for neurosteroid modulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition in the murine dentate gyrus granule cells. We recorded neurosteroid allosteric potentiation of GABA as well as direct activation of tonic currents using a wide array of natural and synthetic neurosteroids. Our results shows that, for all neurosteroids, the C3α-OH group remains obligatory for extrasynaptic receptor functional activity, as C3β-OH epimers were inactive in activating tonic currents. Allopregnanolone and related pregnane analogs exhibited the highest potency and maximal efficacy in promoting tonic currents. Alterations at the C17 or C20 region of the neurosteroid molecule drastically altered the transduction kinetics of tonic current activation. The androstane analogs had the weakest modulatory response among the analogs tested. Neurosteroid potentiation of tonic currents was completely (approximately 95%) diminished in granule cells from δ-knockout mice, suggesting that δ-subunit receptors are essential for neurosteroid activity. The neurosteroid sensitivity of δGABA(A) receptors was confirmed at the systems level using a 6-Hz seizure test. A consensus neurosteroid pharmacophore model at extrasynaptic δGABA(A) receptors is proposed based on a structure-activity relationship for activation of tonic current and seizure protection. PMID:26857959

  2. Structural role of Fe in the soil active glasses.

    PubMed

    Wacławska, I; Szumera, M; Stoch, P; Sitarz, M

    2011-08-15

    Glasses of the SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-K(2)O-MgO-CaO-Fe(2)O(3) system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. The influence of iron addition on the structure of glasses was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The chemical activity of glasses in the 2 mass% citric acid solutions was measured by the ICP-AES method. It has been found that the formation of domains with structure similar to phosphates with chemically stable P-O-Fe(3+) and P-O-Fe(2+) bonds decreases the glass solubility under conditions simulating the soil environment. PMID:20875769

  3. Structural role of Fe in the soil active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacławska, I.; Szumera, M.; Stoch, P.; Sitarz, M.

    2011-08-01

    Glasses of the SiO 2-P 2O 5-K 2O-MgO-CaO-Fe 2O 3 system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. The influence of iron addition on the structure of glasses was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The chemical activity of glasses in the 2 mass% citric acid solutions was measured by the ICP-AES method. It has been found that the formation of domains with structure similar to phosphates with chemically stable P-O-Fe 3+ and P-O-Fe 2+ bonds decreases the glass solubility under conditions simulating the soil environment.

  4. Structure and Activities of the Eukaryotic RNA Exosome.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V; Lima, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the multisubunit eukaryotic RNA exosome was described more than a decade ago, and structural studies conducted since that time have contributed to our mechanistic understanding of factors that are required for 3'-to-5' RNA processing and decay. This chapter describes the organization of the eukaryotic RNA exosome with a focus on presenting results related to the noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core as well as the hydrolytic exo- and endoribonuclease Rrp44 (Dis3) and the exoribonuclease Rrp6. This is achieved in large part by describing crystal structures of Rrp44, Rrp6, and the nine-subunit exosome core with an emphasis on how these molecules interact to endow the RNA exosome with its catalytic activities. PMID:27166440

  5. Synthesis and Structural Activity Relationship Study of Antitubercular Carboxamides

    PubMed Central

    Ugwu, D. I.; Ezema, B. E.; Eze, F. U.; Ugwuja, D. I.

    2014-01-01

    The unusual structure and chemical composition of the mycobacterial cell wall, the tedious duration of therapy, and resistance developed by the microorganism have made the recurrence of the disease multidrug resistance and extensive or extreme drug resistance. The prevalence of tuberculosis in synergy with HIV/AIDS epidemic augments the risk of developing the disease by 100-fold. The need to synthesize new drugs that will shorten the total duration of effective treatment and/or significantly reduce the dosage taken under DOTS supervision, improve on the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis which defies the treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin, and provide effective treatment for latent TB infections which is essential for eliminating tuberculosis prompted this review. In this review, we considered the synthesis and structure activity relationship study of carboxamide derivatives with antitubercular potential. PMID:25610646

  6. Structural evolution of an alkali sulfate activated slag cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of sodium sulfate content and curing duration (from fresh paste up to 18 months) on the binder structure of sodium sulfate activated slag cements was evaluated. Isothermal calorimetry results showed an induction period spanning the first three days after mixing, followed by an acceleration-deceleration peak corresponding to the formation of bulk reaction products. Ettringite, a calcium aluminium silicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) phase, and a hydrotalcite-like Mg-Al layered double hydroxide have been identified as the main reaction products, independent of the Na2SO4 dose. No changes in the phase assemblage were detected in the samples with curing from 1 month up to 18 months, indicating a stable binder structure. The most significant changes upon curing at advanced ages observed were growth of the AFt phase and an increase in silicate chain length in the C-A-S-H, resulting in higher strength.

  7. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure. PMID:9921654

  8. System design for active vibration control of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, V.; Nagaraja, B. V.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Shree S, Amrutha; Muthaiah, Skanda N.

    2003-10-01

    Instrumentation, electronics, digital signal processing and related software form the basic building blocks of a system for implementation of Active Vibration Control (AVC) for smart aerospace structures. This paper essentially deals with the design, development and implementation of a 4 channel analog input sub-system essentially consisting of charge amplifiers, filters, gain amplifiers & Analog to Digital Converters (ADC), the subsequent Digital Signal Processor (DSP) hardware for implementation of the controller and finally a 4 Channel analog output subsystem consisting of Digital to Analog Converters (DAC), reconstruction filters & high voltage amplifiers. This system essentially interfaces to a structure with piezo-ceramic sensors and actuators for implementation of real time AVC on a smart beam. The paper also highlights some of the new ideas that have been incorporated into the system design.

  9. Modelling of piezoelectric actuator dynamics for active structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Chung, Walter H.; Von Flotow, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    The paper models the effects of dynamic coupling between a structure and an electrical network through the piezoelectric effect. The coupled equations of motion of an arbitrary elastic structure with piezoelectric elements and passive electronics are derived. State space models are developed for three important cases: direct voltage driven electrodes, direct charge driven electrodes, and an indirect drive case where the piezoelectric electrodes are connected to an arbitrary electrical circuit with embedded voltage and current sources. The equations are applied to the case of a cantilevered beam with surface mounted piezoceramics and indirect voltage and current drive. The theoretical derivations are validated experimentally on an actively controlled cantilevered beam test article with indirect voltage drive.

  10. Optimum mix of passive and active control of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Lynn; Richards, Ken

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test vibration suppression (settling time and jitter) of a large space structure (LSS) characterized by low frequency high global vibration modes. Five percent passive damping in a large truss was analyzed, tested and correlated. A representative system article re-target analysis shows that modest levels of passive damping dramatically reduce the control energy required. LSS must incorporate passive damping from the outset. The LSS system performance will not be met by either active or passive damping alone.

  11. Binding-activated localization microscopy of DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ingmar; Ries, Jonas; Klotzsch, Enrico; Ewers, Helge; Vogel, Viola

    2011-09-14

    Many nucleic acid stains show a strong fluorescence enhancement upon binding to double-stranded DNA. Here we exploit this property to perform superresolution microscopy based on the localization of individual binding events. The dynamic labeling scheme and the optimization of fluorophore brightness yielded a resolution of ∼14 nm (fwhm) and a spatial sampling of 1/nm. We illustrate our approach with two different DNA-binding dyes and apply it to visualize the organization of the bacterial chromosome in fixed Escherichia coli cells. In general, the principle of binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) can be extended to other dyes and targets such as protein structures. PMID:21838238

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for organophosphates binding to acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Anderson, Paul E; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2013-02-01

    Organophosphates are a group of pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents that inhibit acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the excitatory neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Numerous structural variants exist for this chemical class, and data regarding their toxicity can be difficult to obtain in a timely fashion. At the same time, their use as pesticides and military weapons is widespread, which presents a major concern and challenge in evaluating human toxicity. To address this concern, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was developed to predict pentavalent organophosphate oxon human acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants. A database of 278 three-dimensional structures and their bimolecular rates was developed from 15 peer-reviewed publications. A database of simplified molecular input line entry notations and their respective acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants are listed in Supplementary Material, Table I. The database was quite diverse, spanning 7 log units of activity. In order to describe their structure, 675 molecular descriptors were calculated using AMPAC 8.0 and CODESSA 2.7.10. Orthogonal projection to latent structures regression, bootstrap leave-random-many-out cross-validation and y-randomization were used to develop an externally validated consensus QSAR model. The domain of applicability was assessed by the William's plot. Six external compounds were outside the warning leverage indicating potential model extrapolation. A number of compounds had residuals >2 or <-2, indicating potential outliers or activity cliffs. The results show that the HOMO-LUMO energy gap contributed most significantly to the binding affinity. A mean training R (2) of 0.80, a mean test set R (2) of 0.76 and a consensus external test set R (2) of 0.66 were achieved using the QSAR. The training and external test set RMSE values were found to be 0.76 and 0.88. The results suggest that this QSAR model can be used in

  13. Large-scale cortical correlation structure of spontaneous oscillatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Joerg F.; Hawellek, David J.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Siegel, Markus; Engel, Andreas K.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the brain-wide correlation of electrophysiological signals. Here we show that spontaneous oscillatory neuronal activity exhibits frequency-specific spatial correlation structure in the human brain. We developed an analysis approach that discounts spurious correlation of signal power caused by the limited spatial resolution of electrophysiological measures. We applied this approach to source estimates of spontaneous neuronal activity reconstructed from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Overall, correlation of power across cortical regions was strongest in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–32 Hz) and correlation patterns depended on the underlying oscillation frequency. Global hubs resided in the medial temporal lobe in the theta frequency range (4–6 Hz), in lateral parietal areas in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–23 Hz), and in sensorimotor areas for higher frequencies (32–45 Hz). Our data suggest that interactions in various large-scale cortical networks may be reflected in frequency specific power-envelope correlations. PMID:22561454

  14. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  15. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  16. Fine structure of the magnetic field in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Lev; Beskrovnaya, Nina; Ikhsanov, Nazar

    High-resolution observations with SOHO, SDO, TRACE, HINODE suggest that the solar magnetic field in active regions has a complicated fine structure. There is a large number of thin magnetic arcs extended from the photosphere to corona with almost constant cross-section. We explore a possibility to model the complex of interacting arcs in terms of a dynamical percolating network. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the flute instability of prominences and/or coronal condensations. We speculate around an assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenario as dynamical current percolation through a random resistors network in which the saltatory conduction is controlled by a local current level.

  17. [Nootropic activity of nicotinamide and its structural analogs].

    PubMed

    Akhundov, R A; Zagorevskiĭ, V A; Voronina, T A

    1990-10-01

    It is known that endogenic nicotinamide has a tranquilizing and stress-protective activity. The present investigations show the nootropic effect of this drug and its analogs nicomorpholine and acethylnicotinate on acute models of hypoxia and amnesia. The present results revealed that the observed nootropic activity of nicotinamide and its analogs is more expressed than this of piracetam, pyritinol and meclofenoxate. Having in mind the similarity of pharmacological effects of piracetam and nicotinamide (antihypoxic, antiamnestic and anxiolytic) we try if these drugs have electronic-structure similarities. The analysis revealed some similarity of these drugs' molecules in relation to the composition and distribution of polar centres pi- and p-electronic areas) distance between them, topography of separate molecule parts. PMID:2149078

  18. A Structure-Activity Study with Aryl Acylamidases

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, David T.; Turco, Ronald F.; Konopka, Allan

    1994-01-01

    We examined the relationship between chemical structure and biodegradability of acylanilide herbicides by using a set of model compounds. Four bacterial isolates (one gram-negative and three gram-positive) that grew on acetanilide were used. These soil isolates cleaved the amide bond of acetanilide via an aryl acylamidase reaction, producing aniline and the organic acid acetate. A series of acetanilide analogs with alkyl substitutions on the nitrogen atom or the aromatic ring were tested for their ability to induce aryl acylamidase activity and act as substrates for the enzyme. The substrate range, in general, was limited to those analogs not disubstituted in the ortho position of the benzene ring or which did not contain an alkyl group on the nitrogen atom. These same N-substituted compounds did not induce enzyme activity either, whereas the ortho-substituted compounds could in some cases. PMID:16349428

  19. A structure-activity study with aryl acylamidases.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, D T; Turco, R F; Konopka, A

    1994-11-01

    We examined the relationship between chemical structure and biodegradability of acylanilide herbicides by using a set of model compounds. Four bacterial isolates (one gram-negative and three gram-positive) that grew on acetanilide were used. These soil isolates cleaved the amide bond of acetanilide via an aryl acylamidase reaction, producing aniline and the organic acid acetate. A series of acetanilide analogs with alkyl substitutions on the nitrogen atom or the aromatic ring were tested for their ability to induce aryl acylamidase activity and act as substrates for the enzyme. The substrate range, in general, was limited to those analogs not disubstituted in the ortho position of the benzene ring or which did not contain an alkyl group on the nitrogen atom. These same N-substituted compounds did not induce enzyme activity either, whereas the ortho-substituted compounds could in some cases. PMID:16349428

  20. Vibrational spectra, structure and antioxidant activity of gossypol imine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilkevych, N. S.; Schroeder, G.; Rybachenko, V. I.; Chotiy, K. Y.; Makarova, R. A.

    2012-02-01

    The structures and tautomeric equilibria of natural polyphenol gossypol and four its imine derivatives were studied by FT-IR-, NMR-spectroscopy and quantum chemistry methods. It was shown that gossypol Schiff bases exist in solution as enamine-enamine tautomer and hydrazones as imine-imine tautomer. Infrared absorption spectra of studied compounds were simulated using the PM3 method. The fundamental vibrational frequencies were evaluated using various scale factors which yield a good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Free radical scavenging activity of gossypol and its imine derivatives was evaluated using DPPH method. Antioxidant activity of studied compounds was characterized. Gossypol hydrazones were shown to be more efficient, while Schiff base to be less efficient as antioxidants in comparison with gossypol itself.

  1. Phosphine derivatives of sparfloxacin - Synthesis, structures and in vitro activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarnicka, Urszula K.; Starosta, Radosław; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela; Kyzioł, Agnieszka; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    We synthesized two derivatives of sparfloxacin (HSf): aminomethyl(diphenyl)phosphine (PSf) and its oxide (OPSf). The compounds were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, MS and elemental analysis. In addition, the molecular structures of the compounds were determined using DFT and X-ray (OPSf) analysis. The antibacterial activity of HSf and both derivatives was tested against four reference and fifteen clinical Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains of bacteria (sensitive or resistant to fluoroquinolones). The results showed that the activity of PSf was similar to or higher than the activity of HSf, while OPSf was found significantly less active. The compounds were also tested in vitro toward the following cancer cell lines: mouse colon carcinoma (CT26) and human lung adenocarcinoma (A549). Regardless of the cancer cell line, derivatization of HSf resulted in the gradual increase of cytotoxicity. OPSf exhibited the highest one (4 h - incubation time: IC50(CT26) = 51.0 ± 1.2; IC50(A549) = 74.9 ± 1.4 and 24 h: IC50(CT26) = 109.2 ± 8.8; IC50(A549) = 52.7 ± 9.2).

  2. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    PubMed

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra. PMID:27187329

  4. 4-Aminoquinolines Active against Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum: Basis of Antiparasite Activity and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analyses▿

    PubMed Central

    Hocart, Simon J.; Liu, Huayin; Deng, Haiyan; De, Dibyendu; Krogstad, Frances M.; Krogstad, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a safe and economical 4-aminoquinoline (AQ) antimalarial. However, its value has been severely compromised by the increasing prevalence of CQ resistance. This study examined 108 AQs, including 68 newly synthesized compounds. Of these 108 AQs, 32 (30%) were active only against CQ-susceptible Plasmodium falciparum strains and 59 (55%) were active against both CQ-susceptible and CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s], ≤25 nM). All AQs active against both CQ-susceptible and CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains shared four structural features: (i) an AQ ring without alkyl substitution, (ii) a halogen at position 7 (Cl, Br, or I but not F), (iii) a protonatable nitrogen at position 1, and (iv) a second protonatable nitrogen at the end of the side chain distal from the point of attachment to the AQ ring via the nitrogen at position 4. For activity against CQ-resistant parasites, side chain lengths of ≤3 or ≥10 carbons were necessary but not sufficient; they were identified as essential factors by visual comparison of 2-dimensional (2-D) structures in relation to the antiparasite activities of the AQs and were confirmed by computer-based 3-D comparisons and differential contour plots of activity against P. falciparum. The advantage of the method reported here (refinement of quantitative structure-activity relationship [QSAR] descriptors by random assignment of compounds to multiple training and test sets) is that it retains QSAR descriptors according to their abilities to predict the activities of unknown test compounds rather than according to how well they fit the activities of the compounds in the training sets. PMID:21383099

  5. Poisson Parameters of Antimicrobial Activity: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sestraş, Radu E.; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2012-01-01

    A contingency of observed antimicrobial activities measured for several compounds vs. a series of bacteria was analyzed. A factor analysis revealed the existence of a certain probability distribution function of the antimicrobial activity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis for the overall antimicrobial ability was conducted using the population statistics associated with identified probability distribution function. The antimicrobial activity proved to follow the Poisson distribution if just one factor varies (such as chemical compound or bacteria). The Poisson parameter estimating antimicrobial effect, giving both mean and variance of the antimicrobial activity, was used to develop structure-activity models describing the effect of compounds on bacteria and fungi species. Two approaches were employed to obtain the models, and for every approach, a model was selected, further investigated and found to be statistically significant. The best predictive model for antimicrobial effect on bacteria and fungi species was identified using graphical representation of observed vs. calculated values as well as several predictive power parameters. PMID:22606039

  6. Structure-activity relationships of polybiguanides with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Passic, Shendra R; Ferguson, Mary Lee; Catalone, Bradley J; Kish-Catalone, Tina; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Zhu, Wei; Welsh, William; Rando, Robert; Howett, Mary K; Wigdahl, Brian; Labib, Mohamed; Krebs, Fred C

    2010-12-01

    Previous investigations showing that polydisperse biguanide (PDBG) molecules have activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) also suggested a relationship between PDBG biologic activity and the lengths of hydrocarbon linkers surrounding the positively charged biguanide unit. To better define structure-activity relationships, PDBG molecules with select linker lengths were evaluated for cytotoxicity, anti-HIV-1 activity, and in vivo toxicity. Results of the in vitro experiments demonstrated that increases in linker length (and, therefore, increases in compound lipophilicity) were generally associated with increases in cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against HIV-1. However, a relationship between linker length asymmetry and in vitro therapeutic index (TI) suggested structural specificity in the mechanism of action against HIV-1. Polyethylene hexamethylene biguanide (PEHMB; biguanide units spaced between alternating ethylene and hexamethylene linkers) was found to have the highest in vitro TI (CC₅₀/IC₅₀) among the compounds examined. Recent improvements in PEHMB synthesis and purification have yielded preparations of PEHMB with in vitro TI values of 266 and 7000 against HIV-1 strains BaL and IIIB, respectively. The minimal toxicity of PEHMB relative to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB; biguanide units alternating with hexamethylene linkers) in a murine model of cervicovaginal microbicide toxicity was consistent with considerable differences in cytotoxicity between PEHMB and PHMB observed during in vitro experiments. These structure-activity investigations increase our understanding of PDBG molecules as agents with activity against HIV-1 and provide the foundation for further preclinical studies of PEHMB and other biguanide-based compounds as antiviral and microbicidal agents. PMID:21106331

  7. Protein structure. Structure and activity of tryptophan-rich TSPO proteins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2015-01-30

    Translocator proteins (TSPOs) bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are highly conserved from bacteria to mammals. Here we report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7 Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  8. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation. PMID:26712768

  9. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation. PMID:26712768

  10. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  11. Lithosphere-asthenosphere Structure and Active Tectonics In Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimera, G.; Aoudia, A.; Saraò, A.; Panza, G. F.

    We investigate the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure and the active tectonics along a stripe from the Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic with emphasis on the Umbria-Marche area by means of surface-wave tomography, and inversion studies for structure and seismic moment tensor retrieval. The data include seismic waveforms, a large compilation of local group velocities (0.8-4s) and regional phase and group velocity (10-100s) measurements. The local group velocity maps cover the area reactivated by the 1997 Umbria-Marche earthquake sequence. These maps suggest a relation between the lat- eral heterogeneity and distribution of the active faults and related basins. Such relation is confirmed by the non-linear inversion of the local dispersion curves. To image the deeper structure from the Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic coast, we fix the uppermost part of the crust using the Umbria-Marche models along with the CROP03 profile and related shear wave velocity, and invert the additional long period dispersion measure- ments. The results of the inversion show the geometry and lateral heterogeneity of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. The retrieved models for the Umbria-Marche up- per crust reveal the importance of the inherited compression on the ongoing extension and related seismic activity. The reactivated 1997 normal fault zone displays a thrust fault geometry as evidenced by the lateral extent of the faulted Late Triassic evap- orites that did not yet balance the cumulative normal faulting deformation attesting therefore recent extensional tectonics within the thrust belt. Our data are in favor of a listric geometry of faulting at depth. Source inversion studies of the two main crustal events of September 26 and October 14, 1997 show the dominance of normal faulting mechanisms, whereas selected aftershocks between the reactivated fault segments re- veal that the prevailing deformation at the step-over is of strike-slip faulting type. The rupture of the three distinct and

  12. Structure of urban movements: polycentric activity and entangled hierarchical flows.

    PubMed

    Roth, Camille; Kang, Soong Moon; Batty, Michael; Barthélemy, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of urban hubs and centers and how individuals interact with these centers is a crucial problem with many applications ranging from urban planning to epidemiology. We utilize here in an unprecedented manner the large scale, real-time 'Oyster' card database of individual person movements in the London subway to reveal the structure and organization of the city. We show that patterns of intraurban movement are strongly heterogeneous in terms of volume, but not in terms of distance travelled, and that there is a polycentric structure composed of large flows organized around a limited number of activity centers. For smaller flows, the pattern of connections becomes richer and more complex and is not strictly hierarchical since it mixes different levels consisting of different orders of magnitude. This new understanding can shed light on the impact of new urban projects on the evolution of the polycentric configuration of a city and the dense structure of its centers and it provides an initial approach to modeling flows in an urban system. PMID:21249210

  13. Structure of Urban Movements: Polycentric Activity and Entangled Hierarchical Flows

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Camille; Kang, Soong Moon; Batty, Michael; Barthélemy, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of urban hubs and centers and how individuals interact with these centers is a crucial problem with many applications ranging from urban planning to epidemiology. We utilize here in an unprecedented manner the large scale, real-time ‘Oyster’ card database of individual person movements in the London subway to reveal the structure and organization of the city. We show that patterns of intraurban movement are strongly heterogeneous in terms of volume, but not in terms of distance travelled, and that there is a polycentric structure composed of large flows organized around a limited number of activity centers. For smaller flows, the pattern of connections becomes richer and more complex and is not strictly hierarchical since it mixes different levels consisting of different orders of magnitude. This new understanding can shed light on the impact of new urban projects on the evolution of the polycentric configuration of a city and the dense structure of its centers and it provides an initial approach to modeling flows in an urban system. PMID:21249210

  14. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  15. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu; Wu, Kung C.

    1996-12-31

    A zeroth level introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single- degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  16. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.

    1995-07-01

    An introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single-degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  17. Lipoteichoic Acid in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Structural Model and Immunomodulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cot, Marlène; Ray, Aurélie; Gilleron, Martine; Vercellone, Alain; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Armau, Elise; Gauthier, Sophie; Tiraby, Gérard; Puzo, Germain; Nigou, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Gram positive bacteria produce cell envelope macroamphiphile glycopolymers, i.e. lipoteichoic acids or lipoglycans, whose functions and biosynthesis are not yet fully understood. We report for the first time a detailed structure of lipoteichoic acid isolated from a Streptomyces species, i.e. Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T. Chemical, MS and NMR analyses revealed a polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituted with α-glucosaminyl and α-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl residues but devoid of any amino-acid substituent. This structure is very close, if not identical, to that of the wall teichoic acid of this organism. These data not only contribute to the growing recognition that lipoteichoic acid is a cell envelope component of Gram positive Actinobacteria but also strongly support the recently proposed hypothesis of an overlap between the pathways of lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid synthesis in these bacteria. S. hygroscopicus lipoteichoic acid induced signalling by human innate immune receptor TLR2, confirming its role as a microbe-associated molecular pattern. Its activity was partially dependant on TLR1, TLR6 and CD14. Moreover, it stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 production by a human macrophage cell line to an extent similar to that of Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. These results provide new clues on lipoteichoic acid structure/function relationships, most particularly on the role of the polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituents. PMID:22028855

  18. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications. PMID:25108239

  19. Automated Structure-Activity Relationship Mining: Connecting Chemical Structure to Biological Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Mathias J; Jaramillo, David E; Dančík, Vlado; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Shamji, Alykhan F; Wagner, Bridget K; Schreiber, Stuart L; Clemons, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of small molecules is important for developing probes and novel therapeutic agents in chemical biology and drug discovery. Increasingly, multiplexed small-molecule profiling assays allow simultaneous measurement of many biological response parameters for the same compound (e.g., expression levels for many genes or binding constants against many proteins). Although such methods promise to capture SARs with high granularity, few computational methods are available to support SAR analyses of high-dimensional compound activity profiles. Many of these methods are not generally applicable or reduce the activity space to scalar summary statistics before establishing SARs. In this article, we present a versatile computational method that automatically extracts interpretable SAR rules from high-dimensional profiling data. The rules connect chemical structural features of compounds to patterns in their biological activity profiles. We applied our method to data from novel cell-based gene-expression and imaging assays collected on more than 30,000 small molecules. Based on the rules identified for this data set, we prioritized groups of compounds for further study, including a novel set of putative histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:24710340

  20. Polyphenols in Ammania auriculata: structures, antioxidative activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nawwar, M A; Youb, N A; El-Raey, M A; Zaghloul, S S; Hashem, A M; Mostafa, E S; Eldahshan, O; Werner, V; Becker, A; Haertel, B; Lindequist, U; Linscheid, M W

    2014-11-01

    Chemical and biological investigations of the extract of Ammania auriculata (Lytheraceae) resulted in the identification of eight polyphenols (1 - 8) for the first time from this plant, including the gallotannin, 2,3,6-tri-O-galloyl-(α,β)-4C1-glucopyranose (8), for which 1D and 2D-NMR spectra were recorded and assigned for the first time. The structures of all isolates (1 - 8) were elucidated by conventional methods, spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR, and by HR-ESIMS as well. All of the isolated compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant activities, determined by the DPPH and ORAC methods and for their cytotoxicity against the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT using the neutral red assay (NRU) and cell cycle analysis. Compounds 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6 significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species production with ED50 values between 3.22 and 9.79 μg/ml. Compounds 1, 3, 4, and 5 showed cytotoxic activity against HaCaT cells with IC50 values between 30.7 and 84.1 μg/ml. The new galloyl glucose (8) was found not cytotoxic. Ellagitannins, 2,3-hexahydroxy-((α/β)-glucopyranose (1) and 1 -0-galloyl 2,3-hexahydroxy-(α)-glucopyranose (5) possess remarkable antioxidative and comparably weak cytotoxic activity. PMID:25985585

  1. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalovs, A.; Barkanov, E.; Gluhihs, S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  2. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationships (SAR) and in Silico Studies of Coumarin Derivatives with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Rodrigo S. A.; Guerra, Felipe Q. S.; de O. Lima, Edeltrudes; de Simone, Carlos A.; Tavares, Josean F.; Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus T.; de Aquino, Thiago M.; de Moura, Ricardo O.; Mendonça, Francisco J. B.; Barbosa-Filho, José M.

    2013-01-01

    The increased incidence of opportunistic fungal infections, associated with greater resistance to the antifungal drugs currently in use has highlighted the need for new solutions. In this study twenty four coumarin derivatives were screened in vitro for antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus. Some of the compounds exhibited significant antifungal activity with MICs values ranging between 16 and 32 μg/mL. The structure-activity relationships (SAR) study demonstrated that O-substitutions are essential for antifungal activity. It also showed that the presence of a short aliphatic chain and/or electron withdrawing groups (NO2 and/or acetate) favor activity. These findings were confirmed using density functional theory (DFT), when calculating the LUMO density. In Principal Component Analysis (PCA), two significant principal components (PCs) explained more than 60% of the total variance. The best Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) model showed an r2 of 0.86 and q2cv of 0.64 corroborating the SAR observations as well as demonstrating a greater probe N1 interaction for active compounds. Descriptors generated by TIP correlogram demonstrated the importance of the molecular shape for antifungal activity. PMID:23306152

  3. Extracellular melanogenesis inhibitory activity and the structure-activity relationships of ugonins from Helminthostachys zeylanica roots.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Itakura, Yuki; Batubara, Irmanida

    2015-07-01

    Ugonin J, K, and L, which are luteolin derivatives, were isolated from Helminthostachys zeylanica roots by a series of chromatographic separations of a 50% ethanol/water extract. They were identified using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet (UV) spectra, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF-MS). In this study, the intra and extracellular melanogenic activity of the ugonins were determined using B16 melanoma cells. The results showed that ugonin J at 12.5, 25, and 50μM reduced extracellular melanin contents to 75, 16, and 14%, respectively, compared to the control. This indicates that ugonin J showed a stronger activity than arbutin, used as the positive control. Moreover, ugonin K showed a more potent inhibition with 19, 8, and 9% extracellular melanin reduction at the same concentrations, than that shown by ugonin J. In contrast, ugonin L did not inhibit intra- or extracellular melanogenic activity. Furthermore, in order to investigate the structure-activity relationships of the ugonins, the intra- and extracellular melanogenic activity of luteolin, methylluteolin, quercetin, eriodictyol, apigenin, and chrysin were determined. Consequently, it was suggested that the catechol and flavone skeleton of ugonin K is essential for the extracellular melanogenic inhibitory activity, and the low polarity substituent groups on the A ring of ugonin K may increase the activity. PMID:25979512

  4. The protein structures that shape caspase activity, specificity, activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Salvesen, Guy S.

    2004-01-01

    The death morphology commonly known as apoptosis results from a post-translational pathway driven largely by specific limited proteolysis. In the last decade the structural basis for apoptosis regulation has moved from nothing to ‘quite good’, and we now know the fundamental structures of examples from the initiator phase, the pre-mitochondrial regulator phase, the executioner phase, inhibitors and their antagonists, and even the structures of some substrates. The field is as well advanced as the best known of proteolytic pathways, the coagulation cascade. Fundamentally new mechanisms in protease regulation have been disclosed. Structural evidence suggests that caspases have an unusual catalytic mechanism, and that they are activated by apparently unrelated events, depending on which position in the apoptotic pathway they occupy. Some naturally occurring caspase inhibitors have adopted classic inhibition strategies, but other have revealed completely novel mechanisms. All of the structural and mechanistic information can, and is, being applied to drive therapeutic strategies to combat overactivation of apoptosis in degenerative disease, and underactivation in neoplasia. We present a comprehensive review of the caspases, their regulators and inhibitors from a structural and mechanistic point of view, and with an aim to consolidate the many threads that define the rapid growth of this field. PMID:15450003

  5. Structural Characterization and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Astragalus taipaishanensis and Their Structure-Activity Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wenjun; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Eight phenolic compounds were isolated using bio-guided isolation and purified from the roots of Astragalus taipaishanensis Y. C. Ho et S. B. Ho (A. taipaishanensis) for the first time. Their structures were elucidated by ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D-NMR and 2D-NMR as 7,2‧-dihydroxy-3‧,4‧-dimethoxy isoflavan (1), formononetin (2), isoliquiritigenin (3), quercetin (4), kaempferol (5), ononin (6), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (7) and vanillic acid (8). Six flavonoids (compounds 1-6) exhibited stronger antioxidant activities (determined by DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays) than those of BHA and TBHQ and also demonstrated noticeable protective effects (particularly quercetin and kaempferol) on Escherichia coli under oxidative stress. Additionally, the chemical constituents compared with those of Astragalus membranaceus and the structure-activity relationship of the isolated compounds were both analyzed. The results clearly demonstrated that A. taipaishanensis has the potential to be selected as an alternative medicinal and food plant that can be utilized in health food products, functional tea and pharmaceutical products.

  6. Structural Characterization and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Astragalus taipaishanensis and Their Structure-Activity Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Wenjun; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Eight phenolic compounds were isolated using bio-guided isolation and purified from the roots of Astragalus taipaishanensis Y. C. Ho et S. B. Ho (A. taipaishanensis) for the first time. Their structures were elucidated by ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D-NMR and 2D-NMR as 7,2′-dihydroxy-3′,4′-dimethoxy isoflavan (1), formononetin (2), isoliquiritigenin (3), quercetin (4), kaempferol (5), ononin (6), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (7) and vanillic acid (8). Six flavonoids (compounds 1-6) exhibited stronger antioxidant activities (determined by DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays) than those of BHA and TBHQ and also demonstrated noticeable protective effects (particularly quercetin and kaempferol) on Escherichia coli under oxidative stress. Additionally, the chemical constituents compared with those of Astragalus membranaceus and the structure-activity relationship of the isolated compounds were both analyzed. The results clearly demonstrated that A. taipaishanensis has the potential to be selected as an alternative medicinal and food plant that can be utilized in health food products, functional tea and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26350974

  7. Structural analysis and immunostimulatory activity of glycopeptides from Paecilomyces sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Meng, Meng; Sun, Huiqing; Li, Yang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-03-01

    The parasitic fungus, Paecilomyces sinensis, is used to produce Cordyceps materials as a succedaneum of natural Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) in China. In this work, a glycopeptide (CPS-II) was isolated and purified from Paecilomyces sinensis. The result of HPLC indicated that CPS-II was a glycopeptide. The estimated average molecular weight of CPS-II was 2 × 10(6) Da. FTIR, methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and CD were used for its structural analysis. The glycopeptide CPS-II was mainly composed of (1 → 3), (1 → 4) connected glucose and galactose as the backbone, there are (1 → 2,3,6) connected glucose, (1 → 3,6) connected mannose, and (1 → 6) connected galactose. Cell proliferation assay and morphological observations indicated that in a certain range of concentrations and time, CPS-II can significantly improve the proliferation activity of RAW264.7 cells. PMID:26912165

  8. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  9. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  10. What Preparatory Science is Needed in Coronal Structure and Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will launch in six short years! Before then, we need to accomplish a great deal of science in order to be able to maximize the return of these missions. Preparatory science is especially important for exploratory missions such as SO and SPP, because they truly will be going "where no mission has gone before". Such preparatory science may include all types of research: theory, modeling, data exploitation, and supporting observations. This meeting provides an opportunity for the community to define and begin this critical preparatory work. In this talk I will provide an overview of our state of knowledge in coronal structure and activity, describe what I believe are the most promising opportunities for advances by SO and SPP, and lead a discussion on what programs need to be implemented now in order to achieve these science advances by the time SO and SPP launch.

  11. Structure-activity analysis and antiprion mechanism of isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-12-01

    The prion strain-specific mechanism by which normal prion protein is converted to abnormal prion protein remains largely unknown. This study found that insect juvenile hormone III reduced abnormal prion protein levels only in cells infected with the RML prion. We conducted a structure-activity analysis using juvenile hormone III biosynthetic intermediates in the isoprenoid pathway. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol, the most potent inhibitors of abnormal prion protein formation, behaved in an RML prion-dependent fashion. Neither of them modified cellular and cell surface prion protein levels. Events downstream of this pathway include cholesterol biosynthesis and protein prenylation. However, neither of these isoprenoid compounds modified lipid raft microdomains and cellular cholesterol levels and neither affected the representative prenylated protein expression levels of prenylation pathways. Therefore, these isoprenoid compounds are a new class of prion strain-dependent antiprion compounds. They are useful for exploring strain-specific prion biology. PMID:26402376

  12. Design, structure activity relationship, cytotoxicity and evaluation of antioxidant activity of curcumin derivatives/analogues.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pramod K

    2016-10-01

    New fourteen 3,4-dihydropyrimidine derivatives/analogues of curcumin (2a-2n) were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated for their cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity. Cytotoxicity effect has been evaluated against three cell lines HeLa, HCT-116 and QG-56 by MTT assay method. From SAR study, it has been revealed that particularly, compound 2e and 2j (IC50 value 12.5 μM) have shown better cytotoxicity effect against three cell lines. According to results of SAR study, it was found that 3,4-dihydropyrimidines of curcumin, 2c, 2d, 2j and 2n exhibited better antioxidant activity than curcumin. A correlation of structure and activities relationship of these compounds with respect to drug score profiles and other physico-chemical properties of drugs are described and verified experimentally. Therefore, we conclude that physico-chemical analyses may prove structural features of curcumin analogues with their promising combined cytotoxicity/antioxidant activity and it is also concluded from virtual and practical screening that the compounds were varied to possess a broad range of lipophilic character, revealed by Log P values. PMID:27318975

  13. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  14. COMPUTER-ASSISTED STUDIES OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND GENOTOXIC ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often a compound's biological activity is determined by complex relationships between its structural components. Such a relationship often can only be adequately described and exploited by multivariate structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies that can deal with many variable...

  15. 75 FR 77047 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Finance Activities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for.... Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes the types of internal controls and...

  16. A quantitative structure--activity relationship model for the intrinsic activity of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Spycher, Simon; Escher, Beate I; Gasteiger, Johann

    2005-12-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been derived for the prediction of the activity of phenols in uncoupling oxidative and photophosphorylation. Twenty-one compounds with experimental data for uncoupling activity as well as for the acid dissociation constant, pKa, and for partitioning constants of the neutral and the charged species into model membranes were analyzed. From these measured data, the effective concentration in the membrane was derived, which allowed the study of the intrinsic activity of uncouplers within the membrane. A linear regression model for the intrinsic activity could be established using the following three descriptors: solvation free energies of the anions, an estimate for heterodimer formation describing transport processes, and pKa values describing the speciation of the phenols. In a next step, the aqueous effect concentrations were modeled by combining the model for the intrinsic uncoupling activity with descriptors accounting for the uptake into membranes. Results obtained with experimental membrane-water partitioning data were compared with the results obtained with experimental octanol-water partition coefficients, log Kow, and with calculated log Kow values. The properties of these different measures of lipophilicity were critically discussed. PMID:16359176

  17. Structure-activity in the carrageenans: iota-carrageenan and experimental oedemagenic activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W; Harthill, J E; Zeitlin, I J

    1984-12-01

    The oedemagenic activities of several iota-carrageenans from Eucheuma spinosum have been compared using the rat hindpaw model. From the parent iota-carrageenan of weight average molecular weight 541 100 an acid-degraded iota-carrageenan (Mw = 20 300) was obtained which on fractionation yielded five iota-carrageenans Mw ranging from 73 700 to 4 600. The oedemagenic activity of iota-carrageenan resided in the fraction of Mw = 73 700, the parent undegraded high molecular weight iota-carrageenan being no more active and fractions of lower molecular weight being inactive. Fractionation was based on differential solubilities of the barium salts of the fractions in water and aqueous ethanol and was probably determined by aspects of primary structure in addition to molecular weight. PMID:6151972

  18. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  19. Structure of Biologically Active Organotin(IV) Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Y.; Sanuddin, M.; Yamin, B. M.

    2008-03-01

    The diorganotin(IV) complexes of dithiocarbamates derived from from N-ethyl-n-propylamine (EtPrdtc), 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (Me2Etdtc), 3-dimethlyamino-1-propylamine (Me2Prdtc), p-tolylmethanamine (TylMetdtc) and N-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine (MePhMetdtc) have been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies on Ph3Sn(EtPrdtc), Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 showed that the complexes adopted a monoclinic system with space group P(2)/n, P21/n and C2/c, respectively. The Ph3Sn(EtPrdtc) complex adopted a trigonal pyramidal structure while the Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 complexes displayed structures which may be described as distorted octahedrons. Cytotoxicity test using HL60 cells (human promyelocytic leukemic) showed that only Me2Sn(Me2Etdtc), Me2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 and Bu2Sn(MePhMetdtc)2 complexes were active. The rest of the complexes did not show cytotoxicity behaviour towards HL60 cells.

  20. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of neuromuscular blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Tuba, Zoltan; Maho, Sandor; Vizi, E Sylvester

    2002-08-01

    The first use of neuromuscular blocking agents (muscle relaxants) in clinical practice (1942) revolutionised the practice of anaesthesia and started the modern era of surgery. Since 1942 introduction of tubocurarine (18) neuromuscular blocking agents have been used routinely to provide skeletal muscle relaxation during surgical procedures allowing access to body cavities without hindrance from voluntary or reflex muscle movement. After the introduction of tubocurarine and the depolarizing suxamethonium chloride (4) (1949) several nondepolarizing steroidal and nonsteroidal neuromuscular blocking agents with different onset time and duration of effect were introduced e.g. gallamine triethiodide (1) (1949), methocurine (2) (1949), alcuronium chloride (3) (1963), pancuronium bromide (9) (1968), vecuronium bromide (11) (1982), pipecuronium bromide (10) (1982), atracurium besylate (5) (1982), doxacurium chloride (6) (1991), mivacurium chloride (8) (1992), rocuronium bromide (12) (1994) cisatracurium besylate (7) (1996), and rapacuronium bromide (13) (2000). SZ 1677 (14) a steroid type nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent under development (preclinical phase). This review article deals with a comprehensive survey of the progress in chemical, pharmacological and, in some respects, of clinical studies of neuromuscular blocking agents used in the clinical practice and under development, including the synthesis, structure elucidation, pharmacological actions, structure activity relationships studies of steroidal and nonsteroidal derivatives. PMID:12171561

  1. Structure-activity relationships of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, D V; Shukla, K; Tsukamoto, T

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.4.17.21) is a zinc metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate in the nervous system. Inhibition of GCPII has the potential to reduce extracellular glutamate and represents an opportune target for treating neurological disorders in which excess glutamate is considered pathogenic. Furthermore, GCPII was found to be identical to a tumor marker, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and has drawn significant interest as a diagnostic and/or therapeutic target in oncology. Over the past 15 years, tremendous efforts have been made in the discovery of potent GCPII inhibitors, particularly those with phosphorus-, urea- and thiol-based zinc binding groups. In addition, significant progress has been made in understanding the three-dimensional structural characteristics of GCPII in complex with various ligands. The purpose of this review article is to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of GCPII inhibitors reported to date, which are classified on the basis of their zinc-binding group. SAR and crystallographic data are evaluated in detail for each of these series to highlight the future challenges and opportunities to identify clinically viable GCPII inhibitors. PMID:22304717

  2. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  3. Classification of the extracellular fields produced by activated neural structures

    PubMed Central

    Richerson, Samantha; Ingram, Mark; Perry, Danielle; Stecker, Mark M

    2005-01-01

    Background Classifying the types of extracellular potentials recorded when neural structures are activated is an important component in understanding nerve pathophysiology. Varying definitions and approaches to understanding the factors that influence the potentials recorded during neural activity have made this issue complex. Methods In this article, many of the factors which influence the distribution of electric potential produced by a traveling action potential are discussed from a theoretical standpoint with illustrative simulations. Results For an axon of arbitrary shape, it is shown that a quadrupolar potential is generated by action potentials traveling along a straight axon. However, a dipole moment is generated at any point where an axon bends or its diameter changes. Next, it is shown how asymmetric disturbances in the conductivity of the medium surrounding an axon produce dipolar potentials, even during propagation along a straight axon. Next, by studying the electric fields generated by a dipole source in an insulating cylinder, it is shown that in finite volume conductors, the extracellular potentials can be very different from those in infinite volume conductors. Finally, the effects of impulses propagating along axons with inhomogeneous cable properties are analyzed. Conclusion Because of the well-defined factors affecting extracellular potentials, the vague terms far-field and near-field potentials should be abandoned in favor of more accurate descriptions of the potentials. PMID:16146569

  4. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Linda G; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G; Pickering, Darryl S; Plested, Andrew J R; Kristensen, Anders S

    2016-07-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  5. Effects of zinc on particulate methane monooxygenase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2014-08-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  6. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  7. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Objective is to address the keys to understanding the relation between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Of concern are questions related to enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts and critical active site requirements for molecular synthesis and rearrangement. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Our research program builds upon our previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well we are exploiting our recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. The program is proceeding toward the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of synthetic branched-chain distearoylglycerol (distearin) as protein kinase C activators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qingzhong; Raynor, R.L.; Wood, M.G. Jr.; Menger, F.M.; Kuo, J.F. )

    1988-09-20

    Several representative branched-chain analogues of distearin (DS) were synthesized and tested for their abilities to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and to compete for the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) to the enzyme. Substitutions of stearoyl moieties at sn-1 and sn-2 with 8-methylstearate decreased activities on these parameters, relative to those of the parental diacylglycerol DS, a weak PKC activator. Substitutions with 8-butyl, 4-butyl, or 8-phenyl derivatives, on the other hand, increased activities of the resulting analogues to levels comparable to those seen for diolein (DO), a diacylglycerol prototype shown to be a potent PKC activator. Kinetic analysis indicated that 8-methyldistearin (8-MeDS) acted by decreasing, whereas 8-butyldistearin (8-BuDS) and 8-phenyldistearin (8-PhDS) acted by increasing, the affinities of PKC for phosphatidylserine (PS, a phospholipid cofactor) and Ca{sup 2+} compared to the values seen in the absence or presence of DS. The stimulatory effect of 8-BuDS and 8-PhDS on PKC, as DO, was additive to that of 1,2-(8-butyl)distearoylphosphatidylcholine (1,2(8-Bu)DSPC) and, moreover, they abolished the marked inhibition of the enzyme activity caused by high concentrations of 1,2(8-Bu)DSPC. The present findings demonstrated a structure-activity relationship of the branched-chain DS analogues in the regulation of PKC, perhaps related to their abilities to specifically modify interactions of PKC with PS and/or Ca{sup 2+} critically involved in enzyme activation/inactivation.

  9. Structure-Activity Relationship of Benzophenanthridine Alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Having Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Luciana de C.; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D.; Neto, Alexandre T.; Mostardeiro, Clarice P.; Da Cruz, Ivana B. M.; Oliveira, Raul M.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2014-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1–3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4–12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect

  10. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy. PMID:26233001

  11. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  12. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  13. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross-section (circular and elliptical) and structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. It was found that integrally machined stiffening of the tank walls, while providing the most weight-efficient use of materials, results in higher production costs. Fatigue and fracture mechanics appeared to have little effect on the weight of the three study aircraft. The need for thermal strain relief through insulation is discussed. Aircraft size and magnitude of the internal pressure are seen to be significant factors in tank design.

  14. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships in Human Toll-like Receptor 7-Active Imidazoquinoline Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Nikunj M.; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; Mutz, Cole A.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; David, Sunil A.

    2010-01-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptors serve to link innate immune responses with adaptive immunity and can be exploited as powerful vaccine adjuvants for eliciting both primary and anamnestic immune responses. TLR7 agonists are highly immunostimulatory without inducing dominant proinflammatory cytokine responses. A structure-activity study was conducted on the TLR7-agonistic imidazoquinolines, starting with 1-(4-amino-2-((ethylamino)methyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-1-yl)-2-methylpropan-2-ol as a lead. Modifications of the secondary amine of the C2 ethylaminomethylene sidechain are poorly tolerated. The 4-amino group must be retained for activity. Replacement of the imidazole ring of the scaffold with triazole or cyclic urea led to complete loss of activity. A systematic exploration of N1-benzyl-C2-alkyl substituents showed a very distinct relationship between alkyl length and TLR7-agonistic potency with the optimal compound bearing a C2-n-butyl group. Transposition of the N1 and C2 substituents led to the identification of an extremely active TLR7-agonistic compound with an EC50 value of 8.6 nM. The relative potencies in human TLR7-based primary reporter gene assays were paralleled by interferon-α induction activities in whole human blood models. PMID:20481492

  16. Tectonic activity and structural features of active intracontinental normal faults in the Weihe Graben, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gang; Lin, Aiming; Yan, Bing; Jia, Dong; Wu, Xiaojun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the tectonic activity and structural features of active normal faults in the Weihe Graben, central China. The Weihe Graben is an area with a high level of historic seismicity, and it is one of the intracontinental systems that developed since Tertiary in the extensional environment around the Ordos Block. Analysis of high-resolution remote-sensing imagery data, field observations, and radiocarbon dating results reveal the following: i) active normal faults are mainly developed within a zone < 500 m wide along the southern border of the eastern part of the Weihe Graben; ii) the active faults that have been identified are characterized by stepwise fault scarps dipping into the graben at angles of 40°-71°; iii) there are numerous discontinuous individual fault traces, ranging in length from a few tens of meters to 450 m (generally < 200 m); iv) fault zone structures, topographic features, and fault striations on the main fault planes indicate almost pure normal-slip; and v) late Pleistocene-Holocene terrace risers, loess, and alluvial deposits have been vertically offset by up to ~ 80 m, with a non-uniform dip-slip rate (throw-rates) ranging from ~ 2.1 to 5.7 mm/yr, mostly 2-3 mm/yr. Our results reveal that active normal faults have been developing in the Weihe Graben under an ongoing extensional environment, probably associated with the pre-existing graben and spreading of the continental crust, and this is in contrast with the Ordos Block and neighboring orogenic regions. These results provide new insights into the nature of extensional tectonic deformation in intracontinental graben systems.

  17. A quantitative structure-activity relationship model for radical scavenging activity of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Om, A; Kim, J H

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study has been carried out for a training set of 29 flavonoids to correlate and predict the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity (RSA) values obtained from published data. Genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression were employed to select the descriptors and to generate the best prediction model that relates the structural features to the RSA activities using (1) three-dimensional (3D) Dragon (TALETE srl, Milan, Italy) descriptors and (2) semi-empirical descriptor calculations. The predictivity of the models was estimated by cross-validation with the leave-one-out method. The result showed that a significant improvement of the statistical indices was obtained by deleting outliers. Based on the data for the compounds used in this study, our results suggest a QSAR model of RSA that is based on the following descriptors: 3D-Morse, WHIM, and GETAWAY. Therefore, satisfactory relationships between RSA and the semi-empirical descriptors were found, demonstrating that the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital, total energy, and energy of heat of formation contributed more significantly than all other descriptors. PMID:18361735

  18. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  19. Exploring the active site structure of photoreceptor proteins by Raman optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Masashi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding protein function at the atomic level is a major challenge in a field of biophysics and requires the combined efforts of structural and functional methods. We use photoreceptor proteins as a model system to understand in atomic detail how a chromophore and a protein interact to sense light and send a biological signal. A potential technique for investigating molecular structures is Raman optical activity (ROA), which is a spectroscopic method with a high sensitivity to the structural details of chiral molecules. However, its application to photoreceptor proteins has not been reported. Thus we have constructed ROA spectrometer using near-infrared (NIR) laser excitation at 785 nm. The NIR excitation enables us to measure ROA spectra for a variety of biological samples, including photoreceptor proteins, without fluorescence from the samples. In the present study, we have applied the NIR-ROA to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BR is a light-driven proton pump and contains a protonated Schiff base of retinal as a chromophore. PYP is a blue light receptor, and this protein has the 4-hydroxycinnamyl chromophore, which is covalently linked to Cys69 through a thiolester bond. We have successfully obtained the ROA spectra of the chromophore within a protein environment. Furthermore, calculations of the ROA spectra utilizing density functional theory provide detailed structural information, such as data on out-of-plane distortions of the chromophore. The structural information obtained from the ROA spectra includes the positions of hydrogen atoms, which are usually not detected in the crystal structures of biological samples.

  20. Effect of layered composite meta-structures on the optical activity and ellipticity of structural biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, E. H.; Hor, Y. Li; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Liu, Y. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design layered composite meta-structures to investigate its' effect on the optical activity and circular dichroism (CD). The layered composite meta-structures consist of thin gammadion nanostructure with thickness λ/10, where λ is the incident wavelength. The layered meta-structures are alternate between a dielectric and gold (AU) material. Each layered composite meta-gammadion is arranged together in an array of pitch 700 nm. In the first case, 3 layers of meta-gammadion, with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) configuration are simulated with material properties from optical hand book. There are 3 modes in the CD spectrum, which can be characterized into Bloch CD mode and hybrid CD modes. Compared with the CD spectrum of whole structure of gammadion in gold with same total height, the CD of the MIM layered composite are larger. When the number layer increase to 5, it is observed that the CD is reduced by 30% and there is a red shift in the Bloch CD mode and a slight blue shift in the hybrid CD modes. By further increasing the number of layers to 7, we observed further CD increment and larger wavelength shift in the CD modes. The layered composite meta-gammadion is fabricated using template stripping method. Experimental results also show excellent agreement with the simulation results for CD and wavelength shift. We submerge the layered meta-gammadion into a solution of chiral molecules. The CD spectrum of the meta-gammadion shows a larger wavelength shift compared to pure metal structures. This indicate a more sensitive and robust detection of chiral molecules.

  1. Insights into the Interferon Regulatory Factor Activation from the Crystal Structure of Dimeric IRF5

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Lam, S; Srinath, H; Jiang, Z; Correia, J; Schiffer, C; Fitzgerald, K; Lin, K; Royer, Jr., W

    2008-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are involved in the innate immune response and are activated by phosphorylation. The structure of a pseudophosphorylated IRF5 activation domain now reveals structural changes in the activated form that would turn an autoinhibitory region into a dimerization interface. In vivo analysis supports the relevance of such a dimer to transcriptional activation.

  2. Staying in or Moving Away from Structured Activities: Explanations Involving Parents and Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Andreas; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent participation in structured activities, meaning those with adult leaders, regular meetings, and skill-building activities, is related to good adjustment. Participation in unstructured, unsupervised, peer-oriented activities is related to poor adjustment. Structured activity participation is high in early adolescence and then declines,…

  3. Economic sensor/actuator selection and its application to flexible structure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Robert E.; Li, Faming

    2004-07-01

    A systematic design method is proposed for the selecting of actuators and sensors in the structural control in order to minimize the instrumental cost. With actuators and sensors placed at all the admissible locations initially, an iterative minimization algorithm is carried out to identify the sensor/actuator that requires the least precision. By deleting the roughest sensor/actuator each time till loss of feasibility, one can conclude simultaneously the necessary number and type of sensor/actuator, and the location and precision for each sensor/actuator. A tensegrity structure example has been solved as an application of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Structure Activity Relationship of Dendrimer Microbicides with Dual Action Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tyssen, David; Henderson, Scott A.; Johnson, Adam; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Moore, Katie; La, Jennifer; Zanin, Mark; Sonza, Secondo; Karellas, Peter; Giannis, Michael P.; Krippner, Guy; Wesselingh, Steve; McCarthy, Tom; Gorry, Paul R.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Cone, Richard; Paull, Jeremy R. A.; Lewis, Gareth R.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2010-01-01

    Background Topical microbicides, used by women to prevent the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections are urgently required. Dendrimers are highly branched nanoparticles being developed as microbicides. However, the anti-HIV and HSV structure-activity relationship of dendrimers comprising benzyhydryl amide cores and lysine branches, and a comprehensive analysis of their broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity and mechanism of action have not been published. Methods and Findings Dendrimers with optimized activity against HIV-1 and HSV-2 were identified with respect to the number of lysine branches (generations) and surface groups. Antiviral activity was determined in cell culture assays. Time-of-addition assays were performed to determine dendrimer mechanism of action. In vivo toxicity and HSV-2 inhibitory activity were evaluated in the mouse HSV-2 susceptibility model. Surface groups imparting the most potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 and HSV-2 were naphthalene disulfonic acid (DNAA) and 3,5-disulfobenzoic acid exhibiting the greatest anionic charge and hydrophobicity of the seven surface groups tested. Their anti-HIV-1 activity did not appreciably increase beyond a second-generation dendrimer while dendrimers larger than two generations were required for potent anti-HSV-2 activity. Second (SPL7115) and fourth generation (SPL7013) DNAA dendrimers demonstrated broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity. However, SPL7013 was more active against HSV and blocking HIV-1 envelope mediated cell-to-cell fusion. SPL7013 and SPL7115 inhibited viral entry with similar potency against CXCR4-(X4) and CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains. SPL7013 was not toxic and provided at least 12 h protection against HSV-2 in the mouse vagina. Conclusions Dendrimers can be engineered with optimized potency against HIV and HSV representing a unique platform for the controlled synthesis of chemically defined multivalent agents as viral entry inhibitors. SPL7013 is formulated as Viva

  5. Derivatives of Ergot-alkaloids: Molecular structure, physical properties, and structure-activity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka B.; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive screening of fifteen functionalized Ergot-alkaloids, containing bulk aliphatic cyclic substituents at D-ring of the ergoline molecular skeleton was performed, studying their structure-active relationships and model interactions with α2A-adreno-, serotonin (5HT2A) and dopamine D3 (D3A) receptors. The accounted high affinity to the receptors binding loops and unusual bonding situations, joined with the molecular flexibility of the substituents and the presence of proton accepting/donating functional groups in the studied alkaloids, may contribute to further understanding the mechanisms of biological activity in vivo and in predicting their therapeutic potential in central nervous system (CNS), including those related the Schizophrenia. Since the presented correlation between the molecular structure and properties, was based on the comprehensively theoretical computational and experimental physical study on the successfully isolated derivatives, through using routine synthetic pathways in a relatively high yields, marked these derivatives as 'treasure' for further experimental and theoretical studied in areas such as: (a) pharmacological and clinical testing; (b) molecular-drugs design of novel psychoactive substances; (c) development of the analytical protocols for determination of Ergot-alkaloids through a functionalization of the ergoline-skeleton, and more.

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationship correlation between molecular structure and the Rayleigh enantiomeric enrichment factor.

    PubMed

    Jammer, S; Rizkov, D; Gelman, F; Lev, O

    2015-08-01

    It was recently demonstrated that under environmentally relevant conditions the Rayleigh equation is valid to describe the enantiomeric enrichment - conversion relationship, yielding a proportional constant called the enantiomeric enrichment factor, εER. In the present study we demonstrate a quantitative structure-activity relationship model (QSAR) that describes well the dependence of εER on molecular structure. The enantiomeric enrichment factor can be predicted by the linear Hansch model, which correlates biological activity with physicochemical properties. Enantioselective hydrolysis of sixteen derivatives of 2-(phenoxy)propionate (PPMs) have been analyzed during enzymatic degradation by lipases from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL), Pseudomonas cepacia (PCL), and Candida rugosa (CRL). In all cases the QSAR relationships were significant with R(2) values of 0.90-0.93, and showed high predictive abilities with internal and external validations providing QLOO(2) values of 0.85-0.87 and QExt(2) values of 0.8-0.91. Moreover, it is demonstrated that this model enables differentiation between enzymes with different binding site shapes. The enantioselectivity of PFL and PCL was dictated by electronic properties, whereas the enantioselectivity of CRL was determined by lipophilicity and steric factors. The predictive ability of the QSAR model demonstrated in the present study may serve as a helpful tool in environmental studies, assisting in source tracking of unstudied chiral compounds belonging to a well-studied homologous series. PMID:26153539

  7. Probing structure-antifouling activity relationships of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Zhao, Jun; Li, Xiaosi; Wu, Jiang; Chen, Shenfu; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Qiuming; Gong, Xiong; Li, Lingyan; Zheng, Jie

    2013-07-01

    We have synthesized two different polyacrylamide polymers with amide groups (polySBAA and polyHEAA) and two corresponding polyacrylate polymers without amide groups (polySBMA and polyHEA), with particular attention to the evaluation of the effect of amide group on the hydration and antifouling ability of these systems using both computational and experimental approaches. The influence of polymer architectures of brushes, hydrogels, and nanogels, prepared by different polymerization methods, on antifouling performance is also studied. SPR and ELISA data reveal that all polymers exhibit excellent antifouling ability to repel proteins from undiluted human blood serum/plasma, and such antifouling ability can be further enhanced by presenting amide groups in polySBAA and polyHEAA as compared to polySBMA and polyHEA. The antifouling performance is positively correlated with the hydration properties. Simulations confirm that four polymers indeed have different hydration characteristics, while all presenting a strong hydration overall. Integration of amide group with pendant hydroxyl or sulfobetaine group in polymer backbones is found to increase their surface hydration of polymer chains and thus to improve their antifouling ability. Importantly, we present a proof-of-concept experiment to synthesize polySBAA nanogels, which show a switchable property between antifouling and pH-responsive functions driven by acid-base conditions, while still maintaining high stability in undiluted fetal bovine serum and minimal toxicity to cultured cells. This work provides important structural insights into how very subtle structural changes in polymers can yield great improvement in biological activity, specifically the inclusion of amide group in polymer backbone/sidechain enables to obtain antifouling materials with better performance for biomedical applications. PMID:23562049

  8. Deep structure and origin of active volcanoes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.

    2010-12-01

    Recent geophysical studies have provided important constraints on the deep structure and origin of the active intraplate volcanoes in Mainland China. Magmatism in the western Pacific arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab (e.g., Zhao et al., 2009a), while the intraplate magmatism in China has different origins. The active volcanoes in Northeast China (such as the Changbai and Wudalianchi) are caused by hot upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and deep slab dehydration as well (Zhao et al., 2009b). The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is caused by a similar process in the BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate) (Lei et al., 2009a). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China is a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume which may be associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle (Lei et al., 2009b; Zhao, 2009). The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which can trigger the upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and may cause the slab-plume interactions (Zhao, 2009). References Lei, J., D. Zhao, Y. Su, 2009a. Insight into the origin of the Tengchong intraplate volcano and seismotectonics in southwest China from local and teleseismic data. J. Geophys. Res. 114, B05302. Lei, J., D. Zhao, B. Steinberger et al., 2009b. New seismic constraints on the upper mantle structure of the Hainan plume. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 173, 33-50. Zhao, D., 2009. Multiscale seismic tomography and mantle dynamics. Gondwana Res. 15, 297-323. Zhao, D., Z. Wang, N. Umino, A. Hasegawa, 2009a. Mapping the mantle wedge and interplate thrust zone of the northeast Japan arc. Tectonophysics 467, 89-106. Zhao, D., Y. Tian, J. Lei, L. Liu, 2009b. Seismic

  9. Isothiocyanate synthetic analogs: biological activities, structure-activity relationships and synthetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Milelli, Andrea; Fimognari, Carmela; Ticchi, Nicole; Neviani, Paolo; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a natural product that is constantly under biological investigation for its unique biological properties. This naturally occurring isothiocyanate (ITC) and its analogs are the main components of cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, watercress, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, widely used as chemopreventive agents. Due to their interesting biological profiles, natural ITCs have been exploited as starting point to develop new synthetic analogs. The present mini-review briefly highlights the most important biological actions of selected new synthetic ITCs focusing on their structure-activity relationships and related synthetic strategies. PMID:25373847

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationship of antifungal activity of rosin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hien; Li, Shujun; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jian

    2015-01-15

    To develop new rosin-based wood preservatives with good antifungal activity, 24 rosin derivatives were synthesized, bioassay tested with Trametes versicolor and Gloeophyllum trabeum, and subjected to analysis of their quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). A QSAR analysis using Ampac 9.2.1 and Codessa 2.7.16 software built two QSAR models of antifungal ratio for T. versicolor and G. trabeum with values of R(2)=0.9740 and 0.9692, respectively. Based on the models, tri-N-(3-hydroabietoxy-2-hydroxy) propyl-triethyl ammonium chloride was designed and the bioassay test result proved its better inhibitory effect against the two selected fungi as expected. PMID:25466709

  11. NADPH OXIDASE: STRUCTURE AND ACTIVATION MECHANISMS (REVIEW). NOTE I.

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Manciuc, Carmen; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Foia, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), with its generically termed NOX isoforms, is the major source of ROS (reactive oxigen species) in biological systems. ROS are small oxygen-derived molecules with an important role in various biological processes (physiological or pathological). If under physiological conditions some processes are beneficial and necessary for life, under pathophysiological conditions they are noxious, harmful. NADPH oxidases are present in phagocytes and in a wide variety of nonphagocytic cells. The enzyme generates superoxide by transferring electrons from NADPH inside the cell across the membrane and coupling them to molecular oxygen to produce superoxide anion, a reactive free-radical. Structurally, NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme which includes two integral membrane proteins, glycoprotein gp9 1 Phox and adaptor protein p22(phox), which together form the heterodimeric flavocytochrome b558 that constitutes the core of the enzyme. During the resting state, the multidomain regulatory subunits p40P(phox), p47(phox), p67(Phox) are located in the cytosol organized as a complex. The activation of phagocytic NADPH oxidase occurs through a complex series of protein interactions. PMID:27125069

  12. Improving quantitative structure-activity relationships through multiobjective optimization.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Orazio; Giangreco, Ilenia; Miscioscia, Teresa Fabiola; Carotti, Angelo

    2009-10-01

    A multiobjective optimization algorithm was proposed for the automated integration of structure- and ligand-based molecular design. Driven by a genetic algorithm, the herein proposed approach enabled the detection of a number of trade-off QSAR models accounting simultaneously for two independent objectives. The first was biased toward best regressions among docking scores and biological affinities; the second minimized the atom displacements from a properly established crystal-based binding topology. Based on the concept of dominance, 3D QSAR equivalent models profiled the Pareto frontier and were, thus, designated as nondominated solutions of the search space. K-means clustering was, then, operated to select a representative subset of the available trade-off models. These were effectively subjected to GRID/GOLPE analyses for quantitatively featuring molecular determinants of ligand binding affinity. More specifically, it was demonstrated that a) diverse binding conformations occurred on the basis of the ligand ability to profitably contact different part of protein binding site; b) enzyme selectivity was better approached and interpreted by combining diverse equivalent models; and c) trade-off models were successful and even better than docking virtual screening, in retrieving at high sensitivity active hits from a large pool of chemically similar decoys. The approach was tested on a large series, very well-known to QSAR practitioners, of 3-amidinophenylalanine inhibitors of thrombin and trypsin, two serine proteases having rather different biological actions despite a high sequence similarity. PMID:19785453

  13. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    SciTech Connect

    Auletta, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  14. Structural features of immunologically active polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xing-Feng; Wang, Xue-Song; Dong, Qun; Fang, Ji-Nian; Li, Xiao-Yu

    2002-01-01

    Three polysaccharides, two heteroglycans (PL-1 and PL-4) and one glucan (PL-3), were solubilized from the fruit bodies of Ganoderma lucidum and isolated by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Their structural features were elucidated by glycosyl residue and glycosyl linkage composition analyses, partial acid hydrolysis, acetolysis, periodate oxidation, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and ESI-MS experiments. The data obtained indicated that PL-1 had a backbone consisting of 1,4-linked alpha-D-glucopyranosyl residues and 1,6-linked beta-D-galactopyranosyl residues with branches at O-6 of glucose residues and O-2 of galactose residues, composed of terminal glucose, 1,6-linked glucosyl residues and terminal rhamnose. PL-3 was a highly branched glucan composed of 1,3-linked beta-D-glucopyranosyl residues substituted at O-6 with 1,6-linked glucosyl residues. PL-4 was comprised of 1,3-, 1,4-, 1,6-linked beta-D-glucopyranosyl residues and 1,6-linked beta-D-mannopyranosyl residues. These polysaccharides enhanced the proliferation of T- and B-lymphocytes in vitro to varying contents and PL-1 exhibited an immune-stimulating activity in mice. PMID:11809453

  15. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Kobanov, N. I.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kochanov, A. A.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Chupin, S. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Tomin, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet-optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1-2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe IX 171 Å line. High frequency oscillations (5-7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle is close to 40° above the umbra boundaries in the transition region.

  16. Active folded structures of the Western Caucasus (Sochi region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trikhunkov, Yaroslav; Zelenin, Egor

    2014-05-01

    The Western Caucasus as a margin segment of folded system of the Greater Caucasus was formed at the periphery of collision interaction of the Scythian Plate and the Transcaucasian Massif. The estimated age of the primary folded deformations of the initial surface of that territory ranges from the late Eocene to late Neogene. We have obtained new data on modern folded deformations of the anticlinal ridges, which prevail in Sochi region in the southern macroslope of the mountain system. Very similar Alek, Galitsinsky, Akhun, Nikolaevsky anticlinal ridges are uplifting in the main Caucasus direction (NW - SE) and are crossed by narrow antecedent river valleys. These ridges stand out contrasting to sinclinal depressions, where fluviatile accumulation prevails. At the intersection of the Mzymta river and the Galitsinsky anticlinal ridge a narrow Akhshtyr canyon with steep, 150 meters high slopes were formed. Downstream in the neighboring Akhshtyr synclinal depression the valley expands. Here the floodplain and two levels of terraces with the height of 20 - 30 and 50 - 60 m correspondingly were formed. The age of the first terrace was defined by archeologic data of V. Shchelinsky (2007) and by correlation with marine Black Sea Late Karangat terrace as a 135 - 90 ka (Eemian interglacial). The second terrace is apparently older and dates back to Middle Pleistocene. The field research and analysis of the elevations by ASTER GDEM allowed us to trace both terraces in the southern structural slope of the Galitsinsky ridge above the canyon, adjacent to the Akhshtyr depression, at the heights 70 and 110 m correspondingly. Alluvial deposits in outcrops of lower terrace (elongated pebbles, which look like modern alluvium of the Mzymta) were traced on the surface of the slope. Thereby, described fragments of the Mzymta terraces were uplifted above the level of the corresponding terraces in the synclinal depression as a result of dislocation on the slope of the actively uplifting

  17. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: 60-Day... concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Importation Bond Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Numbers: 301 and 5297. Abstract:...

  18. 78 FR 75576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60-day... Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Number: CBP Forms 301 and 5297. Abstract: Bonds are used to...

  19. Isolation, structure, and HIV-1-integrase inhibitory activity of structurally diverse fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Dewey, Raymond; Polishook, Jon D; Dombrowski, Anne W; Zink, Deborah L; Guan, Ziqiang; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; Pelaez, Fernando; Felock, Peter J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-12-01

    HIV-1 integrase is a critical enzyme for replication of HIV, and its inhibition is one of the most promising new drug strategies for anti-retroviral therapy, with potentially significant advantages over existing therapies. In this report, a series of HIV-1 inhibitors isolated from the organic extract of fermentations from terrestrial fungi is described. These fungal species, belonging to a variety of genera, were collected from throughout the world following the strict guidelines of Rio Convention on Biodiversity. The polyketide- and terpenoid-derived inhibitors are represented by two naphthoquinones, a biphenyl and two triphenyls, a benzophenone, four aromatics with or without catechol units, a linear aliphatic terpenoid, a diterpenoid, and a sesterterpenoid. These compounds inhibited the coupled and strand-transfer reaction of HIV-1 integrase with an IC(50) value of 0.5-120 micro M. The bioassay-directed isolation, structure elucidation, and HIV-1 inhibitory activity of these compounds are described. PMID:14714192

  20. Neuroprotective and Antioxidant Activities of 4-Methylcoumarins: Development of Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Shashwat; Tavakkoli, Marjan; Edraki, Najmeh; Miri, Ramin; Sharma, Sunil Kumar; Prasad, Ashok Kumar; Saso, Luciano; Len, Christophe; Parmar, Virinder Singh; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Coumarins are a major class of polyphenols that are abundantly present in many dietary plants and possess different biological activities. Neuroprotective effect of 28 variously substituted 4-methylcoumarins was evaluated in a cell model of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, which measures viability in PC12 cells challenged with hydrogen peroxide by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The inhibitory activity of these compounds against intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was also determined by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate method in the same cells. Chemical redox-based assays including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) tests were employed to explore structure-antioxidant activity relationships in a cell-free environment. The results demonstrated that 4-methylcoumarins containing ortho-dihydroxy or ortho-diacetoxy substituents on the benzenoid ring possess considerable neuroprotective effects. ortho-Dihydroxy compounds inhibited cytotoxicity (44.7-62.9%) and ROS formation (41.6-71.1%) at 50 µM and showed considerable antioxidant effects. We conclude that 4-methylcoumarins are promising neuroprotective and antioxidant scaffolds potentially usefull for management of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27582333

  1. THE USE OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS IN INTEGRATING THE CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure activity relationships (SARs) are based on the principle that structurally similar chemicals should have similar biological activity. SARs relate specifically-defined toxicological activity of chemicals to their molecular structure and physico-chemical properties. To de...

  2. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were

  3. Recombinant human betacellulin. Molecular structure, biological activities, and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Shintani, A; Nakata, M; Shing, Y; Folkman, J; Igarashi, K; Sasada, R

    1994-04-01

    Soluble forms of human betacellulin (BTC) were purified to homogeneity from the conditioned medium of mouse A9 cells transfected with the BTC precursor cDNA. Three types of soluble BTC, designated BTC-1a, BTC-1b and BTC-2, were resolved by cation-exchange and size-exclusion column chromatography. Physicochemical analysis has revealed that BTC-1a represents the glycosylated, intact molecule composed of 80 amino acid residues (Asp32 to Tyr111 of the precursor molecule). BTC-1b appears to be a truncated molecule lacking 12 amino acid residues from the amino terminus of BTC-1a. BTC-2 was found to be a 50-amino acid molecule (Arg62 to Tyr111) that corresponds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural unit. The biological activities of these BTC molecules were essentially identical as judged by their mitogenicity on Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. BTC and EGF were equipotent in stimulating Balb/c 3T3 cell proliferation and rat mesangial cell Ca2+ mobilization as well as in inhibiting the growth of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. BTC and EGF antagonized each other with similar dose dependence for binding to A431 cells, indicating that these factors bind the same receptor molecules with equivalent avidity. The Kd value of EGF receptor (EGFR) and BTC is 0.5 nM as determined on Balb/c 3T3 cells. In addition, human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-453 cells, which express multiple members of the EGFR family, were found to possess 2.7 x 10(3) BTC binding sites/cell, and the binding was readily quenched by EGF. These results suggest that the primary receptor for BTC is EGFR. PMID:8144591

  4. Structural aging program -- a summary of activities, results, and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. Primary program accomplishments have included formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, the Structural Aging Program conducted in-depth evaluations of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability.

  5. Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Novel Peptoids That Mimic the Structure of Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Zuckermann, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    The constant emergence of new bacterial strains that resist the effectiveness of marketed antimicrobials has led to an urgent demand for and intensive research on new classes of compounds to combat bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptoids comprise one group of potential candidates for antimicrobial drug development. The present study highlights a library of 22 cationic amphipathic peptoids designed to target bacteria. All the peptoids share an overall net charge of +4 and are 8 to 9 residues long; however, the hydrophobicity and charge distribution along the abiotic backbone varied, thus allowing an examination of the structure-activity relationship within the library. In addition, the toxicity profiles of all peptoids were assessed in human red blood cells (hRBCs) and HeLa cells, revealing the low toxicity exerted by the majority of the peptoids. The structural optimization also identified two peptoid candidates, 3 and 4, with high selectivity ratios of 4 to 32 and 8 to 64, respectively, and a concentration-dependent bactericidal mode of action against Gram-negative Escherichia coli. PMID:25941221

  6. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  7. Representation of molecular structure using quantum topology with inductive logic programming in structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Buttingsrud, Bård; Ryeng, Einar; King, Ross D; Alsberg, Bjørn K

    2006-06-01

    The requirement of aligning each individual molecule in a data set severely limits the type of molecules which can be analysed with traditional structure activity relationship (SAR) methods. A method which solves this problem by using relations between objects is inductive logic programming (ILP). Another advantage of this methodology is its ability to include background knowledge as 1st-order logic. However, previous molecular ILP representations have not been effective in describing the electronic structure of molecules. We present a more unified and comprehensive representation based on Richard Bader's quantum topological atoms in molecules (AIM) theory where critical points in the electron density are connected through a network. AIM theory provides a wealth of chemical information about individual atoms and their bond connections enabling a more flexible and chemically relevant representation. To obtain even more relevant rules with higher coverage, we apply manual postprocessing and interpretation of ILP rules. We have tested the usefulness of the new representation in SAR modelling on classifying compounds of low/high mutagenicity and on a set of factor Xa inhibitors of high and low affinity. PMID:17054018

  8. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  9. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  10. Controller reduction for effective interdisciplinary design of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Quan, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    Control problems of large aerospace structures are intrinsically interdisciplinary and require strategies which address the complete interaction between flexible structures, electromechanical actuators and sensors, and feedback control algorithms. Current research and future directions which will require an interdisciplinary team effort in dynamics, control and optimization of such structures are being surveyed. It is generally agreed that the dynamics of space structures require large scale discrete modeling, resulting in thousands of discrete unknowns. Proven control strategies, on the other hand, employ a low order controller that is based on a reduced order model of structures. Integration of such low order controllers and large scale dynamics models often leads to serious deterioration of the closed loop stability margin and even instability. To alleviate this stability deterioration while low order controllers remain effective, the following approach was investigated: (1) retain low order controllers based on reduced order models of structures as the basic control strategy; (2) introduce a compensator that will directly account for the deterioration of stability margin due to controller-structure integration; and (3) assess overall performance of the integrated control structure system by developing measures of suboptimality in the combination of (1) and (2). The benefits include: simplicity in the design of basic controllers, thus facilitating the optimization of structure control interactions; increased understanding of the roles of the compensator so as to modify the structure as well as the basic controller, if necessary, for improved performance; and adaptability to localize controllers by viewing the compensator as a systems integration filter.

  11. 75 FR 61857 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Finance Activities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities. OMB Number: 1550-0111. Form Number: N/A. Description: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes...

  12. The Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity: Applications to the Study of Human Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedny, Gregory Z.; Harris, Steven Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article offers an introduction to the central concepts and principles of the Systemic-Structural Theory of Activity (SSTA), an activity-theoretical approach specifically tailored to the analysis and design of human work. In activity theory, cognition is understood both as a process and as a structured system of actions. Building on the…

  13. Polymer Basics: Classroom Activities Manipulating Paper Clips to Introduce the Structures and Properties of Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umar, Yunusa

    2014-01-01

    A simple and effective hands-on classroom activity designed to illustrate basic polymer concepts is presented. In this activity, students build primary structures of homopolymers and different arrangements of monomers in copolymer using paper clips as monomers. The activity supports formation of a basic understanding of polymer structures,…

  14. Structure Guided Optimization, in Vitro Activity, and in Vivo Activity of Pan-PIM Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthew T; Han, Wooseok; Lan, Jiong; Nishiguchi, Gisele; Bellamacina, Cornelia; Lindval, Mika; Atallah, Gordana; Ding, Yu; Mathur, Michelle; McBride, Chris; Beans, Elizabeth L; Muller, Kristine; Tamez, Victoriano; Zhang, Yanchen; Huh, Kay; Feucht, Paul; Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Dai, Yumin; Holash, Jocelyn; Castillo, Joseph; Langowski, John; Wang, Yingyun; Chen, Min Y; Garcia, Pablo D

    2013-12-12

    Proviral insertion of Moloney virus (PIM) 1, 2, and 3 kinases are serine/threonine kinases that normally function in survival and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. As high expression of PIM1, 2, and 3 is frequently observed in many human malignancies, including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and myeloid leukemias, there is interest in determining whether selective PIM inhibition can improve outcomes of these human cancers. Herein, we describe our efforts toward this goal. The structure guided optimization of a singleton high throughput screening hit in which the potency against all three PIM isoforms was increased >10,000-fold to yield compounds with pan PIM K is < 10 pM, nanomolar cellular potency, and in vivo activity in an acute myeloid leukemia Pim-dependent tumor model is described. PMID:24900629

  15. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  16. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 50772) on August 17, 2010... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-day notice... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importation Bond Structure. This is...

  17. Active Women: Perspectives on Their Structural Position in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Harriett; And Others

    An exploratory pilot study to determine the personal characteristics of women community leaders and their position in the power structure was conducted in Chippewa and Eau Claire Counties, Wisconsin. The research design involved a comparison of three samples: the traditional power structure identified through reputational techniques; the active…

  18. ESTIMATION OF ELECTRON AFFINITY BASED ON STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron affinity for a wide range of organic molecules was calculated from molecular structure using the chemical reactivity models developed in SPARC. hese models are based on fundamental chemical structure theory applied to the prediction of chemical reactivities for organic m...

  19. Beyond Syntactic Priming: Evidence for Activation of Alternative Syntactic Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Waterfall, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Priming methodology was previously used to investigate children's ability to represent abstract syntactic forms. Existing evidence indicates that following exposure to a particular syntactic structure (such as the passive voice), English-speaking children increase their production of that structure with new lexical items. In the present work, we…

  20. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of potent antitumor active quinoline and naphthyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjay K; Jha, Amrita; Agarwal, Shiv K; Mukherjee, Rama; Burman, Anand C

    2007-11-01

    The disease of cancer has been ranked second after cardiovascular diseases and plant-derived molecules have played an important role for the treatment of cancer. Nine cytotoxic plant-derived molecules such as vinblastine, vincristine, navelbine, etoposide, teniposide, taxol, taxotere, topotecan and irinotecan have been approved as anticancer drugs. Recently, epothilones are being emerging as future potential anti-tumor agents. However, targeted cancer therapy has now been rapidly expanding and small organic molecules are being exploited for this purpose. Amongst target specific small organic molecules, quinazoline was found as one of the most successful chemical class in cancer chemotherapy as three drugs namely Gefitinib, Erlotinib and Canertinib belong to this series. Now, quinazoline related chemical classes such as quinolines and naphthyridines are being exploited in cancer chemotherapy and a number of molecules such as compounds EKB-569 (52), HKI-272 (78) and SNS-595 (127a) are in different phases of clinical trials. This review presents the synthesis of quinolines and naphthyridines derivatives, screened for anticancer activity since year 2000. The synthesis of most potent derivatives in each prototype has been delineated. A brief structure activity relationship for each prototype has also been discussed. It has been observed that aniline group at C-4, aminoacrylamide substituents at C-6, cyano group at C-3 and alkoxy groups at C-7 in the quinoline ring play an important role for optimal activity. While aminopyrrolidine functionality at C-7, 2'-thiazolyl at N-1 and carboxy group at C-3 in 1,8-naphthyridine ring are essential for eliciting the cytotoxicity. This review would help the medicinal chemist to design and synthesize molecules for targeted cancer chemotherapy. PMID:18045063

  1. Development of an active truss element for control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Moore, Donald M.; Fanson, James L.; Ealey, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    An active structural element for use in precision control of large space structures is described. The active member is intended to replace a passive strut in a truss-like structure. It incorporates an eddy current displacement sensor and an actuator that is either piezoelectric (PZT) or electrostrictive (PMN). The design of the device is summarized. Performance of separate PZT and PMN actuators is compared for several properties relevant to submicrometer control of precision structures.

  2. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  3. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Vladimir I.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Stonik, Valentin A.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  4. Activities of the Structures Division, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Structures Division's 1990 Annual Report is to give a brief, but comprehensive, review of the technical accomplishments of the Division during the past calendar year. The report is organized topically to match the Center's Strategic Plan. Over the years, the Structures Division has developed the technology base necessary for improving the future of aeronautical and space propulsion systems. In the future, propulsion systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance. Achieving these goals is complex and challenging. Our approach has been to work cooperatively with both industry and universities to develop the technology necessary for state-of-the-art advancement in aeronautical and space propulsion systems. The Structures Division consists of four branches: Structural Mechanics, Fatigue and Fracture, Structural Dynamics, and Structural Integrity. This publication describes the work of the four branches by three topic areas of Research: (1) Basic Discipline; (2) Aeropropulsion; and (3) Space Propulsion. Each topic area is further divided into the following: (1) Materials; (2) Structural Mechanics; (3) Life Prediction; (4) Instruments, Controls, and Testing Techniques; and (5) Mechanisms. The publication covers 78 separate topics with a bibliography containing 159 citations. We hope you will find the publication interesting as well as useful.

  5. COMPUTER-ASSISTED STUDIES OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE-BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-assisted methods can be used to investigate the relationships between the molecular structures of compounds and their biological activity. A number of approaches have been reported in the literature, including correlations of activity with substituent constants, conforma...

  6. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  7. Hierarchical Interaction Structure of Neural Activities in Cortical Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gustavo S.; Gireesh, Elakkat D.; Plenz, Dietmar; Nakahara, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the analysis of neuronal activities suggest that the instantaneous activity patterns can be mostly explained by considering only first-order and pairwise interactions between recorded elements, i.e., action potentials or local field potentials (LFP), and do not require higher-than-pairwise-order interactions. If generally applicable, this pairwise approach greatly simplifies the description of network interactions. However, an important question remains: are the recorded elements the units of interaction that best describe neuronal activity patterns? To explore this, we recorded spontaneous LFP peak activities in cortical organotypic cultures using planar, integrated 60-microelectrode arrays. We compared predictions obtained using a pairwise approach with those using a hierarchical approach that uses two different spatial units for describing the activity interactions: single electrodes and electrode clusters. In this hierarchical model, short-range interactions within each cluster were modeled by pairwise interactions of electrode activities and long-range interactions were modeled by pairwise interactions of cluster activities. Despite the relatively low number of parameters used, the hierarchical model provided a more accurate description of the activity patterns than the pairwise model when applied to ensembles of 10 electrodes. Furthermore, the hierarchical model was successfully applied to a larger-scale data of ~60 electrodes. Electrode activities within clusters were highly correlated and spatially contiguous. In contrast, long-range interactions were diffuse, suggesting the presence of higher-than-pairwise-order interactions involved in the LFP peak activities. Thus, the identification of appropriate units of interaction may allow for the successful characterization of neuronal activities in large-scale networks. PMID:20592194

  8. Artificial cytoskeletal structures within enzymatically active bio-inorganic protocells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravinash Krishna; Li, Mei; Olof, Sam N; Patil, Avinash J; Mann, Stephen

    2013-02-11

    The fabrication of enzymatically active, semi-permeable bio-inorganic protocells capable of self-assembling a cytoskeletal-like interior and undergoing small-molecule dephosphorylation reactions is described. Reversible disassembly of an amino acid-derived supramolecular hydrogel within the internalized reaction space is used to tune the enzymatic activity of the nanoparticle-bounded inorganic compartments. PMID:23027575

  9. Structural Engineering. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide provides technology learning activities designed to prepare students in grades 6-10 to work in the world of the future. The 8-day course provides exploratory, hands-on learning activities and information that can enhance the education of students of all types in an integrated curriculum that provides practical applications of…

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models with receptor-dependent descriptors for predicting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lather, Viney; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship study has been carried out, in which the relationship between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonistic activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives and quantitative descriptors, V(site) calculated in a receptor-dependent manner is modeled. These descriptors quantify the volume occupied by the optimized ligands in regions that are either common or specific to the superimposed binding sites of the targets under consideration. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built by forward stepwise linear regression modeling for a training set of 27 compounds and validated for a test set of seven compounds, resulting in a squared correlation coefficient value of 0.90 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and of 0.89 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The leave-one-out cross-validation and test set predictability squared correlation coefficient values for these models were 0.85 and 0.62 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and 0.89 and 0.50 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma respectively. A dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor model has also been developed, and it indicates the structural features required for the design of ligands with dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity. These quantitative structure-activity relationship models show the importance of the descriptors here introduced in the prediction and interpretation of the compounds affinity and selectivity. PMID:19243388

  11. Structure and VP16 binding of the Mediator Med25 activator interaction domain.

    PubMed

    Vojnic, Erika; Mourão, André; Seizl, Martin; Simon, Bernd; Wenzeck, Larissa; Larivière, Laurent; Baumli, Sonja; Baumgart, Karen; Meisterernst, Michael; Sattler, Michael; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Eukaryotic transcription is regulated by interactions between gene-specific activators and the coactivator complex Mediator. Here we report the NMR structure of the Mediator subunit Med25 (also called Arc92) activator interaction domain (ACID) and analyze the structural and functional interaction of ACID with the archetypical acidic transcription activator VP16. Unlike other known activator targets, ACID forms a seven-stranded β-barrel framed by three helices. The VP16 subdomains H1 and H2 bind to opposite faces of ACID and cooperate during promoter-dependent activated transcription in a in vitro system. The activator-binding ACID faces are functionally required and conserved among higher eukaryotes. Comparison with published activator structures reveals that the VP16 activation domain uses distinct interaction modes to adapt to unrelated target surfaces and folds that evolved for activator binding. PMID:21378965

  12. Synthesis and insecticidal activity of heptafluoroisopropyl-containing benzoylphenylurea structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Tang, Xiuhong; Ishaaya, Isaac; Cao, Song; Wu, Jingjing; Yu, Jinlong; Li, Hui; Qian, Xuhong

    2010-03-10

    Fourteen novel heptafluoroisopropyl-containing benzoylphenylureas were designed and synthesized. Their insecticidal activities against armyworm ( Pseudaletia separata Walker) were examined and compared with the commercial product diflubenzuron. Three compounds (IIi, IIj, and IIk) showed excellent insecticidal effect, and their activity resembled that of diflubenzuron. Compound IIi also showed nearly the same insecticidal activity as novaluron on African cotton leafworm ( Spodoptera littoralis ). Furthermore, results from a field trial indicated that 5% EC IIi exhibited similar efficacy in comparison with chlorfluazuron and hexaflumuron against imported cabbage worm ( Pieris rapae L.) and diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella ), respectively. PMID:20014763

  13. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Active Site and Activity of Human Nit2/ω-Amidase

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Gao, Quan-Ze; Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Lyu, Jyun-Hong; Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Human nitrilase-like protein 2 (hNit2) is a putative tumor suppressor, recently identified as ω-amidase. hNit2/ω-amidase plays a crucial metabolic role by catalyzing the hydrolysis of α-ketoglutaramate (the α-keto analog of glutamine) and α-ketosuccinamate (the α-keto analog of asparagine), yielding α-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate, respectively. Transamination between glutamine and α-keto-γ-methiolbutyrate closes the methionine salvage pathway. Thus, hNit2/ω-amidase links sulfur metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate the catalytic specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild type enzyme and its mutants to investigate enzyme-substrate interactions. Binding free energies were computed to characterize factors contributing to the substrate specificity. The predictions resulting from these computations were verified by kinetic analyses and mutational studies. The activity of hNit2/ω-amidase was determined with α-ketoglutaramate and succinamate as substrates. We constructed three catalytic triad mutants (E43A, K112A, and C153A) and a mutant with a loop 116–128 deletion to validate the role of key residues and the 116–128 loop region in substrate binding and turnover. The molecular dynamics simulations successfully verified the experimental trends in the binding specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase toward various substrates. Our findings have revealed novel structural insights into the binding of substrates to hNit2/ω-amidase. A catalytic triad and the loop residues 116–128 of hNit2 play an essential role in supporting the stability of the enzyme-substrate complex, resulting in the generation of the catalytic products. These observations are predicted to be of benefit in the design of new inhibitors or activators for research involving cancer and hyperammonemic diseases. PMID:22674578

  14. Flightweight radiantly and actively cooled panel: Thermal and structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.; Kelly, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A 2- by 4-ft flightweight panel was subjected to thermal/structural tests representative of design flight conditions for a Mach 6.7 transport and to off-design conditions simulating flight maneuvers and cooling system failures. The panel utilized Rene 41 heat shields backed by a thin layer of insulation to radiate away most of the 12 Btu/ft2-sec incident heating. A solution of ethylene glycol in water circulating through tubes in an aluminum-honeycomb-sandwich panel absorbed the remainder of the incident heating (0.8 Btu/sq ft-sec). The panel successfully withstood (1) 46.7 hr of radiant heating which included 53 thermal cycles and 5000 cycles of uniaxial inplane loading of + or - 1200 lfb/in; (2) simulated 2g-maneuver heating conditions and simulated cooling system failures without excessive temperatures on the structural panel; and (3) the extensive thermal/structural tests and the aerothermal tests reported in NASA TP-1595 without significant damage to the structural panel, coolant leaks, or hot-gas ingress to the structural panel.

  15. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of trimebutine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sai, H; Ozaki, Y; Hayashi, K; Onoda, Y; Yamada, K

    1996-06-01

    Trimebutine derivatives were synthesized by utilizing alkylation or acylation of isonitriles and nitrile as a key step. The colonic contractile effects of these compounds were examined, and T-1815 was found to have strong colonic propulsive activity. PMID:8814947

  16. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  17. Field models and numerical dosimetry inside an extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic bioreactor: the theoretical link between the electromagnetically induced mechanical forces and the biological mechanisms of the cell tensegrity.

    PubMed

    Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Di Barba, Paolo; Magenes, Giovanni; Lenzi, Andrea; Naro, Fabio; Fassina, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We have implemented field models and performed a detailed numerical dosimetry inside our extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic bioreactor which has been successfully used in in vitro Biotechnology and Tissue Engineering researches. The numerical dosimetry permitted to map the magnetic induction field (maximum module equal to about 3.3 mT) and to discuss its biological effects in terms of induced electric currents and induced mechanical forces (compression and traction). So, in the frame of the tensegrity-mechanotransduction theory of Ingber, the study of these electromagnetically induced mechanical forces could be, in our opinion, a powerful tool to understand some effects of the electromagnetic stimulation whose mechanisms remain still elusive. PMID:25202652

  18. Physical Activity and Right Ventricular Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Carrie P.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Barr, R. Graham; Johnson, W. Craig; Bagiella, Emilia; Chahal, Harjit; Jain, Aditya; Kizer, Jorge R.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Lima, João A. C.; Bluemke, David A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Intense exercise in elite athletes is associated with increased left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) mass and volumes. However, the effect of physical activity on the RV in an older community-based population is unknown. Objectives: We studied the association between levels of physical activity in adults and RV mass and volumes. Methods: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging on community-based participants without clinical cardiovascular disease. RV volumes were determined from manually contoured endocardial margins. RV mass was determined from the difference between epicardial and endocardial volumes multiplied by the specific gravity of myocardium. Metabolic equivalent–minutes/day were calculated from the self-reported frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity. Measurements and Main Results: The study sample (n = 1,867) was aged 61.8 ± 10 years, 48% male, 44% white, 27% African American, 20% Hispanic, and 9% Chinese. Higher levels of moderate and vigorous physical activity were linearly associated with higher RV mass (P = 0.02) after adjusting for demographics, anthropometrics, smoking, cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and LV mass. Higher levels of intentional exercise (physical activity done for the sole purpose of conditioning or fitness) were nonlinearly associated with RV mass independent of LV mass (P = 0.03). There were similar associations between higher levels of physical activity and larger RV volumes. Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity in adults were associated with greater RV mass independent of the associations with LV mass; similar results were found for RV volumes. Exercise-associated RV remodeling may have important clinical implications. PMID:20813888

  19. Associations between Children's Physical Activities, Sedentary Behaviours and Family Structure: A Sequential Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarmby, T.; Dagkas, S.; Bridge, M.

    2011-01-01

    This mixed method paper explored the effect of family structure on children's physical activities and sedentary pursuits. It furthers the limited understanding of how family structure impacts on children's time in, and reasons behind engaging in, certain physical activities. Children from three inner city comprehensive schools in the Midlands,…

  20. Activity Structures for Project-Based Teaching and Learning: Design and Adaptation of Cultural Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polman, Joseph L.

    This paper discusses research on activity structure design in a project-based science classroom and efforts to adapt designs from this setting to an after-school program involving historical inquiry. Common activity structures such as classroom lessons and Initiation-Reply-Evaluation (I-R-E) sequences are important cultural tools that help…

  1. X-ray crystal structure of divalent metal-activated ß-xyloisdase, RS223BX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the first X-ray structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ß-xylosidase, RS223BX, which is strongly activated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The 2.69 Å structure reveals that the Ca2+ cation is located at the back of the active site pocket. The Ca2+ coordinates to H274 to sta...

  2. Breadth and Intensity: Salient, Separable, and Developmentally Significant Dimensions of Structured Youth Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an impressive volume of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that youth involvement in structured, organized activities (e.g. school sports, community clubs) may facilitate positive youth development. We present a theory-based framework for studying structured activity involvement (SAI) as a context for positive youth…

  3. A Plethora of Polyketides: Structures, Biological Activities and Enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyketides represent a family of highly structurally diverse compounds, all produced via iterative decarboxylative condensations of starter and extender units, analogous to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. Polyketides have been shown to play important roles in the life cycles of producing organism...

  4. Active control of large space structures: An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the large space structure (LSS) control system design problem is presented. The LSS is defined as a class of system, and LSS modeling techniques are discussed. Model truncation, control system objectives, current control law design techniques, and particular problem areas are discussed.

  5. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariana, Neni

    2010-01-01

    Few researches have been concerned about relation between children's spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was…

  6. AUSTRALINE AND RELATED ALKALOIDS: EASY STRUCTURAL CONFIRMATION AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first polyhydrroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid with a hydroxymethyl group at C-3 was isolated from pods of Alexa leiopetala (leguminosae) and designated alexine (1). The Australian legume Castanospermum australe is also known to produce the same structural type of pyrrolizidines. There are repor...

  7. Discovery of novel mosquito repellents from structure-activity studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the AGRO division: Recent Developments in Invertebrate Repellents. The USDA historical archives of repellents and toxicants consists of over 30,000 chemical structures tested over the past 60 years. We have undertaken a collaborative research project to initially target six subsets of these com...

  8. Active loose bolt detection in a complex satellite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2010-03-01

    This work focuses on the detection, localization, and quantification of damage in the form of loose bolts on an isogrid satellite structure. In the process of rapid satellite development and deployment, it is necessary to quickly complete several levels of validation tests. Structural Health Monitoring methods are being investigated as a means for reducing the number of validation tests required. This method for detecting loose bolts enables quick confirmation of proper assembly, and verification that structural fasteners are still intact after validation testing. Within this testing framework, feature selection is presented as well as a localization methodology. Quantification of fastener torque is also developed. Locating damage in an isogrid structure is complicated by the directionally dependent dispersion characteristics caused by a propagating wave passing through ribs and holes. For this reason, an actuation frequency with the best first wave arrival clarity is selected. A methodology is presented in which a time map is constructed for each actuator-sensor pair which establishes times of flight for each location on the sample. Differences in time between healthy and damaged sensor signals are then extracted and used to create a map of possible damage locations. These resulting solution maps are merged yielding a final damage position. Fastener torque is correlated to a damage parameter, and the loose bolt position is calculated within 3 cm.

  9. Staying in or moving away from structured activities: Explanations involving parents and peers.

    PubMed

    Persson, Andreas; Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent participation in structured activities, meaning those with adult leaders, regular meetings, and skill-building activities, is related to good adjustment. Participation in unstructured, unsupervised, peer-oriented activities is related to poor adjustment. Structured activity participation is high in early adolescence and then declines, raising the question of why youths leave structured activities. The authors examined explanations involving parents and peers. They used longitudinal data from 861 youths (ages 13-17 years). Results showed that, compared with youths who stayed in structured activities, those who switched to hanging out on the streets were less likely to have peers in structured activities and had less positive feelings about the home context and more negative interactions with parents. In addition, delinquency predicted switching to hanging out in the streets and never joining structured activities in the first place. The results concerning parents support a theoretical explanation of how parents might unintentionally affect youths' leisure choices. Furthermore, the authors found some indications that positive feelings at home might protect youths who switch from structured activities to hanging out on the streets from increases in delinquency. PMID:17201519

  10. Antipoliovirus structure-activity relationships of some aporphine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boustie, J; Stigliani, J L; Montanha, J; Amoros, M; Payard, M; Girre, L

    1998-04-01

    A series of 18 aporphinoids have been tested in vitro against human poliovirus. The aporphines (+)-glaucine fumarate (1), (+)-N-methyllaurotetanine (4), (+)-isoboldine (7), and (-)-nuciferine, HCl (10) were found to be active with selectivity indices > 14. The nature of the 1, 2-substituents of the isoquinoline moiety appeared to be critical for antipoliovirus activity. An SAR study demonstrated the importance of a methoxyl group at C-2 on the tetrahydroisoquinoline ring for the induction of antipoliovirus activity. Molecular modeling of some compounds in this series revealed the close similarities between the three-dimensional conformational features of the inactive 1,2-substituted derivatives (+)-boldine (6) and (+)-laurolitsine (5) with derivatives containing the 1,2-(methylenedioxy) moiety, which were generally found to be inactive as exemplified by (+)-cassythicine (9). PMID:9584402

  11. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  12. Phase separation and emergent structures in an active nematic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    We consider a phenomenological continuum theory for an active nematic fluid and show that there exists a universal, model independent instability which renders the homogeneous nematic state unstable to order fluctuations. Using numerical and analytic tools we show that, in the vicinity of a critical point, this instability leads to a phase separated state in which the ordered regions form bands in which the direction of nematic order is perpendicular to the direction of density gradient. We argue that the underlying mechanism that leads to this phase separation is a universal feature of active fluids of different symmetries. PMID:25375491

  13. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  14. Isolation of lignans from Schisandra chinensis with anti-proliferative activity in human colorectal carcinoma: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Gnabre, John; Unlu, Irem; Chang, Tso-Cheng; Lisseck, Paul; Bourne, Bryan; Scolnik, Ryan; Jacobsen, Neil E; Bates, Robert; Huang, Ru Chih

    2010-10-15

    Separate benzocyclooctadiene lignans were isolated from the berries of Schisandra chinensis in milligram quantities on analytical reverse phase (RP) HPLC by an automated repeat-injection method and shown to have anti-proliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. Structures of the compounds were determined by a combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Stereospecific NMR assignments for gomisin-N and deoxyschisandrin, gave more complete and accurate data than previously reported, based on 600MHz 2D HSQC, DQF-COSY and HMBC data. Comparison of coupling constants and HMBC crosspeak intensities with calculated and X-ray crystal structures confirmed their stereochemistry and conformation. Analysis of structure-activity relationships revealed the importance of key structural determinants. The S-biphenyl configuration of gomisin N, the most active lignan, correlated with increased anti-proliferative activity, while the presence of a hydroxyl group at the C7 position reduced or abolished this activity. Increased activity was also observed when a methylenedioxy group was present between C12 and C13. The percent yield of the most active compounds relative to the starting plant materials was 0.0156% for deoxyschisandrin and 0.0173% for gomisin N. The results of these studies indicate that automated repeat-injection method of analytical HPLC may provide a superior alternative to the standard semi-preparative HPLC techniques for separation of complex mixtures. PMID:20810329

  15. Structure-reactivity relationships between fluorescent chromophores and antioxidant activity of grain and sweet sorghum seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenolic structures, such as tannins, are the putative cause of a variety of seed functions including bird/insect resistance and antioxidant activity. Structure-reactivity relationships are necessary to understand the influence of polyphenolic chromophore structures on the tannin content and fr...

  16. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  17. Activation product release from fusion structural materials in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya, I.; Montgomery, F.; Trester, P.; Burnette, R.; Johnson, W.; Schultz, K.

    1985-08-01

    The release and transport of activated materials-of-construction in a fusion reactor during an accident scenario involving overheating and ingress of oxidants is an important area of safety research. This investigation quantified material release characteristics which result from surface oxide spallation and vaporization for the steel alloys PCA and HT-9 in impure helium and air environments.

  18. Gold Sulfinyl Mesoionic Carbenes: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Frutos, María; Avello, Marta G; Viso, Alma; Fernández de la Pradilla, Roberto; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A; Gornitzka, Heinz; Hemmert, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Gold mesoionic carbenes having a chiral sulfoxide group attached to the C4 position of the five membered ring have been prepared and tested as catalysts in the cycloisomerization of enynes. These new catalysts are very efficient, with the sulfoxide moiety playing a key role in their activity and the N1-substituent in control of the regioselectivity of these processes. PMID:27403763

  19. Movement Activity Levels on Traditional and Contemporary Playground Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Carl P.; LeBlanc, Elizabeth

    This study investigated playground activity levels of children in grades K-4 and compared levels of use of traditional and creative playground apparatus. The traditional playground area consisted of climbing bars, slides, ladders, chin bars, swings, see saws, and a merry-go-round. The creative playground contained tire hurdles, tire walk, tire…

  20. Active sound attenuation across a double wall structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of achieving significant local and global sound attenuation across a flat double wall is demonstrated. It is also shown that sound can be prevented from entering the interior of a cabinlike environment. The approach used is unlike established active noise control techniques.

  1. Antitumor activity of low-dimensional alumina structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    Nano-dimensional materials have recently attracted much attention with respect to their potential role in medicine. Physical mechanisms of interaction of nanoparticles with tumor cells will help to develop new methods for cancer disease treatment. Based on aluminum oxide phases, positively charged low-dimensional structures have different shape: agglomerates of nanosheets, nameplates, cone-shaped nanoaggregates were synthesized with the help of aluminum nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity effect of these low-dimensional structures on A549, HeLa, MDA, PyMT tumor cells was studied. It was shown that agglomerates of nanosheets were more toxic for investigating cell lines. Agglomerates of nanosheets had a medium toxic effect at a concentration of 10 mg/ml while nameplates and cone-shaped nanoaggregates were nontoxic. The toxic effect of agglomerates of nanosheets correlates with their shape, mainly the presence of multiple edges.

  2. Structure and Activity of the Axon Guidance Protein MICAL

    SciTech Connect

    Nadella,M.; Bianchet, M.; Gabelli, S.; Barrila, J.; Amzel, L.

    2005-01-01

    During development, neurons are guided to their targets by short- and long-range attractive and repulsive cues. MICAL, a large multidomain protein, is required for the combined action of semaphorins and plexins in axon guidance. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal region of MICAL (MICAL{sub fd}) determined by x-ray diffraction to 2.0 Angstrom resolution. The structure shows that MICAL{sub fd} is an FAD-containing module structurally similar to aromatic hydroxylases and amine oxidases. In addition, we present biochemical data that show that MICALfd is a flavoenzyme that in the presence of NADPH reduces molecular oxygen to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Km, NAPDH = 222 {micro}M; k{sub cat} = 77 sec{sup -1}), a molecule with known signaling properties. We propose that the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by this reaction may be one of the signaling molecules involved in axon guidance by MICAL.

  3. Active self-sensing scheme development for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Jun; Sohn, Hoon

    2006-12-01

    Smart materials such as lead zirconate titanate (PZT) have been widely used for generating and measuring guided waves in solid media. The guided waves are then used to detect local defects for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. In this study, a self-sensing system, composed of self-sensing algorithms and a self-sensing circuit equivalent to a charge amplifier, is developed so that a single PZT wafer can be used for simultaneous actuation and sensing. First, a PZT wafer is modeled as a single capacitor and a voltage source, and a so-called scaling factor, defined as the ratio of the PZT capacitance to the capacitance of the feedback capacitor in the self-sensing circuit, is estimated by applying known waveforms to the PZT wafer. Then, the mechanical response of the PZT wafer coupled with the host structure's response is extracted from the measured PZT output voltage when an arbitrary excitation is applied to the same PZT wafer. While existing self-sensing techniques focus on vibration controls, the proposed self-sensing scheme attempts to improve the accuracy of extracted sensing signals in the time domain. The simplicity, adaptability and autonomous nature of the proposed self-sensing scheme make it attractive for continuous monitoring of structures in the field. The effectiveness of the proposed self-sensing scheme is investigated through numerical simulations and experiments on a cantilever beam.

  4. The structures of the kinase domain and UBA domain of MPK38 suggest the activation mechanism for kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Soon; Yoo, Jiho; Park, Soomin; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2014-02-01

    Murine protein serine/threonine kinase 38 (MPK38) is the murine orthologue of human maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which belongs to the SNF1/AMPK family. MELK is considered to be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy because overexpression and hyperactivation of MELK is correlated with several human cancers. Activation of MPK38 requires the extended sequence (ExS) containing the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) linker and UBA domain and phosphorylation of the activation loop. However, the activation mechanism of MPK38 is unknown. This paper reports the crystal structure of MPK38 (T167E), which mimics a phosphorylated state of the activation loop, in complex with AMP-PNP. In the MPK38 structure, the UBA linker forces an inward movement of the αC helix. Phosphorylation of the activation loop then induces movement of the activation loop towards the C-lobe and results in interlobar cleft closure. These processes generate a fully active state of MPK38. This structure suggests that MPK38 has a similar molecular mechanism regulating activation as in other kinases of the SNF1/AMPK family. PMID:24531485

  5. Active states and structure transformations in accreting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneva, Daniela; Kaygorodov, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Active states in white dwarfs are usually associated with light curve's effects that concern to the bursts, flickering or flare-up occurrences. It is common that a gas-dynamics source exists for each of these processes there. We consider the white dwarf binary stars with accretion disc around the primary. We suggest a flow transformation modeling of the mechanisms that are responsible for ability to cause some flow instability and bring the white dwarfs system to the outburst's development. The processes that cause the accretion rate to sufficiently increase are discussed. Then the transition from a quiescent to an active state is realized. We analyze a quasi-periodic variability in the luminosity of white dwarf binary stars systems. The results are supported with an observational data.

  6. Robustness of active modal damping of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Michael

    1987-01-01

    The method of active modal damping (AMD) is reviewed, and the pinhole/occulter facility (P/OF) is presented as a design example. This system is a large space system composed of a flexible beam, a gimbal-pointing system, and an optical alignment system mounted in the Shuttle cargo bay and excited by typical Shuttle disturbances. The AMD system performance is compared with that of a series-compensated control system.

  7. Activity and structure of methanotrophic communities in landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Julia; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente

    2009-10-01

    The composition of the methanotrophic community in soil covers on five landfills in Northern and Eastern Germany was investigated by means of diagnostic microarray and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), both targeting the pmoA gene of methanotrophs. Physical and chemical properties of the 15 sampled soil profiles varied greatly, thus providing for very different environmental conditions. The potential methane oxidation activity, assessed using undisturbed soil cores, varied between 0.2 and 28 µg CH4 gdw (-1)  h(-1) , the latter amounting to 426 g CH4 m(-2)  h(-1) . Total nitrogen was found to be the soil variable correlating most strongly with methanotrophic activity. Explaining close to 50% of the observed variability, this indicates that on the investigated sites activity and thus abundance of methanotrophs may have been nitrogen-limited. Variables that enhance organic matter and thus nitrogen accumulation, such as field capacity, also positively impacted methanotrophic activity. In spite of the great variability of soil properties and different geographic landfill location, both microarray and T-RFLP analysis suggested that the composition of the methanotrophic community on all five sites, in all profiles and across all depths was similar. Methylocystis, Methylobacter and Methylococcus species, including Methylococcus-related uncultivated methanotrophs, were predominantly detected among type II, Ia and Ib methanotrophs, respectively. This indicates that the high methane fluxes typical for landfill environments may be the most influential driver governing the community composition, or other variables not analysed in this study. Principal component analysis suggested that community diversity is most influenced by the site from which the samples were taken and second, from the location on the individual sites, i.e. the soil profile. Landfill and individual profiles reflect the combined impact of all effective variables, including

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of Chlorotoxin-Like Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Abid; Alam, Mehtab; Abbasi, Atiya; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Kalbacher, Hubert; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Animal venom (e.g., scorpion) is a rich source of various protein and peptide toxins with diverse physio-/pharmaco-logical activities, which generally exert their action via target-specific modulation of different ion channel functions. Scorpion venoms are among the most widely-known source of peptidyl neurotoxins used for callipering different ion channels, such as; Na+, K+, Ca+, Cl−, etc. A new peptide of the chlorotoxin family (i.e., Bs-Tx7) has been isolated, sequenced and synthesized from scorpion Buthus sindicus (family Buthidae) venom. This peptide demonstrates 66% with chlorotoxin (ClTx) and 82% with CFTR channel inhibitor (GaTx1) sequence identities reported from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus venom. The toxin has a molecular mass of 3821 Da and possesses four intra-chain disulphide bonds. Amino acid sequence analysis of Bs-Tx7 revealed the presence of a scissile peptide bond (i.e., Gly-Ile) for human MMP2, whose activity is increased in the case of tumour malignancy. The effect of hMMP2 on Bs-Tx7, or vice versa, observed using the FRET peptide substrate with methoxycoumarin (Mca)/dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as fluorophore/quencher, designed and synthesized to obtain the lowest Km value for this substrate, showed approximately a 60% increase in the activity of hMMP2 upon incubation of Bs-Tx7 with the enzyme at a micromolar concentration (4 µM), indicating the importance of this toxin in diseases associated with decreased MMP2 activity. PMID:26848686

  9. Structure-Activity Relationship of Chlorotoxin-Like Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Abid; Alam, Mehtab; Abbasi, Atiya; Undheim, Eivind A B; Fry, Bryan Grieg; Kalbacher, Hubert; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Animal venom (e.g., scorpion) is a rich source of various protein and peptide toxins with diverse physio-/pharmaco-logical activities, which generally exert their action via target-specific modulation of different ion channel functions. Scorpion venoms are among the most widely-known source of peptidyl neurotoxins used for callipering different ion channels, such as; Na⁺, K⁺, Ca⁺, Cl(-), etc. A new peptide of the chlorotoxin family (i.e., Bs-Tx7) has been isolated, sequenced and synthesized from scorpion Buthus sindicus (family Buthidae) venom. This peptide demonstrates 66% with chlorotoxin (ClTx) and 82% with CFTR channel inhibitor (GaTx1) sequence identities reported from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus venom. The toxin has a molecular mass of 3821 Da and possesses four intra-chain disulphide bonds. Amino acid sequence analysis of Bs-Tx7 revealed the presence of a scissile peptide bond (i.e., Gly-Ile) for human MMP2, whose activity is increased in the case of tumour malignancy. The effect of hMMP2 on Bs-Tx7, or vice versa, observed using the FRET peptide substrate with methoxycoumarin (Mca)/dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as fluorophore/quencher, designed and synthesized to obtain the lowest Km value for this substrate, showed approximately a 60% increase in the activity of hMMP2 upon incubation of Bs-Tx7 with the enzyme at a micromolar concentration (4 µM), indicating the importance of this toxin in diseases associated with decreased MMP2 activity. PMID:26848686

  10. Structural activation pathways from dynamic olfactory receptor-odorant interactions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peter C; Singer, Michael S; Crasto, Chiquito J

    2005-11-01

    We have simulated an odor ligand's dynamic behavior in the binding region of an olfactory receptor (OR). Our short timescale computational studies (up to 200 ps) have helped identify unprecedented postdocking ligand behavior of ligands. From in vacuo molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between models of rat OR I7 and 10 aldehyde ligands, we have identified a dissociative pathway along which the ligand exits and enters the OR-binding pocket--a transit event. The ligand's transit through the receptor's binding region may mark the beginning of a signal transduction cascade leading to odor recognition. We have graphically traced the rotameric changes in key OR amino acid side chains during the transit. Our results have helped substantiate or refute previously held notions of amino acid contribution to ligand stability in the binding pocket. Our observations of ligand activity when compared to those of experimental (electroolfactogram response) OR-activation studies provide a view to predicting the stability of ligands in the binding pocket as a precursor to OR activation by the ligand. PMID:16243965

  11. Location, Timing, and Social Structure Patterns Related to Physical Activity Participation in Weight Loss Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Trevarthen, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Less than half of the adults in the United States meet national guidelines for physical activity. Physical activity programs can induce short-term improvements in physical activity. To develop effective interventions, researchers and practitioners should consider the timing, location, and social structure patterns of participants. Using a pretest,…

  12. Pedagogical Beliefs, Activity Choice and Structure, and Adult-Child Interaction in Nursery Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blay, Josepha A.; Ireson, Judith

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative analysis of four cooking activities undertaken in two nursery classes reveals relationships between the adults' pedagogical beliefs, the choice and structuring of activities, and the nature of adult-child participation. Four adults each planned and carried out separately, one cooking activity of their choice with a small group of…

  13. Structured Extracurricular Activities among Adolescents: Findings and Implications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Rich; Meyers, Joel; Perez, Laura

    2004-01-01

    One factor that contributes to adolescent positive mental health is active engagement. Engagement is defined as any activity that is initiated to attain an outcome. In general, two forms of activities exist that correspond with engagement: solitary, non-structured, and non-cooperative pursuits, often without adult supervision (e.g., playing video…

  14. Structure-activity relationship of immunostimulatory effects of phthalates

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T; Nielsen, Gunnar D

    2008-01-01

    Background Some chemicals, including some phthalate plasticizers, have been shown to have an adjuvant effect in mice. However, an adjuvant effect, defined as an inherent ability to stimulate the humoral immune response, was only observed after exposure to a limited number of the phthalates. An adjuvant effect may be due to the structure or physicochemical characteristics of the molecule. The scope of this study was to investigate which molecular characteristics that determine the observed adjuvant effect of the most widely used phthalate plasticizer, the di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is documented as having a strong adjuvant effect. To do so, a series of nine lipophilic compounds with structural and physicochemical relations to DEHP were investigated. Results Adjuvant effect of phthalates and related compounds were restricted to the IgG1 antibody formation. No effect was seen on IgE. It appears that lipophilicity plays a crucial role, but lipophilicity does not per se cause an adjuvant effect. In addition to lipophilicity, a phthalate must also possess specific stereochemical characteristics in order for it to have adjuvant effect. Conclusion The adjuvant effect of phthalates are highly influenced by both stereochemical and physico-chemical properties. This knowledge may be used in the rational development of plasticizers without adjuvant effect as well as in the design of new immunological adjuvants. PMID:18976460

  15. Ascaroside activity in Caenorhabditis elegans is highly dependent on chemical structure

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Kyle A.; Conner, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Xinxing; Spell, Mark; Bernard, Gary M.; Patel, Pratik; de Carvalho, Ana Carolina G.V.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Ragains, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides, structurally diverse derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, and uses them in chemical communication. At high population densities, specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In order to study the structure-activity relationships for the ascarosides, we synthesized a panel of ascarosides and tested them for dauer-inducing activity. This panel includes a number of natural ascarosides that were detected in crude pheromone extract, but as yet have no assigned function, as well as many unnatural ascaroside derivatives. Most of these ascarosides, some of which have significant structural similarity to the natural dauer pheromone components, have very little dauer-inducing activity. Our results provide a primer to ascaroside structure-activity relationships and suggest that slight modifications to ascaroside structure dramatically influence binding to the relevant G protein-coupled receptors that control dauer formation. PMID:23920482

  16. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  17. Active and structural strain model for magnetostrictive transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapino, Marcelo J.; Smith, Ralph C.; Flatau, Alison B.

    1998-07-01

    We consider the modeling of strains generated by magnetostrictive materials in response to applied magnetic fields. The active or external component of the strain is due to the rotation of magnetic moments within the material to align with the applied field. This is characterized through consideration of the Jiles-Atherton mean field theory for ferromagnetic hysteresis in combination with a quadratic moment rotation model for magnetostriction. The second component of the strain reflects the passive or internal dynamics of the rod as it vibrates. This is modeled through force balancing which yields a wave equation with magnetostrictive inputs. The validity of a combined transducer model is illustrated through comparison with experimental data.

  18. [Biophysical aspects of biological activity structure--strain calcium carbonat in micellar form].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V I; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V; Savostikova, O N; Alekseeva, A V; P'ianzina, I P

    2013-01-01

    Results of the study of electrochemical and structural state of phase of associated water in the solutions of structurally stressed calcium carbonate in the micellar form are reported. On the base on the comparison of structural--physical changes of activated water with the data on the activity of bioluminiscentic "Ecolyum" microorganisms in their noncontact activation the electronic mechanism of the effect of activated water on cellular metabolism is substantiated The use of "Micellate of calcium" possessing non-contact electron-donor action on cellular structures was shown to permit to compensate the deficit of electrons and thereby to restore the activities of reductases and iron-containing peptides required for the production of regulatory ROS and alteration in redox state of the intracellular environment. PMID:24624817

  19. Structure-Activity Relationship of Oligomeric Flavan-3-ols: Importance of the Upper-Unit B-ring Hydroxyl Groups in the Dimeric Structure for Strong Activities.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshitomo; Takano, Syota; Ayano, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Masahiro; Koashi, Takahiro; Okamoto, Syuhei; Doi, Syoma; Ishida, Masahiko; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hamada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Saito, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins, which are composed of oligomeric flavan-3-ol units, are contained in various foodstuffs (e.g., fruits, vegetables, and drinks) and are strongly biologically active compounds. We investigated which element of the proanthocyanidin structure is primarily responsible for this functionality. In this study, we elucidate the importance of the upper-unit of 4-8 condensed dimeric flavan-3-ols for antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) and cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line HeLa S3 proliferation inhibitory activity. To clarify the important constituent unit of proanthocyanidin, we synthesized four dimeric compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and (+)-catechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin and performed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. In addition to antimicrobial activity against S. cerevisiae and proliferation inhibitory activity on HeLa S3 cells, the correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups was low. On the basis of the results of our SAR studies, we concluded that B-ring hydroxyl groups of the upper-unit of the dimer are crucially important for strong and effective activity. PMID:26501251

  20. Structure-activity relationship studies of microbiologically active thiosemicarbazides derived from hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Kaproń, Barbara; Kosikowska, Urszula; Malm, Anna; Strzelczyk, Aleksandra; Stączek, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    Forty-five derivatives of thiosemicarbazide were synthesized, and their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was evaluated. Some of the described compounds exhibited interesting activity against reference strains of Gram-positive bacteria, whereas only two derivatives had the ability to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative species (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 12453). The most potent antimicrobial activity was observed in the cases of salicylic acid hydrazide derivatives. The differences in activity inspired us to conduct conformational analysis using molecular mechanics level. The obtained results suggest that the molecule geometry, especially at the N4-terminus of thiosemicarbazide skeleton, determines the antibacterial activity. Unfortunately, in opposition to what we expected, only one of the tested compounds inhibited the activity of the topoIV enzyme, and none of them was active against DNA gyrase. PMID:25043121

  1. Structure and activity of plasmin and other direct thrombolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Novokhatny, Valery

    2008-01-01

    The physiological or pharmacological dissolution of thrombi is ultimately accomplished by the serine protease plasmin. Plasmin is derived from its precursor plasminogen in a reaction catalyzed by plasminogen activators (PAs) such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). In the middle of the last century, plasmin was investigated as a potential thrombolytic agent. However, technical obstacles led to the abandonment of this agent, and by the 1970s PAs had become the standard of care for pharmacological management of various thrombotic conditions. Talecris Biotherapeutics has developed a methodology to prepare the plasmin product (Human) TAL-05-00018 that is rendered inactive by low pH (pH 3.0-4.0) until it is delivered directly to the neutral environment of a thrombus by catheter-assisted administration. TAL-05-00018 undergoes a rigorous manufacturing process to ensure a final product free from unactivated plasminogen, streptokinase, enveloped and non-enveloped viruses and prion proteins; generating an extremely high-purity product with a shelf life of three years at ambient temperature. TAL-05-00018 has shown promise in in vitro and pre-clinical studies, and in early clinical trials, demonstrating a dose-dependant reduction in clot weight that compares favorably to that seen with tPA. Several other direct thrombolytics have also been developed, including the recombinant, modified deletion mutant of plasmin TAL6003 (Talecris Biotherapeutics), which retains all the major functional attributes of full-length plasmin. PMID:18718639

  2. Frontoparietal activity and its structural connectivity in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Juliane C; O'Shea, Robert P; Watts, Richard

    2009-12-11

    To understand the brain areas associated with visual awareness and their anatomical interconnections, we studied binocular rivalry with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Binocular rivalry occurs when one image is viewed by one eye and a different image by the other; it is experienced as perceptual alternations between the two images. Our first experiment addressed problems with a popular comparison condition, namely permanent suppression, by comparing rivalry with binocular fusion instead. We found an increased fMRI signal in right frontal, parietal, and occipital regions during rivalry viewing. The pattern of neural activity differed from findings of permanent suppression comparisons, except for adjacent activity in the right superior parietal lobule. This location was near fMRI signal changes related to reported rivalry alternations in our second experiment, indicating that neighbouring areas in the right parietal cortex may be involved in different components of rivalry. In our second experiment, we used probabilistic tractography to detect white matter fibres between right-hemispheric areas that showed event-related fMRI signal changes time-locked to reported perceptual alternations during rivalry viewing. Most of these functionally defined areas were linked by probabilistic fibre tracts, some of which followed long-distance connections such as the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus. Corresponding anatomical pathways might mediate communication within the functional network associated with changes in conscious perception during binocular rivalry. PMID:19782667

  3. Cellulolytic activity and structure of symbiotic bacteria in locust guts.

    PubMed

    Su, L-J; Liu, H; Li, Y; Zhang, H-F; Chen, M; Gao, X-H; Wang, F-Q; Song, A-D

    2014-01-01

    Locusts are able to digest the cellulose of Gramineae plants, resulting in their being considered as major crop pests. To illustrate the mechanism involved in cellulose digestion, the cellulolytic activity and zymography in the gut contents of 16 locust species were determined using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as substrate. The diversity of gut symbiotic bacteria was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that high CMC activity was present in Acrididae gut fluid (mean 356.4 U/g proteins). Of the 5 locust species, Oxya chinensis had the highest diversity of intestinal symbiotic bacteria, characterized by the DGGE profile containing more than 20 bands of 16S rRNA. Klebsiella pneumoniae, in the gut of Locusta migratoria manilensis, was identified as the most abundant symbiotic bacterium by DNA sequencing, with a relative abundance of 19.74%. In comparison, Methylobacterium sp was the most dominant species in the Atractomorpha sinensis gut, with a relative abundance of 29.04%. The results indicated that the cellulolytic enzymes and gut microbial communities probably reflected their phylogenetic relationship with different locust species and associated feeding strategies. PMID:25299108

  4. Control of high frequency microactuators using active structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, P. A.; Alvi, F. S.; Reese, B. M.; Oates, W. S.

    2015-02-01

    A fluidically driven microactuator that generates supersonic, pulsed microjets has been implemented with smart materials to actively and precisely control the frequency of the microjets in a closed-loop manner. Since this actuator relies on a number of microscale flow and acoustic phenomena to produce the pulsed microjets, its resonant frequency is determined by its geometry and other flow parameters. The design discussed in this paper integrates piezoelectric stacks by connecting them to movable sidewalls within the actuator such that the microactuator's internal geometry can be controlled by varying the voltage across the piezo-stacks. An open-loop control scheme demonstrates the frequency modulation capabilities that are enabled with this design: very large frequency deviations (up to +/- 500 Hz) around the actuator design frequency are attained at very high rates (up to 1 kHz). Closed-loop control of the microactuator's frequency was also demonstrated, and the results indicate that (combined with appropriate sensors) this actuator could be used effectively for active, feedback control in high-speed, resonance-dominated flowfields. This proof of concept study clearly illustrates the ability of this robust and compact actuator to produce perturbations that can be modulated and controlled based on the desired control objective.

  5. Isolation, antimicrobial activities, and primary structures of hamster neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Wójcik, K; Thogersen, I B; Dubin, A

    1996-01-01

    Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) neutrophil granules contain at least four microbicidal peptides belonging to the defensin family. These compounds were purified from granule acid extracts by reverse-phase chromatography and termed HaNP-1 to -4 (hamster neutrophil peptide). HaNP-1 and HaNP-3 revealed the most bactericidal activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 to 0.8 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The HaNP-4 was always isolated in concentrations exceeding about 10 times the concentrations of other hamster peptides, but its antibacterial activity as well as that of HaNP-2 was relatively lower, probably as a result of conserved Arg residue substitutions. Other microorganisms were also tested, and generally, hamster defensins exhibited less potency against gram-negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of hamster defensins showed a high percentage of identity to the sequence of mouse enteric defensins, reaching about 60% identical residues in the case of HaNP-3 and cryptdin 3. PMID:8890190

  6. Multipetal-Structured and Dumbbell-Structured Gold-Polymer Composite Particles with Self-Modulated Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingmeng; Otanicar, Todd P; Phelan, Patrick E; Dai, Lenore L

    2015-12-01

    A simple synthesis route for gold-polymer composite particles with controlled structure (multipetal structure and dumbbell structure) is developed. It is intriguing to observe that by controlling the reaction time and size of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), tetrapetal-, tripetal-, and dumbbell-structured gold-polystyrene composite are obtained via seeded polymerization. The average number of petals on a single AuNP increases with the AuNP diameter. These particles show potential applications as building blocks for advanced ordered and hierarchical supracolloidal materials. Further, with the incorporation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm), "smart" thermoresponsive dumbbell-structured gold-PNIPAm/polystyrene composite particles are formed. Significant size variation is validated for particles with 83 and 91 wt % PNIPAm content around lower critical solution temperature (LCST), which results in self-modulated catalytic activity. PMID:26445163

  7. HMGA proteins as modulators of chromatin structure during transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nihan; Singh, Indrabahadur; Mehta, Aditi; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant non-histone chromatin associated proteins. HMG proteins bind to DNA and nucleosome and alter the structure of chromatin locally and globally. Accessibility to DNA within chromatin is a central factor that affects DNA-dependent nuclear processes, such as transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. HMG proteins associate with different multi-protein complexes to regulate these processes by mediating accessibility to DNA. HMG proteins can be subdivided into three families: HMGA, HMGB, and HMGN. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in understanding the function of HMGA family members, specifically their role in gene transcription regulation during development and cancer. PMID:25364713

  8. The 2.7 A crystal structure of the activated FERM domain of moesin: an analysis of structural changes on activation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, S D; Keep, N H

    2001-06-19

    Moesin binds to a large range of proteins through its N terminal FERM (band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain. In full-length moesin isolated from cells, this binding is masked by binding to the C-terminal domain of moesin (C-ERMAD). Activation takes place by phosphorylation of Thr 558 in the C-ERMAD, which releases the C-ERMAD. A recently determined crystal structure of a noncovalent complex of the FERM and C-ERMAD domains showed for the first time that the structure of the FERM domain consists of three subdomains, each of which is similar to known structures. The structure reported here also contains a unique 47-residue helix pointing away from the FERM domain at the start of the alpha domain, in agreement with secondary structure predictions. Removal of the C-ERMAD does not result in a huge rearrangement of the FERM domain, but comparison with the activated radixin structure shows a consistent set of small changes. Not surprisingly, the exposed C-ERMAD binding area interacts in crystal contacts. More interestingly, a negatively charged peptide binds to the inositol site in a crystal contact and causes a greater conformational change in the structure than inositol. PMID:11401550

  9. Active structural control for the mini-MAST and ACES structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. G., Jr.; Phillips, D. J.; Hyland, D. C.; King, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments based on the maximum entropy/optimal projection design approach are discussed which were conducted by Harris Corporation as part of the NASA Controls Structures Interaction Guest Investigator program. The design equations consist of four coupled matrix equations which specialize to the standard linear-quadratic Guassian Riccati equations, when the plant is known perfectly and a full order controller is desired. These experiments demonstrate successful control system design and implementation for flexible structures.

  10. Comparative study of two structures of shunt active filter suppressing particular harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchaita, L.; Salem Nia, A.; Saadate, S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper deals with the study of shunt active filters used for suppressing particular harmonics generated by nonlinear loads in utility distribution power systems. Both structures of shunt active filter, voltage source active filter (VSAF) and current source active filter (CSAF), are considered. The analytical study of specific harmonics identification in a given spectrum is first presented. For simulation as well as experimentation the nonlinear load is a conventional three phase thyristor rectifier and harmonics 5 and 7 are selected to be eliminated by active filter. The whole system consisting of the ac power supply network, the SCR rectifier and the shunt active filter (VSAF/CSAF) is then simulated. The simulation results are discussed and the efficiency of the two kinds of active filter are compared. Finally, for the first structure, VSAF, the simulation results are confirmed by experimental test realized by means of a fully digital control active power filter developed in our laboratory.

  11. Microscopic and mesoscopic structural features of an activated carbon sample, prepared from sorghum via activation by phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Rubio-Arroyo, Manuel F.; Aguilar-López, Sergio; Pizio, Orest

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation of a new activated carbon sample from sorghum. ► Characterization by adsorption/desorption methods. ► Determination of the structure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ► The sample is amorphous and contains distorted graphene fragments. ► A characteristic nanoscale distance is established from the radial distribution function. -- Abstract: An acidic chemical activation procedure has been used for preparing activated carbon with a surface area exceeding 1000 m{sup 2}/g from sorghum. In order to reveal structural features, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed. The structure of the material has been characterized by the total scattering structure factor and the radial distribution function describing short-range arrangement of atoms at distances of the order of a few atomic diameters as well as correlations at a longer scale, of the order of nanometers. The atomic arrangement has been found to be consistent with that of amorphous graphite-like carbon. As far as the mesoscopic structure is concerned, the presence of a characteristic distance is suggested on the basis of the clear nanometer scale oscillations of the radial distribution function, which distance may be assigned as the mesopore size in the material. It is suggested that the approach devized here may later be applied routinely for other activated carbon samples, too, for characterizing atomic and nanoscale order simultaneously.

  12. Structure-activity relationship investigations of leishmanicidal N-benzylcytisine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Turabekova, Malakhat A; Vinogradova, Valentina I; Werbovetz, Karl A; Capers, Jeffrey; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor F; Levkovich, Mikhail G; Rakhimov, Shukhrat B; Abdullaev, Nasrulla D

    2011-07-01

    In vitro leishmanicidal activity of 16 N-benzylcytisine derivatives has been evaluated using Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes. In general, halogen (bromo-, chloro-) derivatives appeared to be more toxic against parasites than their parent compounds. Quantum-chemical calculations helped to recognize certain patterns in the structure of frontier orbitals related to bioactivity of compounds. Thus, the presence of halogen atom is shown to have a significant effect on both distribution and the energy of LUMOs thereby on potent activity that was also confirmed by Quantitative-Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) analysis. Experimentally and theoretically observed structure-cytotoxicity relationships are described. PMID:21457471

  13. Benzoic acid derivatives with improved antifungal activity: Design, synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and CYP53 docking studies.

    PubMed

    Berne, Sabina; Kovačič, Lidija; Sova, Matej; Kraševec, Nada; Gobec, Stanislav; Križaj, Igor; Komel, Radovan

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we identified CYP53 as a fungal-specific target of natural phenolic antifungal compounds and discovered several inhibitors with antifungal properties. In this study, we performed similarity-based virtual screening and synthesis to obtain benzoic acid-derived compounds and assessed their antifungal activity against Cochliobolus lunatus, Aspergillus niger and Pleurotus ostreatus. In addition, we generated structural models of CYP53 enzyme and used them in docking trials with 40 selected compounds. Finally, we explored CYP53-ligand interactions and identified structural elements conferring increased antifungal activity to facilitate the development of potential new antifungal agents that specifically target CYP53 enzymes of animal and plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:26154240

  14. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  15. Structure-anti-MRSA activity relationship of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hiromi; Onoda, Kenji; Morita, Daichi; Ishitsubo, Erika; Matsuno, Kenji; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Teruo; Miyachi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-15

    We synthesized a series of macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) derivatives, including riccardin-, isoplagiochin- and marchantin-class structures, and evaluated their antibacterial activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA activity). The structure-activity relationships and the results of molecular dynamics simulations indicated that bis(bibenzyl)s with potent anti-MRSA activity commonly have a 4-hydroxyl group at the D-benzene ring and a 2-hydroxyl group at the C-benzene ring in the hydrophilic part of the molecule, and an unsubstituted phenoxyphenyl group in the hydrophobic part of the molecule containing the A-B-benzene rings. Pharmacological characterization of the bis(bibenzyl) derivatives and 2-phenoxyphenol fragment 25, previously proposed as the minimum structure of riccardin C 1 for anti-MRSA activity, indicated that they have different action mechanisms: the bis(bibenzyl)s are bactericidal, while 25 is bacteriostatic, showing only weak bactericidal activity. PMID:24239015

  16. Indolo[3,2-b]quinolines: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Structure Activity-Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eyunni V.K. Suresh; Etukala, Jagan R.; Ablordeppey, Seth Y.

    2013-01-01

    The tetracyclic indolo[3,2-b]quinoline ring system constitutes an important structural moiety in natural products exhibiting numerous biological activities. In particular, indolo [3, 2-b]quinoline, commonly known as linear quindo-line is of particular interest, because of its rigid structure and scope of derivatization. Although the core linear quindoline skeleton shows little or no activity in several biological systems, introduction of a methyl group on the N-5 atom leading to cryptolepine induces remarkable activity against a broad spectrum of biological targets. A number of analogs of quindoline and cryptolepine have been synthesized, incorporating various functional groups on the core quindoline skeleton leading to improved biological activities. In this review, we describe various synthetic methodologies leading to the quindoline scaffold, the biological activities and the structure activity relationships (SAR) of quindoline derivatives toward different disease states to give a better picture of the importance of this moiety in medicinal chemistry. PMID:18537709

  17. Structure Diversity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity of Cyathane Diterpenoids in Higher Fungi.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao-Yu; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Cheng-Chen; Jia, Qian; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cyathane diterpenoids, occurring exclusively in higher basidiomycete (mushrooms), represent a structurally diverse class of natural products based on a characteristic 5-6-7 tricyclic carbon scaffold, including 105 members reported to date. These compounds show a diverse range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-MRSA, agonistic toward the kappa-opioid receptor, antiinflammatory, anti-proliferative and nerve growth factor (NGF)-like properties. The present review focuses on the structure diversity, structure elucidation and biological studies of these compounds, including mechanisms of actions and structure-activity relationships (SARs). In addition, new progress in chemical synthesis of cyathane diterpenoids is discussed. PMID:25994862

  18. Abstract linguistic structure correlates with temporal activity during naturalistic comprehension.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Jonathan R; Stabler, Edward P; Van Wagenen, Sarah E; Luh, Wen-Ming; Hale, John T

    2016-01-01

    Neurolinguistic accounts of sentence comprehension identify a network of relevant brain regions, but do not detail the information flowing through them. We investigate syntactic information. Does brain activity implicate a computation over hierarchical grammars or does it simply reflect linear order, as in a Markov chain? To address this question, we quantify the cognitive states implied by alternative parsing models. We compare processing-complexity predictions from these states against fMRI timecourses from regions that have been implicated in sentence comprehension. We find that hierarchical grammars independently predict timecourses from left anterior and posterior temporal lobe. Markov models are predictive in these regions and across a broader network that includes the inferior frontal gyrus. These results suggest that while linear effects are wide-spread across the language network, certain areas in the left temporal lobe deal with abstract, hierarchical syntactic representations. PMID:27208858

  19. Phomentrioloxin, a fungal phytotoxin with potential herbicidal activity, and its derivatives: a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna; Zonno, Maria Chiara; Boari, Angela; Troise, Ciro; Motta, Andrea; Vurro, Maurizio; Ash, Gavin; Evidente, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Phomentrioloxin is a phytotoxic geranylcyclohexenetriol produced in liquid culture by Phomopsis sp. (teleomorph: Diaporthe gulyae), a potential mycoherbicide proposed for the control of the annual weed Carthamus lanatus. In this study, seven derivatives obtained by chemical modifications of the toxin were assayed for phytotoxic, antimicrobial, and zootoxic activities, and the structure-activity relationships were examined. Each compound was tested on nonhost weedy and agrarian plants, fungi, Gram+ and Gram- bacteria, and on brine shrimp larvae. The results provide insights into an investigation of the structural requirements for activity. The hydroxy groups at C-2 and C-4 appeared to be important features for the phytotoxicity, as well as an unchanged cyclohexentriol ring. A role seemed also to be played by the unsaturations of the geranyl side chain. These findings could be useful for understanding the mechanisms of action of new natural products, for identifying the active sites, and possibly in devising new herbicides of natural origin. PMID:24083323

  20. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620