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Sample records for active tracer high-resolution

  1. Quantitative observation of tracer transport with high-resolution PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Gruendig, Marion; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in natural porous media are typically heterogeneous over various scales. This heterogeneity is caused by the complexity of pore geometry and molecular processes. Heterogeneous processes, like diffusive transport, conservative advective transport, mixing and reactive transport, can be observed and quantified with quantitative tomography of tracer transport patterns. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is by far the most sensitive method and perfectly selective for positron-emitting radiotracers, therefore it is suited as reference method for spatiotemporal tracer transport observations. The number of such PET-applications is steadily increasing. However, many applications are afflicted by the low spatial resolution (3 - 5 mm) of the clinical scanners from cooperating nuclear medical departments. This resolution is low in relation to typical sample dimensions of 10 cm, which are restricted by the mass attenuation of the material. In contrast, our GeoPET-method applies a high-resolution scanner with a resolution of 1 mm, which is the physical limit of the method and which is more appropriate for samples of the size of soil columns or drill cores. This higher resolution is achieved at the cost of a more elaborate image reconstruction procedure, especially considering the effects of Compton scatter. The result of the quantitative image reconstruction procedure is a suite of frames of the quantitative tracer distribution with adjustable frame rates from minutes to months. The voxel size has to be considered as reference volume of the tracer concentration. This continuous variable includes contributions from structures far below the spatial resolution, as far as a detection threshold, in the pico-molar range, is exceeded. Examples from a period of almost 10 years (Kulenkampff et al. 2008a, Kulenkampff et al. 2008b) of development and application of quantitative GeoPET-process tomography are shown. These examples include different transport processes

  2. Modeling METREX Tracer Releases Using High-Resolution WRF Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J. D.; Draxler, R. R.; Nehrkorn, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Metropolitan Tracer Experiment (METREX) was conducted throughout 1984 over the Washington DC area and consisted of hundreds of passive tracer releases with air samples collected at many downwind locations. The experiment included intensive 4-hour tracer releases conducted once per month starting in April of 1984. We simulate several of these intensive releases that had good air sampling coverage using the HYSPLIT Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by meteorological fields generated by WRF on grids as fine as 1 km and utilizing an urban canopy model (UCM) to parameterize the bulk impacts of buildings within the DC urban airshed. Results indicate that 1 km meteorology generated with the UCM dramatically improve the dispersion simulation compared to those using coarser meteorological inputs generated without the UCM for the November 8th intensive release. This improvement is due to better representation of the vertical mixing at night in WRF. However, for other cases the impact of resolution and the UCM is not as significant as the dispersion was influenced by other factors. We also investigate the sensitivity of the dispersion calculations to the topographic wind speed correction available in WRF 3.6 and several WRF planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations.

  3. High-resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring of a tracer test in a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Chambers, J. E.; Holyoake, S. J.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-04-01

    A permanent geoelectrical subsurface imaging system has been installed at a contaminated land site to monitor changes in groundwater quality after the completion of a remediation programme. Since the resistivities of earth materials are sensitive to the presence of contaminants and their break-down products, 4-dimensional resistivity imaging can act as a surrogate monitoring technology for tracking and visualising changes in contaminant concentrations at much higher spatial and temporal resolution than manual intrusive investigations. The test site, a municipal car park built on a former gasworks, had been polluted by a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dissolved phase contaminants. It was designated statutory contaminated land under Part IIA of the UK Environmental Protection Act due to the risk of polluting an underlying minor aquifer. Resistivity monitoring zones were established on the boundaries of the site by installing vertical electrode arrays in purpose-drilled boreholes. After a year of monitoring data had been collected, a tracer test was performed to investigate groundwater flow velocity and to demonstrate rapid volumetric monitoring of natural attenuation processes. A saline tracer was injected into the confined aquifer, and its motion and evolution were visualised directly in high-resolution tomographic images in near real-time. Breakthrough curves were calculated from independent resistivity measurements, and the estimated seepage velocities from the monitoring images and the breakthrough curves were found to be in good agreement with each other and with estimates based on the piezometric gradient and assumed material parameters.

  4. High-Resolution CFD Simulation of Airflow and Tracer Dispersion in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M J; Chan, S T; Lundquist, J K

    2005-11-02

    In 2004, a research project--the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (NYC UDP)--was launched by the Department of Homeland Security with the goal to improve the permanent network of wind stations in and around New York City and to enhance the city's emergency response capabilities. Encompassing both field studies and computer modeling, one of the program's objectives is to improve and validate urban dispersion models using the data collected from field studies and to transfer the improved capabilities to NYC emergency agencies. The first two field studies were conducted in March and August 2005 respectively and an additional study is planned for the summer of 2006. Concurrently model simulations, using simple to sophisticated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, have been performed to aid the planning of field studies and also to evaluate the performance of such models. Airflow and tracer dispersion in urban areas such as NYC are extremely complicated. Some of the contributing factors are complex geometry, variable terrain, coupling between local and larger scale flows, deep canyon mixing and updrafts/downdrafts caused by large buildings, street channeling and upstream transport, roof features, and heating effects, etc. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), we have developed a CFD model, FEM3MP, to address some of the above complexities. Our model is based on solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate physics for modeling airflow and dispersion in the urban environment. Also utilized in the model are finite-element discretization for effective treatment of complex geometries and a semi-implicit projection method for efficient time-integration. A description of the model can be found in Gresho and Chan (1998), Chan and Stevens (2000). Predictions from our model are continuously being verified against data from field studies, such as URBAN 2000

  5. High-Resolution PET Imaging with Therapeutic Antibody-based PD-1/PD-L1 Checkpoint Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Michael; Braun, Friederike; Bartholomä, Mark D.; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Checkpoint-blocking antibodies like those targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway have revolutionized oncology. We developed radiotracers based on therapeutic checkpoint-blocking antibodies permitting sensitive and high-resolution PET imaging of both PD-1 and PD-L1 in immunocompetent mice. ImmunoPET of naive mice revealed similar overall expression patterns for PD-1 and PD-L1 in secondary lymphoid organs (spleen and lymph nodes). Interestingly, PD-L1 was also detected in brown adipose tissue (BAT), confirming the notion that BAT is immunologically relevant. Under pathophysiological conditions, strong expression of the receptor/ligand pair was also found in non-lymphoid tissues. Both were specifically detected in malignant tumors. PD-1 was readily detected after combined immunoradiotherapy causing massive tumor infiltration by PD-1+ lymphocytes. PD-L1 tracer uptake was reduced in PD-L1 knockout tumors. Moreover, monitoring the expression changes of PD-L1 in response to its main inducer, the effector T cell cytokine IFN-γ, revealed robust upregulation in the lung. This suggests that T cell responses in the lung, a vital organ continuously exposed to a variety of antigens, are strongly restrained by the PD-1 checkpoint. In turn, this could explain the association of PD-1 checkpoint inhibition with potentially fatal immune-mediated pneumonitis and partially also its efficacy in lung cancer. PMID:27446497

  6. Investigation of Contaminant Transport and Dispersion in New York Harbor by a High Resolution SF6 Tracer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplow, T.; Schlosser, P.; Ho, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has been used successfully as a deliberate tracer for rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas, due to its inert nature, non-toxicity, and extremely low detection limit. An automated, high-resolution SF6 measurement system mounted on a boat was recently developed for several projects on the Hudson River. The system has a sampling interval of two minutes and a detection limit of 1 x 10-14 mol L-1. Real-time data visualization enables revisions of sampling strategy during the experiment. A single injection has allowed observation of advection rates, dispersion processes, and air-water gas exchange for up to two weeks, and longer experiments are possible. This equipment, with minor modifications, was applied to New York Harbor in July 2002. New York Harbor is one of the busiest seaports in the United States, processing nearly \\100 billion in cargo each year. Most of the shipping facilities are located in Newark Bay (approximately 15 km^{2}) or in two adjacent channels: the Kill van Kull (6 km long) and the Arthur Kill (20 km long). Newark Bay, which is mostly saline, is fed by the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, both of which flow through heavily industrialized areas. Ultimately, these waters drain through the Kills to Raritan Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Due to a combination of point sources, runoff, wastewater treatment plants, and emissions from the shipping industry, Newark Bay and the Kills receive a large volume and variety of contaminants, including petroleum, heavy metals, PCBs, and dioxins. In addition, much of the area is subject to ongoing and extensive navigational dredging, causing widespread re-suspension of previously deposited contaminants. A small quantity (ca. 2 mols) of SF_{6}$ was injected into northern Newark Bay to investigate the spreading of water throughout the Bay, the Kills, and the tidal portions of the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers. The tracer was successfully monitored across most of this area for 12 consecutive days

  7. High-Resolution Observations of a Filament showing Activated Barb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Anand; Martin, Sara F.; Mathew, Shibu; Srivastava, Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of a filament showing an activated barb using observations from the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 2010 August 20 are presented. The DOT takes Doppler images in Hα, among other wavelengths, in a region about 110 × 110 arcsec^{2} in area, at a cadence of 30~seconds. The offline image restoration technique of speckle reconstruction is applied to obtain diffraction limited images. The filament developed a new barb in 10~minutes, which disappeared within the next 35~minutes. Such a rapid formation and disappearance of a filament barb is unusual, and has not been reported earlier. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images of the target filament. We observe flows in the filament spine towards the barb location prior to its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Photospheric magnetograms from Heliospheric Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, at a cadence of 45~seconds, were used to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The variation of magnetic flux in this duration supports the view that barbs are rooted in minor magnetic polarity. Our analysis shows that barbs can be short-lived and formation and disappearance of the barb was associated with cancellation of magnetic flux.

  8. Using High Resolution Tracer Data to Constrain Storage and Flux Estimates in a Spatially Distributed Rainfall-runoff Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Huijgevoort, M.; Tetzlaff, D.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Models simulating both stream flow and conservative tracers can provide a more realistic representation of flow paths, storage distributions and mixing processes that is advantageous for many predictions. Conceptual models with such integration have provided useful insights, but tend to be lumped and thus crude representations of catchment processes. Using tracers to aid spatially-distributed models has considerable potential to improve the conceptualisation of the dynamics of internal hydrological stores and fluxes. Here, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of a data-driven, spatially-distributed tracer-aided rainfall-runoff model. The model structure allows the assessment of the effect of landscape properties on the routing and mixing of water and tracers. The model was applied to an experimental site (3.2 km2) in the Scottish Highlands with a unique tracer data set; 4 years of daily isotope ratios in stream water and precipitation were available, as well as 2 years of weekly soil and ground water isotopes. The model evolved from an empirically-based, lumped tracer-aided model previously developed for the catchment. The best model runs were selected from Monte Carlo simulations based on a dual calibration criterion that included objective functions for both stream water isotopes and discharge at the outlet. Model results were also tested against observed spatially-distributed soil water isotope data. Model performance for both criteria was good and the model could reproduce the variable isotope signals in steeper hillslopes where storage was low and damped isotope responses in valley bottom cells with high storage. The model also allows us to estimate the age distributions of internal water fluxes and stream flow and has substantially improved spatial and temporal dynamics of process representation. This gives a more robust framework for projecting the effects of environmental change.

  9. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  10. A high resolution EEG study of dynamic brain activity during video game play.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, C; Yuan, H; He, E J; Bai, X; Yang, L; He, B

    2007-01-01

    A high resolution EEG study was conducted on healthy human subjects during video game play. Throughout the game playing experiment short time segments of spontaneous activity were recorded. Spectral analysis was performed on these segments for the theta-wave (4-8 Hz) and alpha-wave (8-13 Hz) bands to investigate the modulatory effects of long-lasting game play and the dynamic changes of spectral contribution in range of alpha-and theta-wave. The present results revealed that a) the frontal midline theta-wave activity increased over time relative to the eye open resting condition and b) the parietal alpha-wave activity initially decreased relative to the resting condition, then followed by a slow increase. These experimental results indicate the high resolution EEG provides a useful quantitative analysis tool for studying dynamic brain activity.

  11. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  12. Tracer-aided modelling using long-term and high resolution data to assess non-stationarity in stream water age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how water and solutes move through watersheds and the associated travel times remains a key research frontier in hydrology. Here we integrate long-term data (6 years of weekly isotope measurements in rainfall and runoff) into a tracer-aided conceptual modelling approach to provide fresh insights into the complex interrelationships between catchment storage dynamics, hydrological connectivity and resulting non-stationary stream water ages. We show that in a wet Scottish upland catchment dominated by runoff generation from riparian peats (histosols) with high water storage capacity, the storage dynamics of different landscape units (e.g. hillslope vs. riparian zones) regulate both mixing processes and the strength of hydrological connectivity that govern water and solute fluxes and determine catchment travel times. We also found that the frequency and longevity of hydrological connectivity and the associated relative importance of dynamic flow paths control the contribution of younger (< 1 month) or older (>4 years) waters to the stream. Water and solute transport is mainly facilitated by overland flow from saturated histosols connected to the stream network even during smaller events. However, during prolonged dry periods, near-surface runoff "switches off" and stream water is dominated by older groundwater. The saturated riparian soils represent large mixing zones that buffer the time variance of water age and act as "isostats" damping variable inputs. These zones also integrate catchment-scale partial mixing processes. Although simulations depend on model performance, which is influenced by stochastic variation in isotope inputs, a longer-term storage analysis using this tracer-aided model allowed us to examine the sensitivity of the catchment response and transit times to extreme hydroclimatic variability. These insights were validated using a more recent high resolution dataset (3 years of daily isotope data) which also improved constraints on

  13. Active compensation of flexure on the High-Resolution Optical Spectrograph for Gemini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arrigo, P.; Diego, Francisco; Walker, David D.

    1997-03-01

    Gravity-induced flexure has been a long-standing challenge in Cassegrain spectrographs at 4-meter class telescopes; it is the more so at the scale of 8-meter telescopes. This is of particular concern for the Gemini high resolution optical spectrograph, which will be Cassegrain-mounted for its routine mode of operation. In this paper we address the general flexure problem, and how to solve it with the use of active optics. We also present the results of an experimental active flexure compensation system for the ISIS (intermediate- dispersion spectroscopic and imaging system) spectrograph on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). This instrument, called ISAAC (ISIS spectrograph automatic active collimator), is based on the concept of active correction, where spectrum drifts, due to the spectrograph flexing under the effect of gravity, are compensated by the movement of an active optical element (in this case a fine steering tip-tilt collimator mirror). The experiment showed that active compensation can reduce flexure down to less than 3 micrometer over four hours of telescope motions, dramatically improving the spectrograph performance. The results of the experiment are used to discuss a flexure compensation system for the high resolution optical spectrograph (HROS) for the 8 m Gemini telescope.

  14. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  15. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  16. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  17. High resolution DEM from Tandem-X interferometry: an accurate tool to characterize volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Tandem-X mission was launched by the German agency (DLR) in June 2010. It is a new generation high resolution SAR sensor mainly dedicated to topographic applications. For the purpose of our researches focused on the study of the volcano-tectonic activity in the Kivu Rift area, a set of Tandem-X bistatic radar images were used to produce a high resolution InSAR DEM of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). The VVP is part of the Western branch of the African rift, situated at the boundary between D.R. Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. It has two highly active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. A first task concerns the quantitative assessment of the vertical accuracy that can be achieved with these new data. The new DEMs are compared to other space borne datasets (SRTM, ASTER) but also to field measurements given by differential GPS. Multi-temporal radar acquisitions allow us to produce several DEM of the same area. This appeared to be very useful in the context of an active volcanic context where new geomorphological features (faults, fissures, volcanic cones and lava flows) appear continuously through time. For example, since the year 2000, time of the SRTM acquisition, we had one eruption at Nyiragongo (2002) and six eruptions at Nyamulagira (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010 and 2011) which all induce large changes in the landscape with the emplacement of new lava fields and scoria cones. From our repetitive Tandem-X DEM production, we have a tool to identify and also quantify in term of size and volume all the topographic changes relative to this past volcanic activity. These parameters are high value information to improve the understanding of the Virunga volcanoes; the accurate estimation of erupted volume and knowledge of structural features associated to past eruptions are key parameters to understand the volcanic system, to ameliorate the hazard assessment, and finally contribute to risk mitigation in a densely populated area.

  18. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  19. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  20. Chromospheric activity on late-type star DM UMa using high-resolution spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, LiYun; Pi, QingFeng; Han, Xianming L.; Chang, Liang; Wang, Daimei

    2016-06-01

    We present new 14 high-resolution echelle spectra to discuss the level of chromospheric activity of DM UMa in {He I} D3, {Na I} D1, D2, Hα, and {Ca II} infrared triplet lines (IRT). It is the first time to discover the emissions above the continuum in the {He I} D3 lines on 2015 February 9 and 10. The emission on February 9 is the strongest one ever detected for DM UMa. We analysed these chromospheric active indicators by employing the spectral subtraction technique. The subtracted spectra reveal weak emissions in the {Na I} D1, D2 lines, strong emission in the Hα line, and clear excess emissions in the {Ca II} IRT lines. Our values for the EW8542/EW8498 ratio are on the low side, in the range of 1.0-1.7. There are also clear phase variations of the level of chromospheric activity in equivalent width (EW) light curves in these chromospheric active lines (especially the Hα line). These phenomena might be explained by flare events or rotational modulations of the level of chromospheric activity.

  1. Recent and episodic volcanic and glacial activity on Mars revealed by the High Resolution Stereo Camera.

    PubMed

    Neukum, G; Jaumann, R; Hoffmann, H; Hauber, E; Head, J W; Basilevsky, A T; Ivanov, B A; Werner, S C; van Gasselt, S; Murray, J B; McCord, T

    2004-12-23

    The large-area coverage at a resolution of 10-20 metres per pixel in colour and three dimensions with the High Resolution Stereo Camera Experiment on the European Space Agency Mars Express Mission has made it possible to study the time-stratigraphic relationships of volcanic and glacial structures in unprecedented detail and give insight into the geological evolution of Mars. Here we show that calderas on five major volcanoes on Mars have undergone repeated activation and resurfacing during the last 20 per cent of martian history, with phases of activity as young as two million years, suggesting that the volcanoes are potentially still active today. Glacial deposits at the base of the Olympus Mons escarpment show evidence for repeated phases of activity as recently as about four million years ago. Morphological evidence is found that snow and ice deposition on the Olympus construct at elevations of more than 7,000 metres led to episodes of glacial activity at this height. Even now, water ice protected by an insulating layer of dust may be present at high altitudes on Olympus Mons.

  2. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  3. A high-resolution, fluorescence-based method for localization of endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W G; Singer, V L

    1999-11-01

    We describe a high-resolution, fluorescence-based method for localizing endogenous alkaline phosphatase in tissues and cultured cells. This method utilizes ELF (Enzyme-Labeled Fluorescence)-97 phosphate, which yields an intensely fluorescent yellow-green precipitate at the site of enzymatic activity. We compared zebrafish intestine, ovary, and kidney cryosections stained for endogenous alkaline phosphatase using four histochemical techniques: ELF-97 phosphate, Gomori method, BCIP/NBT, and naphthol AS-MX phosphate coupled with Fast Blue BB (colored) and Fast Red TR (fluorescent) diazonium salts. Each method localized endogenous alkaline phosphatase to the same specific sample regions. However, we found that sections labeled using ELF-97 phosphate exhibited significantly better resolution than the other samples. The enzymatic product remained highly localized to the site of enzymatic activity, whereas signals generated using the other methods diffused. We found that the ELF-97 precipitate was more photostable than the Fast Red TR azo dye adduct. Using ELF-97 phosphate in cultured cells, we detected an intracellular activity that was only weakly labeled with the other methods, but co-localized with an antibody against alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that the ELF-97 phosphate provided greater sensitivity. Finally, we found that detecting endogenous alkaline phosphatase with ELF-97 phosphate was compatible with the use of antibodies and lectins. (J Histochem Cytochem 47:1443-1455, 1999)

  4. Analyzing for information, not activation, to exploit high-resolution fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Bandettini, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (hi-res fMRI) promises to help bridge the gap between the macro- and the microview of brain function afforded by conventional neuroimaging and invasive cell recording, respectively. Hi-res fMRI (voxel volume ≤ (2 mm)3) is robustly achievable in human studies today using widely available clinical 3-Tesla scanners. However, the neuroscientific exploitation of the greater spatial detail poses four challenges: (1) Hi-res fMRI may give inaccurate (i.e. blurred, displaced and distorted) images of fine-scale neuronal activity patterns. (2) Single small voxels yield very noisy measurements. (3) The greater number of voxels complicates interpretation and poses a more severe multiple-comparisons problem. (4) The functional correspondency mapping between individual brains is unknown at the fine scale of millimeters. Here we argue that these challenges can be met by shifting the focus of brain mapping and visualizing, not the activity patterns themselves, but the amount of information they convey about the experimental conditions. PMID:17804260

  5. High-resolution observations of active region moss and its dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2014-07-10

    The High Resolution Coronal Imager has provided the sharpest view of the EUV corona to date. In this paper, we exploit its impressive resolving power to provide the first analysis of the fine-scale structure of moss in an active region. The data reveal that the moss is made up of a collection of fine threads that have widths with a mean and standard deviation of 440 ± 190 km (FWHM). The brightest moss emission is located at the visible head of the fine-scale structure and the fine structure appears to extend into the lower solar atmosphere. The emission decreases along the features, implying that the lower sections are most likely dominated by cooler transition region plasma. These threads appear to be the cool, lower legs of the hot loops. In addition, the increased resolution allows for the first direct observation of physical displacements of the moss fine structure in a direction transverse to its central axis. Some of these transverse displacements demonstrate periodic behavior, which we interpret as a signature of kink (Alfvénic) waves. Measurements of the properties of the transverse motions are made and the wave motions have means and standard deviations of 55 ± 37 km for the transverse displacement amplitude, 77 ± 33 s for the period, and 4.7 ± 2.5 km s{sup –1} for the velocity amplitude. The presence of waves in the transition region of hot loops could have important implications for the heating of active regions.

  6. High-resolution imagery of active faulting offshore Al Hoceima, Northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, E.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Rabaute, A.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Lafosse, M.; Poort, J.; Ammar, A.; Tahayt, A.; Le Roy, P.; Smit, J.; Do Couto, D.; Cancouët, R.; Prunier, C.; Ercilla, G.; Gorini, C.

    2014-09-01

    Two recent destructive earthquakes in 1994 and 2004 near Al Hoceima highlight that the northern Moroccan margin is one of the most seismically active regions of the Western Mediterranean area. Despite onshore geodetic, seismological and tectonic field studies, the onshore-offshore location and extent of the main active faults remain poorly constrained. Offshore Al Hoceima, high-resolution seismic reflection and swath-bathymetry have been recently acquired during the Marlboro-2 cruise. These data at shallow water depth, close to the coast, allow us to describe the location, continuity and geometry of three active faults bounding the offshore Nekor basin. The well-expressed normal-left-lateral onshore Trougout fault can be followed offshore during several kilometers with a N171°E ± 3° trend. Westward, the Bousekkour-Aghbal normal-left-lateral onshore fault is expressed offshore with a N020°E ± 4° trending fault. The N030°E ± 2° Bokkoya fault corresponds to the western boundary of the Plio-Quaternary offshore Nekor basin in the Al Hoceima bay and seems to define an en échelon tectonic pattern with the Bousekkour-Aghbal fault. We propose that these three faults are part of the complex transtensional system between the Nekor fault and the Al-Idrissi fault zone. Our characterization of the offshore expression of active faulting in the Al Hoceima region is consistent with the geometry and nature of the active fault planes deduced from onshore geomorphological and morphotectonic analyses, as well as seismological, geodetic and geodynamic data.

  7. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  8. Assessment of mental fatigue during car driving by using high resolution EEG activity and neurophysiologic indices.

    PubMed

    Borghini, G; Vecchiato, G; Toppi, J; Astolfi, L; Maglione, A; Isabella, R; Caltagirone, C; Kong, W; Wei, D; Zhou, Z; Polidori, L; Vitiello, S; Babiloni, F

    2012-01-01

    Driving tasks are vulnerable to the effects of sleep deprivation and mental fatigue, diminishing driver's ability to respond effectively to unusual or emergent situations. Physiological and brain activity analysis could help to understand how to provide useful feedback and alert signals to the drivers for avoiding car accidents. In this study we analyze the insurgence of mental fatigue or drowsiness during car driving in a simulated environment by using high resolution EEG techniques as well as neurophysiologic variables such as heart rate (HR) and eye blinks rate (EBR). Results suggest that it is possible to introduce a EEG-based cerebral workload index that it is sensitive to the mental efforts of the driver during drive tasks of different levels of difficulty. Workload index was based on the estimation of increase of EEG power spectra in the theta band over prefrontal areas and the simultaneous decrease of EEG power spectra over parietal areas in alpha band during difficult drive conditions. Such index could be used in a future to assess on-line the mental state of the driver during the drive task.

  9. ATLAS: an airborne active linescan system for high-resolution topographic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willetts, David V.; Kightley, Peter J.; Mole, S. G.; Pearson, Guy N.; Pearson, P.; Coffey, Adrian S.; Stokes, Tim J.; Tapster, Paul R.; Westwood, M.

    2004-12-01

    High resolution ground mapping is of interest for survey and management of long linear features such as roads, railways and pipelines, and for georeferencing of areas such as flood plains for hydrological purposes. ATLAS (Airborne Topographic Laser System) is an active linescan system operating at the eyesafe wavelength of 1.5μm. Built for airborne survey, it is currently certified for use on a Twin Squirrel helicopter for operation from low levels to heights above 500 feet allowing commercial survey in built up areas. The system operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 56kHz with a line completed in 15ms, giving 36 points/m2 at the surface at the design flight speed. At each point the range to the ground is measured together with the scan angle of the system. This data is combined with a system attitude measurement from an integrated inertial navigation system and with system position derived from differential GPS data aboard the platform. A recording system captures the data with a synchronised time-stamp to enable post-processed reconstruction of a cloud of data points that will give a three-dimensional representation of the terrain, allowing the points to be located with respect to absolute Earth referenced coordinates to a precision of 5cm in three axes. This paper summarises the design, harmonisation, evaluation and performance of the system, and shows examples of survey data.

  10. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance

  11. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  12. High Resolution Projections of Indian Summer Monsoon Synoptic Activity in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumaran, Sandeep; Ravindran, Ajayamohan; Thazhe Purayil, Sabin; Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    2016-04-01

    The cyclonic systems of varying intensity, collectively known as Low Pressure Systems (LPS) are responsible more than 50% of the precipitation over Central India. Despite its importance, the future variability of LPS is poorly understood mainly due to the inadequate representation of these systems in global climate models. Insufficient spatial resolution of the current generation coupled models is a hindrance to resolve these storms properly. In order to overcome this problem, we use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM) to simulate current and future climate, with a model grid spacing of ~50km. The time slice experiments for current (1981 - 2005) and future (2071 - 2095) climate are forced with bias-corrected SSTs from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) historical and RCP8.5 simulations respectively. Four ensembles of the experiments are conducted with SST forcing taken from four different CMIP5 models. A benchmark simulation of the HiRAM model with observed SSTs shows that the model is capable of simulating the life cycle of the observed LPS reasonably well. In addition, HiRAM realistically simulates the observed LPS track density. Further, the track density in the historical ensemble is comparable with both observations and benchmark simulation. In the RCP8.5 simulations, an overall decline in the LPS activity is seen which is found to be related to the decrease in the high intensity systems in a warming environment. Consistent with the decrease in LPS activity, the seasonal mean monsoon precipitation is also declining in RCP8.5 simulations.

  13. The Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Mcentire, R. W.; Haerendel, G.; Paschmann, G.; Bryant, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to study the access of solar wind ions to the magnetosphere, together with the processes that transport and accelerate magnetospheric particles, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) mission will release and monitor lithium and barium tracer ions in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere. A single, massive release of barium in the dawn magnetosheath will in addition create a visible artificial comet in the flowing solar wind plasma, within which studies of a range of different plasma effects will be undertaken. The AMPTE will obtain comprehensive measurements of natural magnetospheric particle populations' elemental composition and dynamics. AMPTE comprises three spacecraft: the Ion Release Module, the Charge Composition Explorer, and the United Kingdom Subsatellite.

  14. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, extended definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Technical studies of the feasibility of balloon flights of the former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter, with a modern charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, to study the structure and evolution of solar active regions at high resolution, are reviewed. In particular, different CCD cameras were used at ground-based solar observatories with the SOUP filter, to evaluate their performance and collect high resolution images. High resolution movies of the photosphere and chromosphere were successfully obtained using four different CCD cameras. Some of this data was collected in coordinated observations with the Yohkoh satellite during May-July, 1992, and they are being analyzed scientifically along with simultaneous X-ray observations.

  15. Gastric activity studies using a magnetic tracer.

    PubMed

    Cordova-Fraga, T; Bernal-Alvarado, J J; Gutierrez-Juarez, G; Sosa, M; Vargas-Luna, M

    2004-10-01

    A magnetic pulse generator has been set up in order to study gastric activity. Two coils 1.05 m in diameter, arranged in a Helmholtz configuration, were used. The system generated magnetic field pulses higher than 15 mT, of duration 17.3+/-1.2 ms. Measurements were performed in 11 male volunteers, with average age 29.3+/-6.4 years and body mass index 26.0+/-4.8 kg m(-2). Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with diameters from 75 to 125 microm were used as magnetic tracers, which were mixed in 250 ml of yogurt in concentrations from 2 to 5 g. Signals were registered by using a high speed 3 axis fluxgate digital magnetometer and processed to determine the relaxation of the magnetic tracers by fitting a first-order exponential function to the data, a mean relaxation constant K = 116+/-40 s(-1) was obtained. Also, an average gastric peristaltic frequency was measured; a value of 3.2+/-0.3 cpm was determined. PMID:15535190

  16. Using High-Resolution Forward Model Simulations of Ideal Atmospheric Tracers to Assess the Spatial Information Content of Inverse CO2 Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    Attribution of observed atmospheric carbon concentrations to emissions on the country, state or city level is often inferred using "inversion" techniques. Such computations are often performed using advanced mathematical techniques, such as synthesis inversion or four-dimensional variational analysis, that invoke tracing observed atmospheric concentrations backwards through a transport model to a source region. It is, to date, not well understood how well such techniques can represent fine spatial (and temporal) structure in the inverted flux fields. This question is addressed using forward-model computations with idealized tracers emitted at the surface in a large number of grid boxes over selected regions and examining how distinctly these emitted tracers can be detected downstream. Initial results show that tracers emitted in half-degree grid boxes over a large region of the Eastern USA cannot be distinguished from each other, even at short distances over the Atlantic Ocean, when they are emitted in grid boxes separated by less than five degrees of latitude - especially when only total-column observations are available. A large number of forward model simulations, with varying meteorological conditions, are used to assess how distinctly three types observations (total column, upper tropospheric column, and surface mixing ratio) can separate emissions from different sources. Inferences inverse modeling and source attribution will be drawn.

  17. High Resolution Active Optics Observations from the Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas N.; Ciardi, D. R.; Marcy, G. W.; Hirsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    The ground based follow-up observation program for candidate exoplanets discovered with the Kepler observatory has supported a major effort for high resolution imaging of candidate host stars using adaptive optics wave-front correction (AO), speckle imaging and lucky imaging. These images allow examination of the sky as close as a few tenths of an arcsecond from the host stars to detect background objects that might be the source of the Kepler transit signal instead of the host star. This poster reports on the imaging done with AO cameras on the Keck, Palomar 5m and Shane 3m (Lick Observatory) which have been used to obtain high resolution images of over 500 Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) exoplanet candidate host stars. All observations were made at near infrared wavelengths in the J, H and K bands, mostly using the host target star as the AO guide star. Details of the sensitivity to background objects actually attained by these observations and the number of background objects discovered are presented. Implications to the false positive rate of the Kepler candidates are discussed.

  18. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  19. Feasibility of a semi-automated method for cardiac conduction velocity analysis of high-resolution activation maps.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Ashish N; Walton, Richard D; Krul, Sébastien P; de Groot, Joris R; Bernus, Olivier; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Coronel, Ruben

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial conduction velocity is important for the genesis of arrhythmias. In the normal heart, conduction is primarily dependent on fiber direction (anisotropy) and may be discontinuous at sites with tissue heterogeneities (trabeculated or fibrotic tissue). We present a semi-automated method for the accurate measurement of conduction velocity based on high-resolution activation mapping following central stimulation. The method was applied to activation maps created from myocardium from man, sheep and mouse with anisotropic and discontinuous conduction. Advantages of the presented method over existing methods are discussed.

  20. The Track of Brain Activity during the Observation of TV Commercials with the High-Resolution EEG Technology

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, Laura; Vecchiato, Giovanni; De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Salinari, Serenella; Cincotti, Febo; Aloise, Fabio; Mattia, Donatella; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Bianchi, Luigi; Soranzo, Ramon; Babiloni, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We estimate cortical activity in normal subjects during the observation of TV commercials inserted within a movie by using high-resolution EEG techniques. The brain activity was evaluated in both time and frequency domains by solving the associate inverse problem of EEG with the use of realistic head models. In particular, we recover statistically significant information about cortical areas engaged by particular scenes inserted within the TV commercial proposed with respect to the brain activity estimated while watching a documentary. Results obtained in the population investigated suggest that the statistically significant brain activity during the observation of the TV commercial was mainly concentrated in frontoparietal cortical areas, roughly coincident with the Brodmann areas 8, 9, and 7, in the analyzed population. PMID:19584910

  1. Identification of metabolites from an active fraction of Cajanus cajan seeds by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tekale, Satishkumar S; Jaiwal, Bhimrao V; Padul, Manohar V

    2016-11-15

    Antioxidants are important food additives which prolong food storage due to their protective effects against oxidative degradation of foods by free radicals. However, the synthetic antioxidants show toxic properties. Alternative economical and eco-friendly approach is screening of plant extract for natural antioxidants. Plant phenolics are potent antioxidants. Hence, in present study Cajanus cajan seeds were analyzed for antioxidant activity, Iron chelating activity and total phenolic content. The antioxidant activity using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging assay showed 71.3% inhibition and 65.8% Iron chelating activity. Total 37 compounds including some short peptides and five major abundant compounds were identified in active fraction of C. cajan seeds. This study concludes that C. cajan seeds are good source of antioxidants and Iron chelating activity. Metabolites found in C. cajan seeds which remove reactive oxygen species (ROS), may help to alleviate oxidative stress associated dreaded health problem like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27283694

  2. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  3. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    I will present recent ALMA results on the dense molecular gas in the central regions of local active galaxies, including NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 7469, hosting both AGN and circumnuclear starburst regions. Impact of X-ray radiation, outflows, and shocks from active nuclei on the physical and chemical properties of the surrouding dense molecular medium will be discussed.

  4. High-resolution non-contact measurement of the electrical activity of plants in situ using optical recording

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Zi-Yang; Xue, Lin; Mao, Tong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of conventional extracellular recording and intracellular recording make high-resolution multisite recording of plant bioelectrical activity in situ challenging. By combining a cooled charge-coupled device camera with a voltage-sensitive dye, we recorded the action potentials in the stem of Helianthus annuus and variation potentials at multiple sites simultaneously with high spatial resolution. The method of signal processing using coherence analysis was used to determine the synchronization of the selected signals. Our results provide direct visualization of the phloem, which is the distribution region of the electrical activities in the stem and leaf of H. annuus, and verify that the phloem is the main action potential transmission route in the stems of higher plants. Finally, the method of optical recording offers a unique opportunity to map the dynamic bioelectrical activity and provides an insight into the mechanisms of long-distance electrical signal transmission in higher plants. PMID:26333536

  5. Activation of cortical areas in music execution and imagining: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Kristeva, Rumyana; Chakarov, Vihren; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Spreer, Joachim

    2003-11-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that execution of a musical sequence on an instrument activates bilateral frontal opercular regions, in addition to bilateral sensorimotor and supplementary motor areas. During imagining activation of the same areas without primary sensorimotor areas was shown. We recorded EEG from 58 scalp positions to investigate the temporal sequence and the time course of activation of these areas while violin players prepared to execute, executed, prepared to imagine, or imagined a musical sequence on a violin. During the preparation for the sequence in three of seven musicians investigated the bilateral frontal opercular regions became active earlier than the motor areas and in one of them simultaneously with the motor areas. In two of the musicians a rather variable pattern of activation was observed. The frontal opercular regions were also strongly involved throughout the period of music execution or imagining. The supplementary motor area was involved in both preparation for the sequence and during execution and imagining of the sequence. The left primary sensorimotor area was involved in the preparation and termination of the musical sequence for both execution and imagining. The right sensorimotor area was strongly involved in the preparation for and during the execution of the sequence. We conclude that the bilateral frontal opercular regions are crucial in both preparation for and during music execution and imagining. They may have "mirror neurone" properties that underlie observation or imagining of one's own performance. The motor areas are differentially activated during the preparation and execution or imagining the sequence.

  6. High-resolution genetic mapping of mammalian motor activity levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Kas, M J H; de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; de Krom, M; van Gassen, K L I; van Lith, H A; Olivier, B; Oppelaar, H; Hendriks, J; de Wit, M; Groot Koerkamp, M J A; Holstege, F C P; van Oost, B A; de Graan, P N E

    2009-02-01

    The generation of motor activity levels is under tight neural control to execute essential behaviors, such as movement toward food or for social interaction. To identify novel neurobiological mechanisms underlying motor activity levels, we studied a panel of chromosome substitution (CS) strains derived from mice with high (C57BL/6J strain) or low motor activity levels (A/J strain) using automated home cage behavioral registration. In this study, we genetically mapped the expression of baseline motor activity levels (horizontal distance moved) to mouse chromosome 1. Further genetic mapping of this trait revealed an 8.3-Mb quantitative trait locus (QTL) interval. This locus is distinct from the QTL interval for open-field anxiety-related motor behavior on this chromosome. By data mining, an existing phenotypic and genotypic data set of 2445 genetically heterogeneous mice (http://gscan.well.ox.ac.uk/), we confirmed linkage to the peak marker at 79 970 253 bp and refined the QTL to a 312-kb interval containing a single gene (A830043J08Rik). Sequence analysis showed a nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region of the Riken gene. Genome-wide microarray gene expression profiling in brains of discordant F(2) individuals from CS strain 1 showed a significant upregulation of Epha4 in low-active F(2) individuals. Inclusion of a genetic marker for Epha4 confirmed that this gene is located outside of the QTL interval. Both Epha4 and A830043J08Rik are expressed in brain motor circuits, and similar to Epha4 mutants, we found linkage between reduced motor neurons number and A/J chromosome 1. Our findings provide a novel QTL and a potential downstream target underlying motor circuitry development and the expression of physical activity levels.

  7. 76 FR 80891 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Cape Wind's High Resolution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... that NOAA ask the Department of the Interior (DOI) to defer further action on offshore wind leasing... IHA (76 FR 56735, September 14, 2011). The activities to be conducted have not changed between the IHA... proposed IHA notice (76 FR 56735, September 14, 2011), the application, and associated documents...

  8. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.; Topka, Kenneth P.

    1992-01-01

    The definition phase of a scientific study of active regions on the sun by balloon flight of a former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) is described. SOUP is an optical telescope with image stabilization, tunable filter and various cameras. After the flight phase of the program was cancelled due to budgetary problems, scientific and engineering studies relevant to future balloon experiments of this type were completed. High resolution observations of the sun were obtained using SOUP components at the Swedish Solar Observatory in the Canary Islands. These were analyzed and published in studies of solar magnetic fields and active regions. In addition, testing of low-voltage piezoelectric transducers was performed, which showed they were appropriate for use in image stabilization on a balloon.

  9. Impact of irrigations on simulated convective activity over Central Greece: A high resolution study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsopoulos, S.; Tegoulias, I.; Pytharoulis, I.; Kartsios, S.; Bampzelis, D.; Karacostas, T.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the impact of irrigations in the characteristics of convective activity simulated by the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model with the Advanced Research dynamic solver (WRF-ARW, version 3.5.1), under different upper air synoptic conditions in central Greece. To this end, 42 cases equally distributed under the six most frequent upper air synoptic conditions, which are associated with convective activity in the region of interest, were utilized considering two different soil moisture scenarios. In the first scenario, the model was initialized with the surface soil moisture of the ECMWF analysis data that usually does not take into account the modification of soil moisture due to agricultural activity in the area of interest. In the second scenario, the soil moisture in the upper soil layers of the study area was modified to the field capacity for the irrigated cropland. Three model domains, covering Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and northern Africa (d01), the wider area of Greece (d02) and central Greece - Thessaly region (d03) are used at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km respectively. The model numerical results indicate a strong dependence of convective spatiotemporal characteristics from the soil moisture difference between the two scenarios. Acknowledgements: This research is co-financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) and Greek national funds, through the action "COOPERATION 2011: Partnerships of Production and Research Institutions in Focused Research and Technology Sectors" (contract number 11SYN_8_1088 - DAPHNE) in the framework of the operational programme "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" and Regions in Transition (OPC II, NSRF 2007-2013).

  10. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  11. Active sites without restraints: high-resolution analysis of metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Eva-Maria; Andrade, Susana L A; Einsle, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    For most three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, the factual accuracy of atom positions by far exceeds the resolution of the experimental data, although the refinement problem presented by a protein structure is substantially underdetermined. This is achieved through using restraints that precisely define protein geometries and thus reduce the degrees of freedom of the refinement problem. If such information is not available or when unusual geometries or particular ligand states complicate structural analysis, possible pitfalls arise that not only concern the precise definition of spatial arrangements, but also the identification of atom types and bond distances. Prominent examples include CO dehydrogenase, hydrogenase, acetylene hydratase and nitrogenase, all of which employ unique active sites that turned out not to be what they seemed upon first inspection.

  12. High-resolution wind speed measurements using actively heated fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.; Wagner, James; Selker, John

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel technique to simultaneously measure wind speed (U) at thousands of locations continuously in time based on measurement of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. Measuring temperature differences between paired passive and actively heated fiber-optic (AHFO) cables with a distributed temperature sensing system allowed estimation of U at over 2000 sections along the 230 m transect (resolution of 0.375 m and 5.5 s). The underlying concept is similar to that of a hot wire anemometer extended in space. The correlation coefficient between U measured by two colocated sonic anemometers and the AHFO were 0.91 during the day and 0.87 at night. The combination of classical passive and novel AHFO provides unprecedented dynamic observations of both air temperature and wind speed spanning 4 orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m) while resolving individual turbulent motions, opening new opportunities for testing basic theories for near-surface geophysical flows.

  13. A new active array MST radar system with enhanced capabilities for high resolution atmospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga rao, Meka; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Patra, Amit; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Narayana Rao, T.; Kamaraj, Pandian; Jayaraj, Katta; Kmv, Prasad; Kamal Kumar, J.; Raghavendra, J.; Prasad, T. Rajendra; Thriveni, A.; Yasodha, Polisetti

    2016-07-01

    A new version of the 53-MHz MST Radar, using the 1024 solid state Transmit-Receive Modules (TRM), necessary feeder network, multi-channel receiver and a modified radar controller has been established using the existing antenna array of 1024 crossed Yagis. The new system has been configured for steering the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis in all 360o azimuth and 20o zenith angle, providing enhanced capability to study the Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere and Ionosphere. The multi channel receiver system has been designed for Spaced Antenna (SA) and Interferometry/ Iamging applications. The new system has also been configured for radiating in circular polarization for its application in the Ionosphere Incoherent Scatter mode. The new active array MST radar at Very-High-Frequency (53-MHz) located at Gadanki (13.45°N, 79.18°E), a tropical station in India, will be used to enhance the observations of winds, turbulence during the passage of convective events over the radar site as deep convection occurs very often at tropical latitudes. The new configuration with enhanced average power, beam agility with multi-channel experiments will be a potential source for studying middle atmosphere and ionosphere. In this paper, we present the system configuration, new capabilities and the first results obtained using the new version of the MST Radar.

  14. Combined High-Resolution Active and Passive Imaging of Ocean Surface Winds from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Piepmeier, J. R.; McIntosh, R. E.; Swift, C. T.; Carswell, J. R.; Donnelly, W. J.; Knapp, E.; Westwater, E. R.; Irisov, V. I.; Fedor, L. S.; Vandemark, D. C.

    1997-01-01

    A unique complement of passive and active microwave imaging and sensing instruments for observing ocean surface emission and scattering signatures were integrated onto the NASA Wallops Flight Facility's Orion P-3B aircraft (N426NA) for the purpose of studying the signature of ocean surface winds. The complement included: (1) a, four-band (X, K, Ka, and W) tri-polarimetric scanning radiometer (PSR), (2) a C-band ocean surface scatterometer (CSCAT), (3) a Ka-band conical-scanning polarimetric radiometer (KASPR), (4) a nadir-viewing Ka-band polarimetric radiometer, (KAPOL), (5) a 21- and 31-GHz zenith-viewing cloud and water vapor radiometer (CWVR), and (6) a radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS). The above Ocean Winds Imaging (OWI) complement was flown during January-March, 1997 over the Labrador Sea. Conically-scanned brightness temperature and backscatter imagery were observed over open ocean for a variety of wind speeds and cloud conditions. Presented herein are the results of a preliminary intercomparison of data from several of the OWI instruments.

  15. High Resolution Mapping of Wind Speed Using Active Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, C.; Thomas, C. K.; Wagner, J.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel approach to continuously measure wind speed simultaneously at thousands of locations using actively heated fiber optics with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, this approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface: The temperature difference between the heated surface and ambient air is a function of the convective cooling of the air flowing past the surface. By knowing the thermal properties of the heated surface, the heating input, and ambient temperature, wind speed can be calculated. In our case, the heated surface consists of a thin stainless steel tube that can exceed several km in length. A fiber optic is enclosed within the stainless steel tube to report the heated tube temperature, which in this case was sampled every 0.125 m. Ambient temperature were measured by an independent fiber optic cable located proximally to the stainless steel tube. We will present the theoretical bases of measuring wind speed using heated fiber optic as well as validation of this method in the field. In the field testing, more than 5000 simultaneous wind speed measurements were obtained every 5.5 second at 3 elevations (2m, 1m, and 0.5 m) every 0.125 m along a 230 m transects located across a shallow gulley in Nunn, CO. This method, which provides both air temperature and wind speed spanning four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1 - 1,000m) opens up many important opportunities for testing basic theories in micro-meteorology regarding spatial scales of turbulent length scales as a function of distance from the earth, development of internal boundary layers, applicability of Taylors hypothesis, etc. The equipment employed, including the heating system, which is available to all US scientists, was provided by CTEMPs.org thanks to the generous grant support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or

  16. Determination of 137Cs activity in soil from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K. S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Matthews, M.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Al Sadig, Ibrahim; Daar, Eman

    2016-10-01

    With interest in establishing baseline concentrations of 137Cs in soil from the Qatarian peninsula, we focus on determination of the activity concentrations in 129 soil samples collected across the State of Qatar prior to the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. As such, the data provides the basis of a reference map for the detection of releases of this fission product. The activity concentrations were measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector enclosed in a copper-lined passive lead shield that was situated in a low-background environment. The activity concentrations ranged from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg, with a median value of 1 Bq/kg, the greatest activity concentration being observed in a sample obtained from northern Qatar. Although it cannot be confirmed, it is expected that this contamination is mainly due to releases from the Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986, there being a lack of data from Qatar before the accident. The values are typically within but are sometimes lower than the range indicated by data from other countries in the region. The lower values than those of others is suggested to be due to variation in soil characteristics as well as metrological factors at the time of deposition.

  17. Mapping of active faults based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles in offshore Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, Ljiljana; Glavatovic, Branislav

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data analysis is considered as important tool for mapping of active tectonic faults, since seismic exploration methods on varied scales can image subsurface structures of different depth ranges. Mapping of active faults for the offshore area of Montenegro is performed in Petrel software, using reflection database consist of 2D profiles in length of about 3.500 kilometers and 311 square kilometers of 3D seismics, acquired from 1979 to 2003. Montenegro offshore area is influenced by recent tectonic activity with numerous faults, folded faults and over trusts. Based on reflection profiles analysis, the trust fault system offshore Montenegro is reveled, parallel to the coast and extending up to 15 kilometers from the offshore line. Then, the system of normal top carbonate fault planes is mapped and characterized on the southern Adriatic, with NE trending. The tectonic interpretation of the seismic reflection profiles in Montenegro point toward the existence of principally reverse tectonic forms in the carbonate sediments, covered by young Quaternary sandy sediments of thickness 1-3 kilometers. Also, reflective seismic data indicate the active uplifting of evaporite dome on about 10 kilometers of coastline.

  18. High-resolution water column survey to identify active sublacustrine hydrothermal discharge zones within Lake Rotomahana, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Sharon L.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel; Tivey, Maurice A.; Stucker, Valerie K.

    2016-03-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles were used to conduct a high-resolution water column survey of Lake Rotomahana using temperature, pH, turbidity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) to identify active hydrothermal discharge zones within the lake. Five areas with active sublacustrine venting were identified: (1) the area of the historic Pink Terraces; (2) adjacent to the western shoreline subaerial "Steaming Cliffs," boiling springs and geyser; (3) along the northern shoreline to the east of the Pink Terrace site; (4) the newly discovered Patiti hydrothermal system along the south margin of the 1886 Tarawera eruption rift zone; and (5) a location in the east basin (northeast of Patiti Island). The Pink Terrace hydrothermal system was active prior to the 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera, but venting along the western shoreline, in the east basin, and the Patiti hydrothermal system appear to have been initiated in the aftermath of the eruption, similar to Waimangu Valley to the southwest. Different combinations of turbidity, pH anomalies (both positive and negative), and ORP responses suggest vent fluid compositions vary over short distances within the lake. The seasonal period of stratification limits vertical transport of heat to the surface layer and the hypolimnion temperature of Lake Rotomahana consequently increases with an average warming rate of ~ 0.010 °C/day due to both convective hydrothermal discharge and conductive geothermal heating. A sudden temperature increase occurred during our 2011 survey and was likely the response to an earthquake swarm just 11 days prior.

  19. High-resolution digital movies of emerging flux and horizontal flows in active regions on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of active regions in many wavelength bands obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope of NSO/Sunspot (Sacramento Peak) are presented. The SOUP tunable filter, HRSO 1024 x 1024 CCD camera, and a sunspot tracker for image stabilization were used. Subarrays of 512 x 512 pixels were processed digitally and recorded on videodisk in movie format. The movies with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations were shown: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Doppler velocity, Fe I 5576 A line center, H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The best set of movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field-of-view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Flux emergence is most easily discovered in line center movies: an elongated dark feature appears first, followed soon after by bright points at one or both ends. A brief, strong upflow is seen when the dark feature first appears; downflow in the bright points persists much longer. The magnetic flux appears to increase gradually over this extended period. Some of the flux emergence events were studied in detail, with measurements of horizontal and vertical velocities and magnetic flux versus time within one footpoint of the loop.

  20. Actively heated high-resolution fiber-optic-distributed temperature sensing to quantify streambed flow dynamics in zones of strong groundwater upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Buckley, Sean F.; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Werkema, Dale D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Zones of strong groundwater upwelling to streams enhance thermal stability and moderate thermal extremes, which is particularly important to aquatic ecosystems in a warming climate. Passive thermal tracer methods used to quantify vertical upwelling rates rely on downward conduction of surface temperature signals. However, moderate to high groundwater flux rates (>-1.5 m d-1) restrict downward propagation of diurnal temperature signals, and therefore the applicability of several passive thermal methods. Active streambed heating from within high-resolution fiber-optic temperature sensors (A-HRTS) has the potential to define multidimensional fluid-flux patterns below the extinction depth of surface thermal signals, allowing better quantification and separation of local and regional groundwater discharge. To demonstrate this concept, nine A-HRTS were emplaced vertically into the streambed in a grid with ˜0.40 m lateral spacing at a stream with strong upward vertical flux in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. Long-term (8-9 h) heating events were performed to confirm the dominance of vertical flow to the 0.6 m depth, well below the extinction of ambient diurnal signals. To quantify vertical flux, short-term heating events (28 min) were performed at each A-HRTS, and heat-pulse decay over vertical profiles was numerically modeled in radial two dimension (2-D) using SUTRA. Modeled flux values are similar to those obtained with seepage meters, Darcy methods, and analytical modeling of shallow diurnal signals. We also observed repeatable differential heating patterns along the length of vertically oriented sensors that may indicate sediment layering and hyporheic exchange superimposed on regional groundwater discharge.

  1. Future changes in tropical cyclone activity in the North Indian Ocean projected by high-resolution MRI-AGCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Sugi, Masato; Kitoh, Akio

    2013-04-01

    New and previous versions of the high-resolution 20- and 60-km-mesh Meteorological Research Institute atmospheric general circulation models are used to investigate potential future changes in tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the North Indian Ocean (NIO). Fifteen ensemble experiments are performed under the International Panel on Climate Change A1B scenario. Most of the ensemble future (2075-2099) experiments do not project significant future changes in the basin-scale TC genesis number; however, they commonly show a substantial increase (by 46 %) in TC frequency over the Arabian Sea and a decrease (by 31 %) in the Bay of Bengal. Projected future changes in TC genesis frequency show a marked seasonal variation in the NIO: a significant and robust reduction during the pre-monsoon season, an increase during the peak-monsoon season, and a westward shift during the post-monsoon season. Several large-scale thermodynamic and dynamical parameters are analysed to elucidate the physical mechanism responsible for the future changes in TC activity; this analysis reveals a seasonal dependence of the relative contribution of these parameters to the projected future changes in TC genesis frequency.

  2. A High Resolution, Unobscured View of the Active Regions in (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies from a VLA 33 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Leroy, Adam K.; Evans, Aaron S.; Armus, Lee; Condon, James J.; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Murphy, Eric J.; Ott, Juergen; Privon, George C.; Reichardt, Ashley; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Sanders, David B.; Schinnerer, Eva; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Walter, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    I will present a new survey of 33 GHz radio continuum emission from local U/LIRGs carried out using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This is the first such survey and it combines high resolution, good sensitivity, and multi-configuration observations that should have sensitivity to emission on all spatial scales. (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies host some of the most extreme star-forming environments in the local universe, with large reservoirs of molecular gas and dust concentrated in the central few kpc. Our VLA observations allow us to see through the dust in these systems and to resolve the sizes of their active regions, which is essential to understand the surface and volume densities of star formation and gas in these extreme systems. I will present the best size measurements to date of the active regions for our 22 targets. I will show what these sizes imply about gas volume and surface density and infrared luminosity surface densities. I will also lay out the physical implications of these values for the strength of star formation and feedback (especially radiative feedback) in extreme environments.

  3. A High Resolution, Unobscured View of the Active Regions in (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies from a VLA 33 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Leroy, A.; Evans, A.; et al.

    2016-06-01

    I will present a new survey of 33 GHz radio continuum emission from local U/LIRGs carried out using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This is the first such survey and it combines high resolution, good sensitivity, and multi-configuration observations that should have sensitivity to emission on all spatial scales. (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies host some of the most extreme star-forming environments in the local universe, with large reservoirs of molecular gas and dust concentrated in the central few kpc. Our VLA observations allow us to see through the dust in these systems to resolve the sizes of their active regions, which is essential to understand the surface and volume densities of star formation and gas in these extreme systems. I will present the best size measurements to date of the active regions for our 22 targets. I will show what these sizes imply about gas volume and surface density and infrared luminosity surface densities. I will also lay out the physical implications of these values for the strength of star formation and feedback (especially radiative feedback) in extreme environments.

  4. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  5. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P.; Gawthorpe, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka{sup -1} at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka{sup -1} at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  6. Late Quaternary high resolution sequence stratigraphy of an active rift, the Sperchios Basin, Greece: An analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays

    SciTech Connect

    Eliet, P.P. ); Gawthorpe, R.L. )

    1996-01-01

    The Sperchios Basin is an active asymmetric graben, bounded to the south by a major border fault system with major fault segments typically 20-30 km long. The basin is dominated by a major axial fluvio-deltaic system which enters the partially enclosed Maliakos Gulf to the east. Lateral sourced depositional systems within the basin comprise hanging-wall and footwall-derived alluvial fans and a narrow coastal plain along the footwall scarp bordering the Maliakos Gulf. High resolution seismic data from the Maliakos Gulf reveals three late Quaternary progradational parasequences sourced from axial and lateral depositional systems, with a regional late-Pleistocene transgressive surface dated at circa. 10 ka BP within the Maliakos Gulf. Differential subsidence of the late Pleistocene transgressive surface indicates marked variation in subsidence from 2.4 m ka[sup -1] at fault segment centers to 0.8 m ka[sup -1] at segment boundaries. The geometry and internal variability of each parasequence is controlled by the interplay of the local accommodation development and fluctuations in sediment supply and climatic conditions. The Sperchios Rift provides a modem analogue for subtle stratigraphic plays within ancient extensional basins. The study of controls on sediment source and transport patterns within active rifts has refined our appreciation of the controls on potential reservoir distribution and geometries.

  7. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  8. Optical design of an all-reflecting, high resolution camera for active-optics on ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Morbey, C. L.

    Optical designs of high-resolution all-mirror cameras for the active optics of the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) with classical optics (a paraboloidal primary), and the 2.2-m University of Hawaii telescope with Ritchey-Chretien (R-C) optics (a hyperboloidal primary), are presented. An oblate spheroid is used to produce longer focal ratios in the R-C telescope, lessening its disadvantage of a very small field of good definition at focal ratios longer than the optimized secondary focal ratio. Unlike the R-C telescope, the CFHT is not coma-free, and the prolate spheroid works well as its tertiary mirror. In the present camera design, the scale at the final focus is such that 0.25 arcsec covers 0.065 mm in order to match the resolution of the available detector. These cameras are off-axis, resulting in a slight change of magnification with the field rotation of alt-azimuth telescopes.

  9. Tectonic expression of an active slab tear from high-resolution seismic and bathymetric data offshore Sicily (Ionian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Dominguez, Stephane; Lepinay, Bernard Mercier; Pinheiro, Luis; Gallais, Flora; Babonneau, Nathalie; Cattaneo, Antonio; Le Faou, Yann; Barreca, Giovanni; Micallef, Aaron; Rovere, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Subduction of a narrow slab of oceanic lithosphere beneath a tightly curved orogenic arc requires the presence of at least one lithospheric scale tear fault. While the Calabrian subduction beneath southern Italy is considered to be the type example of this geodynamic setting, the geometry, kinematics and surface expression of the associated lateral, slab tear fault offshore eastern Sicily remain controversial. Results from a new marine geophysical survey conducted in the Ionian Sea, using high-resolution bathymetry and seismic profiling reveal active faulting at the seafloor within a 140 km long, two-branched fault system near Alfeo Seamount. The previously unidentified 60 km long NW trending North Alfeo Fault system shows primarily strike-slip kinematics as indicated by the morphology and steep-dipping transpressional and transtensional faults. Available earthquake focal mechanisms indicate dextral strike-slip motion along this fault segment. The 80 km long SSE trending South Alfeo fault system is expressed by one or two steeply dipping normal faults, bounding the western side of a 500+ m thick, 5 km wide, elongate, syntectonic Plio-Quaternary sedimentary basin. Both branches of the fault system are mechanically capable of generating magnitude 6-7 earthquakes like those that struck eastern Sicily in 1169, 1542, and 1693.

  10. Impact of human activities on the geomagnetic field of Antarctica: a high resolution aeromagnetic survey over Mario Zucchelli Station.

    PubMed

    Armadillo, E; Bozzo, E; Gambetta, M; Rizzello, D

    2012-10-15

    Environmental protection of Antarctica is a fundamental principle of the Antarctic Treaty. Impact assessment and significance evaluation are due for every human activity on the remote continent. While chemical and biological contaminations are widely studied, very little is known about the electromagnetic pollution levels. In this frame, we have evaluated the significance of the impact of Mario Zucchelli Antarctic Station (Northern Victoria Land) on the local geomagnetic field. We have flown a high resolution aeromagnetic survey in drape mode at 320m over the Station, covering an area of 2km(2). The regional and the local field have been separated by a third order polynomial fitting. After the identification of the anthropic magnetic anomaly due to the Station, we have estimated the magnetic field at the ground level by downward continuation with an original inversion scheme regularized by a minimum gradient support functional to avoid high frequency noise effects. The resulting anthropic static magnetic field at ground extends up to 650m far from the Station and reaches a maximum peak to peak value of about 2800nT. This anthropic magnetic anomaly may interact with biological systems, raising the necessity to evaluate the significance of the static magnetic impact of human installations in order to protect the electromagnetic environment and the biota of Antarctica.

  11. Impact of human activities on the geomagnetic field of Antarctica: a high resolution aeromagnetic survey over Mario Zucchelli Station.

    PubMed

    Armadillo, E; Bozzo, E; Gambetta, M; Rizzello, D

    2012-10-15

    Environmental protection of Antarctica is a fundamental principle of the Antarctic Treaty. Impact assessment and significance evaluation are due for every human activity on the remote continent. While chemical and biological contaminations are widely studied, very little is known about the electromagnetic pollution levels. In this frame, we have evaluated the significance of the impact of Mario Zucchelli Antarctic Station (Northern Victoria Land) on the local geomagnetic field. We have flown a high resolution aeromagnetic survey in drape mode at 320m over the Station, covering an area of 2km(2). The regional and the local field have been separated by a third order polynomial fitting. After the identification of the anthropic magnetic anomaly due to the Station, we have estimated the magnetic field at the ground level by downward continuation with an original inversion scheme regularized by a minimum gradient support functional to avoid high frequency noise effects. The resulting anthropic static magnetic field at ground extends up to 650m far from the Station and reaches a maximum peak to peak value of about 2800nT. This anthropic magnetic anomaly may interact with biological systems, raising the necessity to evaluate the significance of the static magnetic impact of human installations in order to protect the electromagnetic environment and the biota of Antarctica. PMID:22706521

  12. Carbon cycle dynamics and solar activity embedded in a high-resolution 14C speleothem record from Belize, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleitner, Franziska A.; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; McIntyre, Cameron; Asmerom, Yemane; Prufer, Keith M.; Polyak, Victor; Culleton, Brendan J.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2015-04-01

    Speleothem 14C has recently emerged as a potentially powerful proxy for climate reconstruction. Several studies have highlighted the link between karst hydrology and speleothem 14C content, and a number of possible causes for this relationship have been proposed, such as dripwater flow dynamics in the karst and changes in soil organic matter (SOM) turnover time (e.g. Griffiths et al., 2012). Here we present a high resolution 14C record for a stalagmite (YOK-I) from Yok Balum cave in southern Belize, Central America. YOK-I grew continuously over the last 2000 years, and has been dated very precisely with the U-Th method (40 dates, mean uncertainty < 10 years). The excellent chronological control for this stalagmite allows us to calculate 14C activity (a14C) at the time of speleothem deposition (a14Cinit), as well as the dead carbon fraction (DCF), predominantly a measure of the reservoir effect introduced by limestone dissolution in the karst (Genty et al., 2001). Both records show striking similarities to atmospheric a14C (IntCal13) and reconstructions of solar activity and 14C production rate. We infer close coupling between cave environment and atmosphere, with minimal signal dampening, an observation supported by monitoring data (Ridley et al., in press). DCF fluctuates between approximately 10% and 16% over the entire record, with distinctly lower DCF values and higher a14Cinit during a period of reduced rainfall between ca. 700-1100 AD (linked to the Classic Maya Collapse). This behavior is consistent with observations made elsewhere, and suggests that DCF responds to karst hydrological variability, specifically open-closed system transitions. YOK-I a14Cinit typically lags atmospheric values by 10-100 cal years. A shorter lag appears to be linked to periods of drought, suggesting a response of SOM dynamics above the cave to rainfall reduction. Specifically, drought is inferred to lead to reduced bioproductivity and soil carbon turnover, lowering contributions

  13. Evaluation of the workload and drowsiness during car driving by using high resolution EEG activity and neurophysiologic indices.

    PubMed

    Maglione, A; Borghini, G; Aricò, P; Borgia, F; Graziani, I; Colosimo, A; Kong, W; Vecchiato, G; Babiloni, F

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and/or a high workload situation can adversely affect driving performance, decreasing a driver's capacity to respond effectively in dangerous situations. In this context, to provide useful feedback and alert signals in real time to the drivers physiological and brain activities have been increasingly investigated in literature. In this study, we analyze the increase of cerebral workload and the insurgence of drowsiness during car driving in a simulated environment by using high resolution electroencephalographic techniques (EEG) as well as neurophysiologic variables such as heart rate (HR) and eye blinks rate (EBR). The simulated drive tasks were modulated with five levels of increasing difficulty. A workload index was then generated by using the EEG signals and the related HR and EBR signals. Results suggest that the derived workload index is sensitive to the mental efforts of the driver during the different drive tasks performed. Such workload index was based on the estimation the variation of EEG power spectra in the theta band over prefrontal cortical areas and the variation of the EEG power spectra over the parietal cortical areas in alpha band. In addition, results suggested as HR increases during the execution of the difficult driving tasks while instead it decreases at the insurgence of the drowsiness. Finally, the results obtained showed as the EBR variable increases of its values when the insurgence of drowsiness in the driver occurs. The proposed workload index could be then used in a near future to assess on-line the mental state of the driver during a drive task.

  14. Ultra-high Resolution Mapping of the Inner Crater of the Active Kick'em Jenny Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, L.; Scott, C.; Tominaga, M.; Smart, C.; Vaughn, I.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.; German, C. R.; Participants, T.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted high-resolution geological characterization of a 0.015km^2 region of the inner crater of the most active submarine volcano in the Caribbean, Kick'em Jenny, located 8 km off Grenada in the Lesser Antilles Island Arc. We obtained digital still images and microbathymetery at an altitude of 3 m from the seafloor by using stereo cameras and a BlueView system mounted on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Hercules during the NA054 cruise on E/V Nautilus (Sept. - Oct. 2014). The seafloor images were processed to construct 2-D photo mosaics of the survey area using Standard Hercules Imaging Suite. We systematically classified the photographed seafloor geology based on the distribution of seafloor morphology and the observable rock fragment and outcrop sizes. The center of the crater floor shows a smooth, coherent texture with little variation in sea floor morphology. From immediately outside this area toward the crater rim, we observe an extensive area covered with outcrops, small rocks, and sediment: and within this area, (1) the north section is partially covered by uneven outcrops with elongated lineaments and a course, rugged seafloor with individual rock fragments observable; (2) the middle section contains high variability and heterogeneity in seafloor morphology in a non-systematic manner; and (3) overall, the southern most section displays subdued seafloor features both in space and variability compared to the other areas. The distributions of rock fragments were classified into four distinct sizes. We observe: (i) little variation in size distribution near the center of the crater floor; and (ii) rock fragment size increasing toward the rim of the crater. To obtain a better understanding of the link between variation in seafloor morphology, rock size distribution, and other in situ processes, we compare our observations on the digital photo mosaic to bathymetry data and ROV visuals (e.g. vents and bacterial mats).

  15. Non-linear responsivity characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for high resolution imaging of the Jovian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M.; Stefanov, K.; Weatherill, D.; Holland, A.; Gow, J.; Leese, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Jovian system is the subject of study for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE), an ESA mission which is planned to launch in 2022. The scientific payload is designed for both characterisation of the magnetosphere and radiation environment local to the spacecraft, as well as remote characterisation of Jupiter and its satellites. A key instrument on JUICE is the high resolution and wide angle camera, JANUS, whose main science goals include detailed characterisation and study phases of three of the Galilean satellites, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa, as well as studies of other moons, the ring system, and irregular satellites. The CIS115 is a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor from e2v technologies selected for the JANUS camera. It is fabricated using 0.18 μ m CMOS imaging sensor process, with an imaging area of 2000 × 1504 pixels, each 7 μ m square. A 4T pixel architecture allows for efficient correlated double sampling, improving the readout noise to better than 8 electrons rms, whilst the sensor is operated in a rolling shutter mode, sampling at up to 10 Mpixel/s at each of the four parallel outputs.A primary parameter to characterise for an imaging device is the relationship that converts the sensor's voltage output back to the corresponding number of electrons that were detected in a pixel, known as the Charge to Voltage Factor (CVF). In modern CMOS sensors with small feature sizes, the CVF is known to be non-linear with signal level, therefore a signal-dependent measurement of the CIS115's CVF has been undertaken and is presented here. The CVF is well modelled as a quadratic function leading to a measurement of the maximum charge handling capacity of the CIS115 to be 3.4 × 104 electrons. If the CIS115's response is assumed linear, its CVF is 21.1 electrons per mV (1/47.5 μ V per electron).

  16. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  17. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  18. Curvature-induced activation of a passive tracer in an active bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, S. A.; Valeriani, C.; Cacciuto, A.

    2014-09-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low-density suspension of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer, which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry.

  19. Curvature-induced activation of a passive tracer in an active bath.

    PubMed

    Mallory, S A; Valeriani, C; Cacciuto, A

    2014-09-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low-density suspension of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer, which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry. PMID:25314448

  20. Investigating Cenozoic climate change in tectonically active regions with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutz, Sebastian; Ehlers, Todd; Li, Jingmin; Werner, Martin; Stepanek, Christian; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Studies of Cenozoic palaeo-climates contribute to our understanding of contemporary climate change by providing insight into analogues such as the Pliocene (PLIO), and by evaluation of GCM (General Circulation Models) performance using the Mid-Holocene (MH) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Furthermore, climate is a factor to be considered in the evolution of ecology, landscapes and mountains, and in the reconstruction of erosion histories. In this study, we use high-resolution (T159) ECHAM5 simulations to investigate pre-industrial (PI) and the the above mentioned palaeo-climates for four tectonically active regions: Alaska (St. Elias Range), the US Northwest Pacific (Cascade Range), western South America (Andes) and parts of Asia (Himalaya-Tibet). The PI climate simulation is an AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) style ECHAM5 experiment, whereas MH and LGM simulation are based on simulations conducted at the Alfred Wegner Institute, Bremerhaven. Sea surface boundary conditions for MH were taken from coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations (Wei and Lohmann, 2012; Zhang et al, 2013) and sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentration for the LGM are based on GLAMAP project reconstructions (Schäfer-Neth and Paul, 2003). Boundary conditions for the PLIO simulation are taken from the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) project and the employed PLIO vegetation boundary condition is created by means of the transfer procedure for the PRISM vegetation reconstruction to the JSBACH plant functional types as described by Stepanek and Lohmann (2012). For each of the investigated areas and time slices, the regional simulated climates are described by means of cluster analyses based on the variability of precipitation, 2m air temperature and the intra-annual amplitude of the values. Results indicate the largest differences to a PI climate are observed for LGM and PLIO climates in the form of widespread cooling and warming

  1. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  2. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  3. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  4. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  5. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  6. Current-Sensing and Voltage-Feedback Driving Method for Large-Area High-Resolution Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Hai‑Jung; Choi, Byong‑Deok; Chung, Ho‑Kyoon; Kwon, Oh‑Kyong

    2006-05-01

    There is the problem of picture quality nonuniformity due to thin film transistor (TFT) characteristic variations throughout a panel of large-area high-resolution active matrix organic light emitting diodes. The current programming method could solve this issue, but it also requires very long charging time of a data line at low gray shades. Therefore, we propose a new driving method and a pixel circuit with emission-current sensing and feedback operation in order to resolve these problems. The proposed driving method and pixel circuit successfully compensate threshold voltage and mobility variations of TFTs and overcome the data line charging problem. Simulation results show that emission current deviations of the proposed driving method are less than 1.7% with ± 10.0% mobility and ± 0.3 V threshold voltage variations of pixel-driving TFTs, which means the proposed driving method is applicable to large-area high-resolution applications.

  7. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Villin Headpiece nad Mutants with Reduced F-Actin Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meng,J.; Vardar, D.; Wang, Y.; Guo, H.; Head, J.; McKnight, C.

    2005-01-01

    Villin-type headpiece domains are approximately 70 amino acid modular motifs found at the C terminus of a variety of actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins. The headpiece domain of villin, a protein found in the actin bundles of the brush border epithelium, is of interest both as a compact F-actin binding domain and as a model folded protein. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of chicken villin headpiece (HP67) at 1.4 Angstrom resolution as well as two mutants, R37A and W64Y, at 1.45 and 1.5 Angstrom resolution, respectively. Replacement of R37 causes a 5-fold reduction in F-actin binding affinity in sedimentation assays. Replacement of W64 results in a much more drastic reduction in F-actin binding affinity without significant changes in headpiece structure or stability. The detailed comparison of these crystal structures with each other and to our previously determined NMR structures of HP67 and the 35-residue autonomously folding subdomain in villin headpiece, HP35, provides the details of the headpiece fold and further defines the F-actin binding site of villin-type headpiece domains.

  8. High-resolution HDX-MS reveals distinct mechanisms of RNA recognition and activation by RIG-I and MDA5

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Yong, Hui Yee; Panutdaporn, Nantika; Liu, Chuanfa; Tang, Kai; Luo, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I and MDA5 are the major intracellular immune receptors that recognize viral RNA species and undergo a series of conformational transitions leading to the activation of the interferon-mediated antiviral response. However, to date, full-length RLRs have resisted crystallographic efforts and a molecular description of their activation pathways remains hypothetical. Here we employ hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to probe the apo states of RIG-I and MDA5 and to dissect the molecular details with respect to distinct RNA species recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis and CARDs activation. We show that human RIG-I maintains an auto-inhibited resting state owing to the intra-molecular HEL2i-CARD2 interactions while apo MDA5 lacks the analogous intra-molecular interactions and therefore adopts an extended conformation. Our work demonstrates that RIG-I binds and responds differently to short triphosphorylated RNA and long duplex RNA and that sequential addition of RNA and ATP triggers specific allosteric effects leading to RIG-I CARDs activation. We also present a high-resolution protein surface mapping technique that refines the cooperative oligomerization model of neighboring MDA5 molecules on long duplex RNA. Taken together, our data provide a high-resolution view of RLR activation in solution and offer new evidence for the molecular mechanism of RLR activation. PMID:25539915

  9. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  10. Characterization of Hydraulic Active Fractures in a Dolostone Aquifer Using Heat and Contaminants As Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldaner, C. H.; Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The number of hydraulically active fractures serving as advective contaminant migration pathways facilitating plume migration in fractured rock aquifers cannot be determined with confidence from indirect means such as visual inspection of core, borehole geophysics, and is only inferred from hydraulic tests. However, the position of depth-discrete hydraulic activity may be determined using contaminants or heat as tracers yet spatially detailed profile measurement techniques are required without imparting measurement bias of an open borehole. Contaminant concentration profiles from numerous samples along continuous core from a site contaminated since the early 1980's and heat injection in the sealed boreholes with high resolution profile monitoring are used to characterize the fracture network . Heat pulse tests using active distributed temperature sensing (DTS) were conducted in coreholes sealed with an impermeable flexible liner manufactured by FLUTe (Santa Fe, NM) to detect hydraulically active fracture zones. Using a Silixa ULTIMA-HSTM DTS, temperature data was acquired every 12.6 cm along an optic fiber cable with a spatial resolution of 29 cm. Temperature precision is on the order of 0.02°C for averaged measurements collected over 5 minute intervals. The test consisted of heating the measurement cable for 4 hours and monitoring the cooling process for over 8 hours. The resulting dataset consists of high-resolution temperature profiles at five-minute time steps during the test period. Dolostone rock composes most of the lithology units of the corehole, therefore it is unlikely that there are significant variations in rock thermal diffusivity. Multiple, successive temperature profiles were used to identify depth-discrete, hydraulically active flow zones with varying transmissivity based on different rates of heat dissipation. These variations were then compared with independent datasets including detected concentrations of contaminants in numerous rock core

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE ACTIVE GALAXIES NGC 6240 AND M51

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Edwards, Philip G. E-mail: Philip.Edwards@csiro.au

    2015-12-20

    We present the results of observations of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission in NGC 6240 and M51 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Two major H{sub 2}O maser features and several minor features are detected toward the southern nucleus of NGC 6240. These features are redshifted by about 300 km s{sup −1} from the galaxy’s systemic velocity and remain unresolved at the synthesized beam size. A combination of our two-epoch observations and published data reveals an apparent correlation between the strength of the maser and the 22 GHz radio continuum emission, implying that the maser excitation relates to the activity of an active galactic nucleus in the southern nucleus rather than star-forming activity. The star-forming galaxy M51 hosts H{sub 2}O maser emission in the center of the galaxy; however, the origin of the maser has been an open question. We report the first detection of 22 GHz nuclear radio continuum emission in M51. The continuum emission is co-located with the maser position, which indicates that the maser arises from nuclear active galactic nucleus-activity and not from star-forming activity in the galaxy.

  12. Evaluation of effects of pharmaceutical processing on structural disorders of active pharmaceutical ingredient crystals using nanoindentation and high-resolution total scattering pair distribution function analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Ho, Raimundo

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical unit operations such as milling and compaction can often generate disordered regions in crystals of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). This may lead to changes in a number of important pharmaceutical properties including dissolution, stability, hygroscopicity, and so on. It is therefore important for pharmaceutical industry to evaluate the effects of pharmaceutical processing on API structural orders, and to investigate and develop analytical tools that are capable of accurately detecting and assessing subtle process-induced structural disorders in pharmaceutical crystals. In this study, nanoindentation was first used to determine the intrinsic mechanical properties including hardness and Young's modulus of two API crystals, compounds 1 and 2. These crystals of different mechanical properties were then milled and compacted under various conditions. The resulting structural disorders in these crystals were subsequently evaluated using synchrotron-based high-resolution total scattering pair distribution function (TS-PDF) analysis. Furthermore, principal component analysis was applied to the PDF data to assess the relative extents of disorders in the API crystals, which showed a good correlation with the process conditions. The study demonstrates that high-resolution TS-PDF analysis coupled with nanoindentation measurement is a valuable and effective tool for detecting and assessing process-induced subtle structural disorders in API crystals.

  13. High Resolution Geophysical Survey of Western Long Island Sound Offshore New York: An Estuary Floor Shaped by Bottom Currents and Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W.; Cormier, M.; McHugh, C.

    2009-05-01

    Western Long Island Sound near metropolitan New York averages 16m in water depth, with a few elongated depression up to 40 m deep. In June 2006, we surveyed the westernmost section of Long island Sound with the R/V HUGH SHARP. Analysis of the high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data collected during that survey reveals a series of sedimentary features that are consistent with a net westward direction of bottom currents. These features include: (1) Large sedimentary waves spaced ab out 100 m west of two km-scale features outcropping through the sediments; (2) Prominent sediment drifts or scour marks west of numerous shipwrecks and bouldery outcrops; (3) Series of subtle, sub-parallel sedimentary furrows aligned in a general EW direction along the north slope of the surveyed area (similar features have been documented in north- central Long Island Sound - (Poppe et al., J. Coastal Res. 2002). The lack of short wavelength sedimentary waves is consistent with the known muddy substrate and weak bottom currents (<10 cm/s) documented in western Long Island Sound. Fields of pockmarks affecting areas of gas-charged sediments may indicate localized, active venting of fluids and/or gas. The high-resolution bathymetry also highlights numerous anthropogenic disturbances such as pipelines, cables, shipwrecks, anchor drag marks, and dredge spoils.

  14. Simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in crude platinum samples by activation analysis and high-resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turkstra, J; de Wet, W J

    1969-08-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis using a Ge(Li) detector has been investigated for the simultaneous determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in crude platinum samples contained in lead cupels. This technique proved feasible and appears promising for extension to the determination of most of the noble metals.

  15. High-resolution crystal structure of a polyextreme GH43 glycosidase from Halothermothrix orenii with α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Noor; Kori, Lokesh D.; Gandini, Rosaria; Patel, Bharat K. C.; Divne, Christina; Tan, Tien Chye

    2015-01-01

    A gene from the heterotrophic, halothermophilic marine bacterium Halothermothrix orenii has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encodes the only glycoside hydrolase of family 43 (GH43) produced by H. orenii. The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. As for other GH43 members, the enzyme folds as a five-bladed β-propeller. The structure features a metal-binding site on the propeller axis, near the active site. Based on thermal denaturation data, the H. orenii glycosidase depends on divalent cations in combination with high salt for optimal thermal stability against unfolding. A maximum melting temperature of 76°C was observed in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn2+ at pH 6.5. The gene encoding the H. orenii GH43 enzyme has previously been annotated as a putative α-l-arabinofuranosidase. Activity was detected with p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside as a substrate, and therefore the name HoAraf43 was suggested for the enzyme. In agreement with the conditions for optimal thermal stability against unfolding, the highest arabinofuranosidase activity was obtained in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn2+ at pH 6.5, giving a specific activity of 20–36 µmol min−1 mg−1. The active site is structurally distinct from those of other GH43 members, including arabinanases, arabinofuranosidases and xylanases. This probably reflects the special requirements for degrading the unique biomass available in highly saline aqueous ecosystems, such as halophilic algae and halophytes. The amino-acid distribution of HoAraf43 has similarities to those of mesophiles, thermophiles and halophiles, but also has unique features, for example more hydrophobic amino acids on the surface and fewer buried charged residues. PMID:25760712

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of a polyextreme GH43 glycosidase from Halothermothrix orenii with α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Noor; Kori, Lokesh D.; Gandini, Rosaria; Patel, Bharat K. C.; Divne, Christina; Tan, Tien Chye

    2015-02-19

    The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. A gene from the heterotrophic, halothermophilic marine bacterium Halothermothrix orenii has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encodes the only glycoside hydrolase of family 43 (GH43) produced by H. orenii. The crystal structure of the H. orenii glycosidase was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.10 Å resolution. As for other GH43 members, the enzyme folds as a five-bladed β-propeller. The structure features a metal-binding site on the propeller axis, near the active site. Based on thermal denaturation data, the H. orenii glycosidase depends on divalent cations in combination with high salt for optimal thermal stability against unfolding. A maximum melting temperature of 76°C was observed in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn{sup 2+} at pH 6.5. The gene encoding the H. orenii GH43 enzyme has previously been annotated as a putative α-l-arabinofuranosidase. Activity was detected with p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside as a substrate, and therefore the name HoAraf43 was suggested for the enzyme. In agreement with the conditions for optimal thermal stability against unfolding, the highest arabinofuranosidase activity was obtained in the presence of 4 M NaCl and Mn{sup 2+} at pH 6.5, giving a specific activity of 20–36 µmol min{sup −1} mg{sup −1}. The active site is structurally distinct from those of other GH43 members, including arabinanases, arabinofuranosidases and xylanases. This probably reflects the special requirements for degrading the unique biomass available in highly saline aqueous ecosystems, such as halophilic algae and halophytes. The amino-acid distribution of HoAraf43 has similarities to those of mesophiles, thermophiles and halophiles, but also has unique features, for example more hydrophobic amino acids on the surface and fewer buried charged residues.

  18. Further characterization and high-resolution mapping of quantitative trait loci for ethanol-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Demarest, K; Koyner, J; McCaughran, J; Cipp, L; Hitzemann, R

    2001-01-01

    Differential sensitivity to the stimulant effects of ethanol on locomotor activity is determined in part by genetic differences. Among inbred strains of mice, moderate doses of ethanol (1-2 g/kg) stimulate locomotor activity in some strains, e.g., the DBA/2J (D2), but only mildly affect activity in other strains, e.g., C57BL/6J (B6) (Crabbe et al., 1982, 1983; Crabbe, 1986; Dudek and Phillips, 1990; Dudek et al., 1991; Dudek and Tritto, 1994). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the acute ethanol (1.5 g/kg) locomotor response has been identified in the BXD recombinant inbred (RI) series (N = 25 strains), a C57BL/6J x DBA/2J (B6D2) F2 intercross (N = 1800), and heterogeneous stock (HS) mice (N = 550). QTLs detected (p < .01) in the RI series were found on chromosomes 1, 2, and 6 and these QTLs were expressed in a time-dependent fashion. The QTLs on chromosomes 1 and 2 were confirmed in the F2 intercross at p < 10(-7) or better. HS mice from G32 to G35 were used to fine-map the chromosome 2 QTL. Compared to the consensus map, the genetic map in the HS animals was expanded 10- to 15-fold. Over the region flanked by D2Mit94 to D2Mit304, three separate QTLs were detected in the HS animals. The data obtained confirm the usefulness of HS mice for the fine-mapping of QTLs to a resolution of 2 cM or less.

  19. High-Resolution fMRI Maps of Cortical Activation in Nonhuman Primates: Correlation with Intrinsic Signal Optical Images

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Anna W.; Chen, Li Min

    2009-01-01

    One of the most widely used functional brain mapping tools is blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This method has contributed to new understandings of the functional roles of different areas in the human brain. However, its ability to map cerebral cortex at high spatial (submillimeter) resolution is still unknown. Other methods such as single- and multiunit electrophysiology and intrinsic signal optical imaging have revealed submillimeter resolution of sensory topography and cortical columnar activations. However, they are limited either by spatial scale (electrophysiology characterizes only local groups of neurons) or by the inability to monitor deep structures in the brain (i.e., cortical regions buried in sulci or subcortical structures). A method that could monitor all regions of the brain at high spatial resolution would be ideal. This capacity would open the doors to investigating, for example, how networks of cerebral cortical columns relate to or produce behavior. In this article we demonstrate that, without benefit of contrast agents, at a magnetic field strength of 9.4 tesla, BOLD fMRI can reveal millimeter-sized topographic maps of digit representation in the somatosensory cortex of the anesthetized squirrel monkey. Furthermore, by mapping the “funneling illusion,” it is possible to detect even submillimeter shifts in activation in the cortex. Our data suggest that at high magnetic field strength, the positive BOLD signal can be used to reveal high spatial resolution maps of brain activity, a finding that weakens previous notions about the ultimate spatial specificity of the positive BOLD signal. PMID:18172338

  20. Mapping high-resolution incident photosynthetically active radiation over land surfaces from MODIS and GOES satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S.; Wang, K.; Wang, D.; Townshend, J.; Running, S.; Tsay, S.

    2008-05-01

    Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is a key variable required by almost all terrestrial ecosystem models. Many radiation efficiency models are linearly related canopy productivity to the absorbed PAR. Unfortunately, the current incident PAR products estimated from remotely sensed data or calculated by radiation models at spatial and temporal resolutions are not sufficient for carbon cycle modeling and various applications. In this study, we aim to develop incident PAR products at one kilometer scale from multiple satellite sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sensor. We first developed a look-up table approach to estimate instantanerous incident PAR product from MODIS (Liang et al., 2006). The temporal observations of each pixel are used to estimate land surface reflectance and look-up tables of both aerosol and cloud are searched, based on the top-of-atmosphere reflectance and surface reflectance for determining incident PAR. The incident PAR product includes both the direct and diffuse components. The calculation of a daily integrated PAR using two different methods has also been developed (Wang, et al., 2008a). The similar algorithm has been further extended to GOES data (Wang, et al., 2008b, Zheng, et al., 2008). Extensive validation activities are conducted to evaluate the algorithms and products using the ground measurements from FLUXNET and other networks. They are also compared with other satellite products. The results indicate that our approaches can produce reasonable PAR product at 1km resolution. We have generated 1km incident PAR products over North America for several years, which are freely available to the science community. Liang, S., T. Zheng, R. Liu, H. Fang, S. C. Tsay, S. Running, (2006), Estimation of incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from MODIS Data, Journal of Geophysical Research ¡§CAtmosphere. 111, D15208,doi:10

  1. Detection of macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo using multichannel, high-resolution laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Ashvin N.; Kohler, Rainer; Aikawa, Elena; Weissleder, Ralph; Jaffer, Farouc

    2006-03-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms of atherogenesis and its treatment are largely being unraveled by in vitro techniques. We describe methodology to directly image macrophage cell activity in vivo in a murine model of atherosclerosis using laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and a macrophage-targeted, near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) magnetofluorescent nanoparticle (MFNP). Atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE -/-) mice (n=10) are injected with MFNP or 0.9% saline, and wild-type mice (n=4) are injected with MFNP as additional controls. After 24 h, common carotid arteries are surgically exposed and prepared for LSFM. Multichannel LSFM of MFNP-enhanced carotid atheroma (5×5-µm in-plane resolution) shows a strong focal NIRF signal, with a plaque target-to-background ratio of 3.9+/-1.8. Minimal NIRF signal is observed in control mice. Spectrally resolved indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiograms confirm the intravascular location of atheroma. On ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging, greater NIRF plaque signal is seen in apoE -/- MFNP mice compared to controls (p<0.01). The NIRF signal correlates well with immunostained macrophages, both by stained surface area (r=0.77) and macrophage number (r=0.86). The validated experimental methodology thus establishes a platform for investigating macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo, and has implications for the detection of clinical vulnerable plaques.

  2. Investigation of active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T.; Frank, Z.; Gilbreth, C.; Shine, R.; Title, A.; Topka, K.; Wolfson, J.

    1989-01-01

    SOUP is a versatile, visible-light solar observatory, built for space or balloon flight. It is designed to study magnetic and velocity fields in the solar atmosphere with high spatial resolution and temporal uniformity, which cannot be achieved from the surface of the earth. The SOUP investigation is carried out by the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Co-investigators include staff members at a dozen observatories and universities in the U.S. and Europe. The primary objectives of the SOUP experiment are: to measure vector magnetic and velocity fields in the solar atmosphere with much better spatial resolution than can be achieved from the ground; to study the physical processes that store magnetic energy in active regions and the conditions that trigger its release; and to understand how magnetic flux emerges, evolves, combines, and disappears on spatial scales of 400 to 100,000 km. SOUP is designed to study intensity, magnetic, and velocity fields in the photosphere and low chromosphere with 0.5 arcsec resolution, free of atmospheric disturbances. The instrument includes: a 30 cm Cassegrain telescope; an active mirror for image stabilization; broadband film and TV cameras; a birefringent filter, tunable over 5100 to 6600 A with 0.05 A bandpass; a 35 mm film camera and a digital CCD camera behind the filter; and a high-speed digital image processor.

  3. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  4. High-resolution geophysical data collected along the Delmarva Peninsula 2014, USGS Field Activity 2014-002-FA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth E.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Danforth, William W.; Foster, David S.; Thieler, E. Robert; Brothers, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The Delmarva Peninsula is a 220-kilometer-long headland, spit, and barrier island complex that was significantly affected by Hurricane Sandy. A USGS cruise was conducted in the summer of 2014 to map the inner-continental shelf of the Delmarva Peninsula using geophysical and sampling techniques to define the geologic framework that governs coastal system evolution at storm-event and longer timescales. Geophysical data collected during the 2014 cruise include swath bathymetric, sidescan sonar, chirp and boomer seismic reflection profiles, acoustic Doppler current profiler, and sample and bottom photograph and video data. Preliminary datasets of backscatter and bathymetry are released here to the public and collaborators while final datasets for all data collected will be released in 2015. More information about the USGS survey conducted as part of the Hurricane Sandy Response-- Geologic Framework and Coastal Vulnerability Study can be found at the project website or on the WHCMSC Field Activity Web pages

  5. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  6. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  7. A high-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type stars: chromospheric activity, rotation, kinematics, and age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Santiago, J.; Montes, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Crespo-Chacón, I.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Fernández-Figueroa, M. J.; de Castro, E.; Cornide, M.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We present a compilation of spectroscopic data from a survey of 144 chromospherically active young stars in the solar neighborhood, which may be used to investigate different aspects of its formation and evolution in terms of kinematics and stellar formation history. The data have already been used by us in several studies. With this paper, we make all these data accessible to the scientific community for future studies on different topics. Methods: We performed spectroscopic observations with echelle spectrographs to cover the entirety of the optical spectral range simultaneously. Standard data reduction was performed with the IRAF echelle package. We applied the spectral subtraction technique to reveal chromospheric emission in the stars of the sample. The equivalent width of chromospheric emission lines was measured in the subtracted spectra and then converted to fluxes using equivalent width-flux relationships. Radial and rotational velocities were determined by the cross-correlation technique. Kinematics, equivalent widths of the lithium line λ6707.8 Å and spectral types were also determined. Results: A catalog of spectroscopic data is compiled: radial and rotational velocities, space motion, equivalent widths of optical chromospheric activity indicators from Ca II H & K to the calcium infrared triplet and the lithium line in λ6708 Å. Fluxes in the chromospheric emission lines and R'_HK are also determined for each observation of a star in the sample. We used these data to investigate the emission levels of our stars. The study of the Hα emission line revealed two different populations of chromospheric emitters in the sample, clearly separated in the logFHα/Fbol - (V-J) diagram. The dichotomy may be associated with the age of the stars. Based on observations made with the 2.2 m telescope of the German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto (Almería, Spain), operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, and the Spanish

  8. High resolution tree-ring based spatial reconstructions of snow avalanche activity in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, Gregory T.; Reardon, Blase; Caruso, C.J.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective design of avalanche hazard mitigation measures requires long-term records of natural avalanche frequency and extent. Such records are also vital for determining whether natural avalanche frequency and extent vary over time due to climatic or biophysical changes. Where historic records are lacking, an accepted substitute is a chronology developed from tree-ring responses to avalanche-induced damage. This study evaluates a method for using tree-ring chronologies to provide spatially explicit differentiations of avalanche frequency and temporally explicit records of avalanche extent that are often lacking. The study area - part of John F. Stevens Canyon on the southern border of Glacier National Park – is within a heavily used railroad and highway corridor with two dozen active avalanche paths. Using a spatially geo-referenced network of avalanche-damaged trees (n=109) from a single path, we reconstructed a 96-year tree-ring based chronology of avalanche extent and frequency. Comparison of the chronology with historic records revealed that trees recorded all known events as well as the same number of previously unidentified events. Kriging methods provided spatially explicit estimates of avalanche return periods. Estimated return periods for the entire avalanche path averaged 3.2 years. Within this path, return intervals ranged from ~2.3 yrs in the lower track, to ~9-11 yrs and ~12 to >25 yrs in the runout zone, where the railroad and highway are located. For avalanche professionals, engineers, and transportation managers this technique proves a powerful tool in landscape risk assessment and decision making.

  9. Determination of the activity concentration levels of the artificial radionuclide137Cs in soil samples collected from Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K. S.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.; Malain, D.; Habib, A.; Al-Dosari, Hanan; Daar, Eman

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to establish the first baseline measurements for radioactivity concentration of the artificial radionuclide 137Cs in soil samples collected from the Qatarian peninsula. The work focused on the determination of the activity concentrations levels of man-made radiation in 129 soil samples collected across the landscape of the State of Qatar. All the samples were collected before the most recent accident in Japan, “the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident”. The activity concentrations have been measured via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a hyper-pure germanium detector situated in a low-background environment with a copper inner-plated passive lead shield. A radiological map showing the activity concentrations of 137Cs is presented in this work. The concentration wasfound to range from 0.21 to 15.41 Bq/kg. The highest activity concentration of 137Cs was observed in sample no. 26 in North of Qatar. The mean value was found to be around 2.15 ± 0.27 Bq/kg. These values lie within the expected range relative to the countries in the region. It is expected that this contamination is mainly due to the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986, but this conclusion cannot be confirmed because of the lack of data before this accident.

  10. Overview of Proposal on High Resolution Climate Model Simulations of Recent Hurricane and Typhoon Activity: The Impact of SSTs and the Madden Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Kang, In-Sik; Reale, Oreste

    2009-01-01

    This talk gives an update on the progress and further plans for a coordinated project to carry out and analyze high-resolution simulations of tropical storm activity with a number of state-of-the-art global climate models. Issues addressed include, the mechanisms by which SSTs control tropical storm. activity on inter-annual and longer time scales, the modulation of that activity by the Madden Julian Oscillation on sub-seasonal time scales, as well as the sensitivity of the results to model formulation. The project also encourages companion coarser resolution runs to help assess resolution dependence, and. the ability of the models to capture the large-scale and long-terra changes in the parameters important for hurricane development. Addressing the above science questions is critical to understanding the nature of the variability of the Asian-Australian monsoon and its regional impacts, and thus CLIVAR RAMP fully endorses the proposed tropical storm simulation activity. The project is open to all interested organizations and investigators, and the results from the runs will be shared among the participants, as well as made available to the broader scientific community for analysis.

  11. High-resolution structures of two complexes between thrombin and thrombin-binding aptamer shed light on the role of cations in the aptamer inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Merlino, Antonello; Randazzo, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Mazzarella, Lelio; Sica, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    The G-quadruplex architecture is a peculiar structure adopted by guanine-rich oligonucleotidic sequences, and, in particular, by several aptamers, including the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) that has the highest inhibitory activity against human α-thrombin. A crucial role in determining structure, stability and biological properties of G-quadruplexes is played by ions. In the case of TBA, K+ ions cause an enhancement of the aptamer clotting inhibitory activity. A detailed picture of the interactions of TBA with the protein and with the ions is still lacking, despite the importance of this aptamer in biomedical field for detection and inhibition of α-thrombin. Here, we fill this gap by presenting a high-resolution crystallographic structural characterization of the thrombin–TBA complex formed in the presence of Na+ or K+ and a circular dichroism study of the structural stability of the aptamer both free and complexed with α-thrombin, in the presence of the two ionic species. The results indicate that the different effects exerted by Na+ and K+ on the inhibitory activity of TBA are related to a subtle perturbation of a few key interactions at the protein–aptamer interface. The present data, in combination with those previously obtained on the complex between α-thrombin and a modified aptamer, may allow the design of new TBA variants with a pharmacological performance enhancement. PMID:22669903

  12. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  13. Space-Borne Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture and Freeze/Thaw Dynamics at High Resolution Using a Combined Active and Passive Instrument Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Njoku, E. G.; Houser, P.; Gurney, R.; Jackson, T.; Kimball, J.; Koster, R.; McDonald, K.; ONeill, P.; Running, S.; VanZyl, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2001-05-01

    The design and expected characteristics of a space-borne system for high-resolution mapping of surface soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw dynamics is presented. This study represents the proposal for a comprehensive terrestrial hydrology monitoring mission. The mission objective is traced to the data requirements of research related to predictability, variations and change in the rate of the hydrologic cycle. The baseline mission builds on the heritage of ground-based and airborne passive and active low frequency microwave measurements that have demonstrated and validated the effectiveness of the measurements and associated algorithms for estimating the amount and phase of surface soil moisture. The satellite has both a radiometer and a radar on board. The radiometer provides polarized brightness temperature fields at 1.4 GHz across a wide swath (~ 900 km) at a resolution of 40 km. The radar operates at 1.2 GHz (VV, HH, and HV) and is capable of high-resolution mapping (less than 3 km) over 70 percent of the swath and low-resolution across the remainder. All terrestrial land regions are revisited within 2-3 days. The instrument uses a light-weight deployable mesh reflector antenna to make conical scans at a constant-incidence angle. The antenna scans at 6 rpm to generate the wide swath and mapping coverage. The algorithm design for producing 40 km and 10 km soil moisture and freeze/thaw data products and 3 km freeze/thaw and inundation extent products will be described. The strategy for estimating and correcting for wet biomass masking of the soil moisture and freeze/thaw signal by vegetation (with cover less than forest cover) will be presented. Finally we present a strategy for using data assimilation to use the synergy of measurements from other platforms, in situ data, and physical constraints on water and energy transports and balances to develop value-added data products that are continuous in time and provide estimates of soil water availability in the root

  14. High resolution crystal structures of triosephosphate isomerase complexed with its suicide inhibitors: The conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded active site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Rajaram; Alahuhta, Markus; Pihko, Petri M; Wierenga, Rik K

    2011-01-01

    The key residue of the active site of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is the catalytic glutamate, which is proposed to be important (i) as a catalytic base, for initiating the reaction, as well as (ii) for the subsequent proton shuttling steps. The structural properties of this glutamate in the liganded complex have been investigated by studying the high resolution crystal structures of typanosomal TIM, complexed with three suicide inhibitors: (S)-glycidol phosphate ((S)-GOP, at 0.99 Å resolution), (R)-glycidol phosphate, ((R)-GOP, at 1.08 Å resolution), and bromohydroxyacetone phosphate (BHAP, at 1.97 Å resolution). The structures show that in the (S)-GOP active site this catalytic glutamate is in the well characterized, competent conformation. However, an unusual side chain conformation is observed in the (R)-GOP and BHAP complexes. In addition, Glu97, salt bridged to the catalytic lysine in the competent active site, adopts an unusual side chain conformation in these two latter complexes. The higher chemical reactivity of (S)-GOP compared with (R)-GOP, as known from solution studies, can be understood: the structures indicate that in the case of (S)-GOP, Glu167 can attack the terminal carbon of the epoxide in a stereoelectronically favored, nearly linear O–C–O arrangement, but this is not possible for the (R)-GOP isomer. These structures confirm the previously proposed conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded state. The importance of this conformational flexibility for the proton shuttling steps in the TIM catalytic cycle, which is apparently achieved by a sliding motion of the side chain carboxylate group above the enediolate plane, is also discussed. PMID:21633986

  15. Active Strike-Slip Faulting in the Inner Continental Borderland, Southern California: Results From New High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Ryan, H. F.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The inner Continental Borderland offshore of southern California accommodates about 7 mm/yr of slip between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly half of this total has previously been thought to be taken up on the Palos Verdes (PV) and Coronado Bank (CB) fault zones, which have been modeled as a single, continuous fault zone in recent seismic hazard assessments for southern California. Although these faults lie roughly on strike with each other, a connection between these faults has not been clearly demonstrated. Newly acquired high-resolution seismic reflection data indicate that the PV fault terminates southwest of Lasuen Knoll in a horsetail splay that becomes progressively buried to the south. The lack of a connection between the PV and CB fault zones implies that a significant amount of slip must be taken up elsewhere in the inner Continental Borderland. Two other significant offshore faults, the San Diego Trough (SDT) and San Pedro Basin (SPB) fault zones, lie about 10-15 km southwest of and sub parallel to the trace of the PV and CB faults. The SDT fault zone extends from south of the Mexican border near Punta Santo Tomas for about 150 km northward to near Crespi Knoll. The SPB fault zone extends northward from off Santa Catalina Island to near Point Dume. The new seismic reflection data reveal a previously unmapped but apparently active fault zone along strike and in the area between the known strands of the SDT and the SPB fault zones. This newly recognized fault links the SDT and SPB faults, forming a continuous, active fault zone that extends about 250 km along the inner Continental Borderland. Although there are no slip rate data available for this fault zone, its overall length, continuity, and active character suggest that a significant portion of the plate motion that occurs offshore is accommodated along the SDT-SPB fault zone, which may pose a more significant seismic hazard than previously recognized.

  16. Definition and Paleoseismology of the Active, Left-Lateral Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault Zone Based on High-Resolution Chirp Profiles: Lakes Azuey and Mirogoane, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mann, P.; von Lignau, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, we obtained a total of 94 km of high-resolution Chirp profiles from the 129 km2, brackish Lake Azuey and 37 km of profiles from the 14 km2, fresh water Lake Mirogoane that both straddle the active trace of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) of Haiti. 80% of the grid on Azuey and 85% on Mirogoane was dedicated to north-south profiles of the EPGFZ. In Azuey we defined the linear and east-west-striking fault trace in deformed Holocene sediments along with its landfalls west of Lake Azuey in Haiti and east of Lake Azuey in the Dominican Republic. All profiles showed the fault to be a sub-vertical flower structure whose active traces could be traced on Chirp data to a depth of 30 m below the lake floor. Previous workers have suggested that this fault ruptured during a large November, 1751, earthquake with a parallel and elongate felt zone. We hypothesize the most recent break of the fault several meters below the lake floor to have formed during the 1751 event but plan a coring program to precisely constrain the timing of historical and prehistorical events based on syn-faulting colluvial wedges observed on Chirp profiles. Our survey of Mirogoane confirmed its rhomboidal pull-apart structure with the basin center at a depth of 42-8 m making this basin the deepest lake in the Caribbean region. Deformational features include active folds at the lake bottom, large oblique-slip normal faults at an angle to the bounding east-west faults, and 30 m of recognizable stratigraphy. The 7 m of Holocene cored in the basin center in 1988 is observed to be highly deformed and locally folded and overlies with angular unconformity a well stratified and more folded lower basinal unit. Historical events are proposed to have ruptured on or near this segment of the EPGFZ in 1701 and 1770.

  17. 10Be in ice at high resolution: Solar activity and climate signals observed and GCM-modeled in Law Dome ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Joel; Heikkilä, Ulla; van Ommen, T. D.; Smith, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Changes in solar activity modulate the galactic cosmic ray flux, and in turn, the production rate of 10Be in the earth's atmosphere. The best archives of past changes in 10Be production rate are the polar ice cores. Key challenges in interpreting these archives as proxies for past solar activity lie in separating the useful solar activity (or production) signal from the interfering meteorological (or climate) signal, and furthermore, in determining the atmospheric source regions of 10Be deposited to the ice core site. In this study we use a new monthly resolution composite 10Be record, which spans the past decade, and a general circulation model (ECHAM5-HAM), to constrain both the production and climate signals in 10Be concentrations at the Law Dome ice core site, East Antarctica. This study differs from most previous work on 10Be in Antarctica due to the very high sample resolution achieved. This high resolution, through a time period where accurate instrumental measurements of solar activity and climate are available, allows us to examine the response of 10Be concentrations in ice to short-term (monthly to annual) variations in solar activity, and to short-term variations in climate, including seasonality. We find a significant correlation (r2 = 0.56, P < 0.005, n = 92) between observed 10Be concentrations and solar activity (represented by the neutron counting rate). The most pervasive climate influence is a seasonal cycle, which shows maximum concentrations in mid-to-late-summer and minimum concentrations in winter. Model results show reasonable agreement with observations; both a solar activity signal and seasonal cycle in 10Be are captured. However, the modeled snow accumulation rate is too high by approximately 60%. According to the model, the main atmospheric source region of 10Be deposited to Law Dome is the 30-90°S stratosphere (~50%), followed by the 30-90°S troposphere (~30%). An enhancement in the fraction of 10Be arriving to Law Dome from the

  18. High-resolution inventory of technologies, activities, and emissions of coal-fired power plants in China from 1990 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, Q.; Tong, D.; Zheng, B.; Li, M.; Huo, H.; He, K. B.

    2015-07-01

    This paper, which focuses on emissions from China's coal-fired power plants during 1990-2010, is the second in a series of papers that aims to develop high-resolution emission inventory for China. This is the first time that emissions from China's coal-fired power plants were estimated at unit level for a 20 year period. This inventory is constructed from a unit-based database compiled in this study, named the China coal-fired Power plant Emissions Database (CPED), which includes detailed information on the technologies, activity data, operation situation, emission factors, and locations of individual units and supplements with aggregated data where unit-based information is not available. Between 1990 and 2010, compared to a 479 % growth in coal consumption, emissions from China's coal-fired power plants increased by 56, 335 and 442 % for SO2, NOx and CO2, respectively, and decreased by 23 % for PM2.5. Driven by the accelerated economy growth, large power plants were constructed throughout the country after 2000, resulting in dramatic growth in emissions. Growth trend of emissions has been effective curbed since 2005 due to strengthened emission control measures including the installation of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems and the optimization of the generation fleet mix by promoting large units and decommissioning small ones. Compared to previous emission inventories, CPED significantly improved the spatial resolution and temporal profile of power plant emission inventory in China by extensive use of underlying data at unit level. The new inventory developed in this study will enable a close examination for temporal and spatial variations of power plant emissions in China and will help to improve the performances of chemical transport models by providing more accurate emission data.

  19. High-resolution inventory of technologies, activities, and emissions of coal-fired power plants in China from 1990 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, Q.; Tong, D.; Zheng, B.; Li, M.; Huo, H.; He, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    This paper, which focuses on emissions from China's coal-fired power plants during 1990-2010, is the second in a series of papers that aims to develop a high-resolution emission inventory for China. This is the first time that emissions from China's coal-fired power plants were estimated at unit level for a 20-year period. This inventory is constructed from a unit-based database compiled in this study, named the China coal-fired Power plant Emissions Database (CPED), which includes detailed information on the technologies, activity data, operation situation, emission factors, and locations of individual units and supplements with aggregated data where unit-based information is not available. Between 1990 and 2010, compared to a 479 % growth in coal consumption, emissions from China's coal-fired power plants increased by 56, 335, and 442 % for SO2, NOx, and CO2, respectively, and decreased by 23 and 27 % for PM2.5 and PM10 respectively. Driven by the accelerated economic growth, large power plants were constructed throughout the country after 2000, resulting in a dramatic growth in emissions. The growth trend of emissions has been effectively curbed since 2005 due to strengthened emission control measures including the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems and the optimization of the generation fleet mix by promoting large units and decommissioning small ones. Compared to previous emission inventories, CPED significantly improved the spatial resolution and temporal profile of the power plant emission inventory in China by extensive use of underlying data at unit level. The new inventory developed in this study will enable a close examination of temporal and spatial variations of power plant emissions in China and will help to improve the performances of chemical transport models by providing more accurate emission data.

  20. 16 Years, 16 Cruises, 1.6 Billion Soundings: a Compilation of High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry of the Active Plate Boundary Along the Chilean Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrebe, W.; Flueh, E. R.; Hasert, M.; Behrmann, J. H.; Voelker, D.; Geersen, J.; Ranero, C. R.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Chile, a country stranding the active plate boundary between the South-American and the Nazca Plate is afflicted by recurrent earthquakes and hazardous volcanic eruptions. The strongest earthquake ever recorded occurred here, and volcanic hazards are frequent. Consequently, this area has been studied by geoscientists for many years to improve the understanding of subduction zone processes. Swath bathymetry mapping of the ocean floor has proven to bear a large potential for the interpretation of subduction-related processes, such as tectonic deformation of the marine forearc, release and migration of fluids as well as earthquake-triggered mass wasting. Multibeam bathymetry data of 16 major cruises of German, British, and Chilean research vessels recorded between 1995 and December 2010, in total more than 10,000 data files comprising about 1.6 billion soundings, have now been carefully reprocessed, compiled and merged into a unifying set of high-resolution bathymetric maps of the Chilean continental margin from latitude 40°S to 20°S. The imprint of subsurface processes on the surface morphology is well displayed in the case of the Chilean continental margin. The 3,500 km long Chilean convergent margin is not uniform, as various segments with different tectonic characteristics can be distinguished. Major factors that control margin morphology and thus the style of subduction are (1) relief and structure of the incoming oceanic plate, (2) supply of trench sediment, (3) turbidite transport within the trench, and (4) the input of terrigeneous sediments down the continental slope. A major segment boundary occurs at latitude 32°-33° S where the hotspot-related volcanic chain of Juan Fernandez is presently subducting. South of the area of ridge subduction the trench is filled with turbidites, and accretionary ridges develop across the base of the slope along most of the segment, whereas north of this boundary the turbiditic infill is reduced and subduction erosion is

  1. ANL high-resolution injector

    SciTech Connect

    Minehara, E.; Kutschera, W.; Hartog, P.D.; Billquist, P.; Liu, Z.

    1986-05-01

    The ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) high-resolution injector has been installed to obtain higher mass resolution and higher preacceleration, and to utilize effectively the full mass range of ATLAS (Argonne tandem linac accelerator system). Preliminary results of the first beam test are reported briefly. The design and performance, in particular a high-mass-resolution magnet with aberration compensation, are discussed.

  2. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  3. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  4. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  5. Active high-resolution seismic tomography of compressional wave velocity and attenuation structure at Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John R.; Zucca, John J.

    1988-12-01

    We determine compressional wave velocity and attenuation structures for the upper crust beneath Medicine Lake volcano in northeast California using a high-resolution active source seismic tomography method. Medicine Lake volcano is a basalt through rhyolite shield volcano of the Cascade Range, lying east of the range axis. The Pg wave from eight explosive sources which has traveled upward through the target volume to a dense array of 140 seismographs provides 1- to 2-km resolution in the upper 5 to 7 km of the crust beneath the volcano. The experiment tests the hypothesis that Cascade Range volcanoes of this type are underlain only by small silicic magma chambers. We image a low-velocity low-Q region not larger than a few tens of cubic kilometers in volume beneath the summit caldera, supporting the hypothesis. A shallower high-velocity high-density feature, previously known to be present, is imaged for the first time in full plan view; it is east-west elongate, paralleling a topographic lineament between Medicine Lake volcano and Mount Shasta. This lineament is interpreted to be the result of an old crustal weakness now affecting the emplacement of magma, both on direct ascent from the lower crust and mantle and in migration from the shallow silicic chamber to summit vents. Differences between this high-velocity feature and the equivalent feature at Newbeny volcano, a volcano in central Oregon resembling Medicine Lake volcano, may partly explain the scarcity of surface hydrothermal features at Medicine Lake volcano. A major low-velocity low-Q feature beneath the southeast flank of the volcano, in an area with no Holocene vents, is interpreted as tephra, flows, and sediments from the volcano deeply ponded on the downthrown side of the Gillem fault, a normal fault mapped at the surface north of the volcano. A high-Q normal-velocity feature beneath the north rim of the summit caldera may be a small, possibly hot, subsolidus intrusion. A high-velocity low-Q region

  6. High-resolution geophysical data collected offshore of Fire Island, New York in 2011, U.S. Geological Survey Field Activity 2011-005-FA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Jane F.; Schwab, William C.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Moore, Eric; Bergeron, Emile M.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped approximately 336 square kilometers of the lower shoreface and inner-continental shelf offshore of Fire Island, New York in 2011 using interferometric sonar and high-resolution chirp seismic-reflection systems. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of the Fire Island coastal system and provide baseline information for research on coastal processes along southern Long Island.

  7. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Herring, Mark; Norris, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), related data system, orbit, and mission operations are described. The pushbroom instrument simultaneously images the terrestrial surface in 192 spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The swath width is 30 km and spatial resolution is 30 m. It is planned to be launched with the Earth Observing System aboard the Space Station Polar Platform in 1995. Array detectors allow concurrent integration of the signals at 192,000 detector elements.

  8. High Resolution Geophysical Survey of Western Long Island Sound Offshore New York: A Seafloor Morphology Shaped by Glacial Features, Tidal Currents, and Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W. I.; Cormier, M.; McHugh, C. M.

    2007-05-01

    Western Long Island Sound, near metropolitan New York, averages 16m in water depth, with elongated depressions up to 40m deep occurring around its axis. These depressions are currently interpreted as ancient drainage channels that were cut into lake deposits some 15,500 years ago, when glacial Lake Connecticut occupied the Long Island Sound estuary and completely drained away. In June 2006, as part of a geoscience educational project, we surveyed a 17km2 area of Long island Sound just off Stamford, CT, with the R/V HUGH SHARP, using its high resolution multibeam bathymetric sonar and a chirp seismic profiler that imaged the Holocene sedimentary strata. Preliminary analysis details fields of sand waves, scour marks, outcropping moraines, pipelines and other human artifacts. Together, this data suggest that the eastward deepening trough within the study area exposes a glacial-sculpted surface, and that tidal currents produce long E-W drift in the shadow of a shallow outcrops (possibly, some moraine block). This interpretation is consistent with that proposed by Poppe et al. [Geo-Marine Letters, 26, 59-68,2006] for Eastern Long Island Sound based on a similar high resolution survey, and may characterize most of Long Island Sound. Grain size analysis for 9 gravity cores collected within the survey area will test the energy of the current regime, and confirm (or not) this interpretation.

  9. DARPA high resolution display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusarczuk, Marko

    1990-11-01

    Much of the information of interest to pilots in flight is display-limited, and is undergoing substantial expansion due to improved sensor output and signal processing; attention is accordingly given to digitally-based instrument display imaging in the present evaluation of high-resolution cockpit display technologies. Also noted are the advantages of digitally transmitted sensor data in cases where the airborne reconnaissance user may be able to analyze telemetered airborne data in real time and respond with requests to the pilot for more detailed information of specific battlefield sites.

  10. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  11. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  12. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  13. High-resolution seismic stratigraphy of the late Neogene of the central sector of the Colombian Pacific continental shelf: A seismic expression of an active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Jaime Orlando; López Ramos, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    The sedimentary prism of the central Pacific continental shelf of Colombia was affected by regional folding and faulting, and probably later mud diapirism, from the Late Miocene to the Holocene. Interpretation of high-resolution seismic lines (2 s/dt) revealed that the prism consists of 13 high-resolution seismic units, that can be separated into 5 seismic groups. Deposition of the prism and the associated stacking pattern, are probably the response to variable uplift and subsidence in a fore-arc basin that underwent important tectonic events by the end of the Miocene. Throughout the Pliocene, the continental shelf sedimentation was affected by the growing of a dome structure probable due to mud diapirism. This fact caused peripheral faults both normal and reverse that controlled the distribution of some of the seismic units. During the Late Pleistocene (Wisconsin stage?) a eustatic sea level fall caused the shoreline to advance about 50 km westward of its present position. Because of this eustatic sea level change, a strong fluvial dissection took place and is interpreted as the probable extension of the San Juan River to the south of the present day river mouth. Within this framework it is believed that the Malaga and Buenaventura Bays were the passageways of branches of the old drainage system of the San Juan River. The inner branch circulated through the present Buenaventura Bay and runs southward leaving the mark of an apparent valley identified in the seismic information in the eastern sector of the study area. This old fluvial valley and its filling material located in the present day inner continental shelf front of Buenaventura are postulated as important targets to find placer minerals such as gold and platinum.

  14. Tracking and evolution of irrigation triggered active landslides by multi-source high resolution DEM: The Jiaojiacun landslide group of Heifangtai (Northwest of China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Runqiang; Meng, Xingmin; Wang, Siyuan; Chen, Guan; Lee, Yajun; Zhang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    The construction of three large hydropower stations, i.e. Liujia, Yanguo and Bapan, resulted in the immigration of the impacted people to Heifangtai from 1960s. To support the living and farming of the immigrated people, a large amount of water has been pumped from the Yellow River to Heifangtai, which has changed the former underground water budget and led to 111 landslides from 1968 in this area. To reveal the deformation process of landslides in Heifangtai, a quantitative deformation analysis model of landslide based on multi-source DEM data is established using four periods of topographic maps obtained in 1970, 2001, 2010 and 2013 respectively, including two 1:10000 topographic maps and two 1:1000 data acquired from 3D Laser Scanner. The whole study area was divided into two sections based on the two distinct kinds of landslide patterns. The selected morphometric parameters, residual topographic surface and surface roughness, extracted from three typical landslides, and the statistical analysis (Box-plot diagrams) of the temporal variations of these parameters, allowed the reconstruction and tracking of these landslides. We monitored the changing of landslide boundaries, average vertical and horizontal displacement rates and zones of uplift and subsidence. The volumes of removed and/or accumulated material were estimated as well. We can then demonstrate the kinematics of landslides based on information from high-resolution DEM, and the changing table of underground water, ring-shear test and soil-water characteristic curve referenced from other researchers. The results provide a new insight on the use of multi-source high resolution DEM in the monitoring of irrigation-triggered landslides.

  15. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  16. High Resolution Thermography In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. P.; Goff, M. R.; Culley, J. E.

    1988-10-01

    A high resolution medical thermal imaging system using an 8 element SPRI1E detector is described. Image processing is by an Intellect 100 processor and is controlled by a DEC LSI 11/23 minicomputer. Image storage is with a 170 Mbyte winchester disc together with archival storage on 12 inch diameter optical discs having a capacity of 1 Gbyte per side. The system is currently being evaluated for use in physiology and medicine. Applications outlined include the potential of thermographic screening to identify genetic carriers in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XED), detailed vas-cular perfusion studies in health and disease and the relation-ship between cutaneous blood flow, neurological peripheral function and skin surface temperature.

  17. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  18. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  19. High resolution spectrograph. [for LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, K.

    1975-01-01

    The high resolution spectrograph (HRS) is designed to be used with the Large Space Telescope (LST) for the study of spectra of point and extended targets in the spectral range 110 to 410 nm. It has spectral resolutions of 1,000; 30,000; and 100,000 and has a field of view as large as 10 arc sec. The spectral range and resolution are selectable using interchangeable optical components and an echelle spectrograph is used to display a cross dispersed spectrum on the photocathode of either of 2 SEC orthicon image tubes. Provisions are included for wavelength calibration, target identification and acquisition and thermal control. The system considerations of the instrument are described.

  20. High-resolution imaging ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Qiwen; Leger, James R

    2002-08-01

    We report on a novel imaging ellipsometer using a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective lens capable of measuring a two-dimensional ellipsometric signal with high resolution. Two-dimensional ellipsometric imaging is made possible by spatial filtering at the pupil plane of the objective. A Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction model and geometrical optics model are developed to simulate the system. The thickness profile of patterned polymethyl methacrylate is measured for calibration purposes. Our instrument has a sensitivity of 5 A and provides spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 microm with 632.8-nm illumination. Its capability of measuring refractive-index variations with high spatial resolution is also demonstrated.

  1. A high resolution TDC subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Geiges, R.; Merle, K. )

    1994-02-01

    A high resolution TDC subsystem was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz. The TDC chip offers a time resolution of less than 300 ps and a programmable measurement range from 0 to 16 [mu]sec. The time measurement is done with a new, purely digital counting method. The chip can be operated in common start or common stop mode. In common start mode the chip is able to store up to 4 multiple hits per channel. The chip is used to build a transputer controlled subsystem for the measurement of the drift times of a vertical drift chamber. The design of the subsystem will be described and the first results from the tests of the prototype system will be presented.

  2. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  3. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  4. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  5. Mars high-resolution mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, R. M.; Thomas, P. K.

    1991-06-01

    A series of photomosaics of high-resolution Viking Orbiter images of Mars is being prepared and published to support the Mars 1:500,000 scale geologic mapping program. More than 100 of these photomosaics were made manually, but for the last several years they have all been made digitally. The digital mosaics are published on the Mars Transverse Mercator (MTM) system, and they are also available to the appropriate principal investigators as digital files in the mosaicked digital image model (MDIM) format. The mosaics contain Viking Orbiter images with the highest available resolution: in some areas as high as 10 m/pixel. This resolution, where it exists, will support a 1:100,000 map scale. The full resolution of a mosaic is preserved in a digital file, but conventional lithographic publication of such large-scale inset maps will be done only if required by the geologic map author. When high-resolution images do not fill the neat lines of an MTM quadrangle, the medium-resolution (1/256 degrees/pixel, or 231 m/pixel) MDIM is used. The mosaics are tied by image-matching to the planetwide MDIM, in which random errors as large as 5 km (10 mm at 1:500,000 scale) are common; a few much larger, worst-case errors also occur. Because of the distribution of the errors, many large discrepancies appear along the cutlines between frames with very different resolutions. Furthermore, each block of quadrangles is compiled on its own local control system, and adjacent blocks, compiled later, are unlikely to match. Selection of areas to be mapped is based on geologic mapping proposals reviewed and recommended by the Mars 1:500,000 scale geologic mapping review panel. There is no intention to map the entire planet at this scale.

  6. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  7. High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express - a decade of PR/EO activities at Freie Universität Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, Heike; Dumke, Alexander; van Gasselt, Stephan; Gross, Christoph; Michael, Gregory; Musiol, Stefanie; Neu, Dominik; Platz, Thomas; Rosenberg, Heike; Schreiner, Björn; Walter, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003 the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) experiment on the Mars Express mission is in orbit around Mars. First images were sent to Earth on January 14th, 2004. The goal-oriented HRSC data dissemination and the transparent representation of the associated work and results are the main aspects that contributed to the success in the public perception of the experiment. The Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing Group at Freie Universität Berlin (FUB) offers both, an interactive web based data access, and browse/download options for HRSC press products [www.fu-berlin.de/planets]. Close collaborations with exhibitors as well as print and digital media representatives allows for regular and directed dissemination of, e.g., conventional imagery, orbital/synthetic surface epipolar images, video footage, and high-resolution displays. On a monthly basis we prepare press releases in close collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) [http://www.geo.fu-berlin.de/en/geol/fachrichtungen/planet/press/index.html]. A release comprises panchromatic, colour, anaglyph, and perspective views of a scene taken from an HRSC image of the Martian surface. In addition, a context map and descriptive texts in English and German are provided. More sophisticated press releases include elaborate animations and simulated flights over the Martian surface, perspective views of stereo data combined with colour and high resolution, mosaics, and perspective views of data mosaics. Altogether 970 high quality PR products and 15 movies were created at FUB during the last decade and published via FUB/DLR/ESA platforms. We support educational outreach events, as well as permanent and special exhibitions. Examples for that are the yearly "Science Fair", where special programs for kids are offered, and the exhibition "Mars Mission and Vision" which is on tour until 2015 through 20 German towns, showing 3-D movies, surface models, and images of the HRSC

  8. High-resolution magnetic signature of active hydrothermal systems in the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Honsho, Chie; Dyment, Jerome; Szitkar, Florent; Mochizuki, Nobutatsu; Asada, Miho

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on five hydrothermal vent fields of the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough using Shinkai 6500, a deep-sea manned submersible. A new 3-D forward scheme was applied that exploits the surrounding bathymetry and varying altitudes of the submersible to estimate absolute crustal magnetization. The results revealed that magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetizations show a reasonable correlation with natural remanent magnetizations of rock samples collected from the seafloor of the same region. The distribution of magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetization suggests that all five andesite-hosted hydrothermal fields are associated with a lack of magnetization, as is generally observed at basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites. Furthermore, both the Pika and Urashima sites were found to have their own distinct low-magnetization zones, which could not be distinguished in magnetic anomaly data collected at higher altitudes by autonomous underwater vehicle due to their limited extension. The spatial extent of the resulting low magnetization is approximately 10 times wider at off-axis sites than at on-axis sites, possibly reflecting larger accumulations of nonmagnetic sulfides, stockwork zones, and/or alteration zones at the off-axis sites.

  9. Tomographic inversion of active thermal tracer experiments to characterize aquifer heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The tomographical approach has been established as an efficient and robust way to characterize spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic aquifer properties. It has been successfully applied on pressure signals and solute tracers, but only little experience is available using heat tracer signals in a tomographic setup. The advantage of using a heat tracer is that temperature can be easily monitored with good temporal and spatial resolution and it provides information directly about the heat transport in the subsurface. In this study, we consider active injection of warm water into a shallow groundwater well. The concept is tested on a virtual aquifer implemented in a numerical model. The thermal evolution in the system after repeated injection at different depth levels is monitored though a tomographical observation setup. This delivers thermal tracer travel times for each combination of injection (source) and observation points (receivers). The combined inversion of all source-receiver travel times is formulated and efficiently solved as an eikonal problem. The result of the eikonal inversion is a cross section through the aquifer of mean tracer velocity and of inverted flow paths. By assuming that the heat transport is dominated by advection, a hydraulic diffusivity map can be calculated from the velocity map, similar to solute tracer tomography, introducing one new variable, which is known as the thermal retardation factor. This assumption is crucial for the inversion procedure, and it also reflects that our main interest is in the detection of preferential flow paths, where thermal diffusion plays only a minor role. For this purpose, early time diagnostics are used instead of, for example, the mean breakthrough time at the receivers. To characterize the reliability of the results, the null-space energy map is calculated based on the inverted advection flow paths. First results of the heat tracer inversion approach are comparable to those from other hydrogeological

  10. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  11. High resolution time interval counter

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  12. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  13. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  14. Innovative radar products for the 3D, high-resolution and real-time monitoring of the convective activity in the airspace around airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, P.; Bousquet, O.; Sénési, S.; Josse, P.

    2009-09-01

    Airports are recognized to become critical areas in the future given the expected doubling in air traffic by 2020. The increased density of aircrafts in the airport airspaces calls for improved systems and products to monitor in real-time potential hazards and thus meet the airport objectives in terms of safety and throughput. Among all meteorological hazards, convection is certainly the most impacting one. We describe here some innovative radar products that have recently been developed and tested at Météo France around the Paris airports. Those products rely on the French Doppler radar network consisting today of 24 elements with some of them being polarimetric. Reflectivity and Doppler volumetric data are concentrated from all 24 radar sites in real-time at the central level (Toulouse) where 3D Cartesian mosaics covering the entire French territory (i.e. a typical 1,000 by 1,000 km² area) are elaborated. The innovation with respect to what has been done previously is that the three components of the wind are retrieved by operational combination of the radial velocities. The final product, available in real-time every 15 minutes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 km horizontally and 500 m vertically, is a 3D grid giving the interpolated reflectivity and wind field (u, v and w) values. The 2.5 km resolution, arising from the fact that the retrieval is carried out every 15 minutes from radars typically spaced apart by 150 km, is not sufficient for airport airspace monitoring but is valuable for en-route monitoring. Its extension to the entire European space is foreseen. To address the specific needs in the airport areas, a downscaling technique has been proposed to merge the above-mentioned low-resolution 3D wind and reflectivity fields with the high resolution (5 minutes and 1 km²) 2D imagery of the Trappes radar that is the one that covers the Paris airports. The merging approach is based on the assumption that the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity (i.e. the

  15. The high resolution topographic evolution of an active retrogressive thaw slump compiled from a decade of photography, ground surveys, laser scans and satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, B. T.; Barnhart, T. B.; Rowland, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing imagery has enables the temporal reconstruction of thermal erosion features including lakes, shorelines and hillslope failures in remote Arctic locations, yet these planar data limit analysis to lines and areas. This study explores the application of varying techniques to reconstruct the three dimensional evolution of a single thermal erosion feature using a mixture of opportunistic oblique photos, ground surveys and satellite imagery. At the Selawik River retrogressive thaw slump in northwest Alaska, a bush plane collected oblique aerial photos when the feature was first discovered in 2004 and in subsequent years. These images were recently processed via Structure from Motion to generate georeferenced point clouds for the years prior to the initiation of our research. High resolution ground surveys in 2007, 2009 and 2010 were completed using robotic total station. Terrestrial laser scans (TLS) were collected in the summers of 2011 and 2012. Analysis of stereo satellite imagery from 2012 and 2015 enable continued monitoring of the feature after ground campaigns ended. As accurate coregistraion between point clouds is vital to topographic change detection, all prior and subsequent datasets were georeferenced to stable features observed in the 2012 TLS scan. Though this coregistration introduces uncertainty into each image, the magnitudes of uncertainty are significantly smaller than the topographic changes detected. Upslope retreat of the slump headwall generally decreases over time as the slump floor progresses from a highly dissected gully topography to a low relief, earthflow dominated depositional plane. The decreasing slope of the slump floor diminishes transport capacity, resulting in the progressive burial of the slump headwall, thus decreasing headwall retreat rates. This self-regulation of slump size based on feature relief and transport capacity suggests a capacity to predict the maximum size a given feature can expand to before

  16. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  17. High-resolution slug testing.

    PubMed

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  18. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems. PMID:27288672

  19. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  20. Online coupling of high-resolution chromatography with extreme UV photon activation tandem mass spectrometry: Application to the structural investigation of complex glycans by dissociative photoionization.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Giuliani, Alexandre; Fanuel, Mathieu; Hervé, Cécile; Czjzek, Mirjam; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-08-24

    The activation of ions by extreme-energy photons (XUV) produced by a synchrotron radiation beamline is a powerful method for characterizing complex glycans using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). As previously described, this activation method leads to rich fragmentation spectra with many structurally valuable cross-ring cleavages while maintaining labile modifications on the glycan structures. However, until now, the tandem MS event was too long to be compatible with liquid chromatography elution times. In this work, the duty cycle of the activation and detection of fragments was shortened, and the background signal on the spectra was drastically reduced. Both improvements allowed, for the first time, the successful coupling of a UHPLC system to XUV-activated tandem MS. The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of oligo-porphyrans, which are a class of highly sulfated oligosaccharides, in a fully automated way. Due to an enhanced dynamic range and an increased sensitivity, some hypothetical structures of low abundance have been unequivocally confirmed in this study and others have been revised. Some previously undescribed species of oligo-porphyrans that exhibit lateral branching have been fully resolved. This work contributes to the scarce knowledge of the structure of porphyrans in red algae and pushes the current capacities of XUV-activation tandem MS by demonstrating the possibility of a direct coupling with UHPLC. This study will considerably broaden the applicability and practicality of this method in many fields of analytical biology. PMID:27496992

  1. Active Faulting, Earthquakes and Geomorphological Changes from Archaeoseismic Data and High-Resolution Topography: Effects on the Urban Evolution of the Roman Town of Sybaris, Ionian Sea (Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, L.; Brunori, C. A.; Cinti, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Sybaris town was founded by the Greeks in 720 B.C and its life went on up to the late Roman time (VI-VII century A.D.). The town was located within the Sibari Plain near the Crati River mouth (Ionian northern Calabria, southern Italy). Sybaris occurs in area repeatedly affected by natural damaging phenomena, as frequent flooding, high local subsidence, marine storms, and earthquakes. The 2700 year long record of history of Sybaris stores the traces of these natural events and their influence on the human ancient environment through time. Among the natural disasters, we recognize two Roman age earthquakes striking the town. We isolate the damaging of these seismic events, set their time of occurrence, and map a shear zone crossing the site. These results were obtained through i) survey of coseismic features on the ruins, ii) geoarchaeological stratigraphy analysis, and TL and C14 dating, iii) analysis of high-resolution topographic data (1m pixel LiDAR DEM). The Sybaris town showed a persistent resilience to the earthquakes, and following their occurrences the site was not abandoned but underwent remodeling of the urban topography. The interaction of the different approaches reveals the presence of a previously unknown fault crossing the archeological site, the Sybaris fault. The high-resolution topography allows the characterization of subtle geomorphological features and hydrological anomalies, tracing the fault extension, whose Holocene activity is controlling the local morphology and the present Crati river course.

  2. High resolution magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ in RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, S.

    2007-05-22

    For a new spectroscopy of nuclei using intense RI beams at RIBF, we started the SHARAQ project where a high-resolution SHARAQ spectrometer is being constructed together with a high-resolution secondary beam line. Physics motivation and the specification of the spectrometer are presented.

  3. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  4. High Resolution PDF Measurements on Ag Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Tulio C. R.; Martin, Chris; Kycia, Stefan; Zanchet, Daniela

    2009-01-29

    The quantitative analysis of structural defects in Ag nanoparticles was addressed in this work. We performed atomic scale structural characterization by a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Pair Distribution Function analysis (PDF) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The XRD measurements were performed using an innovative instrumentation setup to provide high resolution PDF patterns.

  5. Environmental monitoring of El Hierro Island submarine volcano, by combining low and high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio, F.; Martin, J.; Marcello, J.; Fraile-Nuez, E.

    2014-06-01

    El Hierro Island, located at the Canary Islands Archipelago in the Atlantic coast of North Africa, has been rocked by thousands of tremors and earthquakes since July 2011. Finally, an underwater volcanic eruption started 300 m below sea level on October 10, 2011. Since then, regular multidisciplinary monitoring has been carried out in order to quantify the environmental impacts caused by the submarine eruption. Thanks to this natural tracer release, multisensorial satellite imagery obtained from MODIS and MERIS sensors have been processed to monitor the volcano activity and to provide information on the concentration of biological, chemical and physical marine parameters. Specifically, low resolution satellite estimations of optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration under these abnormal conditions have been assessed. These remote sensing data have played a fundamental role during field campaigns guiding the oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. In addition, to analyze El Hierro submarine volcano area, WorldView-2 high resolution satellite spectral bands were atmospherically and deglinted processed prior to obtain a high-resolution optimal diffuse attenuation coefficient model. This novel algorithm was developed using a matchup data set with MERIS and MODIS data, in situ transmittances measurements and a seawater radiative transfer model. Multisensor and multitemporal imagery processed from satellite remote sensing sensors have demonstrated to be a powerful tool for monitoring the submarine volcanic activities, such as discolored seawater, floating material and volcanic plume, having shown the capabilities to improve the understanding of submarine volcanic processes.

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2006-01-01

    The major research activities performed during the cooperative agreement enhanced our spectroscopic knowledge of molecules of atmospheric interest such as H2O (water vapor), O3 (ozone), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), CH4 (methane), NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) and CO (carbon monoxide). The data required for the analyses were obtained from two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS); one of which is located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak, Arizona and the other instrument is located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. The data were analyzed using a modified multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner of the College of William and Mary. The results from these studies made significant improvements in the line positons and intensities for these molecules. The measurements of pressure broadening and pressure induced line shift coefficients and the temperature dependence of pressure broadening and pressure induced shift coefficients for hundreds of infrared transitions of HCN, CO3 CH4 and H2O were also performed during this period. Results from these studies have been used for retrievals of stratospheric gas concentration profiles from data collected by several Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) infrared instruments as well as in the analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra such as those acquired by space-based, ground-based, and various balloon- and aircraft-borne experiments. Our results made significant contributions in several updates of the HITRAN (HIgh resolution TRANsmission) spectral line parameters database. This database enjoys worldwide recognition in research involving diversified scientific fields. The research conducted during the period 2003-2006 has resulted in publications given in this paper. In addition to Journal publications, several oral and poster presentations were given at various Scientific conferences within the United States

  7. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Patel, Ankit H; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X

    2010-05-24

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 microm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within approximately 0.5 deg (approximately 100-150 microm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes.

  8. Ecological applications of high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, William T.

    1989-01-01

    Future directions of NASA's space program plans include a significant effort at studying the Earth as a system of interrelated ecosystems. As part of NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos) Program a series of space platforms will be launched and operated to study the Earth with a variety of active and passive instruments. Several of the Eos instruments will be capable of imaging the planet's surface reflectance on a large number of very narrow portions of the solar spectrum. After the development of appropriate algorithms, this reflectance information will be used to determine key parameters about the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the pattern and processes of those systems across large areas of the globe. Algorithm development applicable to terrestrial systems will permit the inference of ecological processes from high resolution spectrometry data, similar to that to be forthcoming from the Eos mission. The first summer was spent working with tropical soils and relating their reflectance characteristics to particle size, iron content, and color. This summer the emphasis is on vegetation and work was begun with the Forest Ecosystems Dynamics Project in the Earth Resources Branch where both optical and radar characteristics of a mixed conifer/hardwood forest in Maine are being studied for use in a ecological modeling effort. A major series of aircraft overflights will take place throughout the summer. Laboratory and field spectrometers are used to measure the spectral reflectance of a hierarchy of vegetation from individual leaves to whole canopies for eventual modeling of their nutrient content using reflectance data. Key leaf/canopy parameters are being approximated including chlorophyll, nitrogen, phosphorus, water content, and leaf specific weight using high resolution spectrometry alone. Measurements are made of carbon exchange across the landscape for input to a spatial modeling effort to gauge production within the forest. A

  9. High-resolution relocation of aftershocks of the Mw 7.1 Darfield, New Zealand, earthquake and implications for fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.; Rawles, C. J.; Savage, M. K.; Bannister, S.

    2013-08-01

    Low-slip-rate regions often represent under-recognized hazards, and understanding the progression of seismicity when faults in such areas rupture will help us to better understand earthquake rupture patterns. The 3 September 2010 (UTC) Mw 7.1 Darfield earthquake revealed a formerly unrecognized set of faults in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, an area that had previously been mapped as one of the lower-hazard areas in the country. In this study, we analyze the first four months of its aftershock sequence to identify active faults and temporal changes in seismicity along them. We jointly invert for three-dimensional P wave and S wave velocities and hypocentral locations, using data for 2840 aftershocks recorded at 36 temporary and permanent seismic stations within 70 km of the main shock epicenter. These relocations delineate eight individual faults active prior to the 22 February 2011 Mw 6.3 Christchurch earthquake, the largest aftershock of the Darfield earthquake. Two of these faults are in the Christchurch region, one of which corresponds to geodetically determined rupture planes of the Christchurch earthquake. Using focal mechanisms calculated from first-motion polarities, we find mainly strike-slip faulting events, with some reverse and normal faulting events as well. We compare the orientations of these faults to the prevailing regional stress directions to identify which faults may have been active prior to the Darfield earthquake and which may be newly developed.

  10. High-resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence characterization of heterogeneous calcium and heavy metal distributions in alkali-activated fly ash.

    PubMed

    Provis, John L; Rose, Volker; Bernal, Susan A; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2009-10-01

    The nanoscale distribution of elements within fly ash and the aluminosilicate gel products of its alkaline activation ("fly ash geopolymers") are analyzed by means of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence using a hard X-ray Nanoprobe instrument. The distribution of calcium within a hydroxide-activated (fly ash/KOH solution) geopolymer gel is seen to be highly heterogeneous, with these data providing for the first time direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium particles within the binder structure of a geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium (<2 wt % as oxides) fly ash. The silicate-activated (fly ash/potassium silicate solution) sample, by contrast, shows a much more homogeneous geopolymer gel binder structure surrounding the unreacted fly ash particles. This has important implications for the understanding of calcium chemistry within aluminosilicate geopolymer gel phases. Additionally, chromium and iron are seen to be very closely correlated within the structures of both fly ash and the geopolymer product and remain within the regions of the geopolymer which can be identified as unreacted fly ash particles. Given that the potential for chromium release has been one of the queries surrounding the widespread utilization of construction materials derived from fly ash, the observation that this element appears to be localized within the fly ash rather than dispersed throughout the gel binder indicates that it is unlikely to be released problematically into the environment.

  11. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  12. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Isaac, E.; Fodor, É.; Visco, P.; van Wijland, F.; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  13. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel.

    PubMed

    Ben-Isaac, E; Fodor, É; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, Nir S

    2015-07-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels both in artificial (in vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells has been extensively studied with experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct nonthermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures," and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies. PMID:26274211

  14. The Impact of Canonical and Non-canonical El Niño on Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity: High-resolution Tropical Channel Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) variability during the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity by modulating vertical wind shear and tropospheric temperature in the tropical Atlantic, with warmer than average SST during El Niño suppressing Atlantic tropical cyclones. The location of maximum SST warming during El Niño varies from the East Pacific (canonical) to Central Pacific (non-canonical/Modoki). This study investigates how the location and magnitude of maximum tropical Pacific warming impacts Atlantic tropical cyclones, and through what mechanisms. Climate simulations are performed to supplement observationally based studies, which yield conflicting results and rely on a relatively short data record that is complicated by factors other than ENSO, such as Atlantic SST variability. The simulations are run with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model configured as a tropical channel model at a relatively fine horizontal resolution of 27 km compared to the current generation of global climate models that typically use a 50 - 100 km grid. Monthly climatological SST is prescribed in the control simulation, and mechanistic experiments are forced by tropical Pacific SST patterns characteristic of Central Pacific and East Pacific El Niño. Seasonal accumulated cyclone energy is used to evaluate the response in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity to Central and East Pacific El Niño, and the response in atmospheric conditions relevant for tropical cyclones is diagnosed using a genesis potential index.

  15. Inversion of submesoscale patterns from a high-resolution Solomon Sea model: Feasibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaultier, Lucile; Djath, Bughsin'; Verron, Jacques; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Brasseur, Pierre; Melet, Angelique

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution realistic numerical model of the Solomon Sea, which exhibits a high level of variability at mesoscales and submesoscales, is used to explore new avenues for data assimilation. Image data assimilation represents a powerful methodology to integrate information from high-resolution observations such as satellite sea surface temperature or chlorophyll, or high-resolution altimetric sea surface height that will be observed in the forthcoming SWOT mission. The present study investigates the feasibility and accuracy of the inversion of the dynamical submesoscale information contained in high-resolution images of sea surface temperature (SST) or salinity (SSS) to improve the estimation of oceanic surface currents. The inversion method is tested in the context of twin experiments, with SST and SSS data provided by a model of the Solomon Sea. For that purpose, synthetic tracer images are built by binarizing the norm of the gradient of SST, SSS or spiciness. The binarized tracer images are compared to the dynamical image which is derived from the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents. The adjustment of the dynamical image to the tracer image provides the optimal correction to be applied on the surface velocity field. The method is evaluated by comparing the result of the inversion to the reference model solution. The feasibility of the inversion of various images (SST, SSS, both SST and SSS or spiciness) is explored on two small areas of the Solomon Sea. We show that errors in the surface velocity field can be substantially reduced through the inversion of tracer images.

  16. Sediments of Lake Van - a high-resolution archive of changing climate, volcanic events and seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia for the last 500'000 yrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Sturm, M.; Paleovan Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    Varved sedimentary records have shown their high potential to reconstruct abrupt and global climate change within the marine realm (e.g. Cariaco Basin, Santa Barbara Basin). Continental counterparts, consisting of long and varved lacustrine records can be found in the subsurface of some deep lakes, such as Lake Van. Lake Van is a 440 m deep closed soda lake situated in a climatically sensitive semiarid and tectonically active region in Eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The ICDP project Paleovan aims to reconstruct the climatic, tectonic and volcanic history of Lake Van. Driven by an international and interdisciplinary scientific team, two sites, Ahlat Ridge (AR) and Northern Basin (NB) were drilled in summer 2010 recovering sedimentary records of 220 and 140 m, respectively. A total of 800 m of sediment-cores were opened, described and photographed in spring 2011 at the IODP core repository in Bremen. Lithologies of up to five parallel cores (multiple coring) were correlated and a composite profile was defined giving priority to core quality and continuity. Preliminary Ar/Ar dates of the core catcher yielded a basal ages of ~500´000 years. Using this rough age model, geochemical measurements (every 20 cm) indicate that TOC is high in warmer periods (interglacials) and low in colder periods (glacials). These TOC fluctuations match marine isotope stages and extrapolated Holocene sedimentation rates. The 219 m long AR composite profile consists of ~80 % lacustrine sediments, ~10 % of volcaniclastic deposits and 10 % gaps interpreted to be coarse-grained volcaniclastic that are difficult to be recovered. The lacustrine mud, i.e., clayey silt composed of mainly clay minerals and carbonate. Based on major macroscopic sediment features eight major lacustrine sediment types (~900 layer) were differentiated and separated from the volcaniclastic deposits (300 layer). Impressive color transitions and a repetitive pattern of similar lithological successions occur throughout the

  17. History of human activity in last 800 years reconstructed from combined archive data and high-resolution analyses of varved lake sediments from Lake Czechowskie, Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowiński, Michał; Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Ott, Florian; Obremska, Milena; Kaczmarek, Halina; Theuerkauf, Martin; Wulf, Sabine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to reconstruct human and landscape development in the Tuchola Pinewoods (Northern Poland) during the last 800 years. We apply an approach that combines historic maps and documents with pollen data. Pollen data were obtained from varved lake sediments at a resolution of 5 years. The chronology of the sediment record is based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating, 137Cs activity concentration measurements and tephrochronology (Askja AD 1875). We applied the REVEALS model to translate pollen percentage data into regional plant abundances. The interpretation of the pollen record is furthermore based on pollen accumulation rate data. The pollen record and historic documents show similar trends in vegetation development. During the first phase (AD 1200-1412), the Lake Czechowskie area was still largely forested with Quercus, Carpinus and Pinus forests. Vegetation was more open during the second phase (AD 1412-1776), and reached maximum openness during the third phase (AD 1776-1905). Furthermore, intensified forest management led to a transformation from mixed to pine dominated forests during this period. Since the early 20th century, the forest cover increased again with dominance of the Scots pine in the stand. While pollen and historic data show similar trends, they differ substantially in the degree of openness during the four phases with pollen data commonly suggesting more open conditions. We discuss potential causes for this discrepancy, which include unsuitable parameters settings in REVEALS and unknown changes in forest structure. Using pollen accumulation data as a third proxy record we aim to identify the most probable causes. Finally, we discuss the observed vegetation change in relation the socio-economic development of the area. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis - ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association and National Science Centre, Poland (grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10

  18. Travel-time-based thermal tracer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    Active thermal tracer testing is a technique to get information about the flow and transport properties of an aquifer. In this paper we propose an innovative methodology using active thermal tracers in a tomographic setup to reconstruct cross-well hydraulic conductivity profiles. This is facilitated by assuming that the propagation of the injected thermal tracer is mainly controlled by advection. To reduce the effects of density and viscosity changes and thermal diffusion, early-time diagnostics are used and specific travel times of the tracer breakthrough curves are extracted. These travel times are inverted with an eikonal solver using the staggered grid method to reduce constraints from the pre-defined grid geometry and to improve the resolution. Finally, non-reliable pixels are removed from the derived hydraulic conductivity tomograms. The method is applied to successfully reconstruct cross-well profiles as well as a 3-D block of a high-resolution fluvio-aeolian aquifer analog data set. Sensitivity analysis reveals a negligible role of the injection temperature, but more attention has to be drawn to other technical parameters such as the injection rate. This is investigated in more detail through model-based testing using diverse hydraulic and thermal conditions in order to delineate the feasible range of applications for the new tomographic approach.

  19. High-resolution color images of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Color versions of the highest resolution Voyager images of Io were produced by combining the low resolution color images with the high resolution, clear filter images. High resolution versions of the orange, blue, and violet filter images are produced by: orange = high-res clear * low-res orange / low-res clear blue = high-res clear * low-res blue / low-res clear violet = high-res clear * low-res violet / low-res clear. The spectral responses of the high and low resolution clear filter images cancel, leaving the color, while the spatial frequencies of the two low resolution images cancel, leaving the high resolution.

  20. The active Moresby Seamount Detachment Fault, Woodlark Basin: insights into structure and mechanics from high-resolution submarine mapping and sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jan H.; Speckbacher, Romed; Nagel, Thorsten; Klaucke, Ingo; Devey, Colin W.

    2010-05-01

    Moresby Seamount Detachment, located east of Papua New Guinea in the Woodlark Basin, is arguably the best-exposed active extensional detachment fault in the world. It forms the northern slopes of Moresby Seamount, a 3000 meter high east-west trending tectonic horst separating two extensional basins. Fault zone dip is about 30°, and total horizontal stretch accumulated in the past 3.5 Ma is about 8 km. The detachment surface is exposed on the sea floor over an area of about 30 square kilometers. Denudation is almost absent, and sedimentation is apparently suppressed by strong bottom water currents, providing a unique opportunity to analyze the tectonic geomorphology and structure of the fault zone, and sample the fault rocks. R/V SONNE Expedition 203 first mapped the area with about 20 m spatial resolution by ship-based multibeam bathymetry operating at 12 kHz. Most of the detachment surface was subsequently surveyed by AUV fitted with a 200 kHz multibeam echosounder, a CTD and a water column turbidity sensor. Map resolution is about 2 m. Samples were dredged from the detachment, and in basement and sediment sites in the footwall block. In the uppermost part the detachment zone cuts through an approximately 500 m thick sequence of Pliocene clastic sediments. Topography there is rugged, with erosional gullies, and areas of slope failure. Below, an upper smooth zone of the detachment is made up by a slope-parallel belt of cataclasites, generated from metamorphic basement rocks of Paleogene or older age, mainly gabbro, metadiabase and psammo-pelitic schists. Structurally and topographically below the cataclasites is a lower rugged zone mainly exposing cataclasites and mylonites. Topography is due to localized slope failure and a major sinistral strike slip fault scarp transecting the detachment with a 320° azimuth. Below the rugged zone is a lower smooth zone of cataclasites and mylonites. The most spectacular feature here are several north-south trending, extremely

  1. ALMA Observations of the Submillimeter Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Luminous Type-1 Active Nucleus of NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Aalto, Susanne; Doi, Akihiro; Espada, Daniel; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hattori, Takashi; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Ikarashi, Soh; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Iono, Daisuke; Ishizuki, Sumio; Krips, Melanie; Martín, Sergio; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nagai, Hiroshi; Nakai, Naomasa; Nakajima, Taku; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Nomura, Hideko; Regan, Michael W.; Schinnerer, Eva; Sheth, Kartik; Takano, Shuro; Tamura, Yoichi; Terashima, Yuichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Turner, Jean L.; Umehata, Hideki; Wiklind, Tommy

    2015-09-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 1 observations of the central kiloparsec region of the luminous type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with unprecedented high resolution (0.″5 ×0.″4 = 165 × 132 pc) at submillimeter wavelengths. Utilizing the wide bandwidth of ALMA, we simultaneously obtained HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), CS(7-6), and partially CO(3-2) line maps, as well as the 860 μm continuum. The region consists of the central ˜1″ component and the surrounding starburst ring with a radius of ˜1.″5-2.″5. Several structures connect these components. Except for CO(3-2), these dense gas tracers are significantly concentrated toward the central ˜1″, suggesting their suitability to probe the nuclear regions of galaxies. Their spatial distribution resembles well those of centimeter and mid-infrared continuum emissions, but it is anticorrelated with the optical one, indicating the existence of dust-obscured star formation. The integrated intensity ratios of HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) and HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) are higher at the active galactic nucleus (AGN) position than at the starburst ring, which is consistent with our previous findings (submillimeter-HCN enhancement). However, the HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) ratio at the AGN position of NGC 7469 (1.11 ± 0.06) is almost half of the corresponding value of the low-luminosity type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1097 (2.0 ± 0.2), despite the more than two orders of magnitude higher X-ray luminosity of NGC 7469. But the ratio is comparable to that of the close vicinity of the AGN of NGC 1068 (˜1.5). Based on these results, we speculate that some heating mechanisms other than X-ray (e.g., mechanical heating due to an AGN jet) can contribute significantly for shaping the chemical composition in NGC 1097.

  2. High Resolution Imaging with AEOS

    SciTech Connect

    Patience, J; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E

    2001-08-27

    The U. S. Air Force Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) which includes a 941 actuator adaptive optics system on a 3.7m telescope has recently been made available for astronomical programs. Operating at a wavelength of 750 nm, the diffraction-limited angular resolution of the system is 0.04 inches; currently, the magnitude limit is V {approx} 7 mag. At the distances of nearby open clusters, diffraction-limited images should resolve companions with separations as small as 4-6 AU--comparable to the Sun-Jupiter distance. The ability to study such close separations is critical, since most companions are expected to have separations in the few AU to tens of AU range. With the exceptional angular resolution of the current AEOS setup, but restricted target magnitude range, we are conducting a companion search of a large, well-defined sample of bright early-type stars in nearby open clusters and in the field. Our data set will both characterize this relatively new adaptive optics system and answer questions in binary star formation and stellar X-ray activity. We will discuss our experience using AEOS, the data analysis involved, and our initial results.

  3. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  4. Holocene climate change evidence from high-resolution loess/paleosol records and the linkage to fire-climate change-human activities in the Horqin dunefield in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Qin, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    The combination of high-resolution sedimentary paleoclimate proxies of total organic carbon and magnetic susceptibility of a loess/paleosol section with black carbon (BC) records provides us with information about climate change and the linkage of fire-climate change-vegetation-human activities in the Horqin dunefield over the past 11,600 cal yr BP. We found that during 11,600-8000 cal yr BP (the early Holocene), the area was dominated by a dry climate. The vegetation coverage was low, which limited the extent of fire. The Holocene optimum can be placed between 8000 and 3200 cal yr BP, and during this period, anthropogenic fire was a key component of total fire occurrence as the intensity of human activity increased. The development of agricultural activities and the growing population during this period increased the use of fire for cooking food and burning for cultivation and land fertilization purposes. During 2800-2600 cal yr BP, a warm/moister climate prevailed and was associated with a high degree of pedogenesis and vegetation cover density, evident at 2700 cal yr BP. Fires may have contributed to human survival by enabling the cooking of food in the warm and wet climate. In the period since 2000 cal yr BP, fires linked to agriculture may have led to increased biomass burning associated with agricultural activity.

  5. High-Resolution structure of the stable plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 variant 14-1B in its proteinase-cleaved form: A new tool for detailed interaction studies and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.; Gettins, P.

    2008-10-22

    Wild-type plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) rapidly converts to the inactive latent state under conditions of physiological pH and temperature. For in vivo studies of active PAI-1 in cell culture and in vivo model systems, the 14-1B PAI-1 mutant (N150H-K154T-Q319L-M354I), with its stabilized active conformation, has thus become the PAI-1 of choice. As a consequence of the increased stability, the only two forms likely to be encountered are the active or the cleaved form, the latter either free or complexed with target proteinase. We hereby report the first structure of the stable 14-1B PAI-1 variant in its reactive center cleaved form, to a resolution of 2.0 {angstrom}. The >99% complete structure represents the highest resolved structure of free cleaved PAI-1. This high-resolution structure should be of great use for drug target development and for modeling protein-protein interactions such as those of PAI-1 with vitronectin.

  6. Workshop on high-resolution, large-acceptance spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidman, B.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on High-Resolution, Large-Acceptance Spectrometers was to provide a means for exchange of information among those actively engaged in the design and construction of these new spectrometers. Thirty-seven papers were prepared for the data base.

  7. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  8. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  9. High resolution modeling of direct ocean carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Follows; John Marshall

    2004-04-22

    This work has followed two themes: (1) Developing and using the adjoint of the MIT ocean biogeochemistry model to examine the efficiency of carbon sequestration in a global configuration. We have demonstrated the power of the adjoint method for systematic ocean model sensitivity studies. We have shown that the relative efficiency of carbon sequestration in the Atlantic and Pacific basins changes with the period of interest. For decadal to centennial scales, the Pacific is more efficient. On longer timescales the Atlantic is more efficient . (2) We have developed and applied a high-resolution, North Atlantic circulation and tracer model to investigate the role of the mesoscale in controlling sequestration efficiency. We show that the mesoscale eddy field, and its explicit representation, significantly affects the estimated sequestration efficiency for local sources on the Eastern US seaboard.

  10. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  11. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  12. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  13. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  14. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of <1400 m, with an ascent speed of >50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes. PMID:27079264

  15. RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan; Bright, Eddie A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

  16. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Lin, Yong; Martin, Sara F.; Panasenco, Olga; Romashets, Eugene P.

    2013-08-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal, for high-resolution telescopes, will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can serve as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly, one after another, using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch open telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points in the guider image which indicates the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. Automatic production of flats is also programmed. For the first time, mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions. The mosaic movies show larger regions of the solar disk in high resolution and fill a gap between available whole-sun images with limited spatial resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  17. High Resolution Global View of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Io, the most volcanic body in the solar system is seen in the highest resolution obtained to date by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. There are rugged mountains several kilometers high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The picture is centered on the side of Io that always faces away from Jupiter; north is to the top.

    Color images acquired on September 7, 1996 have been merged with higher resolution images acquired on November 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The color is composed of data taken, at a range of 487,000 kilometers, in the near-infrared, green, and violet filters and has been enhanced to emphasize the extraordinary variations in color and brightness that characterize Io's face. The high resolution images were obtained at ranges which varied from 245,719 kilometers to 403,100 kilometers.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Quantification of the Bioturbation Activity of Lumbriculus Variegatus Worms Using Fluorescent Particulate Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. M.; Roche, K. R.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Important biological, physical and chemical processes, such as fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and contaminants, occur across sediment-water interfaces. These processes are influenced by bioturbation activities of benthic animals. Bioturbation is thought to be significant in releasing metals to the water column from contaminated sediments, but metals contamination also affects organism activity. Consequently, the aim of this study was to consider the interactions of biological activity, sediment chemistry, pore water transport, and chemical reactions in sediment mixing and the flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. Prior studies have modeled bioturbation as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not describe accurately sediment mixing due to bioturbation. To this end, we used the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model to assess sediment mixing caused by bioturbation activity of Lumbriculus variegatus worms. We performed experiments using fine-grained sediments with different levels of zinc contamination from Lake DePue, which is a Superfund Site in Illinois. The tests were conducted in an aerated fresh water chamber. Fluorescent particulate tracers were added to the sediment surface to quantify mixing processes and the influence of metals contaminants on L. variegatus bioturbation activity. We observed sediment mixing and organism activity by time-lapse photography over 14 days. Then, we analyzed the images to characterize the fluorescent particle concentration as a function of sediment depth and time. Results reveal that sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. These results suggest that anomalous sediment mixing is probably a ubiquitous process, as this behavior has only been observed previously in marine sediments. Also, the experiments indicate that bioturbation and sediment mixing decreased in the presence of higher metals concentrations in sediments. This process is expected to decrease

  19. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  20. High-resolution two dimensional advective transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Larock, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes a two-dimensional high-resolution scheme for advective transport that is based on a Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a flux limiter. The scheme is applied to the problem of pure-advection of a rotated Gaussian hill and shown to preserve the monotonicity property of the governing conservation law.

  1. Evacuee Compliance Behavior Analysis using High Resolution Demographic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Han, Lee; Liu, Cheng; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether evacuee compliance behavior with route assignments from different resolutions of demographic data would impact the evacuation performance. Most existing evacuation strategies assume that travelers will follow evacuation instructions, while in reality a certain percent of evacuees do not comply with prescribed instructions. In this paper, a comparison study of evacuation assignment based on Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) and high resolution LandScan USA Population Cells (LPC) were conducted for the detailed road network representing Alexandria, Virginia. A revised platform for evacuation modeling built on high resolution demographic data and activity-based microscopic traffic simulation is proposed. The results indicate that evacuee compliance behavior affects evacuation efficiency with traditional TAZ assignment, but it does not significantly compromise the efficiency with high resolution LPC assignment. The TAZ assignment also underestimates the real travel time during evacuation, especially for high compliance simulations. This suggests that conventional evacuation studies based on TAZ assignment might not be effective at providing efficient guidance to evacuees. From the high resolution data perspective, traveler compliance behavior is an important factor but it does not impact the system performance significantly. The highlight of evacuee compliance behavior analysis should be emphasized on individual evacuee level route/shelter assignments, rather than the whole system performance.

  2. Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

    2014-09-30

    Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  3. Improving Radium-Based Tracer Techniques: Hydrologic Controls on Porewater Radium Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. L.; Wilson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic variability influences coastal ecosystems and groundwater biogeochemistry on a range of temporal and spatial scales. Radium isotopes (223Ra, t1/2=11.1 d; 224Ra, t1/2=3.66 d; 226Ra, t1/2=1600 y; and 228Ra, t1/2=5.75 y) are excellent tracers of groundwater movement and discharge in coastal systems, but the accuracy of these tracers has been hindered by poor constraints on porewater radium activity. Porewater activities vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, creating a proportionally large uncertainty in radium-based estimates of coastal groundwater discharge. To determine the primary hydrologic factors that control porewater radium activity, a field and modeling study was performed at an island within North Inlet Salt Marsh in Georgetown, South Carolina. We chose this island because of its well-defined boundaries, the lack of a freshwater upland, its relatively constant elevated salinity, and its stable porewater chemistry (pH and redox). Vibracores collected across the site revealed marsh mud from 1 - 4m thick overlying sand. Porewater radium activity was measured in groundwater samples (wells screened at 1, 2, and 4m depth) and nearby surface water samples collected from November 2009 to February 2011. Water salinity, temperature, pH, and redox were also recorded. Sediment samples were collected from the top 10 cm of the marsh mud as well as from previously-collected sediment cores for analysis of bulk radium generation rates. Statistical analyses revealed no significant relationship (P > 0.05) between porewater radium activity and the known controls of salinity, pH, temperature, and redox. Spatial variations in radium were controlled by differences in groundwater residence time. Porewater radium activity decreased with depth by up to an order of magnitude and laterally by up to a factor of four. Vertical activity variations reflect the contrasting sediment grain size, permeability, and porewater residence time between marsh mud and underlying sand

  4. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  5. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  6. High resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1983-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so-derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme. Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the performance of these new schemes.

  7. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in used automobile catalysts and active pharmaceutical ingredients using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, Martín; Flórez, María del Rosario; Queralt, Ignasi; Marguí, Eva

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of Pd, Pt and Rh in two samples of very different nature. While analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients is straightforward and it is feasible to minimize matrix effects, to the point that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standard solutions, the analysis of used automobile catalysts is more challenging requiring the addition of a chemical modifier (NH4F·HF) to help in releasing the analytes, a more vigorous temperature program and the use of a solid standard (CRM ERM®-EB504) for calibration. However, in both cases it was possible to obtain accurate results and precision values typically better than 10% RSD in a fast and simple way, while only two determinations are needed for the three analytes, since Pt and Rh can be simultaneously monitored in both types of samples. Overall, the methods proposed seem suited for the determination of these analytes in such types of samples, offering a greener and faster alternative that circumvents the traditional problems associated with sample digestion, requiring a small amount of sample only (0.05 mg per replicate for catalysts, and a few milligrams for the pharmaceuticals) and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations. The LODs achieved were 6.5 μg g- 1 (Pd), 8.3 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 9.3 μg g- 1 (Rh) for catalysts, which decreased to 0.08 μg g- 1 (Pd), 0.15 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 0.10 μg g- 1 (Rh) for pharmaceuticals.

  8. Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 and -D2 produced in an inflammatory cell reaction and its application for activity screening and potency evaluation using turbulent flow chromatography liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Sook; Peng, Lei; Kang, Kyungsu; Choi, Yongsoo

    2016-09-01

    Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and -D2 (PGD2) produced from a RAW264.7 cell-based reaction was performed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), which was online coupled with turbulent flow chromatography (TFC). The capability of this method to accurately measure PG levels in cell reaction medium containing cytokines or proteins as a reaction byproduct was cross-validated by two conventional methods. Two methods, including an LC-HRMS method after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of the sample and a commercial PGE2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showed PGE2 and/or PGD2 levels almost similar to those obtained by TFC LC-HRMS over the reaction time after LPS stimulation. After the cross-validation, significant analytical throughputs, allowing simultaneous screening and potency evaluation of 80 natural products including 60 phytochemicals and 20 natural product extracts for the inhibition of the PGD2 produced in the cell-based inflammatory reaction, were achieved using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed. Among the 60 phytochemicals screened, licochalcone A and formononetin inhibited PGD2 production the most with IC50 values of 126 and 151nM, respectively. For a reference activity, indomethacin and diclofenac were used, measuring IC50 values of 0.64 and 0.21nM, respectively. This method also found a butanol extract of Akebia quinata Decne (AQ) stem as a promising natural product for PGD2 inhibition. Direct and accurate analysis of PGs in the inflammatory cell reaction using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed enables the high-throughput screening and potency evaluation of as many as 320 samples in less than 48h without changing a TFC column.

  9. Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 and -D2 produced in an inflammatory cell reaction and its application for activity screening and potency evaluation using turbulent flow chromatography liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Sook; Peng, Lei; Kang, Kyungsu; Choi, Yongsoo

    2016-09-01

    Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and -D2 (PGD2) produced from a RAW264.7 cell-based reaction was performed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), which was online coupled with turbulent flow chromatography (TFC). The capability of this method to accurately measure PG levels in cell reaction medium containing cytokines or proteins as a reaction byproduct was cross-validated by two conventional methods. Two methods, including an LC-HRMS method after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of the sample and a commercial PGE2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showed PGE2 and/or PGD2 levels almost similar to those obtained by TFC LC-HRMS over the reaction time after LPS stimulation. After the cross-validation, significant analytical throughputs, allowing simultaneous screening and potency evaluation of 80 natural products including 60 phytochemicals and 20 natural product extracts for the inhibition of the PGD2 produced in the cell-based inflammatory reaction, were achieved using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed. Among the 60 phytochemicals screened, licochalcone A and formononetin inhibited PGD2 production the most with IC50 values of 126 and 151nM, respectively. For a reference activity, indomethacin and diclofenac were used, measuring IC50 values of 0.64 and 0.21nM, respectively. This method also found a butanol extract of Akebia quinata Decne (AQ) stem as a promising natural product for PGD2 inhibition. Direct and accurate analysis of PGs in the inflammatory cell reaction using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed enables the high-throughput screening and potency evaluation of as many as 320 samples in less than 48h without changing a TFC column. PMID:27524299

  10. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  11. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Sapia, Vincenzo; Fierro, Elisa; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the central section of the 35 km long L'Aquila-Celano active normal fault-system in the central Apennines of Italy. Although palaeoseismic data document high Holocene vertical slip rates (˜1 mm yr-1) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time the shallow subsurface of a key section of the main Piano di Pezza fault splay by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic soundings (TDEM). Our surveys cross a ˜5-m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images, which show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. Our data indicate that the upper fault termination has a sub-vertical attitude, in agreement with palaeoseismological trench evidence, whereas it dips ˜50° to the southwest in the deeper part. We recognize some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions in the fault hangingwall that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of some Holocene palaeo-earthquakes. We estimate a ˜13-15 m throw of this fault splay since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (˜18 ka), leading to a 0.7-0.8 mm yr-1 throw rate that is quite in accordance with previous palaeoseismic estimation of Holocene vertical slip rates. The 1-D resistivity models from TDEM soundings collected along the trace of the electrical profile significantly match with 2-D resistivity images. Moreover, they indicate that in the fault hangingwall, ˜200 m away from the surface fault trace, the pre-Quaternary carbonate basement is at ˜90-100 m depth. We therefore provide a minimal ˜150-160 m estimate of the cumulative throw of the Piano di Pezza

  12. Application of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I. Y.; Tucker, C. J.; Prentice, K. C.

    1987-01-01

    Normalized difference vegetation indices derived from radiances measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer were used to prescribe the phasing of terrestrial photosynthesis. The satellite data were combined with field data on soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to obtain the seasonal exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO2 thus obtained were employed as source/sink functions in a global three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model to simulate the annual oscillations of CO2 in the atmosphere. The results demonstrate that satellite data of high spatial and temporal resolution can be used to provide quantitative information about seasonal and longer-term variations of photosynthetic activity on a global scale.

  13. High-Resolution Vertical Observation of Intracellular Structure Using Magnetically Responsive Microplates.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Onoe, Hiroaki; Tottori, Soichiro; Aonuma, Hiroka; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kamiya, Koki; Ishihara, Hirotaka; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A vertical confocal observation system capable of high-resolution observation of intracellular structure is demonstrated. The system consists of magnet-active microplates to rotate, incline, and translate single adherent cells in the applied magnetic field. Appended to conventional confocal microscopes, this system enables high-resolution cross-sectional imaging with single-molecule sensitivity in single scanning. PMID:27185344

  14. Performance Optimization of NEMO Oceanic Model at High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epicoco, Italo; Mocavero, Silvia; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The NEMO oceanic model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations along with a nonlinear equation of state, which couples the two active tracers (temperature and salinity) to the fluid velocity. The code is written in Fortan 90 and parallelized using MPI. The resolution of the global ocean models used today for climate change studies limits the prediction accuracy. To overcome this limit, a new high-resolution global model, based on NEMO, simulating at 1/16° and 100 vertical levels has been developed at CMCC. The model is computational and memory intensive, so it requires many resources to be run. An optimization activity is needed. The strategy requires a preliminary analysis to highlight scalability bottlenecks. It has been performed on a SandyBridge architecture at CMCC. An efficiency of 48% on 7K cores (the maximum available) has been achieved. The analysis has been also carried out at routine level, so that the improvement actions could be designed for the entire code or for the single kernel. The analysis highlighted for example a loss of performance due to the routine used to implement the north fold algorithm (i.e. handling the points at the north pole of the 3-poles Grids): indeed an optimization of the routine implementation is needed. The folding is achieved considering only the last 4 rows on the top of the global domain and by applying a rotation pivoting on the point in the middle. During the folding, the point on the top left is updated with the value of the point on bottom right and so on. The current version of the parallel algorithm is based on the domain decomposition. Each MPI process takes care of a block of points. Each process can update its points using values belonging to the symmetric process. In the current implementation, each received message is placed in a buffer with a number of elements equal to the total dimension of the global domain. Each process sweeps the entire buffer, but only a part of that computation is really useful for the

  15. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Some Very Inactive Southern Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, A.; King, J. R.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    We have obtained high-resolution echelle spectra of a few dozen solar-type stars that an earlier low resolution Ca II H & K survey suggested have modest evels of chromospheric activity. We present Hα -based chromospheric activity measures, binarity information, and Li abundances of the sample. As expected, our spectra: confirm the low levels of chromospheric activity; suggest that these objects are apparently single; indicate the stars have small projected rotational velocities; and yield low photospheric abundances of Li. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0086576 to JRK.

  16. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  17. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  18. High resolution millimeter-wave imaging sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Howard, R. J.; Parks, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A scanning 3-mm radiometer is described that has been built for use on a small aircraft to produce real time high resolution images of the ground when atmospheric conditions such as smoke, dust, and clouds make IR and visual sensors unusable. The sensor can be used for a variety of remote sensing applications such as measurements of snow cover and snow water equivalent, precipitation mapping, vegetation type and extent, surface moisture and temperature, and surface thermal inertia. The advantages of millimeter waves for cloud penetration and the ability to observe different physical phenomena make this system an attractive supplement to visible and IR remote sensing systems.

  19. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  20. A High Resolution Scale-of-four

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V.

    1949-08-25

    A high resolution scale-of-four has been developed to be used in conjunction with the nuclear particle detection devices in applications where the counting rate is unusually high. Specifically, it is intended to precede the commercially available medium resolution scaling circuits and so decrease the resolving time of the counting system. The circuit will function reliably on continuously recurring pulses separated by less than 0.1 microseconds. It will resolve two pulses (occurring at a moderate repetition rate) which are spaced at 0.04 microseconds. A five-volt input signal is sufficient to actuate the device.

  1. High Resolution Image From Viking Lander 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking 1 took this high-resolution picture today, its third day on Mars. Distance from the camera to the nearfield (bottom) is about 4 meters (13 feet); to the horizon, about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles). The photo shows numerous angular blocks ranging in size from a few centimeters to several meters. The surface between the blocks is composed of fine-grained material. Accumulation of some fine-grained material behind blocks indicates wind deposition of dust and sand downwind of obstacles. The large block on the horizon is about 4 meters (13 feet) wide. Distance across the horizon is about 34 meters (110 feet).

  2. High Resolution Spectroscopy with Submillimeter-Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Dave, Hemant

    2003-03-01

    In order to explain the characteristic features of planetary atmosphere, detection and precise measurements of environmentally important gases such as CO, CIO, No becomes necessary. Since most of the polyatomic molecules have (ro-vibrational) transitions in submillimeter region 100 μ-1000μ), probing in this wavelength region is vital. The specific rotational and vibrational states are the result of interactions between different atoms in the molecule. Since each molecule has a unique arrangement of atoms, it has an exclusive submillimeter signature. We are developing a portable heterodyne receiver system at Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad to perform high-resolution spectroscopy in this wavelength region.

  3. Extensive hydrothermal activity revealed by multi-tracer survey in the Wallis and Futuna region (SW Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konn, C.; Fourré, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Donval, J. P.; Guyader, V.; Birot, D.; Alix, A. S.; Gaillot, A.; Perez, F.; Dapoigny, A.; Pelleter, E.; Resing, J. A.; Charlou, J. L.; Fouquet, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The study area is close to the Wallis and Futuna Islands in the French EEZ. It exists on the western boundary of the fastest tectonic area in the world at the junction of the Lau and North-Fiji basins. At this place, the unstable back-arc accommodates the plate motion in three ways: (i) the north Fiji transform fault, (ii) numerous unstable spreading ridges, and (iii) large areas of recent volcanic activity. This instability creates bountiful opportunity for hydrothermal discharge to occur. Based on geochemical (CH4, TDM, 3He) and geophysical (nephelometry) tracer surveys: (1) no hydrothermal activity could be found on the Futuna Spreading Centre (FSC) which sets the western limit of hydrothermal activity; (2) four distinct hydrothermal active areas were identified: Kulo Lasi Caldera, Amanaki Volcano, Fatu Kapa and Tasi Tulo areas; (3) extensive and diverse hydrothermal manifestations were observed and especially a 2D distribution of the sources. At Kulo Lasi, our data and especially tracer ratios (CH4/3He 50×106 and CH4/TDM 4.5) reveal a transient CH4 input, with elevated levels of CH4 measured in 2010, that had vanished in 2011, most likely caused by an eruptive magmatic event. By contrast at Amanaki, vertical tracer profiles and tracer ratios point to typical seawater/basalt interactions. Fatu Kapa is characterised by a substantial spatial variability of the hydrothermal water column anomalies, most likely due to widespread focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge in the area. In the Tasi Tulo zone, the hydrothermal signal is characterised by a total lack of turbidity, although other tracer anomalies are in the same range as in nearby Fatu Kapa. The background data set revealed the presence of a Mn and 3He chronic plume due to the extensive and cumulative venting over the entire area. To that respect, we believe that the joined domain composed of our active area and the nearby active area discovered in the East by Lupton et al. (2012) highly contribute to the

  4. Predicting/Extrapolating Active Layer Thickness Using Statistical Learning from Remotely-Sensed High-resolution Data in Arctic Permafrost Landscapes: Improved parameterization of Ice-wedge polygons from LiDAR/WorldView-2 derived metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Hubbard, S. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Liljedahl, A.; Wainwright, H. M.; Sloan, V. L.; Altmann, G.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Shelef, E.; Wilson, C. J.; Dafflon, B.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Gibbs, A.; Tweedie, C. E.; Painter, S. L.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with micro-topography, such as active layer thickness (ALT) in ice-wedge polygon ground, are labor-intensive to document in the field at large spatial extents, necessitating remotely sensed methods. Robust techniques to estimate ALT over large areas would improve understanding of coupled dynamics between permafrost, hydrology and landsurface processes, and improve simulations of the rate and timing of release of soil carbon from permafrost settings. In particular, it would provide critically needed data to parameterize and initialize soil property information in permafrost models and evaluate model predictions for large, complex domains. In this work, we demonstrate a new data fusion approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating cm scale ALT in a 5 km2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We used topographic (directed distance, slope, wavelet-curvature) and spectral (NDVI) metrics derived from multisensor data obtained from LiDAR and WorldView-2 platforms to develop a simple data fusion algorithm using statistical machine learning. This algorithm was used to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. A comparison of the estimates with ground-based measurements documented the accuracy (±4.4 cm, r2=0.76) of the approach. Our findings suggest that the broad climatic variability associated with warming air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT, but the smaller-scale variability could be controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic variables. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping subsurface properties over large areas from readily available remote sensing data. Methodology of Mapping and Characterization Polygons:We convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively chose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used

  5. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005.

  6. A quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) analysis of triarylmethane dye tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Jarai; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.

    2006-01-01

    Dyes are important hydrological tracers. Many different dyes have been proposed as optimal tracers, but none of these dyes can be considered an ideal water tracer. Some dyes are toxic and most sorb to subsurface materials. The objective of this study was to find the molecular structure of an optimal water tracer. We used QSAR to screen a large number of hypothetical molecules, belonging to the class of triarylmethane dyes, in regard to their sorption characteristics to a sandy soil. The QSAR model was based on experimental sorption data obtained from four triarylmethane dyes: C.I. Food Blue 2 (C.I. 42090; Brilliant Blue FCF), C.I. Food Green 3 (C.I. 42053; FD&C Green No. 3), C.I. Acid Blue 7 (C.I. 42080; ORCOacid Blue A 150%), and C.I. Acid Green 9 (C.I. 42100; ORCOacid Fast Green B). Sorption characteristics of the dyes to the sandy soil were expressed with the Langmuir isotherm. Our premise was that dye sorption can be reduced by attachment of sulfonic acid (SO 3) groups to the triarylmethane template. About 70 hypothetical dyes were created and QSAR were used to estimate sorption characteristics. The results indicated that both the position and the number of SO 3 groups affected dye sorption. Sorption decreased with increasing number of SO 3 groups attached to the molecule. Increasing the number of sulfonic acid groups also decreases the toxicity of the compounds. An optimal triarylmethane water tracer contains 4 to 6 SO 3 groups.

  7. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  8. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  9. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  10. Common high-resolution MMW scene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Annie V.; McPherson, Dwight A.; Satterfield, H. DeWayne; Sholes, William J.; Mobley, Scott B.

    2001-08-01

    The development of a modularized millimeter wave (MMW) target and background high resolution scene generator is reported. The scene generator's underlying algorithms are applicable to both digital and real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations. The scene generator will be configurable for a variety of MMW and multi-mode sensors employing state of the art signal processing techniques. At present, digital simulations for MMW and multi-mode sensor development and testing are custom-designed by the seeker vendor and are verified, validated, and operated by both the vendor and government in simulation-based acquisition. A typical competition may involve several vendors, each requiring high resolution target and background models for proper exercise of seeker algorithms. There is a need and desire by both the government and sensor vendors to eliminate costly re-design and re-development of digital simulations. Additional efficiencies are realized by assuring commonality between digital and HWIL simulation MMW scene generators, eliminating duplication of verification and validation efforts.

  11. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  12. Comparative Very-High-Resolution VUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Dooley, P. M.; Waring, K.

    Despite their importance to the photochemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, and many experimental studies, previous characterization of the Schumann-Runge (SR) bands of O2, B3 Σ u- <- X3 Σ_g^- (v, 0) (1750-2050 Å) has been limited by poor experimental resolution. In addition, our understanding of the SR spectrum is incomplete, many rovibrational transitions in the perturbed region of the spectrum [B(v > 15)] remaining unassigned. We review new very-high-resolution measurements of the O2 photoabsorption cross section in the SR bands. Tunable, narrow-bandwidth background vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for the measurements ( 7 × 105 resolving power) was generated by the two-photon-resonant difference-frequency four-wave mixing in Xe of excimer-pumped dye-laser radiation. With the aid of these cross-section measurements, rovibrational and line-shape analyses have led to new insights into the molecular structure and predissociation dynamics of O2. The current VUV laser-spectroscopic measurements are shown to compare favourably with results from two other very-high-resolution experimental techniques, namely laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and VUV Fourier-transform spectroscopy, the latter performed using a synchrotron source.

  13. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  14. High-Resolution Shadowing of Transfer RNA

    PubMed Central

    Abermann, Reinhard J.; Yoshikami, Doju

    1972-01-01

    High-resolution shadowing with metals that melt at high temperatures was used to study macromolecules. Molecules of transfer RNA shadowed with tantalum-tungsten are readily visualized in an electron microscope. Mounting procedures for tRNA were perfected that reproducibly gave uniform distributions of both monomeric and dimeric tRNA particles, and allowed a statistical assessment of their gross shapes and sizes. Monomeric tRNA yielded a fairly homogeneous population of rod-shaped particles, with axial dimensions of about 40 × 85 Å. Dimers of yeast alanine tRNA held together by hydrogen bonds and dimers constructed by covalent linkage of the amino-acid acceptor (3′-) termini of monomers both gave slightly more heterogeneous populations of particles. Yet, their structures were also basically rod shaped, with their lengths ranging to about twice that of the monomer; this result indicates an end-to-end arrangement of the monomeric units within both dimers. These results suggest that the amino-acid acceptor terminus and the anticodon region are at the ends of the rod-shaped, dehydrated tRNA monomer visible by electron microscopy, consistent with the generally accepted view of tRNA structure in solution suggested by other workers using other methods. This study demonstrates that high-resolution shadowing with tantalum-tungsten provides a means to examine the three-dimensional structures of relatively small biological macromolecules. Images PMID:4504373

  15. High Resolution Spectroscopy to Support Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy Devi

    2003-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (such as line position, intensity, broadening and shifting coefficients and their temperature dependences, line mixing coefficients etc.) for various molecular species of atmospheric interest are determined. In order to achieve these results, infrared spectra of several molecular bands are obtained using high-resolution recording instruments such as tunable diode laser spectrometer and Fourier transform spectrometers. Using sophisticated analysis routines (Multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique) these high-resolution infrared spectra are processed to determine the various spectral line parameters that are cited above. Spectra were taken using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona as well as the Bruker FTS at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at Richland, Washington. Most of the spectra are acquired not only at room temperature, but also at several different cold temperatures. This procedure is necessary to study the variation of the spectral line parameters as a function of temperature in order to simulate the Earth's and other planetary atmospheric environments. Depending upon the strength or weakness of the various bands recorded and analyzed, the length(s) of the absorption cells in which the gas samples under study are kept varied from a few centimeters up to several meters and the sample temperatures varied from approximately +30 C to -63 C. Research on several infrared bands of various molecular species and their isotopomers are undertaken. Those studies are briefly described.

  16. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability, and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  17. Design of a High Resolution Hexapod Positioning Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Jamie; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high resolution, six-degree of freedom positioning mechanism. This mechanism, based on the Stewart platform concept, was designed for use with the Developmental Comparative Active Optics Telescope Testbed (DCATT), a ground-based technology testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The mechanism provides active control to the DCATT telescope's segmented primary mirror. Emphasis is on design decisions and technical challenges. Significant issues include undesirable motion properties of PZT-inchworm actuators, testing difficulties, dimensional stability and use of advanced composite materials. Supporting test data from prototype mechanisms is presented.

  18. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  19. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  20. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-10-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  1. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  2. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  3. High-Resolution Broadband Spectral Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2002-08-09

    We demonstrate solar spectra from a novel interferometric method for compact broadband high-resolution spectroscopy. The spectral interferometer (SI) is a hybrid instrument that uses a spectrometer to externally disperse the output of a fixed-delay interferometer. It also has been called an externally dispersed interferometer (EDI). The interferometer can be used with linear spectrometers for imaging spectroscopy or with echelle spectrometers for very broad-band coverage. EDI's heterodyning technique enhances the spectrometer's response to high spectral-density features, increasing the effective resolution by factors of several while retaining its bandwidth. The method is extremely robust to instrumental insults such as focal spot size or displacement. The EDI uses no moving parts, such as purely interferometric FTS spectrometers, and can cover a much wider simultaneous bandpass than other internally dispersed interferometers (e.g. HHS or SHS).

  4. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  5. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. High-resolution climate simulation using CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmeister, J.; Neale, R. B.; Hannay, C.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Wehner, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Thanks to the development of highly scalable dynamical cores that can exploit massively parallel computer architectures, we expect that global climate models in the next decade will run routinely at horizontal resolutions of 25 km or finer. Early results at these resolutions show clear improvements in simulating climatologically and societally-important mesoscale meteorology such as tropical cyclones. Improvements in regional circulations likely associated with topography are also obtained. Nevertheless many long-standing biases in climate simulations, e.g., the "double ITCZ" bias in precipitation, remain remarkably insensitive to increased resolution. This talk will present high-resolution global simulations using the community atmosphere model. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology and precipitation statistics to model physics suites will be shown

  7. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C44H90 paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol.

  8. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  9. Low noise and high resolution microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Pan, Jingsheng; Deng, Guangxu; Su, Detan; Xu, Zhiqing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2008-02-01

    To improve the Figure of Merit (FOM) and reduce the Equivalent Background Input (EBI) and Fixed-Pattern-Noise (FPN) in image intensifier, NVT (North Night Vision Technology Co., Ltd) has been researching and developing a low noise and high resolution Micro Channel Plate (MCP). The density of dark current of this new MCP is less than 0.5PA/cm2 (when MCP voltage at 1000V). The FPN and scintillation noise are reduced remarkably. Channel diameter is 6 μm and open area ratio is 60%~70%. The vacuum bakeout temperature could be as high as 500°C. This new kind of MCP will be extensively used in the supper generation and the third generation image intensifiers.

  10. High resolution analysis of satellite gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite gravity gradiometry is a technique now under development which, by the middle of the next decade, may be used for the high resolution charting from space of the gravity field of the earth and, afterwards, of other planets. Some data analysis schemes are reviewed for getting detailed gravity maps from gradiometry on both a global and a local basis. It also presents estimates of the likely accuracies of such maps, in terms of normalized spherical harmonics expansions, both using gradiometry alone and in combination with data from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver carried on the same spacecraft. It compares these accuracies with those of current and future maps obtained from other data (conventional tracking, satellite-satellite tracking, etc.), and also with the spectra of various signals of geophysical interest.

  11. High-resolution MRI: in vivo histology?

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Holly; Clare, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    For centuries scientists have been fascinated with the question of how the brain works. Investigators have looked at both where different functions are localized and how the anatomical microstructure varies across the brain surface. Here we discuss how advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have allowed in vivo visualization of the fine structure of the brain that was previously only visible in post-mortem brains. We present data showing the correspondence between definitions of the primary visual cortex defined anatomically using very high-resolution MRI and functionally using functional MRI. We consider how this technology can be applied to allow the investigation of brains that differ from normal, and what this ever-evolving technology may be able to reveal about in vivo brain structure in the next few years. PMID:16553313

  12. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  13. High-resolution reconstruction for terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Min; Fan, Wen-Hui; Liu, Jia

    2014-11-20

    We present a high-resolution (HR) reconstruction model and algorithms for terahertz imaging, taking advantage of super-resolution methodology and algorithms. The algorithms used include projection onto a convex sets approach, iterative backprojection approach, Lucy-Richardson iteration, and 2D wavelet decomposition reconstruction. Using the first two HR reconstruction methods, we successfully obtain HR terahertz images with improved definition and lower noise from four low-resolution (LR) 22×24 terahertz images taken from our homemade THz-TDS system at the same experimental conditions with 1.0 mm pixel. Using the last two HR reconstruction methods, we transform one relatively LR terahertz image to a HR terahertz image with decreased noise. This indicates potential application of HR reconstruction methods in terahertz imaging with pulsed and continuous wave terahertz sources.

  14. HIRIS - The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff

    1988-01-01

    The High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is a JPL facility instrument designed for NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos).It will have 10-nm wide spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns at 30 m spatial resolution over a 30 km swath. The spectral resolution allows identification of many minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, spectral changes associated with plant canopy biochemistry, composition of atmospheric aerosols, and grain size of snow and its contamination by absorbing impurities. The bands wil have 12-bit quantization over a dynamic range suitable for bright targets, such as snow. For targets of low brightness, such as water bodies, image-motion compensation will allow gains up to a factor of eight to increase signal-to-noise ratios. In the 824-km orbit altitude proposed for Eos, the crosstrack pointing capability will allow 4-5 views during a 16-day revisit cycle.

  15. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-08-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  16. Computer synthesis of high resolution electron micrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Specimen damage, spherical aberration, low contrast and noisy sensors combine to prevent direct atomic viewing in a conventional electron microscope. The paper describes two methods for obtaining ultra-high resolution in biological specimens under the electron microscope. The first method assumes the physical limits of the electron objective lens and uses a series of dark field images of biological crystals to obtain direct information on the phases of the Fourier diffraction maxima; this information is used in an appropriate computer to synthesize a large aperture lens for a 1-A resolution. The second method assumes there is sufficient amplitude scatter from images recorded in focus which can be utilized with a sensitive densitometer and computer contrast stretching to yield fine structure image details. Cancer virus characterization is discussed as an illustrative example. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  17. High resolution detection system of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Li Qiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Hua; Lu, Zu Kang

    2007-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) system was founded according to confocal theory. The 3-D adjustment of the exciting and collecting optical paths was realized. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used and the signals are processed by a software designed by ourselves. Under computer control, high voltage is applied to appropriate reservoirs and to inject and separate DNA samples respectively. Two fluorescent dyes Thiazole Orange (TO) and SYBR Green I were contrasted. With both of the dyes, high signals-to-noise images were obtained with the CE-LIFD system. The single-bases can be distinguished from the electrophoretogram and high resolution of DNA sample separation was obtained.

  18. High-resolution adaptive spiking sonar.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2009-05-01

    A new sonar system based on the conventional 6500 ranging module is presented that generates a sequence of spikes whose temporal density is related to the strength of the received echo. This system notably improves the resolution of a previous system by shortening the discharge cycle of the integrator included in the module. The operation is controlled by a PIC18F452 device, which can adapt the duration of the discharge to changing features of the echo, providing the system with a novel adaptive behavior. The performance of the new sensor is characterized and compared with that of the previous system by performing rotational scans of simple objects with different reflecting strengths. Some applications are suggested that exploit the high resolution and adaptability of this sensor.

  19. Constructing a WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Petty, S.; Cluver, M.; Assef, Roberto J.; Benford, D.; Blain, A.; Bridge, C.; Donoso, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Fowler, J.; Koribalski, B.; Lake, S.; Neill, James D.; Seibert, M.; Stanford, S.; Wright, E.

    2012-01-01

    After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 micron, 4.6 micron, 12 micron, and 22 micron. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

  20. Limits of simulation based high resolution EBSD.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Jon

    2013-08-01

    High resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HREBSD) is a novel technique for a relative determination of both orientation and stress state in crystals through digital image correlation techniques. Recent works have tried to use simulated EBSD patterns as reference patterns to achieve the absolute orientation and stress state of crystals. However, a precise calibration of the pattern centre location is needed to avoid the occurrence of phantom stresses. A careful analysis of the projective transformation involved in the formation of EBSD patterns has permitted to understand these phantom stresses. This geometrical analysis has been confirmed by numerical simulations. The results indicate that certain combinations of crystal strain states and sample locations (pattern centre locations) lead to virtually identical EBSD patterns. This ambiguity makes the problem of solving the absolute stress state of a crystal unfeasible in a single-detector configuration. PMID:23676453

  1. High-Resolution Anamorphic SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-ray imaging system that combines a high-resolution silicon detector with two sets of movable, half-keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnifications are not constrained to be equal. The detector is a 60 mm × 60 mm, one-millimeter-thick, one-megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 59 μm. The flexible nature of this system allows the application of adaptive imaging techniques. We present system details; calibration, acquisition, and reconstruction methods; and imaging results. PMID:26160983

  2. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  3. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  4. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  5. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024 ×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  6. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images. PMID:27475069

  7. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  8. Clickstream data yields high-resolution maps of science

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Johan; Van De Sompel, Herbert; Hagberg, Aric; Bettencourt, Luis; Chute, Ryan; Rodriguez, Marko A; Balakireva, Lyudmila

    2009-01-01

    Intricate maps of science have been created from citation data to visualize the structure of scientific activity. However, most scientific publications are now accessed online. Scholarly web portals record detailed log data at a scale that exceeds the number of all existing citations combined. Such log data is recorded immediately upon publication and keeps track of the sequences of user requests (clickstreams) that are issued by a variety of users across many different domains. Given these advantagees of log datasets over citation data, we investigate whether they can produce high-resolution, more current maps of science.

  9. High-Resolution Geologic Mapping in East Candor Chasma: 2016 Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, C. H.

    2016-06-01

    This abstract summarizes current results and planned activities from an ongoing initiative to construct a series of high-resolution structural and geologic maps in the east Candor Chasma region of Valles Marineris, Mars.

  10. Large-field high-resolution mosaic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, Robert H.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sütterlin, Peter; Martin, Sara F.

    2012-09-01

    Movies with fields-of-view larger than normal for high-resolution telescopes will give a better understanding of processes on the Sun, such as filament and active region developments and their possible interactions. New active regions can influence, by their emergence, their environment to the extent of possibly serving as an igniter of the eruption of a nearby filament. A method to create a large field-of-view is to join several fields-of-view into a mosaic. Fields are imaged quickly one after another using fast telescope-pointing. Such a pointing cycle has been automated at the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), a high-resolution solar telescope located on the Canary Island La Palma. The observer can draw with the computer mouse the desired total field in the guider-telescope image of the whole Sun. The guider telescope is equipped with an H-alpha filter and electronic enhancement of contrast in the image for good visibility of filaments and prominences. The number and positions of the subfields are calculated automatically and represented by an array of bright points indicating the subfield centers inside the drawn rectangle of the total field on the computer screen with the whole-sun image. When the exposures start the telescope repeats automatically the sequence of subfields. Automatic production of flats is also programmed including defocusing and fast motion over the solar disk of the image field. For the first time mosaic movies were programmed from stored information on automated telescope motions from one field to the next. The mosaic movies fill the gap between whole-sun images with limited resolution of synoptic telescopes including space instruments and small-field high-cadence movies of high-resolution solar telescopes.

  11. Crusta: Visualizing High-resolution Global Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, T. S.; Kreylos, O.; Bowles, C. J.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual globes have become indispensable tools for visualizing, understanding and presenting data from Earth and other planetary bodies. The scientific community has invested much effort into exploiting existing globes to their fullest potential by refining and adapting their capabilities to better satisfy specific needs. For example, Google Earth provides users with the ability to view hillshade images derived from airborne LiDAR data such as the 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope data. However, because most available globes were not designed with the specific needs of geoscientists in mind, shortcomings are becoming increasingly evident in geoscience applications such as terrain visualization. In particular, earth scientists struggle to visualize digital elevation models with both high spatial resolution (0.5 - 1 square meters per sample) and large extent (>2000 square kilometers), such as those obtained with airborne LiDAR. To address the specific earth science need of real-time terrain visualization of LiDAR data, we are developing Crusta as part of a close collaboration involving earth and computer scientists. Crusta is a new virtual globe that differs from widely used globes by both providing accurate global data representation and the ability to easily visualize custom topographic and image data. As a result, Crusta enables real-time, interactive visualization of high resolution digital elevation data spanning thousands of square kilometers, such as the complete 2007 Northern California GeoEarthScope airborne LiDAR data set. To implement an accurate data representation and avoid distortion of the display at the poles, where other projections have singularities, Crusta represents the globe as a thirty-sided polyhedron. Each side of this polyhedron can be subdivided to an arbitrarily fine grid on the surface of the globe, which allows Crusta to accommodate input data of arbitrary resolution ranging from global (e.g., Blue Marble) to local (e.g., a tripod

  12. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Ionel Dragos

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  13. Active ion tracer experiments attempted in conjunction with the ion composition experiment on GEOS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.

    It is pointed out that to date six ion injection/tracer experiments have been attempted in conjunction with the GEOS-2 Ion Composition Experiment: three rocket borne Ba shaped-charge releases (Porcupine 3 and 4 and Ba-GEOS), one Li release, and two periods of operation of the Xe(+) accelerator on the SCATHA satellite. The characteristics of each of these six releases are outlined, and upper limits are placed on possible ion fluxes reaching GEOS-2. The order of magnitude of ion fluxes to be expected from each release is estimated, and it is shown that three of the experiments had no real chance of succeeding in the first place.

  14. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Brecknock, Sarah; Dibbayawan, Teresa P; Vesk, Maret; Vesk, Peter A; Faulkner, Christine; Barton, Deborah A; Overall, Robyn L

    2011-10-01

    Symplastic transport occurs between neighbouring plant cells through functionally and structurally dynamic channels called plasmodesmata (PD). Relatively little is known about the composition of PD or the mechanisms that facilitate molecular transport into neighbouring cells. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides 2-dimensional information about the structural components of PD, 3-dimensional information is difficult to extract from ultrathin sections. This study has exploited high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) to reveal the 3-dimensional morphology of PD in the cell walls of algae, ferns and higher plants. Varied patterns of PD were observed in the walls, ranging from uniformly distributed individual PD to discrete clusters. Occasionally the thick walls of the giant alga Chara were fractured, revealing the surface morphology of PD within. External structures such as spokes, spirals and mesh were observed surrounding the PD. Enzymatic digestions of cell wall components indicate that cellulose or pectin either compose or stabilise the extracellular spokes. Occasionally, the PD were fractured open and desmotubule-like structures and other particles were observed in their central regions. Our observations add weight to the argument that Chara PD contain desmotubules and are morphologically similar to higher plant PD.

  15. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  16. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  17. High-resolution light microscopy of nanoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Pustovyy, Oleg; Vainrub, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We developed a high resolution light imaging system. Diffraction gratings with 100 nm width lines as well as less than 100 nm size features of different-shaped objects are clearly visible on a calibrated microscope test slide (Vainrub et al., Optics Letters, 2006, 31, 2855). The two-point resolution increase results from a known narrowing of the central diffraction peak for the annular aperture. Better visibility and advanced contrast of the smallest features in the image are due to enhancement of high spatial frequencies in the optical transfer function. The imaging system is portable, low energy, and battery operated. It has been adapted to use in both transmitting and reflecting light. It is particularly applicable for motile nanoform systems where structure and functions can be depicted in real time. We have isolated micrometer and submicrometer particles, termed proteons, from human and animal blood. Proteons form by reversible seeded aggregation of proteins around proteon nucleating centers (PNCs). PNCs are comprised of 1-2nm metallic nanoclusters containing 40-300 atoms. Proteons are capable of spontaneous assembling into higher nanoform systems assuming structure of complicated topology. The arrangement of complex proteon system mimics the structure of a small biological cell. It has structures that imitate membrane and nucleolus or nuclei. Some of these nanoforms are motile. They interact and divide. Complex nanoform systems can spontaneously reduce to simple proteons. The physical properties of these nanoforms could shed some light on the properties of early life forms or forms at extreme conditions.

  18. High-resolution CCD imaging alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. L.; Acker, D. E.

    1992-08-01

    High resolution CCD color cameras have recently stimulated the interest of a large number of potential end-users for a wide range of practical applications. Real-time High Definition Television (HDTV) systems are now being used or considered for use in applications ranging from entertainment program origination through digital image storage to medical and scientific research. HDTV generation of electronic images offers significant cost and time-saving advantages over the use of film in such applications. Further in still image systems electronic image capture is faster and more efficient than conventional image scanners. The CCD still camera can capture 3-dimensional objects into the computing environment directly without having to shoot a picture on film develop it and then scan the image into a computer. 2. EXTENDING CCD TECHNOLOGY BEYOND BROADCAST Most standard production CCD sensor chips are made for broadcast-compatible systems. One popular CCD and the basis for this discussion offers arrays of roughly 750 x 580 picture elements (pixels) or a total array of approximately 435 pixels (see Fig. 1). FOR. A has developed a technique to increase the number of available pixels for a given image compared to that produced by the standard CCD itself. Using an inter-lined CCD with an overall spatial structure several times larger than the photo-sensitive sensor areas each of the CCD sensors is shifted in two dimensions in order to fill in spatial gaps between adjacent sensors.

  19. High resolution animated scenes from stills.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhouchen; Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Yunbo; Kang, Sing Bing; Fang, Tian

    2007-01-01

    Current techniques for generating animated scenes involve either videos (whose resolution is limited) or a single image (which requires a significant amount of user interaction). In this paper, we describe a system that allows the user to quickly and easily produce a compelling-looking animation from a small collection of high resolution stills. Our system has two unique features. First, it applies an automatic partial temporal order recovery algorithm to the stills in order to approximate the original scene dynamics. The output sequence is subsequently extracted using a second-order Markov Chain model. Second, a region with large motion variation can be automatically decomposed into semiautonomous regions such that their temporal orderings are softly constrained. This is to ensure motion smoothness throughout the original region. The final animation is obtained by frame interpolation and feathering. Our system also provides a simple-to-use interface to help the user to fine-tune the motion of the animated scene. Using our system, an animated scene can be generated in minutes. We show results for a variety of scenes. PMID:17356221

  20. High-resolution microwave images of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, A. W.; Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern midlatitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH3 mixing ratio to be 0.00012 in a region just below the NH3 clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH3 in northern midlatitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process.

  1. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    PubMed

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  2. High-resolution microwave images of saturn.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A W; Muhleman, D O; Berge, G L

    1989-09-15

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern mid-latitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH(3) mixing ratio to be 1.2 x 10(-4) in a region just below the NH(3) clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH(3) in northern mid-latitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process.

  3. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  4. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  5. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  6. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  7. High-Resolution Radar Imagery of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, M. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present high-resolution radar images of Mars obtained during the 2005 and 2007 oppositions. The images were constructed from long-code delay-Doppler observations made with the Arecibo S-band (13-cm) radar. The average image resolution of 3 km represented a better than order-of-magnitude improvement over pre-upgrade Arecibo imagery of the planet. Images of depolarized reflectivity (an indicator primarily of wavelength-scale surface roughness) show the same bright volcanic flow features seen in earlier imagery, but with much finer detail. A new image of the Elysium region shows fine detail in the radar-bright channels of Athabasca Vallis, Marte Vallis, and Grjota Vallis. The new images of Tharsis and Olympus Mons also show a complex array of radar-bright and radar-dark features. Southern Amazonis exhibits some of the most complex and puzzling radar-bright structure on the planet. Another curiosity is the Chryse/Xanthe/Channels region, where we find some radar-bright features in or adjacent to fluvial chaos structures. Chryse/Xanthe is also the only region of Mars showing radar-bright craters (which are rare on Mars but common on the Moon and Mercury). We also obtained the first delay-Doppler image showing the enhanced backscatter from the residual south polar ice cap. In addition to the depolarized imagery, we were able to make the first delay-Doppler images of the circular polarization ratio (an important diagnostic for surface roughness texture). We find that vast areas of the radar-bright volcanic regions have polarization ratios close to unity. Such high ratios are rare for terrestrial lava flows and only seen for extremely blocky surfaces giving high levels of multiple scattering.

  8. Decadal prediction with a high resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Valcke, Sophie; Terray, Laurent; Moine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ability of a high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (with a horizontal resolution of the quarter degree in the ocean and of about 50 km in the atmosphere) to predict the annual means of temperature, precipitation, sea-ice volume and extent is assessed. Reasonable skill in predicting sea surface temperatures and surface air temperature is obtained, especially over the North Atlantic, the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. The skill in predicting precipitations is weaker and not significant. The Sea Ice Extent and volume are also reasonably predicted in winter (March) and summer (September). It is however argued that the skill is mainly due to the atmosphere feeding in well-mixed GHGs. The mid-90's subpolar gyre warming is assessed. The model simulates a warming of the North Atlantic Ocean, associated with an increase of the meridional heat transport, a strengthening of the North Atlantic current and a deepening of the mixed layer over the Labrador Sea. The atmosphere plays a role in the warming through a modulation of the North Atlantic Oscillation and a shrinking of the subpolar gyre. At the 3-8 years lead-time, a negative anomaly of pressure, located south of the subpolar gyre is associated with the wind speed decrease over the subpolar gyre. It prevents oceanic heat-loss and favors the northward move, from the subtropical to the subpolar gyre, of anomalously warm and salty water, leading to its warming. We finally argued that the subpolar gyre warming is triggered by the ocean dynamic but the atmosphere can contributes to its sustaining. This work is realised in the framework of the EU FP7 SPECS Project.

  9. High-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Bowman, Brett; Schwientek, Patrick; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Gies, Esther; Hallam, Steve; Tringe, Susannah; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The representation of bacterial and archaeal genome sequences is strongly biased towards cultivated organisms, which belong to merely four phylogenetic groups. Functional information and inter-phylum level relationships are still largely underexplored for candidate phyla, which are often referred to as microbial dark matter. Furthermore, a large portion of the 16S rRNA gene records in the GenBank database are labeled as environmental samples and unclassified, which is in part due to low read accuracy, potential chimeric sequences produced during PCR amplifications and the low resolution of short amplicons. In order to improve the phylogenetic classification of novel species and advance our knowledge of the ecosystem function of uncultivated microorganisms, high-throughput full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing methodologies with reduced biases are needed. We evaluated the performance of PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing in high-resolution phylogenetic microbial community profiling. For this purpose, we compared PacBio and Illumina metagenomic shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of a mock community as well as of an environmental sample from Sakinaw Lake, British Columbia. Sakinaw Lake is known to contain a large age of microbial species from candidate phyla. Sequencing results show that community structure based on PacBio shotgun and 16S rRNA gene sequences is highly similar in both the mock and the environmental communities. Resolution power and community representation accuracy from SMRT sequencing data appeared to be independent of GC content of microbial genomes and was higher when compared to Illumina-based metagenome shotgun and 16S rRNA gene (iTag) sequences, e.g. full-length sequencing resolved all 23 OTUs in the mock community, while iTags did not resolve closely related species. SMRT sequencing hence offers various potential benefits when characterizing uncharted microbial communities.

  10. Exploring New Challenges of High-Resolution SWOT Satellite Altimetry with a Regional Model of the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, P.; Verron, J. A.; Djath, B.; Duran, M.; Gaultier, L.; Gourdeau, L.; Melet, A.; Molines, J. M.; Ubelmann, C.

    2014-12-01

    The upcoming high-resolution SWOT altimetry satellite will provide an unprecedented description of the ocean dynamic topography for studying sub- and meso-scale processes in the ocean. But there is still much uncertainty on the signal that will be observed. There are many scientific questions that are unresolved about the observability of altimetry at vhigh resolution and on the dynamical role of the ocean meso- and submesoscales. In addition, SWOT data will raise specific problems due to the size of the data flows. These issues will probably impact the data assimilation approaches for future scientific or operational oceanography applications. In this work, we propose to use a high-resolution numerical model of the Western Pacific Solomon Sea as a regional laboratory to explore such observability and dynamical issues, as well as new data assimilation challenges raised by SWOT. The Solomon Sea connects subtropical water masses to the equatorial ones through the low latitude western boundary currents and could potentially modulate the tropical Pacific climate. In the South Western Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits very intense eddy kinetic energy levels, while relatively little is known about the mesoscale and submesoscale activities in this region. The complex bathymetry of the region, complicated by the presence of narrow straits and numerous islands, raises specific challenges. So far, a Solomon sea model configuration has been set up at 1/36° resolution. Numerical simulations have been performed to explore the meso- and submesoscales dynamics. The numerical solutions which have been validated against available in situ data, show the development of small scale features, eddies, fronts and filaments. Spectral analysis reveals a behavior that is consistent with the SQG theory. There is a clear evidence of energy cascade from the small scales including the submesoscales, although those submesoscales are only partially resolved by the model. In parallel

  11. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  12. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  13. The HFIP High Resolution Hurricane Forecast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, L. B.; Bernardet, L.; Bao, S.; Brown, B.; Carson, L.; Fowler, T.; Halley Gotway, J.; Harrop, C.; Szoke, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Wolff, J.; Yuan, H.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are a serious concern for the nation, causing significant risk to life, property and economic vitality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service has a mission of issuing tropical cyclone forecasts and warnings, aimed at protecting life and property and enhancing the national economy. In the last 10 years, the errors in hurricane track forecasts have been reduced by about 50% through improved model guidance, enhanced observations, and forecaster expertise. However, little progress has been made during this period toward reducing forecasted intensity errors. To address this shortcoming, NOAA established the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project (HFIP) in 2007. HFIP is a 10-year plan to improve one to five day tropical cyclone forecasts, with a focus on rapid intensity change. Recent research suggests that prediction models with grid spacing less than 1 km in the inner core of the hurricane may provide a substantial improvement in intensity forecasts. The 2008-09 staging of the High Resolution Hurricane (HRH) Test focused on quantifying the impact of increased horizontal resolution in numerical models on hurricane intensity forecasts. The primary goal of this test was an evaluation of the effect of increasing horizontal resolution within a given model across a variety of storms with different intensity, location and structure. The test focused on 69 retrospectives cases from the 2005 and 2007 hurricane seasons. Six modeling groups participated in the HRH test utilizing a variety of models, including three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the operational GFDL model, the Navy’s tropical cyclone model, and a model developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM). The Development Testbed Center (DTC) was tasked with providing objective verification statistics for a variety of metrics. This presentation provides an overview of the HRH Test and a summary of the standard

  14. EDITORIAL: High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-06-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  15. III-Nitride full-scale high-resolution microdisplays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Jacob; Li, J.; Lie, D. Y. C.; Bradford, Charles; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2011-07-01

    We report the realization and properties of a high-resolution solid-state self-emissive microdisplay based on III-nitride semiconductor micro-size light emitting diodes (µLEDs) capable of delivering video graphics images. The luminance level of III-nitride microdisplays is several orders of magnitude higher than those of liquid crystal and organic-LED displays. The pixel emission intensity was almost constant over an operational temperature range from 100 to -100 °C. The outstanding performance is a direct attribute of III-nitride semiconductors. An energy efficient active drive scheme is accomplished by hybrid integration between µLED arrays and Si CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) active matrix integrated circuits. These integrated devices could play important roles in emerging fields such as biophotonics and optogenetics, as well as ultra-portable products such as next generation pico-projectors.

  16. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  17. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Dengler, Robert J. (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional imaging radar operating at high frequency e.g., 670 GHz, is disclosed. The active target illumination inherent in radar solves the problem of low signal power and narrow-band detection by using submillimeter heterodyne mixer receivers. A submillimeter imaging radar may use low phase-noise synthesizers and a fast chirper to generate a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) waveform. Three-dimensional images are generated through range information derived for each pixel scanned over a target. A peak finding algorithm may be used in processing for each pixel to differentiate material layers of the target. Improved focusing is achieved through a compensation signal sampled from a point source calibration target and applied to received signals from active targets prior to FFT-based range compression to extract and display high-resolution target images. Such an imaging radar has particular application in detecting concealed weapons or contraband.

  18. U Activity Ratios in Surface Waters as Tracers and Chronometers of Water Transfers in the Critical zone;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.

    2015-12-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as geochemical tracer and chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  19. The sun and nearby stars: microwave observations at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Kundu, M R; Lang, K R

    1985-04-01

    High-resolution microwave observations are providing new insights into the nature of active regions and eruptions on the sun and nearby stars. The strength, evolution, and structure of magnetic fields in coronal loops can be determined by multiple-wavelength observations with the Very Large Array. Flare models can be tested with Very Large Array snapshot maps, which have angular resolutions of better than 1 second of arc in time periods as short as 10 seconds. Magnetic changes that precede solar eruptions on time scales of tens of minutes involve primarily emerging coronal loops and the interactions of two or more loops. Magnetic reconnection at the interface of two closed loops may accelerate electrons and trigger the release of microwave energy in the coronal parts of the magnetic loops. Nearby main-sequence stars of late spectral type emit slowly varying microwave radiation and stellar microwave bursts that show striking similarities to those of the sun. PMID:17811548

  20. Porous silicon phantoms for high-resolution scintillation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francia, G.; Scafè, R.; De Vincentis, G.; La Ferrara, V.; Iurlaro, G.; Nasti, I.; Montani, L.; Pellegrini, R.; Betti, M.; Martucciello, N.; Pani, R.

    2006-12-01

    High resolution radionuclide imaging requires phantoms with precise geometries and known activities using either Anger cameras equipped with pinhole collimators or dedicated small animal devices. Porous silicon samples, having areas of different shape and size, can be made and loaded with a radioactive material, obtaining: (a) precise radio-emitting figures corresponding to the porous areas geometry, (b) a radioactivity of each figure depending on the pore's specifications, and (c) the same emission energy to be used in true exams. To this aim a sample with porous circular areas has been made and loaded with a 99mTcO 4- solution. Imaging has been obtained using both general purpose and pinhole collimators. This first sample shows some defects that are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Thermal design concept for a high resolution UV spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, P.; Stipandic, E.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal design concept described has been developed for the High Resolution UV Spectrometer/Polarimeter to be flown on the Solar Maximum Mission. Based on experience gained from a similar Orbiting Solar Observatory mission payload, it has been recognized that initial protection of the optical elements, contamination control, reduction of scattered light, tight bulk temperature, and gradient constraints are key elements that must be accommodated in any thermal control concept for this class of instrument. Salient features of the design include: (1) a telescope door providing contamination protection of an aplanatic Gregorian telescope; (2) a rastering system for the secondary mirror; (3) a unique solar heat absorbing device; (4) heat pipes and special radiators; (5) heaters for active temperature control and optics contamination protection; and (6) high precision platinum resistance thermometers. Viability of the design concept has been established by extensive thermal analysis and some subsystem testing. A summary of analytical and test results is included.

  2. High-Resolution Fractionation of Signaling Endosomes Containing Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Gretchen; Welker, Jonathan; Scott, Jessica; van Der Salm, Louise; Grimes, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Receptor endocytosis is regulated by ligand binding, and receptors may signal after endocytosis in signaling endosomes. We hypothesized that signaling endosomes containing different types of receptors may be distinct from one another and have different physical characteristics. To test this hypothesis, we developed a high-resolution organelle fractionation method based on mass and density, optimized to resolve endosomes from other organelles. Three different types of receptors undergoing ligand-induced endocytosis were localized predominately in endosomes that were resolved from one another using this method. Endosomes containing activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), TrkA and EGFR, were similar to one another. Endosomes containing p75NTR (in the tumor necrosis receptor superfamily) and PAC1 (a G-protein-coupled receptor) were distinct from each other and from RTK endosomes. Receptor-specific endosomes may direct the intracellular location and duration of signal transduction pathways to dictate response to signals and determine cell fate. PMID:19416476

  3. The sun and nearby stars - Microwave observations at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Lang, K. R.

    1985-04-01

    High-resolution microwave observations are providing new insights into the nature of active regions and eruptions on the sun and nearby stars. The strength, evolution, and structure of magnetic fields in coronal loops can be determined by multiple-wavelength observations with the Very Large Array. Flare models ccan be tested with Very Large Array snapshot maps, which have angular resolutions of better than 1 second of arc in time periods as short as 10 seconds. Magnetic changes that precede solar eruptions on time scales of tens of minutes involve primarily emerging coronal loops and the interactions of two or more loops. Magnetic reconnection at the interface of two closed loops may accelerate electrons and trigger the release of microwave energy in the coronal parts of the magnetic loops. Nearby main-sequence stars of late spectral type emit slowly varying microwave radiation and stellar microwave bursts that show striking similarities to those of the sun.

  4. High-resolution mapping of protein sequence-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Douglas M; Araya, Carlos L; Fleishman, Sarel J; Kellogg, Elizabeth H; Stephany, Jason J; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    We present a large-scale approach to investigate the functional consequences of sequence variation in a protein. The approach entails the display of hundreds of thousands of protein variants, moderate selection for activity and high-throughput DNA sequencing to quantify the performance of each variant. Using this strategy, we tracked the performance of >600,000 variants of a human WW domain after three and six rounds of selection by phage display for binding to its peptide ligand. Binding properties of these variants defined a high-resolution map of mutational preference across the WW domain; each position had unique features that could not be captured by a few representative mutations. Our approach could be applied to many in vitro or in vivo protein assays, providing a general means for understanding how protein function relates to sequence.

  5. Using Formaldehyde to Create High Resolution Temperature Maps of CMZ Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    80% of the dense molecular gas in our Galaxy resides in the central few hundred parsecs, known as the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). From our understanding of star formation, we would expect a comparatively high star formation rate in this region, but the estimates so far indicate that only 5-10% of the star formation in our Galaxy occurs there. There are a number of physical effects that may be causing this, but we particularly wish to investigate the role of the temperature of the gas - which initial estimates put at an average of 50-100 K or about a factor of 5 higher than elsewhere in the disk. Armed with the data taken by the SMA Legacy Survey of the CMZ, we aim to compare parameters two transition lines for the dense gas tracer H2CO which are particularly sensitive to temperature to measure the gas temperature on 0.2 pc scales. Ultimately we provide a high resolution temperature map for a set of clouds in the CMZ dubbed "the three little pigs" to provide an initial comparison with similar work done with ammonia tracers in order to pave the way for a high resolution temperature map of the entire CMZ.

  6. High resolution infrared acquisitions droning over the LUSI mud eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Felice, Fabio; Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano

    2016-04-01

    The use of low-cost hand-held infrared (IR) thermal cameras based on uncooled micro-bolometer detector arrays became more widespread during the recent years. Thermal cameras have the ability to estimate temperature values without contact and therefore can be used in circumstances where objects are difficult or dangerous to reach such as volcanic eruptions. Since May 2006 the Indonesian LUSI mud eruption continues to spew boiling mud, water, aqueous vapor, CO2, CH4 and covers a surface of nearly 7 km2. At this locality we performed surveys over the unreachable erupting crater. In the framework of the LUSI Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), in 2014 and 2015, we acquired high resolution infrared images using a specifically equipped remote-controlled drone flying at an altitude of m 100. The drone is equipped with GPS and an autopilot system that allows pre-programming the flying path or designing grids. The mounted thermal camera has peak spectral sensitivity in LW wavelength (μm 10) that is characterized by low water vapor and CO2 absorption. The low distance (high resolution) acquisitions have a temperature detail every cm 40, therefore it is possible to detect and observe physical phenomena such as thermodynamic behavior, hot mud and fluids emissions locations and their time shifts. Despite the harsh logistics and the continuously varying gas concentrations we managed to collect thermal images to estimate the crater zone spatial thermal variations. We applied atmosphere corrections to calculate infrared absorption by high concentration of water vapor. Thousands of images have been stitched together to obtain a mosaic of the crater zone. Regular monitoring with heat variation measurements collected, e.g. every six months, could give important information about the volcano activity estimating its evolution. A future data base of infrared high resolution and visible images stored in a web server could be a useful monitoring tool. An interesting development will be

  7. High-resolution ground-based spectroscopy: where and how ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, R.

    2002-07-01

    An overview is presented of high-resolution optical spectrographs in operation or under development at large telescopes, with emphasis on those facilities best suited for the study of late-type stars and stellar surface inhomogeneities. Plans for the development of new high-resolution spectroscopic instruments are discussed with emphasis on the ICE spectrograph for the PEPSI spectropolarimeter at the LBT.

  8. Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC). Rev. 59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This monthly report discusses management and general status, mission support and operations, and science activities. A technical memorandum entitled "Failure Analysis of HRC Flight Relay" is included with the report.

  9. Theme issue "High Resolution Earth Imaging for Geospatial Information"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heipke, Christian; Soergel, Uwe; Rottensteiner, Franz; Jutzi, Boris

    2015-02-01

    Earth imaging from air and space has undergone major changes over the last decade. Examples of new and significant developments comprise the development and constant improvement of digital aerial cameras, multiple-echo and full-waveform laser scanners and the appearance of geosensor networks and unconventional platforms, most notably unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), sometimes called unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), and the ever increasing number of high-resolution and hyperspectral optical and SAR satellite sensors, small satellites and satellite constellations, which allow for both, a continued availability of satellite data over long periods of time, and a very short revisit time for any location on the globe. To give few examples: the latest Landsat satellite, appropriately called the Landsat data continuity mission or LDCM was launched on February 2013, continuing the Landsat mission which began back in 1972; during 2013 and 2014 France has put the SPOT 6 and 7 twin satellites into orbit, extending the history of high resolution space images, which started in 1986; and in April 2014 the European Space Agency (ESA) successfully launched the Sentinel 1A satellite with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor, the first of a fleet of different sensors that will be sent into space in the coming years. Sentinel 1A together with its twin system Sentinel 1B, to be launched in 2016, will continue the tremendous success story of ESA's C band SAR satellite activities dating back to 1991. Like the predecessors ERS 1, ERS 2, and Envisat ASAR, the Sentinel 1 systems are designed to cover the entire land mass with medium resolution, the repeat cycle is 12 days for Sentinel 1A alone and will even drop to six days as soon as both satellites are operational.

  10. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics

  11. A High-resolution Reanalysis for the European CORDEX Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentzien, Sabrina; Bollmeyer, Christoph; Crewell, Susanne; Friederichs, Petra; Hense, Andreas; Keller, Jan; Keune, Jessica; Kneifel, Stefan; Ohlwein, Christian; Pscheidt, Ieda; Redl, Stephanie; Steinke, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    A High-resolution Reanalysis for the European CORDEX Region Within the Hans-Ertel-Centre for Weather Research (HErZ), the climate monitoring branch concentrates efforts on the assessment and analysis of regional climate in Germany and Europe. In joint cooperation with DWD (German Meteorological Service), a high-resolution reanalysis system based on the COSMO model has been developed. Reanalyses gain more and more importance as a source of meteorological information for many purposes and applications. Several global reanalyses projects (e.g., ERA, MERRA, CSFR, JMA9) produce and verify these data sets to provide time series as long as possible combined with a high data quality. Due to a spatial resolution down to 50-70km and 3-hourly temporal output, they are not suitable for small scale problems (e.g., regional climate assessment, meso-scale NWP verification, input for subsequent models such as river runoff simulations). The implementation of regional reanalyses based on a limited area model along with a data assimilation scheme is able to generate reanalysis data sets with high spatio-temporal resolution. The work presented here focuses on the regional reanalysis for Europe with a domain matching the CORDEX-EURO-11 specifications, albeit at a higher spatial resolution, i.e., 0.055° (6km) instead of 0.11° (12km). The COSMO reanalysis system comprises the assimilation of observational data using the existing nudging scheme of COSMO and is complemented by a special soil moisture analysis and boundary conditions given by ERA-interim data. The reanalysis data set currently covers 6 years (2007-2012). The evaluation of the reanalyses is done using independent observations with special emphasis on precipitation and high-impact weather situations. The development and evaluation of the COSMO-based reanalysis for the CORDEX-Euro domain can be seen as a preparation for joint European activities on the development of an ensemble system of regional reanalyses for Europe.

  12. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  13. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M.; Gamey, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

  14. An Overview of MADONA: A Multinational Field Study of High-Resolution Meteorology and Diffusion over Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, R. M.; Byers, J. H.; Aufm Kampe, W.; van Raden, H.; Weber, H.; Biltoft, C.; Collins, C. G.; Higgs, T. J.; Jones, C. D.; Ride, D. J.; Robson, R.; Hin, A. R. T.; Johansson, P.-E.; Nyrén, K.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mikkelsen, T.; Santabarbara, J. M.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Kimber, J. F.; Streicher, J.

    1999-01-01

    The multination, high-resolution field study of Meteorology And Diffusion Over Non-Uniform Areas (MADONA) was conducted by scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands at Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom, during September and October 1992. The host of the field study was the Chemical and Biological Defence Establishment (CBDE, now part of Defence Evaluation and Research Agency) at Porton Down. MADONA was designed and conducted for high-resolution meteorological data collection and diffusion experiments using smoke, sulphurhexaflouride (SF6), and propylene gas during unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions in an effort to obtain terrain-influenced meteorological fields, dispersion, and concentration fluctuation measurements using specialized sensors and tracer generators. Thirty-one days of meteorological data were collected during the period 7 September-7 October and 27 diffusion experiments were conducted from 14 to 23 September 1992. Puffs and plumes of smoke and SF6 were released simultaneously for most of the experiments to gauge the resultant diffusion and concentration behavior. Some 44 meteorological and aerosol sensors and four source generators were used during each day of the field study. This array of sensors included 14 towers of wind cups and vanes, 10 sonic anemometer/thermometers, one boundary layer sonde, two lidar, one ion sensor, the CBDE Weather Station, and several one-of-a-kind sensors. Simulations of airflow and diffusion over the MADONA topography (a 9 km by 7.5 km area) were made with a variety of models. Wind fields and wind-related parameters were simulated with several high-resolution (microalpha scale) wind flow models. A tally of the various data-gathering activities indicates that the execution of MADONA was highly successful. Preliminary use of the datasets shows the high quality and depth of the MADONA database. This well-documented database is

  15. High-Resolution, Two-Wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.; Henry, Paul K.; Logiurato, D. Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Modified two-color pyrometer measures temperatures of objects with high spatial resolution. Image focused on hole 0.002 in. (0.05 mm) in diameter in brass sheet near end of bundle, causing image to be distributed so fibers covered by defocused radiation from target. Pinhole ensures radiation from only small part of target scene reaches detector, thus providing required spatial resolution. By spreading radiation over bundle, pinhole ensures entire active area of detectors utilized. Produces signal as quiet as conventional instruments but with only 1/64 input radiation.

  16. High resolution spectroscopy to support atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. Chris; Harvey, Gale A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular spectra of ozone and other infrared-active atmospheric species is needed for accurate calculation of atmospheric heating and cooling rates in climate models. Remote sensing experiments on the Nimbus-7 satellites and the Spacelab-3 Space Shuttle Mission have shown that space-based measurements of infrared absorption or emission can be used to accurately determine the concentrations and distributions of stratospheric species on a global scale. The objective of this research task is to improve knowledge of the spectroscopic line parameters (positions, intensities, assignments, halfwidths, and pressure-induced shifts) of key atmospheric constituents through laboratory measurements.

  17. High resolution CO images of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meixner, M.; Puchalsky, R.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M.

    1990-01-01

    The CO (J = 1-0) emission of three Seyfert galaxies, NGC 3227, NGC 7469, and NGC 5033 was imaged. The CO emission in NGC 3227 and NGC 7469 appears as compact structures centered on the active nuclei, containing substantial fractions of the single-dish flux. In NGC 3227, 10 percent of the CO flux detected by the interferometer is contained within the ionized narrow-line region. The unresolved molecular gas concentrations in the nucleus of NGC 3227 imply a CO mass of 65 million solar masses concentrated within a diameter less than 50 pc. The CO emission in NGC 5033 is not detected at this resolution, implying a CO structure size of 20 to 60 arcsec. Continuum emission at 2.7 mm is not detected in any of the three galaxies. In the center of NGC 7469, the H2 mass is comparable to the dynamical mass. Kinematic studies of the detected gas reveal a rotational motion of the gas in NGC 3227 and NGC 7469, allowing identification of the gas in NGC 7469 with a nuclear starburst. These data are consistent with the idea that interactions between galaxies cause gas to concentrate in their nuclei thereby feeding starburst and Seyfert activity.

  18. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  19. High resolution monitoring system for IRE stack releases.

    PubMed

    Deconninck, B; De Lellis, C

    2013-11-01

    The main activity of IRE (Institute for Radio-Element) is radioisotope production of bulk (99)Mo and (131)I for medical application (diagnosis and therapy). Those isotopes are chemically extracted from HEU (High Enriched Uranium) targets activated in reactors. During this process, fission products are released from the targets, including noble gases isotopes (Xe and Kr). Like any nuclear plant, IRE has release limits which are given by the Belgium authority and moreover IRE is in the process of continuously reducing the level of its releases. To achieve this mission, the need of an accurate tool is necessary and IRE has developed a specific monitoring system using a high resolution detector in order to identify and accurately estimate its gaseous releases. This system has a continuous air sampling system in the plant main stack. The sampled gases cross charcoal cartridges where they are slowed down and concentrated for higher detection efficiency. In front of those cartridges is installed an HPGe detector with a detection chain connected to a specific analysis system allowing on-line spectrum analysis. Each isotope can be separately followed without interferences, especially during the production process where high activity can be released. Due to its conception, the system also allows to measure iodine isotopes by integration on the charcoal cartridges. This device is of great help for accurately estimate IRE releases and to help for understanding specific releases and their origin in the production or maintenance process.

  20. High resolution in galaxy photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.-L.; Lelievre, G.

    Techniques for increasing the resolution of ground-based photometric observations of galaxies are discussed. The theoretical limitations on resolution and their implications for choosing telescope size at a given site considered, with an emphasis on the importance of the Fried (1966) parameter r0. The techniques recommended are shortening exposure time, selection of the highest-resolution images, and a posteriori digital image processing (as opposed to active-mirror image stabilization or the cine-CCD system of Fort et al., 1984). The value of the increased resolution (by a factor of 2) achieved at Pic du Midi observatory for studies of detailed structure in extragalactic objects, for determining the distance to galaxies, and for probing the central cores of galaxies is indicated.

  1. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  2. High-Resolution Simulations of Gas-Solids Jet Penetration Into a High Density Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of a gas-solids jet in a 0.3 m diameter and 15.9 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser were conducted with the open source software-MFIX. In the numerical simulations, both gas and solids injected through a 1.6 cm diameter radial-directed tube 4.3 m above the bottom distributor were tracked as tracers, which enable the analysis of the characteristics of a two-phase jet. Two jetting gas velocities of 16.6 and 37.2 m/s were studied with the other operating conditions fixed. Reasonable flow hydrodynamics with respect to overall pressure drop, voidage, and solids velocity distributions were predicted. Due to the different dynamic responses of gas and particles to the crossflow, a significant separation of gas and solids within the jet region was predicted for both cases. In addition, the jet characteristics based on tracer concentration and tracer mass fraction profiles at different downstream levels are discussed. Overall, the numerical predictions compare favorably to the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  3. High resolution characterization of aquifers to improve flow and transport models of highly heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan Diker, Mine

    Aquifers are the primary sources of clean drinking water. Pollution in aquifers is one of the most challenging and important environmental problems. It is not only extremely complex to map but also difficult to remediate. Flow and transport of water and pollutants in porous media requires detailed characterization of the properties of the media. The main property which controls the flow and transport is hydraulic conductivity (K), which can be defined as the ability of the media to let the water flow through. Intensive studies to map the distribution of hydraulic conductivity are necessary to model the plume migration. Conventional in-situ aquifer characterization techniques are invasive and lack the necessary high resolution. Therefore, novel methods are required to improve the methods to monitor and simulate the flow and transport through aquifers. This study introduces a combination of novel techniques to provide the necessary information related to porous media. The proposed method was tested at a highly heterogeneous site called the Macro Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi. The MADE site is a very well studied site where several large scale tracer tests were conducted in the 1980s and 1990s. The tracers used for these tests were monitored using more than 300 multi-level sampler (MLS) wells. Concentration measurements showed that the majority of the mass stayed near the injection area, whereas minute concentrations were measured further down-gradient. This behavior is significantly different from the simulations created using models based on the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE). This behavior and the inability to explain this using most models has led to a major debate in the hydrologic science community. The hypothesis of this study is that the ADE based models can reproduce simulations of the measured transport when the models are parameterized with sufficient high-resolution hydraulic conductivity data. Two novel high resolution

  4. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Van Beek, L. P.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays a vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and also supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, the large natural groundwater storage provides a buffer against water shortage and sustains flows to rivers and wetlands, supporting ecosystem habitats and biodiversity. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, although it is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle. Thus, a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system that allows for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows is essential for GHMs that increasingly run at finer resolution. In this study we present a transient global groundwater model with a resolution of 5 arc-minutes (approximately 10 km at the equator) using MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988). Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps and datasets (Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2013) combined with information about e.g. aquifer thickness and presence of less permeable, impermeable, and semi-impermeable layers. For the parameterization, we relied entirely on available global datasets and did not calibrate the model so that it can equally be expanded to data poor environments. We forced the groundwater model with the output from the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated simulated groundwater heads with observations, from North America and Australia, resulting in a coefficient of determination of 0.8 and 0.7 respectively. This shows that it is feasible to build a global groundwater model using best available

  5. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.; Sutanudjaja, E. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is the world's largest accessible source of fresh water. It plays a vital role in satisfying needs for drinking water, agriculture and industrial activities. During times of drought groundwater sustains baseflow to rivers and wetlands, thereby supporting ecosystems. Most global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, mainly due to lack of geohydrological data at the global scale. For the simulation of lateral flow and groundwater head dynamics a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system is needed, especially for GHMs that run at finer resolution. In this study we present a global scale groundwater model (run at 6' as dynamic steady state) using MODFLOW to construct an equilibrium water table at its natural state as the result of long-term climatic forcing. The aquifer schematization and properties were based on available global datasets of lithology and transmissivities combined with estimated aquifer thickness of an upper unconfined aquifer. The model is forced with outputs from the land-surface model PCR-GLOBWB, specifically with net recharge and surface water levels. A sensitivity analysis, in which the model was run with various parameter settings, showed variation in saturated conductivity causes most of the groundwater level variations. Simulated groundwater heads were validated against reported piezometer observations. The validation showed that groundwater depths are reasonably well simulated for many regions of the world, especially for sediment basins (R2 = 0.95). The simulated regional scale groundwater patterns and flowpaths confirm the relevance of taking lateral groundwater flow into account in GHMs. Flowpaths show inter-basin groundwater flow that can be a significant part of a basins water budget and helps to sustain river baseflow, explicitly during times of droughts. Also important aquifer systems are recharged by inter-basin groundwater flows that positively affect water

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Explorer (HIREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1999-01-01

    SAO has carried out a study to determine the feasibility of building an orbiting telescope capable of resolving 7 km structure on the Sun. In order to achieve the required imaging the telescope must have a resolution 0.01 arcsec. This fact challenges the state of the art of orbiting telescopes in several areas: mirror figuring; optical metrology; optical mounting; mirror figure control; system alignment; optical stability; observatory pointing; and image stability image stability. The telescope design concept is based on a 0.6m Cassegrain-style telescope with a 240 meter effective focal length. This is achieved with 2 mirrors supported at opposite ends of a 27 m space-deployable boom. The telescope mirrors are coated with multilayers designed to reflect a broad XUV passband. A third, small mirror, near the focal plane performs the function of selecting the narrow band that is finally imaged. Image stabilization to the 0.005 a,rcsec level is achieved by active control of the secondary mirror. The primary mirror is held unadjustably to the spacecraft, its pointing set by the space- craft orientation. The secondary mirror is mounted on a 6-axis stage that permits its position to be changed to align the telescope in space. The stage is intended for intermittent adjustment, both because of its speed of travel, and the TBD alignment procedure. The third mirror is called the TXI (Tuneable X-ray Imager). It is mounted on a gimbal that permits it to be tipped over a 60 degree range, selecting between the individual wavelengths in the initial bandpass. It can also rotated completely out of the way to allow the full, broadband EUV flux to strike the focal plane.

  7. Enhancing the activation of silicon carbide tracer particles for PEPT applications using gas-phase deposition of alumina at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdesueiro, D.; Garcia-Triñanes, P.; Meesters, G. M. H.; Kreutzer, M. T.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.; Seville, J. P. K.; van Ommen, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    We have enhanced the radio-activation efficiency of SiC (silicon carbide) particles, which by nature have a poor affinity towards 18F ions, to be employed as tracers in studies using PEPT (Positron Emission Particle Tracking). The resulting SiC-Al2O3 core-shell structure shows a good labelling efficiency, comparable to γ-Al2O3 tracer particles, which are commonly used in PEPT. The coating of the SiC particles was carried at 27±3 °C and 1 bar in a fluidized bed reactor, using trimethylaluminium and water as precursors, by a gas phase technique similar to atomic layer deposition. The thickness of the alumina films, which ranged from 5 to 500 nm, was measured by elemental analysis and confirmed with FIB-TEM (focused ion beam - transmission electron microscope), obtaining consistent results from both techniques. By depositing such a thin film of alumina, properties that influence the hydrodynamic behaviour of the SiC particles, such as size, shape and density, are hardly altered, ensuring that the tracer particle shows the same flow behaviour as the other particles. The paper describes a general method to improve the activation efficiency of materials, which can be applied for the production of tracer particles for many other applications too.

  8. Application of advanced very high resolution radiometer vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, I.Y.; Tucker, C.J.; Prentice, K.C.

    1987-03-20

    Normalized difference vegetation indices derived from radiances measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer aboard the NOAA 7 polar-orbiting satellite were used to prescribe the phasing of terrestrial photosynthesis. The satellite data were combined with field data on soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to obtain the seasonal exchange of CO/sub 2/ between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO/sub 2/ thus obtained were employed as source/sink functions in a global three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model to simulate the annual oscillations of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere. Reasonable agreement was found between the simulated and observed annual cycles of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ at the locations of the remote monitoring stations. The results demonstrate that satellite data of high spatial and temporal resolution can be used to provide quantitative information about seasonal and longer-term variations of photosynthetic activity on a global scale. Atmospheric CO/sub 2/ observations and a three-dimensional atmospheric model have been used to validate the translation of the nondimensional satellite data into dimensional carbon fluxes. Direct calibration will require extensive ground truth and field measurements at ecosystem scales.

  9. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Inge; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays a vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater storage provides a large natural buffer against water shortage and sustains flows to rivers and wetlands, supporting ecosystem habitats and biodiversity. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, although it is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle. Thus, a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system that allows for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows is essential for GHMs that increasingly run at finer resolution. In this study we present a global groundwater model with a resolution of 5 arc-minutes (approximately 10 km at the equator) using MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988). With this global groundwater model we eventually intend to simulate the changes in the groundwater system over time that result from variations in recharge and abstraction. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps and datasets (Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2013), combined with our estimate of aquifer thickness for sedimentary basins. We forced the groundwater model with the output from the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. For the parameterization, we relied entirely on available global datasets and did not calibrate the model so that it can equally be expanded to data poor environments. Based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run the model with various hydrogeological parameter settings, we observed that most variance in groundwater

  10. High Resolution X-Ray Explorer (HIREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulb, Leon

    1997-01-01

    SAO is involved in a study to determine the feasibility of building an orbiting telescope capable of resolving 7 km structure on the Sun. In order to achieve the required imaging the telescope must have a resolution 0.01 arcsec. This fact challenges the state of the art of orbiting telescopes in several areas: Mirror Figuring; Optical Metrology; Optical Mounting; Mirror Figure Control; System Alignment; Optical Stability; Observatory Pointing; and Image Stability. The telescope design concept is based on a 0.6 m Gregorian-style telescope with a 240 meter effective focal length. This is achieved with 2 mirrors supported at opposite ends of a 35 m space-deployable boom. The telescope mirrors are coated with multilayers designed to reflect a broad XUV passband. A third, small mirror, near the focal plane performs the function of selecting the narrow band that is finally imaged. Image stabilization to the 0.005 arcsec level is achieved by active control of the secondary mirror. The primary mirror is held unadjustably to the spacecraft, its pointing set by the spacecraft orientation. The secondary mirror is mounted on a 6-axis stage that permits its position to be changed to align the telescope in space. The stage is intended for intermittent adjustment, both because of its speed of travel, and the TBD alignment procedure. The third mirror is called the TXI (Tuneable X-ray Imager). It is mounted on a gimbal that permits it to be tipped over a 60 degree range, selecting between the individual wavelengths in the initial bandpass. It can also rotated completely out of the way to allow the full, broadband EUV flux to strike the focal plane. Finally, the focal plane assembly is designed to rotate on the outer edge of a circle centered on the TXI mirror rotation axis. This permits the focal plane to move to the location that the TXI redirects the light once it has been set to a given wavelength response. The Engineering Study is divided into the following areas: Mirror

  11. High resolution integral holography using Fourier ptychographic approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui; Liu, Delian

    2014-12-29

    An innovative approach is proposed for calculating high resolution computer generated integral holograms by using the Fourier Ptychographic (FP) algorithm. The approach initializes a high resolution complex hologram with a random guess, and then stitches together low resolution multi-view images, synthesized from the elemental images captured by integral imaging (II), to recover the high resolution hologram through an iterative retrieval with FP constrains. This paper begins with an analysis of the principle of hologram synthesis from multi-projections, followed by an accurate determination of the constrains required in the Fourier ptychographic integral-holography (FPIH). Next, the procedure of the approach is described in detail. Finally, optical reconstructions are performed and the results are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that our proposed approach can reconstruct 3D scenes with high resolution.

  12. Update on High-Resolution Geodetically Controlled LROC Polar Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Richie, J.; Edmundson, K.; Laura, J.; Robinson, M.; Speyerer, E.; Boyd, A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R.; Nefian, A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe progress on high-resolution (1 m/pixel) geodetically controlled LROC mosaics of the lunar poles, which can be used for locating illumination resources (for solar power or cold traps) or landing site and surface operations planning.

  13. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  14. High resolution difference schemes for compressible gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P.; Colella, P.

    1980-07-30

    The advantages and disadvantages of four new high-resolution difference schemes, namely the von Neumann-Richtmyer, Godunovs, MUSCL and Glimms, for mathematically representing physical conditions in compressible gas flows are compared. (LCL)

  15. Methodology of high-resolution photography for mural condition database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, R.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Digital documentation is one of the most useful techniques to record the condition of cultural heritage. Recently, high-resolution images become increasingly useful because it is possible to show general views of mural paintings and also detailed mural conditions in a single image. As mural paintings are damaged by environmental stresses, it is necessary to record the details of painting condition on high-resolution base maps. Unfortunately, the cost of high-resolution photography and the difficulty of operating its instruments and software have commonly been an impediment for researchers and conservators. However, the recent development of graphic software makes its operation simpler and less expensive. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to make digital heritage inventories without special instruments, based on our recent our research project in Üzümlü church in Cappadocia, Turkey. This method enables us to achieve a high-resolution image database with low costs, short time, and limited human resources.

  16. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  17. High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    PubMed

    Gavaret, M; Maillard, L; Jung, J

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) allow the recording of spontaneous or evoked electromagnetic brain activity with excellent temporal resolution. Data must be recorded with high temporal resolution (sampling rate) and high spatial resolution (number of channels). Data analyses are based on several steps with selection of electromagnetic signals, elaboration of a head model and use of algorithms in order to solve the inverse problem. Due to considerable technical advances in spatial resolution, these tools now represent real methods of ElectroMagnetic Source Imaging. HR-EEG and MEG constitute non-invasive and complementary examinations, characterized by distinct sensitivities according to the location and orientation of intracerebral generators. In the presurgical assessment of drug-resistant partial epilepsies, HR-EEG and MEG can characterize and localize interictal activities and thus the irritative zone. HR-EEG and MEG often yield significant additional data that are complementary to other presurgical investigations and particularly relevant in MRI-negative cases. Currently, the determination of the epileptogenic zone and functional brain mapping remain rather less well-validated indications. In France, in 2014, HR-EEG is now part of standard clinical investigation of epilepsy, while MEG remains a research technique.

  18. Monitoring a quarry using high resolution data and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Tsombos, P. I.; Vaiopoulos, A. D.

    2010-10-01

    Active quarries near to urban centers are at the same time a necessity but also a source of pollution. Necessity as they supply to the construction companies the necessary aggregates and source of pollution as they affect biodiversity, vegetation cover and threaten water resources. The objective of this work is to indicate a monitoring methodology in order to survey the present state of the quarry sites and their evolution in time, which are the basic data needed to implement an adequate land reclamation project. The land monitoring has been realised both by using remote sensing techniques, supported by a Geographic Information System of the studied area, and by in situ surveying. The in situ surveying was able to assess the capability of the remote sensing model to describe the state of each site. High resolution satellite data from different sensors were used for the monitoring of an active quarry. More especially, Ikonos Quickbird, and Worldiew data were orthorectified and inserted in a GIS database in order to quantify the changes.

  19. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  20. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  1. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  2. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-11-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001).

  3. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  4. High performance simulation of environmental tracers in heterogeneous domains.

    PubMed

    Gardner, William P; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow, and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, and the mean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2D and 3D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer to the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3D domains differ significantly from 2D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3D systems. PMID:24372403

  5. High performance simulation of environmental tracers in heterogeneous domains.

    PubMed

    Gardner, William P; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow, and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, and the mean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2D and 3D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer to the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3D domains differ significantly from 2D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3D systems.

  6. Fiber optic cable-based high-resolution, long-distance VGA extenders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jin-Geun; Lee, Iksoo; Kim, Heejoon; Kim, Sungjoon; Koh, Yeon-Wan; Kim, Hoik; Lim, Jiseok; Kim, Chur; Kim, Jungwon

    2013-02-01

    Remote transfer of high-resolution video information finds more applications in detached display applications for large facilities such as theaters, sports complex, airports, and security facilities. Active optical cables (AOCs) provide a promising approach for enhancing both the transmittable resolution and distance that standard copper-based cables cannot reach. In addition to the standard digital formats such as HDMI, the high-resolution, long-distance transfer of VGA format signals is important for applications where high-resolution analog video ports should be also supported, such as military/defense applications and high-resolution video camera links. In this presentation we present the development of a compressionless, high-resolution (up to WUXGA, 1920x1200), long-distance (up to 2 km) VGA extenders based on serialized technique. We employed asynchronous serial transmission and clock regeneration techniques, which enables lower cost implementation of VGA extenders by removing the necessity for clock transmission and large memory at the receiver. Two 3.125-Gbps transceivers are used in parallel to meet the required maximum video data rate of 6.25 Gbps. As the data are transmitted asynchronously, 24-bit pixel clock time stamp is employed to regenerate video pixel clock accurately at the receiver side. In parallel to the video information, stereo audio and RS-232 control signals are transmitted as well.

  7. Tracer development at ESRI

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Rose, P.E.; McPherson, P.

    1996-04-10

    At ESRI the Tracer Development Program is divided into three components: liquid-phase tracers, vapor-phase tracers, and pre-test modeling. The liquid-phase project has tested 40 aromatic acids and 10 fluorescent tracers for geothermal use. The vapor-phase project, which develops tracers for reservoirs such as the Geysers, is currently focused on testing SF{sub 6} at high temperatures and examining HPLC methods for the sensitive analysis of alcohol tracers. The pre-test modeling component is exploring the feasibility of using simple numerical models to lower the cost of tracer tests by providing estimates of tracer quantities, flowpaths, and arrival times.

  8. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  9. Seismic investigations for high resolution exploration ahead and around boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksch, Katrin; Giese, Ruediger; Kopf, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Deep reservoirs usually will be explored with a surface seismic survey often in combination with borehole seismic measurements like VSP or SWD which can improve the velocity model of the underground. Reservoirs especially in geothermal fields are often characterized by small-scale structures. Additionally, with depth the need for exploration methods with a high resolution increases because standard methods like borehole seismic measurements cannot improve their resolution with depth. To localize structures with more accuracy methods with higher resolution in the range of meters are necessary. Within the project SPWD - Seismic Prediction While Drilling a new exploration method will be developed. With an implementation of seismic sources and receivers in one device an exploration method ahead and around the borehole will be enabled. Also, a high resolution independent from the depth will be achieved. Therefore active and powerful seismic sources are necessary to reach an acceptable penetration depth. Step by step seismic borehole devices were developed, which can be used under different conditions. Every borehole device contains four seismic sources and several three-component geophones. A small distance between actuators and geophones allows detecting also the high frequency content of the wave field reflected at geological structures. Also, exploration with a high resolution is possible. A first borehole device was developed for basic conditions in horizontal boreholes without special terms to temperature or pressure. In a mine first methodical measurements for the initiated wave field were performed. Therefor an existing seismic test area at the research and education mine of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg was extended with boreholes. In the seismic test area, consisting of a dense geophone array with three-component geophone anchors, two horizontal and one vertical borehole was drilled. To achieve a radiation pattern in predefined directions by constructive

  10. High-Resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the sympathetic eruptions of two solar filaments side by side as observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. These two filaments start from the complex active region NOAA 12434 (north) and end in a large quiescent region (south). The corresponding SDO/HMI magnetic field observations suggest that the two small filaments are located above two different polarity inversion lines in the northern part. The SDO/AIA observations of the eruption show that these two filaments appear to merge into one in the southern quiescent region. The north-eastern filament starts eruption firstly, which is followed by the north-western filament eruption about 20 minutes later. Clear untwisting motions (i.e., signature of flux ropes) are observed in both filaments during the eruption. After the lifts off of the north-western filament, mini filaments are observed to emerge from the surface and rise up multiple times. The high-resolution observations reveal the fact that the filament is composed of multiple sections and multiple layers. The filament in the lower layer can merge into the upper layer, which leads to the increase of non-potentiality of the upper layer. Magnetic field models using the flux rope insertion method are also constructed in order to understand the complex magnetic configuration as well as the initiation and dynamics of the eruptions.

  11. High resolution seismic stratigraphy of Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Tihansky, A.B.; Hine, A.C.; Locker, S.D.; Doyle, L.D. . Dept. of Marine Science)

    1993-03-01

    Tampa Bay is one of two large embayments that interrupt the broad, regional nature of the carbonate ramp of the west coast of the Florida carbonate platform. It is believed to have formed as a result of preferential dissolution of the Cenozoic limestones beneath it. Highly reactive freshwater systems became hydrologically focused in the bay region as the surface and groundwater systems established themselves during sea-level lowstands. This weakening of the underlying limestone resulted in extensive karstification, including warping, subsidence, sinkhole and spring formation. Over 120 miles of high resolution seismic reflection data were collected within Tampa Bay. This record has been tied into 170 core borings taken from within the bay. This investigation has found three major seismic stratigraphic sequences beneath the bay. The lowermost sequence is probably of Miocene age. Its surface is highly irregular due to erosion and dissolution and exhibits a great deal of vertical relief as well as gentler undulations or warping. Much of the middle sequence consists of low angle clinoforms that gently downlap and fill in the underlying karst features. The uppermost sequence is a discontinuous unit comprised of horizontal to low angle clinoforms that are local in their extent. The recent drainage and sedimentation patterns within the bay area are related to the underlying structure controlled by the Miocene karst activity.

  12. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  13. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph SV/GTO Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbets, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Contract number NAS5-30433, known at Ball Aerospace as the GHRS SV/GTO project, supported our participation in the post-launch activities of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The period of performance was December 1988 through December 1998. The contract supported the involvement of Dr Dennis Ebbets in the work of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team, and several of the Ball people in the documentation and publication of results. Three main categories of tasks were covered by this contract; in-orbit calibration of the GHRS, guaranteed time observations, and education and public outreach. The nature and accomplishments of these tasks are described in the report. This summary makes many references to publications in the scientific and technical literature. Appendix A is extracted from a complete bibliography, and lists those papers that are directly related to work performed under this GHRS contract. The tasks related to the in-orbit calibration of the GHRS were by far the largest responsibility during the first six years of the project. During this period Dr. Ebbets was responsible for the definition of calibration requirements, design of experiments, preparation of observing proposals, tracking their implementation and execution, and coordinating the analysis and publication of the results. Prior to the launch of HST in 1990 the observing proposals were developed in cooperation with the scientists on the GHRS DDT, engineers at Ball Aerospace, the operations staff at the STScI, and project coordinators at GSFC.

  14. Quantification of upland thermokarst features with high resolution remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belshe, E. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Grosse, G.

    2013-09-01

    Climate-induced changes to permafrost are altering high latitude landscapes in ways that could increase the vulnerability of the vast soil carbon pools of the region. Permafrost thaw is temporally dynamic and spatially heterogeneous because, in addition to the thickening of the active layer, localized thermokarst features form when ice-rich permafrost thaws and the ground subsides. Thermokarst produces a diversity of landforms and alters the physical environment in dynamic ways. To estimate potential changes to the carbon cycle it is imperative to quantify the size and distribution of thermokarst landforms. By performing a supervised classification on a high resolution IKONOS image, we detected and mapped small, irregular thermokarst features occurring within an upland watershed in discontinuous permafrost of Interior Alaska. We found that 12% of the Eight Mile Lake (EML) watershed has undergone thermokarst, predominantly in valleys where tussock tundra resides. About 35% of the 3.7 km2 tussock tundra class has likely transitioned to thermokarst. These landscape level changes created by permafrost thaw at EML have important implications for ecosystem carbon cycling because thermokarst features are forming in carbon-rich areas and are altering the hydrology in ways that increase seasonal thawing of the soil.

  15. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of clusters of Group V elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-sheng; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    High resolution HeI (580{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and P{sub 4} were obtained with a newly-built high temperature molecular beam source. Vibrational structure was resolved in the photoelectron spectra of the three cluster species. The Jahn-Teller effect is discussed for the {sup 2}E and {sup 2}T{sub 2} states of P{sub 4}{sup +} and As{sub 4}{sup +}. As a result of the Jahn-Teller effect, the {sup 2}E state splits into two bands, and the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state splits into three bands, in combination with the spin-orbit effect. It was observed that the {nu}{sub 2} normal vibrational mode was involved in the vibronic interaction of the {sup 2}E state, while both the {nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 3} modes were active in the {sup 2}T{sub 2} state. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Calibration of the high resolution spectrometer barrel calorimeter at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The High-Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) is a general-purpose detector for the study of high-energy electron-positron collisions. The HRS has been in data-taking operation since early 1982. This report covers the calibration of the barrel shower counter system. The barrel system consists of 40 modules placed in a circular arch having a mean radius of 2.1 m. Each module covers an azimuthal wedge of 9 degrees and has an active length of 3.0 m. There are three independent sections: (1) an inner sandwich of Pb and scintillator (NE110) of thickness 3 r.1., (2) a plane of 14 proportional wire cells equipped with charge-division read-out, and (3) an outer sandwich of Pb and scintillator (NE114) of thickness 8. r. 1. The light from the sandwich section is collected at both ends and is passed through long acrylic pipes (5 cm diameter, 162 cm long) to photomultipliers (Amperex XP2230) mounted outside the magnet steel.

  17. A fluorescein tracer release experiment in the hydrothermally active crater of Vailulu'u volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Girard, A. P.

    2003-08-01

    On 3 April 2001, a 20 kg point source of fluorescein dye was released 30 m above the bottom of the active summit caldera of Vailulu'u submarine volcano, Samoa. Vailulu'u crater is 2000 m wide and at water depths of 600-1000 m, with the bottom 200 m completely enclosed; it thus provides an ideal site to study the hydrodynamics of an active hydrothermal system. The magmatically driven hydrothermal system in the crater is currently exporting massive amounts of particulates, manganese, and helium. The dispersal of the dye was tracked for 4 days with a fluorimeter in tow-yo mode from the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea. Lateral dispersion of the dye ranged from 80 to 500 m d-1; vertical dispersion had two components: a diapycnal diffusivity component averaging 21 cm2 s-1, and an advective component averaging 0.025 cm s-1. These measurements constrain the mass export of water from the crater during this period to be 8-1.3+4.6 × 107 m3 d-1, which leads to a "turnover" time for water in the crater of ˜3.2 days. Coupled with temperature data from CTD profiles and Mn analyses of water samples, the power output from the crater is 610-100+350 MW, and the manganese export flux is ˜240 kg d-1. The Mn/Heat ratio of 4.7 ng J-1 is significantly lower than ratios characteristic of hot smokers and diffuse hydrothermal flows on mid-ocean ridges and points to phase separation processes in this relatively shallow hydrothermal system.

  18. High-resolution mapping of the Palos outflow channel: Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauhala, A. I.; Kukkonen, S.; Kostama, V.-P.

    2013-09-01

    We have begun a high-resolution geomorphic mapping of the "Palos outflow channel" in order to further characterize the paleofluvial activity in the Amenthes region. Preliminary findings, such as multiple instances of hanging valleys, suggest a complex history of flooding.

  19. Global High Resolution Mapping and Assimilation of Soil Moisture Observations for the SMAP Radar and Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2015. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, SMAP high-resolution so...

  20. A survey of HC3N in extragalactic sources. Is HC3N a tracer of activity in ULIRGs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Costagliola, F.; Pérez-Beaupuits, J.-P.; Monje, R.; Muller, S.

    2011-03-01

    Context. HC3N is a molecule that is mainly associated with Galactic star-forming regions, but it has also been detected in extragalactic environments. Aims: To present the first extragalactic survey of HC3N, when combining earlier data from the literature with six new single-dish detections, and to compare HC3N with other molecular tracers (HCN, HNC), as well as other properties (silicate absorption strength, IR flux density ratios, C ii flux, and megamaser activity). Methods: We present mm IRAM 30 m, OSO 20 m, and SEST observations of HC3N rotational lines (mainly the J = 10-9 transition) and of the J = 1-0 transitions of HCN and HNC. Our combined HC3N data account for 13 galaxies (excluding the upper limits reported for the non-detections), while we have HCN and HNC data for more than 20 galaxies. Results: A preliminary definition "HC3N-luminous galaxy" is made based upon the HC3N/HCN ratio. Most (~80%) HC3N-luminous galaxies seem to be deeply obscured galaxies and (U)LIRGs. A majority (~60% or more) of the HC3N-luminous galaxies in the sample present OH mega- or strong kilomaser activity. A possible explanation is that both HC3N and OH megamasers need warm dust for their excitation. Alternatively, the dust that excites the OH megamaser offers protection against UV destruction of HC3N. A high silicate absorption strength is also found in several of the HC3N-luminous objects, which may help the HC3N to survive. Finally, we find that a high HC3N/HCN ratio is related to a high dust temperature and a low C ii flux. Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Electrically Active and Inactive B Lattice Sites in Ultrahighly B Doped Si(001): An X-Ray Near-Edge Absorption Fine-Structure and High-Resolution Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vailionis, A.; Glass, G.; Desjardins, P.; Cahill, D.G.; Greene, J.E.

    1999-05-01

    B lattice positions are determined as a function of B concentration C{sub B} in ultrahighly doped Si(001):B layers grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from B{sub 2}H {sub 6}/Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} . For C{sub B}{le}2.5{times}10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} , all B atoms reside on tetrahedrally bonded electrically active substitutional Si sites. At higher C{sub B} , inactive B is incorporated as B pairs located on single Si sites and oriented primarily along in-plane [100] and [010] directions. The B pairs are sp{sup 2} bonded with trigonal coordination while substitutional single B atoms are sp{sup 3} . A surface reaction path leading to inactive B incorporation is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. High-resolution microscopy of active ribosomal genes and key members of the rRNA processing machinery inside nucleolus-like bodies of fully-grown mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shishova, Kseniya V; Khodarovich, Yuriy M; Lavrentyeva, Elena A; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2015-10-01

    Nucleolus-like bodies (NLBs) of fully-grown (germinal vesicle, GV) mammalian oocytes are traditionally considered as morphologically distinct entities, which, unlike normal nucleoli, contain transcribed ribosomal genes (rDNA) solely at their surface. In the current study, we for the first time showed that active ribosomal genes are present not only on the surface but also inside NLBs of the NSN-type oocytes. The "internal" rRNA synthesis was evidenced by cytoplasmic microinjections of BrUTP as precursor and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a probe to the short-lived 5'ETS segment of the 47S pre-rRNA. We further showed that in the NLB mass of NSN-oocytes, distribution of active rDNA, RNA polymerase I (UBF) and rRNA processing (fibrillarin) protein factors, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs and 18S/28S rRNAs is remarkably similar to that in somatic nucleoli capable to make pre-ribosomes. Overall, these observations support the occurrence of rDNA transcription, rRNA processing and pre-ribosome assembly in the NSN-type NLBs and so that their functional similarity to normal nucleoli. Unlike the NSN-type NLBs, the NLBs of more mature SN-oocytes do not contain transcribed rRNA genes, U3 snoRNA, pre-rRNAs, 18S and 28S rRNAs. These results favor the idea that in a process of transformation of NSN-oocytes to SN-oocytes, NLBs cease to produce pre-ribosomes and, moreover, lose their rRNAs. We also concluded that a denaturing fixative 70% ethanol used in the study to fix oocytes could be more appropriate for light microscopy analysis of nucleolar RNAs and proteins in mammalian fully-grown oocytes than a commonly used cross-linking aldehyde fixative, formalin.

  3. Offset active galactic nuclei as tracers of galaxy mergers and supermassive black hole growth

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-10

    Offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are AGNs that are in ongoing galaxy mergers, which produce kinematic offsets in the AGNs relative to their host galaxies. Offset AGNs are also close relatives of dual AGNs. We conduct a systematic search for offset AGNs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by selecting AGN emission lines that exhibit statistically significant line-of-sight velocity offsets relative to systemic. From a parent sample of 18,314 Type 2 AGNs at z < 0.21, we identify 351 offset AGN candidates with velocity offsets of 50 km s{sup –1} < |Δv| < 410 km s{sup –1}. When we account for projection effects in the observed velocities, we estimate that 4%-8% of AGNs are offset AGNs. We designed our selection criteria to bypass velocity offsets produced by rotating gas disks, AGN outflows, and gravitational recoil of supermassive black holes, but follow-up observations are still required to confirm our candidates as offset AGNs. We find that the fraction of AGNs that are offset candidates increases with AGN bolometric luminosity, from 0.7% to 6% over the luminosity range 43 < log (L{sub bol}) [erg s{sup –1}] <46. If these candidates are shown to be bona fide offset AGNs, then this would be direct observational evidence that galaxy mergers preferentially trigger high-luminosity AGNs. Finally, we find that the fraction of AGNs that are offset AGN candidates increases from 1.9% at z = 0.1 to 32% at z = 0.7, in step with the growth in the galaxy merger fraction over the same redshift range.

  4. High-resolution mantle tomography of China and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinli; Zhao, Dapeng

    2006-09-01

    A high-resolution P wave tomographic model of the crust and mantle down to 1100 km depth under China and surrounding regions is determined by using about one million arrival times of P, pP, PP, and PcP waves from 19,361 earthquakes recorded by 1012 seismic stations. The subducting Pacific slab is imaged clearly as a high-velocity zone from the oceanic trenches down to about 600 km depth, and intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes are located within the slab. The Pacific slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under east China. The western edge of the stagnant slab is roughly coincident with a surface topographic boundary in east China. The active Changbai and Wudalianchi intraplate volcanoes in northeast China are underlain by significant slow anomalies in the upper mantle, above the stagnant Pacific slab. These results suggest that the active intraplate volcanoes in NE China are not hot spots but a kind of back-arc volcano associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific slab and its stagnancy in the transition zone. Under the Mariana arc, however, the Pacific slab penetrates directly down to the lower mantle. The active Tengchong volcano in southwest China is related to the eastward subduction of the Burma microplate. The subducting Indian and Philippine Sea plates are also imaged clearly. The Indian plate has subducted down to 200-300 km depth under the Tibetan Plateau with a horizontal moving distance of about 500 km. High-velocity anomalies are revealed in the upper mantle under the Tarim basin, Ordos, and Sichuan basin, which are three stable blocks in China.

  5. Design of POSICAM: A high resolution multislice whole body positron camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Wong, W.H.; Hartz, R.K.; Bristow, D.; Gaeta, J.M.; Yerian, K.; Adler, S.; Gould, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    A high resolution (6mm), multislice (21) whole body positron camera has been designed with innovative detector and septa arrangement for 3-D imaging and tracer quantitation. An object of interest such as the brain and the heart is optimally imaged by the 21 simultaneous image planes which have 12 mm resolution and are separated by 5.5 mm to provide adequate sampling in the axial direction. The detector geometry and the electronics are flexible enough to allow BaF/sub 2/, BGO, GSO or time of flight BaF/sub 2/ scintillators. The mechanical gantry has been designed for clinical applications and incorporates several features for patient handling and comfort. A large patient opening of 58 cm diameter with a tilt of +-30/sup 0/ and rotation of +-20/sup 0/ permit imaging from different positions without moving the patient. Multiprocessor computing systems and user-friendly software make the POSICAM a powerful 3-D imaging device. 7 figs.

  6. High Resolution Observations and Modeling of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    This research contract investigating the radiative transfer and dynamic physics of the smallest observable magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Due to the lack of a high-resolution visible light satellite instrument for solar studies, all data were acquired using ground-based instrumentation. The primary goal of the investigation was to understand the formation and evolution of "G-band bright points" in relation to the associated magnetic elements. G-band bright points are small (on the order of 100 kin or less in diameter) bright signatures associated with magnetic flux elements in the photosphere. They are seen in the A2A-X2 4308 A molecular bandhead of the CH radical ill the solar spectrum and offer the highest spatial resolution and highest contrast "tracers" of small magnetic structure on the Sun.

  7. Dynamic imaging with high resolution time-of-flight pet camera - TOFPET I

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Bristow, D.; Gaeta, J.; Gould, K.L.; Hartz, R.K.; Philipe, E.A.; Wong, W.H.; Yerian, K.

    1984-02-01

    One of the major design goals of the TOFPET I positron camera was to produce a high resolution whole body positron camera capable of dynamically imaging an organ such as the heart. TOFPET I is now nearing completion and preliminary images have been obtained to assess its dynamic and three dimensional imaging capabilities. Multiple gated images of the uptake of Rubidium in the dog heart and three dimensional surface displays of the distribution of the Rubidium-82 in the myocardium have been generated to demonstrate the three dimensional imaging properties. Fast dynamic images of the first pass of a bolus of radio-tracer through the heart have been collected with 4 second integration time and 50% gating (2 second equivalent integration time) with 18 mCi of Rb-82.

  8. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  9. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  10. Subglacial bedrock topography of an active mountain glacier in a high Alpine setting - insights from high resolution 3D cosmic-muon radiography of the Eiger glacier (Bern, Central Alps, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, David; Lechmann, Alessandro; Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Schlunegger, Fritz; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Scampoli, Paola; Vladymyrov, Mykhailo; Ereditato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock topography and therefore the spatial-altitudinal distribution of ice thickness constrain the ice flow as well as the erosional mechanisms of glaciers. Although the processes by which glaciers have shaped modern and past landscapes have been well investigated, little information is still available about the shape of the bedrock beneath active glaciers in steep Alpine cirques. Here, we we apply the cosmic-muon radiography technology, which uses nuclear emulsion detectors for imaging the bedrock surface. This method should provide information on the bedrock topography beneath a glacier and related ice thicknesses and subglacial meltwater pathways. We apply this technology to the cirque of the Eiger glacier, situated on the western flank of Eiger mountain, Central Swiss Alps. The Eiger glacier originates on the western flank of the Eiger at 3700 m a.s.l., from where it stretches along 2.6 km to the current elevation at 2300 m a.s.l.. The glacier consists of a concave cirque bordered by >40° steep flanks, thereby utilizing weaknesses within the fabric of the bedrock such as folds, joints and foliations. The middle reach hosts a bedrock ridge where glacier diffluence occurs. The lower reaches of the glacier are characterized by several transverse crevasses, while the terminal lobe hosts multiple longitudinal crevasses. A basal till and lateral margins border the ice flow along the lowermost reach. While subglacial erosion in the cirque has probably been accomplished by plucking and abrasion where the glacier might be cold-based, sub glacial melt water might have contributed to bedrock sculpting farther downslope where the ice flow is constrained by bedrock. Overdeepening of some tens of meters is expected in the upper reach of the glacier, which is quite common in cirques (Cook & Swift, 2012). Contrariwise, we expect several tens of meters-deep bedrock excavations (characterized by concave curvatures of bedrock surface) at the site of ice diffluence. The next

  11. Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Johan; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Rodriguez, Marko A.; Balakireva, Lyudmila

    2009-01-01

    Background Intricate maps of science have been created from citation data to visualize the structure of scientific activity. However, most scientific publications are now accessed online. Scholarly web portals record detailed log data at a scale that exceeds the number of all existing citations combined. Such log data is recorded immediately upon publication and keeps track of the sequences of user requests (clickstreams) that are issued by a variety of users across many different domains. Given these advantages of log datasets over citation data, we investigate whether they can produce high-resolution, more current maps of science. Methodology Over the course of 2007 and 2008, we collected nearly 1 billion user interactions recorded by the scholarly web portals of some of the most significant publishers, aggregators and institutional consortia. The resulting reference data set covers a significant part of world-wide use of scholarly web portals in 2006, and provides a balanced coverage of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. A journal clickstream model, i.e. a first-order Markov chain, was extracted from the sequences of user interactions in the logs. The clickstream model was validated by comparing it to the Getty Research Institute's Architecture and Art Thesaurus. The resulting model was visualized as a journal network that outlines the relationships between various scientific domains and clarifies the connection of the social sciences and humanities to the natural sciences. Conclusions Maps of science resulting from large-scale clickstream data provide a detailed, contemporary view of scientific activity and correct the underrepresentation of the social sciences and humanities that is commonly found in citation data. PMID:19277205

  12. High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

  13. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    PubMed

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods.

  14. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    PubMed

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods. PMID:26931650

  15. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  16. Estimation of high-resolution dust column density maps. Empirical model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Sub-millimetre dust emission is an important tracer of column density N of dense interstellar clouds. One has to combine surface brightness information at different spatial resolutions, and specific methods are needed to derive N at a resolution higher than the lowest resolution of the observations. Some methods have been discussed in the literature, including a method (in the following, method B) that constructs the N estimate in stages, where the smallest spatial scales being derived only use the shortest wavelength maps. Aims: We propose simple model fitting as a flexible way to estimate high-resolution column density maps. Our goal is to evaluate the accuracy of this procedure and to determine whether it is a viable alternative for making these maps. Methods: The new method consists of model maps of column density (or intensity at a reference wavelength) and colour temperature. The model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, comparing model predictions with observations at their native resolution. We analyse simulated surface brightness maps and compare its accuracy with method B and the results that would be obtained using high-resolution observations without noise. Results: The new method is able to produce reliable column density estimates at a resolution significantly higher than the lowest resolution of the input maps. Compared to method B, it is relatively resilient against the effects of noise. The method is computationally more demanding, but is feasible even in the analysis of large Herschel maps. Conclusions: The proposed empirical modelling method E is demonstrated to be a good alternative for calculating high-resolution column density maps, even with considerable super-resolution. Both methods E and B include the potential for further improvements, e.g., in the form of better a priori constraints.

  17. High resolution neodymium characterization along the Mediterranean Sea margins: implications for ɛNd modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Arsouze, Thomas; Jeandel, Catherine; Revillon, Sidonie

    2016-04-01

    An extensive compilation of published neodymium (Nd) concentrations and isotopic compositions (ɛNd) was realized in order to establish a new database and a map (using a high resolution geological map of the area) of the distribution of these parameters for all the Mediterranean margins. Data were extracted from different kinds of samples: river solid discharge deposited on the shelf, sedimentary material collected on the margin or geological material outcropping above or close to a margin. Additional analyses of surface sediments were done, in order to improve this dataset in key areas (e.g Sicilian strait). The Mediterranean margin Nd isotopic signatures vary from non-radiogenic values around the Gulf of Lions, (ɛNd values -11) to radiogenic values around the Aegean and the Levantine sub-basins up to +6. Using a high resolution regional oceanic model (1/12° of horizontal resolution), ɛNd distribution was simulated for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. The high resolution of the model provides the opportunity to study in more details the processes governing the Nd isotope distribution in the marine environment. This work highlights that a significant interannual variability of ɛNd distribution in seawater could occur. In particular, important hydrological events such as the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT), associated with deep water formed in the Aegean sub-basin, could induce a shift in Nd IC at intermediate depths that could be noticeable in the Western part of the basin. This highlights that the temporal and geographical variations of ɛNd could represent an interesting insight of Nd as a quasi-conservative tracer of water masses in the Mediterranean Sea, in particular in the context of paleo-oceanographic applications, i.e. to explore if EMT-type signatures occurred in the past (Roether et al., 2014, Gacic et al., 2011).

  18. High resolution squid magnetometry for non-destructive evaluation. Final report, 1 September 1987-30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wikswo, J.P.

    1993-04-30

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers offer promise as multi-mode instruments capable of obtaining high resolution images of extremely low frequency injected currents or eddy currents, and they can be configured to image the magnetic susceptibility of titanium, aluminum and nonmetallic composites. While high resolution SQUID magnetometers will generally be noisier than conventional SQUIDs, the small coils and reduced coil-to-source spacing more than compensate to provide low-noise, high-resolution images. The high spatial resolution which can be obtained with SQUID magnetometers, the unparalleled sensitivity of SQUIDs at low frequencies, the ability to measure weak perturbations in strong applied magnetic fields, and the ability to discriminate against external sources of noise should make SQUID magnetometers well suited for NDE of deep flaws in aluminum and titanium aerostructures. To explore SQUID NDE, the authors have developed research facilities that include the high-resolution MicroSQUID magnetometer, a magnetic shield, a scanning stage, and a computer-based control and data acquisition system. Using this instrumentation, they have imaged magnetic fields produced by sources as varied as intrinsic currents due to corrosion or Johnson noise, remanent magnetization from ferromagnetic contamination, flaw-induced perturbations in either injected current or eddy currents induced by an AC field, Johnson noise currents in a copper ring, persistent currents in high transition-temperature superconductors, distributions of dia- or paramagnetism in an AC or DC magnetic field, and surface flaws decorated with a paramagnetic tracer.

  19. Modified Noise Power Ratio testing of high resolution digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    A broadband, full signal range, side-by-side (tandem) test method for estimating the internal noise performance of high resolution digitizers is described and illustrated. The technique involves a re-definition of the traditional Noise Power Ratio (NPR) test, a change that not only makes this test applicable to higher resolution systems than was previously practical, but also enhances its value and flexibility. Since coherence analysis is the basis of this new definition, and since the application of coherence procedures to high resolution data poses several problems, this report discusses these problems and their resolution.

  20. High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

  1. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  2. High Resolution EUV & FUV Spectroscopy of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Good, S. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Napiwotzki, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    We report on recent results from a high-resolution spectroscopic survey of hot DA white dwarfs, based on IUE, FUSE and HST observations. For the first time, we address the measurement of element abundances in a completely objective manner with a spectroscopic model fitting technique, which allows us to consider formally the limits that can be placed on abundances in stars where no heavy elements are detected. We also include our latest analysis of the high resolution EUV spectrum of G191-B2B recorded by J-PEX.

  3. Wide swath and high resolution optical imaging satellite of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kato, Eri; Imai, Hiroko; Sagisaka, Masakazu

    2016-05-01

    The "Advanced optical satellite" (tentative name) is a follow-on mission from ALOS. Mission objectives of the advanced optical satellite is to build upon the existing advanced techniques for global land observation using optical sensors, as well as to promote data utilization for social needs. Wide swath and high resolution optical imager onboard the advanced optical satellite will extend the capabilities of earlier ALOS missions. The optical imager will be able to collect high-resolution (< 1 m) and wide-swath (70 km) images with high geo-location accuracy. This paper introduces a conceptual design of the advanced optical satellite.

  4. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  5. On the application and extension of Harten's high resolution scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    Extensions of a second order high resolution explicit method for the numerical computation of weak solutions of one dimensonal hyperbolic conservation laws are discussed. The main objectives were (1) to examine the shock resoluton of Harten's method for a two dimensional shock reflection problem, (2) to study the use of a high resolution scheme as a post-processor to an approximate steady state solution, and (3) to construct an implicit in the delta-form using Harten's scheme for the explicit operator and a simplified iteration matrix for the implicit operator.

  6. High resolution BPMS with integrated gain correction system

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Briegel, C.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Gianfelice, E.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Voy, D.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-08-01

    High resolution beam position monitors (BPM) are an essential tool to achieve and reproduce a low vertical beam emittance at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring. The ATF damping ring (DR) BPMs are currently upgraded with new high resolution read-out electronics. Based on analog and digital down-conversion techniques, the upgrade includes an automatic gain calibration system to correct for slow drift effects and ensure high reproducible beam position readings. The concept and its technical realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  7. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buban, James P.; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM. PMID:19915208

  8. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  9. Black Carbon, Metal Concentrations and Lead Isotopes Ratios in Aerosols as Tracers of Human and Natural Activities in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric brown clouds (ABC) observed as widespread layers of brownish haze are regional scale plumes of air pollutants with a hot spot of emission located in East Asia. ABC are mainly composed of aerosol particles such as Black Carbon (BC) emitted to the atmosphere during biomass burning and fossil fuels combustion. The atmospheric lifetime of BC ranges from a few days in wet season up to one month in dry season. The use of stable lead isotopes and 21 elements as tracers of air pollution was applied to identify and characterized the main sources of anthropogenic activities in Asian region. Aerosol samples from Haiphong (North Vietnam) were collected by a high volume sampler for a period of one year from October 2012 to October 2013. Vietnam's 207Pb/206Pb ratios were almost identical to those found for China. Ratios of 207Pb/206Pb ranged from 0.837 to 0.871 which agrees with values previously reported for the last 10 years in China (0.841 - 0.879). No significant variation in isotope ratio was observed during the sampling period, which suggests that there was no large seasonal variation in the isotope ratios of airborne lead. Trajectory analysis showed that almost two third of the air masses originated from East Northeast which implies that China was a major source of lead in atmosphere. Enrichment factor calculations indicated a large influence of coal activity (EF(Al) As = 1982 ± 796, EF(Al) Cd = 972 ± 659, EF(Al) Sb = 1358 ± 930) but the difference between combustion and mining exploitation could not be evidenced. Significant correlations were found between two others groups of elements: As, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Al, Fe K, Co. Wind dilution was effective on metals concentration variation. During the cold and dry season (winter) ambient concentrations were high and variable, during the warm and wet season (summer) concentrations were stable and low. Taken together, these factors also identified industrial and lithogenic activities in the region.

  10. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    images of interior structure to ~20 m, and to map dielectric properties (related to internal composition) to better than 200 m throughout. This is comparable in detail to modern 3D medical ultrasound, although we emphasize that the techniques are somewhat different. An interior mass distribution is obtained through spacecraft tracking, using data acquired during the close, quiet radar orbits. This is aligned with the radar-based images of the interior, and the shape model, to contribute to the multi-dimensional 3D global view. High-resolution visible imaging provides boundary conditions and geologic context to these interior views. An infrared spectroscopy and imaging campaign upon arrival reveals the time-evolving activity of the nucleus and the structure and composition of the inner coma, and the definition of surface units. CORE is designed to obtain a total view of a comet, from the coma to the active and evolving surface to the deep interior. Its primary science goal is to obtain clear images of internal structure and dielectric composition. These will reveal how the comet was formed, what it is made of, and how it 'works'. By making global yet detailed connections from interior to exterior, this knowledge will be an important complement to the Rosetta mission, and will lay the foundation for comet nucleus sample return by revealing the areas of shallow depth to 'bedrock', and relating accessible deposits to their originating provenances within the nucleus.

  11. OBSERVING CASCADES OF SOLAR BULLETS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. II

    SciTech Connect

    Scullion, E.; Engvold, O.; Lin, Y.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der

    2015-12-01

    High resolution observations from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope revealed bright, discrete, blob-like structures (which we refer to as solar bullets) in the Hα 656.28 nm line core that appear to propagate laterally across the solar atmosphere as clusters in active regions (ARs). These small-scale structures appear to be field aligned and many bullets become triggered simultaneously and traverse collectively as a cluster. Here, we conduct a follow-up study on these rapidly evolving structures with coincident observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. With the co-aligned data sets, we reveal (a) an evolving multithermal structure in the bullet cluster ranging from chromospheric to at least transition region temperatures, (b) evidence for cascade-like behavior and corresponding bidirectional motions in bullets within the cluster, which indicate that there is a common source of the initial instability leading to bullet formation, and (c) a direct relationship between co-incident bullet velocities observed in Hα and He ii 30.4 nm and an inverse relationship with respect to bullet intensity in these channels. We find evidence supporting that bullets are typically composed of a cooler, higher density core detectable in Hα with a less dense, hotter, and fainter co-moving outer sheath. Bullets unequivocally demonstrate the finely structured nature of the AR corona. We have no clear evidence for bullets being associated with locally heated (or cooled), fast flowing plasma. Fast MHD pulses (such as solitons) could best describe the dynamic properties of bullets whereas the presence of a multithermal structure is new.

  12. High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bandfield, Joshua L

    2007-05-01

    Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of <1-2 m) of Mars at high latitudes. These models have been mainly supported by the observed presence of large concentrations of hydrogen detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The models and measurements are consistent with a water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has predicted that the depth at which water ice is stable can be highly variable, owing to local surface heterogeneities such as rocks and slopes, and the thermal inertia of the ground cover. Measurements have, however, been limited to the footprint (several hundred kilometres) of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite, preventing the observations from documenting more detailed water-ice distributions. Here I show that by observing the seasonal temperature response of the martian surface with the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, it is possible to observe such heterogeneities at subkilometre scale. These observations show significant regional and local water-ice depth variability, and, in some cases, support distributions in the subsurface predicted by atmospheric exchange and vapour diffusion models. The presence of water ice where it follows the depth of stability under current climatic conditions implies an active martian water cycle that responds to orbit-driven climate cycles. Several regions also have apparent deviations from the theoretical stability level, indicating that additional factors influence the ice-table depth. The high-resolution measurements show that the depth to the water-ice table is highly variable within the potential Phoenix spacecraft landing ellipses, and is likely to be variable at scales that may be sampled by the spacecraft.

  13. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  14. High resolution imaging of the outflow channels on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davatzes, A. K.; Gulick, V. C.

    2008-12-01

    We report observations of the outflow channels on Mars from HiRISE images in MRO's first Martian year. Several hundred images of the outflow channels on Mars have been collected to date from HiRISE, as well as coordinated images with CTX and CRISM. Depositional features, such as slackwater deposits and small bedforms that are expected to be visible at the resolution of HiRISE have not yet been observed, largely due to post-fluvial modification of the channels. Many of the channels have been subsequently covered by a thin layer of lava, ash, dust, or lineated valley fill. Although altered slightly by later aeolian modification, Ares Valles and Kasei Valles preserve much of the original fluvial erosional forms, particularly cataracts and longitudinal grooves that can be used to infer the mechanics of the flow. Cataracts, steep knickpoints in the large outflow channels, were once large waterfalls on the Martian surface. These have been observed in all of the larger outflow systems, including Kasai, Athabasca, Mangala, and Reull Valles. High resolution imaging shows that all of the cataract systems have multiple generations of erosion, with smaller subchannels within the cataract system. Based on the length of the recession and the morphological evidence most of the large channels experienced multiple flooding events or pulses. The tectonically sourced outflow channels, such as Athabasca and Mangala Valles, show sourcing at regions of complex fault geometries, specifically at fault relays. In terrestrial systems, relays tend to be regions of concentrated stress that can produce dilation manifested as high joint density, as well as point sources for hydrothermal outflow on Earth. Athabasca and Mangala Valles, sourced proximal to large volcanic centers, may have been regions of major hydrothermal activity in the past.

  15. The Atlantic Inflow through the Barents Sea from the high-resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Y.; Bacon, S.; Coward, A. C.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2009-04-01

    Atlantic Water is an important component of the Arctic Ocean circulation. To study Atlantic Water pathways we used the results of a high-resolution global sea ice-ocean simulations for the period 1985 - 2006. The simulations also included passive tracers and ventilation tracer analysis which demonstrated high ventilation of the Barents Sea at few localized sites. Mode waters of Barents Sea Water were identified: the first mode is formed at the shallow convective sites in the northern Barents Sea and contributes in the formation of the Arctic cold halocline water; the second mode is the source of the Arctic low halocline water and is formed in the southeastern Barents Sea; the third dense mode is formed west of Novaya Zemlya. The mode waters continue into the Eurasian Arctic through the northwestern Barents Sea and along the northern Barents Sea shelf, and, via the other route, through the southeastern Barents Sea and the St.Anna Trough. The formation rates of the mode waters along with the heat ans salt transports through the Barents Sea have been estimated and compared to observations. Keywords Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Atlantic Water, mode waters, ocean modelling

  16. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  17. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  18. High-resolution imaging of upper limb neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Howe, Benjamin Matthew; Spinner, Robert J; Felmlee, Joel P; Amrami, Kimberly K

    2015-04-01

    MRI of the peripheral nerves continues to grow technologically and in clinical use. This article reviews the technological aspects and basic interpretation of high-resolution MR imaging of the upper extremity nerves. These techniques work with 1.5-, or preferably 3-T, scanners regardless of vendors. The article also includes selected pitfalls in the interpretation of upper extremity nerve MRI.

  19. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  20. Application of Classification Models to Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielens, Jason D.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present 3 methods of performing pattern recognition on spatiotemporal plots produced by pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Method: Classification models, including the artificial neural networks (ANNs) multilayer perceptron (MLP) and learning vector quantization (LVQ), as well as support vector machines (SVM), were…

  1. High-Resolution Land Use and Land Cover Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    As the Nation?s population grows, quantifying, monitoring, and managing land use becomes increasingly important. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long heritage of leadership and innovation in land use and land cover (LULC) mapping that has been the model both nationally and internationally for over 20 years. At present, the USGS is producing high-resolution LULC data for several watershed and urban areas within the United States. This high-resolution LULC mapping is part of an ongoing USGS Land Cover Characterization Program (LCCP). The four components of the LCCP are global (1:2,000,000-scale), national (1:100,000-scale), urban (1:24,000-scale), and special projects (various scales and time periods). Within the urban and special project components, the USGS Rocky Mountain Mapping Center (RMMC) is collecting historical as well as contemporary high-resolution LULC data. RMMC?s high-resolution LULC mapping builds on the heritage and success of previous USGS LULC programs and provides LULC information to meet user requirements.

  2. High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciel, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines recent developments in techniques for obtaining high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra on solid samples, discussing the kinds of applications for which these techniques are well suited. Also discusses the characteristics of NMR of solids and generating magnetization for NMR in solids. (JN)

  3. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  4. High-resolution TFT-LCD for spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, JaeWon; Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Oh, Himchan; Kim, GiHeon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Chu, Hye-Yong; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2014-06-01

    SLM with very fine pixel pitch is needed for the holographic display system. Among various kinds of SLMs, commercially available high resolution LCoS has been widely used as a spatial light modulator. But the size of commercially available LCoS SLM is limited because the manufacturing technology of LCoS is based on the semiconductor process developed on small size Si wafer. Recently very high resolution flat panel display panel (~500ppi) was developed as a "retina display". Until now, the pixel pitch of flat panel display is several times larger than the pixel pitch of LCoS. But considering the possibility of shrink down the pixel pitch with advanced lithographic tools, the application of flat panel display will make it possible to build a SLM with high spatial bandwidth product. We simulated High resolution TFT-LCD panel on glass substrate using oxide semiconductor TFT with pixel pitch of 20um. And we considered phase modulation behavior of LC(ECB) mode. The TFT-LCD panel is reflective type with 4-metal structure with organic planarization layers. The technical challenge for high resolution large area SLM will be discussed with very fine pixel.

  5. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  6. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  7. High Resolution Digital Imaging of Paintings: The Vasari Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Kirk

    1991-01-01

    Describes VASARI (the Visual Art System for Archiving and Retrieval of Images), a project funded by the European Community to show the feasibility of high resolution colormetric imaging directly from paintings. The hardware and software used in the system are explained, storage on optical disks is described, and initial results are reported. (five…

  8. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  9. High resolution data base for use with MAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tapley, W.C.; Harris, D.B.

    1987-05-05

    A high resolution cartographic data base of thw World is available from the CIA. We obtained this data, extracted portions of the data, and produced cartographic files of varying resolutions. The resulting data files are of the proper format for use with MAP (2), our in-house cartographic plotting program.

  10. Linear Actuator Has Long Stroke and High Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Moore, Donald M.; Braun, David F.; Koenig, John S.; Hankins, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    The term precision linear actuator, direct drive ( PLADD ) refers to a robust linear actuator designed to be capable of repeatedly performing, over a lifetime of the order of 5 to 10 years, positioning maneuvers that include, variously, submicron increments or slews of the order of a centimeter. The PLADD is capable of both long stroke (120 mm) and high resolution (repeatable increments of 20 nm). Unlike precise linear actuators of prior design, the PLADD contains no gears, levers, or hydraulic converters. The PLADD, now at the prototype stage of development, is intended for original use as a coarse-positioning actuator in a spaceborne interferometer. The PLADD could also be adapted to terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for long stroke and high resolution: potential applications include medical imaging and fabrication of semiconductor devices. The PLADD (see figure) includes a commercially available ball-screw actuator driven directly by a commercially available three-phase brushless DC motor. The ball-screw actuator comprises a spring-preloaded ball nut on a ball screw that is restrained against rotation as described below. The motor is coupled directly (that is, without an intervening gear train) to a drive link that, in turn, is coupled to the ball nut. By eliminating the gear train, the direct-drive design eliminates the complexity, backlash, and potential for misalignment associated with a gear train. To prevent inadvertent movement, there is a brake that includes flexured levers compressed against the drive link by preload springs. This is a power-off brake: There are also piezoelectric stacks that can be activated to oppose the springs and push the levers away from the drive link. Hence, power must be applied to the piezoelectric stacks to release the drive link from braking. To help ensure long operational life, all of the mechanical drive components are immersed in an oil bath within hermetically sealed bellows. The outer end of the

  11. High resolution spectroscopy of sulfur trioxide and carbon suboxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Tony

    High resolution spectroscopy was used to study the properties of two simple polyatomic molecules, sulfur trioxide, SO3, and carbon suboxide, C3O2. The fundamental modes and several hot bands of the 18O isotopic forms of SO3 (32S18O 3 and 34S18O3) have been investigated using both infrared spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS). The Raman-active symmetric stretching mode, nu 1, shows complex Q-branch patterns due to indirect Coriolis couplings, l-resonances, and Fermi resonances with infrared inaccessible nu2, nu4 combination/overtone levels. 18O isotopic substitution changes the character of these interactions in such a way that their effect on the nu1 CARS spectrum is unique among the different isotopomers studied. Accurate rovibrational constants are determined for all of the mixed states for the first time, leading to deperturbed values for the nu1 band origin of 1004.661(24) and 1004.693(23) for 34S18O 3 and 32S18O3 respectively. The strong Coriolis coupling is very noticeable in these species due to the close proximity of the nu2 and nu4 fundamental vibrations. The effect that this and other interaction terms have on the nu1 CARS spectrum of 34S18O3 is examined by selectively turning off the coupling between the hot bands. A global force field analysis was performed with the fundamental frequency values of all of the isotopomers studied that revealed a counterintuitive trend in the bond lengths between sulfur oxide species. In addition, band center frequencies for all the mixed 16O-18O isotopic species are computed. High-resolution CARS Spectroscopy was also used to study the nu 1 symmetric CO stretching mode of the quasi-linear molecule carbon suboxide, C3O2. Q-branches are seen that originate from the ground state and from thermally-populated levels of the unusually low frequency nu7 bending mode. The intensity variation of these on cooling to about 110 K in a jet expansion requires reversal of the order of assignment

  12. High Resolution Ionospheric Mapping Using Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Chotoo, K.; Roth, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    properties, and (if applicable) geographic location. Three case studies will be presented to highlight the type and quality of ionospheric information that can be retrieved: (1) The high spatial resolution of SAR-derived TEC maps is emphasized in a case study that focuses on high resolution mapping of aurora arcs in central Alaska. Here, TEC enhancements associated with aurora activity are mapped and compared to reference observations from sky cameras and GPS; (2) observations of mid-latitudal traveling ionospheric disturbances are shown to showcase the accuracy of SAR-derived TEC maps. Several SAR-based TEC mapping methods are compared to highlight their respective advantages and disadvantages regarding processing complexity and estimation accuracy; (3) a third example focuses on analyzing post-sunset scintillation phenomena in equatorial regions. SAR is used to assess the frequency of occurrence of scintillation and analyze their associated power spectra. To conclude the paper, the temporal and spatial sampling of the ionosphere provided by the fleet of current and future spaceborne SAR sensors is analyzed to provide an assessment of the global ionospheric mapping capabilities of SAR.

  13. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  14. Ambient Observations of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Submicrometer Aerosols in New York Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Ge, X.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) compounds, which include amines, nitriles, organic nitrates, amides, and N-containing aromatic heterocycles, are an important class of compounds ubiquitously detected in atmospheric particles and fog and cloud droplets. Previous studies indicate that these compounds can make up a significant fraction (20-80%) of the total nitrogen (N) content in atmospheric condensed phases and play important roles in new particle formation and growth and affecting the optical and hygroscopicity of aerosols. In this study, we report the observation of ON compounds in submicrometer particles (PM1) at two locations in New York based on measurements using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). One study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy funded Aerosol Lifecyle - Intensive Operation Period (ALC-IOP) campaign at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL, 40.871˚N, 72.89˚W) in summer, 2011 and the other was conducted at the Queen's College (QC) in New York City (NYC) in summer, 2009. We observed a notable amount of N-containing organic fragment ions, CxHyNp+ and CxHyOzNp+, in the AMS spectra of organic aerosols at both locations and found that they were mainly associated with amino functional groups. Compared with results from lab experiments, the C3H8N+ at m/z = 58 was primarily attributed to trimethylamine. In addition, a significant amount of organonitrates was observed at BNL. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the high resolution mass spectra (HRMS) of organic aerosols identified a unique nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor with elevated nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) at both BNL and QC. Analysis of the size distributions, volatility profiles, and correlations with external tracer indicates that acid-base reactions of amino compounds with sulfate and acidic gas were mainly responsible for the formation of amine salts. Photochemical production was also observed to play a role in the formation of NOA. Bivariate polar

  15. High-Resolution Geologic Mapping in the Eastern Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thal, J.; Bach, W.; Tivey, M.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    AUV-based microbathymetry combined with ROV video data was used to create the first high-resolution geologic maps of two hydrothermal active areas in the eastern Manus Basin: North Su volcano and PACManus hydrothermal field on Pual Ridge. The data were recorded in 2006 and 2011 during the research cruises Magellan-06 operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and BAMBUS (SO-216) operated by MARUM / University Bremen. High accuracy underwater navigation transponder-based and Posidonia systems allowed us to combine video data with bathymetry. The navigation on both cruises was very precise (m-scale) and navigation offsets were less than 10 m. We conducted detailed geologic mapping and sampling to identify the seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal features and created highly detailed maps that provide a comprehensive picture of the seafloor and vent distribution in the eastern Manus Basin. Several different types of dacite lava morphology were mapped, including pillow lava, lobate flows and massive block lava. We have compiled all available information on rock chemistry, fluid and temperature measurements, video data, bathymetry and navigation data into a GIS database. We find that, in contrast to the tectonic control on vent distribution at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, the pathways of upwelling hydrothermal vent fluids at PACManus are dominated by volcanic features, such as lava domes and thick, massive block lava flows. Vent fields are developed preferentially along the margins of major flow units, probably because the cores of these units are impermeable to fluid flow, while the autobrecciated outer parts of the flows are not. In the North Su area, a comparison of seafloor maps from 2006 and 2011 reveals recent volcanic activity, which has strongly modified the bathymetry and hydrothermal vent distribution on the southern flank of the volcano. An ash cone with multiple small craters on the SW flank of the North-Su volcano that didn't exist in 2006 was

  16. High-resolution measurements of humidity and temperature with lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Spaeth, Florian; Hammann, Eva; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    3-dimensional thermodynamic fields of temperature and moisture including their turbulent fluctuations have been observed with the two scanning lidar systems of University of Hohenheim in three field campaigns in 2013 and 2014. In this contribution, we will introduce these two self-developed instruments and illustrate their performance with measurement examples. Finally, an outlook to envisioned future research activities with the new data sets of the instruments is given. Our temperature lidar is based on the rotational Raman technique. The scanning rotational Raman lidar (RRL) uses a seeded frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm. A two-mirror scanner with a 40-cm telescope collects the atmospheric backscatter signals. Humidity measurements are made with a scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which uses a titanium sapphire laser at 820 nm as transmitter. This laser is pumped with a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and injection-seeded for switching between the online and offline wavelengths. The DIAL receiver consists of a scanning 80-cm telescope. The measured temperature and humidity profiles of both instruments have typical resolutions of only a few seconds and 100 m in the atmospheric boundary layer both in day- and night-time. Recent field experiments with the RRL and the DIAL of University of Hohenheim were (1) the HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in spring 2013 in western Germany - this activity is embedded in the project HD(CP)2 (High-definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction); (2) a measurement campaign in Hohenheim in autumn 2013; (3) the campaign SABLE (Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange) in south-western Germany in summer 2014. The collected moisture and temperature data will serve as initial thermodynamic fields for forecast experiments related to the formation of clouds and precipitation. Due to their high resolution and high precision, the systems are capable of resolving

  17. High-resolution climate simulation of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2008-01-01

    The climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model, the NCAR CCM3 at spectral truncation of T170, corresponding to a grid cell size of roughly 75 km. The purpose of the study is to assess whether there are significant benefits from the higher resolution simulation compared to the lower resolution simulation associated with the role of topography. The LGM simulations were forced with modified CLIMAP sea ice distribution and sea surface temperatures (SST) reduced by 1 C, ice sheet topography, reduced CO{sub 2}, and 21,000 BP orbital parameters. The high-resolution model captures modern climate reasonably well, in particular the distribution of heavy precipitation in the tropical Pacific. For the ice age case, surface temperature simulated by the high-resolution model agrees better with those of proxy estimates than does the low-resolution model. Despite the fact that tropical SSTs were only 2.1 C less than the control run, there are many lowland tropical land areas 4-6 C colder than present. Comparison of T170 model results with the best constrained proxy temperature estimates (noble gas concentrations in groundwater) now yield no significant differences between model and observations. There are also significant upland temperature changes in the best resolved tropical mountain belt (the Andes). We provisionally attribute this result in part as resulting from decreased lateral mixing between ocean and land in a model with more model grid cells. A longstanding model-data discrepancy therefore appears to be resolved without invoking any unusual model physics. The response of the Asian summer monsoon can also be more clearly linked to local geography in the high-resolution model than in the low-resolution model; this distinction should enable more confident validation of climate proxy data with the high-resolution model. Elsewhere, an inferred salinity increase in the subtropical North Atlantic may have

  18. High-resolution DEM Effects on Geophysical Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. R.; Bursik, M. I.; Stefanescu, R. E. R.; Patra, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical mass flow models are numerical models that approximate pyroclastic flow events and can be used to assess the volcanic hazards certain areas may face. One such model, TITAN2D, approximates granular-flow physics based on a depth-averaged analytical model using inputs of basal and internal friction, material volume at a coordinate point, and a GIS in the form of a digital elevation model (DEM). The volume of modeled material propagates over the DEM in a way that is governed by the slope and curvature of the DEM surface and the basal and internal friction angles. Results from TITAN2D are highly dependent upon the inputs to the model. Here we focus on a single input: the DEM, which can vary in resolution. High resolution DEMs are advantageous in that they contain more surface details than lower-resolution models, presumably allowing modeled flows to propagate in a way more true to the real surface. However, very high resolution DEMs can create undesirable artifacts in the slope and curvature that corrupt flow calculations. With high-resolution DEMs becoming more widely available and preferable for use, determining the point at which high resolution data is less advantageous compared to lower resolution data becomes important. We find that in cases of high resolution, integer-valued DEMs, very high-resolution is detrimental to good model outputs when moderate-to-low (<10-15°) slope angles are involved. At these slope angles, multiple adjacent DEM cell elevation values are equal due to the need for the DEM to approximate the low slope with a limited set of integer values for elevation. The first derivative of the elevation surface thus becomes zero. In these cases, flow propagation is inhibited by these spurious zero-slope conditions. Here we present evidence for this "terracing effect" from 1) a mathematically defined simulated elevation model, to demonstrate the terracing effects of integer valued data, and 2) a real-world DEM where terracing must be

  19. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-06-01

    The high-resolution (1.90 Å) model of the native histone octamer allows structural comparisons to be made with the nucleosome-core particle, along with an identification of a likely core-histone binding site. Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R{sub work} value of 18.7% and an R{sub free} of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P6{sub 5}, the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle.

  20. 238U-234U activity ratio as tracer of waterpathway within the watershed substratum: evidence of U data from the Strengbach and Ringelbach research catchments (Vosges , France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, F.; Schaffhausen, Th.; Pierret, M.-C.; Ambroise, B.

    2012-04-01

    U activity ratios were measured in spring and source waters collected in two small research watersheds developed on granitic bedrocks in Vosges Mountains (Eastern France), i.e., the Strengbach (http://ohge.u-strasbg.fr) and the Ringelbach catchments. The data indicates a clear relationship between the emerging altitude of sources/springs in each slope of the watersheds, and the intensity of 234U-238U activity ratios in the waters. Such a relationship can be readily explained through a scenario assuming that U mobilization in these waters and their 234U enrichment (consequence of the alpha recoil process) are controlled by the duration of the water-pathway within the substratum of the watershed: longer water pathway within the watershed, longer duration of water-rock interaction and hence higher 234U enrichment in the source/spring waters. The immediate consequence of such an interpretation is that (234U/238U) activity ratio in surface waters, at least at the scale of such small and elemental watersheds, might be a geochemical tracer useful to constrain a key hydrological parameter which controls, at least partly, the nature and the intensity of water-rock interactions in the watershed, namely the water pathway within the watershed substratum. The data also suggests that U activity ratios could be also very relevant to constrain the contribution of deep waters within surface waters. Future developments in this domain will certainly confirm the interest of U activity ratio as hydrological tracer of the water-rock interactions.

  1. INL Tracer Interpretation

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  2. Space to Think: Large, High-Resolution Displays for Sensemaking

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Christopher P.; Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2010-05-05

    Space supports human cognitive abilities in a myriad of ways. The note attached to the side of the monitor, the papers spread out on the desk, diagrams scrawled on a whiteboard, and even the keys left out on the counter are all examples of using space to recall, reveal relationships, and think. Technological advances have made it possible to construct large display environments in which space has real meaning. This paper examines how increased space affects the way displays are regarded and used within the context of the cognitively demanding task of sensemaking. A study was conducted observing analysts using a prototype large, high-resolution display to solve an analytic problem. This paper reports on the results of this study and suggests a number of potential design criteria for future sensemaking tools developed for large, high-resolution displays.

  3. High resolution map of light pollution over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Henryka; Netzel, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    In 1976 Berry introduced a simple mathematical equation to calculate artificial night sky brightness at zenith. In the original model cities, considered as points with given population, are only sources of light emission. In contrary to Berry's model, we assumed that all terrain surface can be a source of light. Emission of light depends on percent of built up area in a given cell. We based on Berry's model. Using field measurements and high-resolution data we obtained the map of night sky brightness over Poland in 100-m resolution. High resolution input data, combined with a very simple model, makes it possible to obtain detailed structures of the night sky brightness without complicating the calculations.

  4. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  5. High-resolution imaging of cellular processes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Amy S; Maddox, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis led to a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Sulston et al., 1983) as did the first use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a transgenic C. elegans (Chalfie et al., 1994). Given that C. elegans is free living, does not require exceptional environmental control, and is optically clear, live imaging is a powerful tool in for this model system. Combining genetics with high-resolution imaging has continued to make important contributions to many fields. In this chapter, we discuss how certain aspects of high-resolution microscopy are implemented. This is not an exhaustive review of microscopy; it is meant to be a helpful guide and point of reference for some basic concepts in imaging. While these concepts are largely true for all biological imaging, they are chosen as particularly important for C. elegans. PMID:22226519

  6. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  7. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOEpatents

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  8. Progressive display of very high resolution images using wavelets.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Wang, James Z.

    2002-01-01

    Digital or digitized biomedical images often have very high resolutions', which make them difficult or impossible to display on computer screens. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a multiresolution display method with which users can freely browse the contents of those high resolution images. In this paper, we present an improved wavelet-based progressive image display algorithm by stressing on the encoding and decoding process. The encoder, which dynamically determines levels of transform and partition of coefficients, is based on a modified Haar wavelet transform. The decoder retrieves the necessary data and reconstructs the requested region at a scale specified by the user. A prototype system, which enables virtually any size of images to be displayed progressively, has been implemented based on this algorithm. The system has low computational complexity for both encoding and decoding process. Images Figure 2 PMID:12476909

  9. The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

  10. High-resolution array processing using implicit eigenvector weighting techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A.K. ); Byrne, C.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Many high-resolution bearing estimators require the explicit calculation of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the cross-spectral matrix of the sensor outputs. Once the eigenvectors have been calculated, various different estimators can be derived by altering the eigenvalues to give a re-weighing of the eigenvectors. For example, in the MUSIC method the eigenvalues corresponding to those eigenvectors in the noise subspace are set to unity, while the eigenvalues corresponding to those eigenvectors in the signal subspace are set to zero. These weighing functions are reminiscent of ideal filter responses in analog filter theory, where practical filters are designed by using polynomial approximations to the ideal desired response. In this paper, the approximation theory developed for filter design is used to derive high-resolution bearing estimators that do not require explicit calculation of the eigenvectors.

  11. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cells Using Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural analysis of cells can reveal valuable information about their morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to provide high-resolution images from the surface of biological samples. However, samples need to be dehydrated and coated with conductive materials for SEM imaging. Besides, immobilizing non-adherent cells during processing and analysis is challenging and requires complex fixation protocols. In this work, we developed a novel dielectrophoresis based microfluidic platform for interfacing non-adherent cells with high-resolution SEM at low vacuum mode. The system enables rapid immobilization and dehydration of samples without deposition of chemical residues over the cell surface. Moreover, it enables the on-chip chemical stimulation and fixation of immobilized cells with minimum dislodgement. These advantages were demonstrated for comparing the morphological changes of non-budding and budding yeast cells following Lyticase treatment. PMID:25089528

  12. High-resolution x-ray phase tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, Andrew G.; Thomas, C. David L.; Clement, John G.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Hannah, Kevin M.; Doshi, Chandni; Putkunz, Corey T.; Clark, Jesse N.

    2010-09-01

    X-ray tomography is a workhorse tool of non-destructive imaging. It is used to probe three-dimensional structures across a wide range of length scales for objects that offer good absorption contrast to x-rays. In recent years extremely high resolution imaging (on the order of tens of nanometres) has become possible due to technological advances in x-ray optics. At the same time the requirement for strong absorption contrast has been relaxed thanks to the advent of new experimental and algorithmic techniques in phase imaging. Advances in both resolution and phase imaging can be combined to image biological samples at the sub-cellular level. I will report on recent advances in our work including improvements to the current approaches in extracting phase information at high resolution from measurements of the diffracted intensity from a sample. I will also discuss our current experimental status.

  13. [Development of a high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Huan, Yan-Fu; Jin, Wei; Feng, Guo-Dong; Fei, Qiang; Cao, Yan-Bo; Jin, Qin-Han

    2007-11-01

    A unique high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch (MPT) atomic emission spectrometer was developed and studied preliminarily. Some advanced technologies were applied to the spectrometer, such as echelle grating, UV-intensified CCD array detector, adjustable microwave generator, and water cooling system for the generator, etc. The detection limits of the spectrometer for some elements were determined, the spectral resolution and pixel resolution of the spectrometer were calculated, and an analysis of a practical sample was carried out. The preliminary results demonstrate that such simultaneous spectrometer has advantages of saving sample and time, possessing high sensitivity and resolution, and low-cost for the purchase and maintenance. Taking analytical figures of merit into consideration, the high resolution simultaneous MPT spectrometer will have extended application areas and greater competition potential as compared with sequential MPT spectrometers.

  14. Note: Differential amplified high-resolution tilt angle measurement system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Enyao; Huang, Pei; Wei, Haoyun

    2014-09-01

    A high-resolution tilt angle measurement system is presented in this paper. In this system, the measurement signal is amplified by two steps: (1) amplified by operational amplifier and (2) differential amplified by two MEMS-based inclinometers. The novel application not only amplifies the signal but, more importantly, substantially reduces the electrical interference and common-mode noise among the same circuit design. Thus, both the extremely high resolution and great long-term stability are achieved in this system. Calibrated by an autocollimator, the system shows a resolution of 2 arc sec. The accuracy is better than ±1.5 arc sec. The zero-drift error is below ±1 arc sec and ±2 arc sec in the short and long term, respectively.

  15. Note: Differential amplified high-resolution tilt angle measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Enyao; Huang, Pei; Wei, Haoyun

    2014-09-01

    A high-resolution tilt angle measurement system is presented in this paper. In this system, the measurement signal is amplified by two steps: (1) amplified by operational amplifier and (2) differential amplified by two MEMS-based inclinometers. The novel application not only amplifies the signal but, more importantly, substantially reduces the electrical interference and common-mode noise among the same circuit design. Thus, both the extremely high resolution and great long-term stability are achieved in this system. Calibrated by an autocollimator, the system shows a resolution of 2 arc sec. The accuracy is better than ±1.5 arc sec. The zero-drift error is below ±1 arc sec and ±2 arc sec in the short and long term, respectively.

  16. Parallelization and Algorithmic Enhancements of High Resolution IRAS Image Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Yu; Prince, Thomas A.; Tereby, Susan; Beichman, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite caried out a nearly complete survey of the infrared sky, and the survey data are important for the study of many astrophysical phenomena. However, many data sets at other wavelengths have higher resolutions than that of the co-added IRAS maps, and high resolution IRAS images are strongly desired both for their own information content and their usefulness in correlation. The HIRES program was developed by the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) to produce high resolution (approx. 1') images from IRAS data using the Maximum Correlation Method (MCM). We describe the port of HIRES to the Intel Paragon, a massively parallel supercomputer, other software developments for mass production of HIRES images, and the IRAS Galaxy Atlas, a project to map the Galactic plane at 60 and 100(micro)m.

  17. Airborne laser scanning for high-resolution mapping of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatho, Bea; Schenk, Toni; Krabill, William; Wilson, Terry; Lyons, William; McKenzie, Garry; Hallam, Cheryl; Manizade, Serdar; Paulsen, Timothy

    In order to evaluate the potential of airborne laser scanning for topographic mapping in Antarctica and to establish calibration/validation sites for NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) altimeter mission, NASA, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) joined forces to collect high-resolution airborne laser scanning data.In a two-week campaign during the 2001-2002 austral summer, NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) system was used to collect data over several sites in the McMurdo Sound area of Antarctica (Figure 1a). From the recorded signals, NASA computed laser points and The Ohio State University (OSU) completed the elaborate computation/verification of high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in 2003. This article reports about the DEM generation and some exemplary results from scientists using the geomorphologic information from the DEMs during the 2003-2004 field season.

  18. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  19. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  20. Effective Area of the AXAF High Resolution Camera (HRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaude, Daniel; Pease, Deron; Donnelly, Hank; Juda, Mike; Jones, Christine; Murray, Steve; Zombeck, Martin; Kraft, Ralph; Kenter, Almus; Meehan, Gary; Meehan, Gary; Swartz, Doug; Elsner, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The AXAF High-Resolution Camera (HRC) was calibrated at NASA MSFC's X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) during 1997 March and April. We have undertaken an analysis of the HRC effective area using all data presently available from the XRCF. We discuss our spectral fitting of the beam-normalization detectors (BNDs), our method of removing higher order contamination lines present in the spectra, and corrections for beam non-uniformities. We apply a model of photon absorption depth in order to fit a smooth curve to the quantum efficiency of the detector. This is then combined with the most recent model of the AXAF High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) to determine the ensemble effective area versus energy for the HRC. We also address future goals and concerns.

  1. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  2. High resolution gas chromatography analysis of rice bran oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fengxiang; Lin, Qinlu; Chen, Xu; Wei, Xiaojun

    To assess the nutritional value and safety quality of rice bran oil (RBO) ,fatty acids of RBO from 15 species rice come from Hunan Province were analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). Crude RBOs were extracted by hexane 3-times using a solvent-to-rice bran ratio of 3:1 (w/w) at 40°C and composition of RBOs was analyzed by HRGC. The result showed that main fatty acids of 15 kinds of RBO include myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), palmitoleic acid (C16:1), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), linolenic acid (C18:3), arachidic acid (C20:0), arachidonic acid (C20:1). It is strange that arachidonic acid (C20:1) is not listed in Chinese standard of RBO (GB11192-2003), and it exists in our samples of RBO. The average value of linolenic acid in RBOs is 1.6304% (range from 1.2425% to 2.131%), and it showed higher level comparing with Chinese standard that linolenic acid is less than 1.0%. The average value of USFA and SFA are 76.81% (range 75.96% to 82.06% ) and 20.15% (range 13.72% to 23.06%) respectively, and USFA content is close to olive oil (83.75%), peanut oil (81.75%) and soybean oil (85.86%). USFA in Jingyou 13 RBO is the highest content. The ratio of USFA to SFA content is 4:1 (range from 3.32 to 5.98:1). The ratio of SFA: MUFA: PUFA of 15 RBOs is 1: 2.2: 1.8, and ω6/ω3 ratio is 21.69 (range from16.54 to 27.28) and it is close to the 26:1 which is reported to be helpful to increase SOD activity. The oleic acid /linoleic acid ratio of 15 RBOs is 1.23:1 (rang from 1.04:1 to 1.42:1). Our data analyzed composition of RBOs from 15 species rice of China and will provide new evidence to revise RBO standard. It also helps us to assess nutritional value of RBOs and identify different RBOs from various species rice and places of origin.

  3. High-resolution full-panoramic imaging surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbyson, Gerald M.

    2002-08-01

    This paper describes new class of high-resolution electro-optical imaging search and surveillance system (visual and/or IR). This new system uniquely provides continuous real-time situation-awareness and response, with immediate detection of approaching/ emerging threats, and rapid assessment of a situation, permitting immediate response/ reaction to counter the threat. As such it is uniquely suited for a very wide variety of diverse surveillance applications, especially in the areas of security and defense. The system provides an uninterrupted real-time, effectively live, imaging-display coverage of the entire 360 degree(s) panorama, all evaluated in real time at the full resolution of the imaging sensor. The image resolution for the full 360 degree(s) panorama collected by the sensor, and displayed by the display module, is unprecedentedly high, typically at least 20 megapixels (e.g., 2,000 pixels vertically by 20,000 pixels in circumference). The associated scene-scan cycle time is typically a second or less. This level of performance assures earliest detection of distant targets and highest-quality evaluation of the targets. Two alternative means of surveillance evaluation are available: the Direct-View (Observer) Surveillance Evaluation, and the Semi-Automated Surveillance Evaluation, with visual verification by the observer personnel. The resulting surveillance capability is unprecedented, simultaneously providing a) assured target detection anywhere within the 360 degree(s) panorama, b) classification, c) localization, d) tracking, and e) target status and activity monitoring, all without the need for any external tip-off or cueing inputs to the system. The greatest value of this unique situation-awareness capability is primarily in situations requiring high-confidence protection of high-value vehicles or installations located inside a relatively open and unobstructed region wherein hostile threats could quickly appear at any time and from any direction. An

  4. High resolution modeling of a small urban catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most complex issues that urban environments have to deal with. In France, flooding remains the first natural risk with 72% of decrees state of natural disaster issued between October 1982 and mid-November 2014. Flooding is a result of meteorological extremes that are usually aggravated by the hydrological behavior of urban catchments and human factors. The continuing urbanization process is indeed changing the whole urban water cycle by limiting the infiltration and promoting runoff. Urban environments are very complex systems due to their extreme variability, the interference between human activities and natural processes but also the effect of the ongoing urbanization process that changes the landscape and hardly influences their hydrologic behavior. Moreover, many recent works highlight the need to simulate all urban water processes at their specific temporal and spatial scales. However, considering urban catchments heterogeneity still challenging for urban hydrology, even after advances noticed in term of high-resolution data collection and computational resources. This issue is more to be related to the architecture of urban models being used and how far these models are ready to take into account the extreme variability of urban catchments. In this work, high spatio-temporal resolution modeling is performed for a small and well-equipped urban catchment. The aim of this work is to identify urban modeling needs in terms of spatial and temporal resolution especially for a very small urban area (3.7 ha urban catchment located in the Perreux-sur-Marne city at the southeast of Paris) MultiHydro model was selected to carry out this work, it is a physical based and fully distributed model that interacts four existing modules each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environments. MultiHydro was implemented at 10m, 5m and 2m resolution. Simulations were performed at different spatio-temporal resolutions and analyzed with

  5. Estimating Scots Pine Tree Mortality Using High Resolution Multispectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriak, L.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Conard, S. G.; Ivanova, G. A.; McRae, D. J.; Soja, A. J.; Okhotkina, E.

    2010-12-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stands of central Siberia are characterized by a mixed-severity fire regime that is dominated by low- to high-severity surface fires, with crown fires occurring less frequently. The purpose of this study was to link ground measurements with air-borne and satellite observations of active wildfires and older fire scars to better estimate tree mortality remotely. Data from field sampling on experimental fires and wildfires were linked with intermediate-resolution satellite (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper) data to estimate fire severity and carbon emissions. Results are being applied to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, MERIS, Landsat-ETM, SPOT (i.e., low, middle and high spatial resolution), to understand their remote-sensing capability for mapping fire severity, as indicated by tree mortality. Tree mortality depends on fireline intensity, residence time, and the physiological effects on the cambium layer, foliage and roots. We have correlated tree mortality measured after fires of varying severity with NDVI and other Chlorophyll Indexes to model tree mortality on a landscape scale. The field data obtained on experimental and wildfires are being analyzed and compared with intermediate-resolution satellite data (Landsat7-ETM) to help estimate fire severity, emissions, and carbon balance. In addition, it is being used to monitor immediate ecosystem fire effects (e.g., tree mortality) and long-term postfire vegetation recovery. These data are also being used to validate AVHRR , MODIS, and MERIS estimates of burn area. We studied burned areas in the Angara Region of central Siberia (northeast of Lake Baikal) for which both ground data and satellite data (ENVISAT-MERIS, Spot4, Landsat5, Landsat7-ETM) were available for the 2003 - 2004 and 2006 - 2008 periods. Ground validation was conducted on seventy sample plots established on burned sites differing in

  6. High Resolution Measurements and Electronic Structure Calculations of a Diazanaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Goubet, Manuel; Pirali, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been suspected to be the carriers of so called Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). Most of the results published in the literature report rotationally unresolved spectra of pure carbon as well as heteroatom-containing PAHs species. To date for this class of molecules, the principal source of rotational informations is ruled by microwave (MW) spectroscopy while high resolution measurements reporting rotational structure of the infrared (IR) vibrational bands are very scarce. Recently, some high resolution techniques provided interesting new results to rotationally resolve the IR and far-IR bands of these large carbonated molecules of astrophysical interest. One of them is to use the bright synchrotron radiation as IR continuum source of a high resolution Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer. We report the very complementary analysis of the [1,6] naphthyridine (a N-bearing PAH) for which we recorded the microwave spectrum at the PhLAM laboratory (Lille) and the high resolution far-infrared spectrum on the AILES beamline at synchrotron facility SOLEIL. MW spectroscopy provided highly accurate rotational constants in the ground state to perform Ground State Combinations Differences (GSCD) allowing the analysis of the two most intense FT-FIR bands in the 50-900 wn range. Moreover, during this presentation the negative value of the inertial defect in the GS of the molecule will be discussed. A. Leger, J. L. Puget, Astron. Astrophys. 137, L5-L8 (1984) L. J. Allamandola et al. Astrophys. J. 290, L25-L28 (1985). Z. Kisiel et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 217, 115 (2003) S. Thorwirth et al. Astrophys. J. 662, 1309 (2007) D. McNaughton et al. J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154305 (2011). S. Albert et al. Faraday Discuss. 150, 71-99 (2011) B. E. Brumfield et al. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1985-1988 (2012) O. Pirali et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 10141 (2013).

  7. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  8. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  9. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  10. High-resolution schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    A class of new explicit second order accurate finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented. These highly nonlinear schemes are obtained by applying a nonoscillatory first order accurae scheme to an appropriately modified flux function. The so derived second order accurate schemes achieve high resolution while preserving the robustness of the original nonoscillatory first order accurate scheme.

  11. LandScan 2013 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  12. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  13. Applications of high-resolution remote sensing image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, W. M.; Leckie, D.; Miller, J.; Buxton, R.

    1990-01-01

    There are many situations in which the image resolution of satellite data is insufficient to provide the detail required for resource management and environmental monitoring. This paper will focus on applications of high-resolution (0.4 to 10 m) airborne multispectral and imaging spectrometer data acquired in Canada using the MEIS II multispectral line imager and the PMI imaging spectrometer. Applications discussed will include forestry, mapping, and geobotany.

  14. Optical alignment of high resolution Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.; Cassie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing, high resolution FTS instruments often contain three primary optical subsystems: Fore-Optics, Interferometer Optics, and Post, or Detector Optics. We discuss the alignment of a double-pass FTS containing a cat's-eye retro-reflector. Also, the alignment of fore-optics containing confocal paraboloids with a reflecting field stop which relays a field image onto a camera is discussed.

  15. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–­H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R work value of 18.7% and an R free of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P65, the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-­resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle. PMID:16511091

  16. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph: Instrument, goals, and science results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Heap, S. R.; Beaver, E. A.; Boggess, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Ebbets, D. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jura, M.; Leckrone, D. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), currently in Earth orbit on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), operates in the wavelength range 1150-3200 A with spectral resolutions (lambda/delta lambda) of approximately 2 x 10(exp 3), 2 x 10(exp 4), and 1 x 10(exp 3). The instrument and its development from inception, its current status, the approach to operations, representative results in the major areas of the scientific goals, and prospects for the future are described.

  17. High-resolution imagery applications in the littorals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abileah, Ronald

    2001-12-01

    We focus on three applications of high-resolution imagery in the littorals: mapping bathymetry, monitoring the health of coral reefs, and taking censuses of marine mammals. All three applications show the importance and potential benefits of higher-resolution imagery. Increased radiometric sensitivity and the simultaneous collection of panchromatic and multispectral imagery are also important. An Ikonos image of Maui is used to demonstrate these applications. We also briefly explain some important differences between multispectral remote sensing over water and land.

  18. High-Resolution Wind Measurements for Offshore Wind Energy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Neumann, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical transform, called the Rosette Transform, together with a new method, called the Dense Sampling Method, have been developed. The Rosette Transform is invented to apply to both the mean part and the fluctuating part of a targeted radar signature using the Dense Sampling Method to construct the data in a high-resolution grid at 1-km posting for wind measurements over water surfaces such as oceans or lakes.

  19. High resolution fiber optic interferometer: FY94 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.; D`Silva, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Objective is a field, on-line high resolution spectrometer system capable of resolving the optical emission from actinide isotopes in an inductively coupled plasma. AOTF (acousto-optic tunable filter) and FFP (fiber optic Fabry-Perot) were combined in this spectrometer, using bulk optical materials. The AOTF-FFP system was tested on U-235/U-238 and RCRA metals. Future development is described; a commercialization plan is attached.

  20. Effects of submesoscale turbulence on ocean tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine M.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-01-01

    Ocean tracers such as carbon dioxide, nutrients, plankton, and oil advect, diffuse, and react primarily in the oceanic mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the spatial distributions of these tracers due to turbulent stirring, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic fronts and eddies and small-scale three-dimensional turbulence are simultaneously active. In this study, a large eddy simulation spanning horizontal scales from 20 km down to 5 m is used to examine the effects of multiscale turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers from interior and sea-surface sources. The simulation includes the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined in order to understand the respective impacts of small-scale and submesoscale motions on tracer transport. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields and statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and the results detail how tracer mixing depends on air-sea tracer flux rate, tracer release depth, and flow regime. Although vertical fluxes of buoyancy by submesoscale eddies compete with mixing by Langmuir turbulence, vertical fluxes of tracers are often dominated by Langmuir turbulence, particularly for tracers that are released near the mixed-layer base or that dissolve rapidly through the surface, even in regions with pronounced submesoscale activity. Early in the evolution of some tracers, negative eddy diffusivities occur co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities or other submesoscale phenomenon may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  1. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  2. Characterization of high-resolution HafSOx inorganic resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksak, R. P.; Herman, G. S.

    2014-04-01

    Inorganic resists are of considerable interest for advanced lithography at the nanoscale due to the potential for high resolution, low line width roughness (LWR), and high sensitivity. Historically inorganic resists suffered from low sensitivity, however approaches have been identified to increase sensitivity while maintaining high contrast. An aqueous precursor of Hf(OH)4-2x-2y(O2)x(SO4)y·qH2O (HafSOx) has been demonstrated with excellent sensitivity to EUV and electrons, while still obtaining high resolution and low LWR. In this work, we characterize both HafSOx precursor solutions and spin-coated thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis. HR-TEM of precursor solutions drop cast onto TEM grids confirmed the presence of nanoscale particles. HR-TEM cross sectional images showed that spin-coated HafSOx films are initially uniform in appearance and composition for thin (12 nm) films, however thicker (30 nm) films display segregation of species leading to multilayer structures. Regardless of film thickness, extended exposure to the high energy TEM electron beam induces significant migration of oxygen species to the Si interface. These species result in the formation of SiOx layers that increase in thickness with an increase in TEM electron beam dose. Sulfate is also very mobile in the films and likely assists in the significant condensation exhibited in completely processed films.

  3. Quantification of Murine Pancreatic Tumors by High Resolution Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sastra, Stephen A.; Olive, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ultrasonography is a powerful imaging modality that enables non-invasive, real time visualization of abdominal organs and tissues. This technology may be adapted for use in mice through the utilization of higher frequency transducers, allowing for extremely high resolution imaging of the mouse pancreas. This technique is particularly well-suited to pancreas imaging due to the ultrasonographic properties of the normal mouse pancreas, easily accessible imaging planes for the head and tail of the mouse pancreas, and the comparative difficulty in imaging the mouse pancreas with other technologies. A suite of measurements tools is available to characterize the normal and diseased states of tissues. Of particular utility for cancer applications is the ability to use tomography to construct a 3D tumor volume, enabling longitudinal imaging studies to track tumor development, or response to therapies. Here, we describe a detailed method for performing high resolution ultrasound to detect and measure pancreatic lesions in a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal using the VisualSonics Vevo2100 High Resolution Ultrasound System. The method includes preparation of the animal for imaging, 2D and 3D image acquisition, and post-acquisition analysis of tumors volumes. The combined procedure has been utilized extensively by our group and others for the preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (1–4). PMID:23359158

  4. High resolution surface plasmon microscopy for cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argoul, F.; Monier, K.; Roland, T.; Elezgaray, J.; Berguiga, L.

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new non-labeling high resolution microscopy method for cellular imaging. This method called SSPM (Scanning Surface Plasmon Microscopy) pushes down the resolution limit of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) to sub-micronic scales. High resolution SPRi is obtained by the surface plasmon lauching with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The advantages of SPPM compared to other high resolution SPRi's rely on three aspects; (i) the interferometric detection of the back reflected light after plasmon excitation, (ii) the twodimensional scanning of the sample for image reconstruction, (iii) the radial polarization of light, enhancing both resolution and sensitivity. This microscope can afford a lateral resolution of - 150 nm in liquid environment and - 200 nm in air. We present in this paper images of IMR90 fibroblasts obtained with SSPM in dried environment. Internal compartments such as nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, cellular and nuclear membrane can be recognized without labelling. We propose an interpretation of the ability of SSPM to reveal high index contrast zones by a local decomposition of the V (Z) function describing the response of the SSPM.

  5. Fabrication High Resolution Metrology Target By Step And Repeat Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusa, Mircea

    1983-10-01

    Based on the photolithography process generally used to generate high resolution masks for semiconductor I.C.S, we found a very useful industrial application of laser technology.First, we have generated high resolution metrology targets which are used in industrial measurement laser interferometers as difra.ction gratings. Secondi we have generated these targets using step and repeat machine, with He-Ne laser interferometer controlled state, as a pattern generator, due to suitable computer programming.Actually, high resolution metrology target, means two chromium plates, one of which is called the" rule" the other one the "vernier". In Fig.1 we have the configuration of the rule and the vernier. The rule has a succesion of 3 μM lines generated as a difraction grating on a 4 x 4 inch chromium blank. The vernier has several exposed fields( areas) having 3 - 15 μm lines, fields placed on very precise position on the chromium blank surface. High degree of uniformity, tight CD tolerances, low defect density required by the targets, creates specialised problems during processing. Details of the processing, together with experimental results will be presented. Before we start to enter into process details, we have to point out that the dimensional requirements of the reticle target, are quite similar or perhaps more strict than LSI master casks. These requirements presented in Fig.2.

  6. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  7. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  8. Machine Learning Based Road Detection from High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ye; Wang, Guofeng; Hu, Xiangyun

    2016-06-01

    At present, remote sensing technology is the best weapon to get information from the earth surface, and it is very useful in geo- information updating and related applications. Extracting road from remote sensing images is one of the biggest demand of rapid city development, therefore, it becomes a hot issue. Roads in high-resolution images are more complex, patterns of roads vary a lot, which becomes obstacles for road extraction. In this paper, a machine learning based strategy is presented. The strategy overall uses the geometry features, radiation features, topology features and texture features. In high resolution remote sensing images, the images cover a great scale of landscape, thus, the speed of extracting roads is slow. So, roads' ROIs are firstly detected by using Houghline detection and buffering method to narrow down the detecting area. As roads in high resolution images are normally in ribbon shape, mean-shift and watershed segmentation methods are used to extract road segments. Then, Real Adaboost supervised machine learning algorithm is used to pick out segments that contain roads' pattern. At last, geometric shape analysis and morphology methods are used to prune and restore the whole roads' area and to detect the centerline of roads.

  9. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  10. Modeling high-resolution broadband discourse in complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J; Corman, Steven R; McPhee, Robert D; Kuhn, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Numerous researchers and practitioners have turned to complexity science to better understand human systems. Simulation can be used to observe how the microlevel actions of many human agents create emergent structures and novel behavior in complex adaptive systems. In such simulations, communication between human agents is often modeled simply as message passing, where a message or text may transfer data, trigger action, or inform context. Human communication involves more than the transmission of texts and messages, however. Such a perspective is likely to limit the effectiveness and insight that we can gain from simulations, and complexity science itself. In this paper, we propose a model of how close analysis of discursive processes between individuals (high-resolution), which occur simultaneously across a human system (broadband), dynamically evolve. We propose six different processes that describe how evolutionary variation can occur in texts-recontextualization, pruning, chunking, merging, appropriation, and mutation. These process models can facilitate the simulation of high-resolution, broadband discourse processes, and can aid in the analysis of data from such processes. Examples are used to illustrate each process. We make the tentative suggestion that discourse may evolve to the "edge of chaos." We conclude with a discussion concerning how high-resolution, broadband discourse data could actually be collected. PMID:12876447

  11. High-Resolution Angioscopic Imaging During Endovascular Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Patrick Z.; Sacho, Raphael; Weersink, Robert A.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Kucharczyk, Walter; Seibel, Eric J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoluminal optical imaging, or angioscopy, has not seen widespread application during neurointerventional procedures, largely as a result of the poor imaging resolution of existing angioscopes. Scanning fiber endoscopes (SFEs) are a novel endoscopic platform that allows high-resolution video imaging in an ultraminiature form factor that is compatible with currently used distal access endoluminal catheters. OBJECTIVE: To test the feasibility and potential utility of high-resolution angioscopy with an SFE during common endovascular neurosurgical procedures. METHODS: A 3.7-French SFE was used in a porcine model system to image endothelial disruption, ischemic stroke and mechanical thrombectomy, aneurysm coiling, and flow-diverting stent placement. RESULTS: High-resolution, video-rate imaging was shown to be possible during all of the common procedures tested and provided information that was complementary to standard fluoroscopic imaging. SFE angioscopy was able to assess novel factors such as aneurysm base coverage fraction and side branch patency, which have previously not been possible to determine with conventional angiography. CONCLUSION: Endovascular imaging with an SFE provides important information on factors that cannot be assessed fluoroscopically and is a novel platform on which future neurointerventional techniques may be based because it allows for periprocedural inspection of the integrity of the vascular system and the deployed devices. In addition, it may be of diagnostic use for inspecting the vascular wall and postprocedure device evaluation. ABBREVIATIONS: CFB, coherent fiber bundle F, French SFE, scanning fiber endoscope PMID:24762703

  12. Operation and maintenance manual for the high resolution stereoscopic video camera system (HRSVS) system 6230

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, A.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16

    The High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Cameral System (HRSVS),system 6230, is a stereoscopic camera system that will be used as an end effector on the LDUA to perform surveillance and inspection activities within Hanford waste tanks. It is attached to the LDUA by means of a Tool Interface Plate (TIP), which provides a feed through for all electrical and pneumatic utilities needed by the end effector to operate.

  13. Regional brain distribution of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]Fluoro-D-talose: A new PET tracer for measurement of galactokinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haradahira, T.; Inoue, O.; Suzuki, K.

    1994-05-01

    We have recently developed a 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-talose (2-[F-18]FDTal) as a new PET tracer for measurements of galactokinase activities in tissues. The rational of 2-[F-18]FDTal as a PET tracer is based on the metabolic trapping by a formation of 2-[F-18]FDTal-1-phosphate by galactokinase. In this study, we have examined the regional brain distribution of 2-[F-18]FDTal in monkey by PET, and compared it with those of 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (2-[F-18]FDG) and 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-galactose (2-[F-18]FDTal), PET tracers for D-glucose and D-galactose metabolisms, respectively. The F-18 sugars used for the PET studies were prepared through nucleophilic fluorinations of the corresponding triflates with [F-18]fluoride. PET imaging obtained by i.v. injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal in rhesus monkey showed very high accumulation of the radioactivity into an occipital cortex region. This regional distribution was very similar to that of 2-[F-18]FDGal, but was quite different with that of 2-[F-18]FDG. In PET data analyses, washout of the radioactivity from the occipital cortex (30% loss of the initial activity) was observed in an early period ({<=}5 min) after injection of 2-[F-18]FDTal, in contrast with the continuous increase of the radioactivity in the same region after injection of 2-[F-18]FDGal. This data indicates a smaller phosphorylation rate constant (K3) of 2-[F-18]FDTal by brain galactokinase than that of 2-[F-18]FDGal. 2-[F-18]FDGal has been reported to be partly metabolized into an UDP-2-[F-18]FDGal via 2-CF-18]FDGal-l-phosphate in animal brains. Therefore 2-[F-18]FDTal offers an advantage over 2-[F-18]FDGal in undergoing its simple metabolism which enables us to make a simple kinetic model for PET imaging. We conclude that 2-[F-18]FDTal may be a new PET tracer to give a characteristic regional brain distribution which reflect the regional galactokinase activity.

  14. Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Mascaro, Joseph; Sinca, Felipe; Chadwick, K Dana; Higgins, Mark; Farfan, William; Llactayo, William; Silman, Miles R

    2014-11-25

    Terrestrial carbon conservation can provide critical environmental, social, and climate benefits. Yet, the geographically complex mosaic of threats to, and opportunities for, conserving carbon in landscapes remain largely unresolved at national scales. Using a new high-resolution carbon mapping approach applied to Perú, a megadiverse country undergoing rapid land use change, we found that at least 0.8 Pg of aboveground carbon stocks are at imminent risk of emission from land use activities. Map-based information on the natural controls over carbon density, as well as current ecosystem threats and protections, revealed three biogeographically explicit strategies that fully offset forthcoming land-use emissions. High-resolution carbon mapping affords targeted interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in rapidly developing tropical nations.

  15. High-resolution images of Pd particles supported on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Yasushi; Naoi, Katsuo; Yahikozawa, Kiyochika; Takasu, Yoshio . Dept. of Fine Materials Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Ultrafine metal particles dispersed on supporting materials have been developed as catalysts for the oxidation of automobile exhaust gas, the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and electrodes of fuel cells. Both activities and selectivities of these reactions depend on the morphology of the dispersed metal. The morphology of palladium particles supported on both highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The particles on the HOPG were linked with neighboring particles to agglomerate, while the particles on the glassy carbon were circular. AFM data with tapping mode for the palladium particles on HOPG were consistent with the high-resolution SEM image. Although the lateral resolution of the AFM image was lower than that for the high-resolution SEM data, the AFM image clearly indicated the height distribution of the agglomerates.

  16. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-11-12

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. PMID:24167281

  17. Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Mascaro, Joseph; Sinca, Felipe; Chadwick, K Dana; Higgins, Mark; Farfan, William; Llactayo, William; Silman, Miles R

    2014-11-25

    Terrestrial carbon conservation can provide critical environmental, social, and climate benefits. Yet, the geographically complex mosaic of threats to, and opportunities for, conserving carbon in landscapes remain largely unresolved at national scales. Using a new high-resolution carbon mapping approach applied to Perú, a megadiverse country undergoing rapid land use change, we found that at least 0.8 Pg of aboveground carbon stocks are at imminent risk of emission from land use activities. Map-based information on the natural controls over carbon density, as well as current ecosystem threats and protections, revealed three biogeographically explicit strategies that fully offset forthcoming land-use emissions. High-resolution carbon mapping affords targeted interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in rapidly developing tropical nations. PMID:25385593

  18. Indoor and outdoor in situ high-resolution gamma radiation measurements in urban areas of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Svoukis, E; Tsertos, H

    2007-01-01

    In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of (232)Th and (238)U series, and (40)K are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +/- 0.5. PMID:17065195

  19. Targeted carbon conservation at national scales with high-resolution monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B.; Mascaro, Joseph; Sinca, Felipe; Chadwick, K. Dana; Higgins, Mark; Farfan, William; Llactayo, William; Silman, Miles R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon conservation can provide critical environmental, social, and climate benefits. Yet, the geographically complex mosaic of threats to, and opportunities for, conserving carbon in landscapes remain largely unresolved at national scales. Using a new high-resolution carbon mapping approach applied to Perú, a megadiverse country undergoing rapid land use change, we found that at least 0.8 Pg of aboveground carbon stocks are at imminent risk of emission from land use activities. Map-based information on the natural controls over carbon density, as well as current ecosystem threats and protections, revealed three biogeographically explicit strategies that fully offset forthcoming land-use emissions. High-resolution carbon mapping affords targeted interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in rapidly developing tropical nations. PMID:25385593

  20. MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE): Education and Public Outreach Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V.; McEwen, A.; Delamere, W. A.; Eliason, E.; Grant, J.; Hansen, C.; Herkenhoff, K.; Keszthelyi, L.; Kirk, R.; Mellon, M.

    2003-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Experiment, described by McEwen et al. and Delamere et al., will fly on the Mars 2005 Orbiter. In conjunction with the NASA Mars E/PO program, the HiRISE team plans an innovative and aggressive E/PO effort to complement the unique high-resolution capabilities of the camera. The team is organizing partnerships with existing educational outreach programs and museums and plans to develop its own educational materials. In addition to other traditional E/PO activities and a strong web presence, opportunities will be provided for the public to participate in image targeting and science analysis. The main aspects of our program are summarized.

  1. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-01-01

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. PMID:24167281

  2. Data Driven Approach for High Resolution Population Distribution and Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Rose, Amy N; Liu, Cheng; Urban, Marie L; Stewart, Robert N

    2014-01-01

    High resolution population distribution data are vital for successfully addressing critical issues ranging from energy and socio-environmental research to public health to human security. Commonly available population data from Census is constrained both in space and time and does not capture population dynamics as functions of space and time. This imposes a significant limitation on the fidelity of event-based simulation models with sensitive space-time resolution. This paper describes ongoing development of high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, through spatial data integration and modeling with behavioral or activity-based mobility datasets for representing temporal dynamics of population. The model is resolved at 1 km resolution globally and describes the U.S. population for nighttime and daytime at 90m. Integration of such population data provides the opportunity to develop simulations and applications in critical infrastructure management from local to global scales.

  3. Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Llactayo, William; Tupayachi, Raul; Luna, Ernesto Ráez

    2013-11-12

    Gold mining has rapidly increased in western Amazonia, but the rates and ecological impacts of mining remain poorly known and potentially underestimated. We combined field surveys, airborne mapping, and high-resolution satellite imaging to assess road- and river-based gold mining in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. In this period, the geographic extent of gold mining increased 400%. The average annual rate of forest loss as a result of gold mining tripled in 2008 following the global economic recession, closely associated with increased gold prices. Small clandestine operations now comprise more than half of all gold mining activities throughout the region. These rates of gold mining are far higher than previous estimates that were based on traditional satellite mapping techniques. Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests.

  4. Remote sensing in support of high-resolution terrestrial carbon monitoring and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.; Zhao, M.; Dubayah, R.; Huang, C.; Swatantran, A.; ONeil-Dunne, J.; Johnson, K. D.; Birdsey, R.; Fisk, J.; Flanagan, S.; Sahajpal, R.; Huang, W.; Tang, H.; Armstrong, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    As part of its Phase 1 Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) activities, NASA initiated a Local-Scale Biomass Pilot study. The goals of the pilot study were to develop protocols for fusing high-resolution remotely sensed observations with field data, provide accurate validation test areas for the continental-scale biomass product, and demonstrate efficacy for prognostic terrestrial ecosystem modeling. In Phase 2, this effort was expanded to the state scale. Here, we present results of this activity focusing on the use of remote sensing in high-resolution ecosystem modeling. The Ecosystem Demography (ED) model was implemented at 90 m spatial resolution for the entire state of Maryland. We rasterized soil depth and soil texture data from SSURGO. For hourly meteorological data, we spatially interpolated 32-km 3-hourly NARR into 1-km hourly and further corrected them at monthly level using PRISM data. NLCD data were used to mask sand, seashore, and wetland. High-resolution 1 m forest/non-forest mapping was used to define forest fraction of 90 m cells. Three alternative strategies were evaluated for initialization of forest structure using high-resolution lidar, and the model was used to calculate statewide estimates of forest biomass, carbon sequestration potential, time to reach sequestration potential, and sensitivity to future forest growth and disturbance rates, all at 90 m resolution. To our knowledge, no dynamic ecosystem model has been run at such high spatial resolution over such large areas utilizing remote sensing and validated as extensively. There are over 3 million 90 m land cells in Maryland, greater than 43 times the ~73,000 half-degree cells in a state-of-the-art global land model.

  5. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Context. Several new techniques to determine the metallicity of M dwarfs with better precision have been developed over the last decades. However, most of these studies were based on empirical methods. In order to enable detailed abundance analysis, standard methods established for warmer solar-like stars, i.e. model-dependent methods using fitting of synthetic spectra, still need to be used. Aims: In this work we continue the reliability confirmation and development of metallicity determinations of M dwarfs using high-resolution infrared spectra. The reliability was confirmed through analysis of M dwarfs in four binary systems with FGK dwarf companions and by comparison with previous optical studies of the FGK dwarfs. Methods: The metallicity determination was based on spectra taken in the J band (1.1-1.4 μm) with the CRIRES spectrograph. In this part of the infrared, the density of stellar molecular lines is limited, reducing the amount of blends with atomic lines enabling an accurate continuum placement. Lines of several atomic species were used to determine the stellar metallicity. Results: All binaries show excellent agreement between the derived metallicity of the M dwarf and its binary companion. Our results are also in good agreement with values found in the literature. Furthermore, we propose an alternative way to determine the effective temperature of M dwarfs of spectral types later than M2 through synthetic spectral fitting of the FeH lines in our observed spectra. Conclusions: We have confirmed that a reliable metallicity determination of M dwarfs can be achieved using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy. We also note that metallicites obtained with photometric metallicity calibrations available for M dwarfs only partly agree with the results we obtain from high-resolution spectroscopy. Based on data obtained at ESO-VLT, Paranal Observatory, Chile, Program ID 082.D-0838(A) and 084.D-1042(A).

  6. High-resolution extended source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    High resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of providing detailed tissue microstructures that are critical for disease diagnosis, yet its sensitivity is usually degraded since the system key components are typically not working at their respective center wavelengths. We developed a novel imaging system that achieves enhanced sensitivity without axial resolution degradation by the use of a spectrally encoded extended source (SEES) technique; it allows larger sample power without exceeding the maximum permissible exposure (MPE). In this study, we demonstrate a high-resolution extended source (HRES) OCT system, which is capable of providing a transverse resolution of 4.4 µm and an axial resolution of 2.1 µm in air with the SEES technique. We first theoretically show a sensitivity advantage of 6-dB of the HRES-OCT over that of its point source counterpart using numerical simulations, and then experimentally validate the applicability of the SEES technique to high-resolution OCT (HR-OCT) by comparing the HRES-OCT with an equivalent point-source system. In the HRES-OCT system, a dispersive prism was placed in the infinity space of the sample arm optics to spectrally extend the visual angle (angular subtense) of the light source to 10.3 mrad. This extended source allowed ~4 times larger MPE than its point source counterpart, which results in an enhancement of ~6 dB in sensitivity. Specifically, to solve the unbalanced dispersion between the sample and the reference arm optics, we proposed easy and efficient methods for system calibration and dispersion correction, respectively. With a maximum scanning speed reaching up to 60K A-lines/s, we further conducted imaging experiments with HRES-OCT using the human fingertip in vivo and the swine eye tissues ex vivo. Results demonstrate that the HRES-OCT is able to achieve significantly larger penetration depth than its conventional point source OCT counterpart.

  7. Proceedings of the workshop on high resolution computed microtomography (CMT)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to determine the status of the field, to define instrumental and computational requirements, and to establish minimum specifications required by possible users. The most important message sent by implementers was the remainder that CMT is a tool. It solves a wide spectrum of scientific problems and is complementary to other microscopy techniques, with certain important advantages that the other methods do not have. High-resolution CMT can be used non-invasively and non-destructively to study a variety of hierarchical three-dimensional microstructures, which in turn control body function. X-ray computed microtomography can also be used at the frontiers of physics, in the study of granular systems, for example. With high-resolution CMT, for example, three-dimensional pore geometries and topologies of soils and rocks can be obtained readily and implemented directly in transport models. In turn, these geometries can be used to calculate fundamental physical properties, such as permeability and electrical conductivity, from first principles. Clearly, use of the high-resolution CMT technique will contribute tremendously to the advancement of current R and D technologies in the production, transport, storage, and utilization of oil and natural gas. It can also be applied to problems related to environmental pollution, particularly to spilling and seepage of hazardous chemicals into the Earth's subsurface. Applications to energy and environmental problems will be far-ranging and may soon extend to disciplines such as materials science--where the method can be used in the manufacture of porous ceramics, filament-resin composites, and microelectronics components--and to biomedicine, where it could be used to design biocompatible materials such as artificial bones, contact lenses, or medication-releasing implants. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. High resolution Arctic snow observations: SnowNet (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, C. A.; Sturm, M.; Gelvin, A. B.; Berezovskaya, S.; Saari, S. P.; Finnegan, D. C.; Liston, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    Snow’s importance has become especially prominent in the terrestrial Arctic, where snow dominates the landscape most of the year and changes in snow arrival, depth, and melt have substantial energy budget and biotic consequences. Yet, the Arctic presents formidable challenges to accurate snow measurements because snow depths can vary greatly over relatively short distances (< 10 m). Snow distribution patterns in windy environments, such as the Arctic, arise from interactions among wind, snow, vegetation, and topography. In this environment, snow is transported easily and is retained in topographic depressions, near taller vegetation, and deposited on the lee sides of hills. Reliable observations of where snow exists in the Arctic landscape can be difficult to obtain, and estimates vary depending on where snow is sampled. Measurements tend to be widely distributed and sparse. In addition, observed changes in Arctic vegetation (e.g., increasing shrubs) and land surfaces (e.g., thermokarst) complicate matters further. In response to this critical shortcoming in Arctic snow measurements, we have developed a prototype observational network (SnowNet) that employs standard meteorological observations and high resolution topographic and vegetation data in concert with a comprehensive spatially-intensive snow measurement program. Our sites at Barrow (started 2007) and Imnavait Creek (started 2008), Alaska, feature frequent site visits and intensive spatial sampling of snow depths and densities and snow-surface topography. Both sites have high resolution (~20 cm) topographic and vegetation data layers generated from remote sensing and ground surveys. Further, we have been incorporating extremely high-resolution (< 10 cm) ground-based LiDAR snow and vegetation datasets that allow us to identify relationships among topography, vegetation, and snow in Arctic environments. In addition, we have collected tens of thousands of manual snow depths across our research sites. This

  9. Visualization of oxygen reduction sites at Pt electrodes on YSZ by means of 18O tracer incorporation: the width of the electrochemically active zone.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander Karl; Schintlmeister, Arno; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2010-10-21

    In this study the electrochemically active region of oxygen incorporation into yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was visualized by means of (18)O tracer incorporation experiments on dense Pt thin film microelectrodes combined with ToF-SIMS analysis. The localization and the shape of the incorporation zone were found to strongly depend on the polarization of the electrode. In case of lower overpotentials the active zone next to the three phase boundary (TPB) was frame-shaped and located beneath the Pt electrode. Increases in polarization led to an extension of the incorporation zone along the free YSZ surface. Owing to the low temperature of 300-330 °C a profile-broadening caused by diffusion in YSZ could be minimized and quantitatively separated from the measured profiles. The TPB-width (i.e. the decay length of electrochemical activity) was determined to be approximately 1.0-1.3 μm at these temperatures.

  10. Multispectral high-resolution hologram generation using orthographic projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniraj, I.; Guo, C.; Sheridan, J. T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method of synthesizing a digital hologram of three-dimensional (3D) real-world objects from multiple orthographic projection images (OPI). A high-resolution multiple perspectives of 3D objects (i.e., two dimensional elemental image array) are captured under incoherent white light using synthetic aperture integral imaging (SAII) technique and their OPIs are obtained respectively. The reference beam is then multiplied with the corresponding OPI and integrated to form a Fourier hologram. Eventually, a modified phase retrieval algorithm (GS/HIO) is applied to reconstruct the hologram. The principle is validated experimentally and the results support the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic

  12. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    SciTech Connect

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Seryi, A.; Smith, T.; Woodley, M.; Briegel, C.; Dysert, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  13. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  14. Measurement of stratospheric HBr using high resolution far infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Carli, B.; Ciarpallini, P.; Cortesi, U.; Griffin, M. J.; Lepri, G.; Mencaraglia, F.; Murray, A. G.; Nolt, I. G.; Park, J. H.; Radostitz, J. V.

    Far infrared spectral features of HBr have been observed in the stratospheric emission spectrum using a balloon borne high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer equipped with a high sensitivity detector specially designed for this purpose. The value of 1.6±0.6 parts per trillion in volume for the HBr mixing ratio has been retrieved, from the global-fit analysis of 121 spectra, in the 25-36.5 km altitude range. The result is briefly compared with models and previous assessments.

  15. High-resolution speckle imaging through strong atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Hope, Douglas A; Jefferies, Stuart M; Hart, Michael; Nagy, James G

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate that high-resolution imaging through strong atmospheric turbulence can be achieved by acquiring data with a system that captures short exposure ("speckle") images using a range of aperture sizes and then using a bootstrap multi-frame blind deconvolution restoration process that starts with the smallest aperture data. Our results suggest a potential paradigm shift in how we image through atmospheric turbulence. No longer should image acquisition and post processing be treated as two independent processes: they should be considered as intimately related.

  16. High-resolution Brillouin analysis of composite materials beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, Yosef; Antman, Yair; Silbiger, Maayan; Efraim, Liel; Froochzad, Avihay; Adler, Gadi; Levenberg, Eyal; Zadok, Avi

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis of fibers embedded within beams of composite materials is performed with 4 cm resolution and 0.5 MHz sensitivity. Two new contributions are presented. First, analysis was carried out continuously over 30 hours following the production of a beam, observing heating during exothermal curing and buildup of residual strains. Second, the bending stiffness and Young's modulus of the composite beam were extracted based on distributed strain measurements, taken during a static three-point bending experiment. The calculated parameters were used to forecast the beam deflections. The latter were favorably compared against external displacement measurements.

  17. Coregistration of high-resolution Mars orbital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    The systematic orbital imaging of the Martian surface started 4 decades ago from NASA's Viking Orbiter 1 & 2 missions, which were launched in August 1975, and acquired orbital images of the planet between 1976 and 1980. The result of this reconnaissance was the first medium-resolution (i.e. ≤ 300m/pixel) global map of Mars, as well as a variety of high-resolution images (reaching up to 8m/pixel) of special regions of interest. Over the last two decades NASA has sent 3 more spacecraft with onboard instruments for high-resolution orbital imaging: Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) having onboard the Mars Orbital Camera - Narrow Angle (MOC-NA), Mars Odyssey having onboard the Thermal Emission Imaging System - Visual (THEMIS-VIS) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) having on board two distinct high-resolution cameras, Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). Moreover, ESA has the multispectral High resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with resolution up to 12.5m since 2004. Overall, this set of cameras have acquired more than 400,000 high-resolution images, i.e. with resolution better than 100m and as fine as 25 cm/pixel. Notwithstanding the high spatial resolution of the available NASA orbital products, their accuracy of areo-referencing is often very poor. As a matter of fact, due to pointing inconsistencies, usually form errors in roll attitude, the acquired products may actually image areas tens of kilometers far away from the point that they are supposed to be looking at. On the other hand, since 2004, the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring stereo images through the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), with resolution that is usually 12.5-25 metres per pixel. The achieved coverage is more than 64% for images with resolution finer than 20 m/pixel, while for ~40% of Mars, Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have been produced with are co-registered with MOLA [Gwinner et al., 2010]. The HRSC images and DTMs

  18. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  19. High-resolution continuum observations of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the PFI or photometric filtergraph instrument is to observe the Sun in the continuum with as high resolution as possible and utilizing the widest range of wavelengths. Because of financial and political problems the CCD was eliminated so that the highest photometric accuracy is only obtainable by comparison with the CFS images. Presently there is a limitation to wavelengths above 2200 A due to the lack of sensitivity of untreated film below 2200 A. Therefore the experiment at present consists of a film camera with 1000 feet of film and 12 filters. The PFI experiments are outlined using only two cameras. Some further problems of the experiment are addressed.

  20. High-resolution (30 m) lunar radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.

    1988-01-01

    New high-resolution radar images of the lunar surface are being produced using the Haystack Observatory range-Doppler radar system. The goals are to: investigate the decameter-scale properties of the lunar surface, as an aid in the understanding of the geophysical history of the moon; and to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of planetary radar backscattering, to aid in the interpretation of the coarser-resolution images which were and will be obtained from planetary probe missions and other earth-based observations.