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Sample records for active treatment phase

  1. Estrogenic and AhR activities in dissolved phase and suspended solids from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Sonia; Gomez, Elena; Picot, Bernadette; Cavaillès, Vincent; Casellas, Claude; Balaguer, Patrick; Fenet, Hélène

    2010-05-15

    The distribution of estrogen receptor (ERalpha) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) activities between the dissolved phase and suspended solids were investigated during wastewater treatment. Three wastewater treatment plants with different treatment technologies (waste stabilization ponds (WSPs), trickling filters (TFs) and activated sludge supplemented with a biofilter system (ASB)) were sampled. Estrogenic and AhR activities were detected in both phases in influents and effluents. Estrogenic and AhR activities in wastewater influents ranged from 41.8 to 79 ng/L E(2) Eq. and from 37.9 to 115.5 ng/L TCDD Eq. in the dissolved phase and from 5.5 to 88.6 ng/g E(2) Eq. and from 15 to 700 ng/g TCDD Eq. in the suspended solids. For both activities, WSP showed greater or similar removal efficiency than ASB and both were much more efficient than TF which had the lowest removal efficiency. Moreover, our data indicate that the efficiency of removal of ER and AhR activities from the suspended solid phase was mainly due to removal of suspended solids. Indeed, ER and AhR activities were detected in the effluent suspended solid phase indicating that suspended solids, which are usually not considered in these types of studies, contribute to environmental contamination by endocrine disrupting compounds and should therefore be routinely assessed for a better estimation of the ER and AhR activities released in the environment. PMID:20303573

  2. Waste activated sludge treatment based on temperature staged and biologically phased anaerobic digestion system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingwen; Zheng, Mingxia; Tao, Tao; Zuo, Jiane; Wang, Kaijun

    2013-10-01

    The concept of temperature staged and biological phased (TSBP) was proposed to enhance the performance of waste-activated sludge anaerobic digestion. Semi-continuous experiments were used to investigate the effect of temperature (35 to 70 degrees C) as well as the hydraulic retention time (HRT) (2, 4 and 6 days) on the acidogenic phase. The results showed that the solubilization degree of waste-activated sludge increased from 14.7% to 30.1% with temperature increasing from 35 to 70 degrees C, while the acidification degree was highest at 45 degrees C (17.6%), and this was quite different from the temperature impact on hydrolysis. Compared with HRT of 2 and 6 days, 4 days was chosen as the appropriate HRT because of its relatively high solubilization degree (24.6%) and acidification degree (20.1%) at 45 degrees C. The TSBP system combined the acidogenic reactor (45 degrees C, 4 days) with the methanogenic reactor (35 degrees C, 16 days) and the results showed 84.8% and 11.4% higher methane yield and volatile solid reduction, respectively, compared with that of the single-stage anaerobic digestion system with HRT of 20 days at 35 degrees C. Moreover, different microbial morphologies were observed in the acidogenic- and methanogenic-phase reactors, which resulted from the temperature control and HRT adjustment. All the above results indicated that 45 degrees C was the optimum temperature to inhibit the activity of methanogenic bacteria in the acidogenic phase, and temperature staging and phase separation was thus accomplished. The advantages of the TSBP process were also confirmed by a full-scale waste-activated sludge anaerobic digestion project which was an energy self-sufficient system. PMID:24494492

  3. Volatile composition and aroma activity of guava puree before and after thermal and dense phase carbon dioxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Maria Lourdes; Marshall, Maurice R; Rouseff, Russell Lee

    2015-02-01

    Volatiles from initially frozen, dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD)- and thermally treated guava purees were isolated by solid phase microextraction (SPME), chromatographically separated and identified using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), GC-olfactometry (GC-O), and GC-pulsed flame photometric detector (GC-PFPD, sulfur mode). Fifty-eight volatiles were identified using GC-MS consisting of: 6 aldehydes, 2 acids, 15 alcohols, 6 ketones, 21 esters, and 8 terpenes. Eleven volatiles were newly identified in guava puree. Hexanal was the most abundant volatile in all 3 types of guava puree. Ten sulfur compounds were identified using GC-PFPD of which 3 possessed aroma activity and 3 were not previously reported in guava puree. Both treatments profoundly reduced total sulfur peak areas and produced different peak patterns compared to control. Thermal treatment reduced total sulfur peak area 47.9% compared to a loss of 34.7% with DPCD treatment. Twenty-six volatiles possessed aroma activity. (Z)-3-Hexenyl hexanoate was the major contributor to the aroma of the freshly thawed and DPCD-treated guava puree. DPCD treatment reduced total MS ion chromatogram (MS TIC) peak area 35% but produced a GC-O aroma profile very similar to control. Whereas thermal treatment reduced total TIC peak area only 8.7% compared to control but produced a 35% loss in total GC-O peak intensities. PMID:25588413

  4. Effects of prior treatment with simvastatin on skeletal muscle structure and mitochondrial enzyme activities during early phases of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkok, Elif; Yorulmaz, Hatice; Ates, Gulten; Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Tamer, Ayse Sule

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the early phase of sepsis and prior treatment of Simvastatin on muscle structure and mitochondrial enzymes treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. We divided rats into control, LPS, simvastatin, simvastatin + LPS groups. Mitochondrial citrate synthase, complex I, II, I + III, II + III, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities were measured. Muscle tissue was stained using modified Gomori trichrome (MGT), succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and cytochrome oxidase (COX). In all treated groups, complex I and citrate synthase activities were higher than in the controls. In the control and LPS groups, COX activity was increased when compared with simvastatins’. Complex II, II-III activities were higher in the LPS group than in the control group. Complex I-III activities were higher in the Simvastatin and Simvastatin + LPS groups than in the control and LPS groups (P < 0.05). Myopathic changes with LPS group were observed in MGT stained sections. Our findings showed improvements in the alterations of enzyme activities and muscle myofibrils after treating rats with LPS that had received a prior dose of simvastatin. PMID:25674200

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment produces an antinociceptive response phase and inhibits astrocyte activation and inflammatory response in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bai-Song; Meng, Ling-Xin; Ding, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Yan-Yan

    2014-06-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment has been proven to be a promising candidate for protection of the nervous system after acute injury in animal models of neuropathic pain. The purposes of this study were to examine the antinociceptive response phase induced by HBO treatment in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the dependence of the treatment's mechanism of alleviating neuropathic pain on the inhibition of spinal astrocyte activation. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Mechanical threshold and thermal latency were tested preoperatively and for 1 week postoperatively, four times daily at fixed time points. Methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) parameters were used as indices of oxidative stress response and tested before and after the treatment. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 were assayed in the sciatic nerve were with enzyme-linked immunoassay. Glial fibrillary acidic protein activation in the spinal cord was evaluated immunohistochemically. The rats exhibited temporary allodynia immediately after HBO treatment completion. This transient allodynia was closely associated with changes in MDA and SOD levels. A single HBO treatment caused a short-acting antinociceptive response phase. Repetitive HBO treatment led to a long-acting antinociceptive response phase and inhibited astrocyte activation. These results indicated that HBO treatment played a dual role in the aggravation and alleviation of neuropathic pain, though the aggravated pain effect (transient allodynia) was far less pronounced than the antinociceptive phase. Astrocyte inhibition and anti-inflammation may contribute to the antinociceptive effect of HBO treatment after nerve injury. PMID:24390961

  6. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  7. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model. PMID:26738731

  8. Masitinib in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis: results of a multicentre, open-label, dose-ranging, phase 2a study

    PubMed Central

    Tebib, Jacques; Mariette, Xavier; Bourgeois, Pierre; Flipo, René-Marc; Gaudin, Philippe; Le Loët, Xavier; Gineste, Paul; Guy, Laurent; Mansfield, Colin D; Moussy, Alain; Dubreuil, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Sibilia, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Since current treatment options for patients suffering from active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain inadequate, especially for those unresponsive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), new and improved medication is needed. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of masitinib (AB1010), a potent and selective protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor of c-KIT, in the monotherapy treatment of DMARD-refractory RA. Methods This was a multicentre, uncontrolled, open-label, randomised, dose-ranging, phase 2a trial. Masitinib was administered orally to 43 patients who had inadequate response to DMARDs, at initial randomised dosing levels of 3 and 6 mg/kg per day over a 12-week period. Dose adjustment was permitted based upon tolerability and response criteria. Efficacy was assessed via American College of Rheumatology 20%/50%/70% improvement criteria (ACR20/50/70) responses, disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28), index of improvement in RA (ACRn) and C-reactive protein (CRP) improvement, relative to baseline at week 12. Results Improvement was observed in all efficacy endpoints, including ACR20/50/70 scores of 54%, 26% and 8%, respectively, and a reduction in CRP level by greater than 50% for approximately half the population. This improvement was sustainable throughout an extension phase (> 84 weeks) and was also independent of initial DMARD resistance (anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha and/or methotrexate). A relatively high patient withdrawal rate (37%) required the use of last observation carried forward (LOCF) data imputation. Incidence of adverse events was high (95%), although the majority were of mild or moderate severity with a considerable decline in frequency observed after 12 weeks of treatment. Two nonfatal serious adverse events were reported. Dose-response analyses tentatively indicate that an initial dosing level of 6.0 mg/kg per day administered orally in two daily intakes is the most appropriate, based upon potency

  9. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  10. A double-blind, randomized, and active-controlled phase III study of Herbiron drink in the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in premenopausal females in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Tzu; Jeng, Cherng-Jye; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chen, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chyi-Long; Lin, Willie; Hsu, Chun-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Background About 468 million non-pregnant women are estimated to suffer from iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) worldwide. The highest prevalence of IDA occurs in the Taiwanese population. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Herbiron to increase iron absorption in women with IDA. Design Phase III double-blind, randomized, active-controlled, and parallel comparative study enrolled 124 patients with IDA and consisted of a 2-week run-in period, randomization, 12 weeks of supplementation, and 4 weeks of follow-up. The treatment group received Herbiron drink 50 mL p.o., b.i.d., before meals (daily iron intake: 21 mg/day) plus placebo tablets. The control group received a ferrous sulfate tablet, t.i.d., plus placebo 50-mL drink before meals (daily iron intake: 195 mg/day). Results Both treatments significantly improved hemoglobin and all secondary efficacy endpoints. Most IDA patients treated with Herbiron or ferrous sulfate finished the study in the normal range. Ferrous sulfate treatment induced a rapid rate of hemoglobin synthesis, which plateaued by week 8, whereas Herbiron treatment increased the rate of hemoglobin synthesis more slowly, likely due to its nine-fold lower iron content. Gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, and nausea) but not infectious adverse events were significantly more common in the ferrous sulfate group (n=11, 18.3%) than those in the Herbiron group (n=1, 1.6%) (p=0.004). Conclusion Twelve weeks of Herbiron treatment delivering 21mg of iron or ferrous sulfate treatment delivering 195 mg of iron induced normal hemoglobin levels in 62 or 91% of non-pregnant women with IDA in Taiwan, respectively, suggesting dose-dependent and bioavailability effects. PMID:27343206

  11. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  12. 40 CFR 35.2108 - Phased or segmented treatment works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phased or segmented treatment works. 35... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2108 Phased or segmented treatment works. Grant funding may be awarded for a phase or segment of a treatment works,...

  13. Treatment of incest perpetrators: a five-phase model.

    PubMed

    Frenken, J

    1994-04-01

    The author's experiences with treating fathers who committed incest and were sentenced to undergo therapy are discussed in this paper. The treatment consists of five phases. Following crisis intervention and assessment, an analysis is made of the sequence of events, thoughts, moods, and behaviors that precede sexual contact. In the third phase, the client's sense of guilt is brought out and he actively takes responsibility for the sexual abuse of his daughter. In the fourth phase, the origin of the sexual abuse is clarified as it is put into the context of his own problems and the problems within the family. In the fifth phase, strategies for relapse prevention are practiced. In addition there are partner-relationship sessions with the couple as well as family counseling sessions. Up to now none of the clients have recidivized. PMID:8187021

  14. 40 CFR 35.2108 - Phased or segmented treatment works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... segmented treatment works. Grant funding may be awarded for a phase or segment of a treatment works, subject to the limitations of § 35.2123, although that phase or segment does not result in compliance with... make the treatment works of which the phase or segment is a part operational and comply with...

  15. 40 CFR 35.2108 - Phased or segmented treatment works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... segmented treatment works. Grant funding may be awarded for a phase or segment of a treatment works, subject to the limitations of § 35.2123, although that phase or segment does not result in compliance with... make the treatment works of which the phase or segment is a part operational and comply with...

  16. Development and evaluation of the Active Treatment Client Rights Checklist.

    PubMed

    Gross, E J; Maguire, K B; Shepard, S M; Piersel, W C

    1994-01-01

    The role of active treatment has been recognized as vital to the habilitation of persons with mental retardation; however, evaluating the provision of active treatment has been difficult. This study describes the development of the Active Treatment Client Rights checklist (ATCR), which was designed to facilitate the assessment, monitoring, and implementation of readily observable client active treatment services. This investigation provides an explanation of item content, initial reliability data (Phase I), and the results of implementation of the ATCR over a 2-year period in an ICF/MR facility with 29 living units serving nearly 500 clients (Phase II). The ATCR is highly reliable, valid, and useful in enhancing staff provision of active treatment. The most sensitive indicator of active treatment was shown to be related to frequency of functional interactions between clients and staff. PMID:8190969

  17. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  18. Decontamination and inspection plan for phase 2 closure of the 300-Area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.B.

    1998-02-06

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 2 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 2, the second phase of three proposed phases of closure for WATS, provides for closure of all WATS portions of the 334-A Building and some, but not all, WATS portions of the 333 and 303-F Buildings. Closure of the entire unit will not occur until all three closure phases have been completed. The DIP also describes the designation and management-process for waste and debris generated during Phase 2 closure activities. Information regarding the decontamination and verification methods for Phase 1 closure can be found in Decontamination and Inspection Plan, for Phase 1 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System, 21 WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001. Information regarding Phase 3 closure will be provided in later documents.

  19. Vinflunine – an active chemotherapy for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with a platinum-based regimen: results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bennouna, J; Breton, J-L; Tourani, J-M; Ottensmeier, C; O'Brien, M; Kosmidis, P; Huat, T E; Pinel, M-C; Colin, C; Douillard, J-Y

    2006-01-01

    A multicentre, single-arm, phase II trial designed to determine the efficacy of single-agent vinflunine in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously treated with a platinum-based regimen. The objectives were to assess efficacy in terms of tumour response rate (primary end point), duration of response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and to evaluate the toxicity associated with this treatment. Patients with advanced NSCLC with progressive disease having failed prior platinum-based first-line treatment for advanced disease. Five responses out of the 63 treated patients were documented by WHO criteria and validated by an independent panel review (IRP), yielding a response rate of 7.9% (95% CI: 2.6–17.6) in the intent-to-treat analysis and 8.3% (95% CI: 2.8–18.4) in the evaluable population. Disease control was achieved in 35 out of 60 evaluable patients (58.3%). The median duration of response (complete response+partial response), according to modified WHO criteria was 7.8 months (95% CI: 4.6–NR). Median PFS was 2.6 months (95% CI: 1.4–3.8), and the median survival was 7.0 months (95% CI: 5.8–9.2). Grades 3–4 neutropenia was reported in 50% of patients; febrile neutropenia was observed in two patients (3.2%); grades 3–4 myalgia and grade 3 constipation were experienced by 10 (15.9%) and six (9.5%) of patients, respectively. Constipation was manageable, noncumulative and could be prevented with laxative prophylaxis. The encouraging results from this phase II study with vinflunine warrant further investigations in phase III trials as second- or first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as a single agent or in combination with other active drugs. PMID:16641911

  20. Integrated thermal treatment system sudy: Phase 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study, the results of which have been published as an interim report, examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 2 systems. The assumptions and methods were the same as for the Phase 1 study. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in he Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr).

  1. Matrix metalloproteases activity and ultrastructural changes in the early phase of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. The effect of oral treatment with spinal cord hydrolysate [correction of hydrolisate] proteins in Lewis rat. The pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska-Patzer, Barbara; Walski, Michał; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Zalewska, Teresa; Baranowska, Bozena; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of genes of the neutral proteinases that are important to normal development and to a variety of pathological processes including neuroinflammation. In the central nervous system (CNS), MMPs degrade components of the basal lamina, leading to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and contribute to the neuroinflammatory responses. Their concentration in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) increases a few folds and is accompanied by a thinner basal membrane in the early phase of EAE. After induction of oral tolerance by pretreatment with spinal cord hydrolisate proteins, the concentration of MMPs decreased by 30%. Other ultrastructural changes were observed in the early phase of EAE, i.e., karioskeletal damage with vesicular structures in karioplasm, compartmentalisation of the endoplasmic reticulum in perikarium, large cisterns of the Golgi apparatus, increased activity of microglial cells with numbers of phagolisosomes, disorganisation of sheets of myelin, neoangiogenesis in parenchyma of the cerebral cortex. After oral pretreatment with spinal cord hydrolisate proteins, no changes in karioskeletal proteins were found. Still Golgi apparatus spheres were large. Many pores in the nuclear membranes were observed, which is probably a sign of increased genetic information transport. We also observed some collagen fibrils as a sign of reparative processes. These results show the diminishing of inflammation in the early phase of EAE after oral induction of immunological tolerance and some possibilities of clinical implication in multiple sclerosis treatment. PMID:15266785

  2. Phased activity in Heterorhabditis megidis infective juveniles.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C M; Griffin, C T

    2002-06-01

    The infectivity of Heterorhabditis megidis infective juveniles (IJs) increases during storage in water. We investigated whether this change can be related to other features of the IJs' behaviour. IJs were stored in water for 4 weeks at 20 degrees C, and the following parameters were assessed at intervals: infectivity for Galleria mellonella, dispersal in sand, host-finding on agar, and the percentage of IJs active in water. In addition, the behaviour of the IJs in water was described using 7 categories. Immediately after emerging from the host cadaver, IJs were highly active (99% of IJs in water were active and 65% displayed 'waving', the normal method of forward movement). Maximum responsiveness to host volatiles in an agar plate assay was recorded on day 2 (69% of IJs moved from the point of application and 44% of all IJs in the agar arena moved towards a host) and maximum dispersal in sand (5.8 cm) on day 0. These tendencies declined gradually with age, while infectivity underwent a significant increase from 11 nematodes per insect on day 0 to 38 nematodes per insect on day 9. Three phases could be distinguished in the behaviour of H. megidis IJs: an initial dispersal phase, during which infectivity was low; an infective phase, during which dispersal tendency was declining, and a third phase during which all behaviours (dispersal, infectivity and activity) were declining. Over the 4-week storage period, infectivity of H. megidis IJs was correlated (R2 = 0.83) with the percentage time IJs engaged in 'head thrusting' (a behaviour that resembles penetration). There is no evidence that the observed increase in infectivity of H. megidis strain UK211 could be accounted for by a generally greater level of motor activity, nor by an increase in responsiveness to volatile host cues, and it is suggested that it is due to an increased tendency to attempt penetration. PMID:12118716

  3. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. (Technical Monitor); Parrott, T. (Technical Monitor); Jones, M. (Technical Monitor); Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Beer, B.; Seybert, A. F.; Tathavadekar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to design, build and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale model fan rigs representative of full scale engines provides not only cost-savings, but also an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing multiple tests. To use scale model treatment as a design tool, the impedance of the sub-scale liner must be known with confidence. This study was aimed at developing impedance measurement methods for high frequencies. A normal incidence impedance tube method that extends the upper frequency range to 25,000 Hz. without grazing flow effects was evaluated. The free field method was investigated as a potential high frequency technique. The potential of the two-microphone in-situ impedance measurement method was evaluated in the presence of grazing flow. Difficulties in achieving the high frequency goals were encountered in all methods. Results of developing a time-domain finite difference resonator impedance model indicated that a re-interpretation of the empirical fluid mechanical models used in the frequency domain model for nonlinear resistance and mass reactance may be required. A scale model treatment design that could be tested on the Universal Propulsion Simulator vehicle was proposed.

  4. The sustained phase of tyrosine hydroxylase activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lin Kooi; Sominsky, Luba; Dickson, Phillip W; Hodgson, Deborah M; Dunkley, Peter R

    2012-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway for catecholamine synthesis. Stress triggers an increase in TH activity, resulting in increased release of catecholamines from both neurons and the adrenal medulla. In response to stress three phases of TH activation have been identified (acute, sustained and chronic) and each phase has a unique mechanism. The acute and chronic phases have been studied in vivo in a number of animal models, but to date the sustained phase has only been characterised in vitro. We aimed to investigate the effects of dual exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in neonatal rats on TH protein, TH phosphorylation at serine residues 19, 31 and 40 and TH activity in the adrenal gland over the sustained phase. Wistar rats were administered LPS (0.05 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivolume of non-pyrogenic saline on days 3 and 5 postpartum. Adrenal glands were collected at 4, 24 and 48 h after the drug exposure on day 5. Neonatal LPS treatment resulted in increases in TH phosphorylation of Ser40 at 4 and 24 h, TH phosphorylation of Ser31 at 24 h, TH activity at 4 and 24 h and TH protein at 48 h. We therefore have provided evidence for the first time that TH phosphorylation at Ser31 and Ser40 occurs for up to 24 h in vivo and leads to TH activation independent of TH protein synthesis, suggesting that the sustained phase of TH activation occurs in vivo. PMID:22684282

  5. Integrated thermal treatment system study -- Phase 2 results. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the second phase of a study on thermal treatment technologies. The study consists of a systematic assessment of nineteen thermal treatment alternatives for the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the MLLW. The alternatives considered in Phase 2 were innovative thermal treatments with nine types of primary processing units. Other variations in the study examined the effect of combustion gas, air pollution control system design, and stabilization technology for the treatment residues. The Phase 1 study examined ten initial thermal treatment alternatives. The Phase 2 systems were evaluated in essentially the same manner as the Phase 1 systems. The alternatives evaluated were: rotary kiln, slagging kiln, plasma furnace, plasma gasification, molten salt oxidation, molten metal waste destruction, steam gasification, Joule-heated vitrification, thermal desorption and mediated electrochemical oxidation, and thermal desorption and supercritical water oxidation. The quantities, and physical and chemical compositions, of the input waste used in the Phase 2 systems differ from those in the Phase 1 systems, which were based on a preliminary waste input database developed at the onset of the Integrated Thermal Treatment System study. The inventory database used in the Phase 2 study incorporates the latest US Department of Energy information. All systems, both primary treatment systems and subsystem inputs, have now been evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 lb/hr). 28 refs., 88 figs., 41 tabs.

  6. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-02-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

  7. Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Peptide Activated Natural Killer (NK) Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) after Radiochemotherapy (RCTx) – From Preclinical Studies to a Clinical Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Hanno M.; Ahrens, Norbert; Blankenstein, Christiane; Duell, Thomas; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Günther, Christine; Gunther, Sophie; Habl, Gregor; Hautmann, Hubert; Hautmann, Matthias; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Molls, Michael; Offner, Robert; Rödel, Claus; Rödel, Franz; Schütz, Martin; Combs, Stephanie E.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells. An unusual cell surface localization could be demonstrated on a large variety of solid tumors including lung, colorectal, breast, squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, prostate and pancreatic carcinomas, glioblastomas, sarcomas and hematological malignancies, but not on corresponding normal tissues. A membrane (m)Hsp70-positive phenotype can be determined either directly on single cell suspensions of tumor biopsies by flow cytometry using cmHsp70.1 monoclonal antibody or indirectly in the serum of patients using a novel lipHsp70 ELISA. A mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype has been associated with highly aggressive tumors, causing invasion and metastases and resistance to cell death. However, natural killer (NK), but not T cells were found to kill mHsp70-positive tumor cells after activation with a naturally occurring Hsp70 peptide (TKD) plus low dose IL-2 (TKD/IL-2). Safety and tolerability of ex vivo TKD/IL-2 stimulated, autologous NK cells has been demonstrated in patients with metastasized colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase I clinical trial. Based on promising clinical results of the previous study, a phase II randomized clinical study was initiated in 2014. The primary objective of this multicenter proof-of-concept trial is to examine whether an adjuvant treatment of NSCLC patients after platinum-based radiochemotherapy (RCTx) with TKD/IL-2 activated, autologous NK cells is clinically effective. As a mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype is associated with poor clinical outcome only mHsp70-positive tumor patients will be recruited into the trial. The primary endpoint of this study will be the comparison of the progression-free survival of patients treated with ex vivo activated NK cells compared to patients who were treated with RCTx alone. As secondary endpoints overall survival, toxicity, quality-of-life, and biological responses will be determined in both

  8. Oral Hygiene Behaviour Change During the Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shamani, Saeed; Jansson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the frequency of smoking cessation and the use of proximal tooth cleaning routines after a nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase in a Specialist clinic of Periodontology and to evaluate if these behaviour changes had any influence on the periodontal healing results. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study on a randomly selected population of 100 patients referred for periodontal treatment. The variables were registered from the dental records and the radiographs. Forty-six individuals declared that they were smokers at baseline and one individual of those quitted smoking during the nonsurgical treatment period. The percentage of individuals who performed proximal tooth cleaning daily was significantly increased from 56% to 72% during the treatment period. The patients practising proximal tooth cleaning daily had significantly lower Plaque index before as well as after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment phase compared to those without the routine. The subjects who did not perform tooth cleaning daily before the treatment and who did not introduce this routine had significantly deeper periodontal pockets compared to those who performed inter-dental cleaning daily before treatment or who had adopted the routine during the treatment phase. However, there were no significant differences according to number of deepened periodontal pockets after nonsurgical treatment irrespective of proximal cleaning routines. In the future, motivational interviewing may be a more effective method to achieve a behaviour change if an extended education of dental hygienists within this area will be implemented. PMID:23284591

  9. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Active treatment. 441.154 Section 441.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve “active treatment”, which means implementation of...

  10. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Active treatment. 441.154 Section 441.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve “active treatment”, which means implementation of...

  11. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Active treatment. 441.154 Section 441.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve “active treatment”, which means implementation of...

  12. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Active treatment. 441.154 Section 441.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve “active treatment”, which means implementation of...

  13. 42 CFR 441.154 - Active treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Active treatment. 441.154 Section 441.154 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment. Inpatient psychiatric services must involve “active treatment”, which means implementation of...

  14. One Phase versus Two Phase Treatment in Mixed Dentition: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Ratnaditya, Akurathi; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Karpe, Shameem

    2015-08-01

    The mixed dentition is the developmental period after the permanent first molars and incisors have erupted, and before the remaining deciduous teeth are lost. Phase I treatment is usually done early in this period. Mixed dentition treatment goals often focus on skeletal rather than dental correction. To design a treatment plan, the clinician must understand the growth and development patterns, and the known effects of the chosen treatment modality. Jaw growth affects orthodontic treatment, usually favorably, but sometimes unfavorably. When and how much growth will occur is completely unpredictable. However, we know some useful facts about jaw growth in the mixed dentition. The two areas that remain controversial in the orthodontic literature are the treatment of crowding and of Class II malocclusions in the mixed dentition. Is there a benefit to early treatment for these problems? This question has yet to be fully answered by researchers. Hence, we planned for review of all available literature to come to a consensus about preventive or interceptive orthodontics or in other words Phase 1 and Phase 2 treatment. The clinician can diagnose and intercept certain developing problems with early treatment. Many other cases should be supervised, but not treated until the permanent teeth are in place. We must base our decision to treat on experience, knowledge of growth and dental development, and research. PMID:26464559

  15. Active metasurface terahertz deflector with phase discontinuities.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoqiang; Ouyang, Chunmei; Xu, Ningning; Cao, Wei; Wei, Xin; Song, Guofeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; O'Hara, John F; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-10-19

    Metasurfaces provide great flexibility in tailoring light beams and reveal unprecedented prospects on novel functional components. However, techniques to dynamically control and manipulate the properties of metasurfaces are lagging behind. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we present an active wave deflector made from a metasurface with phase discontinuities. The active metasurface is capable of delivering efficient real-time control and amplitude manipulation of broadband anomalous diffraction in the terahertz regime. The device consists of complementary C-shape split-ring resonator elements fabricated on a doped semiconductor substrate. Due to the Schottky diode effect formed by the hybrid metal-semiconductor, the real-time conductivity of the doped semiconductor substrate is modified by applying an external voltage bias, thereby effectively manipulating the intensity of the anomalous deflected terahertz wave. A modulation depth of up to 46% was achieved, while the characteristics of broadband frequency responses and constant deflected angles were well maintained during the modulation process. The modulation speed of diffraction amplitude reaches several kilohertz, limited by the capacitance and resistance of the depletion region. The scheme proposed here opens up a novel approach to develop tunable metasurfaces. PMID:26480376

  16. Window Treatment Phase I and Other Energy II Conservation Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Philip E.

    Six different energy-saving treatments for large window areas were tested by Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TCCC) to coordinate energy saving with building design. The TCCC building has an open space design with 33,000 square feet of external glass and other features causing heating problems and high energy costs. Phase I of the…

  17. Treatment of Incest Perpetrators: A Five-Phase Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenken, Jos

    1994-01-01

    A five-phase treatment program for fathers who committed incest includes crisis intervention and assessment; analysis of the sequence of events, thoughts, moods, and behaviors preceding sexual contact; client takes responsibility for the abuse; origin of the abuse is put into the context of client's problems and intrafamilial problems; and…

  18. Complex PTSD and phased treatment in refugees: a debate piece

    PubMed Central

    ter Heide, F. Jackie June; Mooren, Trudy M.; Kleber, Rolf J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Asylum seekers and refugees have been claimed to be at increased risk of developing complex posttraumatic stress disorder (complex PTSD). Consequently, it has been recommended that refugees be treated with present-centred or phased treatment rather than stand-alone trauma-focused treatment. This recommendation has contributed to a clinical practice of delaying or waiving trauma-focused treatment in refugees with PTSD. Objective The aim of this debate piece is to defend two theses: (1) that complex trauma leads to complex PTSD in a minority of refugees only and (2) that trauma-focused treatment should be offered to all refugees who seek treatment for PTSD. Methods The first thesis is defended by comparing data on the prevalence of complex PTSD in refugees to those in other trauma-exposed populations, using studies derived from a systematic review. The second thesis is defended using conclusions of systematic reviews and a meta-analysis of the efficacy of psychotherapeutic treatment in refugees. Results Research shows that refugees are more likely to meet a regular PTSD diagnosis or no diagnosis than a complex PTSD diagnosis and that prevalence of complex PTSD in refugees is relatively low compared to that in survivors of childhood trauma. Effect sizes for trauma-focused treatment in refugees, especially narrative exposure therapy (NET) and culturally adapted cognitive-behaviour therapy (CA-CBT), have consistently been found to be high. Conclusions Complex PTSD in refugees should not be assumed to be present on the basis of complex traumatic experiences but should be carefully diagnosed using a validated interview. In line with treatment guidelines for PTSD, a course of trauma-focused treatment should be offered to all refugees seeking treatment for PTSD, including asylum seekers. PMID:26886486

  19. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  20. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo O; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  1. Urine naloxone concentration at different phases of buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Heikman, Pertti; Häkkinen, Margareeta; Gergov, Merja; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    In spite of the benefits of buprenorphine-naloxone co-formulation (BNX) in opioid maintenance treatment, the naloxone component has not prevented parenteral use of BNX. Current laboratory methods are not sufficient to differentiate between therapeutic and illicit use of buprenorphine, and little is known about urine naloxone concentrations. Measurement of urine naloxone, together with buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, might help to determine the naloxone source and administration route. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for this purpose. Naloxone, buprenorphine, and norbuprenorphine total concentrations were measured in urine samples from opioid-dependent patients before and during stable and unstable phases of maintenance treatment with BNX. The limit of quantification in urine was 1.0 µg/L for naloxone, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Before treatment, all samples contained buprenorphine but the median naloxone concentration was 0 µg/L. During the maintenance treatment with BNX all urine samples were positive for naloxone, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. The naloxone concentration at a stable phase of treatment (median 60 µg/L, range 5-200 µg/L) was not different from the naloxone concentration at an unstable phase (70 µg/L, 10-1700 µg/L). Applying an upper limit of 200 µg/L to the sample, the median naloxone/buprenorphine ratio was higher in the high than in the low naloxone concentration group (0.9 vs 0.3, respectively). This study suggests that naloxone in urine can act as an indicator of compliance with BNX. Parenteral use of BNX was associated with a high naloxone/buprenorphine ratio. Negative naloxone with positive buprenorphine suggests the use/abuse of buprenorphine alone. PMID:23512803

  2. Elastic activator for treatment of open bite.

    PubMed

    Stellzig, A; Steegmayer-Gilde, G; Basdra, E K

    1999-06-01

    This article presents a modified activator for treatment of open bite cases. The intermaxillary acrylic of the lateral occlusal zones is replaced by elastic rubber tubes. By stimulating orthopaedic gymnastics (chewing gum effect), the elastic activator intrudes upper and lower posterior teeth. A noticeable counterclockwise rotation of the mandible was accomplished by a decrease of the gonial angle. Besides the simple fabrication of the device and uncomplicated replacement of the elastic rubber tubes, treatment can be started even in mixed dentition when affixing plates may be difficult. PMID:10420241

  3. Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer Enhancement by Nanofluids: Single-Phase and Two-Phase Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakaç, S.; Pramuanjaroenkij, A.

    2016-06-01

    Nanofluids have been investigated regarding their advantages and potentialities for the purpose of increasing convective heat transfer rates inside thermal systems where they are used as working fluids. Researchers in thermophysics have investigated these fluids experimentally and numerically. This review provides extensive theoretical information concerning nanofluids in the single-phase and two-phase treatments. Important published works on nanofluid properties and correlations are summarized and reviewed in detail. Heat transfer enhancement by nanofluids is a challenging problem due to the difficulties inherent in the model of the physical mechanism of interaction between the paricles. Here the interaction between the phases is modeled by several two-phase models, and the results are given in graphical and tabular forms. Despite the advantages of the mixture model, such as imlementation of physical properties and less computational power requirements, some studies showed that the results of the single-phase and two-phase models are very similar. The main difference consists in the effect of the drift velocities of the phases relative to each other.

  4. Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer Enhancement by Nanofluids: Single-Phase and Two-Phase Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakaç, S.; Pramuanjaroenkij, A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofluids have been investigated regarding their advantages and potentialities for the purpose of increasing convective heat transfer rates inside thermal systems where they are used as working fluids. Researchers in thermophysics have investigated these fluids experimentally and numerically. This review provides extensive theoretical information concerning nanofluids in the single-phase and two-phase treatments. Important published works on nanofluid properties and correlations are summarized and reviewed in detail. Heat transfer enhancement by nanofluids is a challenging problem due to the difficulties inherent in the model of the physical mechanism of interaction between the paricles. Here the interaction between the phases is modeled by several two-phase models, and the results are given in graphical and tabular forms. Despite the advantages of the mixture model, such as imlementation of physical properties and less computational power requirements, some studies showed that the results of the single-phase and two-phase models are very similar. The main difference consists in the effect of the drift velocities of the phases relative to each other.

  5. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  6. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-11-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  7. CAM Provider Use and Expenditures by Cancer Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, William E.; Tyree, Patrick T.; Devlin, Sean M.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Diehr, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess cancer patients’ utilization of complementary and alternative medical providers and the associated expenditures by specific treatment phases. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of medical services utilization and expenditures during three therapeutic intervals: an initial treatment phase, continuing care, and end-of-life. Methods Analysis of an insurance claims database that had been matched to the Washington State SEER cancer registry. Results Of 2,900 registry-matched cancer patients 63.2% were female, the median age was 54 years, and 92.7% were white. Breast cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (52.7%), followed by prostate cancer (24.7%), lung cancer (10.1%), colon cancer (7.0%), and hematologic malignancies (5.6%). CAM provider using patients were 26.5% of the overall cohort (18.5% used chiropractors, 7.7% naturopathic physicians, 5.3% massage therapists, and 4.2% saw acupuncturists). The proportion of CAM using patients was similar during each treatment phase. All patients used some conventional care. Female gender, a breast cancer diagnosis, age, and white race were significant predictors of CAM use. Diagnosis of a musculoskeletal problem occurred at sometime during the study for 72.1% of cancer patients. CAM provider visits were 7.2% of total outpatient medical visits and 85.1% of CAM visits resulted in a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Expenditures for CAM providers were 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.1% of all expenditures during the initial, continuing, and end-of-life phases respectively. Conclusion For cancer patients, musculoskeletal issues were the most commonly listed diagnosis made by a CAM provider. Although expenditures associated with CAM are a small proportion of the total, additional studies are necessary to determine the importance patients place on access to these services. PMID:18471036

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of phase detectors for active bit synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Self-synchronizing digital data communication systems usually use active or phase-locked loop (PLL) bit synchronizers. The three main elements of PLL synchronizers are the phase detector, loop filter, and the voltage controlled oscillator. Of these three elements, phase detector synthesis is the main source of difficulty, particularly when the received signals are demodulated square-wave signals. A phase detector synthesis technique is reviewed that provides a physically realizable design for bit synchronizer phase detectors. The development is based upon nonlinear recursive estimation methods. The phase detector portion of the algorithm is isolated and analyzed.

  9. Treatment of glycerol phase formed by biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-05-01

    Glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel produced by transesterification and is contained in the glycerol phase together with many other materials such as soaps, remaining catalyst, water, and esters formed during the process. The content of glycerol is approximately 30-60 wt.%. In this paper, treatments of the glycerol phase to obtain glycerol with a purity of 86 wt.% (without distillation) and a mixture of fatty acids with esters (1:1) or only a mixture of fatty acids with a purity of 99 wt.% are presented. The treatment was carried out by removing of alkaline substances and esters. Fatty acids were produced by saponification of the remaining esters and subsequent neutralization of alkaline substances by phosphoric, sulfuric, hydrochloric, or acetic acids. Salts are by-products and, in the case of phosphoric acid can be used as potash-phosphate fertilizer. The process of treatment is easy and environmentally friendly, because no special chemicals or equipment are required and all products are utilizable. PMID:20074939

  10. Safety and Clinical Activity of a Combination Therapy Comprising Two Antibody-Based Targeting Agents for the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase I/II Study Evaluating the Immunoconjugate Inotuzumab Ozogamicin With Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Luis; Offner, Fritz; Smith, Mitchell R.; Verhoef, Gregor; Johnson, Peter; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Rohatiner, Ama; Advani, Anjali; Foran, James; Hess, Georg; Coiffier, Bertrand; Czuczman, Myron; Giné, Eva; Durrant, Simon; Kneissl, Michelle; Luu, Kenneth T.; Hua, Steven Y.; Boni, Joseph; Vandendries, Erik; Dang, Nam H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Inotuzumab ozogamicin (INO) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent composed of a humanized anti-CD22 antibody conjugated to calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic agent. We performed a phase I/II study to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of INO plus rituximab (R-INO) for treatment of relapsed/refractory CD20+/CD22+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and Methods A dose-escalation phase to determine the MTD of R-INO was followed by an expanded cohort to further evaluate the efficacy and safety at the MTD. Patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL), relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), or refractory aggressive NHL received R-INO every 4 weeks for up to eight cycles. Results In all, 118 patients received one or more cycles of R-INO (median, four cycles). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (31%) and neutropenia (22%). Common low-grade toxicities included hyperbilirubinemia (25%) and increased AST (36%). The MTD of INO in combination with rituximab (375 mg/m2) was confirmed to be the same as that for single-agent INO (1.8 mg/m2). Treatment at the MTD yielded objective response rates of 87%, 74%, and 20% for relapsed FL (n = 39), relapsed DLBCL (n = 42), and refractory aggressive NHL (n = 30), respectively. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 68% (median, not reached) for FL and 42% (median, 17.1 months) for relapsed DLBCL. Conclusion R-INO demonstrated high response rates and long PFS in patients with relapsed FL or DLBCL. This and the manageable toxicity profile suggest that R-INO may be a promising option for CD20+/CD22+ B-cell NHL. PMID:23295790

  11. Active phase locking of thirty fiber channels using multilevel phase dithering method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhimeng; Tang, Xuan; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Cangli; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Tunan; Han, Mei

    2016-03-01

    An active phase locking of a large-scale fiber array with thirty channels has been demonstrated experimentally. In the experiment, the first group of thirty phase controllers is used to compensate the phase noises between the elements and the second group of thirty phase modulators is used to impose additional phase disturbances to mimic the phase noises in the high power fiber amplifiers. A multi-level phase dithering algorithm using dual-level rectangular-wave phase modulation and time division multiplexing can achieve the same phase control as single/multi-frequency dithering technique, but without coherent demodulation circuit. The phase locking efficiency of 30 fiber channels is achieved about 98.68%, 97.82%, and 96.50% with no additional phase distortion, modulated phase distortion I (±1 rad), and phase distortion II (±2 rad), corresponding to the phase error of λ/54, λ/43, and λ/34 rms. The contrast of the coherent combined beam profile is about 89%. Experimental results reveal that the multi-level phase dithering technique has great potential in scaling to a large number of laser beams. PMID:27036760

  12. Active phase locking of thirty fiber channels using multilevel phase dithering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhimeng; Tang, Xuan; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Cangli; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Tunan; Han, Mei

    2016-03-01

    An active phase locking of a large-scale fiber array with thirty channels has been demonstrated experimentally. In the experiment, the first group of thirty phase controllers is used to compensate the phase noises between the elements and the second group of thirty phase modulators is used to impose additional phase disturbances to mimic the phase noises in the high power fiber amplifiers. A multi-level phase dithering algorithm using dual-level rectangular-wave phase modulation and time division multiplexing can achieve the same phase control as single/multi-frequency dithering technique, but without coherent demodulation circuit. The phase locking efficiency of 30 fiber channels is achieved about 98.68%, 97.82%, and 96.50% with no additional phase distortion, modulated phase distortion I (±1 rad), and phase distortion II (±2 rad), corresponding to the phase error of λ/54, λ/43, and λ/34 rms. The contrast of the coherent combined beam profile is about 89%. Experimental results reveal that the multi-level phase dithering technique has great potential in scaling to a large number of laser beams.

  13. Maintaining professional activity during breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ganem, G; Antoine, E-C; Touboul, C; Naman, H; Dohollou, N; Facchini, T; Coscas, Y; Lortholary, A; Catala, S; Jacquot, S; Lhomel, C; Eisinger, F

    2016-05-01

    The question of returning to work and pursuing professional activity during cancer treatment is an increasingly important consideration. The present work focuses on factors affecting the feasibility of maintaining professional activity during treatment for breast cancer, for women who wished to do so. Written questionnaires were collected from 216 patients between March and November 2012. Since the onset of their treatment, 31.4% of the women (68/216) had not been on sick-leave. The main factors associated with the pursuit of professional activity were: considering the availability of their physician to answer questions as unimportant [OR = 18.83 (3.60-98.53); P ≤ 0.05]; considering the diagnosis of cancer as likely to have a weak impact on career perspectives [OR = 4.07 (2.49-6.64); P ≤ 0.05]; not having any children in the household [OR = 3.87 (2.38-6.28); P ≤ 0.05]; being in a managerial position [OR = 3.13 (1.88-5.21); P ≤ 0.05]. Negative predictive factors were: physician mentioning adverse effects of the treatment [OR = 0.31 (0.16-0.58); P ≤ 0.05], and patient rating workload as high [OR = 0.26 (0.15-0.46); P ≤ 0.05]. As a result of advances in therapeutic strategies, more patients will expect healthcare professionals, as well as employers and occupational health societies, to prioritise issues pertaining to the maintenance of professional activities during cancer treatment. PMID:26891443

  14. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  15. Two-phase surgical treatment of anteromedial knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Felli, Lamberto; Franzi, Paolo; Oliva, Fabio; Pizzella, Luca

    2008-05-01

    The treatment of severe anteromedial knee injuries over the years has undergone various types of approach, changing from proposals, such as combined surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial compartment, to the more current protocol which involves conservative treatment of the peripheral injury and later reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. However, in serious ruptures of the medial ligament compartment, conservative treatment does not make it possible to recover peripheral stability, thus transferring abnormal forces onto the anterior cruciate pro-ligament graft which can gradually deteriorate the transplant itself. Thus in severe anteromedial injuries a treatment with two distinct surgical phases is proposed, using direct immediate suture of the peripheral compartment and, after a period of rehabilitation, later replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament by arthroscope graft. Given the obtained results and the few complications observed in 25 cases, it is probable that this therapeutic scheme can be proposed in selected cases of severe ligament laxity of the medial compartment associated with rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. PMID:18317869

  16. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  17. Thermophilic slurry-phase treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon waste sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldi, F.J.; Bombaugh, K.J.; McFarland, B.

    1995-12-31

    Chemoheterotrophic thermophilic bacteria were used to achieve enhanced hydrocarbon degradation during slurry-phase treatment of oily waste sludges from petroleum refinery operations. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were examined under thermophilic conditions to assess the effects of mode of metabolism on the potential for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The study determined that both aerobic and anaerobic thermophilic bacteria are capable of growth on petroleum hydrocarbons. Thermophilic methanogenesis is feasible during the degradation of hydrocarbons when a strict anaerobic condition is achieved in a slurry bioreactor. Aerobic thermophilic bacteria achieved the largest apparent reduction in chemical oxygen demand, freon extractable oil, total and volatile solid,s and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when treating oily waste sludges. The observed shift with time in the molecular weight distribution of hydrocarbon material was more pronounced under aerobic metabolic conditions than under strict anaerobic conditions. The changes in the hydrocarbon molecular weight distribution, infrared spectra, and PAH concentrations during slurry-phase treatment indicate that the aerobic thermophilic bioslurry achieved a higher degree of hydrocarbon degradation than the anaerobic thermophilic bioslurry during the same time period.

  18. Serum antimuscarinic activity during clozapine treatment.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose; Odom-White, Aruby; Josiassen, Richard C; Diaz, Francisco J; Cooper, Thomas B; Simpson, George M

    2003-08-01

    This study attempts: (1) to verify that serum antimuscarinic activity is related to clozapine dose, and more importantly to clozapine plasma concentrations; (2) to explore whether norclozapine has serum antimuscarinic activity; (3) to explore whether antimuscarinic activity is related to clozapine side effects; and (4) to compare the serum antimuscarinic activities of clozapine with those of antiparkinsonian drugs and other antipsychotics. In 39 patients participating in a double-blind clozapine study, the [3H]QNB assay was used to measure serum antimuscarinic activity: (1) on baseline medications; (2) after a 4-week haloperidol trial; (3) after a 16-week clozapine trial of either 100, 300, or 600 mg/d; and (4) after 1 or 2 consecutive 16-week clozapine trials with remaining doses in nonresponders. Clozapine levels predicted serum antimuscarinic activity better than clozapine dose. At the end of the 1st clozapine trial, the correlation with the levels explained 69% of the variance of serum antimuscarinic activity (r = 0.83, P < 0.001, N = 34). Clozapine levels were good predictors of serum antimuscarinic activity only in patients taking 300 or 600 mg/d. After correcting for clozapine levels, the within-subject correlation between norclozapine levels and serum antimuscarinic activity was relatively high and significant (r = 0.54, F = 26.7, df = 1.65, P < 0.001). Constipation was significantly associated with higher serum antimuscarinic activity during the 1st clozapine trial. Clozapine was associated with clearly higher antimuscarinic activity than other antipsychotics or low doses of antiparkinsonians. In vitro studies and new clinical studies are needed to verify whether norclozapine may significantly contribute to antimuscarinic activity during clozapine treatment. PMID:12920408

  19. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. PMID:26378390

  20. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  1. Aluminium surface treatment with ceramic phases using diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labisz, K.; Tański, T.; Brytan, Z.; Pakieła, W.; Wiśniowski, M.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic particles powder feeding into surface layer of engineering metal alloy is a well-known and widely used technique. New approach into the topic is to obtain finely distributed nano-sized particles involved in the aluminium matrix using the traditional laser technology. In this paper are presented results of microstructure investigation of cast aluminium-silicon-copper alloys surface layer after heat treatment and alloying with ceramic carbides of WC and ZrO2 using high-power diode laser. The surface layer was specially prepared for the reason of reducing the reflectivity, which is the main problem in the up-to-date metal matrix composites production. With scanning electron microscopy, it was possible to determine the deformation process and distribution of WC and ZrO2 ceramic powder phase. Structure of the surface after laser treatment changes, revealing three zones—remelting zone, heat-affected zone and transition zone placed over the Al substrate. The structural changes of ceramic powder, its distribution and morphology as well as microstructure of the matrix material influence on functional properties, especially wear resistance and hardness of the achieved layer, were investigated.

  2. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  3. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  4. Healing defective CVD-graphene through vapor phase treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lam, Do; Kim, Sang-Min; Cho, Youngji; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-05-01

    Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance. In contrast with the chemically doped graphene, the ALD-treated graphenes revealed notable long-term stability under environmental conditions. Our approach promises selective healing of defects present in most materials and possibly ensures considerable improvement in electrical and mechanical properties. ALD with a broad spectrum of material selection could be a versatile tool for upgrading properties of materials.Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance

  5. Semi-active tuned mass dampers with phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Lap-Loi; Lai, Yong-An; Walter Yang, Chuang-Sheng; Lien, Kuan-Hua; Wu, Lai-Yun

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at proposing an innovative phase control methodology for semi-active tuned mass dampers (SA-TMDs) that intend to minimize the off-tuned problems associated with passive tuned mass dampers (P-TMDs). The phase control algorithm is first developed, the essential of which is to apply the variable friction force to slow down the mass block at specific moments when the phase lag of the SA-TMD with respect to the structure is different from 90°, resulting in the SA-TMD back to the desired phase lag, i.e., -90° phase deviation, so that the SA-TMD has the maximum power flow to reduce the structural vibration. The feasibility of the application of the phase control in SA-TMDs is verified by performing numerical analyses of a simplified Taipei 101 structure model with a SA-TMD subjected to sinusoidal loads and design level wind loads. The numerical simulation results show that the SA-TMD implemented with phase control can enable the mass block to vibrate in a manner with a phase lag close to the -90° when the structure model is under sinusoidal excitations with frequencies different from the structural fundamental mode. The SA-TMD with phase control not only exhibits better performance than the optimal P-TMD in terms of suppressing the structural vibration, but also enhances its robustness, particularly when the SA-TMD is off-tuned to the structure.

  6. Functioning of family system in pediatric oncology during treatment phase.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Giovanna; Polizzi, Concetta; Morales, Maria Regina; Marino, Santo; Scacco, Cinzia Favara

    2012-10-01

    The study focuses on parents' psychological implications caused by the treatment of their children suffering from tumor. It investigates some specific mothers' resource factors such as their strategies of coping and the perception of their own family functioning in terms of cohesion and adaptability. The study was performed with 34 mothers of children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), during the treatment phase. The used tools were the Coping Orientation to Problem Experienced--New Italian Version, to investigate coping strategies, and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-III, to analyze both real and ideal perception of family functioning. The data related to coping, show how the involved mothers tend to mainly use the strategies of positive aptitude, orientation toward problem and social support (F = 99.88, df = 4, P < .01). The family functioning, in terms of adaptability, is described as chaotic relating to both the real (χ(2) = 13.29, df = 3, P = .004) and ideal (χ(2) = 11.52, df = 2, P = .003) family, whereas in terms of cohesion, it is perceived as chiefly disengaged in the real family (χ(2) = 12.3, df = 3, P = .006) and as enmeshed in the ideal one (χ(2) = 12.58, df = 3, P = .006). Statistically positive correlations were only detected between adaptability and avoidance (r = 0.49, P < .01); adaptability and orientation toward problem (r = 0.36, P < .05); and adaptability and transcendent orientation (r = -0.04, P < .05). Despite the critical situation, the mothers have shown optimistic view, care for problem management and capability to ask for help. These coping strategies allow the therapeutic alliance between families and health care workers, so useful for the quality of childcare. PMID:22732085

  7. Clustering and phase behaviour of attractive active particles with hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ricard Matas; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2015-10-14

    We simulate clustering, phase separation and hexatic ordering in a monolayered suspension of active squirming disks subject to an attractive Lennard-Jones-like pairwise interaction potential, taking hydrodynamic interactions between the particles fully into account. By comparing the hydrodynamic case with counterpart simulations for passive and active Brownian particles, we elucidate the relative roles of self-propulsion, interparticle attraction, and hydrodynamic interactions in determining clustering and phase behaviour. Even in the presence of an attractive potential, we find that hydrodynamic interactions strongly suppress the motility induced phase separation that might a priori have been expected in a highly active suspension. Instead, we find only a weak tendency for the particles to form stringlike clusters in this regime. At lower activities we demonstrate phase behaviour that is broadly equivalent to that of the counterpart passive system at low temperatures, characterized by regimes of gas-liquid, gas-solid and liquid-solid phase coexistence. In this way, we suggest that a dimensionless quantity representing the level of activity relative to the strength of attraction plays the role of something like an effective non-equilibrium temperature, counterpart to the (dimensionless) true thermodynamic temperature in the passive system. However there are also some important differences from the equilibrium case, most notably with regards the degree of hexatic ordering, which we discuss carefully. PMID:26278520

  8. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Healing defective CVD-graphene through vapor phase treatment.

    PubMed

    Van Lam, Do; Kim, Sang-Min; Cho, Youngji; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-06-01

    Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance. In contrast with the chemically doped graphene, the ALD-treated graphenes revealed notable long-term stability under environmental conditions. Our approach promises selective healing of defects present in most materials and possibly ensures considerable improvement in electrical and mechanical properties. ALD with a broad spectrum of material selection could be a versatile tool for upgrading properties of materials. PMID:24756318

  10. Phase I Design for Completely or Partially Ordered Treatment Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Wages, Nolan A.; O’Quigley, John; Conaway, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of methods for the design of Phase I trials in oncology are based upon a single course of therapy, yet in actual practice it may be the case that there is more than one treatment schedule for any given dose. Therefore, the probability of observing a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) may depend upon both the total amount of the dose given, as well as the frequency with which it is administered. The objective of the study then becomes to find an acceptable combination of both dose and schedule. Past literature on designing these trials has entailed the assumption that toxicity increases monotonically with both dose and schedule. In this article, we relax this assumption for schedules and present a dose-schedule finding design that can be generalized to situations in which we know the ordering between all schedules and those in which we do not. We present simulation results that compare our method to other suggested dose-schedule finding methodology. PMID:24114957

  11. AUTOMATED MONITORING OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatments minimize the transmission of pathogens and are required by EPA with established treatment and monitoring requirements. The efficiency of treatment processes is determined by measuring the inactivation of indicator organisms (e.g., fecal coliform...

  12. [Behavioral activation and depression: a contextual treatment approach].

    PubMed

    Soucy Chartier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Valérie; Provencher, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychological disorder that affects approximately one in five North American. Typical reactions to depression include inactivity, isolation, and rumination. Several treatments and psychological interventions have emerged to address this problematic. Cognitive behavioural therapies have received increasingly large amounts of empirical support. A sub-component of cognitive behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, has been shown to in itself effectively treat symptoms of depression. This intervention involves efforts to re-activate the depressed client by having them engage in pleasant, gratifying, leisure, social, or physical activities, thereby counteracting the tendency to be inactive and to isolate oneself. Clients are guided through the process of establishing a list of potentially rewarding social, leisure, mastery-oriented or physical activities, to then establish a gradual hierarchy of objectives to be accomplished over the span of several weeks. Concrete action plans are devised, and solutions to potential obstacles are elaborated. The client is the asked to execute the targeted objective and to record their mood prior to and following the activity. Behavioural activation effectively reverses the downward spiral to depression. Interestingly, studies show that behavioural activation has a positive effect on cognitive activities. It has been shown to reduce rumination and favour cognitive restructuring, without requiring cognitively-based interventions. The advantage of this treatment is therefore that it is simpler to administer in comparison to full-packaged cognitive behavioural therapies, it requires a lesser number of sessions and can be disseminated in a low-intensity format. This article begins by summarizing the origins of the behavioural model of depression, which serves as a basis to the understanding of behavioural activation. This is followed by a detailed explanation of the different phases involved in a behavioural

  13. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  14. Phase separation and emergent structures in an active nematic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Putzig, Elias; Baskaran, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    We consider a phenomenological continuum theory for an active nematic fluid and show that there exists a universal, model independent instability which renders the homogeneous nematic state unstable to order fluctuations. Using numerical and analytic tools we show that, in the vicinity of a critical point, this instability leads to a phase separated state in which the ordered regions form bands in which the direction of nematic order is perpendicular to the direction of density gradient. We argue that the underlying mechanism that leads to this phase separation is a universal feature of active fluids of different symmetries. PMID:25375491

  15. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge. PMID:23201694

  16. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  17. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  18. Membrane phase characteristics control NA-CATH activity.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Robin; Gillmor, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Our studies presented in this report focus on the behavior of NA-CATH, an α-helical cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, originally discovered in the Naja atra snake. It has demonstrated high potency against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with minimal hemolysis. Here we examine the kinetics, behaviors and potential mechanisms of the peptide in the presence of membrane liposome, modeling Escherichia coli, whose membrane exhibits distinct lipid phases. To understand NA-CATH interactions, the role of lipid phases is critical. We test three different lipid compositions to detangle the effect of phase on NA-CATH's activity using a series of leakage experiments. From these studies, we observe that NA-CATH changes from membrane disruption to pore-based lysing, depending on phases and lipid composition. This behavior also plays a major role in its kinetics. PMID:27216315

  19. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  20. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  1. Does Nanoparticle Activity Depend upon Size and Crystal Phase?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingkun; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Gelein, Robert; Mercer, Pamela; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-01-01

    A method to investigate the dependence of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g. size, surface area and crystal phase) on their oxidant generating capacity is proposed and demonstrated for TiO2 nanoparticles. Gas phase synthesis methods that allow for strict control of size and crystal phase were used to prepare TiO2 nanoparticles. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacity of these particles was then measured. The size dependent ROS activity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 9 different sizes (4 – 195 nm) but the same crystal phase. For a fixed total surface area, an S-shaped curve for ROS generation per unit surface area was observed as a function of particle size. The highest ROS activity per unit area was observed for 30 nm particles, and observed to be constant above 30 nm. There was a decrease in activity per unit area as size decreased from 30 nm to 10 nm; and again constant for particles smaller than 10 nm. The correlation between crystal phase and oxidant capacity was established using TiO2 nanoparticles of 11 different crystal phase combinations but similar size. The ability of different crystal phases of TiO2 nanoparticles to generate ROS was highest for amorphous, followed by anatase, and then anatase/rutile mixtures, and lowest for rutile samples. Based on evaluation of the entire dataset, important dose metrics for ROS generation are established. Their implications of these ROS studies on biological and toxicological studies using nanomaterials are discussed. PMID:20827377

  2. Phase dynamics of high radiance fiber laser arrays with active phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochove, Erik; Neschke, Brendan; Nair, Niketh; Delgado, Paul; Braiman, Yehuda

    2015-03-01

    The existing model of the LOCSET technique for the active phase synchronization of fiber laser arrays (T. Shay, Opt. Express, 2006) is extended to include relevant physical properties of the system, such as inherent optical path differences (OPD), line-width and group velocity dispersion (GVD), and we also include phase "jitter" of the master oscillator's output in the model, which in experiments is implemented to induce spectral broadening for suppression of nonlinear frequency conversion. Linearization of the phase error signal, which incorrectly predicts convergence to a synchronous equilibrium state, is not performed. Instead, the closed-loop control dynamics are shown to be described by differential equations of Kuramoto type when phase corrector response dynamics are negligible. Linear stability analysis indicates that there is always one and no more than one dynamically stable state. The latter is shown to be normally synchronous, except when strong "jitter" is applied. A Liapounov function is found as subject to the validity of certain symmetry conditions.

  3. An attack aimed at active phase compensation in one-way phase-encoded QKD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhao-Yue; Yu, Ning-Na; Wei, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Jin-Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Phase drift is an inherent problem in one-way phase-encoded quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. Although combining passive with active phase compensation (APC) processes can effectively compensate for the phase drift, the security problems brought about by these processes are rarely considered. In this paper, we point out a security hole in the APC process and put forward a corresponding attack scheme. Under our proposed attack, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) of the QKD can be close to zero for some conditions. However, under the same conditions the ratio r of the key "0" and the key "1" which Bob (the legal communicators Alice and Bob) gets is no longer 1:1 but 2:1, which may expose Eve (the eavesdropper). In order to solve this problem, we modify the resend strategy of the attack scheme, which can force r to reach 1 and the QBER to be lower than the tolerable QBER.

  4. Treatment of ichthyophthiriasis with photodynamically active chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Häder, D-P; Schmidl, J; Hilbig, R; Oberle, M; Wedekind, H; Richter, P R

    2016-04-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin) exerts pronounced photodynamic activity on fish parasites. In order to determine its potential as a remedy against ectoparasites in fish carps were incubated in water with defined concentrations of chlorophyllin. The main focus of the experiments was on the ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Fouquet) which is responsible for considerable losses in livestock in aquaculture. As malachite green, which in the past efficiently cured infected fishes, is banned because of its possible carcinogenicity; no effective remedy is presently available in aquaculture to treat ichthyophthiriasis. Using chlorophyllin, the number of trophonts was significantly reduced (more than 50 %) after 3 h incubation of infested fish at 2 and 4 mg/L and subsequent irradiation with simulated solar radiation. The lack of reinfection after light treatment indicates that also the remaining parasites have lost their multiplication capacity. In the controls (no chlorophyllin and no light, light but no chlorophyllin, or chlorophyllin but no light), no reduction of the I. multifiliis infection was observed. We propose that chlorophyllin (or other photodynamic substances) is a possible effective countermeasure against I. multifiliis and other ectoparasites in aquaculture. PMID:26693716

  5. Investigation of stripping of volatile organic contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment systems, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.

    1990-01-01

    Volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) are the largest group of compounds on the effluent monitoring priority pollutant list and are among the most frequently detected in raw wastewater. Their removal by treatment facilities is a major concern in Ontario's Municipal Industrial Strategy for Abatement (MISA) program. In 1987 an investigation of VOC stripping at water pollution control plants was begun. Phase I concluded that many VOCs are stripped from wastewater treatment plants. Phase II was conducted from January 1988 to April 1989 and consisted of a validation of the accuracy of sampling and analytical protocols used in Phase I; a determination of the relative importance of stripping, biological removal and sorption on to secondary sludge from activated sludge aeration basins; and an examination of the impact of the diffuser type (fine or coarse bubble diffusers), airflow rate and solids retention time on VOC stripping. An experimental design was developed using tap water dosed with 10 candidate VOCs as the aeration basin influent; Burlington Skyway wastewater; and Toronto Highland Creek wastewater.

  6. Optically active surfaces formed by ion implantation and thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.; Evans, H.M.; Zuhr, R.

    1996-08-01

    Embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates have been formed in single-crystal sapphire by the ion co-implantation of vanadium and oxygen and subsequent thermal annealing. The embedded VO{sub 2} particles have been shown to exhibit an optical switching behavior that is comparable to that of continuous thin films. In this work, the mechanisms of formation of these optically active particles are investigated. It is shown that precipitation of the vanadium dioxide phase is favored when the thermal treatment is performed on an ion-damaged but still crystalline (rather than amorphized) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The best optical switching behavior is observed in this case, and this behavior is apparently correlated with a more-favorable dispersion of VO{sub 2} small particles inside the matrix.

  7. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  8. Phase-Transfer Activation of Transition Metal Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tuba, Robert; Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-11-01

    With metal-based catalysts, it is quite common that a ligand (L) must first dissociate from a catalyst precursor (L'n M-L) to activate the catalyst. The resulting coordinatively unsaturated active species (L'n M) can either back react with the ligand in a k-1 step, or combine with the substrate in a k2 step. When dissociation is not rate determining and k-1 [L] is greater than or comparable to k2 [substrate], this slows the rate of reaction. By introducing a phase label onto the ligand L and providing a suitable orthogonal liquid or solid phase, dramatic rate accelerations can be achieved. This phenomenon is termed "phase-transfer activation". In this Concept, some historical antecedents are reviewed, followed by successful applications involving fluorous/organic and aqueous/organic liquid/liquid biphasic catalysis, and liquid/solid biphasic catalysis. Variants that include a chemical trap for the phase-labeled ligands are also described. PMID:26338471

  9. Gamma power is phase-locked to posterior alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria; Hermes, Dora; Jensen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations in various frequency bands have been reported in numerous studies in both humans and animals. While it is obvious that these oscillations play an important role in cognitive processing, it remains unclear how oscillations in various frequency bands interact. In this study we have investigated phase to power locking in MEG activity of healthy human subjects at rest with their eyes closed. To examine cross-frequency coupling, we have computed coherence between the time course of the power in a given frequency band and the signal itself within every channel. The time-course of the power was calculated using a sliding tapered time window followed by a Fourier transform. Our findings show that high-frequency gamma power (30-70 Hz) is phase-locked to alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) in the ongoing MEG signals. The topography of the coupling was similar to the topography of the alpha power and was strongest over occipital areas. Interestingly, gamma activity per se was not evident in the power spectra and only became detectable when studied in relation to the alpha phase. Intracranial data from an epileptic subject confirmed these findings albeit there was slowing in both the alpha and gamma band. A tentative explanation for this phenomenon is that the visual system is inhibited during most of the alpha cycle whereas a burst of gamma activity at a specific alpha phase (e.g. at troughs) reflects a window of excitability. PMID:19098986

  10. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  11. Aptamer-based Proteomic Signature of Intensive Phase Treatment Response in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Jarlsberg, Leah G.; Mary, A; Groote, De; Johnson, John L.; Muzanyi, Grace; Engle, Melissa; Weiner, Marc; Janjic, Nebojsa; Sterling, David G.; Ochsner, Urs A.

    2014-01-01

    Background New drug regimens of greater efficacy and shorter duration are needed for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. The identification of accurate, quantitative, non-culture based markers of treatment response would improve the efficiency of Phase 2 TB drug testing. Methods In an unbiased biomarker discovery approach, we applied a highly multiplexed, aptamer-based, proteomic technology to analyze serum samples collected at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment from 39 patients with pulmonary TB from Kampala, Uganda enrolled in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) TB Trials Consortium Phase 2B treatment trial. Results We identified protein expression differences associated with 8-week culture status, including Coagulation Factor V, SAA, XPNPEP1, PSME1, IL-11 Rα, HSP70, Galectin-8, α2-Antiplasmin, ECM1, YES, IGFBP-1, CATZ, BGN, LYNB, and IL-7. Markers noted to have differential changes between responders and slow-responders included nectin-like protein 2, EphA1 (Ephrin type-A receptor 1), gp130, CNDP1, TGF-b RIII, MRC2, ADAM9, and CDON. A logistic regression model combining markers associated with 8-week culture status revealed an ROC curve with AUC=0.96, sensitivity=0.95 and specificity=0.90. Additional markers showed differential changes between responders and slow-responders (nectin-like protein), or correlated with time-to-culture-conversion (KLRK1). Conclusions Serum proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, neutrophil activity, immunity, inflammation, and tissue remodeling were found to be associated with TB treatment response. A quantitative, non-culture based, five-marker signature predictive of 8-week culture status was identified in this pilot study. PMID:24629635

  12. In vitro activity of Aloe vera inner gel against microorganisms grown in planktonic and sessile phases.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, V; Di Bartolomeo, S; Di Campli, E; Nostro, A; Cellini, L; Di Giulio, M

    2015-12-01

    The failure of traditional antimicrobial treatments is becoming a worldwide problem. The use of Aloe vera is of particular interest for its role as curative agent and its efficacy in complementary therapies for a variety of illnesses. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of A. vera inner gel against a panel of microorganisms, Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and Candida albicans. In addition to A. vera inner gel being used in the treatment of peptic ulcers, in dermatological treatments, and wound healing, it was also tested on the sessile phase of clinical Helicobacter pylori strains (including multi-drug-resistant strains) and on planktonic and sessile phase of Staphylococcus aureus/Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from venous leg ulcers.A. vera inner gel expresses its prevalent activity against Gram-negative bacteria and C. albicans in respect to Gram-positive bacteria. The results of the A. vera antibiofilm activity showed a decrease of the produced biomass in a concentration-dependent-way, in each analyzed microorganism. The data obtained show that A. vera inner gel has both an antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity suggesting its potential use for the treatment of microbial infections, in particular for H. pylori gastric infection, especially in case of multi-drug-resistance, as well as for an effective wound dressing. PMID:26526205

  13. Electrocatalytic activity of ordered intermetallic phases for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Casado-Rivera, Emerilis; Volpe, David J; Alden, Laif; Lind, Cora; Downie, Craig; Vázquez-Alvarez, Terannie; Angelo, Antonio C D; DiSalvo, Francis J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2004-03-31

    The electrocatalytic activities of a wide range of ordered intermetallic phases toward a variety of potential fuels have been studied, and results have been compared to those of a pure polycrystalline platinum (Pt(pc)) electrode. A significant number of the ordered intermetallic phases exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity when compared to that of Pt, in terms of both oxidation onset potential and current density. The PtBi, PtIn, and PtPb ordered intermetallic phases appeared to be the most promising electrocatalysts tested thus far for fuel cell applications. PtPb, in particular, showed an onset potential that was 100 mV less positive and a peak current density approximately 40 times higher than those observed for Pt in the case of methanol oxidation. The ability to control the geometric and electronic structures of the electrocatalytic material by using ordered intermetallic phases has been shown to be a promising direction of inquiry in the search for superior electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:15038758

  14. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-12

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface. PMID:26919022

  15. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  16. Monitoring Phases and Phase Transitions in Phosphatidylethanolamine Monolayers Using Active Interfacial Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Ghazvini, Saba; Ricke, Brandon; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2015-01-01

    Active interfacial microrheology is a sensitive tool to detect phase transitions and headgroup order in phospholipid monolayers. The re-orientation of a magnetic nickel nanorod is used to explore changes in the surface rheology of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DLPE) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DMPE), which differ by two CH2 groups in their alkyl chains. Phosphatidylethanolamines such as DLPE and DMPE are a major component of cell membranes in bacteria and in the nervous system. At room temperature, DLPE has a liquid expanded (LE) phase for surface pressure, Π < ~ 38 mN/m; DMPE has an LE phase for Π < ~ 7 mN/m. In their respective LE phases, DLPE and DMPE show no measurable change in surface viscosity with Π, consistent with a surface viscosity < 10−9 Ns/m, the resolution of our technique. However, there is a measurable, discontinuous change in the surface viscosity at the LE to liquid condensed (LC) transition for both DLPE and DMPE. This discontinuous change is correlated with a significant increase in the surface compressibility modulus (or isothermal two-dimensional bulk modulus). In the LC phase of DMPE there is an exponential increase in surface viscosity with Π consistent with a two-dimensional free area model. The second-order LC to solid (S) transition in DMPE is marked by an abrupt onset of surface elasticity; there is no measurable elasticity in the LC phase. A measurable surface elasticity in the S phase suggests a change in the molecular ordering or interactions of the DMPE headgroups that is not reflected in isotherms or in grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. This onset of measurable elasticity is also seen in DLPE, even though no indication of a LC-S transition is visible in the isotherms. PMID:25782993

  17. A Ku band 5 bit MEMS phase shifter for active electronically steerable phased array applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anesh K.; Gautam, Ashu K.; Farinelli, Paola; Dutta, Asudeb; Singh, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    The design, fabrication and measurement of a 5 bit Ku band MEMS phase shifter in different configurations, i.e. a coplanar waveguide and microstrip, are presented in this work. The development architecture is based on the hybrid approach of switched and loaded line topologies. All the switches are monolithically manufactured on a 200 µm high resistivity silicon substrate using 4 inch diameter wafers. The first three bits (180°, 90° and 45°) are realized using switched microstrip lines and series ohmic MEMS switches whereas the fourth and fifth bits (22.5° and 11.25°) consist of microstrip line sections loaded by shunt ohmic MEMS devices. Individual bits are fabricated and evaluated for performance and the monolithic device is a 5 bit Ku band (16-18 GHz) phase shifter with very low average insertion loss of the order of 3.3 dB and a return loss better than 15 dB over the 32 states with a chip area of 44 mm2. A total phase shift of 348.75° with phase accuracy within 3° is achieved over all of the states. The performance of individual bits has been optimized in order to achieve an integrated performance so that they can be implemented into active electronically steerable antennas for phased array applications.

  18. One-, two- and three-phase viscosity treatments for basaltic lava flows.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew J L; Allen, John S

    2008-01-01

    Lava flows comprise three-phase mixtures of melt, crystals, and bubbles. While existing one-phase treatments allow melt phase viscosity to be assessed on the basis of composition, water content, and/or temperature, two-phase treatments constrain the effects of crystallinity or vesicularity on mixture viscosity. However, three-phase treatments, allowing for the effects of coexisting crystallinity and vesicularity, are not well understood. We investigate existing one- and two-phase treatments using lava flow case studies from Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Mount Etna (Italy) and compare these with a three-phase treatment that has not been applied previously to basaltic mixtures. At Etna, melt viscosities of 425 ± 30 Pa s are expected for well-degassed (0.1 w. % H(2)O), and 135 ± 10 Pa s for less well-degassed (0.4 wt % H(2)O), melt at 1080°C. Application of a three-phase model yields mixture viscosities (45% crystals, 25-35% vesicles) in the range 5600-12,500 Pa s. This compares with a measured value for Etnean lava of 9400 ± 1500 Pa s. At Mauna Loa, the three-phase treatment provides a fit with the full range of field measured viscosities, giving three-phase mixture viscosities, upon eruption, of 110-140 Pa s (5% crystals, no bubble effect due to sheared vesicles) to 850-1400 Pa s (25-30% crystals, 40-60% spherical vesicles). The ability of the three-phase treatment to characterize the full range of melt-crystal-bubble mixture viscosities in both settings indicates the potential of this method in characterizing basaltic lava mixture viscosity. PMID:21691456

  19. Phase separation of biphasic mixture of active Janus colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Han, Ming; Luijten, Erik; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    Recently there is a surge of interest in the phase behavior of active matter in which building blocks display self-propelling motion. Although much has been known from theory and simulation, experimental examples are very rare. Specifically, the epitomic problem of a binary mixture of active matter defies any experiment or theory so far. Here we present an experimental realization of binary mixture of particles, which only acquires activity when they collisionally interact with the opposite kind. We used a system in which the only difference in the two particles is the phase in their cyclic motion, precluding any artifact due to difference in interparticle potential. We observe phenomena strikingly similar to spinodal decomposition of molecular system, in addition to new features due to the nonequilibrium nature of the system. We derived a general, effective Flory-Huggins theory for spinodal decomposition of bicomponent active system, and rationalized the 1/3 power law growth of the domain size in regions where thermodynamic analogy is valid. The system also presents a plethora of nonequilibrium phenomena such as critical fluctuation, lane formation, and dynamic absorbing state in different parameter space.

  20. Novel agents and new combination treatments on phase I studies on solid tumors and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad W

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively rare malignancy with a very aggressive natural course, not restrained by the existing current treatments. At the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, the results of few phase I clinical studies on solid tumors and pancreatic cancer were presented. In particular, in the field of immunotherapy, a pilot phase I study tested for first time a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based vaccine (Abstract #2561) on patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and another one the optimal dose and efficacy of trabedersen, an inhibitor of tissue growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-β2) aiming to enhance antitumor immune responses (Abstract #4034). Other phase I studies explored the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of an oral gemcitabine pro-drug (LY2334737; Abstract #2554), or of the combination of gemcitabine with sirolimus (Abstract #3096) or the combination of gemcitabine with an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (MEK 1/2; Abstract #4034). PMID:22797386

  1. Collective versus hub activation of epidemic phases on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Silvio C.; Sander, Renan S.; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    We consider a general criterion to discern the nature of the threshold in epidemic models on scale-free (SF) networks. Comparing the epidemic lifespan of the nodes with largest degrees with the infection time between them, we propose a general dual scenario, in which the epidemic transition is either ruled by a hub activation process, leading to a null threshold in the thermodynamic limit, or given by a collective activation process, corresponding to a standard phase transition with a finite threshold. We validate the proposed criterion applying it to different epidemic models, with waning immunity or heterogeneous infection rates in both synthetic and real SF networks. In particular, a waning immunity, irrespective of its strength, leads to collective activation with finite threshold in scale-free networks with large degree exponent, at odds with canonical theoretical approaches.

  2. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  3. 40 CFR 35.2108 - Phased or segmented treatment works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the enforceable requirements of the Act, provided: (a) The grant agreement requires the recipient to... enforceable requirements of the Act according to a schedule specified in the grant agreement regardless of... secondary treatment requirement waiver under section 301(h) of the Act....

  4. NOVEL NANOPARTICULATE CATALYSTS FOR IMPROVED VOC TREATMENT DEVICES - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalytic oxidation of VOCs is increasingly used for treatment of large-volume emissions at relatively dilute VOC levels. The best performing catalytic oxidation devices for attainment of very high VOC destruction levels employ precious metal catalysts, the costs of which a...

  5. Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

    1994-07-01

    An integrated systems engineering approach is used for uniform comparison of widely varying thermal treatment technologies proposed for management of contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. Ten different systems encompassing several incineration design options are studied. All subsystems, including facilities, equipment, and methods needed for integration of each of the ten systems are identified. Typical subsystems needed for complete treatment of MLLW are incoming waste receiving and preparation (characterization, sorting, sizing, and separation), thermal treatment, air pollution control, primary and secondary stabilization, metal decontamination, metal melting, mercury recovery, lead recovery, and special waste and aqueous waste treatment. The evaluation is performed by developing a preconceptual design package and planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for each system. As part of the preconceptual design process, functional and operational requirements, flow sheets and mass balances, and conceptual equipment layouts are developed for each system. The PLCC components estimated are technology development, production facility construction, pre-operation, operation and maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning. Preconceptual design data and other technology information gathered during the study are examined and areas requiring further development, testing, and evaluation are identified and recommended. Using a qualitative method, each of the ten systems are ranked.

  6. Walking with wider steps increases stance phase gluteus medius activity

    PubMed Central

    Kubinski, Samantha N.; McQueen, Christina A.; Sittloh, Keir A.; Dean, Jesse C.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in step width have been reported for several clinical populations, including older adults and stroke survivors. These populations often also exhibit decreased hip abductor strength, suggesting that walking with wider steps may be an adaptive response in order to reduce the mechanical demands on the hip abductors. The purpose of this study was to quantify the relationship between step width and gluteus medius (GM) activity during walking. Fourteen young, uninjured adults walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m/s for four step width conditions (Normal, Narrow, Medium, and Wide) while step width and stance phase GM electromyographic (EMG) activity were quantified. We also measured hip abduction torque and GM activity during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) at three hip angles (neutral, abducted 10°, and abducted 20°). During walking trials, GM activity was significantly (p<0.0001) influenced by step width; compared to Normal walking, GM activity was 47% higher with Wide steps and 24% lower with Narrow steps. We also observed a weak positive correlation (r=0.18±0.14) between step width and GM activity during Normal walking, as GM activity was higher with wider steps. These results cannot be attributed to changes in GM conformation under the recording electrode, as GM activity was not influenced by hip angle during MVICs. The increased GM activity with wider steps does not support the proposal that increasing step width would be a beneficial adaptation to weakened hip abductors. A likely alternative explanation is that increased step width is a response to decreased gait balance. PMID:25300241

  7. The (Phased?) Activity of Stars Hosting Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott J.; Lopez-Santiago, J.; Sciortino, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The activity of stars harboring hot Jupiters could be influenced by their close-in planets. Cases of enhanced chromospheric activity are reported in literature, suggesting magnetic interaction at well determined planetary phases. In X-rays and FUV, we have studied star-planet interaction (SPI) occurring in the system of HD 189733. In X-rays, HD 189733 shows features of high activity that can be ascribed to the influence of the magnetic field of its planetary companion. Through a wavelet analysis of a flare, we inferred a long magnetic loop of 2 R_* to 4 R_*, and a local magnetic field of strength in 40-100 G. The size of the flaring loop suggests a role of the hot Jupiter in triggering this kind of X-ray variability. In FUV, HST-COS spectra of HD 189733 shows temporal variations in intensity and Doppler shifts of Si III and Si IV lines that can be ascribed to plasma flowing from the planetary atmosphere and accreting onto the star under the action of the combined magnetic field of star and planet. The material from the planetary atmosphere can flow onto the parent star as predicted by MHD models. The foot point of the accretion on the stellar surface results in phased variability observed in X-rays and FUV, when the point, comoving with the planet, emerges at the limb of the star.

  8. Spindle activity phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Klinzing, Jens G; Mölle, Matthias; Weber, Frederik; Supp, Gernot; Hipp, Jörg F; Engel, Andreas K; Born, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The <1Hz slow oscillation (SO) and spindles are hallmarks of mammalian non-rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Spindle activity occurring phase-locked to the SO is considered a candidate mediator of memory consolidation during sleep. We used source localization of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from 11 sleeping human subjects for an in-depth analysis of the temporal and spatial properties of sleep spindles co-occurring with SOs. Slow oscillations and spindles were identified in the EEG and related to the MEG signal, providing enhanced spatial resolution. In the temporal domain, we confirmed a phase-locking of classical 12-15Hz fast spindle activity to the depolarizing SO up-state and of 9-12Hz slow spindle activity to the up-to-down-state transition of the SO. In the spatial domain, we show a broad spread of spindle activity, with less distinct anterior-posterior separation of fast and slow spindles than commonly seen in the EEG. We further tested a prediction of current memory consolidation models, namely the existence of a spatial bias of SOs over sleep spindles as a mechanism to promote localized neuronal synchronization and plasticity. In contrast to that prediction, a comparison of SOs dominating over the left vs. right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing. PMID:27103135

  9. Feedback-induced phase transitions in active porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Samuel; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a reduced-complexity model for an active porous medium where flow and resistance are coupled to each other i.e. the porous medium is modified by the flow and in turn modifies the flow. Using numerical simulations, we show that this results in both channelization and wall-building transitions depending on the form of the feedback. A continuum model allows us to understand the qualitative features of the resulting phase diagram, and suggests ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems. Human Frontiers Science Program Grant RGP0066/2012- TURNER.

  10. Phase 1 immobilized low-activity waste operational source term

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.

    1998-03-06

    This report presents an engineering analysis of the Phase 1 privatization feeds to establish an operational source term for storage and disposal of immobilized low-activity waste packages at the Hanford Site. The source term information is needed to establish a preliminary estimate of the numbers of remote-handled and contact-handled waste packages. A discussion of the uncertainties and their impact on the source term and waste package distribution is also presented. It should be noted that this study is concerned with operational impacts only. Source terms used for accident scenarios would differ due to alpha and beta radiation which were not significant in this study.

  11. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  12. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  13. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF KRAFT BLEACHING EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of color and organic contaminants by adsorption on activated carbon from the effluent of a kraft pulp bleaching plant was investigated in a pilot plant. The caustic bleach effluent, which contains 80% of the color from pulp bleaching, was decolorized successfully when...

  14. Silo 3 Waste Treatment Phase I Physical Testing Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2001-03-13

    A characterization study of the Fernald Silo 3 waste was performed at the request of Rocky Mountain Remedial Services, LLC (RMRS) to support treatment of the waste with the Envirobond reagents and Envirobrick process. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) performed the characterization under a Work for Others Agreement WOF-00-007. Physical property testing was subcontracted to the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). This report is intended to transmit the results of the physical property testing conducted at the CETL. Results of the physical property testing are summarized in a final report from Steve Hoeffner, CETL.

  15. Feedback-Induced Phase Transitions in Active Heterogeneous Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Samuel A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems.

  16. Feedback-induced phase transitions in active heterogeneous conductors.

    PubMed

    Ocko, Samuel A; Mahadevan, L

    2015-04-01

    An active conducting medium is one where the resistance (conductance) of the medium is modified by the current (flow) and in turn modifies the flow, so that the classical linear laws relating current and resistance, e.g., Ohm's law or Darcy's law, are modified over time as the system itself evolves. We consider a minimal model for this feedback coupling in terms of two parameters that characterize the way in which addition or removal of matter follows a simple local (or nonlocal) feedback rule corresponding to either flow-seeking or flow-avoiding behavior. Using numerical simulations and a continuum mean field theory, we show that flow-avoiding feedback causes an initially uniform system to become strongly heterogeneous via a tunneling (channel-building) phase separation; flow-seeking feedback leads to an immuring (wall-building) phase separation. Our results provide a qualitative explanation for the patterning of active conducting media in natural systems, while suggesting ways to realize complex architectures using simple rules in engineered systems. PMID:25884126

  17. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  18. Fortifying the Treatment of Prostate Cancer with Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Champ, Colin E.; Francis, Lanie; Klement, Rainer J.; Dickerman, Roger; Smith, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant data have shown that obese men experience a survival detriment after treatment for prostate cancer. While methods to combat obesity are of utmost importance for the prostate cancer patient, newer data reveal the overall metabolic improvements that accompany increased activity levels and intense exercise beyond weight loss. Along these lines, a plethora of data have shown improvement in prostate cancer-specific outcomes after treatment accompanied with these activity levels. This review discusses the metabolic mechanisms in which increased activity levels and exercise can help improve both outcomes for men treated for prostate cancer while lowering the side effects of treatment. PMID:26977321

  19. Fortifying the Treatment of Prostate Cancer with Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Champ, Colin E; Francis, Lanie; Klement, Rainer J; Dickerman, Roger; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant data have shown that obese men experience a survival detriment after treatment for prostate cancer. While methods to combat obesity are of utmost importance for the prostate cancer patient, newer data reveal the overall metabolic improvements that accompany increased activity levels and intense exercise beyond weight loss. Along these lines, a plethora of data have shown improvement in prostate cancer-specific outcomes after treatment accompanied with these activity levels. This review discusses the metabolic mechanisms in which increased activity levels and exercise can help improve both outcomes for men treated for prostate cancer while lowering the side effects of treatment. PMID:26977321

  20. Gasifier waste water treatment: Phase I cooling tower assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Winton, S.L.

    1985-02-01

    Details of an advanced study of the treatability of waste waters from the fixed-bed gasification of lignite describe the test equipment and results at a pilot plant in North Dakota using stripped-gas liquor (SGL) as cooling tower makeup. Ammonia, alkalinity, phenol, and other non-hydantoin organics were removed from the cooling water by stripping and/or biological degradation, with the phenol concentration in the exhaust air exceeding the odor threshold. It will be necessary to control foaming of the circulating water, but both glycol and silicon based agents performed well during the test. It will also be necessary to reduce the high level of biofouling on heat transfer surfaces, although stainless steel fouling was not a major problem. The conclusion is that SGL is limited by potentially serious operating problems without additional treatment. 5 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  1. Baseline Brain Activity Predicts Response to Neuromodulatory Pain Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Design Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Methods Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). Results As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. Conclusions The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. PMID:25287554

  2. Behavioral activation: a strategy to enhance treatment response.

    PubMed

    Sudak, Donna M; Majeed, Muhammad H; Youngman, Branden

    2014-07-01

    Behavioral activation is an empirically validated treatment for depression pioneered in 1973 by Ferster, based on B.F. Skinner's behavioral principles. After publication of Beck's work on cognitive therapy, the boundaries of behavioral and cognitive therapies were blurred and the two now overlap substantially. Behavioral activation is also used as a stand-alone treatment and can also be effective in conjunction with antidepressant medication. Case conceptualization in behavioral activation entails an assessment of the behaviors that the patient has stopped that produce pleasure or are of importance, as well as behaviors essential to self-care. Activity monitoring, which provides treatment targets and leads to the case conceptualization in behavioral activation, consists of using charts, forms, or other prompts to track the relationship between activities and other variables (e.g., mood, enjoyment). That technique is also used to target rumination, procrastination, and avoidance and may also be helpful for patients with psychosis. PMID:25036582

  3. DESIGN HANDBOOK FOR AUTOMATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a systems engineering handbook for the automation of activated sludge wastewater treatment processes. Process control theory and application are discussed to acquaint the reader with terminology and fundamentals. Successful unit process control strategies currently...

  4. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  5. Influence of plasma treatment time on plasma induced vapor phase grafting modification of PBO fiber surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Meng, L. H.; Huang, Y. D.

    2012-05-01

    The surface of poly-p-phenylene benzobisthiazole (PBO) fibers was treated through oxygen plasma induced vapor phase grafting (PIVPG) method under various oxygen plasma pre-treatment time conditions. The surface chemical composition, surface morphologies and surface free energy of pristine and treated PBO fibers were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Cahn DCAA system. The mechanics property of these fibers was evaluated by tensile strength and interfacial shear strength (IFSS). It was found that the surface characteristics of treated PBO fibers occurred significant change compare with the pristine PBO fibers. After treatment, the polar functional groups were introduced on the fiber surface. Carbon concentration decreased; oxygen concentration and elemental ratio of oxygen to carbon increased. Acrylic acid can react with the activated PBO fibers surface, which led to the fiber surface roughness increased. The surface free energy increased from 41.4 mN/m to 62.8 mN/m when PBO fibers were plasma pre-treated for 10 min, while the IFSS of PBO fibers with epoxy resin increased from 36.6 MPa to 55.8 MPa. Therefore, PIVPG can be used to enhance the interfacial bond between PBO fibers and epoxy resin.

  6. Electrocoagulation: Simply a Phase Separation Technology? The Case of Bronopol Compared to Its Treatment by EAOPs.

    PubMed

    Bocos, Elvira; Brillas, Enric; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Sirés, Ignasi

    2016-07-19

    Electrocoagulation (EC) has long been considered a phase separation process, well suited for industrial wastewater treatment since it causes a quick, drastic decay of organic matter content. This research demonstrates that EC also behaves, at least for some molecules like the industrial preservative bronopol, as an effective transformation technology able to yield several breakdown products. This finding has relevant environmental implications, pointing to EC as a greener process than described in literature. A thorough optimization of EC was performed with solutions of bronopol in a simulated water matrix, yielding the complete disappearance of the parent molecule within 20 min at 200 mA (∼20 mA/cm(2)), using Fe as the anode and cathode. A 25% of total organic carbon (TOC) abatement was attained as maximum, with bronopol being converted into bromonitromethane, bromochloromethane, formaldehyde and formic acid. N atoms were accumulated as NO3(-), whereas Br(-) was stable once released. This suggests that mediated oxidation by active chlorine, as well as by hydroxyl radicals resulting from its reaction with iron ions, is the main transformation mechanism. Aiming to enhance the mineralization, a sequential combination of EC with electro-Fenton (EF) as post-treatment process was proposed. EF with boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode ensured the gradual TOC removal under the action of (•)OH and BDD((•)OH), also transforming Br(-) into BrO3(-). PMID:27328254

  7. A novel, implicit treatment for language comprehension processes in right hemisphere brain damage: Phase I data

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Connie A.; Blake, Margaret T.; Wambaugh, Julie; Meigh, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Background This manuscript reports the initial phase of testing for a novel, “Contextual constraint” treatment, designed to stimulate inefficient language comprehension processes in adults with right hemisphere brain damage (RHD). Two versions of treatment were developed to target two normal comprehension processes that have broad relevance for discourse comprehension and that are often disrupted by RHD: coarse semantic coding and suppression. The development of the treatment was informed by two well-documented strengths of the RHD population. The first is consistently better performance on assessments that are implicit, or nearly so, than on explicit, metalinguistic measures of language and cognitive processing. The second is improved performance when given linguistic context that moderately-to-strongly biases an intended meaning. Treatment consisted of providing brief context sentences to prestimulate, or constrain, intended interpretations. Participants made no explicit associations or judgments about the constraint sentences; rather, these contexts served only as implicit primes. Aims This Phase I treatment study aimed to determine the effects of a novel, implicit, Contextual Constraint treatment in adults with RHD whose coarse coding or suppression processes were inefficient. Treatment was hypothesized to speed coarse coding or suppression function in these individuals. Methods & Procedures Three adults with RHD participated in this study, one (P1) with a coarse coding deficit and two (P2, P3) with suppression deficits. Probe tasks were adapted from prior studies of coarse coding and suppression in RHD. The dependent measure was the percentage of responses that met predetermined response time criteria. When pre-treatment baseline performance was stable, treatment was initiated. There were two levels of contextual constraint, Strong and Moderate, and treatment for each item began with the provision of the Strong constraint context. Outcomes & Results

  8. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  9. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  10. Typical Hus: Evidence of Acute Phase Complement Activation from a Daycare Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Tammy M; Pruette, Cozumel; Loeffler, Lauren F; Weidemann, Darcy; Strouse, John J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) encompass a wide spectrum. Despite the potentially severe sequelae from this syndrome, treatment approaches remain supportive. We present the clinical course of a child who contracted Shiga toxin-positive E. coli (STEC) from a daycare center during an outbreak. Utilizing the modified Ham test which is a rapid, serum-based functional assay used to detect activation of the alternative pathway of complement as observed in atypical HUS, patient sera revealed evidence of increased complement activation in the acute phase of the syndrome but not after resolution. Further, this complement activation was attenuated by eculizumab in vitro, an effect that was replicated in vitro utilizing Shiga toxin as a stimulus of complement activation in normal serum. Our report suggests that complement blockade may be effective in the treatment of STEC-HUS when initiated early in the disease. Given the epidemic nature of the disease that limits the feasibility of randomized clinical trials, further studies are needed to determine the value of early eculizumab treatment in STEC-HUS. PMID:27413789

  11. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  12. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  13. Contribution of siloxanes to COD loading at wastewater treatment plants: phase transfer, removal, and fate at different treatment units.

    PubMed

    Surita, Sharon C; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-03-01

    Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are entering to waste stream in increasing quantities due to their increasing use in personal care products (i.e., shampoos, creams). The cVMSs have high vapor pressures and low solubilities and are mostly transferred into the gaseous phase via volatilization; however, some are sorbed onto biosolids. The purpose of this study was to track and estimate the phase transfer (water, solids, gas), fate, and contribution to COD loading of selected siloxanes (D4, D5 and D6) which are the most commonly found cVMSs in the wastewater systems. Removal efficiencies of the wastewater treatment units were evaluated based on the partitioning characteristics of the cVMSs in gas, liquid, and biosolids phases. The contributions of the siloxanes present in the influent and effluent were estimated in terms of COD levels based on the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD) of the siloxanes. Siloxanes constitute approximately 39 and 0.001mgL(-1) of the COD in the influents and effluent. Oxidation systems showed higher removal efficiencies based COD loading in comparison to the removal efficiencies achieved aeration tanks and filtration systems. Treatment systems effectively remove the siloxanes from the aqueous phase with over 94% efficiency. About 50% of the siloxanes entering to the wastewater treatment plant accumulate in biosolids. PMID:25528947

  14. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  15. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    TW, CRAWFORD

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  16. Brain activation to cocaine cues and motivation/treatment status.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, James J; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; Brady, Kathleen T

    2014-03-01

    Motivation to change is believed to be a key factor in therapeutic success in substance use disorders; however, the neurobiological mechanisms through which motivation to change impacts decreased substance use remain unclear. Existing research is conflicting, with some investigations supporting decreased and others reporting increased frontal activation to drug cues in individuals seeking treatment for substance use disorders. The present study investigated the relationship between motivation to change cocaine use and cue-elicited brain activity in cocaine-dependent individuals using two conceptualizations of 'motivation to change': (1) current treatment status (i.e. currently receiving versus not receiving outpatient treatment for cocaine dependence) and (2) self-reported motivation to change substance use, using the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale. Thirty-eight cocaine-dependent individuals (14 currently in treatment) completed a diagnostic assessment and an fMRI cocaine cue-reactivity task. Whole-brain analyses demonstrated that both treatment-seeking and motivated participants had lower activation to cocaine cues in a wide variety of brain regions in the frontal, occipital, temporal and cingulate cortices relative to non-treatment-seeking and less motivated participants. Future research is needed to explain the mechanism by which treatment and/or motivation impacts neural cue reactivity, as such work could potentially aid in the development of more effective therapeutic techniques for substance-dependent patients. PMID:22458561

  17. Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-Selective Antibacterials with Activity Against Stationary-Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Gabriele; Bremner, John B.; Lewis, Kim; Kelso, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), i.e. metronidazole, vancomycin and more recently fidaxomicin, are mostly effective but treatment failure and disease relapse remain as significant clinical problems. The shortcomings of these agents are attributed to their low selectivity for C. difficile over normal gut microflora and their ineffectiveness against C. difficile spores. This paper reports that certain diarylacylhydrazones identified during a high-throughput screening/counter-screening campaign show selective activity against two Clostridium species (C. difficile and C. perfringens) over common gut commensals. Representative examples are shown to possess activity similar to vancomycin against clinical C. difficile strains and to kill stationary-phase C. difficile cells, which are responsible for spore production. Structure-activity relationships with additional synthesised analogues suggested a protonophoric mechanism may play a role in the observed activity/selectivity and this was supported by the well-known protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) showing selective anti-Clostridium effects and activity similar to diarylacylhydrazones against stationary-phase C. difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. PMID:24360560

  18. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  19. Infliximab treatment reduces complement activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Familian, A; Voskuyl, A; van Mierlo, G J; Heijst, H; Twisk, J; Dijkmans, B; Hack, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents decrease C reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been shown that CRP may contribute to complement activation in RA. Objective: To assess the effect of intravenous infliximab treatment on complement activation, especially that mediated by CRP, in RA. Methods: 35 patients with active RA (28 joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28) >4.4) were treated with intravenous injections of infliximab (3 mg/kg, at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22). Clinical response and plasma levels of complement activation products, of CRP and of CRP-complement complexes, which are specific markers for CRP mediated complement activation, were assessed at the indicated time points up to 22 weeks. The relationship between CRP and CRP-complement complexes was analysed by paired t test between two time points and by generalised estimated equation, to test differences of variables over time. Results: At 2 weeks after the first dose, infliximab significantly reduced overall C3 and C4 activation and plasma levels of CRP and CRP-complement complexes were also significantly reduced at this time point. The effects of infliximab on CRP and complement continued throughout the observation period and were more pronounced in patients with a good response to infliximab treatment. Conclusion: Treatment with infliximab decreases plasma levels of CRP and CRP dependent complement activation products and concomitantly may reduce complement activation in RA. Complement activation may be among the effector mechanisms of TNF in RA. PMID:15958758

  20. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  1. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi; Antonescu, Costin N

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  2. Phase segregation in a system of active dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, Giuseppe; Lamura, Antonio; Suma, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A systems of self-propelled dumbbells interacting by a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson potential is considered. At sufficiently low temperatures the system phase separates into a dense phase and a gas-like phase. The kinetics of the cluster formation and the growth law for the average cluster size are analyzed.

  3. Morphine treatment alters nucleotidase activities in rat blood serum

    PubMed Central

    Rozisky, Joanna Ripoll; Nonose, Yasmine; Laste, Gabriela; dos Santos, Vinicius Souza; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci LS

    2012-01-01

    Morphine has been widely used in neonatal pain management. However, this treatment may produce adaptive changes in several physiologic systems. Our laboratory has demonstrated that morphine treatment in neonate rats alters nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity and gene expression in central nervous system structures. Considering the relationship between the opioid and purinergic systems, our aim was to verify whether treatment with morphine from postnatal days 8 (P8) through 14 (P14) at a dose of 5 µg per day alters NTPDase and 5′-nucleotidase activities in rat serum over the short, medium, and long terms. After the in vivo assay, the morphine group showed increased hydrolysis of all nucleotides at P30, and a decrease in adenosine 5′-diphosphate hydrolysis at P60. Moreover, we found that nucleotidase activities change with age; adenosine 5′-triphosphate hydrolysis activity was lower at P16, and adenosine 5′-monophosphate hydrolysis activity was higher at P60. These changes are very important because these enzymes are the main regulators of blood nucleotide levels and, consequently, nucleotide signaling. Our findings showed that in vivo morphine treatment alters nucleotide hydrolysis in rat blood serum, suggesting that purine homeostasis can be influenced by opioid treatment during the neonatal period.

  4. Deep-cryogenic-treatment-induced phase transformation in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-mei; Cheng, Nan-pu; Chen, Zhi-qian; Guo, Ning; Zeng, Su-min

    2015-01-01

    An aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) subjected to deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) was systematically investigated. The results show that a DCT-induced phase transformation varies the microstructures and affects the mechanical properties of the Al alloy. Both Guinier-Preston (GP) zones and a metastable η' phase were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The phenomenon of the second precipitation of the GP zones in samples subjected to DCT after being aged was observed. The viability of this phase transformation was also demonstrated by first-principles calculations.

  5. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  6. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  7. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  8. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  9. 29 CFR 510.23 - Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agricultural activities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. Agriculture activities eligible for an extended phase-in of the...

  10. The Mechanism of η Phase Precipitation in A286 Superalloy During Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, M.; Razavi, S. H.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Abbasi, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    In this research, the mechanism of eta (η-Ni3Ti) phase precipitation in iron-nickel-based A286 superalloy was assessed during aging heat treatment in the temperature range between 650 and 900 °C for the times of 1-30 h. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential thermal analysis, and x-ray diffractometry were used to describe the η phase transformation. The results showed that the major precipitates at temperatures below 840 °C were γ' and η. The η phase started to precipitate at the expense of the γ' phase after prolonged aging. The η phase existed in the samples aged at temperature higher than 760 °C with cellular morphology. The η volume fraction increased with increasing heat treatment time. In addition, when the aging temperature was increased from 760 to 820 °C, the η volume fraction increased and then decreased after 840 °C. The η phase morphology also changed from cellular to Widmanstätten-type during aging. The time-temperature-precipitation diagrams of these morphologies are presented. The results indicated the differences in precipitation mechanisms of η phase at 840 and 860 °C.

  11. Phase separation of cesium from lead borosilicate glass by heat treatment under a reducing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2016-11-01

    A phase-separation technique for removing sodium from glass using a heat-treatment method under a reducing atmosphere was previously developed for sodium recovery from waste glass. In this study, this technique was applied to cesium-containing lead borosilicate glass to concentrate the cesium in phase-separated sodium-rich materials for efficient cesium extraction. The theoretical phase-separation temperature of the sodium-rich phase was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and was predicted to occur below 700°C for lead borosilicate glass. Experimentally, a simulated lead borosilicate glass was melted at 1000°C and subsequently annealed below 700°C under a CO-containing reducing atmosphere. The phase separation of cesium was found to occur with sodium enrichment on the glass surface that was in contact with the gas phase, promoting cesium extraction from the treated glass using water. The cesium extraction efficiency was affected by the surface area of the treated glass that was in contact with water, and under the examined conditions, the cesium extraction efficiency was up to 66%. Phase separation using reductive heat treatment, combined with a water leaching technique, is suggested to be effective for extracting cesium incorporated in borosilicate glass waste. PMID:27368086

  12. Diagnosis, Cause, and Treatment Approaches for Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder.

    PubMed

    Magee, Michelle; Marbas, Emily M; Wright, Kenneth P; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Broussard, Josiane L

    2016-09-01

    Delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) is commonly defined as an inability to fall asleep and wake at societal times resulting in excessive daytime sleepiness. Although the cause is multifaceted, delays in sleep time are largely driven by misalignment between the circadian pacemaker and the desired sleep-wake timing schedule. Current treatment approaches focus on correcting the circadian delay; however, there is a lack of data investigating combined therapies for treatment of DSWPD. PMID:27542884

  13. The effects of acute-phase inducers and dimethyl sulphoxide on delta-aminolaevulinate synthase activity in human HepG2 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, F; Sassa, S; Kappas, A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of acute-phase inducers and dimethyl sulphoxide (Me2SO) on delta-aminolaevulinate (ALA) synthase in HepG2 cells were examined. Treatment of cells with Me2SO resulted in a significant increase in ALA synthase activity. Interleukin-6 increased ALA synthase activity only slightly, but it substantially potentiated the induction of ALA synthase by Me2SO. These data suggest that ALA synthase activity in liver is altered during acute-phase reactions. PMID:2541694

  14. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes containing TiO2-B and anatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanxi; Zhu, Kerong; Qi, Mengyao; Zhuang, Yonglong; Cheng, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Bicrystal phase TiO2 nanotubes (NTS) containing monoclinic TiO2-B and anatase were prepared by the hydrothermal reaction of anatase nanoparticles with NaOH aqueous solution and a heat treatment. Their structure was characterized by XRD, TEM and Raman spectra. The results showed that the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS were formed after calcining H2Ti4O9·H2O NTS at 573 K. The bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS exhibit significantly higher photocatalytic activity than the single phase anatase NTS and Dessuga P-25 nanoparticles in the degradation of Methyl Orange aqueous solution under ultraviolet light irradiation, which is attributed to the large surface and interface areas of the bicrystal phase TiO2 NTS.

  15. Factors Associated with Fatality during the Intensive Phase of Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Casals, M.; Caminero, J. A.; García-García, J. M.; Jiménez-Fuentes, M. A.; Medina, J. F.; Millet, J. P.; Ruiz-Manzano, J.; Caylá, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the case-fatality rate (CFR) at the end of the intensive phase of tuberculosis (TB) treatment, and factors associated with fatality. Methods TB patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were followed-up during treatment. We computed the CFR at the end of the intensive phase of TB treatment, and the incidence of death per 100 person-days (pd) of follow-up. We performed survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression, and calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 5,182 patients were included, of whom 180 (3.5%) died; 87 of these deaths (48.3%) occurred during the intensive phase of treatment, with a CFR of 1.7%. The incidence of death was 0.028/100 pd. The following factors were associated with death during the intensive phase: being >50 years (HR = 36.9;CI:4.8–283.4); being retired (HR = 2.4;CI:1.1–5.1); having visited the emergency department (HR = 3.1;CI:1.2–7.7); HIV infection (HR = 3.4;CI:1.6–7.2); initial standard treatment with 3 drugs (HR = 2.0;CI:1.2–3.3) or non-standard treatments (HR = 2.68;CI:1.36–5.25); comprehension difficulties (HR = 2.8;CI:1.3–6.1); and smear-positive sputum (HR = 2.3-CI:1.0–4.8). Conclusion There is a non-negligible CFR during the intensive phase of TB, whose reduction should be prioritised. The CFR could be a useful indicator for evaluating TB programs. PMID:27487189

  16. Active phase drift cancellation for optic-fiber frequency transfer using a photonic radio-frequency phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianguo; Wu, Guiling; Hu, Liang; Zou, Weiwen; Chen, Jianping

    2014-04-15

    We propose an active photonic phase drift cancellation scheme for frequency transfer over optical fiber based on a linear photonic RF phase shifter. The photonic RF phase shifter consists of a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and optical filter with the assistance of the local microwave signal. The phase drift induced by fiber transmission can be compensated by simply tuning the bias voltage of the modulator. The principle of the phase cancellation scheme based on the photonic phase shifter is demonstrated and validated experimentally by transferring a 0.5 GHz reference signal over a 20 km single-mode fiber with a root mean square jitter of less than 0.5 ps. PMID:24978989

  17. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  18. A Comparison of Phase and Speckle Tracking Registration Methods for Motion Correction during HIFU Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Tara; Smith, Penny Probert; Noble, Alison; Leslie, Tom; Kennedy, James

    2007-05-01

    The accuracy of treatment monitoring and planning is instrumental to the acceptance of HIFU surgery. The ability to locate, analyze and track a feature of interest during treatment will be affected by patient motion. Additionally, statistical analysis and temperature monitoring algorithms would benefit from the registration of successive frames. In this work two registration algorithms, which have had extensive trials in other imaging applications, are investigated. Their ability to reduce patient respiratory and cardiac motion is within ultrasound sequences, taken during HIFU treatments, is compared. The first algorithm is based on an intensity block matching approach with a similarity measure that incorporates speckle statistics explicitly. The second method registers phase representations of the image with a more general similarity measure. These methods would be expected to succeed on different aspects of the image: phase measurements give weight to features and are rotation and contrast invariant, whereas methods to track speckle are successful in images that lack strong features. In general phase based methods of registration are more robust and have the potential to be extended to multimodality registration (such as MRI to Ultrasound), however in this case tracking speckle may produce better results due to the low signal to noise ratio in ultrasound images taken during HIFU treatments. Numerous examples from HIFU surgery are presented to highlight the performance of each method under a various motion constraints. It is shown that the phase based algorithm is generally superior, except in the close proximity to the skin.

  19. Integrated fungal biomass and activated sludge treatment for textile wastewaters bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, Antonella; Spina, Federica; Romagnolo, Alice; Tigini, Valeria; Prigione, Valeria; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2012-11-01

    A combined biological process was investigated for effective textile wastewater treatment. The process consisted of a first step performed by selected fungal biomasses, mainly devoted to the effluent decolourisation, and of a subsequent stage by means of activated sludge, in order to reduce the remaining COD and toxicity. In particular, the treatment with Trametes pubescens MUT 2400, selected over nine strains, achieved very good results in respect to all parameters. The final scale-up phase in a moving bed bioreactor with the supported biomass of the fungus allowed to verify the effectiveness of the treatment with high volumes. Despite promising results, further steps must be taken in order to optimize the use of these biomasses for a full exploitation of their oxidative potential in textile wastewater treatment. PMID:22940306

  20. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  1. CONSIDERATIONS IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF COMBINED INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to examine the use of activated carbon in reducing the content of biologically resistant organic compounds in a combined industrial wastewater treatment system. The invvestigation was conducted in two stages: (1) characterize organic priority pol...

  2. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  3. Induction by xenobiotics of phase I and phase II enzyme activities in the human keratinocyte cell line NCTC 2544.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, A; Morini, F; Dusatti, F; Penco, S; Ferro, M

    2001-12-01

    This study analyses the expression and induction of several drug-metabolising enzyme activities involved in either phase I or phase II biotransformations in NCTC 2544 human keratinocytes. The phase I activities 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD), 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and 7-pentoxyresorufin O-depenthylase (PROD) were easily detectable in basal conditions. During incubations lasting up to 144 h in the presence of the classical cytochrome P450 inducers beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) and phenobarbital (PB), a considerable and significant increase in all the three activities was observed. PROD activity was induced up to 4.5-fold after 96 h in the presence of PB. The MC-induced ECOD and EROD activities were also dose-dependently inhibited by alpha-naphothflavone, which was given to the cells during the incubation with CYP 1A1 inducers. Also the PB-induced PROD activity was decreased by the simultaneous addition of the CYP 2B inhibitor metyrapone. Both cytochrome P450 inhibitors were used at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and quinone reductase were all highly expressed and inducible by MC. The exposure (24 h) of the cells to four hair dyes used in cosmetic formulations resulted in a marked increase in ECOD activity. All data give sustained evidence for the suitability of NCTC 2544 cell line to skin toxicology studies. PMID:11698172

  4. Ten year revision of the brief behavioral activation treatment for depression: revised treatment manual.

    PubMed

    Lejuez, C W; Hopko, Derek R; Acierno, Ron; Daughters, Stacey B; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2011-03-01

    Following from the seminal work of Ferster, Lewinsohn, and Jacobson, as well as theory and research on the Matching Law, Lejuez, Hopko, LePage, Hopko, and McNeil developed a reinforcement-based depression treatment that was brief, uncomplicated, and tied closely to behavioral theory. They called this treatment the brief behavioral activation treatment for depression (BATD), and the original manual was published in this journal. The current manuscript is a revised manual (BATD-R), reflecting key modifications that simplify and clarify key treatment elements, procedures, and treatment forms. Specific modifications include (a) greater emphasis on treatment rationale, including therapeutic alliance; (b) greater clarity regarding life areas, values, and activities; (c) simplified (and fewer) treatment forms; (d) enhanced procedural details, including troubleshooting and concept reviews; and (e) availability of a modified Daily Monitoring Form to accommodate low literacy patients. Following the presentation of the manual, the authors conclude with a discussion of the key barriers in greater depth, including strategies for addressing these barriers. PMID:21324944

  5. Phase transition ordering-separation: A new approach to heat treatment of alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinovshchikov, Yu. I.

    2015-09-01

    The problems of the consequence of heat treatment of alloys performed using the concept of an ordering-separation phase transition are considered. Fe50Cr50 and Ni88Al12 alloys and U13 steel are used as examples to show that this transition occurs at a temperature specific for each system, and a change in the sign of the chemical interaction between alloy component atoms changes the direction of diffusion fluxes in alloys into the opposite direction, which changes the type of microstructure. The detection of this phase transition radically changes the generally accepted concepts of heat treatment of alloys. This finding calls for transmission electron microscopy investigations to modify the phase diagrams where this phase transition was detected. It is concluded that quenching of alloys from a so-called solid-solution field, which is usually performed before tempering (aging), is an unnecessary and useless operation, since the final structure of an alloy forms upon tempering (aging) irrespective of the structure existing before this heat treatment.

  6. Phase transformations on the surface of YAG composite ceramics under the action of directed laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, M.; Márquez Aguilar, P. A.; Escobar Martinez, A.; Kakazey, M.; Guardian Tapia, R.; Trujillo Estrada, A.

    2016-07-01

    The laser treatment of composite ceramics based on Y3Al5O12 with Y2Ti2O7, Al2Y4O9, and Al2O3 additives is accompanied by the melting of the surface layer and formation of tracks. In the volume of tracks, the partial dissociation of Y3Al5O12, Y2Ti2O7, and Al2Y4O9, and the formation of new phases such as YAlO3 of orthorhombic and hexagonal modifications along with the appearance of additional content of Y3Al5O12 and Al2O3 are observed. The content of all these phases depends on the irradiation mode and the phase composition of the ceramics. With increase in the corundum content in ceramic specimens, in the tracks, the Al2O3 content increases, and the Y3Al5O12 content decreases. In the volume of tracks, Y3Al5O12 crystallites are textured. The size of YAG crystallites and their crystallographic texturing depend on the irradiation mode and Y3Al5O12/Al2O3 phase ratio. On the surface of tracks, a layer enriched in YAlO3 forms. Thus, as a result of laser treatment, on the surface of the ceramics, a two-layer coating with a radically new phase composition and specific texture of Y3Al5O12 crystallites forms.

  7. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array. [microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  8. Biologically Inspired Photocatalytically Active Membranes for Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsinger, Nichola M.

    There is an alarming increase of a variety of new chemicals that are now being discharged into the wastewater system causing increased concern for public health and safety because many are not removed by typical wastewater treatment practices. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is a heterogeneous photocatalytic material that rapidly and completely mineralizing organics without harmful byproducts. TiO2 is synthesized by various methods, which lack the necessary control of crystal size, phase, and morphological features that yield optimized semiconductor materials. Mineralizing organisms demonstrate how nature can produce elegant structures at room temperature through controlled organic-mineral interactions. Here, we utilize biologically-inspired scaffolds to template the nucleation and growth of inorganic materials such as TiO2, which aid in controlling the size and phase of these particles and ultimately, their properties. Nanosized rutile and anatase particles were synthesized under solution conditions at relatively low temperatures and mild pH conditions. The effects of reaction conditions on phase and grain size were investigated and discussed from coordination chemistry and coarsening mechanisms. Photocatalytic characterization of TiO2 phase mixtures was performed to investigate their synergistic effect. The suspension conditions of these catalytic nanomaterials were modulated to optimize the degradation rate of organic analytes. Through the addition of an organic scaffold during the synthesis reaction, a mechanically robust (elastic) composite material containing TiO2 nanoparticles was produced. This composite was subsequently heat-treated to produce a porous, high surface area TiO2 nanoparticulate membrane. Processing conditions were investigated to characterize the growth and phase transformation of TiO2, which ultimately impacts photocatalytic performance. These bulk porous TiO2 structures can be fabricated and tailored to act as stand-alone photocatalytic membranes

  9. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-08-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:26737878

  10. Transitioning from multi-phase to single-phase microfluidics for long-term culture and treatment of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-09-21

    When compared to methodologies based on low adhesion or hanging drop plates, droplet microfluidics offers several advantages for the formation and culture of multicellular spheroids, such as the potential for higher throughput screening and the use of reduced cell numbers, whilst providing increased stability for plate handling. However, a drawback of the technology is its characteristic compartmentalisation which limits the nutrients available to cells within an emulsion and poses challenges to the exchange of the encapsulated solution, often resulting in short-term cell culture and/or viability issues. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-purpose microfluidic platform that combines the high-throughput characteristics of multi-phase flows with that of ease of perfusion typical of single-phase microfluidics. We developed a versatile system to upscale the formation and long-term culture of multicellular spheroids for testing anticancer treatments, creating an array of fluidically addressable, compact spheroids that could be cultured in either medium or within a gel scaffold. The work provides proof-of-concept results for using this system to test both chemo- and radio-therapeutic protocols using in vitro 3D cancer models. PMID:27477673

  11. Effects of different heat treatments on lysozyme quantity and antimicrobial activity of jenny milk.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Labella, C; Elshafie, H S; Camele, I; Musto, M; Paolino, R; D'Adamo, C; Freschi, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal treatments are used to improve milk microbial safety, shelf life, and biological activity of some of its components. However, thermal treatments can reduce the nutritional quality of milk, affecting the molecular structure of milk proteins, such as lysozyme, which is a very important milk component due to its antimicrobial effect against gram-positive bacteria. Jenny milk is characterized by high lysozyme content. For this reason, in the last few years, it has been used as an antimicrobial additive in dairy products as an alternative to hen egg white lysozyme, which can cause allergic reactions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pasteurization and condensation on the concentration and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk. Furthermore, lysozyme quantity and activity were tested in raw and pasteurized milk after condensation at 40 and 20% of the initial volume. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed under fluorescence detection to monitor lysozyme in milk samples. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the tested milk against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, Clavibacter michiganensis, Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Xanthomonas campestris, and Escherichia coli. Condensation and pasteurization did not affect the concentration or antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk, except for B. mojaventis, which showed resistance to lysozyme in milk samples subjected to heat treatments. Moreover, lysozyme in jenny milk showed antimicrobial activity similar to synthetic antibiotics versus some gram-positive strains and also versus the gram-negative strain X. campestris. PMID:27157571

  12. Phase Transformation Behavior at Low Temperature in Hydrothermal Treatment of Stable and Unstable Titania Sol

    PubMed

    So; Park; Kim; Moon

    1997-07-15

    Nanosize titania sol was prepared from titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and conditions for the formation of stable sol were identified. As the H+/TTIP mole ratio decreased and H2O/TTIP mole ratio increased, stable sol was likely to be formed. The size and crystallinity remained unchanged after hydrothermal treatment of the stable sol at between 160 and 240°C. However, hydrothermal treatment of unstable sol produced rod-like particles and crystallinity of particles was changed from anatase to rutile. This difference in phase transformation at low hydrothermal treatment temperature was likely to be caused by the fact that stable sol remained to be stable even after hydrothermal treatment, while unstable sol had a tendency to be aggregated. PMID:9268523

  13. Immunoregulatory and antitumor activity of schizophyllan under ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kui; Tong, Litao; Liu, Liya; Zhou, Xianrong; Liu, Xingxun; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Sumei

    2015-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasonic treatment on the biological activities of schizophyllan (SPG) from Schizophyllum commune. The immunoregulatory and antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo of SPG and ultrasonic-treated SPG (USPG) were evaluated by splenic lymphocytes, macrophages RAW264.7 and human breast carcinoma T-47D cells. Compared with SPG, USPG fractions had small molecular weight and narrow distribution. Meantime, more enhancement of NO production in macrophages RAW264.7, lymphocytes proliferation rates, IL-2 and TNF-α level from spleen lymphocytes and T-47D cells inhibition rates were observed in USPG fractions groups. This result indicated that the immune-enhancing and antitumor activity of SPG was significantly improved after ultrasonic treatment. USPG60 exhibited the highest biological activity in this study. In conclusion, application of ultrasonic technology on SPG preparation is an efficient approach to get high biological polysaccharide, and USPG60 might be a potential functional component for immunoregulatory and cancer treatment. PMID:26126943

  14. Co-Cu Nanoparticles: Synthesis by Galvanic Replacement and Phase Rearrangement during Catalytic Activation.

    PubMed

    Nafria, Raquel; Genç, Aziz; Ibáñez, Maria; Arbiol, Jordi; de la Piscina, Pilar Ramírez; Homs, Narcís; Cabot, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    The control of the phase distribution in multicomponent nanomaterials is critical to optimize their catalytic performance. In this direction, while impressive advances have been achieved in the past decade in the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles and nanocomposites, element rearrangement during catalyst activation has been frequently overseen. Here, we present a facile galvanic replacement-based procedure to synthesize Co@Cu nanoparticles with narrow size and composition distributions. We further characterize their phase arrangement before and after catalytic activation. When oxidized at 350 °C in air to remove organics, Co@Cu core-shell nanostructures oxidize to polycrystalline CuO-Co3O4 nanoparticles with randomly distributed CuO and Co3O4 crystallites. During a posterior reduction treatment in H2 atmosphere, Cu precipitates in a metallic core and Co migrates to the nanoparticle surface to form Cu@Co core-shell nanostructures. The catalytic behavior of such Cu@Co nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica was further analyzed toward CO2 hydrogenation in real working conditions. PMID:26878153

  15. Phase advancement and nucleus-specific timing of thalamocortical activity during slow cortical oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Slézia, Andrea; Hangya, Balázs; Ulbert, István; Acsády, László

    2011-01-01

    The exact timing of cortical afferent activity is instrumental for the correct coding and retrieval of internal and external stimuli. Thalamocortical inputs represent the most significant subcortical pathway to the cortex, but the precise timing and temporal variability of thalamocortical activity is not known. To examine this question, we studied the phase of thalamic action potentials relative to cortical oscillations and established correlations among phase, the nuclear location of the thalamocortical neurons and the frequency of cortical activity. The phase of thalamic action potentials depended on the exact frequency of the slow cortical oscillation both on long (minutes) and short (single wave) time scales. Faster waves were accompanied by phase advancement in both cases. Thalamocortical neurons located in different nuclei fired at significantly different phases of the slow waves but were active at similar phase of spindle oscillations. Different thalamic nuclei displayed distinct burst patterns. Bursts with higher number of action potentials displayed progressive phase advancement in a nucleus-specific manner. Thalamic neurons located along nuclear borders were characterized by mixed burst and phase properties. Our data demonstrate that the temporal relationship between cortical and thalamic activity is not fixed but displays dynamic changes during oscillatory activity. The timing depends on the precise location and exact activity of thalamocortical cells and the ongoing cortical network pattern. This variability of thalamic output and its coupling to cortical activity can enable thalamocortical neurons to actively participate in the coding and retrieval of complex cortical signals. PMID:21228169

  16. Research on change of phase transformation temperatures and electrical resistance triggered by heat treatment of alloy from Cu-Mn system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, N.; Aldirmaz, E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed at studying influence of various heat treatments on transformation temperatures and electrical resistance properties of alloys from binary Cu-Mn system. It was noticed that with an increase in sample's grain size, transformation temperatures also increased. The activation energies of samples were calculated according to Kissinger and Augis-Bennett. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were used to investigate phase transformations and kinetic parameters. The electrical values of resistance of alloy were investigated at different temperatures. The resistance as a function of quenching temperature showed a decrease. Depending on quenching techniques, Cu-Mn alloy can display different product phases such as parent phase and precipitation.

  17. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion*

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the Discrepancy Index (DI) category, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma. PMID:25279531

  18. General Electric ATS Program technical review Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, T.; Smith, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program Phase 2 objectives are to select a cycle, and to identify and resolve technical issues required to realize the ATS Program goals of 60% net combined cycle efficiency, single digit NOx, and a 10% electric power cost reduction, compared to current technology. The Phase 2 efforts have showns that the ATS Program goals are achievable. The GE Power Generation advanced gas turbine will use closed-loop steam cooling in the first two turbine stages and advanced coatings, seals and cooling designs to meet ATS performance and cost of electricity goals.

  19. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  20. Identification of new compounds with high activity against stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi from the NCI compound collection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease in the USA. Whereas the majority of Lyme disease patients with early disease can be cured with standard treatment, some patients suffer from chronic fatigue and joint and muscular pain despite treatment, a syndrome called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. Although the cause is unclear, ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi persisters by current Lyme disease antibiotics is one possible explanation. We took advantage of our recently developed high-throughput viability assay and screened the National Cancer Institute compound library collection consisting of 2526 compounds against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. We identified the top 30 new active hits, including the top six anthracycline antibiotics daunomycin 3-oxime, dimethyldaunomycin, daunomycin, NSC299187, NSC363998 and nogalamycin, along with other compounds, including prodigiosin, mitomycin, nanaomycin and dactinomycin, as having excellent activity against B. burgdorferi stationary phase culture. The anthracycline or anthraquinone compounds, which are known to have both anti-cancer and antibacterial activities, also had high activity against growing B. burgdorferi with low minimum inhibitory concentration. Future studies on the structure-activity relationship and mechanisms of action of anthracyclines/anthraquinones are warranted. In addition, drug combination studies with the anthracycline class of compounds and the current Lyme antibiotics to eradicate B. burgdorferi persisters in vitro and in animal models are needed to determine if they improve the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:26954881

  1. Halide based shock-wave treatment of fluid-rich natural phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlothauer, T.; Schimpf, C.; Brendler, E.; Keller, K.; Kroke, E.; Heide, G.

    2015-11-01

    For the synthesis of high pressure phases from natural minerals and the shock wave treatment of fluid bearing phases a halide based method was developed. The experiments were performed in the pressure range between 25 and 162 GPa with a success rate for the new method of 100% for the new method. Based on the Impedance Corrected Sample Recovery Capsule under avoiding the adiabatic decompression a direct comparison between different loading paths and sample holder geometries is possible. The recovered samples show neither indications of melting in the case of kaolinite and very limited degassing in the case of carbonates. The recovery of amorphous water bearing Al-Si-phases with Aluminum in four-, five- and six-fold coordination was possible. The samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nuclear-magnetic-resonance- and infra-red-spectroscopy and the results were directly compared.

  2. What is still missing in acute-phase treatment of stroke: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Sara; Turri, Giulia; Mirandola, Rina; Bovi, Paolo; Bisoffi, Giulia

    2013-04-01

    Early recognition of stroke symptoms and activation of emergency medical service (EMS) positively affects prognosis after a stroke. To assess stroke awareness among stroke patients and medical personnel in the catchment area of Verona Hospital and how it affects stroke care, we prospectively studied timing of acute stroke care in relation to patients' characteristics. Patients admitted to Medical Departments of Verona University Hospital between January 1st and December 31st 2009 with a diagnosis of TIA or stroke were enrolled. Outcome measures were: time between (i) symptoms onset and hospital arrival, (ii) hospital arrival and brain CT scan, blood examination, ECG and neurological evaluation. The following patient/event characteristics were also collected: means of hospital arrival, sex, age, degree of disability, type of event (first or recurrent) and acute-phase treatment. Of 578 patients providing complete information, 60 % arrived to the emergency department with the EMS (EMS+ group), while 40 % arrived on their own (EMS-). EMS+ group was older than EMS- (mean age 76.2, SD 13.2, vs. 72.3, SD 13, respectively), displayed more severe symptoms (mRS 4 vs. 2) and shorter time interval between symptoms onset and hospital arrival, hospital arrival and CT scan, ECG, laboratory tests and neurological evaluation (p < 0.0001); 22 % of the EMS+ patients were stroke recurrences versus 29 % of the EMS- (p = 0.058); 85 % of thrombolised patients were EMS+. We conclude that there is a lack of awareness of stroke symptoms and risks of recurrence even among patients who already had a stroke and among medical personnel. PMID:22466805

  3. Early responses of human cancer cells upon photodynamic treatment monitored by laser phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Theo A.; Graschew, Georgi; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Dressler, Cathrin; Beuthan, Juergen; Schlag, Peter M.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment of cancer cells is known to eventually cause cell death in most cases. The precise pathways and the time course seem to vary among different cell types and modes of photodynamic treatment. In this contribution, the focus was put on the responses of human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 within the first 15 minutes after laser irradiation in the presence of Photofrin« II (PII). To monitor the cell response in this early time period laser phase microscopic imaging was used, a method sensitive to changes in overall cell shape and intracellular structures, mediated by changes in the local refractive index. Laser irradiation of cells loaded with PII induced a significant reduction of the phase shifts, which probably reflects the induced damage to the different cellular membrane structures. The data suggest that even within the first 30 s after the onset of laser illumination, a significant reduction of the phase shifts can be detected. These results underline that laser phase microscopy is a suitable diagnostic tool for cellular research, also in the early time domain.

  4. Sequential combined treatment with allopurinol and benznidazole in the chronic phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Mazliah, D. E.; Alvarez, M. G.; Cooley, G.; Lococo, B. E.; Bertocchi, G.; Petti, M.; Albareda, M. C.; Armenti, A. H.; Tarleton, R. L.; Laucella, S. A.; Viotti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Even though the use of combined drugs has been proved to be effective in other chronic infections, assessment of combined treatment of antiparasitic drugs in human Chagas' disease has not been performed. Herein, a pilot study was conducted to evaluate the tolerance and side effects of a sequential combined treatment of two antiparasitic drugs, allopurinol and benznidazole, in the chronic phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Patients and methods Changes in total and T. cruzi-specific T and B cells were monitored during a median follow-up of 36 months. Allopurinol was administered for 3 months (600 mg/day) followed by 30 days of benznidazole (5 mg/kg/day) in 11 T. cruzi-infected subjects. Results The combined sequential treatment of allopurinol and benznidazole was well tolerated. The levels of T. cruzi-specific antibodies significantly decreased after sequential combined treatment, as determined by conventional serology and by a multiplex assay using recombinant proteins. The frequency of T. cruzi-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells significantly increased after allopurinol treatment and decreased to background levels following benznidazole administration in a substantial proportion of subjects evaluated. The levels of total naive (CD45RA + CCR7 + CD62L+) CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were restored after allopurinol administration and maintained after completion of the combined drug protocol, along with a decrease in T cell activation in total peripheral CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Conclusions This pilot study shows that the combination of allopurinol and benznidazole induces significant modifications in T and B cell responses indicative of a reduction in parasite burden, and sustains the feasibility of administration of two antiparasitic drugs in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease. PMID:23104493

  5. Early Surrogate Markers of Treatment Activity: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed

    Klintman, Marie; Dowsett, Mitchell

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of new therapies in the adjuvant setting in early breast cancer requires large numbers of patients and many years of follow-up for results to be presented. Therefore, the neoadjuvant study setting, which allows for early prediction of treatment response in smaller patient sets, has become increasingly popular. Ki67 is the most commonly used and extensively studied intermediate biomarker of treatment activity and residual risk in neoadjuvant trials on endocrine therapy, new biological therapies, and chemotherapy. It is increasingly being used as a primary endpoint for new therapies particularly those added to endocrine therapy. The PeriOperative Endocrine Therapy for Individualizing Care (POETIC) trial, including more than 4000 postmenopausal, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients randomly assigned to receive 2 weeks of presurgical treatment with an aromatase inhibitor or no further treatment, is the largest window-of-opportunity trial conducted and is assessing the clinical utility of on-treatment Ki67 as a predictor of long-term outcome. For generalizability, Ki67 measurements in the POETIC and other trials need to use standard methodology. The International Working Group on Ki67 in Breast Cancer is conducting a series of studies to bring this to reality. PMID:26063881

  6. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  7. Acupuncture as a primary and independent treatment in the acute phases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is an otological emergency defined as a rapid hearing loss, seriously affects patient's social life. To data, no study has reported the treatment by acupuncture alone in the acute phase. In this report, Acupuncture and Moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer is outlined. The patient was a 26-year-old young woman who had an SSHL coupled with ear fullness. The patient had no past medical history, but she had undergone variable emotions and had a history of excessive noise exposure. The patient refused to receive any medicine especially steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. She just only received acupuncture treatment. Her symptoms and outcome measurements were improved every week and completely recovered after the last week. Even though the article presents a single case and is based on self-reports, there are very clear trends on how patients with SSHL responded to acupuncture treatments. PMID:27368045

  8. Activity induced phase separation in particles and (bio)polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    It was recently shown that the non-equilibrium steady state of the mixture of two types of particles exposed to two different thermostats can phase separate (A.Y.Grosberg, J.-F.Joanny, PRE, v. 91, 032118, 2015). similar result is valid also in the case when particles in question are monomers of two different polymer chains, or blocks of a co-polymer. We discuss the implications of these results for the physics of chromatin.

  9. Chelation efficacy and erythroid response during deferasirox treatment in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in fibrotic phase.

    PubMed

    Latagliata, Roberto; Montagna, Chiara; Porrini, Raffaele; Di Veroli, Ambra; Leonetti, Sabrina Crescenzi; Niscola, Pasquale; Ciccone, Fabrizio; Spadea, Antonio; Breccia, Massimo; Maurillo, Luca; Rago, Angela; Spirito, Francesca; Cedrone, Michele; De Muro, Marianna; Montanaro, Marco; Andriani, Alessandro; Bagnato, Antonino; Montefusco, Enrico; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-06-01

    At present, very few data are available on deferasirox (DFX) in the treatment of patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in fibrotic phase (FP-MPN) and transfusion dependence. To address this issue, a retrospective analysis of 28 patients (22 male and 6 female) with FP-MPN and iron overload secondary to transfusion dependence was performed, based on patients enrolled in the database of our regional cooperative group who received treatment with DFX. DFX was started after a median interval from diagnosis of 12.8 months (IR 7.1-43.1) with median ferritin values of 1415 ng/mL (IR 1168-1768). Extra-hematological toxicity was reported in 16 of 28 patients (57.1%), but only two patients discontinued treatment due to toxicity. Among 26 patients evaluable for response (≥6 months of treatment), after a median treatment period of 15.4 months (IR 8.1-22.3), 11 patients (42.3%) achieved a stable and consistent reduction in ferritin levels <1000 ng/mL. As for hematological improvement, 6 of 26 patients (23%) showed a persistent (>3 months) rise of Hb levels >1.5 g/dL, with disappearance of transfusion dependence in four cases. Treatment with DFX is feasible and effective in FP-MPN with iron overload. Moreover, in this setting, an erythroid response can occur in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:26277477

  10. Coarsening Kinetics and Morphological Evolution in a Two-Phase Titanium Alloy During Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei; Zeng, Weidong; Jia, Zhiqiang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Yawei

    2016-03-01

    The effects of alpha/beta heat treatment on microstructure evolution of Ti-17 alloy with a lamellar colony structure are established. Heat treatment experiments are conducted at 1103 or 1063 K for times ranging from 10 min to 8 h. The main features of microstructure evolution during heat treatment comprise static globularization and coarsening of primary alpha phase. Such behaviors can be accelerated by higher heat treatment temperature. Furthermore, globularization and coarsening behaviors show a faster rate at higher prestrain. In order to better understand the microstructure evolution of Ti-17 alloy during alpha/beta heat treatment, static globularization and coarsening behaviors are modeled in the theoretical frame of the Johnson-Mehl-Avarmi-Kolmogorov (JMAK) and Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theories, respectively. The JMAK and LSW kinetics parameters are derived under different experimental conditions. Agreements between measurements and predictions are found, indicating that the JMAK and LSW theories can be used to predict and trace static globularization and coarsening processes of Ti-17 alloy during alpha/beta heat treatment.

  11. Ghrelin treatment prevents development of activity based anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Romain; Lucas, Nicolas; Breton, Jonathan; Azhar, Saïda; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation of feeding is necessary for treatment of pathological conditions of chronic malnutrition due to anorexia. Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, is one of the candidate for pharmacological treatments of anorexia, but because of its instability in plasma has limited efficacy. We previously showed that plasmatic IgG protect ghrelin from degradation and that IgG from obese subjects and mice may increase ghrelin׳s orexigenic effect. In this study we tested if ghrelin alone or combined with IgG may improve feeding in chronically food-restricted mice with or without physical activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by free access to a running wheel. Mice received a single daily intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (1nM) together or not with total IgG (1nM) from obese ob/ob or lean mice before access to food during 8 days of 3h/day feeding time. We found that both ghrelin and ghrelin combined with IgG from obese, but not lean mice, prevented ABA, however, they were not able to diminish body weight loss. Physical activity was lower during the feeding period and was increased shortly after feeding in mice receiving ghrelin together with IgG from obese mice. In food-restricted mice without ABA, ghrelin treatments did not have significant effects on food intake. Thus, this study supports pharmacological use of ghrelin or ghrelin combined with IgG from obese animals for treatment of anorexia accompanied by elevated physical activity. The utility of combining ghrelin with protective IgG should be further determined in animal models of anorexia with unrestricted access to food. PMID:27052473

  12. Evaluating sedimentation problems in activated sludge treatment plants operating at complete sludge retention time.

    PubMed

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Pekridis, George; Taousanidis, Nikolaos

    2015-02-01

    Zero net sludge growth can be achieved by complete retention of solids in activated sludge wastewater treatment, especially in high strength and biodegradable wastewaters. When increasing the solids retention time, MLSS and MLVSS concentrations reach a plateau phase and observed growth yields values tend to zero (Yobs ≈ 0). In this work, in order to evaluate sedimentation problems arised due to high MLSS concentrations and complete sludge retention operational conditions, two identical innovative slaughterhouse wastewater treatment plants were studied. Measurements of wastewaters' quality characteristics, treatment plant's operational conditions, sludge microscopic analysis and state point analysis were conducted. Results have shown that low COD/Nitrogen ratios increase sludge bulking and flotation phenomena due to accidental denitrification in clarifiers. High return activated sludge rate is essential in complete retention systems as it reduces sludge condensation and hydraulic retention time in the clarifiers. Under certain operational conditions sludge loading rates can greatly exceed literature limit values. The presented methodology is a useful tool for estimation of sedimentation problems encountered in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with complete retention time. PMID:25463928

  13. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  14. Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

    2005-03-11

    This report summarizes work performed on this project from October 2004 through March 2005. In previous work, a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) was shown to be an effective system for removing BTEX contaminants from produced water. Additional work on this project demonstrated that a compost-based biofilter could biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, it was also determined that the BTEX concentrations in the waste gas stream varied significantly during the regeneration period and the initial BTEX concentrations were too high for the biofilter to handle effectively. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a passive adsorption column placed upstream of the biofilter to attenuate the peak gas-phase VOC concentrations delivered to the biofilter during the SMZ regeneration process. In preparation for the field test of the SMZ/VPB treatment system in New Mexico, a pilot-scale SMZ system was also designed and constructed during this reporting period. Finally, a cost and feasibility analysis was also completed. To investigate the merits of the passive buffering system during SMZ regeneration, two adsorbents, SMZ and granular activated carbon (GAC) were investigated in flow-through laboratory-scale columns to determine their capacity to handle steady and unsteady VOC feed conditions. When subjected to a toluene-contaminated air stream, the column containing SMZ reduced the peak inlet 1000 ppmv toluene concentration to 630 ppmv at a 10 second contact time. This level of buffering was insufficient to ensure complete removal in the downstream biofilter and the contact time was longer than desired. For this reason, using SMZ as a passive buffering system for the gas phase contaminants was not pursued further. In contrast to the SMZ results, GAC was found to be an effective adsorbent to handle the peak contaminant concentrations that occur early during the SMZ regeneration process. At a one

  15. Activation of bone marrow phagocytes following benzene treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, D L; MacEachern, L; Snyder, R

    1989-01-01

    Techniques in flow cytometry/cell sorting were used to characterize the effects of benzene and its metabolites on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. Treatment of male Balb/c mice with benzene (880 mg/kg) or a combination of its metabolites, hydroquinone and phenol (50 mg/kg), resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed two subpopulations of bone marrow cells that could be distinguished by their size and density or granularity. The larger, more dense subpopulation was found to consist predominantly of macrophages and granulocytes as determined by monoclonal antibody binding and by cell sorting. Benzene treatment had no selective cytotoxic effects on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. To determine if benzene treatment activated bone marrow phagocytes, we quantified production of hydrogen peroxide by these cells using the fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that macrophages and granulocytes from bone marrow of treated mice produced 50% more hydrogen peroxide in response to the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate than did cells from control animals. It is hypothesized that phagocyte activation and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates may contribute to hematotoxicity induced by benzene. PMID:2676504

  16. Design for efficient Suburban Activity Centers. Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-19

    The advent of Suburban Activity Centers has had a radical effect on the shape and function of regions throughout the country. These centers are typically made up of large concentrations of office space, retail uses, and more recently, light industrial and manufacturing facilities. Very few Suburban Activity Centers include significant residential components, much less parks, schools, and other civic buildings. While SACs come in many sizes and shapes, there appear to be a number of distinctive common characteristics. The overall purpose of the study is to identify methods for designing Activity Centers so that they minimize traffic congestion, improve pedestrian, bicycle, and transit model shares and contribute to healthy regions.

  17. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20–T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR.

  18. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-21

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20-T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR. PMID:27100312

  19. Randomized Phase 2 Trial of the Oncolytic Virus Pelareorep (Reolysin) in Upfront Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Anne M; Farren, Matthew R; Geyer, Susan M; Huang, Ying; Tahiri, Sanaa; Ahn, Daniel; Mikhail, Sameh; Ciombor, Kristen K; Pant, Shubham; Aparo, Santiago; Sexton, Jennifer; Marshall, John L; Mace, Thomas A; Wu, Christina S; El-Rayes, Bassel; Timmers, Cynthia D; Zwiebel, James; Lesinski, Gregory B; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S

    2016-06-01

    Pelareorep causes oncolysis in tumor cells with activated Ras. We hypothesized that pelareorep would have efficacy and immunomodulatory activity in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (MPA) when combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel. A randomized phase 2 study (NCT01280058) was conducted in treatment-naive patients with MPA randomized to two treatment arms: paclitaxel/carboplatin + pelareorep (Arm A, n = 36 evaluable patients) versus paclitaxel/carboplatin (Arm B, n = 37 evaluable patients). There was no difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between the arms (Arm A PFS = 4.9 months, Arm B PFS = 5.2 months, P = 0.6), and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS) status did not impact outcome. Quality-adjusted Time without Symptoms or Toxicity analysis revealed that the majority of PFS time was without toxicity or progression (4.3 months). Patient immunophenotype appeared important, as soluble immune biomarkers were associated with treatment outcome (fractalkine, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). Increased circulating T and natural killer (NK)-cell subsets were also significantly associated with treatment outcome. Addition of pelareorep was associated with higher levels of 14 proinflammatory plasma cytokines/chemokines and cells with an immunosuppressive phenotype (Tregs, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated protein 4 (CTLA4)(+) T cells). Overall, pelareorep was safe but does not improve PFS when administered with carboplatin/paclitaxel, regardless of KRAS mutational status. Immunologic studies suggest that chemotherapy backbone improves immune reconstitution and that targeting remaining immunosuppressive mediators may improve oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:27039845

  20. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  1. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  2. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-12-27

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  3. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3. PMID:26871026

  4. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V.; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu.

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ɛ ,δ ) -expansion scheme is employed, where ɛ is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4 /3 .

  5. Ozonation and activated carbon treatment of sewage effluents: removal of endocrine activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; Magdeburg, Axel; Wagner, Martin; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Concerns about endocrine disrupting compounds in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents give rise to the implementation of advanced treatment steps for the elimination of trace organic contaminants. The present study investigated the effects of ozonation (O(3)) and activated carbon treatment (AC) on endocrine activities [estrogenicity, anti-estrogenicity, androgenicity, anti-androgenicity, aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonistic activity] with yeast-based bioassays. To evaluate the removal of non-specific toxicity, a cytotoxicity assay using a rat cell line was applied. Wastewater (WW) was sampled at two STPs after conventional activated sludge treatment following the secondary clarifier (SC) and after subsequent advanced treatments: O(3), O(3) + sand filtration (O(3-SF)), and AC. Conventional treatment reduced estrogenicity, androgenicity, and AhR agonistic activity by 78-99% compared to the untreated influent WW. Anti-androgenicity and anti-estrogenicity were not detectable in the influent but appeared in SC, possibly due to the more effective removal of respective agonists during conventional treatment. Endocrine activities after SC ranged from 2.0 to 2.8 ng/L estradiol equivalents (estrogenicity), from 4 to 22 μg/L 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalents (anti-estrogenicity), from 1.9 to 2.0 ng/L testosterone equivalents (androgenicity), from 302 to 614 μg/L flutamide equivalents (anti-androgenicity), and from 387 to 741 ng/L β-naphthoflavone equivalents (AhR agonistic activity). In particular, estrogenicity and anti-androgenicity occurred in environmentally relevant concentrations. O(3) and AC further reduced endocrine activities effectively (estrogenicity: 77-99%, anti-androgenicity: 63-96%, AhR agonistic activity: 79-82%). The cytotoxicity assay exhibited a 32% removal of non-specific toxicity after O(3) compared to SC. O(3) and sand filtration reduced cytotoxic effects by 49%, indicating that sand filtration contributes to the removal of toxicants. AC was the

  6. Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

  7. Low temperature fabrication & photocatalytical activity of carbon fiber-supported TiO2 with different phase compositions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Yoshinaga, Kohji; Bu, Xiu R; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles with different phase compositions were fabricated on carbon fibers. The fabrication is achieved at low temperature. The process includes the treatment of Ti(OH)4 with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of carbon fibers. Neither additional acids nor bases, or additives are used during the process. Carbon fibers prior to and after TiO2 loading are characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was assessed via photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange solution, and found to be phase composition-dependent & pH dependent. Carbon fibers loaded with mixed-phase TiO2 led to the best photocatalytic performance. HRTEM reveals the anatase/rutile heterojunction which helps explain the high efficiency of photocatalysis. They have been demonstrated to be re-usable in the continuous photocatalytic degradation process. PMID:25791498

  8. Degradation of dyes by active species injected from a gas phase surface discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Tiecheng; Lu, Na; Zhang, Dandan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Tianwei; Sato, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    A reactor, based on the traditional gas phase surface discharge (GPSD), is designed for degradation of dye wastewater in this study. The reactor is characterized by using the dye wastewater as a ground electrode. A spiral discharge electrode of stainless steel wire attached on the inside wall of a cylindrical insulating medium and the wastewater surrounding the insulating medium for simultaneous cooling of the discharge electrode constitute the reactor. The active chemical radicals generated by the discharge of the spiral electrode are injected into the water with the carrier gas. The removal of three organic dyes (including methyl red (MR), reactive brilliant blue (RBB) and cationic red (CR)) in aqueous solution is investigated. The effects of electrode configuration, discharge voltage and solution pH value on the decoloration efficiency of MR are discussed. The experimental results show that over 95% of decoloration efficiencies for all the dyes are obtained after several minutes of plasma treatment. 40% of chemical oxygen demand removal of MR is obtained after 8 min of discharge treatment. Furthermore, it is found that ozone mainly affects the removal of dyes and several aliphatic compounds are identified as the oxidation products of MR. The possible degradation pathways of MR by GPSD are proposed.

  9. Phase Behavior of Active Swimmers in Depletants: Molecular Dynamics and Integral Equation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subir K.; Egorov, Sergei A.; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region.

  10. Phase behavior of active swimmers in depletants: molecular dynamics and integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Das, Subir K; Egorov, Sergei A; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-16

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region. PMID:24877969

  11. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  12. Activity mediated phase separation: Can we understand phase behavior of the nonequilibrium problem from an equilibrium approach?

    PubMed

    Trefz, Benjamin; Das, Subir K; Egorov, Sergei A; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-04-14

    We present results for structure and dynamics of mixtures of active and passive particles, from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and integral equation theory (IET) calculations, for a physically motivated model. The perfectly passive limit of the model corresponds to the phase-separating Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures in which, for the present study, the colloids are made self-propelling by introducing activity in accordance with the well known Vicsek model. Such activity facilitates phase separation further, as confirmed by our MD simulations and IET calculations. Depending upon the composition of active and passive particles, the diffusive motion of the active species can only be realized at large time scales. Despite this, we have been able to construct an equilibrium approach to obtain the structural properties of such inherently out-of-equilibrium systems. In this method, effective inter-particle potentials were constructed via IET by taking structural inputs from the MD simulations of the active system. These potentials in turn were used in passive MD simulations, results from which are observed to be in fair agreement with the original ones. PMID:27083747

  13. Activity mediated phase separation: Can we understand phase behavior of the nonequilibrium problem from an equilibrium approach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefz, Benjamin; Das, Subir K.; Egorov, Sergei A.; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    We present results for structure and dynamics of mixtures of active and passive particles, from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and integral equation theory (IET) calculations, for a physically motivated model. The perfectly passive limit of the model corresponds to the phase-separating Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures in which, for the present study, the colloids are made self-propelling by introducing activity in accordance with the well known Vicsek model. Such activity facilitates phase separation further, as confirmed by our MD simulations and IET calculations. Depending upon the composition of active and passive particles, the diffusive motion of the active species can only be realized at large time scales. Despite this, we have been able to construct an equilibrium approach to obtain the structural properties of such inherently out-of-equilibrium systems. In this method, effective inter-particle potentials were constructed via IET by taking structural inputs from the MD simulations of the active system. These potentials in turn were used in passive MD simulations, results from which are observed to be in fair agreement with the original ones.

  14. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  15. Active terahertz nanoantennas based on VO2 phase transition.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minah; Kyoung, Jisoo; Park, Hyeongryeol; Koo, Sukmo; Kim, Hyun-sun; Bernien, Hannes; Kim, Bong Jun; Choe, Jong Ho; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Park, Namkyoo; Park, Q-Han; Ahn, Kwangjun; Kim, Dai-sik

    2010-06-01

    Unusual performances of metamaterials such as negative index of refraction, memory effect, and cloaking originate from the resonance features of the metallic composite atom(1-6). Indeed, control of metamaterial properties by changing dielectric environments of thin films below the metallic resonators has been demonstrated(7-11). However, the dynamic control ranges are still limited to less than a factor of 10,(7-11) with the applicable bandwidth defined by the sharp resonance features. Here, we present ultra-broad-band metamaterial thin film with colossal dynamic control range, fulfilling present day research demands. Hybridized with thin VO(2) (vanadium dioxide) (12-18) films, nanoresonator supercell arrays designed for one decade of spectral width in terahertz frequency region show an unprecedented extinction ratio of over 10000 when the underlying thin film experiences a phase transition. Our nanoresonator approach realizes the full potential of the thin film technology for long wavelength applications. PMID:20469898

  16. Improving the treatment of non-aqueous phase TCE in low permeability zones with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Comfort, Steve; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Dvorak, Bruce

    2014-03-15

    Treating dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) embedded in low permeability zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate (MnO4(-)) into LPZs to treat high concentrations of TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into a LPZ that was spiked with non-aqueous phase (14)C-TCE. The treatments we evaluated included permanganate paired with: (i) a shear-thinning polymer (xanthan); (ii) stabilization aids that minimized MnO2 rind formation and (iii) a phase-transfer catalyst. In addition, we quantified the ability of these flooding solutions to improve TCE destruction under batch conditions by developing miniature LPZ cylinders that were spiked with (14)C-TCE. Transport experiments showed that MnO4(-) alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with non-aqueous phase TCE, due to a distinct and large MnO2 rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. By including xanthan with MnO4(-), the sweeping efficiency increased (90%) but rind formation was still evident. By including the stabilization aid, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. Batch experiments using LPZ cylinders allowed longer contact times between the flooding solutions and the DNAPL and results showed that SHMP+MnO4(-) improved TCE destruction by ∼16% over MnO4(-) alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%). These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in low permeable zones. PMID:24491441

  17. Treatment with Benznidazole during the Chronic Phase of Experimental Chagas' Disease Decreases Cardiac Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Simone; Ramos, Carolina O.; Senra, Juliana F. V.; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is one of the main causes of death due to heart failure in Latin American countries. Benznidazole, the chemotherapeutic agent most often used for the treatment of chagasic patients, is highly toxic and has limited efficacy, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. In the present study we used a mouse model of chronic Chagas' disease to investigate the effects of benznidazole treatment during the chronic phase on disease progression. The hearts of benznidazole-treated mice had decreased parasitism and myocarditis compared to the hearts of untreated chagasic mice. Both groups of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice had significant alterations in their electrocardiograms compared to those of the healthy mice. However, untreated mice had significantly higher cardiac conduction disturbances than benznidazole-treated mice, including intraventricular conduction disturbances, atrioventricular blocks, and extrasystoles. The levels of antibodies against T. cruzi antigens (epimastigote extract, P2β, and trans-sialidase) as well as antibodies against peptides of the second extracellular loops of β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors were also lower in the sera from benznidazole-treated mice than in the sera from untreated mice. These results demonstrate that treatment with benznidazole in the chronic phase of infection prevents the development of severe chronic cardiomyopathy, despite the lack of complete parasite eradication. In addition, our data highlight the role of parasite persistence in the development of chronic Chagas' disease and reinforce the importance of T. cruzi elimination in order to decrease or prevent the development of severe chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:15793134

  18. Treatment of reactive interfaces in pore-scale reactive transport with the phase-field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Di Palma, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The two major challenges for continuum reactive transport models are the treatment of interfaces between different phases (multi-fluids like DNAPL-water, or solid-fluid) and the ability to model transient chemical gradients at the pore-scale. Pore-scale models allow us to deal naturally with chemical gradients at the discrete scale and they generally consider interfaces as boundary conditions that satisfy a local, but modified, mass balance equation. In other word grains do not take part in the mass balance of chemical species besides providing a boundary condition for the fluid. For instance, heterogeneous reactions at solid-fluid boundaries are framed as a balance between incoming chemical flux and reactions. Due to complex topology of interfaces in natural porous media, the treatment of heterogeneous reactions depends on the orientation of the interface and therefore requires a special care. It can become complicated and tedious especially when interfaces are allowed to evolve with time. Approaches such as the enthalpy method, which was developed for solving moving interfaces during melting processes, offer the advantage of a treatment that is independent of the shape of the moving interface. Similar methods have been used for modeling multiphase flows with diffuse interface successfully. Here, we expand on these approaches and introduce a phase-field approach to introduce heterogeneous reactions in single and multiphase reactive flows at the pore-scale. Mass conservation is solved in each phase and we introduce interface conditions as a source/sink term in the conservation equation rather than a boundary condition. The advantages are that the method becomes independent of the (time-dependent) topology of the interface and automatically enforces local mass conservation between the different constituents of the domain. We show validations of the model and applications to multispecies reactive transport, isotope fractionation during calcite growth and finally

  19. Pomalidomide Is Active in the Treatment of Anemia Associated With Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Verstovsek, Srdan; Barosi, Giovanni; Passamonti, Francesco; Roboz, Gail J.; Gisslinger, Heinz; Paquette, Ronald L.; Cervantes, Francisco; Rivera, Candido E.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Thiele, Juergen; Kvasnicka, Hans M.; Vardiman, James W.; Zhang, Yanming; Bekele, B. Nebiyou; Mesa, Ruben A.; Gale, Robert P.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Thalidomide and lenalidomide can alleviate anemia in myelofibrosis. However, their value is undermined by their respective potential to cause peripheral neuropathy and myelosuppression. We therefore evaluated the safety and therapeutic activity of another immunomodulatory drug, pomalidomide. Methods In a phase II randomized, multicenter, double-blind, adaptive design study, four treatment arms were evaluated: pomalidomide (2 mg/d) plus placebo, pomalidomide (2 mg/d) plus prednisone, pomalidomide (0.5 mg/d) plus prednisone, and prednisone plus placebo. Pomalidomide was administered for up to 12 28-day treatment cycles. Prednisone (30 mg/d) was given in a tapering dose schedule during the first three cycles. Response was assessed by International Working Group criteria. Results Eighty-four patients with myelofibrosis-associated anemia were randomly assigned to the aforementioned treatment arms: 22, 19, 22, and 21, respectively. Response in anemia was documented in 20 patients, including 15 who became transfusion independent. Response rates in the four treatment arms were 23% (95% CI, 5% to 41%), 16% (95% CI, 0% to 33%), 36% (95% CI, 16% to 56%), and 19% (95% CI, 2% to 36%). The corresponding figures for patients receiving ≥ 3 cycles of treatment (n = 62) were 38%, 23%, 40%, and 25%. Response to pomalidomide with or without prednisone was durable (range, 3.2 to 16.9+ months) and significantly better in the absence of leukocytosis (37% v 8%; P = .01); JAK2V617F or cytogenetic status did not affect response. Grade ≥ 3 toxicities were infrequent and included (in each treatment arm) neutropenia (9%; 16%; 5%; 5%), thrombocytopenia (14%; 16%; 9%; 5%), and thrombosis (9%; 5%; 0%; 0%). Conclusion Pomalidomide therapy at 0.5 or 2 mg/d with or without an abbreviated course of prednisone is well tolerated in patients with myelofibrosis and active in the treatment of anemia. PMID:19652059

  20. Digital active material processing platform effort (DAMPER), SBIR phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Applied Technology Associates, Inc., (ATA) has demonstrated that inertial actuation can be employed effectively in digital, active vibration isolation systems. Inertial actuation involves the use of momentum exchange to produce corrective forces which act directly on the payload being actively isolated. In a typical active vibration isolation system, accelerometers are used to measure the inertial motion of the payload. The signals from the accelerometers are then used to calculate the corrective forces required to counteract, or 'cancel out' the payload motion. Active vibration isolation is common technology, but the use of inertial actuation in such systems is novel, and is the focus of the DAMPER project. A May 1991 report was completed which documented the successful demonstration of inertial actuation, employed in the control of vibration in a single axis. In the 1 degree-of-freedom (1DOF) experiment a set of air bearing rails was used to suspend the payload, simulating a microgravity environment in a single horizontal axis. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology was used to calculate in real time, the control law between the accelerometer signals and the inertial actuators. The data obtained from this experiment verified that as much as 20 dB of rejection could be realized by this type of system. A discussion is included of recent tests performed in which vibrations were actively controlled in three axes simultaneously. In the three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) system, the air bearings were designed in such a way that the payload is free to rotate about the azimuth axis, as well as translate in the two horizontal directions. The actuator developed for the DAMPER project has applications beyond payload isolation, including structural damping and source vibration isolation. This report includes a brief discussion of these applications, as well as a commercialization plan for the actuator.

  1. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  2. Change of Mandibular Position during Two-Phase Orthodontic Treatment of Skeletal Class II in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, Urban; Wong, Ricky Wing Kit; Liao, Chongshan; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in mandibular position during a two-phase orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Thirty consecutively treated Chinese male adolescents who had undergone two-phase treatment with Herbst appliance and fixed appliance and fulfilled the specific selection criteria were sampled. Cephalograms taken at T0 (before treatment), T1 (at the end of functional appliance treatment), and T2 (at the end of fixed appliance treatment) were analyzed. The change in sagittal positioning of the mandible was 6.8±3.44 mm in phase I (T0-T1), 0.4±2.79 mm in phase II (T1-T2), and 7.2±4.61 mm in total. The mandible came forward in 100% of the patients at T1. In phase II, it came forward in one-third (positive group) remained unchanged in one-third (stable group) and went backward in one-third (negative group) of the patients. At T2, it came forward twice as much in the positive group compared to the negative group. Mandibular length was significantly increased in 100% of the patients in both phases. In conclusion, during the treatment with functional appliance, the mandibular prognathism increases in all patients, whereas during the treatment with fixed appliance there is no significant change in mandibular prognathism. PMID:25695103

  3. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  4. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  5. Active phase-nulling of the self-mixing phase in a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Dean, P; Keeley, J; Valavanis, A; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Taimre, T; Alhathlool, R; Li, L H; Indjin, D; Rakić, A D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate an active phase-nulling scheme for terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) under optical feedback, by active electronic feedback control of the emission frequency. Using this scheme, the frequency tuning rate of a THz QCL is characterized, with significantly reduced experimental complexity compared to alternative approaches. Furthermore, we demonstrate real-time displacement sensing of targets, overcoming the resolution limits imposed by quantization in previously implemented fringe-counting methods. Our approach is readily applicable to high-frequency vibrometry and surface profiling of targets, as well as frequency-stabilization schemes for THz QCLs. PMID:25768154

  6. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  7. The Stability of CI02 as a Product of Gas Phase Decontamination Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Simmons

    1994-09-01

    The gas phase decontamination project is investigating the use of chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to produce uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas. The potential existence of chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) during gas phase decontamination with ClF{sub 3} has been the subject of recent safety discussions. Some of the laboratory data collected during feasibility studies of the gas phase process has been evaluated for the presence of ClO{sub 2} in the product gas stream. The preliminary evidence to date can be summarized as follows: (1) ClO{sub 2} was not detected in the flow loop in the absence of ClF{sub 3}; (2) ClO{sub 2} was not detected in the static reactors in the absence of both ClF{sub 3} and ClF; and (3) ClO{sub 2} was detected in a static reactor in the absence of all fluorinating gases. The experimental evidence suggests that ClO{sub 2} will not exist in the presence of ClF{sub 3}, ClF, or UF{sub 6}. The data analyzed to date is insufficient to determine the stability of ClO{sub 2} in the presence of ClO{sub 2}F. Thermodynamic calculations of the ClF{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O system support the experimental evidence, and suggest that ClO{sub 2} will not exist in the presence of ClO{sub 2}F. Additional experimental efforts are needed to provide a better understanding of the gas phase ClF{sub 3} treatments and the product gases. However, preliminary evidence to date suggests that ClO{sub 2} should not be present as a product during the normal operations of the gas phase decontamination project.

  8. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates particulate-phase sulfate and ammonium. In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics for sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, and chloride have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Compared to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and thus could improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing, SWCF) on the global scale. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry could further improve the prediction of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD on the global scale. IMN can improve the prediction of secondary PM2

  9. Bioaugmentation to improve nitrification in activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Leu, Shao-Yuan; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Bioaugmentation is a proposed technique to improve nutrient removal in municipal wastewater treatment. Compared with commonly used nitrification/denitrification (NDN) processes, bioaugmentation may be able to reduce tankage or land requirements. Many approaches for bioaugmentation have been developed, but few studies have compared the benefits among different approaches. This paper quantifies the effectiveness of bioaugmentation processes and investigates three major "onsite" bioaugmentation alternatives: 1) the parallel-plants approach, which uses acclimated biomass grown in a nitrifying "long-SRT" (sludge retention time) plant to augment a low-SRT treatment plant; 2) the enricher-reactor approach, which uses an offline reactor to produce the augmentation cultures; and 3) the enricher-reactor/return activated sludge (ER-RAS) approach, which grows enrichment culture in a reaeration reactor that receives a portion of the recycle activated sludge. Kinetic models were developed to simulate each approach, and the benefits of various approaches are presented on the same basis with controllable parameters, such as bioaugmentation levels, aeration tank volume, and temperatures. Examples were given to illustrate the potential benefits of bioaugmentation by upgrading a "carbon-only" wastewater treatment plant to nitrification. Simulation results suggested that all bioaugmentation approaches can decrease the minimum SRT for nitrification. The parallel-plants approach creates the highest concentration of biomass but may fail at too low temperature. The ER-RAS approach likely would be more useful at lower temperature and required less reactor volume; enricher-reactor approach would likely be more advantageous in the presence of inhibitory compound(s). PMID:20572460

  10. General Electric ATS program technical review: Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, T.; Smith, D.

    1995-10-01

    In response to the industrial and utility objectives specified for the ATS, the GE Power Generation ATS Phase 2 Program consisted of a dual approach. These were (1) development of an Industrial ATS (aircraft engine based) led by GE Aircraft Engines, and (2) development of a Utility ATS which was already underway at GEPG. Both programs required the identification and resolution of critical technical issues. Both systems were studied in Tasks 3-7, and both have resulted in designs that meet all ATS goals. The Industrial ATS as defined (130 MW) did not meet projected market power size requirements, and emphasis has remained on the Utility ATS development. The design and testing effort has been focused on the MS7001H combined cycle gas turbine, as the next product evolution in GE Power Generation`s product line. Common technology derived from the ATS Program is also being incorporated into the 50 Hz version of the ATS utility machine designated as the MS9001H.

  11. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Rituximab for treatment of inhibitors in haemophilia A. A Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, C; Josephson, C D; Granger, S; Konkle, B A; Kruse-Jarres, R; Ragni, M V; Journeycake, J M; Valentino, L; Key, N S; Gill, J C; McCrae, K R; Neufeld, E J; Manno, C; Raffini, L; Saxena, K; Torres, M; Marder, V; Bennett, C M; Assmann, S F

    2014-09-01

    The development of antibodies against infused factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with haemophilia A is a serious complication leading to poorly controlled bleeding and increased morbidity. No treatment has been proven to reduce high titre antibodies in patients who fail immune tolerance induction or are not candidates for it. The Rituximab for the Treatment of Inhibitors in Congenital Hemophilia A (RICH) study was a phase II trial to assess whether rituximab can reduce anamnestic FVIII antibody (inhibitor) titres. Male subjects with severe congenital haemophilia A and an inhibitor titre ≥5 Bethesda Units/ml (BU) following a FVIII challenge infusion received rituximab 375 mg/m² weekly for weeks 1 through 4. Post-rituximab inhibitor titres were measured monthly from week 6 through week 22 to assess treatment response. Of 16 subjects who received at least one dose of rituximab, three (18.8%) met the criteria for a major response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, persisting after FVIII re-challenge. One subject had a minor response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, increasing to 5-10 BU after FVIII re-challenge, but <50% of the original peak inhibitor titre. Rituximab is useful in lowering inhibitor levels in patients, but its effect as a solo treatment strategy is modest. Future studies are indicated to determine the role of rituximab as an adjunctive therapy in immune tolerisation strategies. PMID:24919980

  13. Nuclei and Microtubule Asters Stimulate Maturation/M Phase Promoting Factor (Mpf) Activation in Xenopus Eggs and Egg Cytoplasmic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mongiovi, Daniel; Beckhelling, Clare; Chang, Patrick; Ford, Christopher C.; Houliston, Evelyn

    2000-01-01

    Although maturation/M phase promoting factor (MPF) can activate autonomously in Xenopus egg cytoplasm, indirect evidence suggests that nuclei and centrosomes may focus activation within the cell. We have dissected the contribution of these structures to MPF activation in fertilized eggs and in egg fragments containing different combinations of nuclei, centrosomes, and microtubules by following the behavior of Cdc2 (the kinase component of MPF), the regulatory subunit cyclin B, and the activating phosphatase Cdc25. The absence of the entire nucleus–centrosome complex resulted in a marked delay in MPF activation, whereas the absence of the centrosome alone caused a lesser delay. Nocodazole treatment to depolymerize microtubules through first interphase had an effect equivalent to removing the centrosome. Furthermore, microinjection of isolated centrosomes into anucleate eggs promoted MPF activation and advanced the onset of surface contraction waves, which are close indicators of MPF activation and could be triggered by ectopic MPF injection. Finally, we were able to demonstrate stimulation of MPF activation by the nucleus–centriole complex in vitro, as low concentrations of isolated sperm nuclei advanced MPF activation in cycling cytoplasmic extracts. Together these results indicate that nuclei and microtubule asters can independently stimulate MPF activation and that they cooperate to enhance activation locally. PMID:10973988

  14. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors.

  15. Removal of diclofenac by conventional drinking water treatment processes and granular activated carbon filtration.

    PubMed

    Rigobello, Eliane Sloboda; Dantas, Angela Di Bernardo; Di Bernardo, Luiz; Vieira, Eny Maria

    2013-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of conventional drinking water treatment processes with and without pre-oxidation with chlorine and chlorine dioxide and the use of granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration for the removal of diclofenac (DCF). Water treatment was performed using the Jar test with filters on a lab scale, employing nonchlorinated artesian well water prepared with aquatic humic substances to yield 20HU true color, kaolin turbidity of 70 NTU and 1mgL(-1) DCF. For the quantification of DCF in water samples, solid phase extraction and HPLC-DAD methods were developed and validated. There was no removal of DCF in coagulation with aluminum sulfate (3.47mgAlL(-1) and pH=6.5), flocculation, sedimentation and sand filtration. In the treatment with pre-oxidation and disinfection, DCF was partially removed, but the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was unchanged and byproducts of DCF were observed. Chlorine dioxide was more effective than chorine in oxidizing DCF. In conclusion, the identification of DCF and DOC in finished water indicated the incomplete elimination of DCF through conventional treatments. Nevertheless, conventional drinking water treatment followed by GAC filtration was effective in removing DCF (⩾99.7%). In the oxidation with chlorine, three byproducts were tentatively identified, corresponding to a hydroxylation, aromatic substitution of one hydrogen by chlorine and a decarboxylation/hydroxylation. Oxidation with chlorine dioxide resulted in only one byproduct (hydroxylation). PMID:23540811

  16. S. cerevisiae fermentation activity after moderate pulsed electric field pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Jessy R; Turk, Mohammad F; Nonus, Maurice; Lebovka, Nikolai I; El Zakhem, Henri; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2015-06-01

    The batch fermentation process, inoculated by Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) treated wine yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Actiflore F33), was studied. PEF treatment was applied to the aqueous yeast suspensions ([Y] = 0.012 g/L) at the electric field strengths of E = 100 and 6000 V/cm using the same treatment protocol (number of pulses n = 1000, pulse duration ti = 100 μs, and pulse repetition time Δt = 100 ms). Electrical conductivity was increasing during and after the PEF treatment, which reflected cell electroporation. Then, fermentation was run for 150 h in an incubator (30 °C) with synchronic agitation. Electro-stimulation was revealing itself by the improvement of fermentation characteristics, and thus increased yeast metabolism. At the end of the lag phase (t = 40 h), fructose consumption in samples with electrically activated inoculum exceeded that of the control samples by ≈ 2.33 times for E = 100 V/cm and by ≈ 3.98 for E = 6000 V/cm. At the end of the log phase (120 h of fermentation), ≈ 30% mass reduction was reached in samples with PEF-treated inocula (E = 6000 V/cm), whereas the same mass reduction of the control sample required approximately 20 extra hours of fermentation. PMID:25204702

  17. Integrated basic treatment of activated carbon for enhanced CO2 selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelodun, Adedeji Adebukola; Jo, Young-Min

    2013-12-01

    We attempted the use of three chemical agents viz nitric acid (HN), calcium nitrate (CaN) and calcium ethanoate (CaEt) to achieve enhanced CO2 selective adsorption by activated carbon (AC). In dry phase treatment, microporous coconut shell-based carbon (CS) exhibits higher CO2 capacity than coal-based. However, upon wet-phase pre-treatment, modified CS samples showed lesser CO2 adsorption efficiency. Surface characterization with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of calcium and amine species on the samples with integrated treatment (A-CaN). These samples recorded the highest low-level CO2 capture despite calcinated CaEt-doped samples (C-CaEt) showing the highest value for pure and high level CO2 adsorption capacities. The slope and linearity values of isobaric desorption were used to estimate the proportion of CO2 chemisorbed and heterogeneity of the adsorbents’ surfaces respectively. Consequently, integrated basic impregnation provides the most efficient adsorbents for selective adsorption of both indoor and outdoor CO2 levels.

  18. Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions: Activated Random Walks at Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, M.; Rolla, L. T.; Sidoravicius, V.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present rigorous results on the critical behavior of the Activated Random Walk model. We conjecture that on a general class of graphs, including , and under general initial conditions, the system at the critical point does not reach an absorbing state. We prove this for the case where the sleep rate is infinite. Moreover, for the one-dimensional asymmetric system, we identify the scaling limit of the flow through the origin at criticality. The case remains largely open, with the exception of the one-dimensional totally-asymmetric case, for which it is known that there is no fixation at criticality.

  19. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Intratumoral Reovirus Infusion for the Treatment of Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, John S; Gill, George M; Coffey, Matt; Markert, James M

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus, an oncolytic RNA virus exhibiting antiglioma activity, was shown in a previous single institution phase 1 study found that the inoculation of the virus to be well tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant glioma (MG). The goals of multicenter study reported herein were to determine the dose-limiting toxicity, maximum tolerated dose, and target lesion response rate when reovirus was administered in a novel fashion via intratumoral infusion for 72 hours in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Fifteen adult patients were treated in a dose escalation study ranging from 1 × 108 to 1 × 1010 tissue culture infectious dose 50, tentimes the dose achieved in the previous trial. Neurological, functional examinations, and imaging studies were completed pre- and postinfusion. There was one grade 3 adverse event (convulsions) felt to be possibly related to treatment, but no grade 4 adverse events considered probably or definitely related to treatment. Dose-limiting toxicity were not identified and a maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Evidence of antiglioma activity was seen in some patients. This first report of intratumoral infusion of reovirus in patients with recurrent malignant glioma demonstrated the approach to be safe and well tolerated, warranting further studies. PMID:24553100

  20. Drivers of microbial community composition in mesophilic and thermophilic temperature-phased anaerobic digestion pre-treatment reactors.

    PubMed

    Pervin, Hasina M; Dennis, Paul G; Lim, Hui J; Tyson, Gene W; Batstone, Damien J; Bond, Philip L

    2013-12-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) is an emerging technology that facilitates improved performance and pathogen destruction in anaerobic sewage sludge digestion by optimising conditions for 1) hydrolytic and acidogenic organisms in a first-stage/pre-treatment reactor and then 2) methogenic populations in a second stage reactor. Pre-treatment reactors are typically operated at 55-65 °C and as such select for thermophilic bacterial communities. However, details of key microbial populations in hydrolytic communities and links to functionality are very limited. In this study, experimental thermophilic pre-treatment (TP) and control mesophilic pre-treatment (MP) reactors were operated as first-stages of TPAD systems treating activated sludge for 340 days. The TP system was operated sequentially at 50, 60 and 65 °C, while the MP rector was held at 35 °C for the entire period. The composition of microbial communities associated with the MP and TP pre-treatment reactors was characterised weekly using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) supported by clone library sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The outcomes of this approach were confirmed using 454 pyrosequencing of gene amplicons and fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). TP associated bacterial communities were dominated by populations affiliated to the Firmicutes, Thermotogae, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi. In particular there was a progression from Thermotogae to Lutispora and Coprothermobacter and diversity decreased as temperature and hydrolysis performance increased. While change in the composition of TP associated bacterial communities was attributable to temperature, that of MP associated bacterial communities was related to the composition of the incoming feed. This study determined processes driving the dynamics of key microbial populations that are correlated with an enhanced hydrolytic functionality of the TPAD system. PMID:24216229

  1. Brain activation and lexical learning: the impact of learning phase and word type.

    PubMed

    Raboyeau, G; Marcotte, K; Adrover-Roig, D; Ansaldo, A I

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated the neural correlates of second-language lexical acquisition in terms of learning phase and word type. Ten French-speaking participants learned 80 Spanish words-40 cognates, 40 non-cognates-by means of a computer program. The learning process included the early learning phase, which comprised 5 days, and the consolidation phase, which lasted 2 weeks. After each phase, participants performed an overt naming task during an er-fMRI scan. Naming accuracy was better for cognates during the early learning phase only. However, cognates were named faster than non-cognates during both phases. The early learning phase was characterized by activations in the left iFG and Broca's area, which were associated with effortful lexical retrieval and phonological processing, respectively. Further, the activation in the left ACC and DLPFC suggested that monitoring may be involved during the early phases of lexical learning. During the consolidation phase, the activation in the left premotor cortex, the right supramarginal gyrus and the cerebellum indicated that articulatory planning may contribute to the consolidation of second-language phonetic representations. No dissociation between word type and learning phase could be supported. However, a Fisher r-to-z test showed that successful cognate retrieval was associated with activations in Broca's area, which could reflect the adaptation of known L1 phonological sequences. Moreover, successful retrieval of non-cognates was associated with activity in the anterior-medial left fusiform and right posterior cingulate cortices, suggesting that their successful retrieval may rely upon the access to semantic and lexical information, and even on the greater likelihood of errors. PMID:19837173

  2. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  3. Laboratory investigation of aluminum solubility and solid-phase properties following alum treatment of lake waters.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Jacob; Anderson, Michael A; Graham, Robert C

    2005-10-01

    Water samples from two southern California lakes adversely affected by internal nutrient loading were treated with a 20 mg/L dose of Al3+ in laboratory studies to examine Al solubility and solid-phase speciation over time. Alum [Al2(SO4)3 . 18 H2O] applications to water samples from Big Bear Lake and Lake Elsinore resulted in a rapid initial decrease in pH and alkalinity followed by a gradual recovery in pH over several weeks. Dissolved Al concentrations increased following treatment, reaching a maximum of 2.54 mg/L after 17 days in Lake Elsinore water and 0.91 mg/L after 48 days in Big Bear Lake water; concentrations in both waters then decreased to <0.25 mg/L after 150 days. The solid phase was periodically collected and analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface area analyses to investigate the nature of the reaction products and crystallinity development over time. Poorly ordered, X-ray amorphous solid phases transformed over time to relatively well-ordered gibbsite, with strong diffraction peaks at 4.8 and 4.3 A. XRD also indicated the formation of a second (possibly aluminosilicate) crystalline phase after 150 days in Lake Elsinore water. Surface areas also decreased over time as crystals reordered to form gibbsite/microcrystalline gibbsite species. DSC-TGA results suggested that the initially formed amorphous Al(OH)3 underwent transformation to >45% gibbsite. These results were supported by geochemical modeling using Visual MINTEQ, with Al solubility putatively controlled by amorphous Al(OH)3 shortly after treatment and approaching that of microcrystalline gibbsite after about 150 days. These findings indicate that Al(OH)3 formed after alum treatment undergoes significant chemical and mineralogical changes that may alter its effectiveness as a reactive barrier to phosphorus release from lake sediments. PMID:16139325

  4. Rotation of nilotinib and imatinib for first-line treatment of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gugliotta, Gabriele; Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Gozzini, Antonella; Usala, Emilio; Carella, Angelo M; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Martino, Bruno; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Albano, Francesco; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigia; D'Adda, Mariella; Bocchia, Monica; Cavazzini, Francesco; Tiribelli, Mario; Lunghi, Monia; Pia Falcone, Antonietta; Musolino, Caterina; Levato, Luciano; Venturi, Claudia; Soverini, Simona; Cavo, Michele; Alimena, Giuliana; Pane, Fabrizio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of second-generation tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has generated a lively debate on the choice of first-line TKI in chronic phase, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Despite the TKIs have different efficacy and toxicity profiles, the planned use of two TKIs has never been investigated. We report on a phase 2 study that was designed to evaluate efficacy and safety of a treatment alternating nilotinib and imatinib, in newly diagnosed BCR-ABL1 positive, chronic phase, CML patients. One hundred twenty-three patients were enrolled. Median age was 56 years. The probabilities of achieving a complete cytogenetic response, a major molecular response, and a deep molecular response (MR 4.0) by 2 years were 93%, 87%, and 61%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival were 89%. Response rates and survival are in the range of those reported with nilotinib alone. Moreover, we observed a relatively low rate of cardiovascular adverse events (5%). These data show that the different efficacy and toxicity profiles of TKIs could be favorably exploited by alternating their use. Am. J. Hematol. 91:617-622, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971721

  5. Hydrodynamical description of first-order phase transitions: Analytical treatment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokov, V. V.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2009-09-01

    Solutions of hydrodynamical equations are presented for an equation of state allowing for a first-order phase transition. The numerical analysis is supplemented by analytical treatment provided the system is close to the critical point. The processes of growth and dissolution of seeds of various sizes and shapes in meta-stable phases (like super-cooled vapor and super-heated liquid) are studied, as well as the dynamics of unstable modes in the spinodal region. We show that initially nonspherical seeds acquire spherical shape with passage of time. Applications to the description of the first-order phase transitions in nuclear systems, such as the nuclear gas-liquid transition occurring in low energy heavy-ion collisions and the hadron-quark transition in the high energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed. In both cases we point out the important role played by effects of viscosity and surface tension. It is shown that fluctuations dissolve and grow as if the fluid were effectively very viscous. Even in the spinodal region seeds may grow slowly due to viscosity and critical slowing down. This prevents the enhancement of fluctuations in the near-critical region, which is frequently considered as a signal of the critical point in heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Unbiased estimation in seamless phase II/III trials with unequal treatment effect variances and hypothesis-driven selection rules.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-09-30

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials offer an efficient way to select an experimental treatment and perform confirmatory analysis within a single trial. However, combining the data from both stages in the final analysis can induce bias into the estimates of treatment effects. Methods for bias adjustment developed thus far have made restrictive assumptions about the design and selection rules followed. In order to address these shortcomings, we apply recent methodological advances to derive the uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimator for two-stage seamless phase II/III trials. Our framework allows for the precision of the treatment arm estimates to take arbitrary values, can be utilised for all treatments that are taken forward to phase III and is applicable when the decision to select or drop treatment arms is driven by a multiplicity-adjusted hypothesis testing procedure. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27103068

  7. In Situ Mercury Stabilization (ISMS) Treatment: Technology Maturation Project Phase I Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb,P.D.; Milian, L.

    2008-03-01

    further developed it has the potential for large-scale in-situ treatment of contaminated soils that could substantially reduce the prohibitive cost of thermal desorption and/or excavation and disposal. Licensing and spin-off technology development opportunities would then be viable. Depending on performance and regulatory acceptance, the treated mercury could either be excavated for disposal elsewhere or left in place as a stable alternative. Excavated spent treatment rods could be processed by the SPSS process to reduce the potential for dispersion and lower leachability even further. The Phase I objectives of the In Situ Mercury Stabilization Treatment Process Technology Maturation Project were to: (1) replicate the original bench-scale results that formed the basis for BNL's patent application, i.e., mercury contamination in soil will migrate to and react with 'rods' containing sulfur and/or sulfur compounds, (2) provide enough information to evaluate a decision to conduct further development, and (3) establish some of the critical parameters that require further technology maturation during Phase II. The information contained in this report summarizes the work conducted in Phase I to meet these objectives.

  8. Upgrading of the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by combining temperature-phased anaerobic digestion and intermediate ozonation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Li, Y Y; Harada, H; Yasui, H; Noike, T

    2009-01-01

    Upgrading of the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) by the combination of temperature-phased two-stage digestion and intermediate ozonation was investigated by a continuous experiment with two processes, TM and TOM. The TM process is a temperature-phased two-stage system, which consists of a thermophilic digester and a mesophilic digester in series. The TOM process is a temperature-phased two-stage process with the intermediate ozonation. Two processes were operated at hydraulic retention times of 30 days for over 123 days. Waste activated sludge taken from wastewater treatment plant was fed as a substrate. Microbial community structure in each digester was analysed with molecular tools. Despite of less amount of ozone dose in TOM than ozone pre-treatment process, better effect of ozonation on performance improvement was obtained in TOM. TOM had the highest methane yield and COD(Cr) reduction among comparative processes. Furthermore, flocculation efficiency of TOM followed that of mesophilic digestion. Quality of dewatered supernatant is comparable to mesophilic digestion. PMID:19151501

  9. Treatment of coke-oven wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated sludge process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suidan, M.T.; Deady, M.A.; Gee, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine optimum parameters for the operation of an innovative process train used in the treatment of coke-over wastewater. The treatment process train consisted of a contact-stabilization activated sludge system with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, followed by activated sludge nitrification, followed by denitrification in an anoxic filter. The control and operating parameters evaluated during the study were: (a) the average mixed-liquor PAC concentration maintained in the contact-stabilization system, (b) the solids retention time practiced in the contact-stabilization system, and (c) the hydraulic detention time maintained in the contact aeration tank. Three identical treatement process trains were constructed and employed in this study. The coke-oven wastewater used for this investigation was fed to the treatment units at 30% strength. The first part of the study was devoted to determining the interactions between the mixed liquor PAC concentration and the solids retention time in the contact-stabilization tanks. Results showed that optimum overall system performance is attainable when the highest sludge age (30 day) and highest mixed liquor PAC concentration were practiced. During the second phase of the study, all three systems were operated at a 30 day solids retention time while different detention times of 1, 2/3 and 1/3 day were evaluated in the contact tank. PAC addition rates were maintained at the former levels and, consequently, reduced contact times entailed higher mixed liquor carbon concentrations. Once again, the system receiving the highest PAC addition rate of PAC exhibited the best overall performance. This system exhibited no deterioration in process performance as a result of decreased contact detention time. 72 references, 41 figures, 24 tables.

  10. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011–2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  11. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-01

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p < 0.05), and 3.1% of the variations in these occurrence over the study period were explained by these factors. Meteorological variables may predict occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26251916

  12. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  13. Phase conjugation method and apparatus for an active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Chernoff, R. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array wherein a reference array element is used to generate a phase reference which is replicated at succeeding elements of the array. Each element of the array is associated with a phase regeneration circuit and the phase conjugation circuitry of an adjacent element. In one implementation, the phase reference circuit operates on the input signal at the reference element, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) output signal and the input pilot signal at the next array element received from a transmission line. By proper filtering and mixing, a phase component may be produced to which the VCO may be locked to produce the phase conjugate of the pilot signal at the next array element plus a transmission line delay. In another implementation, particularly suited for large arrays in space, two different input pilot frequencies are employed.

  14. Therapeutic Immunization In HIV Infected Ugandans Receiving Stable Antiretroviral Treatment: A Phase I Safety Study4

    PubMed Central

    Kityo, Cissy; Bousheri, Stephanie; Akao, Juliette; Ssali, Francis; Byaruhanga, Rose; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Muloma, Prossy; Myalo, Sula; Magala, Rose; Lu, Yichen; Mugyenyi, Peter; Cao, Huyen

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic immunizations in HIV infection may boost immunity during antiretroviral treatment. We report on the first therapeutic vaccine trial in Uganda, Africa. This open label Phase I trial was designed to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine candidate. Thirty HIV positive volunteers receiving a stable regimen of antiretroviral therapy with CD4 counts > 400 were recruited for the safety evaluation of LFn-p24C, a detoxified anthrax-derived polypeptide fused to the subtype C HIV gag protein p24. The vaccine was well tolerated and HIV RNA levels remained undetectable following three immunizations. CD4 counts in vaccine recipients were significantly higher compared to the control individuals after 12 months. HIV-specific responses were associated with higher gain in CD4 counts following LFn-p24C immunizations. Volunteers were subsequently asked to undergo a 30-day period of observed treatment interruption. 8/24 (30%) individuals showed no evidence of viral rebound during treatment interruption. All demonstrated prompt suppression of viral load following resumption of ART. Our data demonstrates the safety of LFn-p24C and suggests that adjunct therapeutic immunization may benefit select individuals in further boosting an immune response. PMID:21211581

  15. Treatment benefits on metabolic syndrome with diet and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dragusha, Gani; Elezi, Abdulla; Dragusha, Shpend; Gorani, Daut; Begolli, Luljeta

    2010-05-01

    The research has included 422 patients aged between 25 to 60, of whom 341 were men and 81 women. The purpose of research was to determine impact of diet and physical activity in the treatment of metabolic syndrome during the six month period. Processing of results through descriptive and discriminative analysis have indicated that 6 month treatment with diet and physical activity have had an impact in the: waistline decrease by 6.05 cm or 5.50% among males, and 4.92 cm or 5.10% among females; body mass index (BMI) decrease by 1.78 or 6.20% among males, and 2.3 or 8.16% among females; decrease of blood triglycerides levels by 0.35 mmol/L or 16.28% among males, and 0.27 mmol/L or 13.30% among females; increase of blood cholesterol HDL-C by 0.48 mmol/L or 34.78% among males, and 0.06 mmol/L or 4.28% among females; systolic arterial pressure decreased by 15 mmHg or 10.18%, and diastolic blood pressure by 8.74 mmHg or 9.47% among males, and systolic arterial pressure decreased by 7.39 mmHg or 5.17%, and diastolic blood pressure decreased by 5.18 mmHg or 5.75% among females; the level of blood glucose decreased by 0.45 mmol/L or 7.04% among males, and by 0.64 mmol/L or 9.92% decreased among females. The results show that physical exercise and diet are important factors in reducing the values symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In order to improve symptoms of metabolic syndrome, it is necessary to keep on with healthy diet and physical exercise that means the change of lifestyle. PMID:20507300

  16. Research on soybean protein wastewater treatment by the integrated two-phase anaerobic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yaqin

    2015-01-01

    The start-up tests of treating soybean protein wastewater by the integrated two-phase anaerobic reactor were studied. The results showed that the soybean protein wastewater could be successfully processed around 30 days when running under the situation of dosing seed sludge with the influent of approximately 2000 mg/L and an HRT of 40 h. When the start-up was finished, the removal rate of COD by the reactor was about 80%. In the zone I, biogas mainly revealed carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2). Methane was the main component in the zone 2 which ranged from 53% to 59% with an average of 55%. The methane content in biogas increased from the zone I to II. It indicated that the methane-producing capacity of the anaerobic sludge increased. It was found that the uniquely designed two-phase integrated anaerobic reactor played a key role in treating soybean protein wastewater. The acidogenic fermentation bacteria dominated in the zone I, while methanogen became dominant in the zone II. It realized the relatively effective separation of hydrolysis acidification and methanogenesis process in the reactor, which was benefit to promote a more reasonable space distribution of the microbial communities in the reactor. There were some differences between the activities of the sludge in the two reaction zones of the integrated two-phase anaerobic reactor. The activity of protease was higher in the reaction zone I. And the coenzyme F420 in the reaction zone II was twice than that in the reaction zone I, which indicated that the activity of the methanogens was stronger in the reaction zone II. PMID:26288554

  17. 42 CFR 483.440 - Condition of participation: Active treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Active treatment... CARE FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded § 483.440 Condition of participation: Active treatment services. (a) Standard: Active treatment....

  18. Follow-up of 6-10-Year-Old Stuttering Children after Lidcombe Program Treatment: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koushik, Sarita; Shenker, Rosalee; Onslow, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I trial sought to establish (1) whether the Lidcombe Program is viable for school-age children, (2) whether there is any indication that it requires modification for school-age children, (3) whether treatment effects are durable, (4) how many treatment sessions appear to be required to significantly reduce stuttering frequency…

  19. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  20. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  1. Variability in AIRS CO2 during active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Ravi Kumar, K; Tiwari, Yogesh K; Valsala, Vinu

    2016-01-15

    Due to human activities, the atmospheric concentration of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has been rising extensively since the Industrial Revolution. Indian summer monsoon (ISM) has a dominant westerly component from ocean to land with a strong tendency to ascend and hence may have role in CO2 distribution in lower and middle troposphere over Indian sub-continent. A substantial component of ISM variability arises from the fluctuations on the intra-seasonal scale between active and break phases which correspond to strong and weak monsoon circulation. In view of the above, an attempt is made in this study to examine the AIRS/AQUA satellite retrieved CO2 distribution in response to atmospheric circulation with focus on active and break phase. Correlation analysis indicates the increase in AIRS CO2 linked with strong monsoon circulation. Study also reveals that anomalous circulation pattern during active and break phase show resemblance with high and low values of AIRS CO2. Homogeneous monsoon regions of India show substantial increase in CO2 levels during active phase. Hilly regions of India show strong contrast in CO2 and vertical velocity during active and break phases. PMID:26476061

  2. EFFECT OF VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR OPERATION ON BIOMASS ACCUMULATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND ACTIVITY. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess biomass accumulation and activity loss in vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) can lead to unreliable long-term operation. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in biomass accumulation, distribution and activity in VPBs treating toluene-contaminated air were monitored o...

  3. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Shyam M.; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M.; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of colorectal cancer patients. Introduction of the HER2 mutations, S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M, into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutations are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors, neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) WT colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX’s) identified 4 PDX’s with HER2 mutations. HER2 targeted therapies were tested on two PDX’s. Treatment with a single HER2 targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2 targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2 mutated PDX’s. PMID:26243863

  4. Combined phase I/II study of imexon (AOP99.0001) for treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Moehler, Thomas M; Feneberg, Reinhard; Ho, Anthony Dick; Golenkov, Anatoly K; Ludwig, Heinz; Kropff, Martin; Khuageva, Nuriet K; Hajda, Jacek; von Broen, Ingo; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    Imexon [AOP99.0001 (4-imino-1,3-diazobicyclo[3. 1. 0]-hexan-2-one)] belongs to a novel class of promising anticancer agents that induce tumor apoptosis through oxidative stress. Clinical experience since the late 1960s has provided initial evidence for a clinical antitumor activity. Our open-label, multicenter phase I clinical trial was designed to further investigate the adverse event (AEs) profile and pharmacokinetics of AOP99.0001 in pretreated myeloma patients and collect initial data on the potential clinical efficacy in this indication. Thirty-six patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma, who had been pretreated with at least two lines of therapy earlier, were included. Imexon was applied intravenously on 5 consecutive days for 2 weeks (d1-5 and d8-12) for a 3-week cycle. The plasma half-life of AOP99.0001 and its active metabolite AOP99.0002 was found to be approximately 1.2 and 2.6 h, respectively. The mean duration of treatment with Imexon was 6.8 weeks in a dose range between 50 and 1000 mg/m without reaching dose-limiting toxicity. Drug-related AEs occurring with a frequency of greater than 10% were fatigue, nausea, constipation, headache, asthenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia and creatinine increase. A total of nine severe adverse events occurred in three patients. No mortality was encountered when patients were on treatment with Imexon. Preliminary antimyeloma efficacy of AOP99.0001 was observed with 1 minimal response, 12 (36%) stable disease responses, and all other evaluable patients had progressive disease. Remarkably, the patient with minimal response also experienced a complete clinical resolution of myeloma-associated polyneuropathy. Overall, Imexon was safe and well tolerated in the dose range investigated. Imexon showed minor clinical activity as a single agent in heavily pretreated myeloma patients. On account of its unique mechanism of action, favorable toxicity profile, initial clinical evidence for antimyeloma activity, and

  5. Role of proinflammatory cytokines on lipopolysaccharide-induced phase shifts in locomotor activity circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Leone, M Juliana; Marpegan, Luciano; Duhart, José M; Golombek, Diego A

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that early night peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection produces phase delays in the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity in mice. We now assess the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on circadian physiology, including their role in LPS-induced phase shifts. First, we investigated whether differential systemic induction of classic proinflammatory cytokines could explain the time-specific behavioral effects of peripheral LPS. Induction levels for plasma interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α did not differ between animals receiving a LPS challenge in the early day or early night. We next tested the in vivo effects of central proinflammatory cytokines on circadian physiology. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) delivery of TNF-α or interleukin IL-1β induced phase delays on wheel-running activity rhythms. Furthermore, we analyzed if these cytokines mediate the LPS-induced phase shifts and found that i.c.v. administration of soluble TNF-α receptor (but not an IL-1β antagonistic) prior to LPS stimulation inhibited the phase delays. Our work suggests that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) responds to central proinflammatory cytokines in vivo, producing phase shifts in locomotor activity rhythms. Moreover, we show that the LPS-induced phase delays are mediated through the action of TNF-α at the central level, and that systemic induction of proinflammatory cytokines might be necessary, but not sufficient, for this behavioral outcome. PMID:22734572

  6. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S.; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers.

  7. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2015-04-21

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers. PMID:25802946

  8. Phase dependent photocatalytic activity of Ag loaded TiO2 films under sun light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi, V.; Kondaiah, P.; Shaik, Habibuddin; Rao, G. Mohan

    2016-02-01

    Well-crystallized anatase and mixed (anatase-rutile) phase TiO2 thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique at various DC powers in the range of 80-140 W. Pure anatase phase was observed in the TiO2 films deposited at low power of 80 W. Films deposited at 120 W were composed of both anatase and rutile phases. At higher power of 140 W, the films are rutile dominated and the rutile percentage increased from 0 to 82% with increase of DC power. The same results of phase change were confirmed by Raman studies. The surface morphology of the TiO2 films showed that the density of the films increased with increase of sputter power. The optical band gap of the films varied from 3.35 to 3.14 eV with increase of DC power. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 films increased with increasing DC power up to 120 W and after that it decreases. We found that the TiO2 films deposited at 120 W with 48% of rutile phase, exhibited high photocatalytic activity (43% of degradation) under UV light compared with other TiO2 films. After loading the optimized Ag nanoparticles on the mixed phase TiO2 films, the photocatalytic activity shifted from UV to visible region with enhancement of photocatalytic activity (55% of degradation).

  9. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly-simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+). In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Comparing to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions, as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF)) on globe. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry further improves the predictions of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD over globe. IMN can improve the predictions of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe, as well as AOD and CDNC over globe. The explicit

  10. Physiologically motivated multiplex Kuramoto model describes phase diagram of cortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Sadilek, Maximilian; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We derive a two-layer multiplex Kuramoto model from Wilson-Cowan type physiological equations that describe neural activity on a network of interconnected cortical regions. This is mathematically possible due to the existence of a unique, stable limit cycle, weak coupling, and inhibitory synaptic time delays. We study the phase diagram of this model numerically as a function of the inter-regional connection strength that is related to cerebral blood flow, and a phase shift parameter that is associated with synaptic GABA concentrations. We find three macroscopic phases of cortical activity: background activity (unsynchronized oscillations), epileptiform activity (highly synchronized oscillations) and resting-state activity (synchronized clusters/chaotic behaviour). Previous network models could hitherto not explain the existence of all three phases. We further observe a shift of the average oscillation frequency towards lower values together with the appearance of coherent slow oscillations at the transition from resting-state to epileptiform activity. This observation is fully in line with experimental data and could explain the influence of GABAergic drugs both on gamma oscillations and epileptic states. Compared to previous models for gamma oscillations and resting-state activity, the multiplex Kuramoto model not only provides a unifying framework, but also has a direct connection to measurable physiological parameters. PMID:25996547

  11. Physiologically motivated multiplex Kuramoto model describes phase diagram of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadilek, Maximilian; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    We derive a two-layer multiplex Kuramoto model from Wilson-Cowan type physiological equations that describe neural activity on a network of interconnected cortical regions. This is mathematically possible due to the existence of a unique, stable limit cycle, weak coupling, and inhibitory synaptic time delays. We study the phase diagram of this model numerically as a function of the inter-regional connection strength that is related to cerebral blood flow, and a phase shift parameter that is associated with synaptic GABA concentrations. We find three macroscopic phases of cortical activity: background activity (unsynchronized oscillations), epileptiform activity (highly synchronized oscillations) and resting-state activity (synchronized clusters/chaotic behaviour). Previous network models could hitherto not explain the existence of all three phases. We further observe a shift of the average oscillation frequency towards lower values together with the appearance of coherent slow oscillations at the transition from resting-state to epileptiform activity. This observation is fully in line with experimental data and could explain the influence of GABAergic drugs both on gamma oscillations and epileptic states. Compared to previous models for gamma oscillations and resting-state activity, the multiplex Kuramoto model not only provides a unifying framework, but also has a direct connection to measurable physiological parameters.

  12. Modeling stress-relaxation behavior of the periodontal ligament during the initial phase of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Romanyk, Dan L; Melenka, Garrett W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-09-01

    The periodontal ligament is the tissue that provides early tooth motion as a result of applied forces during orthodontic treatment: a force-displacement behavior characterized by an instantaneous displacement followed by a creep phase and a stress relaxation phase. Stress relaxation behavior is that which provides the long-term loading to and causes remodelling of the alveolar bone, which is responsible for the long-term permanent displacement of the tooth. In this study, the objective was to assess six viscoelastic models to predict stress relaxation behavior of rabbit periodontal ligament (PDL). Using rabbit stress relaxation data found in the literature, it was found that the modified superposition theory (MST) model best predicts the rabbit PDL behavior as compared to nonstrain-dependent and strain-dependent versions of the Burgers four-parameter and the five-parameter viscoelastic models, as well as predictions by Schapery's viscoelastic model. Furthermore, it is established that using a quadratic form for MST strain dependency provides more stable solutions than the cubic form seen in previous studies. PMID:23722595

  13. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  14. Active Treatment for Idiopathic Adolescent Scoliosis (ACTIvATeS): a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark A; Heine, Peter J; Williamson, Esther M; Toye, Francine; Dritsaki, Melina; Petrou, Stavros; Crossman, Richard; Lall, Ranjit; Barker, Karen L; Fairbank, Jeremy; Harding, Ian; Gardner, Adrian; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Coulson, Neil; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The feasibility of conducting a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of scoliosis-specific exercises (SSEs) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is uncertain. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a large, multicentre trial of SSE treatment for patients with AIS, in comparison with standard care, and to refine elements of the study design. The objectives were to (1) update a systematic review of controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of SSE in AIS; (2) survey UK orthopaedic surgeons and physiotherapists to determine current practice, patient populations and equipoise; (3) randomise 50 adolescents to a feasibility trial of either usual care or SSE interventions across a range of sites; (4) develop, document and assess acceptability and adherence of interventions; (5) assess and describe training requirements of physiotherapists; and (6) gain user input in all relevant stages of treatment and protocol design. DESIGN Multicomponent feasibility study including UK clinician survey, systematic literature review and a randomised feasibility trial. SETTING The randomised feasibility study involved four secondary care NHS trusts providing specialist care for patients with AIS. PARTICIPANTS The randomised feasibility study recruited people aged 10-16 years with mild AIS (Cobb angle of < 50°). INTERVENTIONS The randomised study allocated participants to standard practice of advice and education or a physiotherapy SSE programme supported by a home exercise plan. Our choice of intervention was informed by a systematic review of exercise interventions for AIS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The main outcome was feasibility of recruitment to the randomised study. Other elements were to inform choice of outcomes for a definitive trial and included curve severity, quality of life, requirement for surgery/brace, adverse events, psychological symptoms, costs and

  15. [Advanced Treatment of Effluent from Industrial Park Wastewater Treatment Plant by Ferrous Ion Activated Sodium Persulfate].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Song-mei; Zhou, Zhen; Gu, Ling-yun; Jiang, Hai-tao; Ren, Jia-min; Wang, Luo-chun

    2016-01-15

    Fe(II) activated sodium persulfate (PS) technology was used for advanced treatment of effluent from industrial park wastewater treatment plant. Separate and combined effects of PS/COD, Fe(II)/PS and pH on COD and TOC removal were analyzed by the response surface methodology. Variations of organic substances before and after Fe(II)-PS oxidation were characterized by UV-Vis spectrometry, gel chromatography and three-dimensional fluorescence. PS/COD and Fe(II)/PS had significant effect on COD removal, while all the three factors had significant effect on TOC removal. The combined effect of PS/COD and pH had significant effect on COD removal. COD and TOC removal efficiencies reached 50.7% and 60.6% under optimized conditions of PS/COD 3.47, Fe(II)/PS 3.32 and pH 6.5. Fe(II)-PS oxidation converted macromolecular organic substances to small ones, and reduced contents of protein-, humic- and fulvic-like substances. PMID:27078964

  16. Phase impact factor: a novel parameter for determining optimal CT phase in 4D radiation therapy treatment planning for mobile lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yulin; Huang, Xiaolei; Mueller, Boris; Mychalczak, Borys

    2008-03-01

    Due to respiratory motion, lung tumor can move up to several centimeters. If respiratory motion is not carefully considered during the radiation treatment planning, the highly conformal dose distribution with steep gradients could miss the target. To address this issue, the common strategy is to add a population-derived safety margin to the gross tumor volume (GTV). However, during a free breathing CT simulation, the images could be acquired at any phase of a breathing cycle. With such a generalized uniform margin, the planning target volume (PTV) may either include more normal lung tissue than required or miss the GTV at certain phases of a breathing cycle. Recently, respiration correlated CT (4DCT) has been developed and implemented. With 4DCT, it is now possible to trace the tumor 3D trajectories during a breathing cycle and to define the tumor volume as the union of these 3D trajectories. The tumor volume defined in this way is called the internal target volume (ITV). In this study, we introduced a novel parameter, the phase impact factor (PIF), to determine the optimal CT phase for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for lung cancer. A minimum PIF yields a minimum probability for the GTV to move out of the ITV during the course of an IMRT treatment, providing a minimum probability of a geometric miss. Once the CT images with the optimal phase were determined, an IMRT plan with three to five co-planner beams was computed and optimized using the inverse treatment planning technique.

  17. [EFFICACY AND SECURITY OF A CONVENTIONAL PROCEDURE OF PLASMAPHERESIS IN COMPLEX OF TREATMENT OF NONBILIARY ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN EARLY PHASE OF THE DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Mishalov, V G; Markulan, L Yu; Matveyev, R M

    2016-02-01

    Abstract Efficacy and security of a plasmapheresis procedure in complex of treatment of nonbiliary acute pancreatitis in early phase of the disease were established, basing on the treatment results analysis in 48 patients. The plasmapheresis results were estimated in accordance to changes revealed in the intoxication leukocytic index (ILI), a general protein (GP) content, general calcium (GC) in the blood plasm and of the activated partial thrombin time (APTHT). Application of plasmapheresis in patients, suffering purulent pancreatitis in the enzymal phase, have guaranteed a staged reduction of ILI by (34.86 ± 1.27)%, the APTHT enhancement from (35.15 ± 0.37) to (52.01 ± 0.62) sec, a trustworthy lowering of the GP by (4.35 ± 0.02) g/L at average and of GC in a blood plasmby (10.45 ± 0.38)%. PMID:27244915

  18. Sporicidal Activity of the KMT reagent in its vapor phase against Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores.

    PubMed

    Kida, Nori; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Taguchi, Fumiaki

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation of the sporicidal activity of the KMT reagent, a vapor phase study was performed using five kinds of carriers contaminated with Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When 25 ml of the KMT reagent was vaporized in a chamber (capacity; approximately 95 liters), the 2-step heating method (vaporization by a combination of low temperature and high temperature) showed the most effective sporicidal activity in comparison with the 1-step heating method (rapid vaporization). The 2-step heating method appeared to be related to the sporicidal activity of vaporized KMT reagent, i.e., ethanol and iodine, which vaporized mainly when heated at a low temperature such as 55 C, and acidic water, which vaporized mainly when heated at a high temperature such as 300 C. We proposed that the KMT reagent can be used as a new disinfectant not only in the liquid phase but also in the vapor phase in the same way as peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. PMID:17237604

  19. Spatial distribution and activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in lipid bilayer membranes with phase boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Brewer, Jonathan; Bagatolli, Luis A; Simonsen, Adam C; Ipsen, John H; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-06-01

    We have reconstituted functional Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of well-defined binary and ternary lipid composition including cholesterol. The activity of the membrane system can be turned on and off by ATP. The hydrolytic activity of NKA is found to depend on membrane phase, and the water relaxation in the membrane on the presence of NKA. By collapsing and fixating the GUVs onto a solid support and using high-resolution atomic-force microscopy (AFM) imaging we determine the protein orientation and spatial distribution at the single-molecule level and find that NKA is preferentially located at lo/ld interfaces in two-phase GUVs and homogeneously distributed in single-phase GUVs. When turned active, the membrane is found to unbind from the support suggesting that the protein function leads to softening of the membrane. PMID:26994932

  20. Nonequilibrium phase transitions, fluctuations and correlations in an active contractile polar fluid.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-21

    We study the patterning, fluctuations and correlations of an active polar fluid consisting of contractile polar filaments on a two-dimensional substrate, using a hydrodynamic description. The steady states generically consist of arrays of inward pointing asters and show a continuous transition from a moving lamellar phase, a moving aster street, to a stationary aster lattice with no net polar order. We next study the effect of spatio-temporal athermal noise, parametrized by an active temperature TA, on the stability of the ordered phases. In contrast to its equilibrium counterpart, we find that the active crystal shows true long range order at low TA. On increasing TA, the asters dynamically remodel, concomitantly we find novel phase transitions characterized by bond-orientational and polar order upon "heating". PMID:26742682

  1. Menstrual cycle phase does not affect sympathetic neural activity in women with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stickford, Abigail SL; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are primarily premenopausal women, which may be attributed to female sex hormones. We tested the hypothesis that hormonal fluctuations of the menstrual cycle alter sympathetic neural activity and orthostatic tolerance in POTS women. Ten POTS women were studied during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. Haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured when supine, during 60 deg upright tilt for 45 min or until presyncope, and during the cold pressor test (CPT) and Valsalva manoeuvres. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were higher during rest and tilting in the ML than EF phase; however, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were similar between phases. There were no mean ± SD differences in MSNA burst frequency (8 ± 8 EF phase vs. 10 ± 10 bursts min–1 ML phase at rest; 34 ± 15 EF phase vs. 36 ± 16 bursts min–1 ML phase at 5 min tilt), burst incidence or total activity, nor any differences in the cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities between phases under any condition. The incidence of presyncope was also the same between phases. There were no differences in haemodynamic or sympathetic responses to CPT or Valsalva. These results suggest that the menstrual cycle does not affect sympathetic neural activity but modulates blood pressure and vasoconstriction in POTS women during tilting. Thus, factors other than sympathetic neural activity are probably responsible for the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS. Key points Women with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) report fluctuations in orthostatic tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle. The mechanism(s) underlying blood pressure control across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS are unknown. The findings of the present study indicate that the menstrual

  2. Unstable Angina Treatment in Various Periods of Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshina, S. S.; Tokayeva, L. K.; Afanasiyeva, T. N.; Samsonov, S. N.; Petrova, V. D.; Dolgova, E. M.; Manykina, V. I.; Vodolagina, E. S.

    In 145 patients with unstable angina (UA) there was analized an efficiency of a drug therapy at different types of heliogeophysical activity (HA) during the 23th solar cycle. 83 patients were examined at the period of a lower HA (Kp-index 16,19±0,18), and 62 patients - at the period of a higher HA (Kp-index 17,25±0,21, p<0,05). Baseline severity of patients' condition with UA at the moment of hospitalization at the studied periods did not differ, but the effectiveness of the therapy depended on the period of HA. At the period of a higher HA antianginal effect was stronger than at the lower period of HA (2,27±0,16 points and 1,75±0,12 points, p<0,05), and the need in nitroglycerin on the background of a drug therapy disappeared for 5-7 days quicker than at the period of a lower HA. Maximal hypotensive effect at a higher HA was achieved quicker - on the 3rd day of the treatment, and at a lower HA - only up to hospital discharge (p<0,05). Blood viscosity did not normalize in both of the studied periods, but in small vessels there was noted a decrease of a BV (p<0,05). So, at a higher HA the effectiveness of a drug therapy in patients with UA is higher than at the period of a lower HA.

  3. Dissecting eukaryotic cells by coherent phase microscopy: quantitative analysis of quiescent and activated T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.; Kretushev, Alexander V.; Vyshenskaya, Tatiana V.; Shtil, Alexander A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a concept for quantitative characterization of a functional state of an individual eukaryotic cell based on interference imaging. The informative parameters of the phase images of quiescent and mitogen-activated T lymphocytes included the phase thickness, phase volume, the area, and the size of organelles. These parameters were obtained without a special hypothesis about cell structure. Combinations of these parameters generated a ``phase portrait'' of the cell. A simplified spherical multilayer optic model of a T lymphocyte was used to calculate the refractivity profile, to identify structural elements of the image with the organelles, and to interpret the parameters of the phase portrait. The values of phase image parameters underwent characteristic changes in the course of mitogenic stimulation of T cells; thereby, the functional state of individual cells can be described using these parameters. Because the values of the components of the phase portrait are measured in absolute units, it is possible to compare the parameters of images obtained with different interference microscopes. Thus, the analysis of phase portraits provides a new and perspective approach for quantitative, real-time analysis of subcellular structure and physiologic state of an individual cell.

  4. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    PubMed Central

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  5. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials. PMID:25740351

  6. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A. O.; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W.; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  7. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988). It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments. PMID:23351279

  8. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. Methods ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function

  9. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  10. Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs of Acinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oerther, Daniel B.; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schramm, Andreas; Amann, Rudolf; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Cangelosi and Brabant used oligonucleotide probes targeting the precursor 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli to demonstrate that the levels of precursor rRNA were more sensitive to changes in growth phase than the levels of total rRNA (G. A. Cangelosi and W. H. Brabant, J. Bacteriol. 179:4457–4463, 1997). In order to measure changes in the levels of precursor rRNA in activated sludge systems, we designed oligonucleotide probes targeting the 3′ region of the precursor 16S rRNA of Acinetobacter spp. We used these probes to monitor changes in the level of precursor 16S rRNA during batch growth of Acinetobacter spp. in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, filtered wastewater, and in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. Consistent with the previous reports for E. coli, results obtained with membrane hybridizations and fluorescence in situ hybridizations with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus grown in LB medium showed a more substantial and faster increase in precursor 16S rRNA levels compared to the increase in total 16S rRNA levels during exponential growth. Diluting an overnight culture of A. calcoaceticus grown in LB medium with filtered wastewater resulted in a pattern of precursor 16S rRNA levels that appeared to follow diauxic growth. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes targeting total 16S rRNA and precursor 16S rRNA showed that individual cells of A. calcoaceticus expressed highly variable levels of precursor 16S rRNA when adapting from LB medium to filtered sewage. Precursor 16S rRNA levels of Acinetobacter spp. transiently increased when activated sludge was mixed with influent wastewater in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. These results suggest that Acinetobacter spp. experience a change in growth activity within wastewater treatment systems. PMID:10788395

  11. Simulation of Transrib HIFU Propagation and the Strategy of Phased-array Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Mingjun

    Liver ablation is challenging in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) because of the presence of ribs and great inhomogeneity in multi-layer tissue. In this study, angular spectrum approach (ASA) has been used in the wave propagation from phased-array HIFU transducer, and diffraction, attenuation and the nonlinearity are accounted for by means of second order operator splitting method. Bioheat equation is used to simulate the subsequent temperature elevation and lesion formation with the formation of shifted focus and multiple foci. In summary, our approach could simulate the performance of phased-array HIFU in the clinics and then develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  12. Influence of Thermal Treatment on the Antimicrobial Activity of Silver-Doped Biological Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina Liana; Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Voicu, Georgeta; Vasile, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Predoi, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report the structural and morphological properties of silver-doped hydroxyapatite (AgHAp) with a silver concentration x Ag = 0.5 before and after being thermal treated at 600 and 1000 °C. The results obtained by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopy suggest that the structure of the samples changes gradually, from hydroxyapatite (AgHAp_40) to a predominant β-TCP structure (AgHAp_1000), achieved when the thermal treatment temperature is 1000 °C. In the AgHAp_600 sample, the presence of two phases, HAp and β-TCP, was highlighted. Also, scanning electron microscopy studies suggest that the shape and dimension of the nanoparticles begin to change when the temperature increases. The antimicrobial activity of the obtained compounds was evaluated against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans strains.

  13. Thymidylate synthase expression and activity: relation to S-phase parameters and 5-fluorouracil sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Mirjolet, J. F.; Barberi-Heyob, M.; Merlin, J. L.; Marchal, S.; Etienne, M. C.; Milano, G.; Bey, P.

    1998-01-01

    Six human cancer cell lines exhibiting a large range of sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were evaluated for thymidylate synthase (TS) and p53 gene expression, TS and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity, as well as cell cycle parameters, S-phase fraction (SPF), bromodeoxyuridine labelling index (LI) and S-phase duration (SPD). All these parameters were investigated for 7 days in asynchronously growing cell populations and compared with the cell sensitivity to 5-FU. No significant correlation was found between S-phase parameters and TS gene expression and/or activity. TS activity was higher in proliferating cells; however, it was not significantly higher in rapidly growing cell lines with short SPD. Neither TS gene expression nor activity was found to correlate with 5-FU sensitivity. On the another hand, a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.0001) was observed between LI and SPD and 5-FU sensitivity. The present results suggest that cell cycle parameters such as SPD and/or LI could be better parameters for 5-FU sensitivity prediction than TS gene expression and/or activity. This could be especially informative in cases of concomitant radio-chemotherapy as S-phase parameters are already proposed for hyperfractionated radiotherapy planning. PMID:9662252

  14. Second phase HCV RNA decline during telaprevir based therapy increases with drug effectiveness: implications for treatment duration

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Jeremie; Perelson, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay during antiviral therapy is characterized by a rapid first phase followed by a slower second phase. The current understanding of viral kinetics attributes the magnitude of the first phase decay to the treatment effectiveness, whereas the second phase decay is attributed to the progressive loss of infected cells. Here we analyzed data from 44 patients treated with telaprevir, a potent HCV protease inhibitor. Using a viral kinetic model that accounts for the pharmacokinetics of telaprevir, we found that the second phase slope of viral decline to be strongly correlated with the treatment effectiveness and to be roughly four-fold more rapid than has been reported with interferon-based therapies. Since telaprevir is not known to increase the death rate of infected cells, our results suggest the second phase slope of viral decline is driven not only by the death of infected cells but may also involve other mechanisms, such as a treatment effectiveness-dependent degradation of intracellular viral RNA. As a consequence of the enhanced viral decay caused by the high antiviral effectiveness of telaprevir, we predict that if drug resistance could be avoided by using an appropriate combination of antiviral agents, treatment duration needed to clear HCV might be dramatically shortened. Indeed, we predict that in 95% of fully compliant patients, the last virus particle should be eliminated by week 7 of therapy. If the remaining infected hepatocytes act as a potential reservoir for the renewal of infection, no more than 10 weeks of treatment should be sufficient to clear the infection in 95% of fully compliant patients. However, if patients miss doses, treatment duration would need to be extended. PMID:21384401

  15. Long term results of mechanical prostheses for treatment of active infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, J; Tornos, M; Permanyer-Miralda, G; Almirante, B; Murtra, M; Soler-Soler, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the long term results of mechanical prostheses for treating active infective endocarditis.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study of a consecutive series of patients diagnosed with infective endocarditis and operated on in the active phase of the infection for insertion of a mechanical prosthesis.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre in a metropolitan area.
RESULTS—Between 1975 and 1997, 637 cases of infective endocarditis were diagnosed in the centre. Of these, 436 were left sided (with overall mortality of 20.3%). Surgical treatment in the active phase of the infection was needed in 141 patients (72% native, 28% prosthetic infective endocarditis). Mechanical prostheses were used in 131 patients. Operative mortality was 30.5% (40 patients). Ninety one survivors were followed up prospectively for (mean (SD)) 5.4 (4.5) years. Thirteen patients developed prosthetic valve dysfunction. Nine patients suffered reinfection: four of these (4%) were early and five were late. The median time from surgery for late reinfection was 1.4 years. During follow up, 12 patients died. Excluding operative mortality, actuarial survival was 86.6% at five years and 83.7% at 10 years; actuarial survival free from death, reoperation, and reinfection was 73.1% at five years and 59.8% at 10 years.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients surviving acute infective endocarditis and receiving mechanical prostheses, the rate of early reinfection compares well with reported results of homografts. In addition, prosthesis dysfunction rate is low and long term survival is good. These data should prove useful for comparison with long term studies, when available, using other types of valve surgery in active infective endocarditis.


Keywords: infective endocarditis; surgery; mechanical prosthesis PMID:11410564

  16. Strategies for Early Non-response to Antipsychotic Drugs in the Treatment of Acute-phase Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroto

    2014-01-01

    As a strategy for antipsychotic treatment of schizophrenia, monotherapy is clearly optimal when both effective and tolerated. When a patient fails to respond to an adequate dose of an antipsychotic, alternatives include switching, administering a higher dose (above the licensed dose), polypharmacy or clozapine. Clozapine is the only option with established efficacy, but is less manageable than other antipsychotics. We therefore reviewed other options, focusing on the treatment of acute-phase schizophrenia. According to recent evidence, an antipsychotic may be viewed as ineffective within 1-4 weeks in acute-phase practice, although some differences may exist among antipsychotics. Whether a switching strategy is effective might depend on the initial antipsychotic and which antipsychotic is switched to. As weak evidence points toward augmentation being superior to continuation of the initial antipsychotic, inclusion of augmentation arms in larger studies comparing strategies for early non-responders in the acute-phase is justified. With respect to high-doses, little evidence is available regarding acute-phase treatment, and the issue remains controversial. Although evidence for antipsychotic switching, augmentation, and high-doses has gradually been accumulating, more studies performed in real clinical practice with minimal bias are required to establish strategies for early non-response to an antipsychotic drug in the treatment of acute-phase schizophrenia. PMID:24851115

  17. Effects of plasmochemical treatments and cerium additions on the structural characteristics and activity of copper catalyst particles in isopropanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Lobanov, N. N.; Galimova, N. A.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the treatment of the 5 wt % Cu/SiO2 (I) and (5 wt % Cu + 0.5 wt % Ce)/SiO2 (II) catalysts with glow discharge plasma in O2, H2, and Ar on their structural characteristics was studied by X-ray phase analysis; the influence of cerium additions and plasmochemical treatments on the catalyst activity in isopropanol dehydrogenation was also investigated. Under the plasmochemical treatment, the diameters of Cu particles in catalyst I nearly doubled and microstresses in the metal particles also changed. Catalyst II was X-ray amorphous both before and after plasmochemical treatments. The activity of I after plasmochemical treatment increased because of the increase in the number of centers and changes in their composition. Growth of the activity of I compared with the activity of II was explained by the formation of new catalytic centers due to positive charging of the Ce+α adatom on the surface of the copper particle.

  18. Trimebutine-induced phase III-like activity in infants with intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Boige, N; Cargill, G; Mashako, L; Cezard, J P; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    Duodenal manometric recordings were performed in five male children (mean age 11.7 +/- 6.8 months) suffering from severe digestive pathology with clinical findings of dysmotility; they required total parenteral nutrition: one case of enteropathy following intestinal resection for congenital small bowel atresia, and four cases of intestinal pseudoobstruction. The basal 3-h fasting recordings showed complete disorganization of interdigestive activity characterized by an absence of migrating motor complexes and a marked basal hypomotility with motor indices lower than in control subjects. Intravenous trimebutine (3 mg/kg) produced a phase III-like activity 88 +/- 121 s after administration in four cases. The activity lasted 236 +/- 105 s and had a mean frequency of 11.75 +/- 0.86 waves/min. It was propagated aborally in the two patients having two duodenal recording sites. Trimebutine-induced phase III activity was followed by signs of peristalsis in two patients. PMID:3430262

  19. [THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY OF MICRONIZED MEBENDAZOLE IN THE MUSCULAR PHASE OF EXPERIMENTAL TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS INVASION IN ALBINO MICE].

    PubMed

    Kukhaleva, I V; Kovalenko, F P; Shkolyar, N A; Legonkov, Yu A; Musaev, A Kh; Bulanova, T E; Samochatova, E I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of trichinosis in Russia was 0.07 per 100,000 population in 2014, which was 2.9-fold higher than that in 2013. Two WHO recommended medications mebendazole and albendazole are now used to treat humari trichinosis. The drugs are active against only mature helminths and non-encysted muscle larvae. The original oil suspension of micronized mebendazole was.found to have 100% efficacy against trichinosis in albino mice in the late muscular phase (encysted larvae) of hyperinvasion after intensive therapy under lifetime diagnostic guidance during and after a treatment cycle. The lifetime diagnostic method used to evaluate the larvicidal activity of anti-trichinosis agents in animals with experimental trichinosis revealed the signs of viaility, established a trend for deatih of Trichinella larvae, and determined their destructive changes. PMID:26827586

  20. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo phase

  1. Highly active antiretroviral treatment for the prevention of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 an estimated 33 million people were living with HIV; 67% resided in sub-Saharan Africa, with 35% in eight countries alone. In 2007, there were about 1.4 million HIV-positive tuberculosis cases. Globally, approximately 4 million people had been given highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by the end of 2008, but in 2007, an estimated 6.7 million were still in need of HAART and 2.7 million more became infected with HIV. Although there has been unprecedented investment in confronting HIV/AIDS - the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates $13.8 billion was spent in 2008 - a key challenge is how to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic given limited and potentially shrinking resources. Economic disparities may further exacerbate human rights issues and widen the increasingly divergent approaches to HIV prevention, care and treatment. HIV transmission only occurs from people with HIV, and viral load is the single greatest risk factor for all modes of transmission. HAART can lower viral load to nearly undetectable levels. Prevention of mother to child transmission offers proof of the concept of HAART interrupting transmission, and observational studies and previous modelling work support using HAART for prevention. Although knowing one's HIV status is key for prevention efforts, it is not known with certainty when to start HAART. Building on previous modelling work, we used an HIV/AIDS epidemic of South African intensity to explore the impact of testing all adults annually and starting persons on HAART immediately after they are diagnosed as HIV positive. This theoretical strategy would reduce annual HIV incidence and mortality to less than one case per 1000 people within 10 years and it would reduce the prevalence of HIV to less than 1% within 50 years. To explore HAART as a prevention strategy, we recommend further discussions to explore human rights and ethical considerations, clarify research priorities and review feasibility and acceptability

  2. Impact of Antipsychotic Treatment on Nonfasting Triglycerides in the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial Phase 1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jonathan M.; Davis, Vicki G.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Goff, Donald C.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Davis, Sonia M.; Daumit, Gail L.; Hsiao, John; Swartz, Marvin S.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent literature documents a stronger association between nonfasting triglycerides (TG) and cardiovascular risk compared to fasting TG. Given concerns over antipsychotic effects on serum TG, this analysis explored changes in nonfasting TG in phase 1 of the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial. Methods Change in nonfasting TG, adjusted for baseline value, was compared between antipsychotic treatment groups using subjects with nonfasting laboratory assessments at baseline and 3 months. Results Among the 246 subjects there were significant treatment differences in 3-month change from baseline (p=0.009). The greatest increases in median and adjusted mean nonfasting TG levels were seen among those randomized to quetiapine (mean +54.7 mg/dl, median +26 mg/dl) and olanzapine (mean +23.4 mg/dl, median +26.5 mg/dl), while ziprasidone was neutral (mean +0.0 mg/dl, median + 8 mg/dl), and decreases were seen with risperidone (mean −18.4 mg/dl, median −6.5 mg/dl) and perphenazine (mean −1.3 mg/dl, median −22 mg/dl). Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant between-group difference for perphenazine vs. olanzapine (p=0.002) and a trend for perphenazine vs. quetiapine (p=0.006). Conclusions This analysis provides further evidence for differential antipsychotic metabolic liabilities, and confirms signals for the effects of olanzapine and quetiapine on serum TG seen in earlier CATIE analyses. Future consensus recommendations will clarify the role of nonfasting TG monitoring in routine clinical practice. PMID:18534821

  3. Phase II evaluation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) for the treatment of hot flashes

    PubMed Central

    Kadakia, Kunal C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Fee-Schroeder, Kelliann C.; Sood, Amit; Barton, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hot flashes are a significant source of symptom burden that negatively impacts quality of life (QOL). For women who have contraindications to, or are unwilling to consider, estrogens or antidepressants for bothersome hot flashes, there are limited effective pharmacologic or complementary and alternative medicines. Methods This single-arm phase II trial studied the efficacy of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) for the treatment of hot flashes. Eligible women were required to have reported ≥14 hot flashes per week for ≥1 month. The patients were treated with SAMe at a dose of 400 mg twice daily to evaluate whether a reduction in hot flash score appeared to be better than the historical placebo response of approximately 25 %. The women kept a daily hot flash diary during a baseline week and then daily during weeks 2–7. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to week 7 in hot flash score and hot flash frequency. Secondary endpoints included toxicity analyses and the effect of SAMe on QOL. Results From October 28, 2010 to January 30, 2012, 43 women were treated with SAMe. The decrease in mean percent of baseline hot flash score and frequency was 35.4 and 32.6 %, respectively. When compared to the historical placebo response of 25 %, the effect of SAMe on hot flash score was not statistically significant (p=0.09). Treatment was well tolerated with expected grade 1/2 gastrointestinal toxicity and no negative effect on QOL. Conclusions The use of SAMe does not appear to significantly reduce hot flashes more than would be expected with a placebo. PMID:26248653

  4. Tonic Nanomolar Dopamine Enables an Activity-Dependent Phase Recovery Mechanism That Persistently Alters the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current in a Rhythmically Active Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Edmund W.; Fu, Jing Jing; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C.

    2011-01-01

    The phases at which network neurons fire in rhythmic motor outputs are critically important for the proper generation of motor behaviors. The pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion generates a rhythmic motor output wherein neuronal phase relationships are remarkably invariant across individuals and throughout lifetimes. The mechanisms for maintaining these robust phase relationships over the long-term are not well described. Here we show that tonic nanomolar dopamine (DA) acts at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) to enable an activity-dependent mechanism that can contribute to phase maintenance in the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron. The LP displays continuous rhythmic bursting. The activity-dependent mechanism was triggered by a prolonged decrease in LP burst duration, and it generated a persistent increase in the maximal conductance (Gmax) of the LP hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), but only in the presence of steady-state DA. Interestingly, micromolar DA produces an LP phase advance accompanied by a decrease in LP burst duration that abolishes normal LP network function. During a 1 h application of micromolar DA, LP phase recovered over tens of minutes because, the activity-dependent mechanism enabled by steady-state DA was triggered by the micromolar DA-induced decrease in LP burst duration. Presumably, this mechanism restored normal LP network function. These data suggest steady-state DA may enable homeostatic mechanisms that maintain motor network output during protracted neuromodulation. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent mechanism to preserve phase may be broadly relevant, as diminished dopaminergic tone has recently been shown to reduce Ih in rhythmically active neurons in the mammalian brain. PMID:22072689

  5. Dramatic activity of mixed-phase TiO2 photocatalyst synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiquan; Xu, Bolian; Fan, Yining

    2013-02-01

    The mixed-phase TiO2 photocatalysts with different anatase/rutile/brookite ratios and high specific surface area (157-218 m2/g) were prepared by hydrothermal method at 100 °C and the effect of rutile content in TiO2 on the BET surface area, light absorption and separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers was studied and correlated to the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. Rutile content increased from 0% to 100% by increasing the amount of TiCl4 in aqueous phase and the initial pH value of reaction solution played an important role in the phase composition of TiO2. The photocatalytic mechanism of mixed-phase TiO2 was discussed.

  6. Advanced Control Strategy for Single-Phase Voltage-Source Active Rectifier with Low Harmonic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahník, Vojtĕch; Peroutka, Zdenĕk; Talla, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces the advanced control of single-phase voltage-source active rectifier. This control provide direct control of trolley-wire current and active damping of low-frequency disturbances at the converter ac side. Our proposed control strategy combines PR controller with feed-forward model and low-frequency harmonic compensator based on resonant controllers. Achieved experimental results show excellent converter behavior, where converter is fed by strongly distorted supply voltage.

  7. Activation of M1/4 receptors phase advances the hamster circadian clock during the day.

    PubMed

    Basu, Priyoneel; Wensel, Adrienne L; McKibbon, Reid; Lefebvre, Nicole; Antle, Michael C

    2016-05-16

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be reset by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. In hamsters, intraSCN carbachol produces phase advances during the day. This phenomenon has previously been attributed to the muscarinic receptors, as carbachol-induced phase shifts are blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist atropine. The SCN contains all five muscarinic receptors, leaving open the question as to which muscarinic receptors mediate these shifts. Here we test two selective muscarinic agonists, the M1/4 agonist McN-A-343 and the M2/3 agonist bethanechol, in addition to the non-selective cholinergic agonist carbachol. Consistent with previous reports, carbachol produced significant phase advances when injected to the SCN during the mid-subjective day. At the doses used here, McN-A-343, but not bethanechol, also produced significant phase shifts when injected to the SCN during the mid-subjective day. Phase shifts to McN-A-343 were as large as those produced by carbachol, suggesting that activation of the M1/4 receptors alone can fully account for the daytime phase advances produced by cholinergic agonists. Given acetylcholine's role in arousal, and the similarity between phase advances to carbachol/McN-A-343 and to exercise and arousal manipulations, it is possible that acetylcholine may contribute to non-photic resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:27063283

  8. Active Optical Metasurfaces Based on Defect-Engineered Phase-Transition Materials.

    PubMed

    Rensberg, Jura; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhou, You; McLeod, Alexander S; Schwarz, Christian; Goldflam, Michael; Liu, Mengkun; Kerbusch, Jochen; Nawrodt, Ronny; Ramanathan, Shriram; Basov, D N; Capasso, Federico; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-02-10

    Active, widely tunable optical materials have enabled rapid advances in photonics and optoelectronics, especially in the emerging field of meta-devices. Here, we demonstrate that spatially selective defect engineering on the nanometer scale can transform phase-transition materials into optical metasurfaces. Using ion irradiation through nanometer-scale masks, we selectively defect-engineered the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide, a prototypical correlated phase-transition material whose optical properties change dramatically depending on its state. Using this robust technique, we demonstrated several optical metasurfaces, including tunable absorbers with artificially induced phase coexistence and tunable polarizers based on thermally triggered dichroism. Spatially selective nanoscale defect engineering represents a new paradigm for active photonic structures and devices. PMID:26690855

  9. Active role of the liquid phase of developer in revealing surface flaws by capillary methods

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorenko, P.P.; Dezhkunov, N.V.; Stoicheva, I.V.

    1988-08-01

    The article investigates the interaction of two chemically nonreacting liquids after they have been brought into contact with each other in a capillary. It is established that the liquid phase of the developer is not only a passive carrier of the developing component but also exerts an active influence on the process of development, and consequently, on the detectability of flaws.

  10. Dopant activation during solid phase crystallization of poly-Si and influence of fluorine and hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Kingi, R.M.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    Dopant activation for ion implanted solid phase crystallized (SPC) a-Si:H films, deposited by low temperature PECVD, was investigated. The impact of film thickness, the effect of subsequent hydrogenation, and a possible role for fluorine in this process have been studied.

  11. Solid phase microextraction for active or passive sampling of methyl bromide during fumigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high diffusivity and volatility of methyl bromide make it an ideal compound for Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME)-based sampling of air prior to gas-chromatographic quantifications. SPME fibers can be used as active methyl bromide samplers, with high capacities and an equilibrium time of 1-2 m...

  12. Fostering Students' Creativity through Van Hiele's 5 Phase-Based Tangram Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siew, Nyet Moi; Chong, Chin Lu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Van Hiele's 5 phase-based tangrams activities could help to foster creativity among Grade Three primary school students. Students' creativity was investigated in terms of Torrance's Figural Test of creative thinking: Fluency, Originality, Elaboration, Abstractness of title, and Resistance to a…

  13. Immunosuppressive activity of pogostone on T cells: Blocking proliferation via S phase arrest.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Yan; Luo, Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Deng, Xiang-Liang; Su, Zi-Ren; Zhou, Lian; Li, Shan-Shan; Dai, Zhenhua; Xu, Yang; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Pogostone (PO) is one of the major chemical constituents of the essential oil of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth. In the present study, the effect of PO on T cell responsiveness was investigated to explore its potential in immunosuppression by a Concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulation model using splenocytes isolated from C57BL/6 mice. Cytotoxicity by PO on normal splenocytes was evaluated by MTS assays. Characteristics of apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry. Related expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) were also determined by flow cytometry. Inflammatory cytokine profiling was performed emplying cytometric beads assays (CBA). Moreover, the T cell-mediated delayed Type hepersensity (DTH) model was applied to evaluate the immunosuppressive activity of PO. Neither viability reduction in normal splenocytes nor apoptosis in ConA-stimulated splenocytes was observed under PO treatments. Meanwhile, PO remarkably reduced the total population of ConA-stimulated T cell, blocked T cell proliferation induced by Con A, and inhibited the production of IFN-γ and IL-10. This blockade of stimulated T cell proliferation by PO was likely attributed to down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin B and CDK1 and the subsequent S-phase arrest. Additionally, PO could inhibit the DTH reaction by alleviating ear swelling and inflammatory infiltrations in the DNCB-challenged ear. Taken together, PO exhibited an immunosuppressive property by directly blocking T cell proliferation as well as altering inflammatory cytokine profile, suggesting that PO may have clinical implications for treating autoimmune diseases and other immune-based disorders. PMID:25912345

  14. Effect of the sulfide phase on the properties of steel after heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovskii, V.D.; Kut'in, A.B.; Gerbikh, N.M.

    1988-05-01

    The results of investigations concerned with the effect of the cooling regimes in the austenitic range on the nature of the segregation of sulfides in steels are presented. Experiments were carried out mainly with steel 18Kh2N4MA conventionally melted with low (0.008%) and high (0.04%) sulfur content and after electroslag remelting (ESR) (0.005% S). Results from an investigation of the change of morphology in dependence on the temperature and time of isothermal holding are presented in a diagram illustrating segregation for the predominating kinds of sulfides. The change of morphology and the nature of the distribution of sulfides affected both the fracture and impact toughness of the steel. The effect of the cooling rate from the overheating temperature on the impact toughness of ESR steels and of conventionally melted steels was examined. For ESR steels, characterized by low sulfur content, it was found that the mechanical properties can be changed by controlling the shape and distribution of inclusions of the nonmetallic phase, viz., manganese sulfides, during heat treatment.

  15. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

    2003-10-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and

  16. Phase II Study of Vorinostat for Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirschbaum, Mark; Frankel, Paul; Popplewell, Leslie; Zain, Jasmine; Delioukina, Maria; Pullarkat, Vinod; Matsuoka, Deron; Pulone, Bernadette; Rotter, Arnold J.; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.; Gandara, David; Newman, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We performed a phase II study of oral vorinostat, a histone and protein deacetylase inhibitor, to examine its efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsed/refractory indolent lymphoma. Patients and Methods In this open label phase II study (NCT00253630), patients with relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma (FL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), with ≤ 4 prior therapies were eligible. Oral vorinostat was administered at a dose of 200 mg twice daily on days 1 through 14 of a 21-day cycle until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was objective response rate (ORR), with secondary end points of progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression, duration of response, safety, and tolerability. Results All 35 eligible patients were evaluable for response. The median number of vorinostat cycles received was nine. ORR was 29% (five complete responses [CR] and five partial responses [PR]). For 17 patients with FL, ORR was 47% (four CR, four PR). There were two of nine responders with MZL (one CR, one PR), and no formal responders among the nine patients with MCL, although one patient maintained stable disease for 26 months. Median PFS was 15.6 months for patients with FL, 5.9 months for MCL, and 18.8 months for MZL. The drug was well-tolerated over long periods of treatment, with the most common grade 3 adverse events being thrombocytopenia, anemia, leucopenia, and fatigue. Conclusion Oral vorinostat is a promising agent in FL and MZL, with an acceptable safety profile. Further studies in combination with other active agents in this setting are warranted. PMID:21300924

  17. Modulation of Rubisco Activity during the Diurnal Phases of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Maxwell; Borland; Haslam; Helliker; Roberts; Griffiths

    1999-11-01

    The regulation of Rubisco activity was investigated under high, constant photosynthetic photon flux density during the diurnal phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr. During phase I, a significant period of nocturnal, C(4)-mediated CO(2) fixation was observed, with the generated malic acid being decarboxylated the following day (phase III). Two periods of daytime atmospheric CO(2) fixation occurred at the beginning (phase II, C(4)-C(3) carboxylation) and end (phase IV, C(3)-C(4) carboxylation) of the day. During the 1st h of the photoperiod, when phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was still active, the highest rates of atmospheric CO(2) uptake were observed, coincident with the lowest rates of electron transport and minimal Rubisco activity. Over the next 1 to 2 h of phase II, carbamylation increased rapidly during an initial period of decarboxylation. Maximal carbamylation (70%-80%) was reached 2 h into phase III and was maintained under conditions of elevated CO(2) resulting from malic acid decarboxylation. Initial and total Rubisco activity increased throughout phase III, with maximal activity achieved 9 h into the photoperiod at the beginning of phase IV, as atmospheric CO(2) uptake recommenced. We suggest that the increased enzyme activity supports assimilation under CO(2)-limited conditions at the start of phase IV. The data indicate that Rubisco activity is modulated in-line with intracellular CO(2) supply during the daytime phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:10557233

  18. The acute phase of inflammatory response involved in the wound-healing process after excimer laser treatment

    PubMed Central

    Resan, Mirko; Vukosavljevic, Miroslav; Vojvodic, Danilo; Pajic-Eggspuehler, Brigitte; Pajic, Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the participation of proinflammatory cytokines in the acute phase of corneal wound-healing response after excimer laser treatment. Methods The study included 68 myopic eyes up to −3.0 diopters divided into two groups: 1) eyes treated with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (n=31) and 2) eyes treated with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) (n=37). Each group was then divided into three subgroups based on tear sampling times: before (0 hours), 1 hour after, and 24 hours after treatment. The tear fluid was sampled from lower lateral tear meniscus using a cellulose microsurgical sponge. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in tear fluid were determined by flow cytometry method. Results Statistical significance was observed in the concentrations of TNF-α (P=0.0421) and IL-1β (P=0.0225) between samples collected 1 and 24 hours after PRK treatment in favor of samples collected 1 hour after treatment. IL-6 concentration changes showed a significant increase in the PRK group in both time intervals following treatment compared to pretreatment (0 hour/1 hour, P=0.0031; 0 hour/24 hours, P=0.0059). For IL-8 concentrations, significant differences were observed between control and experimental groups in samples collected 1 hour after LASIK and 1 hour after PRK treatment (P<0.001 for both groups), and IL-8 concentrations between control and experimental groups in samples collected 24 hours after LASIK and 24 hours after PRK treatment were greater after PRK treatment (P=0.0005). Comparison of average concentration values of proinflammatory cytokines in all the tested samples between LASIK and PRK groups showed significantly higher levels of IL-1β in the LASIK group 24 hours after treatment (P=0.0134), and of IL-6 in the PRK group 24 hours after treatment (P=0.0031). Conclusion The acute phase of corneal wound healing after excimer laser treatment is defined by an intensive inflammatory response. After PRK

  19. Impact of Activation Treatment and CCN/IN Concentrations on Simulations of A Continental Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberg, D. A.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol play an important role in mediating cloud microphysics by serving as both cloud condensation and ice nuclei (CCN and IN). In mixed-phase, deep convective clouds, these CCN and IN can alter physical processes related to droplet activation and heterogeneous freezing, affecting the dynamics, microphysics, and ultimately evolution of the cloud. However, modifying the CCN and IN budget entrained into a cloud eventually leads to many simultaneous, competing microphysical processes which make it difficult to precisely predict how cloud properties will change. Here, we study the sensitivity of a continental convective system observed during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) in 2011 to changes in CCN and IN burden with the help of 2D and 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We explore how the potential for convective invigoration is sensitive to the treatment of droplet activation at the cloud base by adopting an emulator of an adiabatic parcel model to parameterize the activation calculation. Furthermore, we study how changes in the IN budget can enhance the role of heterogeneous freezing and diminish the efficacy of homogeneous freezing above the -40C isotherm within the cloud. Since anvil ice is typically produced homogeneously, we also study how this shift in freezing mechanisms affects the size distributions and properties of the system's anvil cirrus. The in situ observations of anvil ice obtained during MACPEX and the ice nuclei residuals are used as a reference to constrain the simulations.

  20. Piperine Causes G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells through Checkpoint Kinase-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Fofaria, Neel M.; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the cytotoxic effects of piperine, a major constituent of black and long pepper in melanoma cells. Piperine treatment inhibited the growth of SK MEL 28 and B16 F0 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory effects of piperine were mediated by cell cycle arrest of both the cell lines in G1 phase. The G1 arrest by piperine correlated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and induction of p21. Furthermore, this growth arrest by piperine treatment was associated with DNA damage as indicated by phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139, activation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related protein (ATR) and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). Pretreatment with AZD 7762, a Chk1 inhibitor not only abrogated the activation of Chk1 but also piperine mediated G1 arrest. Similarly, transfection of cells with Chk1 siRNA completely protected the cells from G1 arrest induced by piperine. Piperine treatment caused down-regulation of E2F1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Apoptosis induced by piperine was associated with down-regulation of XIAP, Bid (full length) and cleavage of Caspase-3 and PARP. Furthermore, our results showed that piperine treatment generated ROS in melanoma cells. Blocking ROS by tiron protected the cells from piperine mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results suggest that piperine mediated ROS played a critical role in inducing DNA damage and activation of Chk1 leading to G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:24804719

  1. STAT3 Activation in Skeletal Muscle Links Muscle Wasting and the Acute Phase Response in Cancer Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Kunzevitzky, Noelia; Guttridge, Denis C.; Khuri, Sawsan; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cachexia, or weight loss despite adequate nutrition, significantly impairs quality of life and response to therapy in cancer patients. In cancer patients, skeletal muscle wasting, weight loss and mortality are all positively associated with increased serum cytokines, particularly Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the presence of the acute phase response. Acute phase proteins, including fibrinogen and serum amyloid A (SAA) are synthesized by hepatocytes in response to IL-6 as part of the innate immune response. To gain insight into the relationships among these observations, we studied mice with moderate and severe Colon-26 (C26)-carcinoma cachexia. Methodology/Principal Findings Moderate and severe C26 cachexia was associated with high serum IL-6 and IL-6 family cytokines and highly similar patterns of skeletal muscle gene expression. The top canonical pathways up-regulated in both were the complement/coagulation cascade, proteasome, MAPK signaling, and the IL-6 and STAT3 pathways. Cachexia was associated with increased muscle pY705-STAT3 and increased STAT3 localization in myonuclei. STAT3 target genes, including SOCS3 mRNA and acute phase response proteins, were highly induced in cachectic muscle. IL-6 treatment and STAT3 activation both also induced fibrinogen in cultured C2C12 myotubes. Quantitation of muscle versus liver fibrinogen and SAA protein levels indicates that muscle contributes a large fraction of serum acute phase proteins in cancer. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that the STAT3 transcriptome is a major mechanism for wasting in cancer. Through IL-6/STAT3 activation, skeletal muscle is induced to synthesize acute phase proteins, thus establishing a molecular link between the observations of high IL-6, increased acute phase response proteins and muscle wasting in cancer. These results suggest a mechanism by which STAT3 might causally influence muscle wasting by altering the profile of genes expressed and translated in muscle such

  2. 77 FR 43605 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Glucocerebrosidase Activators for the Treatment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Glucocerebrosidase Activators for the Treatment of Gaucher Disease and Central Nervous System Proteinopathies... human central nervous system proteinopathies, including without limitation Parkinson's disease.''...

  3. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays (MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzene ω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors (GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  4. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays(MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzeneω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors(GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  5. Purification of Active Myrosinase from Plants by Aqueous Two-Phase Counter-Current Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Kristina L.; Ito, Yoichiro; Ramarathnam, Aarthi; Holtzclaw, W. David; Fahey, Jed W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myrosinase (thioglucoside glucohydrolase; E.C. 3.2.1.147), is a plant enzyme of increasing interest and importance to the biomedical community. Myrosinase catalyses the formation of isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane (frombroccoli) and 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate (from moringa), which are potent inducers of the cytoprotective phase-2 response in humans, by hydrolysis of their abundant glucosinolate (β-thioglucoside N-hydroxysulphate) precursors. Objective To develop an aqueous two-phase counter-current chromatography (CCC) system for the rapid, three-step purification of catalytically active myrosinase. Methods A high-concentration potassium phosphate and polyethylene glycol biphasic aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) is used with a newly developed CCC configuration that utilises spiral-wound, flat-twisted tubing (with an ovoid cross-section). Results Making the initial crude plant extract directly in the ATPS and injecting only the lower phase permitted highly selective partitioning of the myrosinase complex before a short chromatography on a spiral disk CCC. Optimum phase retention and separation of myrosinase from other plant proteins afforded a 60-fold purification. Conclusion Catalytically active myrosinase is purified from 3-day broccoli sprouts, 7-day daikon sprouts, mustard seeds and the leaves of field-grown moringa trees, in a CCC system that is predictably scalable. PMID:25130502

  6. APPRAISAL OF POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESSES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powdered activated carbon has been the subject of several developmental efforts directed towards producing improved methods for treating municipal wastewaters. Granular activated carbon has proven itself as an effective means of reducing dissolved organic contaminant levels, but ...

  7. A COMPARISON OF LIQUID AND GAS-PHASE PHOTOOXIDATION TREATMENT OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER: SYNTHETIC AND FIELD SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of photo-oxidation treatment of metyl tert-butyl either (MTBE) in water was investigated using two systems, 1) a slurry falling film photo-reactor, and 2) an integrated air-stripping with gas phase photooxidation system. MTBE-contaminated synthetic water and field...

  8. Nanoscale Properties and Stability Simulations of Alkali Activated Cement Phases from First Principle Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Ongun; White, Claire

    Using first principle density functional calculations, we present the nanoscale properties of interactions, local bonds, charge distributions, mechanical properties and strength of alkali activated cement phases which are the most promising alternative to the ordinary Portland cement with a much lower cost to the environment. We present results on the stability and long term durability of various alkali activated cement structures, effects of external alkali agents on their properties and ways of utilizing them for further applications. We compare the calculated properties of alkali activated cement with those of ordinary Portland cement and contribute to the formation of long term durability data of these phases. Comparison with X-ray and neutron scattering experiment results are also provided via pair distribution functions extracted from simulation results.

  9. Phase-Controlled Electrochemical Activity of Epitaxial Mg-Spinel Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenxing; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Liang; Lipson, Albert L; Fister, Timothy T; Zeng, Li; Kim, Chunjoong; Yi, Tanghong; Sa, Niya; Proffit, Danielle L; Burrell, Anthony K; Cabana, Jordi; Ingram, Brian J; Biegalski, Michael D; Bedzyk, Michael J; Fenter, Paul

    2015-12-30

    We report an approach to control the reversible electrochemical activity (i.e., extraction/insertion) of Mg(2+) in a cathode host through the use of phase-pure epitaxially stabilized thin film structures. The epitaxially stabilized MgMn2O4 (MMO) thin films in the distinct tetragonal and cubic phases are shown to exhibit dramatically different properties (in a nonaqueous electrolyte, Mg(TFSI)2 in propylene carbonate): tetragonal MMO shows negligible activity while the cubic MMO (normally found as polymorph at high temperature or high pressure) exhibits reversible Mg(2+) activity with associated changes in film structure and Mn oxidation state. These results demonstrate a novel strategy for identifying the factors that control multivalent cation mobility in next-generation battery materials. PMID:26641524

  10. Gemcitabine and Doxetaxel for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Phase II North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) Clinical Trial1

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Reid, Joel M.; Morlan, Bruce W.; Farr, Gist H.; Camoriano, John K.; Johnson, David B.; Egner, James R.; Seay, Thomas E.; Kim, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Few effective options are available for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several phase I trials suggest promising activity of a combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel. Methods Patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC were treated with docetaxel 40 mg/m2 (later reduced to 30 mg/m2) and gemcitabine 800 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 every 3 weeks. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in 26 months. Median age was 64 (range 27-78), 17 were male, 14 had liver-only disease and, 11 had extrahepatic disease. Results Of 25 patients evaluable for the primary endpoint (response), 2 (8%) have a confirmed partial response. The median TTP is 2.76 months (95% CI 1.84-6.64 months). Median survival was 12.8 months (95% CI: 5.26-28.00). Two patients died on-study due to adverse events (1 hepatic and 1 renal failure), neither of which were attributed to the study medications. Twenty patients (81%) have experienced grade 3+ adverse events, including 11 with grade 4+ adverse events, primarily neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, and fatigue. Conclusions While this combination appears to have potential benefit, as measured by overall survival, its toxicity and the recent introduction of sorafenib has further limited the use of chemotherapy. Approaches other than chemotherapy are likely to be of the greatest potential benefit. PMID:21555932

  11. Phase matching of four-wave interactions of SRS components in birefringent SRS-active crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T

    2012-03-31

    A new method has been proposed for achieving wave vector matching in four-wave interactions of frequency components upon SRS in birefringent SRS-active crystals. The method ensures anti-Stokes wave generation and enables a substantial reduction in higher order Stokes SRS generation thresholds. Phase matching directions in BaWO{sub 4} SRS-active negative uniaxial crystals and SrWO{sub 4} SRS-active positive uniaxial crystals have been found in the wavelength range 0.4 - 0.7 {mu}m.

  12. A Phase II Evaluation of Gefitinib in the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Kimberly K.; Sill, Michael W.; Fischer, Edgar; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Mannel, Robert S.; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Hanjani, Parviz; Wilken, Jason A.; Baron, Andre T.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schilder, Russell J.; Singh, Meenakshi; Maihle, Nita J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A phase II trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gefitinib in patients with persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer. Methods Women with histologically confirmed persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer were treated with 500 mg oral gefitinib daily until progression or severe toxicity, with progression-free survival (PFS) at six months as the primary endpoint. Tumor expression of total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor A (PRA) and B (PRB), Ki67, pEGFR and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) were examined pre- and post-treatment. EGFR was sequenced, and serum concentrations of soluble EGFR (sEGFR) at baseline also were examined. Results Of 29 patients enrolled, 26 were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Four patients experienced PFS ≥6 months, and one had a complete response which was not associated with an EGFR mutation. The concentration of sEGFR in pretreatment serum was positively correlated with overall survival (OS), but not with responsiveness to gefitinib in this small patient cohort. Expression of tumor biomarkers was not associated with PFS or OS. Co-expression of ER with PRA in primary and recurrent tumors, and pEGFR with pERK in primary tumors was observed. Conclusions This treatment regimen was tolerable but lacked sufficient efficacy to warrant further evaluation in this setting. The possible association between serum sEGFR concentrations and OS, and temporal changes in expression of pEGFR and pERK and the documented CR of one patient are interesting and warrant additional investigation. PMID:23438670

  13. Early Phase in the Development of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Yasmin L; Yoon, Michelle; Manini, Alex F; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Ostman, Maria; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cannabinoids derived from the marijuana plant have potential therapeutic benefits but most have not been well investigated, despite the widespread legalization of medical marijuana in the USA and other countries. Therapeutic indications will depend on determinations as to which of the multiple cannabinoids, and other biologically active chemicals that are present in the marijuana plant, can be developed to treat specific symptoms and/or diseases. Such insights are particularly critical for addiction disorders, where different phytocannabinoids appear to induce opposing actions that can confound the development of treatment interventions. Whereas Δ(9)-tetracannabinol has been well documented to be rewarding and to enhance sensitivity to other drugs, cannabidiol (CBD), in contrast, appears to have low reinforcing properties with limited abuse potential and to inhibit drug-seeking behavior. Other considerations such as CBD's anxiolytic properties and minimal adverse side effects also support its potential viability as a treatment option for a variety of symptoms associated with drug addiction. However, significant research is still needed as CBD investigations published to date primarily relate to its effects on opioid drugs, and CBD's efficacy at different phases of the abuse cycle for different classes of addictive substances remain largely understudied. Our paper provides an overview of preclinical animal and human clinical investigations, and presents preliminary clinical data that collectively sets a strong foundation in support of the further exploration of CBD as a therapeutic intervention against opioid relapse. As the legal landscape for medical marijuana unfolds, it is important to distinguish it from "medical CBD" and other specific cannabinoids, that can more appropriately be used to maximize the medicinal potential of the marijuana plant. PMID:26269227

  14. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  15. Phase development in conventional and active belite cement pastes by Rietveld analysis and chemical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Cuberos, Antonio J.M.; De la Torre, Angeles G.; Martin-Sedeno, M. Carmen; Moreno-Real, Laureano; Merlini, Marco; Ordonez, Luis M.; Aranda, Miguel A.G.

    2009-10-15

    High belite cements may be an alternative to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Although CO{sub 2} emissions may be depleted up to 10%, unfortunately, the hydration reactivity of belite phases is slow which leads to low mechanical strengths at early ages. In order to enhance their hydraulic reactivity, the activation of these cements by doping with alkaline oxides has been proposed. Here, we have synthesised a laboratory belite clinker without activation (47 wt.% of {beta}-C{sub 2}S and 19 wt.% of {alpha}{sub H}'-C{sub 2}S) and two alkaline oxide activated clinkers (one with 13 wt.% of {beta}-C{sub 2}S, 24 wt.% of {alpha}{sub H}'-C{sub 2}S and 19 wt.% of {alpha}-C{sub 2}S; and the second with 12 wt.% of {beta}-C{sub 2}S, 42 wt.% of {alpha}{sub H}'-C{sub 2}S and 5 wt.% of {alpha}-C{sub 2}S). We have also developed a methodology to analyse quantitatively the phase evolution of cement pastes and we have applied it to these high belite cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, together with chemical constraints, is used to determine the phase development up to 1 year of hydration in the belite cement pastes. {beta}-C{sub 2}S almost does not react during the first 3 months, meanwhile {alpha}{sub H}'-C{sub 2}S reacts on average more than 50% in the same period. Moreover, the degree of reaction of {alpha}-C{sub 2}S is slightly larger (on average about 70% after three months) than that of {alpha}{sub H}'-C{sub 2}S. Full phase analyses are reported and discussed including the time evolution of amorphous phases and free water.

  16. Liver protein kinase A activity is decreased during the late hypoglycemic phase of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C; Hsu, H K; Yang, S L; Jao, H C; Liu, M S

    1999-10-01

    Changes in protein kinase A (PKA, or cAMP-dependent protein kinase) activity in the rat liver during different metabolic phases of sepsis were investigated. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Experiments were divided into 3 groups: control, early sepsis, and late sepsis. Early and late sepsis refer to those animals killed at 9 and 18 h, respectively, after CLP. Hepatic PKA was extracted and partially purified by acid precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose chromatography. PKA was eluted from DEAE-cellulose column with a linear NaCl gradient. Two peaks of PKA, type I (eluted at low ionic strength) and type II (eluted at high ionic strength), were collected and their activities were determined on the basis of the rate of incorporation of [gamma-32-P]ATP into histone. The results show that during early sepsis, both type I and type II PKA activities remained unchanged. During late sepsis, type I PKA activity was decreased by 40.7-53.6%, whereas type II PKA activity was unaffected. Kinetic analysis of the data on type I PKA during the late phase of sepsis reveals that the Vmax (maximal velocity) values for ATP, cAMP, and histone were decreased by 40.7, 53.6, and 47.3%, respectively whereas the Km (substrate concentration required for half-maximal enzymatic activity) values for ATP, cAMP, and histone were unaltered. These data indicate that type I PKA was inactivated during the late hypoglycemic phase of sepsis in the rat liver. Because PKA-mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism, an inactivation of PKA may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia during the late phase of sepsis. PMID:10509629

  17. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  18. Phase transformation of iron in hydroxyapatite in the activation of n-octane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padayachee, D.; Dasireddy, V. D. B. C.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Singh, S.; Friedrich, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    The phase change of iron modified hydroxyapatite catalysts used in the activation of n-octane has been investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. These catalysts were prepared using a wet impregnation and a co-precipitation technique. Both the catalysts showed the presence of an iron(III) phase. Differences were observed in the reduction behavior of the catalysts, suggesting that their reduction pathway is sensitive to the method of synthesis. This study focused on characterizing the differences in the phasic composition of the catalysts in an attempt to further understand their catalytic performance.

  19. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  20. Experimental demonstration of an active phase randomization and monitor module for quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2012-08-01

    Phase randomization is a very important assumption in the BB84 quantum key distribution (QKD) system with weak coherent source; otherwise, eavesdropper may spy the final key. In this Letter, a stable and monitored active phase randomization scheme for the one-way and two-way QKD system is proposed and demonstrated in experiments. Furthermore, our scheme gives an easy way for Alice to monitor the degree of randomization in experiments. Therefore, we expect our scheme to become a standard part in future QKD systems due to its secure significance and feasibility.

  1. A mouse-human phase 1 co-clinical trial of a protease-activated fluorescent probe for imaging cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi Javid; Cardona, Diana M; Lazarides, Alexander L; Spasojevic, Ivan; Ferrer, Jorge M; Cahill, Joan; Lee, Chang-Lung; Snuderl, Matija; Blazer, Dan G; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Mosca, Paul J; Mito, Jeffrey K; Cuneo, Kyle C; Larrier, Nicole A; O'Reilly, Erin K; Riedel, Richard F; Eward, William C; Strasfeld, David B; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G; Brigman, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence is a common cause of treatment failure for patients with solid tumors. Intraoperative detection of microscopic residual cancer in the tumor bed could be used to decrease the risk of a positive surgical margin, reduce rates of reexcision, and tailor adjuvant therapy. We used a protease-activated fluorescent imaging probe, LUM015, to detect cancer in vivo in a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and ex vivo in a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial. In mice, intravenous injection of LUM015 labeled tumor cells, and residual fluorescence within the tumor bed predicted local recurrence. In 15 patients with STS or breast cancer, intravenous injection of LUM015 before surgery was well tolerated. Imaging of resected human tissues showed that fluorescence from tumor was significantly higher than fluorescence from normal tissues. LUM015 biodistribution, pharmacokinetic profiles, and metabolism were similar in mouse and human subjects. Tissue concentrations of LUM015 and its metabolites, including fluorescently labeled lysine, demonstrated that LUM015 is selectively distributed to tumors where it is activated by proteases. Experiments in mice with a constitutively active PEGylated fluorescent imaging probe support a model where tumor-selective probe distribution is a determinant of increased fluorescence in cancer. These co-clinical studies suggest that the tumor specificity of protease-activated imaging probes, such as LUM015, is dependent on both biodistribution and enzyme activity. Our first-in-human data support future clinical trials of LUM015 and other protease-sensitive probes. PMID:26738797

  2. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  3. Developing Treatment for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial of the Camperdown Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearne, Anna; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark; O'Brian, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate in detail how adolescents who stutter perform during treatment, with the aim of informing treatment development for this age group. Method: The Camperdown Program was conducted with 3 adolescents who stutter. Their performance during treatment was recorded in detail, and outcome measures were collected before treatment and…

  4. Effects of Two-Phase Treatment with the Herbst and Preadjusted Edgewise Appliances on the Upper Airway Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Woei Li; Tse, Christine Shuk Kwan; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To assess the effects of two-phase treatment with the Herbst and the preadjusted edgewise appliances on upper airway dimensions and to investigate the correlation between changes in the upper airway dimensions and skeletal morphologies. Methods. A total of 27 Chinese male adolescents aged 12.8 ± 1.3 years were selected. Lateral cephalograms were collected to assess the skeletal morphology and upper airway dimensions. Results. Following Herbst appliance treatment, the upper airway space was significantly enlarged, with the retropalatal (U-MPW) increasing by 1.1 ± 1.6 mm (P < 0.001), the retroglossal (PASmin) increasing by 1.3 ± 2.9 mm (P < 0.05), and the hypopharynx (V-LPW) enlarging by 1.6 ± 3.0 mm (P < 0.01). PASmin was found to show a negative correlation to the mandibular plane angle (MnPl-SN) by r = −0.413 (P < 0.05). There was no significant change (P > 0.05) in upper airway dimensions during the second-phase treatment. Conclusions. Herbst appliance treatment increased the oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal airway dimensions among adolescents with Class II malocclusion, and the effects were maintained throughout the second treatment phase with a preadjusted edgewise appliance. There was a negative correlation between the change in the depth of the retroglossal pharynx and the mandibular plane angle. PMID:27073805

  5. Kinetic attractor phase diagrams of active nematic suspensions: the dilute regime.

    PubMed

    Forest, M Gregory; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Ruhai

    2015-08-28

    Large-scale simulations by the authors of the kinetic-hydrodynamic equations for active polar nematics revealed a variety of spatio-temporal attractors, including steady and unsteady, banded (1d) and cellular (2d) spatial patterns. These particle scale activation-induced attractors arise at dilute nanorod volume fractions where the passive equilibrium phase is isotropic, whereas all previous model simulations have focused on the semi-dilute, nematic equilibrium regime and mostly on low-moment orientation tensor and polarity vector models. Here we extend our previous results to complete attractor phase diagrams for active nematics, with and without an explicit polar potential, to map out novel spatial and dynamic transitions, and to identify some new attractors, over the parameter space of dilute nanorod volume fraction and nanorod activation strength. The particle-scale activation parameter corresponds experimentally to a tunable force dipole strength (so-called pushers with propulsion from the rod tail) generated by active rod macromolecules, e.g., catalysis with the solvent phase, ATP-induced propulsion, or light-activated propulsion. The simulations allow 2d spatial variations in all flow and orientational variables and full spherical orientational degrees of freedom; the attractors correspond to numerical integration of a coupled system of 125 nonlinear PDEs in 2d plus time. The phase diagrams with and without the polar interaction potential are remarkably similar, implying that polar interactions among the rodlike particles are not essential to long-range spatial and temporal correlations in flow, polarity, and nematic order. As a general rule, above a threshold, low volume fractions induce 1d banded patterns, whereas higher yet still dilute volume fractions yield 2d patterns. Again as a general rule, varying activation strength at fixed volume fraction induces novel dynamic transitions. First, stationary patterns saturate the instability of the isotropic

  6. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study. Phase 2: Extravehicular activity at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Valerie; Shields, Nicholas, Jr.; Carr, Gerald P.; Pogue, William; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Schulze, Arthur E.

    1988-01-01

    The focus is on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems requirements definition for an advanced space mission: remote-from-main base EVA on the Moon. The lunar environment, biomedical considerations, appropriate hardware design criteria, hardware and interface requirements, and key technical issues for advanced lunar EVA were examined. Six remote EVA scenarios (three nominal operations and three contingency situations) were developed in considerable detail.

  7. Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

    2006-01-31

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during

  8. Evidence for platelet-activating factor as a late-phase mediator of chronic pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W. G.; Chao, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a mediator of pancreatic inflammation was examined in the rat pancreatic duct ligation model of obstructive pancreatitis. Pancreatic generation of PAF, as measured by bioassay (ie, platelet [3H]serotonin secretion), was determined at various times after induction of inflammation. Tissue levels of PAF in the normal pancreas averaged 600 +/- 49 pg/g, but PAF was not detectable during the initial 24 hours of pancreatitis, a time when the inflammatory reaction would be considered acute, that is, during the period of maximal serum amylase release and the development of interstitial edema. However a substantial increase in pancreatic PAF levels (12 times control levels) was observed 7 to 14 days after duct ligation during the late-phase response interval similar to the situation characteristic of chronic pancreatitis in which parenchymal atrophy, fibrosis, and pancreatic insufficiency evolve. One week after duct ligation when PAF levels peaked, an evaluation was made of the effects of PAF antagonists (BN52021 and WEB2170) on pancreatic lesions using Evan's blue extravasation, pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and acid phosphatase activity in peritoneal lavage fluid. BN52021 or WEB2170 treatment was shown to reduce pancreatic damage and inflammation significantly. Long-term in vivo administration of exogenous PAF (20 micrograms/kg/hr for 7 days) exhibited a reduction of [3H]thymidine uptake into and amylase release from pancreatic acini in vitro. Our observations 1) that pancreatic PAF levels increased significantly during the chronic phase of obstructive pancreatitis induced by duct ligation; 2) that inhibition of the action of PAF, through specific receptor antagonism, caused an attenuation of pancreatic lesions; and 3) that chronic administration of PAF resulted in decreased pancreatic regeneration and exocrine function are consistent with a pivotal role for PAF as a late-phase inflammatory mediator in chronic

  9. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo

  10. Efficacy of SLZ and MTX (alone or combination) on the treatment of active sacroiliitis in early AS.

    PubMed

    Kabasakal, Yasemin; Kitapcioglu, Gul; Yargucu, Figen; Taylan, Ali; Argin, Mehmet; Gumusdis, Gurbuz

    2009-10-01

    Sacroiliitis is an important sign of spondylarthritis (SpA) of which the prototype disease is ankylosing spondylitis. The radiographic changes required for diagnosing AS occur as late as 8-11 years after the onset of clinical symptoms. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been the main treatment for spondylitis of AS. For patients refractory or intolerant to NSAIDs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have been used as a second-line approach. Sulphasalazine (SLZ) is known as the best DMARD in treatment of peripheral arthritis; also methotrexate (MTX) is currently one of the most widely used DMARDs. But there was no objective information about inflammation of sacroiliac joints during treatment with these DMARDS that are the first places of the beginning point of SpA. For this purpose, in this study, the effect of SLZ and MTX, which are used alone and combination in 6 months, on treatment of active sacroiliitis, which is shown by dynamic magnetic resonance and acute phase reactants in laboratory has been investigated. 55 patients (F:M = 34:21) with active sacroiliitis [mean age = 37.05 + 13.03 year (n = 55)] were evaluated and determined by dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in this study. The better response in the SLZ treatment group than the other two groups has been obtained. Nevertheless, those changes were not statistically found different. In conclusion, the ratio of treatment of active sacroiliitis, especially early period, with SLZ as a DMARD is better than MTX or MTX + SLZ, but this difference is not statistically significant. A prospective study of the treatment of active sacroiliitis by DMARDs may be more illustrative. PMID:19593568

  11. Evaluating the Stability of Open Bite Treatments and Its Predictive Factors in the Retention Phase during Permanent Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Parisa; Pakshir, Hamid Reza; Hoseini, Seyed Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Orthodontists often find challenges in treating the anterior open bite and maintaining the results. Purpose This retrospective study was aimed to evaluate the stability of corrected open bite in the retention phase during permanent dentition. Materials and Method A total number of 37 patients, including 20 males and 17 females, with the mean age of 18±2.1 years at the beginning of the treatment were studied after correction of the anterior open bite. Overbites of the patients were measured from their lateral cephalograms before (T1), at the end (T2) and at least 3 years after the end of the treatment in the presence of their fixed retainers (T3).The mean overbite changes and the number of patients with open bite, due to treatment relapse, at T3 were calculated. The relationship between the pre-treatment factors and the treatment relapse was assessed at T1 and T2. Also the effects of treatment methods, extraction and adjunctive use of removable appliances on the post-treatment relapse were evaluated. Results The mean overbite change during the post-treatment period was -0.46±0.7 mm and six patients (16.2%) had relapse in the follow-up recall. Cephalometric Jaraback index showed statistically significant, but weak correlation with overbite changes after the treatment (p= 0.035; r= -0.353). No significant difference was found between the extraction and non-extraction groups (p= 0.117) the use and the type of the removable appliances (p= 0.801). Conclusion Fixed retainers alone are insufficient for stabilizing the results of corrected open bite. The change of overbite in the retention phase could not be predicted from cephalometric measurements. Extraction and use of adjunctive removable appliance did not have any effect on the treatment relapse. PMID:25759854

  12. Human Thalamus Regulates Cortical Activity via Spatially Specific and Structurally Constrained Phase-Amplitude Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Malekmohammadi, Mahsa; Elias, W. Jeff; Pouratian, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Although the thalamus is believed to regulate and coordinate cortical activity both within and across functional regions, such as motor and visual cortices, direct evidence for such regulation and the mechanism of regulation remains poorly described. Using simultaneous invasive recordings of cortical and thalamic electrophysiological activity in 2 awake and spontaneously behaving human subjects, we provide direct evidence of thalamic regulation of cortical activity through a mechanism of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC), in which the phase of low frequency oscillations regulates the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations. Specifically, we show that cortical PAC between the theta phase and beta amplitude is spatially dependent on and time variant with the magnitude of thalamocortical theta coherence. Moreover, using causality analysis and MR diffusion tractography, we provide evidence that thalamic theta activity drives cortical theta oscillations and PAC across structures and that these thalamocortical relationships are structurally constrained by anatomic pathways. This relationship allows for new evidence of thalamocortical PAC. Given the diffuse connectivity of the thalamus with the cerebral cortex, thalamocortical PAC may play an important role in addressing the binding problem, including both integration and segregation of information within and across cortical areas. PMID:24408958

  13. Hemispheric activation during planning and execution phases in reaching post stroke: a consort study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Daly, Janis J; Hansley, Jeff; Yao, Wan X; Yang, Qi; Sun, Jiayang; Hvorat, Ken; Pundik, Svetlana; Yue, Guang H

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced activation in the non-lesion hemisphere in stroke patients was widely observed during movement of the affected upper limb, but its functional role related to motor planning and execution is still unknown.This study was to characterize the activation in the non-lesion hemisphere during movement planning and execution by localizing sources of high-density electroencephalography (EEG) signal and estimating the source strength (current density [A/m]).Ten individuals with chronic stroke and shoulder/elbow coordination deficits and 5 healthy controls participated in the study.EEG (64 channels) was recorded from scalp electrodes while the subjects performed a reach task involving shoulder flexion and elbow extension of the affected (patients) or dominant (controls) upper extremity. Sources of the EEG were obtained and analyzed at 17 time points across movement preparation and execution phases. A 3-layer boundary element model was overlaid and used to identify the brain activation sources. A distributed current density model, low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) L1 norm method, was applied to the data pre-processed by independent component analysis.Subjects with stroke had stronger source strength in the sensorimotor cortices during the movement compared with the controls. Their contralesional/lesional activation ratio (CTLR) for the primary motor cortices was significantly higher than that of the controls during the movement-planning phase, but not during the execution phase. The CTLR was higher in planning than in the execution phase in the stroke group.Excessive contralesional motor cortical activation appears to be more related to movement preparation rather than execution in chronic stroke. PMID:25621675

  14. Nucleation pathway and kinetics of phase-separating active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Richard, David; Löwen, Hartmut; Speck, Thomas

    2016-06-28

    Suspensions of purely repulsive but self-propelled Brownian particles might undergo phase separation, a phenomenon that strongly resembles the phase separation of passive particles with attractions. Here we employ computer simulations to study the nucleation kinetics and the microscopic pathway active Brownian disks take in two dimensions when quenched from the homogeneous suspension to propulsion speeds beyond the binodal. We find the same qualitative behavior for the nucleation rate as a function of density as for a passive suspension undergoing liquid-vapor separation, suggesting that the scenario of an effective free energy also extends to the kinetics of phase separation. We study the transition in more detail through a committor analysis and find that transition states are best described by a combination of cluster size and the radial polarization of particles in the cluster. PMID:27126952

  15. Thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in easy-plane magnetic wires within the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, which runs parallel to the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory for thermal resistances in superconducting wires. To that end, we start by obtaining the exact solutions for free-energy minima and saddle points. We provide an analytical expression for the phase-slip rate in the zero spin-current limit, which involves a detailed analysis of spin fluctuations at the extrema of the free energy. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which thermal phase slips can be inferred by measuring nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  16. Modulating Photoluminescence of Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide by Metal-Insulator Phase Transition in Active Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jiwei; Wang, Xi; Fu, Deyi; Ko, Changhyun; Chen, Yabin; Sun, Yufei; Lee, Sangwook; Wang, Kevin X; Dong, Kaichen; Sun, Yinghui; Tongay, Sefaattin; Jiao, Liying; Yao, Jie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Junqiao

    2016-08-01

    The atomic thickness and flatness allow properties of 2D semiconductors to be modulated with influence from the substrate. Reversible modulation of these properties requires an "active," reconfigurable substrate, i.e., a substrate with switchable functionalities that interacts strongly with the 2D overlayer. In this work, the photoluminescence (PL) of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) is modulated by interfacing it with a phase transition material, vanadium dioxide (VO2 ). The MoS2 PL intensity is enhanced by a factor of up to three when the underlying VO2 undergoes the thermally driven phase transition from the insulating to metallic phase. A nonvolatile, reversible way to rewrite the PL pattern is also demonstrated. The enhancement effect is attributed to constructive optical interference when the VO2 turns metallic. This modulation method requires no chemical or mechanical processes, potentially finding applications in new switches and sensors. PMID:27335137

  17. Protein kinase a activity is increased in rat heart during late hypodynamic phase of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, S L; Hsu, C; Lue, S I; Hsu, H K; Liu, M S

    1997-07-01

    Changes in the activities of protein kinase A (PKA, or cAMP-dependent protein kinase) in rat heart during different cardiodynamic phases of sepsis were investigated. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Experiments were divided into three groups: control, early sepsis, and late sepsis. Early and late sepsis refers to those animals killed at 9 and 18 h, respectively, after cecal ligation and puncture. Cardiac PKA was extracted and partially purified by acid precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. PKA was eluted from DEAE-cellulose column with a linear NaCl gradient. Two peaks of PKA, type I (eluted at low ionic strength) and type II (eluted at high ionic strength), were collected and their activities were determined based on the rate of incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into histone. Results obtained show that during early sepsis, both type I and type II PKA activities were unaffected. During late sepsis, type I PKA activities were stimulated by 66.7-97.7%, while type II PKA activities remained constant. Kinetic analysis of the data on type I PKA during late sepsis reveals that the Vmax values for ATP, cAMP, and histone were increased by 84.7, 66.7, and 97.7%, respectively; while the Km values for ATP, cAMP, and histone were unaltered. These data indicate that type I PKA is activated in rat heart during late hypodynamic phase of sepsis. Since kinase-mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating myocardial function and metabolism, an activation of type I PKA during late sepsis may contribute to the development of altered myocardial function during hypodynamic phase of sepsis. PMID:9249915

  18. Ten Year Revision of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression: Revised Treatment Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lejuez, C. W.; Hopko, Derek R.; Acierno, Ron; Daughters, Stacey B.; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2011-01-01

    Following from the seminal work of Ferster, Lewinsohn, and Jacobson, as well as theory and research on the Matching Law, Lejuez, Hopko, LePage, Hopko, and McNeil developed a reinforcement-based depression treatment that was brief, uncomplicated, and tied closely to behavioral theory. They called this treatment the brief behavioral activation…

  19. Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15

    Abstract only. Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of 100+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory of this waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most of the leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper

  20. Factors affecting the phase behavior and antimicrobial activity of carvacrol microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Hamdy A; Edris, Amr E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate some factors that can contribute to the formulation of aqueous-based carvacrol microemulsion that can potentially be used in food preservation or disinfection. For this purpose the capacity of formation of carvacrol microemulsion was first revealed by studying the phase behavior of that compound in five different non-ionic microemulsion systems. Factors affecting that phase behavior like the type of non-ionic surfactant and presence of solubilization enhancers were also studied. The fully dilutable microemulsion system that can incorporate high carvacrol amount, as revealed from the phase diagrams, was chosen for the antibacterial evaluation study. The same microemulsion system was re-formulated in a cationic form by substituting the non-ionic surfactant, Tween 20 (T20) with the cationic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). The disc diffusion method was used to evaluate the activity of these microemulsion systems against different pathogenic bacteria. Results of the phase behavior study showed that carvacrol is a challenging phenolic compound which did not lend itself easily for solubilization in a fully dilutable non-ionic microemulsion. Incorporation of some solubilization enhancers like propylene glycol (PG) or short chain alcohols can fulfill this purpose however high surfactant/carvacrol ratio (9:1) was still required to solubilize only 1.0 wt% carvacrol in dilutable microemulsion. The antibacterial evaluation study at that concentration revealed that non-ionic carvacrol microemulsion formulated with T20 and a solubilization enhancer did not exhibit better antimicrobial activity than the same concentration of carvacrol formulated in surfactant-free aqueous solution composed of water/PG (1:1). On the other hand, the CPC-formulated carvacrol microemulsion showed significantly higher antibacterial activity than T20-formulated microemulsion. Results of the current investigation shed the light on the solubilization capacity and

  1. Correlation of scintigraphic phase maps with intraoperative epicardial/endocardial maps in patients with activation disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Scheinmann, M.H.; Morady, F.J.; Davis, J.A.; Schechtmann, N.; Frais, M.; Faulkner, D.; O'Connell, W.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the true accuracy of scintigraphic findings, 8 patients (PTS), 6 with pre-excitation (PEX) syndrome and 2 with intractable ventricular tachycardia (VT), were studied by phase analysis, prior to corrective surgery. Sites of earliest phase angle were determined in multiple projections during the conduction disturbance, compared to sites of early ventricular activation determined by epicardial mapping during PEX and, when performed, by endocardial mapping during VT, and to maps previously generated at conventional electrophysiologic study (EPS). Among PEX PTS, Rt and Lt lateral, Lt anterolateral, Rt and Lt posterolateral and posteroseptal bypass pathways mapped at surgery correlated with phase localization. While localization from EPS also correlated well with surgical maps in 4 PTS, 1 PT could not be mapped by EPS and another presented ambiguities. Scintigraphic localization also correlated well with surgical mapping in a PT with a RV VT focus while EPS was suggestive but uncertain. A second PT with VT mapped scintigraphically to originate in a Lt lateral focus, demonstrated a similar localization on EPS, and during surgical mapping, an incision made through the scintigraphic focus terminated VT. Incision in regions of earliest activity in the first VT PT and in PTS with PEX resolved the arrhythmia or interrupted the bypass tract. Phase mapping correlated closely with surface mapping at surgery while providing an accurate, independent method for noninvasive assessment of conduction disturbances and a complementary tool to standard EPS.

  2. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  3. Activation of gas-phase uranyl: from an oxo to a nitrido complex.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Vallet, Valérie; Michelini, Maria del Carmen; Rios, Daniel; Gibson, John K

    2014-01-01

    The uranyl moiety, UO2(2+), is ubiquitous in the chemistry of uranium, the most prevalent actinide. Replacing the strong uranium-oxygen bonds in uranyl with other ligands is very challenging, having met with only limited success. We report here uranyl oxo bond activation in the gas phase to form a terminal nitrido complex, a previously elusive transformation. Collision induced dissociation of gas-phase UO2(NCO)Cl2(-) in an ion trap produced the nitrido oxo complex, NUOCl2(-), and CO2. NUOCl2(-) was computed by DFT to have Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. The computed bond length and order indicate a triple U-N bond. Endothermic activation of UO2(NCO)Cl2(-) to produce NUOCl2(-) and neutral CO2 was computed to be thermodynamically more favorable than NCO ligand loss. Complete reaction pathways for the CO2 elimination process were computed at the DFT level. PMID:24354492

  4. The activity of recent anti-allergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were performed during the pollen season to study the activity of different antiallergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction during the season. The first study assessed the effect of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg a day) and of a combination of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg) plus H2 (Cimetidine 800 mg a day) antagonists on nasal symptoms, mediator release and eosinophil count in a group of 16 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. During the same season a second study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of Budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and Azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients. Results showed that both antihistamines, applied topically of dosed orally, reduced sneezing even when significant increases of histamine concentration in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. When a combination of Cetirizine and Cimetidine was administered, a significant (p < 0.01) reduction of nasal airway resistance and increase of nasal airflow after NAC were demonstrated as well. In addition, topical application of Budesonide showed a strong (p < 0.01) effect on the infiltration and activation of eosinophils during the season, and on tryptase release after NAC. These effects lasted at least for one week after therapy. PMID:8669268

  5. Oscillatory phase modulates the timing of neuronal activations and resulting behavior.

    PubMed

    Coon, W G; Gunduz, A; Brunner, P; Ritaccio, A L; Pesaran, B; Schalk, G

    2016-06-01

    Human behavioral response timing is highly variable from trial to trial. While it is generally understood that behavioral variability must be due to trial-by-trial variations in brain function, it is still largely unknown which physiological mechanisms govern the timing of neural activity as it travels through networks of neuronal populations, and how variations in the timing of neural activity relate to variations in the timing of behavior. In our study, we submitted recordings from the cortical surface to novel analytic techniques to chart the trajectory of neuronal population activity across the human cortex in single trials, and found joint modulation of the timing of this activity and of consequent behavior by neuronal oscillations in the alpha band (8-12Hz). Specifically, we established that the onset of population activity tends to occur during the trough of oscillatory activity, and that deviations from this preferred relationship are related to changes in the timing of population activity and the speed of the resulting behavioral response. These results indicate that neuronal activity incurs variable delays as it propagates across neuronal populations, and that the duration of each delay is a function of the instantaneous phase of oscillatory activity. We conclude that the results presented in this paper are supportive of a general model for variability in the effective speed of information transmission in the human brain and for variability in the timing of human behavior. PMID:26975551

  6. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment. PMID:27328020

  7. Liquid-Phase Adsorption of Phenol onto Activated Carbons Prepared with Different Activation Levels.

    PubMed

    Hsieh; Teng

    2000-10-01

    The influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions was explored. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons, determined according to the Dubinin-Stoeckli equation, were found to vary with the burn-off level. By incorporating the distribution with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation using an inverse proportionality between the micropore size and the adsorption energy, the isotherms for the adsorption of phenol onto these carbons can be well predicted. The present study has demonstrated that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998301

  8. Once-daily USL255 as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures: Randomized phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Steve S; Fakhoury, Toufic A; Hogan, R Edward; Nagaraddi, Venkatesh N; Blatt, Ilan; Lawson, Balduin; Arnold, Stephan; Anders, Bob; Clark, Annie M; Laine, Dawn; Meadows, R Shawn; Halvorsen, Mark B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of USL255, Qudexy™ XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules, as an adjunctive treatment for refractory partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults taking one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs. Methods In this global phase III study (PREVAIL; NCT01142193), 249 adults with POS were randomized 1:1 to once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) or placebo. The primary and key secondary efficacy endpoints were median percent reduction in weekly POS frequency and responder rate (proportion of patients with ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency). Seizure freedom was also assessed. Safety (adverse events, clinical and laboratory findings), as well as treatment effects on quality of life (QOLIE-31-P) and clinical global impression of change (CGI-C), were evaluated. Results Across the entire 11-week treatment phase, USL255 significantly reduced the median percent seizure frequency and significantly improved responder rate compared with placebo. Efficacy over placebo was observed early in treatment, in patients with highly refractory POS, and in those with the most debilitating seizure types (i.e., complex partial, partial secondarily generalized). USL255 was safe and generally well tolerated with a low incidence of neurocognitive adverse events. USL255 was associated with significant clinical improvement without adversely affecting quality of life. Significance The PREVAIL phase III clinical study demonstrated that once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) significantly improved seizure control and was safe and generally well tolerated with few neurocognitive side effects. PMID:24902983

  9. Activities conducted during the definition phase of the outer planets missions program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The activities are described of the Meteoroid Science Team for the definition phase of the outer planet missions. Studies reported include: (1) combined zodiacal experiment for the Grand Tour Missions of the outer planets, (2) optical transmission of a honeycomb panel and its effectiveness as a particle impact surface, (3) element identification data from the combined zodiacal OPGT experiment and (4) development of lightweight thermally stable mirrors.

  10. High photocatalytic activity of mixed anatase-rutile phases on commercial TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruu Siah, Wai; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is well-known as an active photocatalyst for degradation of various organic pollutants. Over the years, a wide range of TiO2 nanoparticles with different phase compositions, crystallinities, and surface areas have been developed. Due to the different methods and conditions used to synthesize these commercial TiO2 nanoparticles, the properties and photocatalytic performance would also be different from each other. In this study, the photocatalytic removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5- trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) was investigated on commercial Evonik P25, Evonik P90, Hombikat UV100 and Hombikat N100 TiO2 nanoparticles. Upon photocatalytic tests, it was found that overall, the photocatalytic activities of the P25 and the P90 were higher than the N100 and the UV100 for the removal of both 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. The high activities of the P25 and the P90 could be attributed to their phase compositions, which are made up of a mixture of anatase and rutile phases of TiO2. Whereas, the UV100 and the N100 are made up of 100% anatase phase of TiO2. The synergistic effect of the anatase/rutile mixture was reported to slow down the recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Consequently, the photocatalytic activity was increased on these TiO2 nanoparticles.

  11. Active-to-absorbing-state phase transition in an evolving population with mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Niladri

    2015-10-01

    We study the active to absorbing phase transition (AAPT) in a simple two-component model system for a species and its mutant. We uncover the nontrivial critical scaling behavior and weak dynamic scaling near the AAPT that shows the significance of mutation and highlights the connection of this model with the well-known directed percolation universality class. Our model should be a useful starting point to study how mutation may affect extinction or survival of a species.

  12. Active-to-absorbing-state phase transition in an evolving population with mutation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Niladri

    2015-10-01

    We study the active to absorbing phase transition (AAPT) in a simple two-component model system for a species and its mutant. We uncover the nontrivial critical scaling behavior and weak dynamic scaling near the AAPT that shows the significance of mutation and highlights the connection of this model with the well-known directed percolation universality class. Our model should be a useful starting point to study how mutation may affect extinction or survival of a species. PMID:26565171

  13. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  14. Significant Treatment Effect of Bupropion in Patients With Bipolar Disorder but Similar Phase-Shifting Rate as Other Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bupropion is widely used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), and especially those with depressive mood, based on its good treatment effect, safety profile, and lower risk of phase shifting. However, increasing evidence indicates that the safety of bupropion in BD patients may not be as good as previously thought. The aim of this study was to summarize data on the treatment effect and safety profile of bupropion in the treatment of BD via a meta-analysis. Electronic search through PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. The inclusion criteria were: (i) studies comparing changes in disease severity before and after bupropion treatment or articles comparing the treatment effect of bupropion in BD patients with those receiving other standard treatments; (ii) articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were (i) case reports/series, and (ii) nonclinical trials. All effect sizes from 10 clinical trials were pooled using a random effects model. We examined the possible confounding variables using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Bupropion significantly improved the severity of disease in BD patients (P < 0.001), and the treatment effect was similar to other antidepressants/standard treatments (P = 0.220). There were no significant differences in the dropout rate (P = 0.285) and rate of phase shifting (P = 0.952) between BD patients who received bupropion and those who received other antidepressants. We could not perform a detailed meta-analysis of every category of antidepressant, nor could we rule out the possible confounding effect of concurrent psychotropics or include all drug side effects. Furthermore, the number of studies recruited in the meta-analysis was relatively small. Our findings reconfirm the benefits of bupropion for the treatment of bipolar depression, which are similar to those of other antidepressants. However, the rate of phase shifting with bupropion usage was not as low compared to other

  15. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  16. CO oxidation over ruthenium: identification of the catalytically active phases at near-atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Goodman, Wayne D.

    2012-05-21

    CO oxidation was carried out over Ru(0001) and RuO2(110) thin film grown on Ru(0001) at various O2/CO ratios near atmospheric pressures. Reaction kinetics, coupled with in situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and post-reaction Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements were used to identify the catalytically relevant phases at different reaction conditions. Under stoichiometric and reducing conditions at all reaction temperatures, as well as net-oxidizing reaction conditions below {approx}475 K, a reduced metallic phase with chemisorbed oxygen is the thermodynamically stable and catalytically active phase. On this surface CO oxidation occurs at surface defect sites, for example step edges. Only at net-oxidizing reaction conditions and above {approx}475 K is the RuO2 thin film grown on metallic Ru stable and active. However, RuO2 is not active itself without the existence of the metal substrate, suggesting the importance of a strong metal-substrate interaction (SMSI).

  17. Waves of Cdk1 Activity in S Phase Synchronize the Cell Cycle in Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Deneke, Victoria E; Melbinger, Anna; Vergassola, Massimo; Di Talia, Stefano

    2016-08-22

    Embryos of most metazoans undergo rapid and synchronous cell cycles following fertilization. While diffusion is too slow for synchronization of mitosis across large spatial scales, waves of Cdk1 activity represent a possible process of synchronization. However, the mechanisms regulating Cdk1 waves during embryonic development remain poorly understood. Using biosensors of Cdk1 and Chk1 activities, we dissect the regulation of Cdk1 waves in the Drosophila syncytial blastoderm. We show that Cdk1 waves are not controlled by the mitotic switch but by a double-negative feedback between Cdk1 and Chk1. Using mathematical modeling and surgical ligations, we demonstrate a fundamental distinction between S phase Cdk1 waves, which propagate as active trigger waves in an excitable medium, and mitotic Cdk1 waves, which propagate as passive phase waves. Our findings show that in Drosophila embryos, Cdk1 positive feedback serves primarily to ensure the rapid onset of mitosis, while wave propagation is regulated by S phase events. PMID:27554859

  18. Phase separation and rotor self-assembly in active particle suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz-Linek, J.; Valeriani, C.; Cacciuto, A.; Cates, M. E.; Marenduzzo, D.; Morozov, A. N.; Poon, W. C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Adding a nonadsorbing polymer to passive colloids induces an attraction between the particles via the “depletion” mechanism. High enough polymer concentrations lead to phase separation. We combine experiments, theory, and simulations to demonstrate that using active colloids (such as motile bacteria) dramatically changes the physics of such mixtures. First, significantly stronger interparticle attraction is needed to cause phase separation. Secondly, the finite size aggregates formed at lower interparticle attraction show unidirectional rotation. These micro-rotors demonstrate the self-assembly of functional structures using active particles. The angular speed of the rotating clusters scales approximately as the inverse of their size, which may be understood theoretically by assuming that the torques exerted by the outermost bacteria in a cluster add up randomly. Our simulations suggest that both the suppression of phase separation and the self-assembly of rotors are generic features of aggregating swimmers and should therefore occur in a variety of biological and synthetic active particle systems. PMID:22392986

  19. Dissemination Activities: A Critical New Role for Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Terry C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for integration of substance abuse treatment into medical care via medical homes and continuing specialty care. For this integration to occur in the substance abuse treatment field, substantial sharing and dissemination of information by treatment providers is required. This study explored the determinants of organizational activities directed at disseminating evidence-based practices (EBP) undertaken by 193 community treatment programs who are members of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. Using factor analysis, the research identified two generic categories reflecting different motivations for dissemination activities, and explored both treatment center leadership and organizational characteristics as determinants of these different types of dissemination activities. Organizational characteristics predicting treatment center dissemination activities included size, previous involvement in research protocols, linkages with other providers, and having non-profit status. The treatment center leader's membership in professional organizations was also a significant determinant. Organization variables account for a larger portion of the variance in treatment center dissemination activities. The results suggest that the willingness of treatment providers to help disseminate EBPs within the industry may be heavily influenced through shared network connections with other treatment organizations. PMID:24722825

  20. 14-3-3-dependent inhibition of the deubiquitinating activity of UBPY and its cancellation in the M phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Emi; Kitamura, Naomi; Komada, Masayuki

    2007-10-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY, also known as USP8, regulates cargo sorting and membrane traffic at early endosomes. Here we demonstrate the regulatory mechanism of the UBPY catalytic activity. We identified 14-3-3 {epsilon}, {gamma}, and {zeta} as UBPY-binding proteins using co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The 14-3-3 binding of UBPY was inhibited by mutating the consensus 14-3-3-binding motif RSYS{sup 680}SP, by phosphatase treatment, and by competition with the Ser{sup 680}-phosphorylated RSYS{sup 680}SP peptide. Metabolic labeling with [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate and immunoblotting using antibody against the phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding motif showed that Ser{sup 680} is a major phosphorylation site in UBPY. These results indicated that 14-3-3s bind to the region surrounding Ser{sup 680} in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The mutation at Ser{sup 680} led to enhanced ubiquitin isopeptidase activity of UBPY toward poly-ubiquitin chains and a cellular substrate, epidermal growth factor receptor, in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, addition of 14-3-3{epsilon} inhibited the UBPY activity in vitro. Finally, UBPY was dephosphorylated at Ser{sup 680} and dissociated from 14-3-3s in the M phase, resulting in enhanced activity of UBPY during cell division. We conclude that UBPY is catalytically inhibited in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by 14-3-3s during the interphase, and this regulation is cancelled in the M phase.

  1. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  2. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  5. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  6. Application of active-phase plot to the kinetic analysis of lipoxygenase in reverse micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Gilabert, M; Sanchez-Ferrer, A; Garcia-Carmona, F

    1992-01-01

    A new plot for explaining the complex expression of the enzymic activity in reverse micelles has been developed as an extension of the theoretical model described by our group [Bru, Sánchez-Ferrer & García-Carmona (1990) Biochem. J. 268, 679-684]. The plot describes the changes in the relative volume, amount of enzyme (mumoles), enzyme concentration (microM) and substrate concentration (microM) in the phase where the enzyme is active. To illustrate the usefulness of this plot, the complex activity of soya bean lipoxygenase in reverse micelles acting on its interfacial substrate, octadecadienoic acid, was studied. It showed the key parameters ruling the activity profiles of lipoxygenase with respect to micelle size (omega 0), micelle concentration (theta) and the substrate/surfactant molar ratio (rho), which have never been described before. PMID:1281978

  7. Patterns of metabolic activity in the treatment of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, J.D.; Christman, D.R.; Corona, J.F.; Fowler, J.S.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Jaeger, J.; Micheels, P.A.; Rotrosen, J.; Russell, J.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Wikler, A.

    1984-04-01

    Six patients with chronic schizophrenia were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) before and after neuroleptic treatment, using fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose. After treatment, the mean whole-slice glucose metabolic rate at the level of the basal ganglia showed a 25% increase. However, patterns of frontal hypometabolism observed with the schizophrenic patients were not altered by medication. Pattern analysis using the fast Fourier transform was applied to a set of 422 images from a mixed group of normal, depressed, and schizophrenic subjects. Reconstruction of the images with low-frequency coefficients was excellent, reducing considerably the number of variables needed to characterize each image. Hierarchical cluster analysis categorized the transformed images according to anatomical level and subject group (patient versus control). The results suggest the utility of this procedure for the classification and characterization of metabolic PET images from psychiatric patients. 8 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. [Ethical concerns around donors after cessation of active treatment].

    PubMed

    Dorez, Didier

    2016-09-01

    The cessation of treatment in intensive care leads to death through circulatory arrest. In these circumstances there is an opportunity to remove organs, if that was the wish of the patient. This raises legitimate ethical questions. A French national protocol defines the conditions of this donation and ensures a harmonisation of practices as well as an overall improvement in end-of-life support in intensive care. These donors represent an opportunity to increase the number of organs available for transplant. PMID:27596498

  9. Fate and removal of permethrin by conventional activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Reif, R; Hillis, P; Judd, S J

    2011-01-01

    The fate and removal of permethrin during conventional wastewater treatment were evaluated at pilot-plant scale at different concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and, hence, different solids retention times (SRT). At feed concentrations of 0.26-0.86 microg L(-1), the permethrin was removed by primary treatment at an efficiency rate of 37%, similar to previously reported data, and from 40% to 83% for secondary treatment, decreasing with decreasing SRT. Comparable ranges, from 37% up to 98%, have been reported for micropollutants with similar physicochemical properties to permethrin, such as galaxolide and tonalide. Little difference in removal was noted between the medium and low MLSS concentrations trials, the main difference in treated effluent permethrin concentration arising on changing from high to medium MLSS levels. This was attributed to the limited acclimatization period employed in these two trials, leading to higher levels of soluble organic matter in the treated water, with which the permethrin appeared to be associated. PMID:21970178

  10. Development of a solid-phase assay for measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Johnson, K.; Kaplan, J.

    1980-09-15

    A solid-phase, plate assay was developed for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity. In this assay procedure, radiolabeled substrates were dried onto the surface of microtiter wells. Following drying, the wells were washed two times with saline to remove the nonadherent substrate. When proteolytic enzymes were added to the wells, protein hydrolysis occurred, releasing radioactivity into the supernatant fluid. The amount of protein hydrolysis that occurred was reflected by the amount of radioactivity in the supernatant fluid. When /sup 125/I-hemoglobin was used as the substrate, it was as susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid-phase assay as it was in solution in a standard assay procedure. Protease activity from a variety of sources (including from viable cells as well as from extracellular sources) were also able to hydrolyze the hemoglobin on the plate. /sup 125/I-Labeled serum albumen, fibrinogen, and rat pulmonary basement membrane were also susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid phase. When (/sup 14/C)elastin was dried onto the plate, it behaved in a similar manner to elastin in solution. It was resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin but was highly susceptible to hydrolysis by elastase. The solid-phase plate assay has several features which recommended it for routine use. It is as sensitive as standard tube assays (and much more sensitive than routinely used colormetric assays). It is quick and convenient; there are no precipitation, centrifugation, or filtration steps. In addition, very small volumes of radioactive wastes are generated. Another advantage of the solid-phase plate assay is the resistance of the dried substrates to spontaneous breakdown and to microbial contamination. Finally, this assay is suitable for use with viable cells as well as for extracellular proteases.

  11. The effect of phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds on the measured CCN activity of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the CCN activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles before activation in the CCN counter? (2) How much the CCN activity can be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? The results show that, to increase the CCN activity of aerosol particles, a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) is needed. We used nitric acid as a test compound. A concentration of several ppb or higher is needed for measurable effect. In the case of particle evaporation, we used ammonium nitrate as a test compound and found that it partially evaporates before maximum supersaturation is reached in the CCN counter, thus causing an underestimation of CCN activity. The effect of evaporation is clearly visible in all supersaturations, leading to an underestimation of the critical dry diameter by 10 to 15 nanometres in the case of ammonium nitrate particles in different supersaturations. This result was also confirmed by measurements in supersaturations between 0.1 and 0.7%.

  12. Scale-Up Information for Gas-Phase Ammonia Treatment of Uranium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2014-09-01

    Uranium is present in the vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau and is of concern for protection of groundwater. The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau identified gas-phase treatment and geochemical manipulation as potentially effective treatment approaches for uranium and technetium in the Hanford Central Plateau vadose zone. Based on laboratory evaluation, use of ammonia vapor was selected as the most promising uranium treatment candidate for further development and field testing. While laboratory tests have shown that ammonia treatment effectively reduces the mobility of uranium, additional information is needed to enable deployment of this technology for remediation. Of importance for field applications are aspects of the technology associated with effective distribution of ammonia to a targeted treatment zone, understanding the fate of injected ammonia and its impact on subsurface conditions, and identifying effective monitoring approaches. In addition, information is needed to select equipment and operational parameters for a field design. As part of development efforts for the ammonia technology for remediation of vadose zone uranium contamination, field scale-up issues were identified and have been addressed through a series of laboratory and modeling efforts. This report presents a conceptual description for field application of the ammonia treatment process, engineering calculations to support treatment design, ammonia transport information, field application monitoring approaches, and a discussion of processes affecting the fate of ammonia in the subsurface. The report compiles this information from previous publications and from recent research and development activities. The intent of this report is to provide technical information about these scale-up elements to support the design and operation of a field test for the ammonia treatment technology.

  13. Brexpiprazole for the Treatment of Schizophrenia: A Review of this Novel Serotonin-Dopamine Activity Modulator.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Joseph; Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Brexpiprazole is an antipsychotic medication and received approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of schizophrenia in July 2015. Brexpiprazole acts as a partial agonist at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors, and as an antagonist at serotonin 5-HT2A and at adrenergic alpha1B and alpha2C receptors. Compared with aripiprazole, brexpiprazole is more potent at 5-HT1A receptors and displays less intrinsic activity at D2 receptors. The recommended dose range of brexpiprazole for the treatment of schizophrenia is 2-4 mg/day; the recommended titration schedule is to start with 1 mg/day and increase to 2 mg/day on Day 5 to Day 7, then to 4 mg/day on Day 8. Two positive, 6-week, Phase 3 randomized controlled trials in acute schizophrenia demonstrated superiority of brexpiprazole over placebo. Pooled responder rates were 46% for brexpiprazole 2-4 mg/day vs. 31% for placebo, resulting in a number needed to treat (NNT) of 7. In a 52-week, randomized withdrawal study, significantly fewer patients relapsed in the brexpiprazole group compared with placebo (13.5% vs. 38.5%), resulting in an NNT of 4. The most commonly encountered adverse event (incidence ≥4% and at least twice the rate of placebo) is increased weight. Short-term weight gain appears modest (approximately 10% of patients receiving brexpiprazole 1-4 mg/day gained ≥7% body weight from baseline, compared with 4% for those randomized to placebo, resulting in a number needed to harm [NNH] of 17); however, more outliers with an increase of ≥7% of body weight were evident in open-label, 52-week safety studies. Effects on glucose and lipids were small. Rates of akathisia as an adverse event were 5.5% for the pooled doses of brexpiprazole 1-4 mg/day vs. 4.6% for placebo, yielding an NNH of 112. Minimal effects on prolactin were observed, and no clinically relevant effects on the ECG QTc interval were evident. Brexpiprazole is also approved as an adjunct medication for the treatment of

  14. Application of acid-activated Bauxsol for wastewater treatment with high phosphate concentration: Characterization, adsorption optimization, and desorption behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jie; Cong, Xiangna; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming; Hoffmann, Erhard; Liu, Yang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Haibo; Fang, Wei; Hahn, Hermann H

    2016-02-01

    Acid-activated Bauxsol was applied to treat wastewater with high phosphate concentration in a batch adsorption system in this paper. The effect of acid activation on the change of Bauxsol structure was systematically investigated. The mineralogical inhomogeneity and intensity of Bauxsol decreased after acid activation, and FeCl3·2H2O and Al(OH)3 became the dominant phases of acid-activated Bauxsol adsorption. Moreover, the BET surface area and total pore volume of Bauxsol increased after acid activation. Interaction of initial solution pH and adsorption temperature on phosphate adsorption onto acid-activated Bauxsol was investigated by using response surface methodology with central composite design. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity of 192.94 mg g(-1) was achieved with an initial solution pH of 4.19 and an adsorption temperature of 52.18 °C, which increased by 7.61 times compared with that of Bauxsol (22.40 mg g(-1)), and was higher than other adsorbents. Furthermore, the desorption studies demonstrated that the acid-activated Bauxsol was successfully regenerated with 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl solution. The adsorption capacity and desorption efficiency of acid-activated Bauxsol maintained at 80.48% and 93.02% in the fifth adsorption-desorption cycle, respectively, suggesting that the acid-activated Bauxsol could be repeatedly used in wastewater treatment with high phosphate concentration. PMID:26606195

  15. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses and passive...

  18. The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D): outcomes from the acute phase of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Saveanu, Radu; Etkin, Amit; Duchemin, Anne-Marie; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea; Gyurak, Anett; Debattista, Charles; Schatzberg, Alan F; Sood, Satish; Day, Claire V A; Palmer, Donna M; Rekshan, William R; Gordon, Evian; Rush, A John; Williams, Leanne M

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to characterize a large international cohort of outpatients with MDD within a practical trial design, in order to identify clinically useful predictors of outcomes with three common antidepressant medications in acute-phase treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression has presently enrolled 1008 treatment-seeking outpatients (18-65 years old) at 17 sites (five countries). At pre-treatment, we characterized participants by symptoms, clinical history, functional status and comorbidity. Participants were randomized to receive escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-extended release and managed by their physician following usual treatment practices. Symptoms, function, quality of life, and side-effect outcomes were assessed 8 weeks later. The relationship of anxiety to response and remission was assessed by comorbid Axis I diagnosis, presence/absence of anxiety symptoms, and dimensionally by anxiety symptom severity. The sample had moderate-to-severe symptoms, but substantial comorbidity and functional impairment. Of completers at week 8, 62.2% responded and 45.4% reached remission on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; 53.3% and 37.6%, respectively on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Functional improvements were seen across all domains. Most participants had side effects that occurred with a frequency of 25% or less and were reported as being in the "none" to minimal/mild range for intensity and burden. Outcomes did not differ across medication groups. More severe anxiety symptoms at pre-treatment were associated with lower remission rates across all medications, independent of depressive severity, diagnostic comorbidity or side effects. Across medications, we found consistent and similar improvements in symptoms and function, and a dimensional prognostic effect of comorbid anxiety symptoms. These equivalent outcomes across treatments lay the foundation for

  19. Brain Activity in Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder Before and After Fluoxetine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rongrong; Calley, Clifford S.; Hart, John; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Lu, Hanzhang; Kennard, Betsy D.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Major depression in adolescents is a significant public health concern because of its frequency and severity. To examine the neurobiological basis of depression in this population, the authors studied functional activation characteristics of the brain before and after antidepressant treatment in antidepressant-naive depressed adolescents and healthy comparison subjects. Method Depressed (N=19) and healthy (N=21) adolescents, ages 11 to 18 years, underwent functional MRI assessment while viewing fearful and neutral facial expressions at baseline and again 8 weeks later. The depressed adolescents received 8 weeks of open-label fluoxetine treatment after their baseline scan. Results Voxel-wise whole brain analyses showed that depressed youths have exaggerated brain activation compared with healthy comparison subjects in multiple regions, including the frontal, temporal, and limbic cortices. The 8 weeks of fluoxetine treatment normalized most of these regions of hyperactivity in the depressed group. Region-of-interest analyses of the areas involved in emotion processing indicated that before treatment, depressed youths had significantly greater activations to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions than did healthy comparison subjects in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex bilaterally. Fluoxetine treatment decreased activations in all three regions, as compared with the repeat scans of healthy comparison subjects. Conclusions While effective treatments are available, the impact of depression and its treatment on the brain in adolescents is understudied. This study confirms increases in brain activation in untreated depressed adolescents and demonstrates reductions in these aberrant activations with treatment. PMID:22267183

  20. Determining chemical activity of (semi)volatile compounds by headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Legind, Charlotte N; Karlson, Ulrich; Burken, Joel G; Reichenberg, Fredrik; Mayer, Philipp

    2007-04-01

    This research introduces a new analytical methodology for measuring chemical activity of nonpolar (semi)volatile organic compounds in different sample matrices using automated solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The chemical activity of an analyte is known to determine its equilibrium concentration in the SPME fiber coating. On this basis, SPME was utilized for the analytical determination of chemical activity, fugacity, and freely dissolved concentration using these steps: (1) a sample is brought into a vial, (2) the SPME fiber is introduced into the headspace and equilibrated with the sample, (3) the SPME fiber is injected into the GC for thermal desorption and analysis, and (4) the method is calibrated by SPME above partitioning standards in methanol. Model substances were BTEX, naphthalene, and alkanes, which were measured in a variety of sample types: liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), wood, soil, and nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Variable sample types (i.e., matrices) had no influence on sampling kinetics because diffusion through the headspace was rate limiting for the overall sampling process. Sampling time was 30 min, and relative standard deviations were generally below 5% for homogeneous solutions and somewhat higher for soil and NAPL. This type of activity measurement is fast, reliable, almost solvent free, and applicable for mixed-media sampling. PMID:17313185

  1. Structure-phase states evolution in Al-Si alloy under electron-beam treatment and high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Sergey Alsaraeva, Krestina Gromov, Victor Semina, Olga; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    By methods of scanning and transmission electron diffraction microscopy the analysis of structure-phase states and defect substructure of silumin subjected to high-intensity electron beam irradiation in various regimes and subsequent fatigue loading up to failure was carried out. It is revealed that the sources of fatigue microcracks are silicon plates of micron and submicron size are not soluble in electron beam processing. The possible reasons of the silumin fatigue life increase under electron-beam treatment are discussed.

  2. Household costs of illness during different phases of tuberculosis treatment in Central Asia: a patient survey in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Illness-related costs incurred by patients constitute a severe economic burden for households especially in low-income countries. High household costs of illness lead to impoverishment; they impair affordability and equitable access to health care and consequently hamper tuberculosis (TB) control. So far, no study has investigated patient costs of TB in the former Soviet Union. Methods All adult new pulmonary TB cases enrolled into the DOTS program in 12 study districts during the study period were enrolled. Medical and non-medical expenditure as well as loss of income were quantified in two interviews covering separate time periods. Costs of different items were summed up to calculate total costs. For missing values, multiple imputation was applied. Results A cohort of 204 patients under DOTS, 114 men and 90 women, participated in the questionnaire survey. Total illness costs of a TB episode averaged $1053 (c. $4900 purchasing power parity, PPP), of which $292, $338 and $422 were encountered before the start of treatment, during intensive phase and in continuation phase, respectively. Costs per month were highest before the start of treatment ($145) and during intensive phase ($153) and lower during continuation phase ($95). These differences were highly significant (paired t-test, p < 0.0005 for both comparisons). Conclusions The illness-related costs of an episode of TB exceed the per capita GDP of $1600 PPP about two-and-a-half times. Hence, these costs are catastrophic for concerned households and suggest a high risk for impoverishment. Costs are not equally spread over time, but peak in early stages of treatment, exacerbating the problem of affordability. Mitigation strategies are needed in order to control TB in Tajikistan and may include social support to the patients as well as changes in the management of TB cases. These mitigation strategies should be timed early in treatment when the cost burden is highest. PMID:20078897

  3. Studies of porosity, connectivity, and parasitic phases in textured Bi-2212/Ag after non-melt heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F.; Damborsky, K.; McIntyre, P.; McInturff, A.; Pogue, N.; Smit, Klaus; Sooby, E.

    2012-06-01

    Specimens of cold-pressed, highly textured Bi-2212 powders were subjected to sintering heat treatments to evaluate the impact of sintering upon texture, density, connectivity, microstructure, and growth of parasitic phases. A regime of non-melt sintering parameters were identified that produce near-solid density, strong texture, extensive growth of the Bi-2212 phase in the textured a-b planes, and no significant growth of parasitic phases. This favorable regime is stable over a sintering temperature range from 865°C - 875°C. The results establish one element of our strategy for fabrication of highperformance Bi-2212/Ag wire using textured powder in a 'jelly-roll' configuration.

  4. Phase Change Activation and Characterization of Spray-Deposited Poly(vinylidene) Fluoride Piezoelectric Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riosbaas, Miranda Tiffany

    Structural safety and integrity continues to be an issue of utmost concern in our world today. Existing infrastructures in civil, commercial, and military applications are beginning to see issues associated with age and environmental conditions. In addition, new materials are being put to service that are not yet fully characterized and understood when it comes to long term behavior. In order to assess the structural health of both old and new materials, it is necessary to implement a technique for monitoring wear and tear. Current methods that are being used today typically depend on visual inspection techniques or handheld instruments. These methods are not always ideal for large structures as they become very tedious leading to a substantial amount of both time and money spent. More recently, composite materials have been introduced into applications that can benefit from high strength-to-weight ratio materials. However, the use of more complex materials (such as composites) leads to a high demand of structural health monitoring techniques, since the damage is often internal and not visible to the naked eye. The work performed in this thesis examines the methods that can be used for phase change activation and characterization of sprayable poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PVDF) thin films in order to exploit their piezoelectric characteristics for sensing applications. PVDF is widely accepted to exist in four phases: alpha, beta, gamma, and delta. Alpha phase PVDF is produced directly from the melt and exhibits no piezoelectric properties. The activation or transition from α phase to some combination of beta and/or gamma phase PVDF leads to a polarizable piezoelectric thin film to be used in sensing applications. The work herein presents the methods used to activate phase change in PVDF, such as mechanical stretching, annealing, and chemical composition, to be able to implement PVDF as an impact detection sensor. The results and analysis provided in this thesis will

  5. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis in a phase 3 randomised, placebo-controlled trial with apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Arthur; Mease, Philip J; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Adebajo, Adewale O; Wollenhaupt, Jürgen; Gladman, Dafna D; Lespessailles, Eric; Hall, Stephen; Hochfeld, Marla; Hu, ChiaChi; Hough, Douglas; Stevens, Randall M; Schett, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, regulates inflammatory mediators. Psoriatic Arthritis Long-term Assessment of Clinical Efficacy 1 (PALACE 1) compared apremilast with placebo in patients with active psoriatic arthritis despite prior traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or biologic therapy. Methods In the 24-week, placebo-controlled phase of PALACE 1, patients (N=504) were randomised (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg twice a day (BID) or apremilast 30 mg BID. At week 16, patients without ≥20% reduction in swollen and tender joint counts were required to be re-randomised equally to either apremilast dose if initially randomised to placebo or remained on their initial apremilast dose. Patients on background concurrent DMARDs continued stable doses (methotrexate, leflunomide and/or sulfasalazine). Primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving 20% improvement in modified American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at week 16. Results At week 16, significantly more apremilast 20 mg BID (31%) and 30 mg BID (40%) patients achieved ACR20 versus placebo (19%) (p<0.001). Significant improvements in key secondary measures (physical function, psoriasis) were evident with both apremilast doses versus placebo. Across outcome measures, the 30-mg group generally had higher and more consistent response rates, although statistical comparison was not conducted. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal and generally occurred early, were self-limiting and infrequently led to discontinuation. No imbalance in major adverse cardiac events, serious or opportunistic infections, malignancies or laboratory abnormalities was observed. Conclusions Apremilast was effective in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, improving signs and symptoms and physical function. Apremilast demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was generally well tolerated. Clinical trial registration number NCT

  6. CF102 for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Phase I/II, Open-Label, Dose-Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer, Salomon M.; Benjaminov, Ofer; Medalia, Gal; Ciuraru, Noab B.; Silverman, Michael H.; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Fishman, Sari; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Cohen, Shira; Patoka, Renana; Singer, Barak; Kerns, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is overexpressed in the tumor and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The orally active drug candidate CF102, an A3AR agonist, induces apoptosis of HCC cells via deregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway. In this open label phase I/II trial, the safety and clinical effects of CF102 were assessed in patients with advanced unresectable HCC. Methods. The primary objectives of this trial were to examine the safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) behavior of CF102 given orally (1, 5, and 25 mg BID) in 28-day cycles. Evaluation of anti-tumor effects and the utilization of A3AR as a biological predictive marker of response to CF102 were the secondary objectives. Results. Eighteen patients received CF102—six at each dose level. No serious drug-related adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities were observed. CF102 demonstrated good oral bioavailability and linear PK behavior. Median overall survival in the study population, 67% of whom had received prior sorafenib, was 7.8 months, and for Child Pugh B patients (28%) it was 8.1 months. Stable disease by RECIST was observed in four patients for at least 4 months. CF102 maintained liver function over a 6-month period. A correlation between receptor overexpression levels at baseline and patients' overall survival was found. One of the patients who presented with skin nodules that were biopsy-proven to be HCC metastases prior to the trial showed complete metastasis regression during three months of treatment with CF102. Conclusions. CF102 is safe and well-tolerated, showing favorable PK characteristics in Child Pugh A and B HCC patients, justifying further clinical development. PMID:23299770

  7. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS: SELECTED TECHNICAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the tremendous interest in the organic constituent removal by activated carbon, the two industrial categories displaying the most interest are the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. EPA's Office of Research and Development has co-sponsored two technical s...

  8. Activated Sludge. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials needed to teach a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. These materials include an overview of the unit, lesson plans, lecture outlines (keyed to slides designed for use with the lessons), student worksheets for each of the seven lessons (with answers), and two copies of a final quiz (with and…

  9. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  10. Incorporating Nondrug Social & Recreational Activities in Outpatient Chemical Dependency Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siporin, Sheldon; Baron, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "Contingency Management programs (CMP) and non-drug social and recreational activities (NDSRA) are interventions premised on behavior theory that rely on external sources of reinforcement alternative to drug-based forms to decrease drug use. CMP usually employs vouchers as reinforcement for negative toxicologies. Despite research support, CMP…

  11. Pressure-induced phase transitions of exposed curved surface nano-TiO2 with high photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanwei; Chen, Fengjiao; Li, Xin; Yuan, Ye; Dong, Haini; Samanta, Sudeshna; Yu, Zhenhai; Rahman, Saqib; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Ke; Yan, Shuai; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique phase transition in compressed exposed curved surface nano-TiO2 with high photocatalytic activity using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. High-pressure studies indicate that the anatase phase starts to transform into baddeleyite phase upon compression at 19.4 GPa, and completely transforms into the baddeleyite phase above 24.6 GPa. Upon decompression, the baddeleyite phase was maintained until the pressure was released to 6.4 GPa and then transformed into the α-PbO2 phase at 2.7 GPa. Together with the results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and the pressure-volume relationship, this phase transition's characteristics during the compression-decompression cycle demonstrate that the truncated biconic morphology possessed excellent stability. This study may provide an insight to the mechanisms of stability for high photocatalytic activity of nano-TiO2.

  12. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  13. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-10-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices.

  14. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M Q; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  15. Activity of fosfomycin in the treatment of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, R; Fernandes, V; Muñoz, D; Rozentraub, A

    1977-01-01

    30 patients with different infections were treated with fosfomycin: 13 had urinary infections, 14 had pneumonial infections, 2 had staphylococcus osteomyelitis and 1 had staphylococcus septicemia. The antibiotic was administered in doses ranging from 100 to 230 mg/kg/day, with periods of treatment that lasted from 5 to 58 days. The doses were administered every 6 h by the oral or intramuscular route. A total of 35 organisms were isolated: 7 E. coli, 7beta-hemolitic Streptococcus, 6 Proteus sp., 6 S. aureus, 6 S. viridans, 2 Klebsiella sp. and 1 negative coagulase S. aureus. All were sensitive to fosfomycin in vitro, as was revealed by the diffusion in discs method. The therapeutic results were good in 29 of the 30 cases (96.7%). There were no important side effects. A patient complained of a local pain in the area of the injection. The transaminases increased temporarily in 2 patients. One patient had a moderate eosinophilia while under treatment. PMID:832537

  16. Phenolic wastewater treatment through extractive recovery coupled with biodegradation in a two-phase partitioning membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2015-12-01

    A two-phase partitioning membrane bioreactor (TPPMB) was designed and operated for treatment of high strength phenolic wastewater through extraction/stripping and concomitant biodegradation. Tributyl phosphate dissolved in kerosene was used as the organic phase, sodium hydroxide as the stripping phase and Pseudomonas putida for biodegradation. In a semi-dispersive approach, organic phase dispersed in the stripping solution was contacted with wastewater through semi-permeable membranes for removal of phenol from wastewater, while the microorganisms were inoculated directly into the wastewater for biodegradation. The TPPMB exhibited high phenol removal rates, and phenol concentrations of 1000-3000mg/L were reduced to undetected amounts within 2-4h. Up to 80% phenol was recovered through extraction, while the remaining was metabolized by the microorganisms. Phenol recovery in the TPPMB was enhanced by increasing the mass transfer rate of phenol through the membranes, and it was also estimated that phenol diffusion through the aqueous boundary layer on the tube side was the rate limiting step. The flexibility in adjusting inoculation time in the TPPMB prevented microorganisms from adverse effects of substrate inhibition, which facilitated complete removal of phenol from the wastewater. TPPMB retained the advantages of both solvent extraction and biodegradation, and it can be highly promising for the treatment of toxic industrial wastewater. PMID:26210322

  17. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  18. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-01-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g−1·h−1 and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts. PMID:26470013

  19. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-01-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g(-1)·h(-1) and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts. PMID:26470013

  20. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  1. Efficient Photocatalytic Activities of TiO2 Hollow Fibers with Mixed Phases and Mesoporous Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huilin; Shang, Minghui; Wang, Lin; Li, Wenge; Tang, Bin; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-10-01

    Currently, Degussa P25, with the typical mixed phases of anatase and rutile TiO2, is widely applied as the commercial photocatalysts. However, there are still some of obstacles for the P25 nanoparticles with totally high photocatalytic activities, especially for the catalytic stability due to their inevitable aggregation of the nanoparticles when used as the photocatalysts. In the present work, we reported the exploration of a novel TiO2 photocatalyst, which could offer an ideal platform for synergetic combination of the mixed-phase composition, hollow architecture and mesoporous walls for the desired excellent photocatalytic efficiency and robust stability. The mesoporous TiO2 hollow nanofibers were fabricated via a facile single capillary electrospinning technique, in which the foaming agents were used for creating mesopores throughout the walls of the hollow fibers. The obtained hollow fibers exhibit a high purity and possess the mixed phases of 94.6% anatase and 5.4% rutile TiO2. As compared to P25, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 hollow fibers exhibited much higher efficient photocatalytic activities and stabilities toward the hydrogen evolution with a rate of ~499.1 μmol g-1·h-1 and ~99.5% degradation Rhodamine B (RhB) in 60 min, suggesting their promising application in efficient photocatalysts.

  2. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  3. Intravitreal Sirolimus for the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Philip A.; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Results. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. Conclusions. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.) PMID:25525171

  4. Human Motor Cortical Activity Is Selectively Phase-Entrained on Underlying Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kai J.; Hermes, Dora; Honey, Christopher J.; Hebb, Adam O.; Ramsey, Nick F.; Knight, Robert T.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2012-01-01

    The functional significance of electrical rhythms in the mammalian brain remains uncertain. In the motor cortex, the 12–20 Hz beta rhythm is known to transiently decrease in amplitude during movement, and to be altered in many motor diseases. Here we show that the activity of neuronal populations is phase-coupled with the beta rhythm on rapid timescales, and describe how the strength of this relation changes with movement. To investigate the relationship of the beta rhythm to neuronal dynamics, we measured local cortical activity using arrays of subdural electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes in human patients performing simple movement tasks. In addition to rhythmic brain processes, ECoG potentials also reveal a spectrally broadband motif that reflects the aggregate neural population activity beneath each electrode. During movement, the amplitude of this broadband motif follows the dynamics of individual fingers, with somatotopically specific responses for different fingers at different sites on the pre-central gyrus. The 12–20 Hz beta rhythm, in contrast, is widespread as well as spatially coherent within sulcal boundaries and decreases in amplitude across the pre- and post-central gyri in a diffuse manner that is not finger-specific. We find that the amplitude of this broadband motif is entrained on the phase of the beta rhythm, as well as rhythms at other frequencies, in peri-central cortex during fixation. During finger movement, the beta phase-entrainment is diminished or eliminated. We suggest that the beta rhythm may be more than a resting rhythm, and that this entrainment may reflect a suppressive mechanism for actively gating motor function. PMID:22969416

  5. Human motor cortical activity is selectively phase-entrained on underlying rhythms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kai J; Hermes, Dora; Honey, Christopher J; Hebb, Adam O; Ramsey, Nick F; Knight, Robert T; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2012-01-01

    The functional significance of electrical rhythms in the mammalian brain remains uncertain. In the motor cortex, the 12-20 Hz beta rhythm is known to transiently decrease in amplitude during movement, and to be altered in many motor diseases. Here we show that the activity of neuronal populations is phase-coupled with the beta rhythm on rapid timescales, and describe how the strength of this relation changes with movement. To investigate the relationship of the beta rhythm to neuronal dynamics, we measured local cortical activity using arrays of subdural electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes in human patients performing simple movement tasks. In addition to rhythmic brain processes, ECoG potentials also reveal a spectrally broadband motif that reflects the aggregate neural population activity beneath each electrode. During movement, the amplitude of this broadband motif follows the dynamics of individual fingers, with somatotopically specific responses for different fingers at different sites on the pre-central gyrus. The 12-20 Hz beta rhythm, in contrast, is widespread as well as spatially coherent within sulcal boundaries and decreases in amplitude across the pre- and post-central gyri in a diffuse manner that is not finger-specific. We find that the amplitude of this broadband motif is entrained on the phase of the beta rhythm, as well as rhythms at other frequencies, in peri-central cortex during fixation. During finger movement, the beta phase-entrainment is diminished or eliminated. We suggest that the beta rhythm may be more than a resting rhythm, and that this entrainment may reflect a suppressive mechanism for actively gating motor function. PMID:22969416

  6. Generalized Hammersley Process and Phase Transition for Activated Random Walk Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolla, Leonardo T.

    2008-12-01

    * ACTIVATED RANDOM WALK MODEL * This is a conservative particle system on the lattice, with a Markovian continuous-time evolution. Active particles perform random walks without interaction, and they may as well change their state to passive, then stopping to jump. When particles of both types occupy the same site, they all become active. This model exhibits phase transition in the sense that for low initial densities the system locally fixates and for high densities it keeps active. Though extensively studied in the physics literature, the matter of giving a mathematical proof of such phase transition remained as an open problem for several years. In this work we identify some variables that are sufficient to characterize fixation and at the same time are stochastically monotone in the model's parameters. We employ an explicit graphical representation in order to obtain the monotonicity. With this method we prove that there is a unique phase transition for the one-dimensional finite-range random walk. Joint with V. Sidoravicius. * BROKEN LINE PROCESS * We introduce the broken line process and derive some of its properties. Its discrete version is presented first and a natural generalization to the continuum is then proposed and studied. The broken lines are related to the Young diagram and the Hammersley process and are useful for computing last passage percolation values and finding maximal oriented paths. For a class of passage time distributions there is a family of boundary conditions that make the process stationary and reversible. One application is a simple proof of the explicit law of large numbers for last passage percolation with exponential and geometric distributions. Joint with V. Sidoravicius, D. Surgailis, and M. E. Vares.

  7. Digestive enzymes activity in subsequent generations of Cameraria ohridella larvae harvested from horse chestnut trees after treatment with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Stygar, Dominika; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Dolezych, Bogdan; Nakonieczny, Miroslaw; Migula, Pawel; Zaak, Maria; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Kukla, Michal; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Buldak, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we describe the effect of chloronicotinoid pesticide (imidacloprid) on the digestive enzymes activity of the Cameraria ohridella larvae after lasting 1 year sublethal exposure to imidacloprid pesticide. Caterpillars - L4 stage (fourth instar, hyperphagic tissue-feeding phase) - were collected from chemically protected white horse chestnut trees 1 year after imidacloprid treatment, and compared with caterpillars collected from non-treated trees in a previous study. Enzymes activity of α-amylase, disaccharidases, glycosidases and proteases was assayed. The presence of pesticide in ingested food changed the digestive enzymes profile of caterpillars. The analysis of correlations between different digestive enzymes showed many significant correlations (P<0.05) among glycolytic activities like β-glucosidase and α-galactosidase activities. Statistically significant correlations for proteolytic activity were found between trypsin and chymotrypsin activity and aminopeptidase activity that occurred only in the 1st generation. PCA distinguished five primary components with eigenvalues higher than 1, from which the first two explain almost 59% of analyzed results. Surprisingly, in the pesticide treated groups significantly higher activities of sucrase and lactase in relation to control were found. In general, glycosidase (α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase) activities showed a similar pattern of activity in different generations. These results contrast with those obtained with control larvae, where significant differences in activities of α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase may result from the different quantity and quality food intake by subsequent generations of larvae. No inter-generation differences in total proteolytic activity were observed in treated larvae. The absolute value of total proteolytic activity was higher than that in the control group. The pesticide present in the vascular system of the horse chestnut

  8. Solar activity phase diagram and forecast of the coming 23rd cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, A. K.; Narmanskij, V. Ya.; Vladimirskij, B. M.

    1998-10-01

    The phase diagram method is used for investigation of relations between planetary dynamics and solar activity variations. It was found that the calculated moments of solar activity maxima/minima are disposed regularly in the coordinates of the difference of heliocentric longitudes of Uranus-Neptune versus the difference of heliocentric longitudes of Saturn-Neptune. There are separate zones containing maxima (minima) of only the northern (or southern) polarity of solar mean magnetic field. There is also a region where only maxima of small amplitudes are concentrated (Rz < 100). The regularities obtained are used for prognosis of the 23rd cycle. The minimum of activity must be observed in 1999±2. The maximum is forecast in 2006±2. The amplitude Rz can be as small as 60±20. Probably there will be no change of the polarity of the mean solar magnetic field.

  9. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones. PMID:26865182

  10. Structural phase transitions and lean NO removal activity of copper-modified alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Suzuki, Suguru; Loong, C.K.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Thomas, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    Copper-modified alumina catalysts, designed for NO removal under lean-burn engine conditions, have been investigated from the viewpoint of the structural phase transition and thermal stability. The structural changes of crystalline components heat-treated at temperatures from 500{degrees}C to 1100{degrees}C were characterized by neutron diffraction (ND) method. In the as-prepared materials, powder-diffraction patterns revealed a mixture of crystalline {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuO, and electron spin resonance (ESR) data showed well-dispersed Cu{sup 2+} cations coordinated by O atoms in an open-octahedron geometry. ND measurements confirmed the elimination of the CuO phase above 800{degrees}C, and suggested the stabilization of a {delta}-phase of alumina by 10 mol% CuO-doping at 900-1000{degrees}C. This Cu-alumina catalyst which was subjected to heat treatment at 900{degrees}C in air showed a 20% lean de-NOx removal efficiency in a test using a model exhaust gas mixture of space velocity =00, 000 h{sup -1}.

  11. Predictability of Indian summer monsoon weather during active and break phases using a high resolution regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraphdar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Goswami, B. N.

    2010-11-01

    As the active and break phases of Indian monsoon are associated with different large scale background regimes, the predictability of monsoon weather is expected to be different during these phases. In the present study, an ensemble of ‘identical twin’ perturbation experiments are carried out using Weather Research Forecast model at 15 km resolution to demonstrate the predictability of weather during these phases. The initial conditions are taken from the 9 years (2001-2009) control simulations during periods of strong intra-seasonal oscillations events. The study revealed that the background estimates are different in these two contrasting regimes with more errors in the active phases confined mostly along the monsoon trough region. As a consequence, the predictability of active (break) period is found to be around 4 (10) days. Thus, the rapid (sluggish) error growth indicates that the monsoon weather such as lows are less (more) predictable during active (break) phases.

  12. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; Laplant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration. PMID:25329007

  13. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  14. FOULING-RESISTANT CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR TREATMENT OF METASTABLE OIL/WATER EMULSIONS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Billions of gallons of oily wastewaters are generated daily by a variety of industrial sources. One class of oily wastewaters, metastable oil/water emulsions, encompasses waste streams for which a need exists for more cost-effective and reliable treatment. Current treatment...

  15. Antimicrobial activity of different filling pastes for deciduous tooth treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, Bruna Feltrin; Pires, Carine Weber; Bresolin, Carmela Rampazzo; Weiss, Rita Niederauer; Praetzel, Juliana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Guedes-Pinto paste is the filling material most employed in Brazil for endodontic treatment of deciduous teeth; however, the Rifocort® ointment has been removed. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of filling pastes, by proposing three new pharmacological associations to replace Rifocort® ointment with drugs of already established antimicrobial power: Nebacetin® ointment, 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate gel, and Maxitrol® ointment. A paste composed of Iodoform, Rifocort® ointment and Camphorated Paramonochlorophenol (CPC) was employed as the gold standard (G1). The other associations were: Iodoform, Nebacetin® ointment and CPC (G2); Iodoform, 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate gel and CPC (G3); Iodoform, Maxitrol® ointment and CPC (G4). The associations were tested for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), using the methods of dilution on solid medium - orifice agar - and broth dilution. The results were tested using statistical analysis ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis. They showed that all the pastes had a bacteriostatic effect on all the microorganisms, without any statistically significant difference, compared with G1. S. aureus was statistically significant (multiple comparison test of Tukey), insofar as G2 and G3 presented the worst and the best performance, respectively. All associations were bactericidal for E. coli, S. aureus, S. mutans and S. oralis. Only G3 and G4 were bactericidal for E. faecalis, whereas no product was bactericidal for B. subtilis. Thus, the tested pastes have antimicrobial potential and have proved acceptable for endodontic treatment of primary teeth. PMID:25466327

  16. Transparent gels: study of their formation and assimilation of active ingredients through phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Comelles, F; Caelles, J; Parra, J L; Leal, J S

    1992-08-01

    Synopsis Multicomponent gel formulations capable of assimilating, simultaneously, several active ingredients of potential application in the cosmetic field were studied. The possibility of formation of a transparent gel was determined using a method which consisted in the optimization of several lipophilic basic compositions, composed of oil, a mixture of surfactants, a sunscreen agent, several vitamins and antioxidants situated in the base of a regular tetrahedron that symbolized the considered system. To this, a polar phase made of water, a cosolvent and urea in appropriate proportions and situated in the fourth vertex, was progressively added. It may be concluded, that the use of phase diagrams on cosmetic systems, constitutes a useful way to select the components and their mutual ratios, allowing an adaptation to the specific requested conditions of formulation. PMID:19272106

  17. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier With Active Ripple Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruxi; Wang, Fei; Boroyevich, Dushan; Burgos, Rolando; Lai, Rixin; Ning, Puqi; Rajashekara, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that single-phase pulse width modulation rectifiers have second-order harmonic currents and corresponding ripple voltages on the dc bus. The low-frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus, which results in low power density. However, pursuing high power density in converter design is a very important goal in the aerospace applications. This paper studies methods for reducing the energy storage capacitor for single-phase rectifiers. The minimum ripple energy storage requirement is derived independently of a specific topology. Based on theminimum ripple energy requirement, the feasibility of the active capacitor s reduction schemes is verified. Then, we propose a bidirectional buck boost converter as the ripple energy storage circuit, which can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The analysis and design are validated by simulation and experimental results.

  18. X-RAY ACTIVITY PHASED WITH PLANET MOTION IN HD 189733?

    SciTech Connect

    Pillitteri, I.; Guenther, H. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Cohen, O.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the follow-up XMM-Newton observation of the planet-hosting star HD 189733 we obtained in 2011 April. We observe a flare just after the secondary transit of the hot Jupiter. This event shares the same phase and many of the characteristics of the flare we observed in 2009. We suggest that a systematic interaction between planet and stellar magnetic fields when the planet passes close to active regions on the star can lead to periodic variability phased with planetary motion. By means of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton, we determine that the corona of this star is unusually dense.

  19. Active illumination using a digital micromirror device for quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-15

    We present a powerful and cost-effective method for active illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for quantitative phase-imaging techniques. Displaying binary illumination patterns on a DMD with appropriate spatial filtering, plane waves with various illumination angles are generated and impinged onto a sample. Complex optical fields of the sample obtained with various incident angles are then measured via Mach-Zehnder interferometry, from which a high-resolution 2D synthetic aperture phase image and a 3D refractive index tomogram of the sample are reconstructed. We demonstrate the fast and stable illumination-control capability of the proposed method by imaging colloidal spheres and biological cells. The capability of high-speed optical diffraction tomography is also demonstrated by measuring 3D Brownian motion of colloidal particles with the tomogram acquisition rate of 100 Hz. PMID:26565886

  20. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  1. Density-matrix renormalization-group study of current and activity fluctuations near nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Mieke; Hooyberghs, Jef; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Cumulants of a fluctuating current can be obtained from a free-energy-like generating function, which for Markov processes equals the largest eigenvalue of a generalized generator. We determine this eigenvalue with the density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic systems. We calculate the variance of the current in the different phases, and at the phase transitions, of the totally asymmetric exclusion process. Our results can be described in the terms of a scaling ansatz that involves the dynamical exponent z . We also calculate the generating function of the dynamical activity (total number of configuration changes) near the absorbing-state transition of the contact process. Its scaling properties can be expressed in terms of known critical exponents. PMID:19391693

  2. The inactive-active phase transition in the noisy additive (exclusive-or) probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the inactive-active phase transition in an array of additive (exclusive-or) cellular automata (CA) under noise. The model is closely related with the Domany-Kinzel (DK) probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA), for which there are rigorous as well as numerical estimates on the transition probabilities. Here, we characterize the critical behavior of the noisy additive cellular automaton by mean field analysis and finite-size scaling and show that its phase transition belongs to the directed percolation universality class of critical behavior. As a by-product of our analysis, we argue that the critical behavior of the noisy elementary CA 90 and 102 (in Wolfram’s enumeration scheme) must be the same. We also perform an empirical investigation of the mean field equations to assess their quality and find that away from the critical point (but not necessarily very far away) the mean field approximations provide a reasonably good description of the dynamics of the PCA.

  3. A Novel Phase-Shift Control of Semibridgeless Active Rectifier for Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Colak, Kerim; Asa, Erdem; Bojarski, Mariusz; Czarkowski, Dariusz; Onar, Omer C.

    2015-05-12

    We investigated a novel phase-shift control of a semibridgeless active rectifier (S-BAR) in order to utilize the S-BAR in wireless energy transfer applications. The standard receiver-side rectifier topology is developed by replacing rectifier lower diodes with synchronous switches controlled by a phase-shifted PWM signal. Moreover, theoretical and simulation results showthat with the proposed control technique, the output quantities can be regulated without communication between the receiver and transmitter. In order to confirm the performance of the proposed converter and control, experimental results are provided using 8-, 15-, and 23-cm air gap coreless transformer which has dimension of 76 cm x 76 cm, with 120-V input and the output power range of 0 to 1kW with a maximum efficiency of 94.4%.

  4. A Novel Phase-Shift Control of Semibridgeless Active Rectifier for Wireless Power Transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Colak, Kerim; Asa, Erdem; Bojarski, Mariusz; Czarkowski, Dariusz; Onar, Omer C.

    2015-05-12

    We investigated a novel phase-shift control of a semibridgeless active rectifier (S-BAR) in order to utilize the S-BAR in wireless energy transfer applications. The standard receiver-side rectifier topology is developed by replacing rectifier lower diodes with synchronous switches controlled by a phase-shifted PWM signal. Moreover, theoretical and simulation results showthat with the proposed control technique, the output quantities can be regulated without communication between the receiver and transmitter. In order to confirm the performance of the proposed converter and control, experimental results are provided using 8-, 15-, and 23-cm air gap coreless transformer which has dimension of 76 cm xmore » 76 cm, with 120-V input and the output power range of 0 to 1kW with a maximum efficiency of 94.4%.« less

  5. Association of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity with treatment and clinical outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (HCV)

    PubMed Central

    Everhart, James E.; Wright, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Increased GGT activity is associated with liver injury and with mortality in the general population. Less is known about its association with HCV outcomes. We examined the GGT as a predictor of both virological response to treatment and long-term clinical outcomes in the Hepatitis C Anti-viral Treatment Against Cirrhosis Trial (HALT-C). Methods: HALT-C enrolled patients with advanced liver disease (Ishak fibrosis score >=3) in 2 phases: a lead-in to establish lack of sustained viral response with full dose pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin followed by a 3.5 year randomized trial with low-dose IFN. Low-dose IFN did not prevent liver disease progression, and patients were then followed for up to an additional 5 years off therapy. Analyses were performed for 1319 patients who had GGT measured prior to initiation of treatment. Increases in risk with each increase in quintile of GGT (10–57, 58–89, 90–139, 140–230, 231–2000 IU/L) were determined by logistic regression for treatment response or Cox regression for clinical outcomes. Results: Baseline GGT was associated with male sex, non-white ethnicity, diabetes and insulin resistance, IL28B rs12979860 CT and TT genotypes, and numerous markers of liver disease injury and severity. In the lead-in phase, increasing GGT was strongly associated with diminished week 20 response, end of treatment response and sustained virological response in both univariate and multivariate analyses controlling for factors known to be associated with treatment response (p<0.0001). GGT was also associated with all clinical outcomes in univariate and multivariate analysis (p<0.05) except for hepatocellular carcinoma (p=0.46 in multivariate analysis). Conclusion: GGT is an independent predictor of both virological response and clinical outcomes among patients with advanced liver disease due to HCV. PMID:23258530

  6. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  7. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  8. Water at Biological Phase Boundaries: Its Role in Interfacial Activation of Enzymes and Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Many life-sustaining activities in living cells occur at the membrane-water interface. The pertinent questions that we need to ask are, what are the evolutionary reasons in biology for choosing the membrane-water interface as the site for performing and/or controlling crucial biological reactions, and what is the key physical principle that is very singular to the membrane-water interface that biology exploits for regulating metabolic processes in cells? In this chapter, a hypothesis is developed, which espouses that cells control activities of membrane-bound enzymes through manipulation of the thermodynamic activity of water in the lipid-water interfacial region. The hypothesis is based on the fact that the surface pressure of a lipid monolayer is a direct measure of the thermodynamic activity of water at the lipid-water interface. Accordingly, the surface pressure-dependent activation or inactivation of interfacial enzymes is directly related to changes in the thermodynamic activity of interfacial water. Extension of this argument suggests that cells may manipulate conformations (and activities) of membrane-bound enzymes by manipulating the (re)activity of interfacial water at various locations in the membrane by localized compression or expansion of the interface. In this respect, cells may use the membrane-bound hormone receptors, lipid phase transition, and local variations in membrane lipid composition as effectors of local compression and/or expansion of membrane, and thereby local water activity. Several experimental data in the literature will be reexamined in the light of this hypothesis. PMID:26438268

  9. Effect of Physical Activity in Treatment of Paediatric Obesity.

    PubMed

    Pastucha, Dalibor; Malinčíková, Jana; Horák, Stanislav; Povová, Jana; Konečný, Petr

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the differences in anthropometric parameters, maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂max) and physical activity (PA) between groups of 146 obese boys and 128 obese girls. We tried to describe the relationships between changes in PA and changes in VO₂max, body fat, weight, waist circumference and hip circumference. We found statistically significant changes in VO₂max and waist circumference only in the group of boys and significant changes in VO₂max in the group of girls. PMID:26849545

  10. Nrf2 activation as target to implement therapeutic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health. PMID:25699252

  11. NRF2 Activation as Target to Implement Therapeutic Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health.

  12. Role of Activation Energy in Resistance Drift of Amorphous Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Dellen, Christian; Salinga, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The time evolution of the resistance of amorphous thin films of the phase change materials Ge2Sb2Te5, GeTe and AgIn-Sb2Te is measured during annealing at T=80°C. The annealing process is interrupted by several fast temperature dips to determine the changing temperature dependence of the resistance. This procedure enables us to identify to what extent the resistance increase over time can be traced back to an increase in activation energy EA or to a rise of the prefactor R*. We observe that, depending on the material, the dominating contribution to the increase in resistance during annealing can be either a change in activation energy (Ge2Sb2Te5) or a change in prefactor (AgIn-Sb2Te). In the case of GeTe, both contribute about equally. We conclude that any phenomenological model for the resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials that is based on the increase of one parameter alone (e.g. the activation energy) cannot claim general validity.

  13. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 λ/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  14. Gamma Activity Coupled to Alpha Phase as a Mechanism for Top-Down Controlled Gating

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Mathilde; Jensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between neural oscillations in different frequency bands has been proposed to coordinate neural processing. In particular, gamma power coupled to alpha phase is proposed to reflect gating of information in the visual system but the existence of such a mechanism remains untested. Here, we recorded ongoing brain activity using magnetoencephalography in subjects who performed a modified Sternberg working memory task in which distractors were presented in the retention interval. During the anticipatory pre-distractor period, we show that the phase of alpha oscillations was coupled with the power of high (80-120Hz) gamma band activity, i.e. gamma power consistently was lower at the trough than at the peak of the alpha cycle (9-12Hz). We further show that high alpha power was associated with weaker gamma power at the trough of the alpha cycle. This result is in line with alpha activity in sensory region implementing a mechanism of pulsed inhibition silencing neuronal firing every ~100 ms. PMID:26039691

  15. Influence of wastewater treatment plants' operational conditions on activated sludge microbiological and morphological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Tzelios, Dimitrios; Michailidis, Avraam

    2016-01-01

    The effect of wastewater composition and operating conditions in activated sludge (AS) microbiological and morphological characteristics was studied in three AS wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs): (a) a high organic load slaughterhouse AS WWTP, operating at complete solids retention, monitored from its start-up and for 425 days; (b) a seasonally operational, low nitrogen load fruit canning industry AS WWTP, operating at complete solids retention, monitored from its start-up and until the end of the season (87 days); (c) a municipal AS WWTP, treating wastewater from a semi-combined sewer system, monitored during the transitions from dry to rainy and again to dry periods of operation. The sludge microbiological and morphological characteristics were correlated to nutrients' availability, solids retention time, hydraulic retention time, dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids (MLVSS), organic load (F/M) and substrate utilization rate. The AS WWTPs' operation was distinguished in periods based on biomass growth phase, characterized by different biological and morphological characteristics and on operational conditions. An anoxic/aerobic selector minimizes the readily biodegradable compounds in influent, inhibiting filamentous growth. Plant performance controlling is presented in a logic flowchart in which operational parameters are linked to microbial manipulation, resulting in a useful tool for researchers and engineers. PMID:26145184

  16. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  17. Phase II Study of the Safety and Antitumor Activity of the Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Combination With Doxorubicin in Patients With Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sant P.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Van Tine, Brian A.; Reed, Damon R.; Okuno, Scott H.; Butrynski, James E.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Kroll, Stew; Ganjoo, Kristen N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose TH-302, a prodrug of the cytotoxic alkylating agent bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, is preferentially activated in hypoxic conditions. This phase II study investigated TH-302 in combination with doxorubicin, followed by single-agent TH-302 maintenance therapy in patients with first-line advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) to assess progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, overall survival, safety, and tolerability. Patients and Methods In this open-label phase II study, TH-302 300 mg/m2 was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8 with doxorubicin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. After six cycles, patients with stable and/or responding disease could receive maintenance monotherapy with TH-302. Results Ninety-one patients initiated TH-302 plus doxorubicin induction treatment. The PFS rate at 6 months (primary efficacy measure) was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 68%). Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.8 to 7.7 months); median overall survival was 21.5 months (95% CI, 16.0 to 26.2 months). Best tumor responses were complete response (n = 2 [2%]) and partial response (n = 30 [34%]). During TH-302 maintenance (n = 48), five patients improved from stable disease to partial response, and one patient improved from partial to complete response. The most common adverse events during induction were fatigue, nausea, and skin and/or mucosal toxicities as well as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia. These were less severe and less frequent during maintenance. There was no evidence of TH-302–related hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. Conclusion PFS, overall survival, and tumor response compared favorably with historical outcomes achieved with other first-line chemotherapies for advanced STS. A phase III study of TH-302 is ongoing (NCT01440088). PMID:25185097

  18. Environmental risk assessment of Polish wastewater treatment plant activity.

    PubMed

    Kudłak, Błażej; Wieczerzak, Monika; Yotova, Galina; Tsakovski, Stefan; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) play an extremely important role in shaping modern society's environmental well-being and awareness, however only well operated and supervised systems can be considered as environmentally sustainable. For this reason, an attempt was undertaken to assess the environmental burden posed by WWTPs in major Polish cities by collecting water samples prior to and just after wastewater release points. Both classical and biological methods (Microtox(®), Ostracodtoxkit F™ and comet assay) were utilized to assess environmental impact of given WWTP. Interestingly, in some cases, water quality improvement indicated as a toxicity decrement toward one of the bio-indicating organisms makes water worse for others in the systems. This fact is particularly noticeable in case of Silesian cities where heavy industry and high population density is present. It proves that WWTP should undergo individual evaluation of pollutant removal efficiency and tuned to selectively remove pollutants of highest risk to surrounding regional ecosystems. Biotests again proved to be an extremely important tool to fully assess the impact of environmental stressors on water bodies receiving effluents from WWTPs. PMID:27376857

  19. Withanolides: Biologically Active Constituents in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid A; Khan, Sher B; Shah, Zarbad; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural products in drug discovery and development have an important history. Several therapeutic agents have been investigated during the biological screenings of natural compounds. It is well documented that plants are possibly the core of novel substances that led to the discovery of new, novel, and effective therapeutic agents. Therefore, in the last few decades, scientists were thoroughly attempting for the search of benevolent drugs to protect mankind from various diseases and discomforts. The diverse chemical structures of natural products are the key element of their success in modern drug discovery. Cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors (ChEI) are chemicals which inhibit the splitting of cholinesterase enzymes (acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase). Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are two types of cholinesterase enzymes that have been identified in vertebrates that are responsible for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. Withanolides are affective plant secondary metabolites which inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzyme and thus possibly will be the future drug for Alzheimer's disease. By viewing the importance of natural products in drug discovery and development, we present here, the importance of withanolides in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we also describe the classification and structural characterization of withanolides. This review comprises of 114 compounds. PMID:26527154

  20. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  1. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27080005

  2. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  3. Dynamic Protein Associations Define Two Phases of IL-1β Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Saccani, Simona; Shin, Hyunjin; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    IL-1β is a key proinflammatory cytokine with roles in multiple diseases. Monocytes package the IL-1β promoter into a “poised architecture” characterized by a histone-free transcription start site and constitutive transcription factor associations. Upon LPS stimulation, multiple proteins inducibly associate with the IL-1β gene. To understand how the complex combination of constitutive and inducible transcription factors activate the IL-1β gene from a poised structure, we measured temporal changes in NF-κB and IFN regulatory factor (IRF) association with IL-1β regulatory elements. Association of the p65 subunit of NF-κB peaks 30–60 min post-monocyte stimulation, and it shortly precedes IRF-4 recruitment to the IL-1β enhancer and maximal mRNA production. In contrast, IRF-8/enhancer association decreases poststimulation. To test the importance of delayed IRF-4/enhancer association, we introduced a mutated PU.1 protein shown to prevent PU.1-mediated IRF-4 recruitment to the enhancer sequence. Mutated PU.1 initially increased IL-1β mRNA followed by decreased mRNA levels 2–3 h poststimulation. Taken together, these data support a dynamic model of IL-1β transcriptional activation in which a combination of IRF-8 and p65 drives the initial phase of IL-1β transcription, while PU.1-mediated IRF-4 recruitment to the enhancer is important for the second phase. We further demonstrate that activation of both NF-κB and IRF-4 depends on CK2 kinase activity. Because IRF-4/enhancer association requires CK2 but not p65 activation, we conclude that CK2 triggers the IRF-4 and p65 pathways independently to serve as a master regulator of IL-1β transcription. PMID:18566416

  4. Increased temperature in the thermophilic stage in temperature phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) improves degradability of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huoqing; Jensen, Paul D; Batstone, Damien J

    2011-03-15

    Two-stage temperature phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) is an increasingly popular method to improve stabilisation of sewage waste activated sludge, which normally has inherently poor and slow degradation. However, there has been limited systematic analysis of the impact of the initial thermophilic stage (temperature, pH and retention time) on performance in the main mesophilic stage. In this study, we demonstrate a novel two-stage batch test method for TPAD processes, and use it to optimize operating conditions of the thermophilic stage in terms of degradation extent and methane production. The method determines overall degradability and apparent hydrolysis coefficient in both stages. The overall process was more effective with short pre-treatment retention times (1-2 days) and neutral pH compared to longer retention time (4 days) and low pH (4-5). Degradabilities and apparent hydrolysis coefficients were 0.3-0.5 (fraction degradable) and 0.1-0.4d(-1), respectively, with a margin of error in each measurement of approximately 20% relative (95% confidence). Pre-treatment temperature had a strong impact on the whole process, increasing overall degradability from 0.3 to 0.5 as temperature increased from 50 to 65 °C, with apparent hydrolysis coefficient increasing from 0.1 to 0.4d(-1). PMID:21277081

  5. Structural and phase changes in carbides of the high-speed steel upon heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaus, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on structural and phase changes in carbides of the tungsten-molybdenum high-speed steel has been studied. The results of metallographic analysis and energy dispersive microanalysis have been discussed. It has been shown that an increase in austenitizing temperature from 1180 to 1260°C causes structural transformations in carbide particles of eutectic origin crushed upon hot plastic deformation, which are related to their dissolution and coalescence, and changes in the phase composition of the carbides themselves.

  6. Zero-g experiments with a He II active phase separator for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denner, H. D.; Klipping, G.; Lueders, K.; Ruppert, U.; Stahnke, F.; Szuecs, Z.; Elleman, D.; Petrac, D.

    1984-01-01

    An active phase separator (APS) for temperature control of He II space cooling systems was tested in a zero-g environment during a series of parabolic flights on a NASA KC 135 aircraft. The APS provides for liquid-gas separation and features an annular gap, a downstream heat exchanger and an upstream ball closure. The apparatus was operated during acceleration and floating and in two different heat load situations. The tests confirmed that adequate mass flow rates could be maintained using a vacuum pump to simulate space vacuum and that residual liquid could be evaporated from the heat exchanger after closing a ball valve to seal off flows.

  7. Novel multi-source phase-controlled radiofrequency technology for non-ablative and micro-ablative treatment of wrinkles, lax skin and acne scars.

    PubMed

    Elman, Monica; Harth, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    The basic properties of lasers and pulsed light sources limit their ability to deliver high energy to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues without excessive damage to the epidermis. Radiofrequency was shown to penetrate deeper than optical light sources independent of skin color. The early RF-based devices used single source bipolar RF, which is safe but limited in use due to the superficial flow of energy between the two bipolar electrodes. Another type of single source RF employs a single electrode (monopolar) in which the RF energy flows from one electrode on the surface of the skin through the entire body to a plate under the body. Although more effective than bipolar, this devices require intense active cooling of the skin and may be associated with considerable pain and other systemic and local safety concerns. Latest generation of RF technology developed by EndyMed Medical Ltd. (Caesarea, Israel) utilizes simultaneously six or more phase controlled RF generators (3DEEP technology). The multiple electrical fields created by the multiple sources "repel" or "attract" each other, leading to the precise 3 dimensional delivery of RF energy to the dermal and sub-dermal targets minimizing the energy flow through the epidermis without the need for active cooling. Confocal microscopy of the skin has shown that 6 treatment sessions of Multisource RF technology improve skin structure features. The skin after treatment had longer and narrower dermal papilla and denser and finer collagen fiber typical to younger skin as compared to pre treatment skin. Ultrasound of the skin showed after 6 treatment sessions reduction of 10 percent in the thickness of the subcutaneous fat layer. Non ablative facial clinical studies showed a significant reduction of wrinkles after treatment further reduced at 3 months follow-up. Body treatment studies showed a circumference reduction of 2.9 cm immediately after 6 treatments, and 2 cm at 12 months after the end of treatment, proving long term

  8. SELENIUM TREATMENT/REMOVAL ALTERNATIVES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM ACTIVITY III, PROJECT 20

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for EPA's Mine WAste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 20--Selenium Treatment/Removal Alternatives Demonstration project. Selenium contamination originates from many sources including mining operations, mineral processing, abandoned...

  9. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  10. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  11. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  12. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  13. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  14. BREAKPOINT CHLORINATION/ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT: EFFECT ON VOLATILE HALOGENATED ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and removal of six volatile halogenated organic compounds during treatment of tertiary clarified and filtered wastewater by breakpoint chlorination and activated carbon was examined in a continuous flow pilot plant. Short contact time breakpoint chlorination of fil...

  15. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  16. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOGICAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-quantitative scanning electron microscope (SEK) analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon (GAC) utilized as media for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment (combined processes). he procedure allows for the objective monitoring, com...

  17. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin. PMID:26108493

  18. Stress and Activity Management: Group Treatment for Cancer Patients and Spouses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrich, Richard L.; Schag, Cyndie Coscarelli

    1985-01-01

    Studied 51 ambulatory patients with commonly occurring cancers and 25 of their spouses to evaluate a group stress and activity management treatment program. Found support for unique effects of the treatment intervention, but also support for improvement in psychosocial adjustment for patients and spouses with the passage of time. (Author/MCF)

  19. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  20. 76 FR 24572 - Proposed Information Collection (Report of Treatment by Attending Physician) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... of Treatment by Attending Physician, VA Form 29-551a. OMB Control Number: 2900-0120. Type of Review... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Report of Treatment by Attending Physician) Activity: Comment...., Washington, DC 20420 or e-mail nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0120'' in...

  1. Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Bioavailable and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen in activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was carried out to understand the fate of biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) and bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen (ABDON) along the treatment trains of a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) equipped with an activated sludge (AS) system and a WWTF equipped with a two-stag...

  3. Contingency Management Treatments: Reinforcing Abstinence Versus Adherence with Goal-Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Hanson, Tressa; MacKinnon, Stephen; Rounsaville, Bruce; Sierra, Sean

    2006-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions usually reinforce submission of drug-negative specimens, but they can also reinforce adherence with goal-related activities. This study compared the efficacy of the 2 approaches. Substance-abusing outpatients (N = 131) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 12-week treatments: standard treatment (ST), ST with CM…

  4. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Treatment in Hospital) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of Treatment in Hospital) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: Report of Treatment in Hospital, VA FL 29-551. OMB Control Number: 2900-0119. Type...

  5. Modulation of phase-II enzyme activities in benzene treated ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Yeshvandra; Rana, S V S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of ovariectomy on phase II enzymes viz. glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) in liver and kidney of female rats treated with benzene. The results showed the significant decrease of the GST and GPX activity in benzene treated rats after ovariectomy. However progesterone supplementation stimulated the activity of GST and GPX in liver and kidney of benzene treated non ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats. Progesterone supplementation to benzene treated ovariectomized rats helps to gain in CAT activity. Our results on DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis also confirmed our findings on antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that lack of protective progesterone against benzene toxicity is reflected in alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities. However progesterone therapy to benzene treated ovariectomized rats results in activating the antioxidant defence system. Since female workers are engaged in industrial sector, these results are important from occupational health point of view. Benzene exposure affects their reproductive health. Nevertheless, it could be modulated by suitable hormonal therapy. PMID:21787707

  6. Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

  7. Nanoalloying and phase transformations during thermal treatment of physical mixtures of Pd and Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, Vineetha; Yin, Jun; Joseph, Pharrah; Luo, Jin; Shan, Shiyao; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Malis, Oana

    2014-04-01

    Nanoscale alloying and phase transformations in physical mixtures of Pd and Cu ultrafine nanoparticles are investigated in real time with in situ synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction complemented by ex situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The combination of metal-support interaction and reactive/non-reactive environment was found to determine the thermal evolution and ultimate structure of this binary system. At 300 °C, the nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black intermix to form a chemically ordered CsCl-type (B2) alloy phase. The B2 phase transforms into a disordered fcc alloy at higher temperature (> 450 °C). The alloy nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black are homogeneous in volume, but evidence was found of Pd surface enrichment. In sharp contrast, when supported on alumina, the two metals segregated at 300 °C to produce almost pure fcc Cu and Pd phases. Upon further annealing of the mixture on alumina above 600 °C, the two metals interdiffused, forming two distinct disordered alloys of compositions 30% and 90% Pd. The annealing atmosphere also plays a major role in the structural evolution of these bimetallic nanoparticles. The nanoparticles annealed in forming gas are larger than the nanoparticles annealing in helium due to reduction of the surface oxides that promotes coalescence and sintering.

  8. THE DISTRIBUTION AND SOLID-PHASE SPECIATION OF AS IN IRON-BASED TREATMENT MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic concentrations (Total Recoverable As by EPA Method 3051) and solid-phase speciation (by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy-XANES) were assessed as a function of depth through Fe-media beds for two commercially available products from pilot-scale field tests. These r...

  9. Inhibition of protein kinase B activity induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis during early G₁ phase in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, José; van Donselaar, Elly; Humbel, Bruno M; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of PKB (protein kinase B) activity using a highly selective PKB inhibitor resulted in inhibition of cell cycle progression only if cells were in early G1 phase at the time of addition of the inhibitor, as demonstrated by time-lapse cinematography. Addition of the inhibitor during mitosis up to 2 h after mitosis resulted in arrest of the cells in early G1 phase, as deduced from the expression of cyclins D and A and incorporation of thymidine. After 24 h of cell cycle arrest, cells expressed the cleaved caspase-3, a central mediator of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that PKB activity in early G1 phase is required to prevent the induction of apoptosis. Using antibodies, it was demonstrated that active PKB translocates to the nucleus during early G1 phase, while an even distribution of PKB was observed through cytoplasm and nucleus during the end of G1 phase. PMID:22251027

  10. Low-activity waste envelope definitions for the TWRS Privatization Phase I Request For Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Patello, G.K.; Lauerhass, L.; Myers, R.L.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Radioactive waste has been stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site since 1944. Approximately 212 million liters of waste containing approximately 240,000 metric tons of processed chemicals and 177 mega-curies of radionuclides are now stored in 177 tanks. These caustic wastes are in the form of liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludge. In 1991, the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of these wastes in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost-effective manner. The Department of Energy (DOE) has believes that it is feasible to privatize portions of the TWRS Program. Under the privatization strategy embodied in the Request for Proposal (RFP), DOE will purchase services from a contractor-owned, contractor-operated facility under a fixed-price contract. Phase I of the TWRS privatization strategy is a proof-of-concept/commercial demonstration-scale effort. The objectives of Phase I are to demonstrate the technical and business viability of using privatized facilities to treat Hanford tank waste; define and maintain required levels of radiological, nuclear, process, and occupational safety; maintain environmental protection and compliance; and substantially reduce life-cycle costs and time required to treat Hanford tank waste. Three low-activity waste (LAW) envelopes are identified for Phase I of the privatization contract and are representative of the range of Hanford double-shelled tank (DST) waste.

  11. Effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore

    PubMed Central

    LI, YANLING; YAO, MEIYING; WANG, XIA; ZHAO, YANQING

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sore pertains to tissue damage or necrosis that occurs due to lack of adequate nutrition following long-term exposure to pressure and decreased blood circulation. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore. In total, 50 patients with phase III bedsore were included in the present study. The patients were randomly divided into the control (n=25) and observation (n=25) groups. Patients in the control group received conventional nursing, while those in the observation group received gelatin sponge combined with moist wound healing nursing. The effects of the two nursing methods were compared and analyzed. The results showed that the improvement rate of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). The Branden score and area of pressure sore of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). The frequency and time of dressing change and the average cost of hospitalization of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.001). In conclusion, gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention may significantly improve the treatment of phase III bedsore. PMID:27313666

  12. Effective treatment of olive mill effluents from two-phase and three-phase extraction processes by batch membranes in series operation upon threshold conditions.

    PubMed

    Ochando-Pulido, J M; Hodaifa, G; Victor-Ortega, M D; Rodriguez-Vives, S; Martinez-Ferez, A

    2013-12-15

    Production of olive oil results in the generation of high amounts of heavy polluted effluents characterized by extremely variable contaminants degree, leading to sensible complexity in treatment. In this work, batch membrane processes in series comprising ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) are used to purify the effluents exiting both the two-phase and tree-phase extraction processes to a grade compatible to the discharge in municipal sewer systems in Spain and Italy. However, one main problem in applying this technology to wastewater management issues is given by membrane fouling. In the last years, the threshold flux theory was introduced as a key tool to understand fouling problems, and threshold flux measurement can give valuable information regarding optimal membrane process design and operation. In the present manuscript, mathematical approach of threshold flux conditions for membranes operation is addressed, also implementing proper pretreatment processes such as pH-T flocculation and UV/TiO2 photocatalysis with ferromagnetic-core nanoparticles in order to reduce membranes fouling. Both influence the organic matter content as well as the particle size distribution of the solutes surviving in the wastewater stream, leading, when properly applied, to reduced fouling, higher rejection and recovery values, thus enhancing the economic feasibility of the process. PMID:23602253

  13. Solid-Phase Synthesis, Characterization, and Cellular Activities of Collagen-Model Nanodiamond-Peptide Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Knapinska, Anna M.; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Amar, Sabrina; Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Mochalin, Vadym N.; Gogotsi, Yury; Cosme, Patrick; Terentis, Andrew C.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2015-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have received considerable attention as potential drug delivery vehicles. NDs are small (~5 nm diameter), can be surface modified in a controllable fashion with a variety of functional groups, and have little observed toxicity in vitro and in vivo. However, most biomedical applications of NDs utilize surface adsorption of biomolecules, as opposed to covalent attachment. Covalent modification provides reliable and reproducible ND–biomolecule ratios, and alleviate