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Sample records for active tuberculosis disease

  1. Psoriatic disease and tuberculosis nowadays.

    PubMed

    Balato, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Bocchino, Marialuisa

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing and remitting inflammatory skin and joint disease that has a prevalence of 2-3% in the world's population, whereas of 1-2% in Europe. The traditional concept of psoriasis as the "healthy people's" disease has been recently revised because of ever-increasing reports of associations with various pathological conditions (hypertension, Crohn's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, infectious conditions). Particularly, advances in psoriasis therapies have introduced biologic agents. All the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of developing active disease in patients with latent tuberculosis infection, because of TNF-α key role against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For this reason, exclusion of active tuberculosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection are clinical imperatives prior to starting this therapy. Moreover active surveillance for a history of untreated or partially treated tuberculosis or latent form has already been shown to be effective in reducing the number of incident tuberculosis cases.

  2. Activity against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexican plants used to treat respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Arellanes, Adelina; Meckes, Mariana; Ramirez, Raquel; Torres, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2003-09-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) demands the search for alternative antimycobacterial drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases for activity against MDR-TB. A group of 22 plants was screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium avium at concentrations from 50 to 200 microg/mL. The antimycobacterial effect was determined by a microcolorimetric assay with Alamar blue dye. None of the aqueous extracts had antimycobacterial activity. Hexane extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana, Chamaedora tepejilote, Lantana hispida, Juniperus communis and Malva parviflora, and methanol extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana and Juniperus communis inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium avium was inhibited by Juniperus communis hexane extract and by Malva parviflora methanol extract. The active extracts were tested against monoresistant variants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol resistant) and the hexane extract of Lantana hispida showed the best activity. Lantana hispida hexane extract was also active against a group of MDR-TB clinical isolates. In contrast, it did not inhibit the growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The hexane extract of Lantana hispida was fractionated by column chromatography and one of its fractions (FVI) inhibited the growth of all the MDR-TB clinical isolates at concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. This study supports the fact that selecting plants by ethnobotanical criteria enhances the probability of finding species with activity against mycobacteria, and our results point to Lantana hispida as an important source of potential compounds against MDR-TB.

  3. Activity against drug resistant-tuberculosis strains of plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Corona, María Del Rayo; Ramírez-Cabrera, Mónica A; Santiago, Omar González-; Garza-González, Elvira; Palacios, Isidoro de Paz; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) kills about 3 million people per year worldwide. Furthermore, TB is an infectious disease associated with HIV patients, and there is a rise in multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases around the world. There is a need for new anti-TB agents. The study evaluated the antimycobacterial activity of nine plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases. Nasturtium officinale showed the best activity (MIC = 100 microg/mL) against the sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The following plants were active also but at 200 microg/mL: Citrus sinensis, Citrus aurantifolia, Foeniculum vulgare, Larrea tridentata, Musa acuminata and Olea europaea. Contrary to the above data, activity against drug-resistant variants of M. tuberculosis was more evident, e.g. N. officinale was the most potent (MIC < or = 100 microg/mL) against the four mono-resistant variants tested; F. vulgare and O. europaea were active against all the resistant variants (MICs < or = 100 microg/mL). The most susceptible variant was the isoniazid resistant, being inhibited by C. aurantifolia, C. sinensis and O. europaea (MIC = 25 microg/mL). These data point to the importance of biological testing of extracts against drug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, and the bioguided assay of these extracts for the identification of lead compounds against MDR-TB isolates.

  4. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Garvy, Beth A

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted.

  5. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R.; Garvy, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted. PMID:26835156

  6. Tuberculosis Comorbidity with Communicable and Noncommunicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Marais, Ben J; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-02-06

    The 18th WHO Global Tuberculosis Annual Report indicates that there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, which included 2.9 million women and 530,000 children. TB caused 1.3 million deaths including 320,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people; three-quarters of deaths occurred in Africa and Southeast Asia. With one-third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), active TB disease is primarily associated with a break down in immune surveillance. This explains the strong link between active TB disease and other communicable diseases (CDs) or noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that exert a toll on the immune system. Comorbid NCD risk factors include diabetes, smoking, malnutrition, and chronic lung disease, all of which have increased relentlessly over the past decade in developing countries. The huge overlap between killer infections such as TB, HIV, malaria, and severe viral infections with NCDs, results in a "double burden of disease" in developing countries. The current focus on vertical disease programs fails to recognize comorbidities or to encourage joint management approaches. This review highlights major disease overlaps and discusses the rationale for better integration of tuberculosis care with services for NCDs and other infectious diseases to enhance the overall efficiency of the public health responses.

  7. The increased risk of active tuberculosis disease in patients with dermatomyositis – a nationwide retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping-Hsun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Yu-Chih; Lin, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The risk of active tuberculosis (TB) in patients with dermatomyositis (DM) is poorly understood. The cohort study aimed to investigate the association between DM and the risk of active TB disease. We conducted a population based study on 4,958 patients with newly diagnosed DM and 19,832 matched controls according to age, sex, and index date between 1998 and 2008. The hazard ratios (HRs) and cumulative incidences of active TB disease between DM patients and controls were analyzed. During the study period, a total of 85 (1.7%) DM patients developed active TB disease, which was significantly higher than that of non-DM patients (0.64%). The incidence rate of active TB disease was higher among DM patients than controls (incidence rate ratio 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.24 to 3.88). The Cox regression model demonstrated significantly higher active TB disease rate among DM patients compared with controls (adjusted HR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.54; p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and underlying medical disorders. The most significant risk factors for developing active TB included male sex, diabetes mellitus comorbidity, and use of corticosteroids and azathioprine in DM patients. In conclusion, DM patients are at a greater risk for active TB disease. PMID:26573418

  8. Antigen-Specific IFN-γ Responses Correlate with the Activity of M. tuberculosis Infection but Are Not Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nikitina, Irina Yu.; Panteleev, Alexander V.; Karpina, Natalya L.; Bagdasarian, Tatef R.; Burmistrova, Irina A.; Andreevskaya, Sofia N.; Chernousova, Larisa N.; Vasilyeva, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    IFN-γ is a key cytokine in antituberculosis (TB) defense. However, how the levels of its secretion affect M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is not clear. We have analyzed associations between IFN-γ responses measured in QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-tube (QFT) assay, TB disease severity, and Mtb infection activity. TB severity was evaluated based on the results of radiological, microbiological, and clinical examinations. Antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion did not correlate with TB severity. Mitogen-induced IFN-γ secretion correlated inversely with the form of pulmonary pathology and the area of affected pulmonary tissue; the levels of spontaneous IFN-γ secretion correlated with patients' age (r = 0.395, p = 0.001). Mtb infection activity was evaluated based on radiological data of lung tissue infiltration, destruction, dissemination or calcification, and condensation. The rate of positive QFT results and the levels of antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion increased in a row: patients with residual TB lesions < patients with low TB activity < patients with high TB activity. Thus, antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion and QFT results did not associate with TB severity but associated with the infection activity. The results suggest that quantitative parameters of IFN-γ secretion play a minor role in determining the course of TB disease but mirror the activity of the infectious process. PMID:28042583

  9. Antigen-Specific IFN-γ Responses Correlate with the Activity of M. tuberculosis Infection but Are Not Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Irina Yu; Panteleev, Alexander V; Sosunova, Ekaterina V; Karpina, Natalya L; Bagdasarian, Tatef R; Burmistrova, Irina A; Andreevskaya, Sofia N; Chernousova, Larisa N; Vasilyeva, Irina A; Lyadova, Irina V

    2016-01-01

    IFN-γ is a key cytokine in antituberculosis (TB) defense. However, how the levels of its secretion affect M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is not clear. We have analyzed associations between IFN-γ responses measured in QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-tube (QFT) assay, TB disease severity, and Mtb infection activity. TB severity was evaluated based on the results of radiological, microbiological, and clinical examinations. Antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion did not correlate with TB severity. Mitogen-induced IFN-γ secretion correlated inversely with the form of pulmonary pathology and the area of affected pulmonary tissue; the levels of spontaneous IFN-γ secretion correlated with patients' age (r = 0.395, p = 0.001). Mtb infection activity was evaluated based on radiological data of lung tissue infiltration, destruction, dissemination or calcification, and condensation. The rate of positive QFT results and the levels of antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion increased in a row: patients with residual TB lesions < patients with low TB activity < patients with high TB activity. Thus, antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion and QFT results did not associate with TB severity but associated with the infection activity. The results suggest that quantitative parameters of IFN-γ secretion play a minor role in determining the course of TB disease but mirror the activity of the infectious process.

  10. Promotion of a down-modulated lung immune state may be a strategy by M. tuberculosis to foster active disease and persistence.

    PubMed

    Ho, John L; Lapa e Silva, Jose Roberto

    2010-01-01

    One-third of humans carry Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB) where microbe/host immune response interactions result in persistence or active TB. However, immune mediators associated with human TB remain poorly defined. Through a series of comparative studies of lung immune response of TB cases at the time of diagnosis and patients with other infectious lung diseases and volunteers, we found that TB cases expressed significantly higher levels of mediators that counteract Th1-type and innate immunity critical for containment of M. tuberculosis. Despite the concomitant heightened levels of Th1-type mediators, they are likely rendered ineffectual by high levels of intracellular (e.g., SOCS) and extracellular (e.g., IL-10) immune suppressors. These modulators are a direct response to M. tuberculosis as many suppressive factors declined to the levels of controls by 30 days of anti-TB treatment while most Th1-type and innate immune mediators rose above the pre-treatment levels. Parallel laboratory studies and monitored lung alveolar macrophage effector, nitric oxide synthase-2 (being shown critical for killing M. tuberculosis), support that M. tuberculosis actively promotes down-modulatory mediators to counteract Th1-type/innate immunity as an immunopathological strategy. Our studies highlight the potential application of immune mediators as surrogate markers for TB diagnosis or treatment response.

  11. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  12. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  13. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  14. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  15. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  16. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  17. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  18. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases proposed for treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-a therapy. When TB (LTBI or AT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-a therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-a therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. If TST is performed in immunosuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-a therapy, even in the presence of a negative test.

  19. Potential Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific IL-2 and IFN-γ Responses in Discriminating between Latent Infection and Active Disease after Long-Term Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qin; Wei, Wei; Sha, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) could accurately diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection. However, these assays do not discriminate between latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis disease (ATB). Here, a total of 177 subjects, including 65 patients with ATB, 43 subjects with LTBI, and 69 TB-uninfected controls (CON group) were enrolled. The concentration of IFN-γ, IP-10, and IL-2 was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after short-term (24h) or long-term (72h) stimulation with TB antigens including ESAT-6/CFP-10 (EC) and purified protein derivative (PPD).EC-stimulated IL-2 and gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) release (24h and 72h) showed a good diagnostic performance in distinguishing between TB-infected and TB-uninfected individuals, but failed to discriminate between ATB and LTBI. After 72h of incubation, the release of IL-2 was higher in LTBI patients after stimulation with EC and PPD. The PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after 72h incubation had the diagnostic potential to discriminate between ATB and LTBI, with a sensitivity of 90.8% and a specificity of 97.7%. In addition, these new biomarkers, combined with T-SPOT test in a two-step strategy, were validated with high levels of accuracy in a prospective clinical-based cohort. Collectively, the PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after long-term incubation may be an alternative diagnostic biomarker in distinguishing between active TB patients and subjects with latent infection. PMID:28033330

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  1. Pathogen-derived biomarkers for active tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Paula; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Marin, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Despite the availability of effective treatments, TB remains a major public health concern in most low and middle-income countries, representing worldwide the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease. Inadequate case detection and failures to classify the disease status hamper proper TB control. The limitations of the conventional diagnostic methods have encouraged much research activities in this field, but there is still an urgent need for an accurate point of care test for active TB diagnosis. A rapid, precise, and inexpensive TB diagnostic test would allow an earlier implementation of an appropriate treatment and the reduction of disease transmission. Pathogen-derived molecules present in clinical specimens of affected patients are being validated for that purpose. This short review aims to summarize the available data regarding biomarkers derived from M. tuberculosis, and their current usage in active TB diagnosis.

  2. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-alpha therapy. When TB (LTBI orAT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-alpha therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-alpha therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. IfTST is performed in immunosupressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test.

  3. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  4. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment.

  5. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283.

  6. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by M. tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P.W.J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable variability exists in the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that M. africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. In a cohort study of tuberculosis patients and their household contacts in the Gambia, we categorized 1,808 HIV negative tuberculosis contacts according to exposure to M. tuberculosis or to M. africanum. A positive skin test indicated transmission and development of tuberculosis during 2 years of follow-up indicated progression to disease. Transmission was similar, but progression to disease was significantly lower in contacts exposed to M. africanum than to M. tuberculosis (1.0% vs 2.9%; Hazard Ratio (HR) 3.1, 95% CI 1.1–8.7). Within M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, contacts exposed to a Beijing family strain were most likely to progress to disease (5.6%; HR 6.7 (2.0–22) relative to M. africanum). M. africanum and M. tuberculosis transmit equally well to household contacts, but contacts exposed to M. africanum are less likely to progress to tuberculosis disease than those exposed to M. tuberculosis. The variable rate of progression by lineage suggests that TB variability matters in clinical settings and should be taken into account in studies evaluating tuberculosis vaccines and treatment regimens for latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:18702608

  7. The impact of IFN-γ receptor on SLPI expression in active tuberculosis: association with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Tateosian, Nancy L; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Ambrosi, Nella; Guerrieri, Diego; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Santucci, Natalia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Araujo-Solis, María A; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Garcia, Verónica E; Chuluyan, H Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ displays a critical role in tuberculosis (TB), modulating the innate and adaptive immune responses. Previously, we reported that secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a pattern recognition receptor with anti-mycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Herein, we determined whether IFN-γ modulated the levels of SLPI in TB patients. Plasma levels of SLPI and IFN-γ were studied in healthy donors (HDs) and TB patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HDs and patients with TB or defective IFN-γ receptor 1* were stimulated with Mtb antigen and SLPI, and IFN-γR expression levels were measured. Both SLPI and IFN-γ were significantly enhanced in plasma from those with TB compared with HDs. A direct association between SLPI levels and the severity of TB was detected. In addition, Mtb antigen stimulation decreased the SLPI produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HDs, but not from TB or IFN-γR patients. Neutralization of IFN-γ reversed the inhibition of SLPI induced by Mtb antigen in HDs, but not in TB patients. Furthermore, recombinant IFN-γ was unable to modify the expression of SLPI in TB patients. Finally, IFN-γR expression was lower in TB compared with HD peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results show that Mtb-induced IFN-γ down-modulated SLPI levels by signaling through the IFN-γR in HDs. This inhibitory mechanism was not observed in TB, probably because of the low expression of IFN-γR detected in these individuals.

  8. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  9. Plasma Metabolomics in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Frediani, Jennifer K.; Jones, Dean P.; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T.; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I.; Kempker, Russell R.; Kurani, Shaheen S.; Colas, Romain A.; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  10. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  11. A Focused Screen Identifies Antifolates with Activity on Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuradha; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Pérez, Esther; Gonzalez, Ruben R.; Torres, Pedro; Calvo, David; Gómez, Ruben M.; Ortega, Fátima; Jiménez, Elena; Gabarro, Raquel C.; Rullás, Joaquín; Ballell, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Antifolates are widely used to treat several diseases but are not currently used in the first-line treatment of tuberculosis, despite evidence that some of these molecules can target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli in vitro. To identify new antifolate candidates for animal-model efficacy studies of tuberculosis, we paired knowledge and tools developed in academia with the infrastructure and chemistry resources of a large pharmaceutical company. Together we curated a focused library of 2508 potential antifolates, which were then tested for activity against live Mtb. We identified 210 primary hits, confirmed the on-target activity of potent compounds, and now report the identification and characterization of 5 hit compounds, representative of 5 different chemical scaffolds. These antifolates have potent activity against Mtb and represent good starting points for improvement that could lead to in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:26771003

  12. Activation of the Wnt Pathway by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Wnt–Wnt Situation

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Madrid-Paulino, Edgardo; Maldonado-Bravo, Rafael; Urbán-Aragón, Antonio; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), an intracellular pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is the cause of tuberculosis (TB), a major worldwide human infectious disease. The innate immune system is the first host defense against M. tuberculosis. The recognition of this pathogen is mediated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors expressed on the host innate immune cells, including Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and C-type lectin receptors like Dectin-1, the Mannose receptor, and DC-SIGN. M. tuberculosis interaction with any of these receptors activates multiple signaling pathways among which the protein kinase C, the MAPK, and the NFκB pathways have been widely studied. These pathways have been implicated in macrophage invasion, M. tuberculosis survival, and impaired immune response, thus promoting a successful infection and disease. Interestingly, the Wnt signaling pathway, classically regarded as a pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in embryonic development, has recently been involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms in infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as TB, sepsis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge supporting a role for the Wnt signaling pathway during macrophage infection by M. tuberculosis and the regulation of the immune response against M. tuberculosis. Understanding the cross talk between different signaling pathways activated by M. tuberculosis will impact on the search for new therapeutic targets to fuel the rational design of drugs aimed to restore the immunological response against M. tuberculosis. PMID:28203237

  13. Activation of the Wnt Pathway by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Wnt-Wnt Situation.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Madrid-Paulino, Edgardo; Maldonado-Bravo, Rafael; Urbán-Aragón, Antonio; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), an intracellular pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is the cause of tuberculosis (TB), a major worldwide human infectious disease. The innate immune system is the first host defense against M. tuberculosis. The recognition of this pathogen is mediated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors expressed on the host innate immune cells, including Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and C-type lectin receptors like Dectin-1, the Mannose receptor, and DC-SIGN. M. tuberculosis interaction with any of these receptors activates multiple signaling pathways among which the protein kinase C, the MAPK, and the NFκB pathways have been widely studied. These pathways have been implicated in macrophage invasion, M. tuberculosis survival, and impaired immune response, thus promoting a successful infection and disease. Interestingly, the Wnt signaling pathway, classically regarded as a pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in embryonic development, has recently been involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms in infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as TB, sepsis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge supporting a role for the Wnt signaling pathway during macrophage infection by M. tuberculosis and the regulation of the immune response against M. tuberculosis. Understanding the cross talk between different signaling pathways activated by M. tuberculosis will impact on the search for new therapeutic targets to fuel the rational design of drugs aimed to restore the immunological response against M. tuberculosis.

  14. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  15. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  16. Disease-associated glycosylated molecular variants of human C-reactive protein activate complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes in tuberculosis and Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Waliza; Mukhopadhyay, Sumi; Habib, S K Hasan; Basu, Shyamasree; Saha, Bibhuti; Sen, Asish Kumar; Mandal, C N; Mandal, Chitra

    2009-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP), as a mediator of innate immunity, removed damaged cells by activating the classical complement pathway. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated that CRPs are differentially induced as glycosylated molecular variants in certain pathological conditions. Affinity-purified CRPs from two most prevalent diseases in India viz. tuberculosis (TB) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have differential glycosylation in their sugar composition and linkages. As anemia is a common manifestation in TB and VL, we assessed the contributory role of glycosylated CRPs to influence hemolysis via CRP-complement-pathway as compared to healthy control subjects. Accordingly, the specific binding of glycosylated CRPs with erythrocytes was established by flow-cytometry and ELISA. Significantly, deglycosylated CRPs showed a 7-8-fold reduced binding with erythrocytes confirming the role of glycosylated moieties. Scatchard analysis revealed striking differences in the apparent binding constants (10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) and number of binding sites (10(6)-10(7)sites/erythrocyte) for CRP on patients' erythrocytes as compared to normal. Western blotting along with immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the presence of distinct molecular determinants on TB and VL erythrocytes specific to disease-associated CRP. Increased fragility, hydrophobicity and decreased rigidity of diseased-erythrocytes upon binding with glycosylated CRP suggested membrane damage. Finally, the erythrocyte-CRP binding was shown to activate the CRP-complement-cascade causing hemolysis, even at physiological concentration of CRP (10 microg/ml). Thus, it may be postulated that CRP have a protective role towards the clearance of damaged-erythrocytes in these two diseases.

  17. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  18. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal?

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A; Waters, W Ray

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis most commonly presents as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, and induction of transmissible pathology all occur in the lungs. If viewed as a pulmonary disease, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis, and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (including lymphatic tuberculosis) are not transmissible, hence representing an evolutionary dead-end for the pathogen. In an alternative theory, Mycobacterium tuberculosis passes asymptomatically through the lungs and rapidly establishes a chronic lymphatic infection. After a period of weeks to decades secondary lung pathology develops, ultimately allowing transmission to occur. Evidence that supports this lymphatic model includes historical descriptions of human tuberculosis from the preantibiotic era, analogy with other mycobacterial infections, observations of tuberculosis in non-human hosts, and experimental models of tuberculosis disease. At a fundamental level, a lymphocentric model proposes that spread of organisms outside the lung parenchyma is essential to induce adaptive immunity, which is crucial for the generation of transmissible pathology. Furthermore, a lymphatic model could explain why the lesion associated with primary infection (Ghon focus) is anatomically separated from the most common site of reactivation disease (the apex). More practically, an alternative perspective that classes tuberculosis as a lymphatic disease might affect strategies for preclinical and clinical assessment of novel diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines.

  19. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 Protein as a Diagnostic Marker of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Kanunfre, Kelly; Dhiman, Rakesh; Restrepo, Blanca I.; Zarate, Izelda; Pino, Paula A.; Mora-Guzman, Francisco; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Michel, Gerd; Kashino, Suely S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of an accurate antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) would represent a major clinical advance. Here, we demonstrate that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 protein is a biomarker for active TB with potential diagnostic utility. We initially identified, by mass spectroscopy, peptides from the Rv1681 protein in urine specimens from 4 patients with untreated active TB. Rabbit IgG anti-recombinant Rv1681 detected Rv1681 protein in lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis and immunoprecipitated it from pooled urine specimens from two TB patients. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formatted with these antibodies detected Rv1681 protein in unconcentrated urine specimens from 11/25 (44%) TB patients and 1/21 (4.8%) subjects in whom TB was initially clinically suspected but then ruled out by conventional methods. Rv1681 protein was not detected in urine specimens from 10 subjects with Escherichia coli-positive urine cultures, 26 subjects with confirmed non-TB tropical diseases (11 with schistosomiasis, 5 with Chagas' disease, and 10 with cutaneous leishmaniasis), and 14 healthy subjects. These results provide strong validation of Rv1681 protein as a promising biomarker for TB diagnosis. PMID:23390284

  20. Association of Diabetes and Tuberculosis Disease among US-Bound Adult Refugees, 2009–2014

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Edward W.; Jonnalagadda, Sasi; Phares, Christina R.; Zhou, Weigong; Painter, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for active tuberculosis (TB) disease. We conducted a case–control study and found a significant association between diabetes and TB disease among US-bound refugees. These findings underscore the value of collaborative management of both diseases. PMID:28221111

  1. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  2. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. Tuberculosis may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there is no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis. Objectives To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people being treated with antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946 to 4 February 2016), EMBASE (from 1980 to 4 February 2016), LILACS (from 1982 to 4 February 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis up to 4 February 2016, and checked the reference lists of all included studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause death, and cure at six and 12 months. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We presented the results as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate, we pooled data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Main results Thirty-five trials

  3. Rv3168 phosphotransferase activity mediates kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2013-11-28

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide epidemic disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with an estimated one-third of the human population currently affected. Treatment of this disease with aminoglycoside antibiotics has become less effective owing to antibiotic resistance. Recent determination of the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis Rv3168 protein suggests a structure similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis APH(3')-IIIa, and that this protein may be an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. To determine whether Rv3168 confers antibiotic resistance against kanamycin, we performed dose-response antibiotic resistance experiments using kanamycin. Expression of the Rv3168 protein in Escherichia coli conferred antibiotic resistance against 100 μM kanamycin, a concentration that effected cell growth arrest in the parental E. coli strain and an E. coli strain expressing the Rv3168(D249A) mutant, in which the catalytic Asp249 residue was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, we detected phosphotransferase activity of Rv3168 against kanamycin as a substrate. Moreover, docking simulation of kanamycin into the Rv3168 structure suggests that kanamycin fits well into the substrate binding pocket of the protein, and that the phosphorylation-hydroxyl-group of kanamycin was located at a position similar to that in E. faecalis APH(3')-IIIa. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the Rv3168 mediates kanamycin resistance in M. tuberculosis, likely through phosphotransferase targeting of kanamycin.

  4. TUBERCULOSIS AS OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE OF MEDICAL AND NURSING PERSONNEL AND ITS PREVENTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MEDICAL PERSONNEL, DISEASES, MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS , INFECTIOUS DISEASES, HAZARDS, IMMUNITY, TUBERCULIN, MEDICAL EXAMINATION, PUBLIC HEALTH, GERMICIDES, HOSPITALS, HYGIENE, TRAINING, WEST GERMANY.

  5. Diagnostic dilemma: Kikuchi's disease or tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Nayak, Hemanta Kumar; Mohanty, Pankaj Kumar; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Bagchi, Avishek

    2013-01-29

    Any patient from a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area such as India with classical clinical features of fever, weight loss and lymphadenopathy, making a diagnosis of Kikuchi's disease (KD) prior to waiting for the 6-week culture is not appropriate. KD or histiocytic necrotising lymphadenitis is a rare self-limiting cervical lymphadenitis, often a diagnosis of exclusion. One needs to exclude TB, sarcodosis, lymphoma and autoimmune diseases to make such a diagnosis. The patient here with classical clinical presentation of TB with lymph node biopsy mimicking KD (biopsy and immunohistochemistry) posed a big diagnostic dilemma. However, culture of the biopsied lymphatic tissue was confirmed to be mycobacterium TB after the 6th week of incubation. The patient was treated with antitubercular drugs initially, and later, steroid was added in view of his persistent symptoms and he responded. One should wait for the tissue culture report to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of TB. Exclusion should not be based only on laboratory criteria. Histopathogically, TB can mimic any other granulomatous disorder.

  6. [Spontaneous pneumothorax associated to active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Rojas, F; Córdova Gutiérrez, H; Aguirre Gas, H

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviewed 8 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, associated to pulmonary tuberculosis during a period of time of two years at the A.L.M. General Hospital of Toluca, Mex. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical picture, radiology and bacteriology studies. Six males and two females proceding of the low class; farmers all of them. Their age ranged between 18 and 35 years. Two of the patients showed cavitary lesions, five had difusse fibrosis of the lung. We analized the clinical manifestations and reviewed the pathogenic mechanisms as well the medical and surgical treatment. No deaths ocurred en this series. We concluded that the direct relation between active pulmonary tuberculosis and spontaneous pneumothorax is not clear, but their association in this serie suggested further studies to stablished this. We emphasized the importance of this complication rare in the world literature.

  7. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  8. [Tuberculosis epidemiology and disease control in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Ubaĭdullaev, A M; Khamrakulov, R Sh; Stoianovskiĭ, E A; Ataullaeva, D E

    2000-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation is complicated in Uzbekistan and in other countries of the world. In the past 5 years, due to the transition from mass prophylactic examinations to the differential surveys of population groups, the annual coverage of the population to be examined by fluorographic studies has reduced from 6 to 3.5 million along with a simultaneous rise in tuberculosis detection rates from 0.1 to 0.24% and in its incidence by 33.3%. Searches for new organizational forms of tuberculosis control work are under way. The State programme on tuberculosis control and the draft law of the Republic of Uzbekistan, which regulate associated measures have been developed.

  9. Alternative activation deprives macrophages of a coordinated defense program to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Seiler, Peter; Stein, Maik; Bandermann, Silke; Hahnke, Karin; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2006-03-01

    A potent Th1 immune response is critical to the control of tuberculosis. The impact of an additive Th2 response on the course of disease has so far been insufficiently characterized, despite increased morbidity after co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Th2-eliciting helminths and possible involvement of Th2 polarization in reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Here, we describe the gene expression profile of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages alternatively activated by IL-4 in response to infection with M. tuberculosis. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of infected IL-4- and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages revealed delayed and partially diminished responses to intracellular bacteria in alternatively activated macrophages, characterized by reduced exposure to nitrosative stress and increased iron availability, respectively. Alternative activation of host macrophages correlated with elevated expression of the M. tuberculosis iron storage protein bacterioferritin as well as reduced expression of the mycobactin synthesis genes mbtI and mbtJ. The extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 was induced in alternatively activated macrophages in vitro, and MMP-12-expressing macrophages were abundant at late, but not early, stages of tuberculosis in murine lungs. Our findings emphasize that alternative activation deprives macrophages of control mechanisms that limit mycobacterial growth in vivo, thus supporting intracellular persistence of M. tuberculosis.

  10. Persisting PET-CT lesion activity and M. tuberculosis mRNA after pulmonary tuberculosis cure

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Shenai, Shubhada; Ronacher, Katharina; Loxton, Andre G.; Dolganov, Gregory; Kriel, Magdalena; Van, Tran; Chen, Ray Y.; Warwick, James; Via, Laura E.; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Schoolnik, Gary; Tromp, Gerard; Alland, David; Barry, Clifton E.; Winter, Jill; Walzl, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The absence of a gold standard to determine when antibiotics have induced sterilizing cure confounds the development of new approaches to treat pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). We detected PET-CT imaging response patterns consistent with active disease along with the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples in a substantial proportion of adult, HIV-negative PTB patients after standard 6-month treatment plus one year follow-up, including patients with a durable cure and others who later developed recurrent disease. The presence of MTB mRNA in the context of non-resolving and intensifying lesions on PET-CT might indicate ongoing transcription, suggesting that even apparently curative PTB treatment may not eradicate all organisms in most patients. This suggests an important complementary role for the immune response in maintaining a disease-free state. Sterilizing drugs or host-directed therapies and better treatment response markers are likely needed for the successful development of improved and shortened PTB treatment strategies. PMID:27595324

  11. Diseases masking and delaying the diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Kholtobin, Denis

    2015-12-01

    As urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) has no specific clinical features, it is often overlooked. To identify some of the reasons for misdiagnosing UGTB we performed a systematic review. We searched in Medline/PubMed papers with keywords 'urogenital tuberculosis, rare' and 'urogenital tuberculosis, unusual'. 'Urogenital tuberculosis, rare' presented 230 articles and 'urogenital tuberculosis, unusual' presented 81 articles only, a total of 311 papers. A total of 34 papers were duplicated and so were excluded from the review. In addition, we excluded from the analysis 33 papers on epidemiological studies and literature reviews, papers describing non-TB cases and cases of TB another than urogenital organs (48 articles), cases of congenital TB (three articles), UGTB as a case of concomitant disease (16 articles), and UGTB as a complication of BCG-therapy (eight articles). We also excluded 22 articles dedicated to complications of the therapy, which made a total of 164 articles. Among the remaining 147 articles we selected 43 which described really unusual, difficult to diagnose cases. We also included in our review a WHO report from 2014, and one scientific monograph on TB urology. The most frequent reasons for delayed diagnosis were absence typical clinical features of UGTB, and the tendency of UGTB to hide behind the mask of another disease. We can conclude that actually UGTB is not rare disease, but it is often an overlooked disease. The main reasons for delayed diagnosis are vague, atypical clinical features and a low index of suspicion.

  12. Tuberculosis infection and disease among schoolchildren: the influence of the HIV epidemic and of other factors

    PubMed Central

    Villalbi, J. R.; Galdos-Tanguis, H.; Cayla, J. A.; Casanas, P.; Ferrer, A.; Nebot, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The HIV/AIDS epidemic has caused an excess of tuberculosis cases in Spain and in other countries, but its impact on tuberculosis infection is less well understood. This study presents a massive screening undertaken to estimate the prevalence of tuberculous infection in a cohort of primary school entrants. The evolution of the risk of infection is studied by comparison with previous data in the same population. METHODS: Tuberculin skin test screening with 2TU of PPD RT 23 of first grade students in the primary schools of Barcelona, in the 1994-95 school year (cohort born in 1988). Information was also sought from families of unscreened children. Contacts of PPD+ children were traced to locate index cases. The results were also linked to the case registry of the tuberculosis control programme. RESULTS: The prevalence of tuberculin reactors free of BCG vaccination among the 11,080 schoolchildren screened belonging to the 1988 cohort was 0.76%. A 3% annual decline in the annual risk of infection is estimated by comparison with previous data. The identification of 24 cases with a previous history of tuberculosis disease and of 13 cases with active disease diagnosed after the screening was possible by the follow up of these tuberculin positive children and of the information provided by families of unscreened pupils. The screening detected 1.5 new cases of tuberculosis per 1000 tuberculin tests performed. Tuberculosis infection could be traced to HIV infected tuberculosis cases for at least 6% of the positive schoolchildren. CONCLUSIONS: The decline of the annual risk of infection continues in Barcelona, although at a slower pace than before the HIV/AIDS epidemic, probably attributable to the influence of injecting drug users with smear positive tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.   PMID:10396472

  13. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  14. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  15. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  16. Phenotypes of lung mononuclear phagocytes in HIV seronegative tuberculosis patients: evidence for new recruitment and cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lapa e Silva, J R; Linhares, C; Boechat, N; Rego, L; Almeida, M G; Kriski, A L; Ho, J L

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis preferentially resides in mononuclear phagocytes. The mechanisms by which mononuclear phagocytes keep M. tuberculosis in check or by which the microbe evades control to cause disease remain poorly understood. As an initial effort to delineate these mechanisms, we examined by immunostaining the phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes obtained from lungs of patients with active tuberculosis. From August 1994 to March 1995, consecutive patients who had an abnormal chest X-ray, no demonstrable acid-fast bacilli in sputum specimens and required a diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were enrolled. Of the 39 patients enrolled, 21 had microbiologically diagnosed tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 tuberculosis patients were either HIV seronegative (n = 12) or had no risk factor for HIV and constituted the tuberculosis group. For comparison, M. tuberculosis negative patients who had BAL samples taken during this time (n = 9) or normal healthy volunteers (n = 3) served as control group. Compared to the control group, the tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing markers of young monocytes (UCHM1) and RFD7, a marker for phagocytic cells, and increased expression of HLA-DR, a marker of cell activation. In addition, tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing dendritic cell marker (RFD1) and epithelioid cell marker (RFD9). These data suggest that despite recruitment of monocytes probably from the peripheral blood and local cell activation, host defense of the resident lung cells is insufficient to control M. tuberculosis.

  17. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is commonly viewed as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, induction of pathology and bacterial expulsion all occur in the lungs. In this model, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis and spread of organisms to extrapulmonary sites results in a non-transm...

  18. Active screening at entry for tuberculosis among new immigrants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arshad, S; Bavan, L; Gajari, K; Paget, S N J; Baussano, I

    2010-06-01

    Although there is no evidence that imported tuberculosis increases the incidence of the disease in host countries, the rise in migration worldwide raises concerns regarding the adequacy of surveillance and control of immigrant-associated tuberculosis in low incidence countries. Assessing the performance of screening of immigrants for tuberculosis is key to rationalizing control policies for the detection and management of immigrant-associated tuberculosis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the yield of active screening for tuberculosis among new immigrants at the point of entry. The yield for pulmonary tuberculosis was 3.5 cases per 1,000 screened (95% CI 2.9-4.1; I(2) = 94%); for refugees, asylum seekers and regular immigrants the estimates were 11.9 (95% CI 6.7-17.2; I(2) = 92%), 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.7; I(2) = 96%) and 2.7 (95% CI 2.0-3.4; I(2) = 81%), respectively. The yield estimates for immigrants from Europe, Africa and Asia were 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-3.4; I(2) = 51.5%), 6.5 (95% CI 3.2-10.0; I(2) = 62%) and 11.2 (95% CI 6.2-16.1; I(2) = 95%), respectively. These results provide useful data to inform the development of coherent policies and rational screening services for the detection of immigrant-associated tuberculosis.

  19. Quantitative Comparison of Active and Latent Tuberculosis in the Cynomolgus Macaque Model▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Rodgers, Mark; Smith, Le'kneitah; Bigbee, Matthew; Myers, Amy; Bigbee, Carolyn; Chiosea, Ion; Capuano, Saverio V.; Fuhrman, Carl; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2009-01-01

    We previously described that low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques results in a spectrum of disease similar to that of human infection: primary disease, latent infection, and reactivation tuberculosis (S. V. Capuano III, D. A. Croix, S. Pawar, A. Zinovik, A. Myers, P. L. Lin, S. Bissel, C. Fuhrman, E. Klein, and J. L. Flynn, Infect. Immun. 71:5831-5844, 2003). This is the only established model of latent infection, and it provides a unique opportunity to understand host and pathogen differences across of range of disease states. Here, we provide a more extensive and detailed characterization of the gross pathology, microscopic histopathology, and immunologic characteristics of monkeys in each clinical disease category. The data underscore the similarities between human and nonhuman primate M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, we describe novel methods of quantifying gross pathology and bacterial burden that distinguish between active disease and latent infection, and we extend the usefulness of this model for comparative studies. Early in infection, an abnormal chest X ray, M. tuberculosis growth by gastric aspirate, and increased mycobacterium-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were associated with the development of active disease. At necropsy, disease was quantified with respect to pathology and bacterial numbers. Microscopically, a spectrum of granuloma types are seen and differ with disease type. At necropsy, monkeys with active disease had more lung T cells and more IFN-γ from PBMC, BAL, and mediastinal lymph nodes than monkeys with latent infection. Finally, we have observed a spectrum of disease not only in monkeys with active disease but also in those with latent infection that provides insight into human latent tuberculosis. PMID:19620341

  20. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  1. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  2. [Development and study of structure-activity relationship of drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Baska, Ferenc; Székely, Edina Rita; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Bánhegyi, Péter; Hegymegi-Barakonyi, Bálint; Németh, Gábor; Breza, Nóra; Zsákai, Lilian; Greff, Zoltán; Pató, János; Kéri, György; Orfi, Lászlo

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is considered to be one of the major health problem not only in the less developed countries but in the economically developed countries as well. Roughly one third of the world's population are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a significant part of them are carriers of latent tuberculosis. From ten percent of these latent infections are developing the active TB disease and fifty percent of them die from the illness without appropriate treatment. The drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB, XDR-TB) and TB-HIV co-infection attracted attention to the most serious infectious disease. Inhibition of alternative signaling pathways were an important part of the research strategies for cancer and inflammatory diseases in recent years. In case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis such pathways were also identified, for example, three serine-threonine kinases (PknA, PknB, PknG) which are necessary and essential for bacterial growth. In this paper we summarize our best anti-TB active compounds, their biological effects and structure-activity relationships using in silico modeling, biochemical measurements and tests on active bacteria.

  3. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  4. Diseases masking and delaying the diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Kholtobin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    As urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) has no specific clinical features, it is often overlooked. To identify some of the reasons for misdiagnosing UGTB we performed a systematic review. We searched in Medline/PubMed papers with keywords ‘urogenital tuberculosis, rare’ and ‘urogenital tuberculosis, unusual’. ‘Urogenital tuberculosis, rare’ presented 230 articles and ‘urogenital tuberculosis, unusual’ presented 81 articles only, a total of 311 papers. A total of 34 papers were duplicated and so were excluded from the review. In addition, we excluded from the analysis 33 papers on epidemiological studies and literature reviews, papers describing non-TB cases and cases of TB another than urogenital organs (48 articles), cases of congenital TB (three articles), UGTB as a case of concomitant disease (16 articles), and UGTB as a complication of BCG-therapy (eight articles). We also excluded 22 articles dedicated to complications of the therapy, which made a total of 164 articles. Among the remaining 147 articles we selected 43 which described really unusual, difficult to diagnose cases. We also included in our review a WHO report from 2014, and one scientific monograph on TB urology. The most frequent reasons for delayed diagnosis were absence typical clinical features of UGTB, and the tendency of UGTB to hide behind the mask of another disease. We can conclude that actually UGTB is not rare disease, but it is often an overlooked disease. The main reasons for delayed diagnosis are vague, atypical clinical features and a low index of suspicion. PMID:26622318

  5. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  6. Misdiagnosis and Mistherapy of Crohn's Disease as Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Sen-Yang; Chen, Qiu-Yu; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) remains difficult as the clinical symptoms of the 2 digestive diseases are so similar. Here we report a case where a patient was initially misdiagnosed with ITB prior to the correct CD diagnosis. The 46-year-old male patient was hospitalized elsewhere for pain in the right lower abdomen and underwent an appendectomy. The pathological diagnosis was ITB and the patient was administered antituberculosis therapy for 1 year. Afterward, the patient was readmitted to the hospital for a right lower abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed intestinal gas, fistula, and abdominal mass. We performed a right hemicolectomy on the patient. Postoperatively, we diagnosed the patient with CD, based on patient history and pathological examination. According to the CD active index (CDAI), the patient was at high risk and began treatment with infliximab. The patient has remained in complete remission and made a good recovery after 8-months follow-up. We compared this case with the results of a literature review on the misdiagnosis between CD and ITB (26 previously reported cases) to determine the characteristics of misdiagnosed cases. We found that distinguishing between ITB and CD is difficult because of their varied clinical presentation, nonspecific investigative tools, and profound similarities even in pathological specimens. Although a CT scan to determine the morphology of the bowel wall is a key for correct diagnosis, each case still poses challenges for diagnosis and administrating the appropriate treatment. PMID:26735549

  7. Tetrahdroxysqualene from Rhus taitensis Shows Antimycobacterial Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Jeffrey C.; Barrows, Louis R.; Gideon, Osia G.; Ireland, Chris M.; Koch, Michael; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Piskaut, Pius; Pond, Christopher D.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis has become a major health problem, in particular with the emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB). In our search for new therapeutic leads against TB, we isolated a new triterpene (1) from the plant Rhus taitensis collected in Papua New Guinea. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of R. taitensis leaves and twigs. The structure of tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was elucidated on the basis of HRESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) exhibited anti–tuberculosis activity with an MIC of 10.0 μg/mL while showing only modest cytotoxicity. PMID:18710283

  8. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  9. [On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Antonio; Sánchez, Francesca; Nelson, Jeanne; Miró, José M; Caylà, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    New treatment guidelines are required to improve the tuberculosis control strategies that have been used for 30 years. Seven centers of the Barcelona Tuberculosis Research Unit (BTRU) (Unitat d'Investigació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona) are collaborating with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total). General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (started in 2006), designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5% of the total). The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007) showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway, in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment.

  10. Auxiliary diagnostic value of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 of whole blood in active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Li, Hang; Bao, Hong; Jin, Yufen; Liu, Xiaoju; Wu, Xueqiong; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the expression level of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in peripheral blood and its auxiliary diagnostic value in active tuberculosis. A chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay method was used to detect the levels of IFN-γ and MCP-1 in peripheral blood. Then the receiver operating characteristic curve were drawn to determine the threshold of IFN-γ and MCP-1 for diagnosis of active tuberculosis and to evaluate their diagnostic performance. The specific IFN-γ and MCP-1 levels in the active tuberculosis group were significantly higher than those in the non-tuberculous pulmonary disease group (P < 0.01) and those in the healthy control group (P < 0.01). The IFN-γ levels in the healthy control group and the non-tuberculous respiratory disease group showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05), but the MCP-1 levels in the non-tuberculous respiratory disease group were significantly higher than those of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The specific IFN-γ and MCP-1 level cut off values were 256 pg/ml and 389 pg/ml as an active tuberculosis diagnostic standard. The sensitivities of IFN-γ and MCP-1 were 57.3% and 92.8%, respectively; specificities were 80% and 80.7%, respectively; the positive predictive values were 76.9% and 84.9%, respectively; negative predictive values were 61.7% and 78.7%, respectively; and accuracy rates were 76.9% and 84.9%, respectively. Compared with the detection of IFN-γ, we observed a better diagnostic performance of MCP-1 in peripheral blood in active tuberculosis. MCP-1 may become one of the active tuberculosis auxiliary diagnostic targets. PMID:26309608

  11. Neglected disease in mentally ill patients: Major tuberculosis outbreak in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmak, Ljiljana; Obrovac, Mihaela; Lovric, Zvjezdana; Jankovic Makek, Mateja; Katalinic Jankovic, Vera

    2017-04-01

    As tuberculosis incidence decreases, the possibility of overlooking the disease increases, especially in vulnerable populations. We describe here a major tuberculosis outbreak among mentally ill patients in Croatia, focusing on 1 regional hospital where most patients were hospitalized. The outbreak emphasizes the vulnerability of mentally ill patients to tuberculosis infection and the complexity of infection control measures in psychiatric institutions. The awareness of tuberculosis in these settings should be maintained to interrupt prolonged exposure and avoid unnecessary infection.

  12. IFNγ Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Risk of Infection and Disease in Household Contacts of Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; Marín, Diana M.; López, Lucelly; Henao, Hanna M.; Martínez, Teresita; Villa, Liliana; Barrera, Luis F.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Ramírez, María E.; Montes, Carlos J.; Oquendo, María C.; Arango, Lisandra M.; Riaño, Felipe; Aguirre, Carlos; Bustamante, Alberto; Belisle, John T.; Dobos, Karen; Mejía, Gloria I.; Giraldo, Margarita R.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Robledo, Jaime; Arbeláez, María P.; Rojas, Carlos A.; García, Luis F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Household contacts (HHCs) of pulmonary tuberculosis patients are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and early disease development. Identification of individuals at risk of tuberculosis disease is a desirable goal for tuberculosis control. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) using specific M. tuberculosis antigens provide an alternative to tuberculin skin testing (TST) for infection detection. Additionally, the levels of IFNγ produced in response to these antigens may have prognostic value. We estimated the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection by IGRA and TST in HHCs and their source population (SP), and assessed whether IFNγ levels in HHCs correlate with tuberculosis development. Methods A cohort of 2060 HHCs was followed for 2–3 years after exposure to a tuberculosis case. Besides TST, IFNγ responses to mycobacterial antigens: CFP, CFP-10, HspX and Ag85A were assessed in 7-days whole blood cultures and compared to 766 individuals from the SP in Medellín, Colombia. Isoniazid prophylaxis was not offered to child contacts because Colombian tuberculosis regulations consider it only in children under 5 years, TST positive without BCG vaccination. Results Using TST 65.9% of HHCs and 42.7% subjects from the SP were positive (OR 2.60, p<0.0001). IFNγ response to CFP-10, a biomarker of M. tuberculosis infection, tested positive in 66.3% HHCs and 24.3% from the SP (OR = 6.07, p<0.0001). Tuberculosis incidence rate was 7.0/1000 person years. Children <5 years accounted for 21.6% of incident cases. No significant difference was found between positive and negative IFNγ responders to CFP-10 (HR 1.82 95% CI 0.79–4.20 p = 0.16). However, a significant trend for tuberculosis development amongst high HHC IFNγ producers was observed (trend Log rank p = 0.007). Discussion CFP-10-induced IFNγ production is useful to establish tuberculosis infection prevalence amongst HHC and identify those at highest risk of disease. The high

  13. Eosinophilic cystitis and cholangitis - systemic disease triggered by mycobacterium tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Grenda, Ryszard; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Gietka, Piotr; Skobejko-Włodarska, Lidia; Felberg, Karina; Książyk, Janusz

    Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the urinary tract characterized by infiltration of bladder with eosinophils. The cause remains unclear, immunological mechanisms have been implicated in pathogenesis. Potential etiological factors include: tumors, allergy, parasitic infections, trauma. The disease may have a variable course, from a mild self-limiting, through common symptoms like: dysuria, hematuria, abdominal pain, tumor, to severe renal failure, with eosinophilic infiltration of the other organs and systemic complications. Treatment depending on disease severity and etiology is pharmacological and/or surgical. Here we report a case of a previously healthy 16-year old girl with inflammatory tumor in the liver hilum infiltrating extrahepatic biliary tract who developed three months later haematuria with acute dysuric signs and renal failure. Based on histopathological findings diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis was established. Tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were positive. To our knowledge, EC association with cholangitis and tuberculosis have never been reported before.

  14. Childhood tuberculosis: epidemiology and natural history of disease.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J

    2011-03-01

    Despite previous misperceptions that childhood tuberculosis (TB) is less relevant, since children tend to develop mild disease, contribute little to transmission and do not impact epidemic control, awareness is growing that TB is an important preventable cause of disease and death among children in TB endemic areas. At an operational level there remains an urgent need for feasible and implementable policies to guide management in resource limited settings. This manuscript reviews the epidemiology and natural history of TB in children in order to improve understanding of the various disease entities encountered and to provide the rationale for different management approaches.

  15. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection: a 'danger-couple model' of disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki M; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Ellegård, Rada; Barathan, Muttiah; Chong, Yee K; Bador, M Kahar; Rukumani, Devi V; Sabet, Negar S; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection interfere and impact the pathogenesis phenomena of each other. Owing to atypical clinical presentations and diagnostic complications, HIV/TB co-infection continues to be a menace for healthcare providers. Although the increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a reduction in HIV-associated opportunistic infections and mortality, the concurrent management of HIV/TB co-infection remains a challenge owing to adverse effects, complex drug interactions, overlapping toxicities and tuberculosis -associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Several hypotheses have been put forward for the exacerbation of tuberculosis by HIV and vice versa supported by immunological studies. Discussion on the mechanisms produced by infectious cofactors with impact on disease pathology could shed light on how to design potential interventions that could decelerate disease progression. With no vaccine for HIV and lack of an effective vaccine for tuberculosis, it is essential to design strategies against HIV-TB co-infection.

  16. Tuberculosis: a breast-feeding challenge.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Suzanne; Winkelman, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    A recent resurgence of tuberculosis in the world community has brought the disease into the forefront of communicable disease control. Acknowledging the proven benefits of breast-feeding infants, the question of compatibility arises regarding the safety of breast-feeding an infant in the event of active tuberculosis disease in the mother. This article will discuss the emerging trends of tuberculosis disease and review the evidence that addresses the issues of safety while breast-feeding during tuberculosis treatment.

  17. Is it Crohn's disease or intestinal tuberculosis? CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, D

    1998-08-01

    A computed tomographic (CT) analysis of 36 patients with differential diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis (IT) or Crohn's disease (CD) in barium gastrointestinal studies was undertaken to identify distinguishing bowel wall or mesenteric features which could provide a radiological definitive diagnosis. Final diagnoses obtained in 32 cases were tuberculosis (N = 18), CD (N = 9), carcinoid (N = 2), chronic appendicitis (N = 2) and bowel infarction (N = 1). In IT, the bowel wall changes were varied: absence of wall thickening (N = 6), minimal asymmetric wall thickening with and without mucosal tethering (N = 8), minimal symmetric wall thickening often with mild peritonitis (N = 3), exophytic mass encircling bowel lumen (N = 4). Mural stratification (target sign) was not found. CD showed concentric or symmetrical wall thickening ranging from 0.6 to 1.5 mm and mural stratification occurred in about a half of the cases. Lymphadenopathy was the commonest associated feature in both but in IT, the nodes were larger and a third had necrotic centers. Displacement of bowel loops was more often due to enlarged lymphadenopathy in IT while in CD it was frequently due to fibrofatty change. CT was able to provide the correct diagnosis in 26 out of these 32 (81%) cases of indeterminate barium studies. CT is recommended when barium gastrointestinal studies are unable to differentiate between intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease.

  18. Specific lytic activity against mycobacterial antigens is inversely correlated with the severity of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    DE LA BARRERA, S S; FINIASZ, M; FRIAS, A; ALEMÁN, M; BARRIONUEVO, P; FINK, S; FRANCO, M C; ABBATE, E; SASIAIN, M Del C

    2003-01-01

    The ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with active tuberculosis to display cytotoxic responses against autologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-pulsed macrophages was evaluated. Non-MHC restricted cell-dependent lytic activity was observed in ex vivo effector cells from tuberculosis patients and was mediated mainly by CD3+γδ TCR+ T (γδ T) cells bearing CD56 and/or CD16 molecules. MHC-restricted and non-MHC restricted cytotoxic T cells (CTL) were differentially expanded upon stimulation with Mtb in tuberculosis patients and normal controls (N). Class-I restricted CD8+ CTL and class-II restricted CD4+ CTL were generated in PPD+N and to a lesser extent in PPD–N. Mtb-stimulated effector cells from tuberculosis patients became progressively non-MHC restricted CD4–CD8–γδ T cells, while lytic activity of CD4+ and CD8+CTL decreased gradually as the disease became more severe. On the other hand, target cells were lysed by ex vivo cells from tuberculosis patients through the Fas-FasL and perforin pathways. Mtb-induced CD4+ CTL from tuberculosis patients and N controls preferentially employed the Fas-FasL mechanism. Mtb-induced CD8+ CTL effector cells from patients used the perforin-based mechanism while cells from N controls also used the Fas-FasL pathway. While Mtb-induced γδ CTL from patients and PPD–N employed the latter mechanism cells from PPD+N individuals also used the perforin pathway. It can be concluded that shifts in the CTL response and the cytolytic mechanisms take place as the pulmonary involvement becomes more severe. PMID:12780692

  19. [Submitting to disease, controlling disease, industrialization and medical technology: the case of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Thebaud, A; Lert, F

    1985-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the research work undertaken in France and Algeria on tuberculosis and the application of tuberculosis treatments. Tuberculosis is one of the best medical pointers to social inequality. The disease is seen here as typical of the links between industrialization and health, with regard to the evolution of the epidemiological model and the influence of innovational+ treatments, based on chemotherapy, on the organization of care for tubercular patients, together with the socio-economic and cultural changes that have affected both French and Algerian society during the twentieth century. The first part of the article shows how the epidemiology of tuberculosis tends to vary in accordance with the dynamic evolution of social relationships as industrialization occurs in each country, and how world-wide epidemiological trends are one of the best medical pointers to the North-South divide. The second part of the article is given over to a study of the way in which the application of tuberculosis treatments in both France and Algeria is a function of the organization of the health system in each country, of the status and power of the medical profession within society, and of the impact of technical innovations on the changing forms of care for tubercular patients in both countries. In France, it can be seen that the structure of the system set up to combat tuberculosis in the inter-war years has tended to remain unchanged, despite the opportunities for re-organization of tuberculosis treatment and for making therapy less onerous which have arisen as the incidence of the disease has dropped and antibiotics have been introduced. This resistance to change seems due primarily to the difficulty of achieving redeployment of medical staff, and the inertia caused by the rigid structure of tuberculosis care within the French socio-medical system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Poncet's disease (reactive arthritis associated with tuberculosis): retrospective case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdulaziz, Sultana; Almoallim, Hani; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Samannodi, Mohammed; Shabrawishi, Mohammed; Meeralam, Yasir; Abdulmajeed, Ghadi; Banjar, Ghadeer; Qutub, Weam; Dowaikh, Hiba

    2012-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with Poncet's disease (PD) in the Makkah region in Saudi Arabia, where tuberculosis is on the rise. The secondary objective is conducting a PD systematic literature review to compare our findings. We studied seven patients who presented with arthritis within the first 3 years from diagnosis of active tuberculosis in two centers in the Makkah region: King Faisal Specialist Hospital and King Fahad Hospital in Jeddah from January 2005 to December 2011. We conducted a literature review on PD in multiple biomedical/pharmaceutical databases up to December 2011. We detected a new pattern of reactive arthritis associated with tuberculosis (TB). We identified this as PD or tuberculous rheumatism, which is a sterile reactive arthritis that can emerge during any stage of acute TB infection. Seven cases of Poncet's disease were identified in our study. The most common presentation was extrapulmonary with involvement of multiple sites. Six out of seven patients developed arthritis after initiation of anti-TB drugs; one patient developed polyarthritis after completion of anti-TB medication. Asymmetrical polyarthritis was the most common presentation and the resolution of the arthritis was with symptomatic treatment and continuation of anti-TB drugs except in one case. PD may manifest in a variable pattern during the course of active tuberculous infection. Physicians should be aware of this rare complication associated with a common disease to prevent delay in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment.

  1. Functional analysis of TPM domain containing Rv2345 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies its phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Avni; Eniyan, Kandasamy; Sinha, Swati; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Bajpai, Urmi

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causal agent of tuberculosis, the second largest infectious disease. With the rise of multi-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, serious challenge lies ahead of us in treating the disease. The availability of complete genome sequence of Mtb has improved the scope for identifying new proteins that would not only further our understanding of biology of the organism but could also serve to discover new drug targets. In this study, Rv2345, a hypothetical membrane protein of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, which is reported to be a putative ortholog of ZipA cell division protein has been assigned function through functional annotation using bioinformatics tools followed by experimental validation. Sequence analysis showed Rv2345 to have a TPM domain at its N-terminal region and predicted it to have phosphatase activity. The TPM domain containing region of Rv2345 was cloned and expressed using pET28a vector in Escherichia coli and purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. The purified TPM domain was tested in vitro and our results confirmed it to have phosphatase activity. The enzyme activity was first checked and optimized with pNPP as substrate, followed by using ATP, which was also found to be used as substrate by the purified protein. Hence sequence analysis followed by in vitro studies characterizes TPM domain of Rv2345 to contain phosphatase activity.

  2. Multitarget Drug Discovery for Tuberculosis and Other Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a series of new drug leads that have potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis as well as against other bacteria, fungi, and a malaria parasite. The compounds are analogues of the new tuberculosis (TB) drug SQ109 (1), which has been reported to act by inhibiting a transporter called MmpL3, involved in cell wall biosynthesis. We show that 1 and the new compounds also target enzymes involved in menaquinone biosynthesis and electron transport, inhibiting respiration and ATP biosynthesis, and are uncouplers, collapsing the pH gradient and membrane potential used to power transporters. The result of such multitarget inhibition is potent inhibition of TB cell growth, as well as very low rates of spontaneous drug resistance. Several targets are absent in humans but are present in other bacteria, as well as in malaria parasites, whose growth is also inhibited. PMID:24568559

  3. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pulmonary tuberculosis... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films...

  4. Congenital Tuberculosis as a Result of Disseminated Maternal Disease: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Honeysberg, Mónica; Diazgranados-Cuenca, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is highly prevalent worldwide, congenital tuberculosis is one of the least common manifestations of the disease. The diagnosis is usually difficult because of the non-specific clinical presentation and the lack of awareness of maternal disease prior to pregnancy and delivery. We present the case of a preterm neonate with congenital tuberculosis, born to a previously healthy mother who had developed severe disseminated tuberculosis during her pregnancy. Once the diagnosis was confirmed in the mother, the congenital infection was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirates, and positive polymerase chain reaction in a cerebrospinal fluid examination. Treatment for tuberculosis with a four-drug regimen resulted in an adequate clinical response in both the mother and infant. PMID:26508944

  5. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (i): Epidemiology and diagnosis. Congenital tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; Del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening in pregnancy using tuberculin skin test (TST) is recommended in case of symptoms of TB disease, close contact with a patient with infectious TB, or high risk of developing active disease. The new interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) tests are recommended in BCG-vaccinated pregnant women with positive TST and no known risk factors for TB, and in those immunocompromised, with clinical suspicion of TB but negative TST. TB diagnosis is difficult due to the non-specific symptoms, the increased frequency of extrapulmonary disease, the delay in radiological examinations, and the high rate of tuberculin anergy. Neonatal TB can be acquired in utero (congenital TB), or through airborne transmission after delivery (postnatal TB). Congenital TB is extremely rare and does not cause fetal malformations. It may be evident at birth, although it usually presents after the second week of life. In newborns with no family history of TB, the disease should be considered in cases of miliary pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly with focal lesions, or lymphocytic meningitis with hypoglycorrhachia, especially in those born to immigrants from high TB-burden countries. TST is usually negative, and IGRAs have lower sensitivity than in older children. However, the yield of acid-fast smear and culture is higher, mostly in congenital TB. Molecular diagnosis techniques enable early diagnosis and detection of drug resistance mutations. There is a substantial risk of disseminated disease and death.

  6. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  7. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  8. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  9. Alteration of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis following anti-tuberculosis drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Imran Hussain; Ahmed, Albin Mostaque; Choudhuri, Subhadip; Sen, Aditi; Hazra, Avijit; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Bhattacharya, Basudev; Bahar, Bojlul

    2014-11-01

    Active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is associated with a failure of the host immune system to control the invading Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The objective of this study was to quantify and assess the role of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients following anti-tuberculosis drug (ATD) therapy. Blood samples were collected from APTB patients and normal healthy subjects (NHS) (total n=204) at baseline and 2, 4 and 6 months post-therapy and the abundance of serum inflammatory cytokines were measured by cytokine specific ELISA. Compared to NHS, APTB patients at baseline had higher levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 (P<0.001), IFN-γ (P<0.001), TNF-α (P<0.01), IL-1β (P<0.001) and IL-6 (P<0.001) and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 (P<0.001) and TGF-β1 (P<0.001) while there was no change in the level of IL-4. In APTB patients, the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 directly relate to the bacterial load while the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 relate to radiological severity. At baseline, the IL-6 level in NHS and APTB patients differed most and following ATD therapy, this level rapidly decreased and stabilized by 4-month in APTB patients. It is concluded that a subtle reduction in the serum level of IL-6 of the APTB patients following ATD therapy might play a vital role in immune-protection of the host against Mtb infection and hence the serum IL-6 level can be a useful marker to diagnose the effectiveness of therapy in the patients.

  10. Identification of novel host biomarkers in plasma as candidates for the immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis disease and monitoring of tuberculosis treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Ruschca; Malherbe, Stephanus; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; van der Spuy, Gian; Walzl, Gerhard; Chegou, Novel N.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new tools for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. We evaluated the potentials of 74 host markers as biomarkers for the immunological diagnosis of tuberculosis and monitoring of treatment response. Fifty-five individuals that presented with signs and symptoms requiring investigation for tuberculosis disease were prospectively recruited prior to clinical diagnosis, at a health centre in Cape Town, South Africa. Patients were later classified as having tuberculosis disease or other respiratory diseases (ORD) using a combination of clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. Out of 74 host markers that were evaluated in plasma samples from study participants using a multiplex platform, 18 showed potential as tuberculosis diagnostic candidates with the most promising being NCAM, CRP, SAP, IP-10, ferritin, TPA, I-309, and MIG, which diagnosed tuberculosis disease individually, with area under the ROC curve ≥0.80. Six-marker biosignatures containing NCAM diagnosed tuberculosis disease with a sensitivity of 100% (95%CI, 86.3-100%) and specificity of 89.3% (95%CI, 67.6-97.3%) irrespective of HIV status, and 100% accuracy in the absence of HIV infection. Furthermore, the concentrations of 11 of these proteins changed with treatment, thereby indicating that they may be useful in monitoring of the response to tuberculosis treatment. Our findings have potential to be translated into a point-of-care screening test for tuberculosis, after future validation studies. PMID:27557501

  11. Oral Tuberculosis: A Rare Manifestation of Disseminated Disease in a Patient with Dermatomyositis on Chronic Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Khateeb, Dina; Feurdean, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of death around the world despite advancements in diagnostic testing and medical therapies. It commonly affects the lungs, but isolated extra pulmonary clinical manifestations have been reported. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity is exceedingly rare. We present a case of a patient with dermatomyositis on chronic steroid therapy, who presented with tuberculosis involving the tongue as the only clinical manifestation of disseminated disease. Physicians must be aware of extra pulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis in patients at risk, in order to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment and to prevent further contagion. PMID:27895668

  12. The outcome of tuberculosis treatment in subjects with chronic kidney disease in Brazil: a multinomial analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Santos, Barbara; Gomes, Teresa; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between clinical/epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment in patients with concomitant tuberculosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Brazil. METHODS: We used the Brazilian Ministry of Health National Case Registry Database to identify patients with tuberculosis and CKD, treated between 2007 and 2011. The tuberculosis treatment outcomes were compared with epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the subjects using a hierarchical multinomial logistic regression model, in which cure was the reference outcome. RESULTS: The prevalence of CKD among patients with tuberculosis was 0.4% (95% CI: 0.37-0.42%). The sample comprised 1,077 subjects. The outcomes were cure, in 58%; treatment abandonment, in 7%; death from tuberculosis, in 13%; and death from other causes, in 22%. The characteristics that differentiated the ORs for treatment abandonment or death were age; alcoholism; AIDS; previous noncompliance with treatment; transfer to another facility; suspected tuberculosis on chest X-ray; positive results in the first smear microscopy; and indications for/use of directly observed treatment, short-course strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the importance of sociodemographic characteristics for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with CKD and underscore the need for tuberculosis control strategies targeting patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as CKD. PMID:24310632

  13. The IL-17A rs2275913 single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with protection to tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rolandelli, A; Hernández Del Pino, R E; Pellegrini, J M; Tateosian, N L; Amiano, N O; de la Barrera, S; Casco, N; Gutiérrez, M; Palmero, D J; García, V E

    2017-01-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes nearly 10 millions of new tuberculosis disease cases annually. However, most individuals exposed to Mtb do not develop tuberculosis, suggesting the influence of a human genetic component. Here, we investigated the association of the rs2275913 SNP (G → A) from IL-17A and tuberculosis in Argentina by a case-control study. Furthermore, we evaluated in vitro the functional relevance of this SNP during the immune response of the host against Mtb and analyzed its impact on clinical parameters of the disease. We found an association between the AA genotype and tuberculosis resistance. Additionally, within the healthy donors population, AA cells stimulated with a Mtb lysate (Mtb-Ag) produced the highest amounts of IL-17A and IFN-γ, which further support the genetic evidence found. In contrast, within the tuberculosis patients population, AA Mtb-Ag stimulated cells showed the lowest immunological parameters and we evidenced an association between the AA genotype and clinical parameters of disease severity, such as severe radiological lesions and higher bacilli burden in sputum. Overall, our findings demonstrated that the AA genotype from the IL-17A rs2275913 SNP is positively associated with protection to active tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in the Argentinean population.

  14. The IL-17A rs2275913 single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with protection to tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rolandelli, A.; Hernández Del Pino, R. E.; Pellegrini, J. M.; Tateosian, N. L.; Amiano, N. O.; de la Barrera, S.; Casco, N.; Gutiérrez, M.; Palmero, D. J.; García, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes nearly 10 millions of new tuberculosis disease cases annually. However, most individuals exposed to Mtb do not develop tuberculosis, suggesting the influence of a human genetic component. Here, we investigated the association of the rs2275913 SNP (G → A) from IL-17A and tuberculosis in Argentina by a case-control study. Furthermore, we evaluated in vitro the functional relevance of this SNP during the immune response of the host against Mtb and analyzed its impact on clinical parameters of the disease. We found an association between the AA genotype and tuberculosis resistance. Additionally, within the healthy donors population, AA cells stimulated with a Mtb lysate (Mtb-Ag) produced the highest amounts of IL-17A and IFN-γ, which further support the genetic evidence found. In contrast, within the tuberculosis patients population, AA Mtb-Ag stimulated cells showed the lowest immunological parameters and we evidenced an association between the AA genotype and clinical parameters of disease severity, such as severe radiological lesions and higher bacilli burden in sputum. Overall, our findings demonstrated that the AA genotype from the IL-17A rs2275913 SNP is positively associated with protection to active tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in the Argentinean population. PMID:28098168

  15. [The antropology of disease and the diseased: perceptions and life strategies adopted by tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    Bertolli Filho, C

    The article examines how tuberculosis patients who were exiled to sanitarium-cities in the state of Sao Paulo reacted to the social representations assigned to them not only by the public at large but by medical workers as well. By evaluating memoirs and related documents from the perspective of the anthropology of disease and the diseased, it was possible to identify the network of signifieds created by the afflicted community.

  16. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  17. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Billo, Nils; Castro, José Luis; Jones, Sinéad; Rusen, I D; Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Fussell, Mark; Fujiwara, Paula I; Harries, Anthony D; Enarson, Donald A

    2009-12-01

    The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) is the oldest international non-governmental organization involved in the fight against tuberculosis. This review documents the history and structure of The Union up to 2009, and describes the achievements that have taken place in the field of tuberculosis and lung health. The progress made in tackling the major killer (pneumonia) of children less than 5 years of age, the barrier to affordable essential asthma medicines, the complex issue of tobacco control, the move into the realm of HIV and AIDS, and new ideas and activities around the increasingly important domain of operational research are described and discussed. Finally, as with many institutions that have seen a rapid phase of growth, expansion and decentralisation to regional offices around the world, the review highlights the internal strategic initiative that aims to fine-tune the organisational structure, clarify lines of authority, create more efficient business, human resource and financial systems and revise, where necessary, The Union's guiding mission, vision and values for the future.

  18. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  19. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  20. Helminth-induced arginase-1 exacerbates lung inflammation and disease severity in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Monin, Leticia; Griffiths, Kristin L; Lam, Wing Y; Gopal, Radha; Kang, Dongwan D; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Babu, Subash; Kolls, Jay K; Mitreva, Makedonka; Rosa, Bruce A; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Morrison, Thomas E; Murray, Peter J; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Pearce, Edward J; Khader, Shabaana A

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic helminth worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, are endemic in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among the population. Human studies suggest that helminth coinfections contribute to increased TB susceptibility and increased rates of TB reactivation. Prevailing models suggest that T helper type 2 (Th2) responses induced by helminth infection impair Th1 immune responses and thereby limit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) control. Using a pulmonary mouse model of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that S. mansoni coinfection or immunization with S. mansoni egg antigens can reversibly impair Mtb-specific T cell responses without affecting macrophage-mediated Mtb control. Instead, S. mansoni infection resulted in accumulation of high arginase-1-expressing macrophages in the lung, which formed type 2 granulomas and exacerbated inflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Treatment of coinfected animals with an antihelminthic improved Mtb-specific Th1 responses and reduced disease severity. In a genetically diverse mouse population infected with Mtb, enhanced arginase-1 activity was associated with increased lung inflammation. Moreover, in patients with pulmonary TB, lung damage correlated with increased serum activity of arginase-1, which was elevated in TB patients coinfected with helminths. Together, our data indicate that helminth coinfection induces arginase-1-expressing type 2 granulomas, thereby increasing inflammation and TB disease severity. These results also provide insight into the mechanisms by which helminth coinfections drive increased susceptibility, disease progression, and severity in TB.

  1. Encapsulation of Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs within Mesoporous Silica and Intracellular Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin; Pethe, Kevin; Kim, Ryangyeo; Ballell, Lluis; Barros, David; Cechetto, Jonathan; Jeon, HeeKyoung; Kim, Kideok; Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major problem in public health. While new effective treatments to combat the disease are currently under development, they tend suffer from poor solubility often resulting in low and/or inconsistent oral bioavailability. Mesoporous materials are here investigated in an in vitro intracellular assay, for the effective delivery of compound PA-824; a poorly soluble bactericidal agent being developed against Tuberculosis (TB). Mesoporous materials enhance the solubility of PA-824; however, this is not translated into a higher antibacterial activity in TB-infected macrophages after 5 days of incubation, where similar values are obtained. The lack of improved activity may be due to insufficient release of the drug from the mesopores in the context of the cellular environment. However, these results show promising data for the use of mesoporous particles in the context of oral delivery with expected improvements in bioavailability.

  2. Tuberculosis of the manubriosternal joint and concurrent asymptomatic active pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient presenting with a chest wall mass.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Ayala-Carbonero, Ana María; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; García Latorre, Raquel; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented to our hospital with an anterior chest wall swelling. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed findings consistent with an infectious arthritis of the manubriosternal joint, and CT images also demonstrated multiple centrilobular nodules in both lungs, suggesting an infectious bronchiolitis. A CT-guided fine needle aspiration of a presternal mass yielded growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed an active pulmonary tuberculosis. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare.

  3. Genome scan of M. tuberculosis infection and disease in Ugandans.

    PubMed

    Stein, Catherine M; Zalwango, Sarah; Malone, LaShaunda L; Won, Sungho; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mugerwa, Roy D; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Thompson, Cheryl L; Cartier, Kevin C; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K; Boom, W Henry; Whalen, Christopher C

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI) or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-); this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate). We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10(-3)) was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002). We also observed linkage at the nominal alpha = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02), IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01), IL12BR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.006), IL12A (TB p = 0.02) and IFNGR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.002). These results confirm not

  4. Genome Scan of M. tuberculosis Infection and Disease in Ugandans

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Catherine M.; Zalwango, Sarah; Malone, LaShaunda L.; Won, Sungho; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mugerwa, Roy D.; Leontiev, Dmitry V.; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Cartier, Kevin C.; Elston, Robert C.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Boom, W. Henry; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI) or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-); this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate). We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10−3) was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002). We also observed linkage at the nominal α = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02), IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01), IL12BR2 (TNFα p = 0.006), IL12A (TB p = 0.02) and IFNGR2 (TNFα p = 0.002). These results

  5. Anaerobic incubation conditions enhance pyrazinamide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mary Margaret; Zhang, Ying

    2004-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an unconventional front line tuberculosis drug characterized by high in vivo sterilizing activity, but poor in vitro activity. This disparity in PZA activity may reflect differences between the in vivo tissue environment and in vitro culture conditions. This study examined the effect of anaerobic conditions, which exist in granulomatous lesions in vivo, on PZA activity in vitro. Low oxygen enhanced the activity of PZA against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with anaerobic conditions resulting in greater enhancement than microaerobic conditions. ATPase and respiratory chain enzyme inhibitors enhanced PZA activity under normal atmospheric conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the inhibitors did not enhance isoniazid or rifampicin activity. Nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor antagonized PZA activity under anaerobic conditions. These findings provide further support for a proposed mechanism of action of PZA in which the active form of PZA (pyrazinoic acid) depletes the membrane energy reserve. They also provide another explanation for the higher sterilizing activity of PZA within in vivo lesions with low oxygen than under in vitro drug susceptibility testing conditions with ambient oxygen.

  6. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    PubMed Central

    de Prince, Karina Andrade; Sordi, Renata; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Barreto Santos, Adolfo Carlos; Araujo, Angela R.; Leite, Sergio R.A.; Leite, Clarice Q. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib.) B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae), cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA) and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties. PMID:24031821

  7. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA

    PubMed Central

    Frankland, Timothy B.; Daida, Yihe G.; Honda, Jennifer R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005–2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility. PMID:28221128

  8. Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease: challenging differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia Yi; Tong, Jin Lu; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2016-03-01

    Along with epidemiological changes in tuberculosis (TB) and an increased incidence of Crohn's disease (CD), the differential diagnosis of intestinal TB (ITB) and CD is of vital importance and has become a clinical challenge because treatment based on misdiagnosis may lead to fatal outcomes. In this study, we reviewed the similarities and differences in clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological features of these two diseases. Concomitant pulmonary TB, ascites, night sweats, involvement of fewer than four segments of the bowel, patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, scars or pseudopolyps strongly indicate ITB. Bloody stools, perianal signs, chronic diarrhea, extraintestinal manifestations, anorectal lesions, longitudinal ulcers and a cobblestone appearance are all suggestive of CD. Significant differences in the size, number, location and patterns of granulomas in ITB and CD with regard to their histopathologic features have been noted. Immune stain of cell surface markers is also helpful. Interferon-γ release assay and polymerase chain reaction analysis have achieved satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of ITB. Computed tomography enterographic findings of segmental small bowel or left colon involvement, mural stratification, the comb sign and fibrofatty proliferation are significantly more common in CD, whereas mesenteric lymph node changes (calcification or central necrosis) and focal ileocecal lesions are more frequently seen in ITB. A diagnosis should be carefully established before the initiation of the therapy. In suspicious cases, short-term empirical anti-TB therapy is quite efficient to further confirm the diagnosis.

  9. Lipophilic pyrazinoic acid amide and ester prodrugs stability, activation and activity against M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Valente, Emília; Gómez, M José Rodríguez; Anes, Elsa; Constantino, Luís

    2009-06-28

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against M. tuberculosis and is a first line agent for the treatment of human tuberculosis. PZA is itself a prodrug that requires activation by a pyrazinamidase to form its active metabolite pyrazinoic acid (POA). Since the specificity of cleavage is dependent on a single bacterial enzyme, resistance to PZA is often found in tuberculosis patients. Esters of POA have been proposed in the past as alternatives to PZA however the most promising compounds were rapidly degraded in the presence of serum. In order to obtain compounds that could survive during the transport phase, we synthesized lipophilic ester and amide POA derivatives, studied their activity against M. tuberculosis, their stability in plasma and rat liver homogenate and also their activation by a mycobacterial homogenate. The new lipophilic ester prodrugs were found to be active in concentrations 10-fold lower than those needed for PZA to kill sensitive M. tuberculosis and also have a suitable stability in the presence of plasma. Amides of POA although more stable in plasma have lower activity. The reason can probably be found in the rate of activation of both types of prodrugs; while esters are easily activated by mycobacterial esterases, amides are resistant to activation and are not transformed into POA at a suitable rate.

  10. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-05

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes.

  11. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data.

  12. A case of solely lung-involved IgG4-related disease mimicking tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongyi; Li, Haitao; Hu, Yongbing; Niu, Ruichao; Pan, Pinhua; Hu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a chronic progressive autoimmune disease. Solely lung involved IgG4-RD is extremely rare. Herein, we reported a case of IgG4-related disease as mimicking tuberculosis. A 52-year-old male patient was admitted due to cough and hemoptysis for two months and fever for 1 month. The pre-admission diagnosis in another hospital was secondary pulmonary tuberculosis, but the quadruple anti-tuberculosis therapy was ineffective and the disease condition continued to deteriorate. The percutaneous lung biopsy was carried out after admission and the pathological diagnosis was IgG4-related disease. The patient's disease condition was improved following hormonal therapy.

  13. Tuberculosis and Leprosy: Classical Granulomatous Diseases in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Dacso, Mara M; Abad-Venida, Ma Luisa

    2015-07-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis are chronic mycobacterial infections that elicit granulomatous inflammation. Both infections are curable, but granulomatous injury to cutaneous structures, including cutaneous nerves in leprosy, may cause permanent damage. Both diseases are major global concerns: tuberculosis for its high prevalence and mortality, and leprosy for its persistent global presence and high rate of neuropathic disability. Cutaneous manifestations of both leprosy and tuberculosis are frequently subtle and challenging in dermatologic practice and often require a careful travel and social history and a high index of suspicion.

  14. Congenital tuberculosis: a rare manifestation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Pooja; Gomber, Sunil; Das, Saurabhi

    2014-02-01

    Congenital tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose unless there is a high index of suspicion. A 2-month-old infant boy presented with a history of fever since birth and failure to thrive. Chest radiograph demonstrated right upper lobe collapse/consolidation and an ultrasonogram of the abdomen showed multiple hypo-echoic hepatic and splenic lesions, and multiple retroperitoneal nodes. Fine needle aspiration of a cervical lymph node detected acid-fast bacilli (AFB). The mother's chest radiograph demonstrated features of pulmonary tuberculosis. Placental histology detected AFB. The combined clinical and laboratory features in both mother and infant supports the diagnosis of congenital tuberculosis.

  15. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  16. Granzyme A as a potential biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Guggino, Giuliana; Orlando, Valentina; Cutrera, Stella; La Manna, Marco P; Di Liberto, Diana; Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Dieli, Francesco; Goletti, Delia; Caccamo, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic molecules such as granulysin, perforin and granzymes produced by cytolytic T cells directly contribute to immune defense against tuberculosis (TB). In search for novel TB biomarkers, we have evaluated the levels of granzyme A in plasma obtained from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In tube (QFT-IT) assays from patients with active TB disease and subjects with latent TB infection (LTBI). Granzyme A serum levels in TB patients were significantly lower than values found in LTBI subjects even after subtraction of the unstimulated levels from the antigen-stimulated responses. The receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis comparing TB patients and LTBI groups, showed that at a cut-off value of granzyme A of <3.425pg/ml, the sensitivity and the specificity of the assay were 29.41% and 94.74%, respectively. Our results suggest that granzyme A could be considered another biomarker of TB, that can be used, other than IFN-γ, to discriminate between patients with active TB and LTBI subjects in a well characterized cohort of confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected individuals.

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression Underlies Distinct Disease Profiles in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno B.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Riteau, Nicolas; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Tosh, Kevin W.; Maier, Nolan; Conceição, Elisabete L.; Kubler, Andre; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Jawahar, Mohideen S.; Barbosa, Theolis; Manganiello, Vincent C.; Moss, Joel; Fontana, Joseph R.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Holland, Steven M.; Jackson, Sharon H.; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen; Sereti, Irini; Barber, Daniel L.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by oxidative stress and lung tissue destruction by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). The interplay between these distinct pathological processes and the implications for TB diagnosis and disease staging are poorly understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels have been shown to distinguish active from latent as well as successfully treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. MMP-1 expression is also associated with active TB. Here, we measured plasma levels of these two important biomarkers in distinct TB cohorts from India and Brazil. Patients with active TB expressed either very high levels of HO-1 and low levels of MMP-1 or the converse. Moreover, TB patients with either high HO-1 or MMP-1 levels displayed distinct clinical presentations as well as plasma inflammatory marker profiles. In contrast, in an exploratory North American study, inversely correlated expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 was not observed in patients with other non-tuberculous lung diseases. To assess possible regulatory interactions in the biosynthesis of these two enzymes at the cellular level, we studied expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 in Mtb-infected human and murine macrophages. We found that infection of macrophages with live virulent Mtb is required for robust induction of high levels of HO-1, but not MMP-1. In addition, we observed that carbon monoxide, a product of Mtb induced HO-1 activity, inhibits MMP-1 expression by suppressing c-Jun/AP-1 activation. These findings reveal a mechanistic link between oxidative stress and tissue remodeling that may find applicability in the clinical staging of TB patients. PMID:26268658

  18. HIV and AIDS, other sexually transmitted diseases, and tuberculosis in ethnic minorities in United Kingdom: is surveillance serving its purpose?

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, K. M.; Low, N.

    1997-01-01

    Experience of disease differs across ethnic groups, and ethnicity is a relevant personal characteristic for descriptive epidemiology. Information about ethnicity and country of birth is omitted from the routine notification of many diseases. HIV infection and AIDS, other sexually transmitted diseases, and tuberculosis have different incidence rates in different ethnic groups in the United Kingdom. Omission of ethnic data from surveillance activities allows such differences in incidence to go undetected and unaddressed. Surveillance data that included ethnic details could guide interventions to reduce inequalities in health between different subpopulations. PMID:9202508

  19. [The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sekiya; Sakaguchi, Nobuki; Hotta, Jyunnichi

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infects all organs in the body; however, lung infection is the primary lesion. The total number of infections is decreasing, but the percentage of infections in older people is rising. Because this disease is due to infection with M. tuberculosis, the diagnosis requires the presence of M. tuberculosis. Chest X-ray and CT are very powerful tools to suggest the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Pathological examination of the tissues also shows the typical findings of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the presence of the bacterium was not proven in certain cases of M. tuberculosis infection, and especially in cases of latent infection. Recently, the whole-blood interferon--gamma test (QuantiFERON-TB, QFT) became more popular than the tuberculin skin test. It is reported that the specificity and sensitivity of QFT are similar to or better than the tuberculin skin test. However, it should be noted that QFT positive does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of active M. tuberculosis infection and that QFT is one of the supplementary tests in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Currently, massive infection with M. tuberculosis is increasing. The precise responsible linkage in massive infection with M. tuberculosis needs DNA polymorphism analysis using variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) or restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipolytic Enzymes as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Belinda; Lecoufle, Mélanie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dedieu, Luc; Canaan, Stéphane; Valverde, Viviane; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB) burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452) as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. Methods Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. Results A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. Conclusion These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent biomarkers providing high

  1. Determinants of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Ambo Hospital, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengiste, Bezatu; Mesfin, Frehiwot; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis seen in cases in Ambo Hospital, Ethiopia. Design A facility-based prospective case-control study. Setting Patients attending Ambo Hospital from 01 December 2011 to 29 March 2012. Participants The sample included 312 adult patients attending Ambo Hospital. The main outcome measure was presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Explanatory measures Age, gender, occupation, educational status, marital status, place of residence, patient history of TB, family history of TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking, alcohol intake, khat chewing, body mass index (BMI), employment, diabetes, history of asthma, previous history of worm infestation, history of hospitalisation, number of adults living in the household (HH), person per room, housing condition. Results A total of 312 study participants, including 104 active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (cases) and 208 non-active PTB cases (controls), were recruited for the present study. Having one or more family member with a history of TB (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.50–12.90), marital status (OR = 7.6; 95% CI: 2.2–12.6), male gender (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7), rural residence (OR = 3.3; P = 0.012), being a current or past smoker (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1–7.2), BMI < 18.5 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.03–4.2), HIV infection (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.4–23.8) and a history of worm infestation (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 2.6–15.4) remained significant independent host-related factors for active PTB. Conclusion Patients who came from a compound with more than two HHs were more likely to develop active PTB than those who came from a compound with only one HH. Those who lived in houses with no windows were more likely to develop active PTB than those who lived in houses with one or more windows, had a family history of TB, lived in rural areas. Sex of the patient was a predicting factor. Not being the owner of the house was

  2. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  3. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  4. Respiratory rehabilitation in severe restrictive lung disease secondary to tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, G F; Alba, A; Lee, M

    1984-09-01

    There is a need for portable and less expensive devices for patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency. The case of a 44-year-old Hispanic woman is illustrative. The patient had severe restrictive lung disease secondary to right phrenic nerve crush/pneumoperitoneum and left pneumonectomy/decortication for bilateral lower lobe tuberculosis. In 1969, 12 years after her last operation, she developed dyspnea, coryza, and somnolence. She was hospitalized with a PaO2 of 30mmHg; PaCO2 of 77mmHg and a pH of 7.28. Pulmonary function tests showed alveolar hypoventilation and her resting ventilation was between 2.26 to 3.74L/min. Her vital capacity was 1130cc (37% of predicted value) and maximum breathing capacity was 36L/min (44% of predicted value). From 1969, she used a poncho (wraparound) ventilator for her long-term respiratory care and modified the poncho suit to meet her personal needs. In 1971, she discovered that a mouth intermittent positive pressure ventilation (MIPPV) method, often used by patients with neuromuscular disorders, was easier to apply. Since then, she has continued to use a Bantam Respirator with MIPPV and a lipguard/mouthpiece during the night, and the respirator with a mouthpiece for a few hours during the days. However, when she has an upper respiratory infection or feels tired, she finds that she needs the greater rest and comfort that the poncho provides. With the assistance of these two respiratory devices, she has been able to complete her education, marry, and lead a fulfilling life in the community. This patient is considered the first person with severe lung pathology to utilize MIPPV for sleep.

  5. Plasma drug activity assay for treatment optimization in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Heysell, Scott K; Mtabho, Charles; Mpagama, Stellah; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Pholwat, Suporn; Ndusilo, Norah; Gratz, Jean; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Kibiki, Gibson S; Houpt, Eric R

    2011-12-01

    Low antituberculosis (TB) drug levels are common, but their clinical significance remains unclear, and methods of measurement are resource intensive. Subjects initiating treatment for sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were enrolled from Kibong'oto National TB Hospital, Tanzania, and levels of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide were measured at the time of typical peak plasma concentration (C(2 h)). To evaluate the significance of the effect of observed drug levels on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth, a plasma TB drug activity (TDA) assay was developed using the Bactec MGIT system. Time to detection of plasma-cocultured M. tuberculosis versus time to detection of control growth was defined as a TDA ratio. TDA assays were later performed using the subject's own M. tuberculosis isolate and C(2 h) plasma from the Tanzanian cohort and compared to drug levels and clinical outcomes. Sixteen subjects with a mean age of 37.8 years ± 10.7 were enrolled. Fourteen (88%) had C(2 h) rifampin levels and 11 (69%) had isoniazid levels below 90% of the lower limit of the expected range. Plasma spiked with various concentrations of antituberculosis medications found TDA assay results to be unaffected by ethambutol or pyrazinamide. Yet with a range of isoniazid and rifampin concentrations, TDA exhibited a statistically significant correlation with drug level and drug MIC, and a TDA of ~1.0 indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant TB. In Tanzania, low (≤ 2.0) TDA was significantly associated with both lower isoniazid and rifampin C(2 h) levels, and very low (≤ 1.5) TDA corresponded to a trend toward lack of cure. Study of TDA compared to additional clinical outcomes and as a therapeutic management tool is warranted.

  6. The Small Breathing Amplitude at the Upper Lobes Favors the Attraction of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lesions and Helps to Understand the Evolution toward Active Disease in An Individual-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Pere-Joan; Prats, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can induce two kinds of lesions, namely proliferative and exudative. The former are based on the presence of macrophages with controlled induction of intragranulomatous necrosis, and are even able to stop its physical progression, thus avoiding the induction of active tuberculosis (TB). In contrast, the most significant characteristic of exudative lesions is their massive infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), which favor enlargement of the lesions and extracellular growth of the bacilli. We have built an individual-based model (IBM) (known as “TBPATCH”) using the NetLogo interface to better understand the progression from Mtb infection to TB. We have tested four main factors previously identified as being able to favor the infiltration of Mtb-infected lesions with PMNs, namely the tolerability of infected macrophages to the bacillary load; the capacity to modulate the Th17 response; the breathing amplitude (BAM) (large or small in the lower and upper lobes respectively), which influences bacillary drainage at the alveoli; and the encapsulation of Mtb-infected lesions by the interlobular septae that structure the pulmonary parenchyma into secondary lobes. Overall, although all the factors analyzed play some role, the small BAM is the major factor determining whether Mtb-infected lesions become exudative, and thus induce TB, thereby helping to understand why this usually takes place in the upper lobes. This information will be very useful for the design of future prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against TB. PMID:27065951

  7. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB.

  8. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Glênio César Nunes; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Ferrer, Kelian Tenfen; Traebert, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population), YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population), followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population). CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions. PMID:24626271

  9. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  10. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  11. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  12. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  13. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  14. Association between tuberculin skin test result and clinical presentation of tuberculosis disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tuberculin skin test (TST) is used to test for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and support the diagnosis of active TB. However, little is known about the relationship between the TST result and the clinical presentation of TB disease. Methods We analyzed US TB surveillance data, 1993–2010, and used multinomial logistic regression to calculate the association between TST result (0–4 mm [negative], 5–9 mm, 10–14 mm, and ≥ 15 mm) and clinical presentation of disease (miliary, combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary, extrapulmonary only, non-cavitary pulmonary, and cavitary pulmonary). For persons with pulmonary disease, multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of having acid-fast bacilli (AFB) positive sputum. Results There were 64,238 persons with culture-confirmed TB included in the analysis, which was stratified by HIV status and birthplace (US- vs. foreign-born). Persons with a TST ≥ 15 mm were less likely to have miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease, but more likely to have cavitary pulmonary disease than non-cavitary pulmonary disease. Persons with non-cavitary pulmonary disease with a negative TST were significantly more likely to have AFB positive sputum. Conclusions Clinical presentation of TB disease differed according to TST result and persons with a negative TST were more likely to have disseminated disease (i.e., miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary). Further study of the TST result may improve our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in TB disease. PMID:24093965

  15. Disseminated tuberculosis following reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation for adult patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Kusumi, E; Kami, M; Kawabata, M; Le Pavoux, A; Hara, S; Chizuka, A; Murashige, N; Tanimoto, T E; Matsumura, T; Yuji, K; Yuji, Ko; Wake, A; Miyakoshi, S; Morinaga, S; Taniguchi, S

    2005-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) recipients are prone to infections. The incidences of mycobacterial infections after allo-SCT in several case series vary from less than 0.1-5.5%. However, no study has been published on tuberculosis following unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 113 adult patients with a median age of 54 years who underwent reduced-intensity UCBT (RI-UCBT) at Toranomon Hospital from March 2002 to May 2004. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections were diagnosed in three patients (2.7%), of these two patients developed primary infection and one patient developed reactivation of latent tuberculosis. The interval between RI-UCBT and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was 34, 41 and 61 days. All the patients had disseminated disease at diagnosis. Histological examination showed the lack of granuloma in caseous necrosis. Combination antituberculous treatments showed limited efficacy, and two patients died immediately after diagnosis. M. tuberculosis caused life-threatening illness, rapidly progressing in RI-UCBT recipients. The lack of granuloma in caseous necrosis suggests the impaired T-cell function in early post transplant phase of RI-UCBT. We should consider M. tuberculosis in the differential diagnoses of fever of unknown source after RI-UCBT.

  16. [What changes were introduced by the new law concerning infectious diseases for patients with tuberculosis?].

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M

    2015-01-01

    In July 2012, the act on preventing and counteracting infections and infectious diseases in humans was amended. Many changes concerning duties of physicians looking after patients with tuberculosis were proposed. Particularly important is the requirement of written certification by patients that they were notified by the physician of the obligation to undergo antituberculous treatment. It is also essential that the national sanitary inspector be notified as to which health-care institution the patient with tuberculosis was referred to for treatment, and also about an evasion of antituberculous therapy by the patient. Many paragraphs concerning the control of infectious diseases were formulated more precisely.

  17. Mechanism of action of the tuberculosis and Crohn disease risk factor IRGM in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Santosh; Mandell, Michael A; Deretic, Vojo

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the IRGM gene, associated with Crohn disease (CD) and tuberculosis, are among the earliest identified examples documenting the role of autophagy in human disease. Functional studies have shown that IRGM protects against these diseases by modulating autophagy, yet the exact molecular mechanism of IRGM's activity has remained unknown. We have recently elucidated IRGM's mechanism of action. IRGM functions as a platform for assembling, stabilizing, and activating the core autophagic machinery, while at the same time physically coupling it to conventional innate immunity receptors. Exposure to microbial products or bacterial invasion increases IRGM expression, which leads to stabilization of AMPK. Specific protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of IRGM, lead to a co-assembly with IRGM of the key autophagy regulators ULK1 and BECN1 in their activated forms. IRGM physically interacts with 2 other CD risk factors, ATG16L1 and NOD2, placing these 3 principal players in CD within the same molecular complex. This explains how polymorphisms altering expression or function of any of the 3 factors individually can affect the same process-autophagy. Furthermore, IRGM's interaction with NOD2, and additional pattern recognition receptors such as NOD1, RIG-I, and select TLRs, transduces microbial signals to the core autophagy apparatus. This work solves the long-standing enigma of how IRGM controls autophagy.

  18. Etanercept Exacerbates Inflammation and Pathology in a Rabbit Model of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Fallows, Dorothy; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonists has been associated with increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We examined the usefulness of the rabbit model of active pulmonary TB for studying the impact of the human immune modulatory reagent etanercept on the host immune response. Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, disease pathology, and the global transcriptional response in Mtb-infected lungs of rabbits were studied. Etanercept treatment exacerbated disease pathology and reduced bacillary control in the lungs, compared with infected untreated animals. Reduced collagen and fibrin deposition in the granulomas was associated with significant downregulation of the collagen metabolism and fibrosis network genes and upregulation of genes in the inflammatory response and cell recruitment networks in the lungs of etanercept treated, compared with untreated rabbits. Our results suggest that targeting the TNF-α signaling pathway disrupts the tissue remodeling process, which is required for the formation and maintenance of well-differentiated granulomas and for control of Mtb growth in the lungs. These results validate the use of the rabbit model for investigating the impact of selected human immune modulatory drugs, such as a TNF-α antagonist, on the host immune response and pathogenesis in TB. PMID:24831609

  19. Biomarkers for risk of developing active tuberculosis in contacts of TB patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Richard, Vincent; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Gicquel, Brigitte; Doherty, T Mark; Zumla, Alimuddin; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-10-01

    Identifying those Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent-infected individuals most at risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) using routine clinical and laboratory tests remains a huge challenge in TB control efforts. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of clinical and laboratory markers associated with the risk of developing active TB in contacts with latent M. tuberculosis infection.HIV-negative household contacts (n=296) of pulmonary TB patients underwent monitoring of clinical features, full blood cell counts, tuberculin skin text (TST) and chest radiography performed regularly during 18 months of follow-up. Paired statistical tests, a Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard modelling were performed on variables between contacts progressing or not progressing to active TB.The appearance of TB disease symptoms in contacts was significantly associated with an elevated peripheral percentage of blood monocytes (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 6.25, 95% CI 1.63-23.95; p<0.01), a ≥14 mm TST response (aHR 5.72, 95% CI 1.22-26.80; p=0.03) and an increased monocyte:lymphocyte ratio (aHR 4.97, 95% CI 1.3-18.99; p=0.03). Among contacts having TST ≥14 mm, a strong association with risk of progression to TB was found with an elevated blood monocyte percentage (aHR 8.46, 95% CI 1.74-41.22; p<0.01).Elevated percentage of peripheral blood monocytes plus an elevated TST response are potential biomarkers for identifying contacts of TB patients at highest risk of developing active TB.

  20. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  1. Computational medicinal chemistry for rational drug design: Identification of novel chemical structures with potential anti-tuberculosis activity.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Yuji; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is a common infectious disease with high mortality and morbidity. The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains of TB presents a major public health problem. Due to the lack of effective drugs to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-TB drugs is important. Computer-aided drug design has become an established strategy for the identification of novel active chemicals through a combination of several drug design tools. In this review, we summarise the current chemotherapy for TB, describe attractive target proteins for the development of antibiotics against TB, and detail several computational drug design strategies that may contribute to the further identification of active chemicals for the treatment of not only TB but also other diseases.

  2. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (α/β) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (α/β) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  4. Bronchocentric granulomatosis with extensive cystic lung disease in tuberculosis: An unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Periwal, Pallavi; Khanna, Arjun; Gothi, Rajesh; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is known to cause both cystic lung disease and bronchocentric granulomatosis (BCG). However, both are rare manifestations of this common disease. We report a case of BCG with extensive cystic lung disease in a young female who presented with fever, weight loss, and recurrent pneumothoraces with respiratory failure. Early diagnosis and treatment are imperative, as appropriate therapy may be life-saving in such cases. PMID:27185999

  5. Characterization of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity of Synthetic Pandinin 2 Variants and Their Inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural “kink” linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects. PMID:25019413

  6. Characterization of antibacterial and hemolytic activity of synthetic pandinin 2 variants and their inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural "kink" linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects.

  7. Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-based agents active against tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Marco; Tipparaju, Suresh K; Lun, Shichun; Song, Yang; Sturm, A Willem; Bishai, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2011-02-07

    The struggle against tuberculosis (TB) is still far from over. TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the deadliest infections worldwide. Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains have further increased the burden for this disease. Herein, we report the discovery of 2-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1H,5H-pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-4-carbonitrile as an effective antitubercular agent and the structural modifications of this molecule that have led to analogues with improved potency and lower toxicity. A number of these derivatives were also active at sub-micromolar concentrations against resistant TB strains and devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero cells, thereby underscoring their value as novel scaffolds for the development of new anti-TB drugs.

  8. US College and University Student Health Screening Requirements for Tuberculosis and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Amy; Bell, Teal; Cohen, Nicole J.; Buckley, Kirsten; Leino, E. Victor; Even, Susan; Beavers, Suzanne; Brown, Clive; Marano, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Colleges are at risk for communicable disease outbreaks because of the high degree of person-to-person interactions and relatively crowded dormitory settings. This report describes the US college student health screening requirements among US resident and international students for tuberculosis (TB) and vaccine-preventable diseases…

  9. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host’s immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host’s immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23522098

  10. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-03-22

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host's immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host's immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  11. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  12. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  13. Iron homeostasis and progression to pulmonary tuberculosis disease among household contacts.

    PubMed

    Minchella, Peter A; Donkor, Simon; McDermid, Joann M; Sutherland, Jayne S

    2015-05-01

    Early identification of individuals at risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) disease may limit new transmission and improve clinical outcomes. Evidence indicates altered iron homeostasis may identify those at greater risk of disease progression in HIV co-infection. We aimed to investigate iron homeostasis biomarkers as risk factors for progression to TB. Archived plasma samples were analyzed from household contacts of pulmonary TB index cases in The Gambia. Contacts were classified as asymptomatic non-progressors (n = 17) or TB-progressors (n = 10), which included two HIV-infected participants. Iron homeostasis (hemoglobin, ferritin, hepcidin, soluble transferrin receptor, transferrin) was assessed in all contacts at study recruitment. Plasma was collected a median of 910 days prior to TB diagnosis. Low transferrin around the time of known exposure to infectious TB was a disease progression risk factor among all TB-progressors (Poisson incidence rate ratio: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35-0.89). Iron homeostasis also differed between early and delayed TB-progressors, with higher ferritin and hepcidin concentrations observed among early TB-progressors (mean ferritin 50.2 vs. 26.2 ng/ml; P = 0.027; mean hepcidin 37.7 vs. 5.6 ng/ml; P = 0.036). Iron homeostasis is associated with progression to TB among household contacts. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms and determine the clinical utility of monitoring iron homeostasis biomarkers.

  14. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses.

  15. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (ii): Prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    In pregnant women who have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB), primary isoniazid prophylaxis is only recommended in cases of immunosuppression, chronic medical conditions or obstetric risk factors, and close and sustained contact with a patient with infectious TB. Isoniazid prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended in women who have close contact with an infectious TB patient or have risk factors for progression to active disease. Otherwise, it should be delayed until at least three weeks after delivery. Treatment of TB disease during pregnancy is the same as for the general adult population. Infants born to mothers with disseminated or extrapulmonary TB in pregnancy, with active TB at delivery, or with postnatal exposure to TB, should undergo a complete diagnostic evaluation. Primary isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 12 weeks is recommended for those with negative diagnostic tests and no evidence of disease. Repeated negative diagnostic tests are mandatory before interrupting prophylaxis. Isoniazid for 9 months is recommended in LTBI. Treatment of neonatal TB disease is similar to that of older children, but should be maintained for at least 9 months. Respiratory isolation is recommended in congenital TB, and in postnatal TB with positive gastric or bronchial aspirate acid-fast smears. Separation of mother and infant is only necessary when the mother has received treatment for less than 2 weeks, is sputum smear-positive, or has drug-resistant TB. Breastfeeding is not contraindicated, and in case of mother-infant separation expressed breast milk feeding is recommended.

  16. Differentiation of Crohn’s disease from intestinal tuberculosis in India in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Pulimood, Anna Benjamin; Amarapurkar, Deepak Narayan; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Phillip, Mathew; Pai, Cannanore Ganesh; Reddy, Duvvur Nageshwar; Nagi, Birender; Ramakrishna, Balakrishna Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn’s disease (CD) is an important clinical challenge of considerable therapeutic significance. The problem is of greatest magnitude in countries where tuberculosis continues to be highly prevalent, and where the incidence of CD is increasing. The final clinical diagnosis is based on a combination of the clinical history with endoscopic studies, culture and polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, biopsy pathology, radiological investigations and response to therapy. In a subset of patients, surgery is required and intraoperative findings with pathological study of the resected bowel provide a definitive diagnosis. Awareness of the parameters useful in distinguishing these two disorders in each of the different diagnostic modalities is crucial to accurate decision making. Newer techniques, such as capsule endoscopy, small bowel enteroscopy and immunological assays for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have a role to play in the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis and CD. This review presents currently available evidence regarding the usefulness and limitations of all these different modalities available for the evaluation of these two disorders. PMID:21274372

  17. Combining PMTCT with active case finding for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kali, Paula B N; Gray, Glenda E; Violari, Avy; Chaisson, Richard E; McIntyre, James A; Martinson, Neil A

    2006-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the preeminent manifestation of HIV infection and has become a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in high HIV-prevalence settings. Active TB in pregnant women has potentially serious consequences for fetuses and newborns. In Soweto, South Africa, there is a more than 90% uptake of voluntary counseling and HIV testing during routine antenatal care, and almost one third of pregnant women are HIV-infected. The posttest counseling session of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission program provides an opportunity to screen HIV-infected pregnant women for TB. In this study, 370 HIV-infected pregnant women were screened for symptoms of active TB by lay counselors at the posttest counseling session. If symptomatic, they were referred to nurses who investigated them further. Eight women were found to have previously undiagnosed, smear-negative, culture-confirmed TB (2160/100,000). The mean CD4 count in those with active TB compared to those without TB was 276 x 10(6) cells per liter vs 447 x 10(6) cells per liter (P = 0.051). Symptoms most associated with active TB were hemoptysis and fever. We conclude that rates of TB in HIV-infected pregnant women are high, and screening for TB during routine antenatal care should be implemented in high HIV-prevalence settings.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication by transcriptional activation at the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nakata, K; Weiden, M; Rom, W N

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as an epidemic fueled by the large number of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, especially those who are injecting drug users. We found a striking increase from 4- to 208-fold in p24 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from involved sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection vs uninvolved sites in three HIV+ patients. We used an in vitro cell culture model to determine if tuberculosis could activate replication of HIV-1. Mononuclear phagocyte cell lines U937 and THP-1 infected with HIV-1JR-CSF, in vitro and stimulated with live M. tuberculosis H37Ra, had a threefold increase in p24 in culture supernatants. Using the HIV-1 long terminal repeat with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter construct, live M. tuberculosis increased transcription 20-fold in THP-1 cells, and cell wall components stimulated CAT expression to a lesser extent. The nuclear factor-kappa B enhancer element was responsible for the majority of the increased CAT activity although two upstream nuclear factor-IL6 sites may also contribute to enhanced transcription. Antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-1 inhibited the increase in CAT activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by M. tuberculosis from 21-fold to 8-fold. Stimulation of HIV-1 replication by M. tuberculosis may exacerbate dysfunction of the host immune response in dually infected individuals. Images PMID:7738195

  19. Safety of Resuming Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Concomitant with the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Nationwide Registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Won; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Baek, Han Joo; Seo, Mi Ryung; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju Yang; Son, Chang-Nam; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Patients who develop an active tuberculosis infection during tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment typically discontinue TNF inhibitor and receive standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. However, there is currently insufficient information on patient outcomes following resumption of TNF inhibitor treatment during ongoing anti- tuberculosis treatment. Our study was designed to investigate the safety of resuming TNF inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients who developed tuberculosis as a complication of the use of TNF inhibitors. Methods Through the nationwide registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research, 3929 AS patients who were prescribed TNF inhibitors were recruited between June 2003 and June 2014 at fourteen referral hospitals. Clinical information was analyzed about the patients who experienced tuberculosis after exposure to TNF inhibitors. The clinical features of resumers and non-resumers of TNF inhibitors were compared and the outcomes of tuberculosis were surveyed individually. Findings Fifty-six AS patients were treated for tuberculosis associated with TNF inhibitors. Among them, 23 patients resumed TNF inhibitors, and these patients were found to be exposed to TNF inhibitors for a longer period of time and experienced more frequent disease flare-up after discontinuation of TNF inhibitors compared with those who did not resume. Fifteen patients resumed TNF inhibitors during anti-tuberculosis treatment (early resumers) and 8 after completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment (late resumers). Median time to resuming TNF inhibitor from tuberculosis was 3.3 and 9.0 months in the early and late resumers, respectively. Tuberculosis was treated successfully in all resumers and did not relapse in any of them during follow-up (median 33.8 [IQR; 20.8–66.7] months). Conclusions Instances of tuberculosis were treated successfully in our AS patients, even when given concomitantly with TNF inhibitors. We suggest that early

  20. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  1. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  2. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  3. Evaluation of the characteristics of the enzyme-linked immunospot assay for diagnosis of active tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linchuan; Yu, Yan; Chen, Wei; Feng, Jin; Wang, Jinyuan; Zhao, Heping; Ma, Lietin; Yang, Bo; Ma, Yanfen; Dang, Pei

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of the T-SPOT.TB test for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (ATB) and to distinguish ATB from other diseases using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 535 patients with suspected active tuberculosis were enrolled in the study and divided into ATB and nonactive tuberculosis (NATB) groups, as well as pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) subgroups. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of the T-SPOT.TB test for the diagnosis of ATB were 84.95%, 85.12%, 82.94%, 86.93%, 5.71, and 0.18, respectively. The median number of spot-forming cells (SFCs) in the ATB group was higher than that in the NATB group (71 versus 1; P < 0.0001). The sensitivities in the PTB and EPTB subgroups were 92.31% and 81.77%. The areas under the curve (AUC) for the diagnosis of ATB using the T-SPOT.TB, early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6), and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) were 0.906, 0.884, and 0.877, respectively. A cutoff of 42.5 SFCs for ATB yielded a positive predictive value of 100%. Our study shows that the T-SPOT.TB test is useful for the diagnosis of ATB. Utilizing an ROC curve to select an appropriate cutoff made it possible to discriminate ATB from NATB.

  4. [The development of tuberculosis control and tuberculosis epidemiology in East Germany].

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, P

    1983-01-01

    The fight against tuberculosis in the German Democratic Republic was performed from the very beginning as a task of the state and the society; it was developed according to the progress of economic possibilities and the epidemiological situation. The contribution of the community and of the social-economic development on tuberculosis epidemiology has proved to be decisively important factors in tuberculosis control. The specific methods applied in tuberculosis control in the course of more than 30 years have changed in their importance effectiveness and efficiency with the reduction of the tuberculosis problem and the development of new techniques. Therefore a continuous evaluation of the tuberculosis situation is necessary to recognize the most effective approach. By reducing the estimated annual infection rate to less than 0.05%, the incidence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis to less than 5/100,000 and the practical disappearance of tuberculosis among children tuberculosis has become an endemic localized disease among predominantly old citizens. People's mass x-ray examinations have considerably lost their value for finding tuberculosis. Early coverage and examination of persons with respiratory symptoms (21-days-coughers), of contact persons and high risk groups will determine the future activities of the chest clinics. Their integration into the system of outpatient clinics and the system of primary health care were an important step on this way. Successful treatment of each case of tuberculosis is now possible and must be attained. Early case finding + treatment considered as an united activity has become the decisively important measure in the control of tuberculosis. The endemic foci of tuberculosis in some communities have to be surveyed and eliminated with priority. Moreover, the cooperation of all physicians of public health is necessary. Only by this way tuberculosis can be eradicated in GDR in a defined time. (Aim of WHO and IUaT: 1 case of

  5. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission.

  6. IL23R(Arg381Gln) Functional Polymorphism Is Associated with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Severity

    PubMed Central

    Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 Gwild type → Areduced function, Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10−8], 33% versus 5% [P = 10−8], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10−3], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10−5) and 7.74-fold (P = 10−5) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients. PMID:22695161

  7. Iron-dependent RNA-binding activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis aconitase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sharmistha; Nandyala, Ashok Kumar; Raviprasad, Podili; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2007-06-01

    Cellular iron levels are closely monitored by iron regulatory and sensor proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for survival inside macrophages. One such class of proteins systematically studied in eukaryotes and reported in a few prokaryotes are the iron-responsive proteins (IRPs). These IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) present at untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs and are responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of the expression of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Amino acid sequence analysis of M. tuberculosis aconitase (Acn), a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme, showed the presence of the conserved residues of the IRP class of proteins. We demonstrate that M. tuberculosis Acn is bifunctional. It is a monomeric protein that is enzymatically active in converting isocitrate to cis-aconitate at a broad pH range of 7 to 10 (optimum, pH 8). As evident from gel retardation assays, M. tuberculosis Acn also behaves like an IRP by binding to known mammalian IRE-like sequences and to predicted IRE-like sequences present at the 3' UTR of thioredoxin (trxC) and the 5' UTR of the iron-dependent repressor and activator (ideR) of M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis Acn when reactivated with Fe(2+) functions as a TCA cycle enzyme, but upon iron depletion by a specific iron chelator, it behaves like an IRP, binding to the selected IREs in vitro. Since iron is required for the Acn activity and inhibits the RNA-binding activity of Acn, the two activities of M. tuberculosis Acn are mutually exclusive. Our results demonstrate the bifunctional nature of M. tuberculosis Acn, pointing to its likely role in iron homeostasis.

  8. Misdiagnosis and Mistherapy of Crohn's Disease as Intestinal Tuberculosis: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Sen-Yang; Chen, Qiu-Yu; Liu, Tong; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) remains difficult as the clinical symptoms of the 2 digestive diseases are so similar. Here we report a case where a patient was initially misdiagnosed with ITB prior to the correct CD diagnosis. The 46-year-old male patient was hospitalized elsewhere for pain in the right lower abdomen and underwent an appendectomy. The pathological diagnosis was ITB and the patient was administered antituberculosis therapy for 1 year. Afterward, the patient was readmitted to the hospital for a right lower abdominal mass. A computed tomography scan revealed intestinal gas, fistula, and abdominal mass. We performed a right hemicolectomy on the patient. Postoperatively, we diagnosed the patient with CD, based on patient history and pathological examination. According to the CD active index (CDAI), the patient was at high risk and began treatment with infliximab. The patient has remained in complete remission and made a good recovery after 8-months follow-up. We compared this case with the results of a literature review on the misdiagnosis between CD and ITB (26 previously reported cases) to determine the characteristics of misdiagnosed cases. We found that distinguishing between ITB and CD is difficult because of their varied clinical presentation, nonspecific investigative tools, and profound similarities even in pathological specimens. Although a CT scan to determine the morphology of the bowel wall is a key for correct diagnosis, each case still poses challenges for diagnosis and administrating the appropriate treatment.

  9. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and co-infected (HIV+) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV− individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV+ individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV− TB, 0.95 for HIV+ TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  10. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  11. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  12. [Frequency of previous tuberculosis history in patients with and without active tuberculosis admitted to our hospital in 1980-83 and in 1997-99].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Naohiro; Baba, Motoo; Hori, Akihiro; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Nagai, Hideaki; Akagawa, Shinobu; Kawabe, Yoshiko; Machida, Kazuko; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Yotsumoto, Hideki; Mouri, Masashi

    2002-07-01

    To study recurrence rate over a long period after recovery from previous tuberculosis history, we examined the frequency of previous tuberculosis history in patients who were admitted to our hospital in 1980-83 and in 1997-99 and the comparison was made between cases with and without culture-positive tuberculosis. The tuberculosis groups comprised of 297 patients in 1980-83 and 688 patients in 1997-99. The non-tuberculosis groups (control groups) comprised of 373 patients in 1980-83 and 1092 patients in 1997-99 with non-tuberculosis diseases other than the tuberculosis-related diseases such as non-tuberculosis mycobacteriosis, pulmonary aspergillosis, bronchiectasis, chronic bronchitis and tuberculosis sequelae. The patients with viral chronic hepatitis previously operated and transfused were also excluded as they might be operated because of pulmonary tuberculosis in the era of surgical treatment for tuberculosis. In both tuberculosis and control groups, they had previous tuberculosis history most frequently when they were twenties. In the control groups, the frequency of previous tuberculosis history among cases admitted in 1980-83 and were born in 1910-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49 were 15/84 (17.9%), 22/93 (23.7%), 11/77 (14.3%) and 3/43 (7.0%), respectively, and those admitted in 1997-99 were 11/70 (15.7%), 30/231 (13.0%), 28/288 (9.7%), and 10/230 (4.3%), respectively. In these 4 birth year groups, frequency of previous tuberculosis history among cases admitted in 1997-99 were significantly lower than that admitted in 1980-83 (p < 0.05, one-sided paired t-test), and the fact suggests that persons with tuberculosis history died earlier than those without it. In the tuberculosis groups, the frequencies of previous tuberculosis history among cases admitted in 1980-83 and were born in 1910-19, 20-29, 30-39 and 40-49 were 20/35 (57.1%), 31/58 (53.4%), 19/48 (39.6%), and 11/53 (20.8%), respectively, and those among cases admitted in 1997-99 were 30/99 (30.3%), 58/125 (46

  13. Targeting dendritic cells to accelerate T-cell activation overcomes a bottleneck in tuberculosis vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristin L.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Das, Shibali; Gopal, Radha; Horne, William; Connell, Terry D.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induces sterilizing immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been elusive. Absence of sterilizing immunity induced by TB vaccines may be due to delayed activation of mucosal dendritic cells (DCs), and subsequent delay in antigen presentation and activation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. Here we show that pulmonary delivery of activated M. tuberculosis antigen-primed DCs into vaccinated mice, at the time of M. tuberculosis exposure, can overcome the delay in accumulation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. In addition, activating endogenous host CD103+ DCs and the CD40–CD40L pathway can similarly induce rapid accumulation of vaccine-induced lung CD4+ T-cell responses and limit early M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, our study provides proof of concept that targeting mucosal DCs can accelerate vaccine-induced T-cell responses on M. tuberculosis infection, and provide insights to overcome bottlenecks in TB vaccine efficacy. PMID:28004802

  14. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  15. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? Signs ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  16. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  17. Pyrazinamide Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cultures at Neutral pH and Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Alice L; Menting, Sandra; Pfeltz, Richard; Warns, Matthew; Siddiqi, Salman H; Anthony, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    For the past decades, an acidic pH has been used to render Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptible to pyrazinamide for in vitro testing. Here, we show that at the standard breakpoint concentration and reduced culture temperatures, pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against tuberculosis (TB) at neutral pH. This finding should help unravel the mechanism of action of PZA and allow drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods to be optimized.

  18. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  19. A guide to the management of tuberculosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Radha K; Saraswat, Vivek A; Rajekar, Harshal; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2012-09-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the 'Captains of the Men of Death' even today, particularly in the developing world. Its frequency is increased 14-fold in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) and liver cirrhosis, more so in those with decompensated disease, probably due to the cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, and case-fatality rates are high. The diagnosis of tuberculosis, particularly the interpretation of the Mantoux test, is also fraught with difficulties in CLD, especially after previous BCG vaccination. However, the greatest challenge in the patient with CLD or liver cirrhosis and tuberculosis is managing their therapy since the best first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs are hepatotoxic and baseline liver function is often deranged. Frequency of hepatotoxicity is increased in those with liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C, possibly related to increased viral loads and may be decreased following antiviral therapy. If hepatotoxicity develops in those with liver cirrhosis, particularly decompensated cirrhosis, the risk of severe liver failure is markedly increased. Currently, there are no established guidelines for anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) in CLD and liver cirrhosis although the need for such guidelines is self-evident. It is proposed that ATT should include no more than 2 hepatotoxic drugs (RIF and INH) in patients with CLD or liver cirrhosis and stable liver function [Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) ≤7], only a single hepatotoxic drug (RIF or INH) in those with advanced liver dysfunction (CTP 8-10) and no hepatotoxic drugs with very advanced liver dysfunction (CTP ≥11). A standard protocol should be followed for monitoring ATT-related hepatotoxicity and for stop rules and reintroduction rules in all these patients, on the lines proposed here. It is hoped that these proposals will introduce uniformity and result in streamlining the management of these difficult patients.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activates Human Macrophage Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Linking Mannose Receptor Recognition to Regulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Brooks, Michelle N.; Morris, Jessica D.; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances its survival in macrophages by suppressing immune responses in part through its complex cell wall structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is a transcriptional factor that regulates inflammation and has high expression in alternatively activated alveolar macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, both cell types relevant to tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we show that virulent M. tuberculosis and its cell wall mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan induce PPARγ expression through a macrophage mannose receptor-dependent pathway. When activated, PPARγ promotes IL-8 and cyclooxygenase 2 expression, a process modulated by a PPARγ agonist or antagonist. Upstream, MAPK-p38 mediates cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, which is required for PPARγ ligand production. The induced IL-8 response mediated by mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan and the mannose receptor is independent of TLR2 and NF-κB activation. In contrast, the attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces less PPARγ and preferentially uses the NF-κB–mediated pathway to induce IL-8 production. Finally, PPARγ knockdown in human macrophages enhances TNF production and controls the intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis. These data identify a new molecular pathway that links engagement of the mannose receptor, an important pattern recognition receptor for M. tuberculosis, with PPARγ activation, which regulates the macrophage inflammatory response, thereby playing a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:20554962

  1. Quantitative and qualitative profiles of circulating monocytes may help identifying tuberculosis infection and disease stages

    PubMed Central

    La Manna, Marco Pio; Orlando, Valentina; Dieli, Francesco; Di Carlo, Paola; Cascio, Antonio; Cuzzi, Gilda; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Goletti, Delia

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important cause of morbidity and death among infectious diseases, and continuous efforts are needed to improve diagnostic tools and therapy. Previous published studies showed that the absolute cells number of monocytes or lymphocytes in peripheral blood or yet the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes displayed the ability to predict the risk of active TB. In the present study we evaluated the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes variation and we also analyzed the ex-vivo expression of CD64 on monocytes as tools to identify biomarkers for discriminating TB stages. Significant differences were found when the average ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes of active TB patients was compared with latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, cured TB and healthy donors (HD). By the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis the cut-off value of 0.285, allowed the discrimination of active TB from HD, with a sensitivity of 91.04% and a specificity of 93.55% (95% of confidence interval: 0.92–0.99). The ROC curve analysis comparing TB patients and LTBI groups, led to a sensitivity and the specificity of the assay of 85.07% and 85.71%, respectively (95% of confidence interval: 0.85 to 0.96). The upregulation of CD64 expression on circulating monocytes in active TB patients could represent an additional biomarker for diagnosis of active TB. In conclusion, we found that the ML ratio or monocyte absolute count or phenotypic measures show predictive value for active TB. PMID:28208160

  2. Peer-led active tuberculosis case-finding among people living with HIV: lessons from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Dipu; Sthapit, Raisha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Problem People living with a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have a high risk of tuberculosis and should undergo regular screening. However, they can be difficult to reach because they are stigmatized and discriminated against. Approach In Nepal, the nongovernmental organization Naya Goreto implemented a peer-led tuberculosis screening project in which people living with HIV volunteered to contact others in this high-risk population. Volunteers took part in a short training course, after which they attempted to contact people living with HIV through existing networks and self-help groups. Tuberculosis screening and testing were carried out in accordance with national guidelines. Local setting In Nepal, the prevalence of HIV infection is 0.3% in the general population but is much higher, at 6%, in people in Kathmandu who inject drugs. To date, the health system has not been able to implement systematic tuberculosis screening in people living with HIV. Relevant changes Between May 2014 and mid-September 2015, 30 volunteers screened 6642 people in 10 districts, 5430 (82%) of whom were living with HIV. Of the 6642, 6046 (91%) were tested for tuberculosis and 287 (4.3%) were diagnosed with the disease, 240 of whom were HIV-positive. Of those with tuberculosis, 270 (94%) initiated treatment. Lessons learnt Using peers to contact people living with HIV for tuberculosis screening resulted in a high participation rate and the identification of a considerable number of HIV-positive tuberculosis patients. Follow-up during treatment was difficult in this highly mobile group and needs more attention in future interventions. PMID:28250514

  3. BCG Vaccination Confers Poor Protection Against M. tuberculosis HN878-induced Central Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; Harbacheuski, Ryhor; Sung, Nackmoon; Ellison, Evette; Fallows, Dorothy; Kaplan, Gilla

    2007-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of tuberculous meningitis (TBM), we compared the protective efficacy of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination against central nervous system infection with the virulent M. tuberculosis clinical isolate HN878 and the laboratory strain H37Rv. Although BCG clearly provided protection against infection with either challenge strain, protection against disease manifestations was significantly poorer in rabbits infected with HN878. BCG was less efficient in protecting against HN878 dissemination to the liver and spleen and against HN878-induced inflammation, loss of body weight, lung and brain pathology, and signs of disease. We suggest that the efficacy of newly developed vaccines should be tested in animal models not only against challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv but also with different clinical isolates including the highly virulent strains of the W-Beijing family. PMID:17241704

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manzanillo, Paolo S; Shiloh, Michael U; Portnoy, Daniel A; Cox, Jeffery S

    2012-05-17

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between "vacuolar" and "cytosolic" pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the Sting/Tbk1/Irf3 axis, resulting in IFN-β production. Surprisingly, Irf3(-/-) mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis.

  5. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  6. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  7. Interferon-γ release assays for diagnosis of tuberculosis infection and disease in children.

    PubMed

    Starke, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important problem among children in the United States and throughout the world. Although diagnosis and treatment of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (also referred to as latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI] or TB infection) remain the lynchpins of TB prevention, there is no diagnostic reference standard for LTBI. The tuberculin skin test (TST) has many limitations, including difficulty in administration and interpretation, the need for a return visit by the patient, and false-positive results caused by significant cross-reaction with Mycobacterium bovis-bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines and many nontuberculous mycobacteria. Interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) are blood tests that measure ex vivo T-lymphocyte release of interferon-γ after stimulation by antigens specific for M tuberculosis. Because these antigens are not found on M bovis-BCG or most nontuberculous mycobacteria, IGRAs are more specific tests than the TST, yielding fewer false-positive results. However, IGRAs have little advantage over the TST in sensitivity, and both methods have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised children, including children with severe TB disease. Both methods have a higher positive predictive value when applied to children with risk factors for LTBI. Unfortunately, neither method distinguishes between TB infection and TB disease. The objective of this technical report is to review what IGRAs are most useful for: (1) increasing test specificity in children who have received a BCG vaccine and may have a false-positive TST result; (2) using with the TST to increase sensitivity for finding LTBI in patients at high risk of developing progression from LTBI to disease; and (3) helping to diagnose TB disease.

  8. Symptom screening rules to identify active pulmonary tuberculosis: Findings from the Zambian South African Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS Reduction (ZAMSTAR) trial prevalence surveys

    PubMed Central

    Claassens, M. M.; Floyd, S.; Ayles, H.; Beyers, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background High tuberculosis (TB) burden countries should consider systematic screening among adults in the general population. We identified symptom screening rules to be used in addition to cough ≥2 weeks, in a context where X-ray screening is not feasible, aiming to increase the sensitivity of screening while achieving a specificity of ≥85%. Methods We used 2010 Zambia South Africa Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS Reduction (ZAMSTAR) survey data: a South African (SA) training dataset, a SA testing dataset for internal validation and a Zambian dataset for external validation. Regression analyses investigated relationships between symptoms or combinations of symptoms and active disease. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for candidate rules. Results Among all participants, the sensitivity of using only cough ≥2 weeks as a screening rule was less than 25% in both SA and Zambia. The addition of any three of six TB symptoms (cough <2 weeks, night sweats, weight loss, fever, chest pain, shortness of breath), or 2 or more of cough <2 weeks, night sweats, and weight loss, increased the sensitivity to ~38%, while reducing specificity from ~95% to ~85% in SA and ~97% to ~92% in Zambia. Among HIV-negative adults, findings were similar in SA, whereas in Zambia the increase in sensitivity was relatively small (15% to 22%). Conclusion High TB burden countries should investigate cost-effective strategies for systematic screening: one such strategy could be to use our rule in addition to cough ≥2 weeks. PMID:28257424

  9. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis control in Africa: synergies and potential.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Hargreaves, Nicola J.; Chimzizi, Rehab; Salaniponi, Felix M.

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and TB (tuberculosis) are two of the world's major pandemics, the brunt of which falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS have largely focused on prevention, little attention having been paid to care. Work on TB control has concentrated on case detection and treatment. HIV infection has complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is unlikely to be a decline in the number of cases of TB unless additional strategies are developed to control both this disease and HIV simultaneously. Such strategies would include active case-finding in situations where TB transmission is high, the provision of a package of care for HIV-related illness, and the application of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The latter is likely to have the greatest impact, but for this therapy to become more accessible in Africa the drugs would have to be made available through international support and a programme structure would have to be developed for its administration. It could be delivered by means of a structure based on the five-point strategy called DOTS, which has been adopted for TB control. However, it may be unrealistic to give TB control programmes the responsibility for running such a programme. A better approach might be to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy within a comprehensive HIV/AIDS management strategy complementing the preventive work already being undertaken by AIDS control programmes. TB programmes could contribute towards the development and implementation of this strategy. PMID:12132003

  10. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  11. Tuberculosis trends in the U.S. Armed Forces, active component, 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Aaron, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    Members of the Armed Forces represent a segment of the U.S. population that may be at increased risk for tuberculosis (TB) infection, disease, and transmission due to overseas service in endemic areas and residence in congregate settings. The purpose of this study was to examine recent surveillance trends and risk factors associated with TB disease in the active component U.S. military. The rate of TB in the U.S. military -0.6 per 100,000 population (n=128) over the interval from 1998 to 2012 - was lower than the age-adjusted rate among the U.S. population (adjusted rate ratio=0.20) over the same time interval. During the last five years of the surveillance period, the most common factor associated with the diagnosis of TB disease during military service was latent infection at time of accession; also, as many as nine (24%) cases of TB were associated with deployment to Iraq or other military exposures. TB control activities should continue to mitigate unique military exposures such as crowding during recruit training and deployments to TB endemic areas.

  12. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  13. Differential virulence and disease progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Via, Laura E; Weiner, Danielle M; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B; Flynn, Joanne L; Barry, Clifton E

    2013-08-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades.

  14. Immune Cell Regulatory Pathways Unexplored as Host-Directed Therapeutic Targets for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: An Opportunity to Apply Precision Medicine Innovations to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Robert N.; Hafner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The lack of novel antimicrobial drugs in development for tuberculosis treatment has provided an impetus for the discovery of adjunctive host-directed therapies (HDTs). Several promising HDT candidates are being evaluated, but major advancement of tuberculosis HDTs will require understanding of the master or “core” cell signaling pathways that control intersecting immunologic and metabolic regulatory mechanisms, collectively described as “immunometabolism.” Core regulatory pathways conserved in all eukaryotic cells include poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), sirtuins, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Critical interactions of these signaling pathways with each other and their roles as master regulators of immunometabolic functions will be addressed, as well as how Mycobacterium tuberculosis is already known to influence various other cell signaling pathways interacting with them. Knowledge of these essential mechanisms of cell function regulation has led to breakthrough targeted treatment advances for many diseases, most prominently in oncology. Leveraging these exciting advances in precision medicine for the development of innovative next-generation HDTs may lead to entirely new paradigms for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:26409283

  15. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  16. IL-10 down-regulates costimulatory molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-pulsed macrophages and impairs the lytic activity of CD4 and CD8 CTL in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    de la Barrera, S; Aleman, M; Musella, R; Schierloh, P; Pasquinelli, V; Garcia, V; Abbate, E; Sasiain, M del C

    2004-10-01

    Activation of T cells requires both TCR-specific ligation and costimulation through accessory molecules during T cell priming. IFNgamma is a key cytokine responsible for macrophage activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection while IL-10 is associated with suppression of cell mediated immunity in intracellular infection. In this paper we evaluated the role of IFNgamma and IL-10 on the function of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and on the modulation of costimulatory molecules in healthy controls and patients with active tuberculosis (TB). gamma-irradiated-Mtb (i-Mtb) induced IL-10 production from CD14(+) cells from TB patients. Moreover, CD3(+) T cells of patients with advanced disease also produced IL-10 after i-Mtb stimulation. In healthy donors, IL-10 decreased the lytic activity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells whereas it increased gammadelta-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that the presence of IL-10 induced a loss of the alternative processing pathways of antigen presentation along with a down-regulation of the expression of costimulatory molecule expression on monocytes and macrophages from healthy individuals. Conversely, neutralization of endogenous IL-10 or addition of IFNgamma to either effector or target cells from TB patients induced a strong lytic activity mediated by CD8(+) CTL together with an up-regulation of CD54 and CD86 expression on target cells. Moreover, we observed that macrophages from TB patients could use alternative pathways for i-Mtb presentation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the presence of IL-10 during Mtb infection might contribute to mycobacteria persistence inside host macrophages through a mechanism that involved inhibition of MHC-restricted cytotoxicity against infected macrophages.

  17. A Dual Read-Out Assay to Evaluate the Potency of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Moraski, Garrett C.; Casey, Allen; Florio, Stephanie; Alling, Torey; Miller, Marvin J.; Parish, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious global health problem caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There is an urgent need for discovery and development of new treatments, but this can only be accomplished through rapid and reproducible M. tuberculosis assays designed to identify potent inhibitors. We developed an automated 96-well assay utilizing a recombinant strain of M. tuberculosis expressing a far-red fluorescent reporter to determine the activity of novel compounds; this allowed us to measure growth by monitoring both optical density and fluorescence. We determined that optical density and fluorescence were correlated with cell number during logarithmic phase growth. Fluorescence was stably maintained without antibiotic selection over 5 days, during which time cells remained actively growing. We optimized parameters for the assay, with the final format being 5 days’ growth in 96-well plates in the presence of 2% w/v DMSO. We confirmed reproducibility using rifampicin and other antibiotics. The dual detection method allows for a reproducible calculation of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), at the same time detecting artefacts such as fluorescence quenching or compound precipitation. We used our assay to confirm anti-tubercular activity and establish the structure activity relationship (SAR) around the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxamides, a promising series of M. tuberculosis inhibitors. PMID:23593234

  18. The Structure Activity Relationship of Urea Derivatives as Anti-Tuberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua R.; North, Elton J.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Morisseau, Christophe; Scarborough, Jerrod S.; Sun, Dianqing; Korduláková, Jana; Scherman, Michael S.; Jones, Victoria; Grzegorzewicz, Anna; Crew, Rebecca M.; Jackson, Mary; McNeil, Michael R.; Lee, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is becoming more difficult due to the ever increasing prevalence of drug resistance. Thus, it is imperative that novel anti-tuberculosis agents, with unique mechanisms of action, be discovered and developed. The direct anti-tubercular testing of a small compound library led to discovery of adamantyl urea hit compound 1. In this study, the hit was followed up through the synthesis of an optimization library. This library was generated by systematically replacing each section of the molecule with a similar moiety until a clear structure activity relationship was obtained with respect to anti-tubercular activity. The best compounds in this series contained a 1-adamantyl-3-phenyl urea core and had potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis plus an acceptable therapeutic index. It was noted that the compounds identified and the pharmacophore developed is consistent with inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase family of enzymes. Consequently, the compounds were tested for inhibition of representative epoxide hydrolases: M. tuberculosis EphB and EphE; and human soluble epoxide hydrolase. Many of the optimized inhibitors showed both potent EphB and EphE inhibition suggesting the antitubercular activity is through inhibition of multiple epoxide hydrolyase enzymes. The inhibitors also showed potent inhibition of humans soluble expoxide hydrolyase, but limited cytotoxicity suggesting that future studies must be towards increasing the selectivity of epoxide hydrolyase inhibition towards the M. tuberculosis enzymes. PMID:21840723

  19. Efficient heterologous expression and one-step purification of fully active c-terminal histidine-tagged uridine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Penpassakarn, Praweenuch; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has long been recognized as one of the most significant public health problems. Finding novel antituberculous drugs is always a necessary approach for controlling the disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrH gene (Rv2883c) encodes for uridine monophosphate kinase (UMK), which is a key enzyme in the uridine nucleotide interconversion pathway. The enzyme is essential for M. tuberculosis to sustain growth and hence is a potential drug target. In this study, we have developed a rapid protocol for production and purification of M. tuberculosis UMK by cloning pyrH (Rv2883c) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv with the addition of 6-histidine residues to the C-terminus of the protein, and expressing in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIPL using an auto-induction medium. The enzyme was efficiently purified by a single-step TALON cobalt affinity chromatography with about 8 fold increase in specific activity, which was determined by a coupled assay with the pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The molecular mass of monomeric UMK was 28.2 kDa and that of the native enzyme was 217 kDa. The enzyme uses UMP as a substrate but not CMP and TMP and activity was enhanced by GTP. Measurements of enzyme kinetics revealed the kcat value of 7.6 +/- 0.4 U mg(-1) or 0.127 +/- 0.006 sec(-1).The protocol reported here can be used for expression of M. tuberculosis UMK in large quantity for formulating a high throughput target-based assay for screening anti-tuberculosis UMK compounds.

  20. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Blower, Tim R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94). M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water-metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrA(A90)) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone-gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94) cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge-enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone-enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrA(A90V) and GyrA(D94G). 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug-enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis.

  1. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  2. Comparison of clinical and laboratory findings between those with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Chunpongthong, Pongsak; Phojanamongkolkij, Kamol; Jitruckthai, Pasakorn; Kasetjaroen, Yuttichai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    In tuberculosis endemic areas, patients with sputum positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are usually diagnosed and treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease is often ascertained only after lung disease progression occurs, increasing the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. We conducted a matched case-control study among a prospective cohort of 300 patients with newly diagnosed AFB-positive sputum in Thailand during 2010-2012. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters and outcomes among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, NTM lung disease and NTM colonization. A mycobacterial culture was performed in all patients. Ten patients with NTM lung disease were compared to 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 patients with NTM colonization. The presence of diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus infection, were associated with NTM lung disease (p = 0.030). Patients with NTM lung disease had a significantly lower body weight prior to treatment (p = 0.021), a higher body weight change from baseline (p = 0.038), and were more likely to have cavitations on chest radiograph (p = 0.033) than those with NTM colonization. In tuberculosis endemic areas, mycobacterial identification should be performed among patients with impaired immune function. NTM lung disease treatment should be considered in patients with NTM sputum isolates who have a history of significant weight loss or cavitations on chest radiography.

  3. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI.

  4. Comparison of symptoms and treatment outcomes between actively and passively detected tuberculosis cases: the additional value of active case finding.

    PubMed

    den Boon, S; Verver, S; Lombard, C J; Bateman, E D; Irusen, E M; Enarson, D A; Borgdorff, M W; Beyers, N

    2008-10-01

    Passive detection of tuberculosis (TB) cases may lead to delay in treatment which may contribute to increased severity of disease and mortality. Active case finding may be an alternative. In a community survey in Cape Town, South Africa, we actively detected 27 bacteriologically positive TB cases and compared those with 473 passively detected TB cases. Seven of 27 (26%) actively detected TB cases did not start treatment within 2 months and were considered initial defaulters. Those who did start treatment had similar treatment success rates as passively detected TB cases (both 80%) (OR 1.01, CI 0.33-3.09). Passively detected cases reported the presence of the symptoms cough (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.47-9.39), haemoptysis (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.03-9.93), night sweats (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.40-7.99), fever (OR 4.28, 95% CI 1.21-15.14), and weight loss (OR 11.14, 95% CI 4.17-29.74) more often than those detected actively. We conclude that although TB cases detected by a community survey are less symptomatic and are prone to a high initial default rate, active case finding can potentially identify a substantial portion of the existing caseload at an earlier stage of disease, thereby reducing the risk of transmission.

  5. Disseminated kidney tuberculosis complicating autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hideki; Amemiya, Morimasa; Chiba, Koji; Urushibara, Masayasu; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Noro, Akira

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is rare, and its diagnosis and treatment are difficult because numerous cysts are exposed to infection and antibiotics do not easily penetrate infected cysts. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old Japanese man with disseminated urogenital tuberculosis (TB) and ADPKD without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Delayed diagnosis and ineffective anti-TB chemotherapy worsened his condition. Finally, he underwent bilateral nephrectomy but experienced postoperative complications. In conclusion, kidney TB should be recognized as a cause of renal infection in ADPKD, and surgical treatment should be instituted without delay. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment cannot be overemphasized to prevent kidney TB deterioration.

  6. Cost–effectiveness of screening for active cases of tuberculosis in Flanders, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Smit, G Suzanne A; Apers, Ludwig; Arrazola de Onate, Wouter; Beutels, Philippe; Dorny, Pierre; Forier, An-Marie; Janssens, Kristien; Macq, Jean; Mak, Ruud; Schol, Sandrina; Wildemeersch, Dirk; Speybroeck, Niko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the cost–effectiveness of the tuberculosis screening activities currently funded by the Flemish government in Flanders, Belgium. Methods After estimating the expenses for 2013–2014 of each of nine screening components – which include high-risk groups, contacts and people who are seeking tuberculosis consultation at a centre for respiratory health care – and the associated costs per active case of tuberculosis identified between 2007 and 2014, we compared the cost–effectiveness of each component. The applied perspective was that of the Flemish government. Findings The three most cost-effective activities appeared to be the follow-up of asylum seekers who were found to have abnormal X-rays in initial screening at the Immigration Office, systematic screening in prisons and contact investigation. The mean costs of these activities were 5564 (95% uncertainty interval, UI: 3791–8160), 11 603 (95% UI: 9010–14 909) and 13 941 (95% UI: 10 723–18 201) euros (€) per detected active case, respectively. The periodic or supplementary initial screening of asylum seekers and the screening of new immigrants from high-incidence countries – which had corresponding costs of €51 813 (95% UI: 34 855–76 847), €126 236 (95% UI: 41 984–347 822) and €418 359 (95% UI: 74 975–1 686 588) – appeared much less cost-effective. Between 2007 and 2014, no active tuberculosis cases were detected during screening in the juvenile detention centres. Conclusion In Flanders, tuberculosis screening in juvenile detention centres and among new immigrants and the periodic or supplementary initial screening of asylum seekers appear to be relatively expensive ways of detecting people with active tuberculosis. PMID:28053362

  7. Immunochromatographic IgG/IgM test for rapid diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Harizi, Hedi; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-12-01

    For rapid diagnosis and discrimination between active tuberculosis (TB) and other pulmonary diseases, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of detection of serum immunoglobulin IgG and IgM antibodies raised against mycobacterial 38-kDa, 16-kDa, and 6-kDa antigens by a commercial rapid immunochromatographic IgG/IgM test (Standard Diagnostics, South Korea) in 246 serum samples from three groups of patients: (i) 171 patients with active TB (128 with pulmonary TB [pTB] and 43 with extrapulmonary TB [epTB]), (ii) 73 patients with pulmonary non-TB diseases, and (iii) two leprosy patients. The sensitivities of IgG and IgM in patients with active TB (pTB and epTB) were 68.4% and 2.3%, respectively. IgG had the best performance characteristics, with sensitivities of 78.1% and 39.5% in sera from patients with active pTB and epTB, respectively, and a specificity of 100%. The sensitivities of IgM were poor and were similar for pTB and epTB (2.3%). In contrast, specificity was very elevated (100%). The combination of IgG with IgM did not improve its sensitivity. IgG-mediated responses against the mycobacterial 38-kDa, 16-kDa, and 6-kDa antigens might constitute a clinically useful tool for presumptive diagnosis and discrimination of active pTB from other pulmonary diseases. Moreover, based on its simplicity and rapidity of application, it could be a screening tool for active pTB in poorly equipped laboratories.

  8. Early and Extended Early Bactericidal Activity of Linezolid in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Reynaldo; Hadad, David Jamil; McGee, Bryan; Molino, Lucilia Pereira Dutra; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Peloquin, Charles A.; Johnson, Denise F.; Debanne, Sara M.; Eisenach, Kathleen; Boom, W. Henry; Palaci, Moises; Johnson, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone approved for clinical use, has effective in vitro and promising in vivo activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Objectives: To evaluate the early and extended early bactericidal activity of linezolid in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Randomized open label trial. Thirty patients with newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (10 per arm) were assigned to receive isoniazid (300 mg daily) and linezolid (600 mg twice daily or 600 mg once daily) for 7 days. Sputum for quantitative culture was collected for 2 days before and then daily during 7 days of study drug administration. Bactericidal activity was estimated by measuring the decline in bacilli during the first 2 days (early bactericidal activity) and the last 5 days of study drug administration (extended early bactericidal activity). Measurements and Main Results: The mean early bactericidal activity of isoniazid (0.67 log10 cfu/ml/d) was greater than that of linezolid twice and once daily (0.26 and 0.18 log10 cfu/ml/d, respectively). The extended early bactericidal activity of linezolid between Days 2 and 7 was minimal. Conclusions: Linezolid has modest early bactericidal activity against rapidly dividing tubercle bacilli in patients with cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis during the first 2 days of administration, but little extended early bactericidal activity. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00396084). PMID:18787216

  9. [An example of partnership cooperation. Cantonal League against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases/Association "Das Band"].

    PubMed

    Michaelis, E

    1984-01-01

    Together with the Cantonal League against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases of Zurich, the Association "Das Band" has organized a first course for parents of children with asthma. The course is a component of the associations new "Prophylaxis Program for Children with Asthma and Their Parents". By exchanging ideas, the parents should become able to reflect their situation, characterized by excessive protectionism, aggressiveness, and guiltiness, and they also should learn to accept the disease as a part of their daily life. The first course, which meanwhile is followed by a second one, provided a first base for the solution of the many problems.

  10. Macrophage form, function, and phenotype in mycobacterial infection: lessons from tuberculosis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    McClean, Colleen M; Tobin, David M

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages play a central role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Recent work has highlighted the importance of diverse macrophage types and phenotypes that depend on local environment and developmental origins. In this review, we highlight how distinct macrophage phenotypes may influence disease progression in tuberculosis. In addition, we draw on work investigating specialized macrophage populations important in cancer biology and atherosclerosis in order to suggest new areas of investigation relevant to mycobacterial pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the repertoire of macrophage phenotypes and behaviors during infection may provide opportunities for novel control of disease through modulation of macrophage form and function.

  11. Comparative Proteomics of Activated THP-1 Cells Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identifies Putative Clearance Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewseekhao, Benjawan; Naranbhai, Vivek; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namwat, Wises; Paemanee, Atchara; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Faksri, Kiatichai

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for determining clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection during anti-tuberculosis therapy or following exposure could facilitate enhanced monitoring and treatment. We screened for biomarkers indicating clearance of Mtb infection in vitro. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using GeLC MSI/MS. Intracellular and secreted proteomes from activated THP-1 cells infected with the Mtb H37Rv strain (MOI = 1) and treated with isoniazid and rifampicin for 1 day (infection stage) and 5 days (clearance stage) were analyzed. Host proteins associated with early infection (n = 82), clearance (n = 121), sustained in both conditions (n = 34) and suppressed by infection (n = 46) were elucidated. Of the potential clearance markers, SSFA2 and CAECAM18 showed the highest and lowest protein intensities, respectively. A western blot of CAECAM18 validated the LC MS/MS result. For three clearance markers (SSFA2, PARP14 and PSME4), in vivo clinical validation was concordantly reported in previous patient cohorts. A network analysis revealed that clearance markers were enriched amongst four protein interaction networks centered on: (i) CD44/CCND1, (ii) IFN-β1/NF-κB, (iii) TP53/TGF-β and (iv) IFN-γ/CCL2. After infection, proteins associated with proliferation, and recruitment of immune cells appeared to be enriched possibly reflecting recruitment of defense mechanisms. Counteracting proteins (CASP3 vs. Akt and NF-κB vs. TP53) associated with apoptosis regulation and its networks were enriched among the early and sustained infection biomarkers, indicating host-pathogen competition. The BRCA1/2 network was suppressed during infection, suggesting that cell proliferation suppression is a feature of Mtb survival. Our study provides insights into the mechanisms of host-Mtb interaction by comparing the stages of infection clearance. The identified clearance biomarkers may be useful in monitoring tuberculosis treatment.

  12. National survey of tuberculosis notifications in England and Wales 1978--9. Report from the Medical Research Council Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases Unit.

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    A survey of all tuberculosis notifications in England and Wales for a six-month period showed that 70% of 3732 newly notified, previously untreated patients had respiratory disease only, 23% had non-respiratory disease only, and 7% had both. Fifty-seven per cent of patients were of white and 35% were of Indian subcontinent (Indian, Pakistani, or Bangladeshi) ethnic origin, the latter group contributing over half the cases of non-respiratory disease. The estimated overall annual notification rate per 100 000 population for 1978--9 was 16.4 for England and 13.5 for Wales. The rates differed considerably between the different ethnic groups in England, the highest rates occurring in the Indian and in the Pakistani and Bangladeshi groups and the lowest in the white group; the differences in the non-respiratory rates were the more striking. Nearly a quarter of patients with respiratory disease had large pulmonary lesions, the proportion being higher for the white group than for the Indian subcontinent group. Over half the patients had positive cultures for tubercle bacilli and over a third had positive smears; both proportions were higher for the white group. This survey has identified many of the problems which tuberculosis presents in England and Wales today. These include the substantial number of patients with sputum-positive disease, the considerable variation in the rates in the different ethnic groups, and the not uncommon occurrence of childhood tuberculosis. PMID:7427500

  13. Killing of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by activated murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, yet the mechanisms by which macrophages defend against Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained obscure. Results from this study show that murine macrophages, activated by interferon gamma, and lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, both growth inhibit and kill M. tuberculosis. This antimycobacterial effect, demonstrable both in murine macrophage cell lines and in peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice, is independent of the macrophage capacity to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Both the ROI-deficient murine macrophage cell line D9, and its ROI-generating, parental line J774.16, expressed comparable antimycobacterial activity upon activation. In addition, the oxygen radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, mannitol, and diazabicyclooctane had no effect on the antimycobacterial activity of macrophages. These findings, together with the results showing the relative resistance of M. tuberculosis to enzymatically generated H2O2, suggest that ROI are unlikely to be significantly involved in killing M. tuberculosis. In contrast, the antimycobacterial activity of these macrophages strongly correlates with the induction of the L-arginine- dependent generation of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The effector molecule(s) that could participate in mediating this antimycobacterial function are toxic RNI, including NO, NO2, and HNO2, as demonstrated by the mycobacteriocidal effect of acidified NO2. The oxygen radical scavenger SOD adventitiously perturbs RNI production, and cannot be used to discriminate between cytocidal mechanisms involving ROI and RNI. Overall, our results provide support for the view that the L-arginine-dependent production of RNI is the principal effector mechanism in activated murine macrophages responsible for killing and growth inhibiting virulent M. tuberculosis. PMID:1552282

  14. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now...

  15. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now...

  16. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now...

  17. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now...

  18. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now...

  19. Type I IFN Inhibits Alternative Macrophage Activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Leads to Enhanced Protection in the Absence of IFN-γ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Jeremy; McNab, Finlay W.; Torrado, Egídio; Cardoso, Filipa; Machado, Henrique; Castro, Flávia; Cardoso, Vânia; Gaifem, Joana; Wu, Xuemei; Appelberg, Rui; Castro, António Gil; O’Garra, Anne; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis causes ∼1.5 million deaths every year, thus remaining a leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the world. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that type I IFN plays a detrimental role in tuberculosis pathogenesis, likely by interfering with IFN-γ–dependent immunity. In this article, we reveal a novel mechanism by which type I IFN may confer protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the absence of IFN-γ signaling. We show that production of type I IFN by M. tuberculosis–infected macrophages induced NO synthase 2 and inhibited arginase 1 gene expression. In vivo, absence of both type I and type II IFN receptors led to strikingly increased levels of arginase 1 gene expression and protein activity in infected lungs, characteristic of alternatively activated macrophages. This correlated with increased lung bacterial burden and pathology and decreased survival compared with mice deficient in either receptor. Increased expression of other genes associated with alternatively activated macrophages, as well as increased expression of Th2-associated cytokines and decreased TNF expression, were also observed. Thus, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, type I IFN suppressed the switching of macrophages from a more protective classically activated phenotype to a more permissive alternatively activated phenotype. Together, our data support a model in which suppression of alternative macrophage activation by type I IFN during M. tuberculosis infection, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, contributes to host protection. PMID:27849167

  20. Hyperthermostable binding molecules on phage: Assay components for point-of-care diagnostics for active tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Spencer, John; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2017-03-15

    Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The low sensitivity, extended processing time, and high expense of current diagnostics are major challenges to the detection and treatment of tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ornithine transcarbamylase (Mtb OTC, Rv1656) has been identified in the urine of patients with active TB infection and is a promising target for point-of-care diagnostics. Specific binding proteins with low nanomolar affinities for Mtb OTC were selected from a phage display library built upon a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold. Phage particles displaying Sso7d variants were utilized to generate a sandwich ELISA-based assay for Mtb OTC. The assay response is linear between 2 ng/mL and 125 ng/mL recombinant Mtb OTC and has a limit of detection of 400 pg/mL recombinant Mtb OTC. The assay employing a phage-based detection reagent is comparable to commercially-available antibody-based biosensors. Importantly, the assay maintains functionality at both neutral and basic pH in presence of salt and urea over the range of concentrations typical for human urine. Phage-based diagnostic systems may feature improved physical stability and cost of production relative to traditional antibody-based reagents, without sacrificing specificity and sensitivity.

  1. In vitro Anti-mycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden with one –third of the world’s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and annually 1.4 million deaths occur due to the disease. This high incidence of infection and the increased rate of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism further complicated the problem of TB control and have called for an urgent need to develop new anti-TB drugs from plants. In this study, the in vitro activity of root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were evaluated against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Methods Five Ethiopian medicinal plants, root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis used locally for the management of TB. They were investigated for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. 80% methanolic extracts of the plant materials were obtained by maceration. The antimycobacterial activity was determined using 96 wells of microplate with the help of visual Resazurin Microtiter Assay. Results The crude 80% methanolic extracts of the root of C. aurea, seeds of O. basilicum, and leaves of A. abyssinica, C. macrostachyus, and E. camaldulensis had anti-mycobacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 6.25–100 μg/mL. The MIC of 80% methanol extracts in the order mentioned above ranged 25-100 μg/ml and 12.5-75 μg/mL, 25–100 μg/mL and 25–50 μg/mL, 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, 12.5-100 μg/mL and 18.25-50 μg/mL and 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, respectively for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Conclusions The results support the local use of these plants in the treatment of TB and it is suggested that these plants may have therapeutic value in the treatment of TB. However

  2. Rapid, Semiquantitative Assay To Discriminate among Compounds with Activity against Replicating or Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Quezada, Landys Lopez; Glasheen, Jou; Ballinger, Elaine; Somersan-Karakaya, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Warren, J. David; Nathan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs that can kill replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces practical bottlenecks. Measurement of CFU and discrimination of bacteriostatic from bactericidal activity are costly in compounds, supplies, labor, and time. Testing compounds against M. tuberculosis under conditions that prevent the replication of M. tuberculosis often involves a second phase of the test in which conditions are altered to permit the replication of bacteria that survived the first phase. False-positive determinations of activity against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis may arise from carryover of compounds from the nonreplicating stage of the assay that act in the replicating stage. We mitigate these problems by carrying out a 96-well microplate liquid MIC assay and then transferring an aliquot of each well to a second set of plates in which each well contains agar supplemented with activated charcoal. After 7 to 10 days—about 2 weeks sooner than required to count CFU—fluorometry reveals whether M. tuberculosis bacilli in each well have replicated extensively enough to reduce a resazurin dye added for the final hour. This charcoal agar resazurin assay (CARA) distinguishes between bacterial biomasses in any two wells that differ by 2 to 3 log10 CFU. The CARA thus serves as a pretest and semiquantitative surrogate for longer, more laborious, and expensive CFU-based assays, helps distinguish bactericidal from bacteriostatic activity, and identifies compounds that are active under replicating conditions, nonreplicating conditions, or both. Results for 14 antimycobacterial compounds, including tuberculosis (TB) drugs, revealed that PA-824 (pretomanid) and TMC207 (bedaquiline) are largely bacteriostatic. PMID:26239979

  3. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and cytotoxicity of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess (Clusiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Claudia Terencio Agostinho; Brenzan, Mislaine Adriana; Scodro, Regiane Bertin de Lima; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Lopes, Luciana Dias Ghiraldi; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and the cytotoxicity of dichloromethane extract and pure compounds from the leaves of Calophyllum brasiliense. Purification of the dichloromethane extract yielded the pure compounds (-) mammea A/BB (1), (-) mammea B/BB (2) and amentoflavone (3). The compound structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and spectrometric data. The contents of bioactive compounds in the extracts were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet detector. The anti-M. tuberculosis activity of the extracts and the pure compounds was evaluated using a resazurin microtitre assay plate. The cytotoxicity assay was performed in J774G.8 macrophages using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colourimetric method. The quantification of the dichloromethane extract showed (1) and (2) at concentrations of 31.86 ± 2.6 and 8.24 ± 1.1 µg/mg of extract, respectively. The dichloromethane and aqueous extracts showed anti-M. tuberculosis H37Rv activity of 62.5 and 125 µg/mL, respectively. Coumarins (1) and (2) showed minimal inhibitory concentration ranges of 31.2 and 62.5 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and clinical isolates. Compound (3) showed no activity against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The selectivity index ranged from 0.59-1.06. We report the activity of the extracts and coumarins from the leaves of C. brasiliense against M. tuberculosis. PMID:24676652

  4. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and cytotoxicity of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess (Clusiaceae).

    PubMed

    Pires, Claudia Terencio Agostinho; Brenzan, Mislaine Adriana; Scodro, Regiane Bertin de Lima; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Lopes, Luciana Dias Ghiraldi; Siqueira, Vera Lucia Dias; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the in vitro anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and the cytotoxicity of dichloromethane extract and pure compounds from the leaves of Calophyllum brasiliense. Purification of the dichloromethane extract yielded the pure compounds (-) mammea A/BB (1), (-) mammea B/BB (2) and amentoflavone (3). The compound structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and spectrometric data. The contents of bioactive compounds in the extracts were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet detector. The anti-M. tuberculosis activity of the extracts and the pure compounds was evaluated using a resazurin microtitre assay plate. The cytotoxicity assay was performed in J774G.8 macrophages using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colourimetric method. The quantification of the dichloromethane extract showed (1) and (2) at concentrations of 31.86 ± 2.6 and 8.24 ± 1.1 µg/mg of extract, respectively. The dichloromethane and aqueous extracts showed anti-M. tuberculosis H37Rv activity of 62.5 and 125 µg/mL, respectively. Coumarins (1) and (2) showed minimal inhibitory concentration ranges of 31.2 and 62.5 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and clinical isolates. Compound (3) showed no activity against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The selectivity index ranged from 0.59-1.06. We report the activity of the extracts and coumarins from the leaves of C. brasiliense against M. tuberculosis.

  5. Performance of univariate forecasting on seasonal diseases: the case of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Adhistya Erna; Rambli, Dayang Rohaya Awang; Dominic, P Dhanapal Durai

    2011-01-01

    The annual disease incident worldwide is desirable to be predicted for taking appropriate policy to prevent disease outbreak. This chapter considers the performance of different forecasting method to predict the future number of disease incidence, especially for seasonal disease. Six forecasting methods, namely linear regression, moving average, decomposition, Holt-Winter's, ARIMA, and artificial neural network (ANN), were used for disease forecasting on tuberculosis monthly data. The model derived met the requirement of time series with seasonality pattern and downward trend. The forecasting performance was compared using similar error measure in the base of the last 5 years forecast result. The findings indicate that ARIMA model was the most appropriate model since it obtained the less relatively error than the other model.

  6. Fc gamma receptors regulate immune activation and susceptibility during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Casadevall, Arturo; Chan, John

    2008-03-01

    The critical role of cellular immunity during tuberculosis (TB) has been extensively studied, but the impact of Abs upon this infection remains poorly defined. Previously, we demonstrated that B cells are required for optimal protection in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice. FcgammaR modulate immunity by engaging Igs produced by B cells. We report that C57BL/6 mice deficient in inhibitory FcgammaRIIB (RIIB-/-) manifested enhanced mycobacterial containment and diminished immunopathology compared with wild-type controls. These findings corresponded with enhanced pulmonary Th1 responses, evidenced by increased IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells, and elevated expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 in the lungs. Upon M. tuberculosis infection and immune complex engagement, RIIB-/- macrophages produced more of the p40 component of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-12. These data strongly suggest that FcgammaRIIB engagement can dampen the TB Th1 response by attenuating IL-12p40 production or activation of APCs. Conversely, C57BL/6 mice lacking the gamma-chain shared by activating FcgammaR had enhanced susceptibility and exacerbated immunopathology upon M. tuberculosis challenge, associated with increased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Thus, engagement of distinct FcgammaR can divergently affect cytokine production and susceptibility during M. tuberculosis infection.

  7. Stress and host immunity amplify Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypic heterogeneity and induce nongrowing metabolically active forms.

    PubMed

    Manina, Giulia; Dhar, Neeraj; McKinney, John D

    2015-01-14

    Nonreplicating and metabolically quiescent bacteria are implicated in latent tuberculosis infections and relapses following "sterilizing" chemotherapy. However, evidence linking bacterial dormancy and persistence in vivo is largely inconclusive. Here we measure the single-cell dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication and ribosomal activity using quantitative time-lapse microscopy and a reporter of ribosomal RNA gene expression. Single-cell dynamics exhibit heterogeneity under standard growth conditions, which is amplified by stressful conditions such as nutrient limitation, stationary phase, intracellular replication, and growth in mouse lungs. Additionally, the lungs of chronically infected mice harbor a subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active bacteria, which are absent in mice lacking interferon-γ, a cytokine essential for antituberculosis immunity. These cryptic bacterial forms are prominent in mice treated with the antituberculosis drug isoniazid, suggesting a role in postchemotherapeutic relapses. Thus, amplification of bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity in response to host immunity and drug pressure may contribute to tuberculosis persistence.

  8. IL23R(Arg381Gln) functional polymorphism is associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis severity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Boukadida, Jalel

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin-23 receptor gene (IL23R; rs11209026, 1142 G(wild type) → A(reduced function), Arg381Gln) and disease severity outcome in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the Tunisian population. SNP was investigated in a population of 168 patients with active pulmonary TB (cases were stratified into patients with minimal/moderate lung involvement, i.e., patients with minimal/moderate disease [Pmd], and patients with extensive lung involvement, i.e., patients with active disease [Pad]) and 150 healthy subjects. Genotype analyses were carried out using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We have found that the IL23R reduced-function allele 1142A and genotypes AA and AG were overrepresented, especially in the Pad subgroup compared with the control group (51% versus 18% [P = 10(-8)], 33% versus 5% [P = 10(-8)], and 36% versus 26% [P = 5 × 10(-3)], respectively). Additionally, comparison of the Pad and the Pmd groups showed that the A allele and AA genotype seemed to be associated with 2.79-fold (P = 4 × 10(-5)) and 7.74-fold (P = 10(-5)) increased risks of TB with minimal/moderate lung involvement, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the reduced-function polymorphism 1142G → A encoded by IL23R influences the outcome of disease severity of active pulmonary TB in Tunisian patients.

  9. Active Community-Based Case Finding for Tuberculosis With Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Bindu; Kittel, Guenter; Bolokon, Ignatius; Duke, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is one of the 14 highest-burden countries for tuberculosis (TB) infection, but few community-based studies exist. We evaluated a low-cost method of active community case finding in Kabwum and Wasu in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. Over 3 months we visited 26 villages and screened adults and children for symptoms and signs of TB. Sputum samples were examined using smear microscopy. A total of 1700 people had chronic symptoms, of which 267 were suspicious for TB on further examination. Sputum from 230 symptomatic adults yielded 97 samples that were positive for acid-fast bacilli. In addition, 15 cases of extrapulmonary TB in adults and 17 cases of TB in children were identified. One hundred and thirty people were identified with active TB disease among the source population of approximately 17 000, giving an estimated prevalence of 765 per 100 000. One hundred and six (82%) cases were not previously diagnosed. The cost per case identified was US$146. It is feasible to conduct active community-based case finding and treatment initiation for TB with limited resources and in remote areas, and in Papua New Guinea the yield was high. Active case finding and follow-up of treatment in villages is needed to address the hidden burden of TB in Papua New Guinea and other high-burden Asia Pacific countries. PMID:28033717

  10. Latent Tuberculosis in Health Care Workers Exposed to Active Tuberculosis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Faryal; Al-Lawati, Adil; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Abri, Seif; Al-Naamani, Jaleelah; Al-Harthi, Harith; Al-Jardani, Amina; Al-Harthi, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Data on the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in healthcare workers (HCW) in Oman and the Arabian Gulf is scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (LTB) among HCW exposed to active TB in one of the tertiary care hospitals in Muscat. Methods Exposed HCW were screened for LTB from January to June 2012 using skin tuberculin and serum interferon tests. Candidates were followed-up for a total of nine months. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Results A total of 371 exposed HCW were involved in the study. The incidence of LTB in exposed HCW was 33.2% (n = 123). Almost 54% (66/123) of the HCW started treatment and only 42.4% (28/66) completed the full nine-month treatment course. Conclusions The high prevalence of LTBI in exposed HCW merits further evaluation of the screening and treatment programs in the country. Future countrywide studies are warranted to provide more precise statistics on the prevalence and management of this public health issue. PMID:27403243

  11. Circulating B-lymphocytes as potential biomarkers of tuberculosis infection activity.

    PubMed

    Sebina, Ismail; Biraro, Irene A; Dockrell, Hazel M; Elliott, Alison M; Cose, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection activity would significantly improve early diagnosis, treatment and management of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesised that circulating B-lymphocytes may be useful biomarkers of tuberculosis (TB) infection status in highly TB-endemic settings. Ex-vivo and in-vitro mycobacteria-specific B-cell ELISPOT assays were used to examine the plasmablast (PB) and memory B-cell (MBC) responses in the peripheral blood of adult, healthy, community controls (n = 151) and of active TB patients (n = 48) living in Uganda. Frequencies of mycobacteria-specific PBs were markedly higher in active TB patients compared to healthy controls, and, conversely, MBCs were markedly higher in the healthy controls compared to active TB patients. In addition, the community controls with evidence of latent TB infection had higher peripheral blood PB and MBC responses than those without evidence of TB infection. These data demonstrate that peripheral blood B-cell responses are differentially modulated during latent and active M. tuberculosis infection, and suggest that the PB to MBC ratio may be a useful biomarker of TB infection activity.

  12. Tuberculosis at the human-animal interface: an emerging disease of elephants.

    PubMed

    Mikota, Susan K; Maslow, Joel N

    2011-05-01

    Over the past 15 years, cases of infection with organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex have been diagnosed among captive elephants in the United States and worldwide. Outbreak investigations have documented that among staff employed at facilities housing infected animals, skin test conversion to purified protein derivative have been documented. Clonal spread among animals in close contact and even inter-species spread between elephant and human has been documented. Detection of actively infected animals relies on samples obtained by trunk wash. Diagnosis has been augmented by the development of a multi-antigen serologic assay with excellent specificity and sensitivity. Treatment regimens are still in development with efficacy largely unknown due to a paucity of both premortem follow-up and necropsy data of treated animals. The epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in elephants require additional careful study of clinical data.

  13. Developing vaccines to prevent sustained infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Conference proceedings: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rockville, Maryland USA, November 7, 2014.

    PubMed

    2015-06-12

    On November 7, 2014, Aeras and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a conference entitled "Vaccine Prevention of Sustained Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection." The purpose of this meeting was to explore the biologic plausibility, potential public health and economic impact, and regulatory feasibility in attempting to develop a vaccine to prevent sustained infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Currently there are two main goals for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development, to develop a vaccine that could serve as a booster to Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination and prevent active TB in adolescents and adults, and to develop an improved vaccine to replace BCG in infants. Although prevention of sustained Mtb infection is being used as a proof of biological activity for vaccines in mid-Phase 2 development, there currently are no plans for pursuing a prevention of Mtb infection licensure indication for TB vaccines. Ultimately, pursuing a prevention of sustained Mtb infection indication for TB vaccines, in parallel with ongoing efforts to develop vaccines to prevent active TB disease, was deemed a potentially important effort, but would require further resources, particularly to improve diagnostic assays, to increase the regulatory feasibility of this endeavor.

  14. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-04-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens.

  15. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  16. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; ...

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  17. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M; Sherman, David R; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L; Andersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress-induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56.

  18. Identification of 2-Aminothiazole-4-Carboxylate Derivatives Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and the β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase mtFabH

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay; Anthony, Nahoum G.; Al-Jaidi, Bilal; Alnimr, Amani; Abbott, Grainne; Brown, Alistair K.; Taylor, Rebecca C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Gillespie, Stephen H.; Johnston, Blair F.; Mackay, Simon P.; Coxon, Geoffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease which kills two million people every year and infects approximately over one-third of the world's population. The difficulty in managing tuberculosis is the prolonged treatment duration, the emergence of drug resistance and co-infection with HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis control requires new drugs that act at novel drug targets to help combat resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and reduce treatment duration. Methodology/Principal Findings Our approach was to modify the naturally occurring and synthetically challenging antibiotic thiolactomycin (TLM) to the more tractable 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold to generate compounds that mimic TLM's novel mode of action. We report here the identification of a series of compounds possessing excellent activity against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and, dissociatively, against the β-ketoacyl synthase enzyme mtFabH which is targeted by TLM. Specifically, methyl 2-amino-5-benzylthiazole-4-carboxylate was found to inhibit M. tuberculosis H37Rv with an MIC of 0.06 µg/ml (240 nM), but showed no activity against mtFabH, whereas methyl 2-(2-bromoacetamido)-5-(3-chlorophenyl)thiazole-4-carboxylate inhibited mtFabH with an IC50 of 0.95±0.05 µg/ml (2.43±0.13 µM) but was not active against the whole cell organism. Conclusions/Significance These findings clearly identify the 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold as a promising new template towards the discovery of a new class of anti-tubercular agents. PMID:19440303

  19. Untreated Active Tuberculosis in Pregnancy with Intraocular Dissemination: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rezai, Shadi; LoBue, Stephen; Adams, Daniel; Oladipo, Yewande; Posso, Ramses; Mapp, Tiffany; Santiago, Crystal; Jain, Manisha; Marino, William D; Henderson, Cassandra E

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that affects hundreds of millions of people across the world. However, the incidence in developed countries has decreased over the past decades causing physicians to become unfamiliar with its unspecific symptoms. Pregnant individuals are especially difficult because many symptoms of active TB can mimic normal physiological changes of pregnancy. We present a case report of a 26-year-old multiparous woman, G4P3003, at 38-week gestation with a history of positive PPD who emigrated from Ghana 6 years ago. She came to the hospital with an initial complaint of suprapubic pain, pressure, and possible leakage of amniotic fluid for the past week. Patient also complained of a productive cough for the past 3 to 4 months with a decrease in vision occurring with the start of pregnancy. Visual acuity was worse than 20/200 in both eyes. Definitive diagnosis of active TB was delayed due to patient refusal of chest X-ray. Fortunately, delay in diagnosis was minimized since patient delivered within 24 hours of admission. Active TB was confirmed with intraocular dissemination. Patient had optic atrophy OS (left eye) and papillitis, choroiditis, and uveitis OD (right eye) due to TB infiltration. Fetus was asymptomatic and anti-TB therapy was started for both patients.

  20. Untreated Active Tuberculosis in Pregnancy with Intraocular Dissemination: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Stephen; Adams, Daniel; Oladipo, Yewande; Posso, Ramses; Mapp, Tiffany; Santiago, Crystal; Jain, Manisha; Marino, William D.; Henderson, Cassandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that affects hundreds of millions of people across the world. However, the incidence in developed countries has decreased over the past decades causing physicians to become unfamiliar with its unspecific symptoms. Pregnant individuals are especially difficult because many symptoms of active TB can mimic normal physiological changes of pregnancy. We present a case report of a 26-year-old multiparous woman, G4P3003, at 38-week gestation with a history of positive PPD who emigrated from Ghana 6 years ago. She came to the hospital with an initial complaint of suprapubic pain, pressure, and possible leakage of amniotic fluid for the past week. Patient also complained of a productive cough for the past 3 to 4 months with a decrease in vision occurring with the start of pregnancy. Visual acuity was worse than 20/200 in both eyes. Definitive diagnosis of active TB was delayed due to patient refusal of chest X-ray. Fortunately, delay in diagnosis was minimized since patient delivered within 24 hours of admission. Active TB was confirmed with intraocular dissemination. Patient had optic atrophy OS (left eye) and papillitis, choroiditis, and uveitis OD (right eye) due to TB infiltration. Fetus was asymptomatic and anti-TB therapy was started for both patients. PMID:26693374

  1. In Vitro Activity of a New Isothiazoloquinolone, ACH-702, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Rendón, Adrian; Pucci, Michael J.; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we describe the activity of ACH-702 against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and six different nontuberculous mycobacteria. The MIC50 and MIC90 of both susceptible and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains tested were 0.0625 and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for Mycobacterium fortuitum isolates were 0.0625 μg/ml in both cases; Mycobacterium avium complex isolates showed MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:20231398

  2. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  3. Modification of Rifamycin Polyketide Backbone Leads to Improved Drug Activity against Rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N.; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-01-01

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. PMID:24923585

  4. Modification of rifamycin polyketide backbone leads to improved drug activity against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-07-25

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains.

  5. Fighting an old disease with modern tools: characteristics and molecular detection methods of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Engström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease, but not a disease of the past. The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, demands new measures to combat the situation. Rapid and accurate detection of the pathogen, and its drug susceptibility pattern, is essential for timely initiation of treatment, and ultimately, control of the disease. Molecular-based methods offer a great chance to improve detection of drug-resistant TB; however, their development and usage should be accompanied with a profound understanding of drug resistance mechanisms and circulating M. tuberculosis strains in specific settings, as otherwise, the usefulness of such tests may be limited. This review gives an overview of the history of TB treatment and drug resistance, drug resistance mechanisms for the most commonly used drugs and molecular methods designed to detect drug-resistant strains.

  6. Role of the Health Department in Tuberculosis Prevention and Control-Legal and Public Health Considerations.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Carla; Lobue, Phil; Chorba, Terence; Metchock, Beverly; Kashef, Ijaz

    2017-03-01

    Because tuberculosis is caused by an infectious organism that is spread from person to person through the air, public health measures are essential to control the disease. There are three priority strategies for tuberculosis prevention and control in the United States: (i) identifying and treating persons who have tuberculosis disease; (ii) finding persons exposed to infectious tuberculosis patients, evaluating them for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease, and providing subsequent treatment, if appropriate; and (iii) testing populations at high risk for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and treating those persons who are infected to prevent progression to disease. These strategies for prevention and control of tuberculosis are discussed in a framework containing the following important topics: historical and epidemiological context of tuberculosis control, organization of public health tuberculosis control programs, legal basis for public health authority, conducting overall planning and development of policy, identifying persons who have clinically active tuberculosis, evaluation of immigrants, managing persons who have or who are suspected of having disease, medical consultation, interjurisdictional referrals, identifying and managing persons infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, providing laboratory and diagnostic services, collecting and analyzing data, and providing training and education. This chapter describes the role of the health department in the context of these components. This discussion is primarily applicable to tuberculosis prevention and control programs in the United States.

  7. Activation of JAK2/STAT1-alpha-dependent signaling events during Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mauricio; Olivier, Martin; García, Luis F

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage involves TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production and caspase cascade activation; however, the intracellular signaling pathways implicated remain to be established. Our results indicate that infection of the B10R murine macrophage line with M. tuberculosis induces apoptosis independent of mycobacterial phagocytosis and that M. tuberculosis induces protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, JAK2/STAT1-alpha phosphorylation, and STAT1-alpha nuclear translocation. Inhibitors of PTK (AG-126), or JAK2 (AG-490) inhibited TNF-alpha and NO production, caspase 1 activation and apoptosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis-induction of these events depends on JAK2/STAT1-alpha activation. In addition, we have obtained evidence that ManLAM capacity to inhibit M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis involves the activation of the PTP SHP-1. The finding that M. tuberculosis infection activate JAK2/STAT1-alpha pathway suggests that M. tuberculosis might mimic macrophage-activating stimuli.

  8. Differential expression of HLA-G and ILT-2 receptor in human tuberculosis: Localized versus disseminated disease.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Abhinav; Thakral, Deepshi; Mourya, Manish K; Singh, Amar; Mohan, Anant; Bhatnagar, Anuj K; Mitra, Dipendra K; Kanga, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecule that can modulate immune cell activation. The role of HLA-G in tuberculosis, an immune-mediated and chronic bacterial disease remains to be elucidated. We investigated the expression profile of soluble and membrane bound HLA-G in pulmonary TB (PTB), TB pleural effusion (TB-PE, localized disease) and Miliary TB (disseminated form). The expression of HLA-G receptor, ILT-2 was also determined on the immune cells. We observed that the plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly increased in Miliary TB than in TB-PE patients. In contrast, immunophenotyping revealed that the percent frequency of CD3(+) T cells expressing HLA-G was significantly reduced in Miliary TB as compared to TB-PE, whereas frequency of CD14(+) monocytes expressing HLA-G was significantly higher in TB-PE patients. Strikingly in the TB-PE cases, comparison of disease site, i.e. pleural effusion with peripheral blood showed increased expression of both soluble and surface HLA-G, whereas ILT-2 expressing cells were reduced at the local disease site. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in TB-PE cases, HLA-G expression on CD3(+) T cells was influenced by broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. Thus, differential expression of HLA-G could potentially be a useful biomarker to distinguish different states of TB disease.

  9. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  10. Active tuberculosis among homeless persons, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kamran; Rea, Elizabeth; McDermaid, Cameron; Stuart, Rebecca; Chambers, Catharine; Wang, Jun; Chan, Angie; Gardam, Michael; Jamieson, Frances; Yang, Jae; Hwang, Stephen W

    2011-03-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) in Canadian cities is increasingly affecting foreign-born persons, homeless persons remain at high risk. To assess trends in TB, we studied all homeless persons in Toronto who had a diagnosis of active TB during 1998-2007. We compared Canada-born and foreign-born homeless persons and assessed changes over time. We identified 91 homeless persons with active TB; they typically had highly contagious, advanced disease, and 19% died within 12 months of diagnosis. The proportion of homeless persons who were foreign-born increased from 24% in 1998-2002 to 39% in 2003-2007. Among foreign-born homeless persons with TB, 56% of infections were caused by strains not known to circulate among homeless persons in Toronto. Only 2% of infections were resistant to first-line TB medications. The rise in foreign-born homeless persons with TB strains likely acquired overseas suggests that the risk for drug-resistant strains entering the homeless shelter system may be escalating.

  11. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L; Silva, Pedro A; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates.

  12. Clofazimine Contributes Sustained Antimicrobial Activity after Treatment Cessation in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Rosemary V.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Ngcobo, Bongani; Adamson, John; Moodley, Chivonne; Dorasamy, Afton; Moodley, Sashen; Mgaga, Zinhle; Bester, Linda A.; Singh, Sanil D.; Almeida, Deepak V.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the antileprosy drug clofazimine may contribute treatment-shortening activity when included in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Clofazimine accumulates to high levels in tissues, has a long half-life, and remains in the body for months after administration is stopped. We hypothesized that in tuberculosis treatment, accumulated clofazimine may contribute sustained antimicrobial activity after treatment cessation, and we used the BALB/c mouse model of chronic tuberculosis chemotherapy to address this hypothesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were treated for 4 weeks or 8 weeks with either isoniazid alone, clofazimine alone, the first-line regimen rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide-ethambutol, or a first-line regimen where clofazimine was administered in place of ethambutol. To evaluate posttreatment antimicrobial activity, bacterial regrowth in the lungs and spleens was assessed at the day of treatment cessation and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment was stopped. Bacterial regrowth was delayed in all mice receiving clofazimine, either alone or in combination, compared to the mice that did not receive clofazimine. This effect was especially evident in mice receiving multidrug therapy. In mice not receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth began almost immediately after treatment was stopped, while in mice receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth was delayed for up to 6 weeks, with the duration of sustained antimicrobial activity being positively associated with the time that serum clofazimine levels remained at or above the 0.25-μg/ml MIC for M. tuberculosis. Thus, sustained activity of clofazimine may be important in the treatment-shortening effect associated with this drug. PMID:26926638

  13. Dynamics of a Mathematical Model for Tuberculosis with Variability in Susceptibility and Disease Progressions Due to Difference in Awareness Level

    PubMed Central

    Okuonghae, Daniel; Ikhimwin, Bernard O.

    2016-01-01

    This work extends a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis that examined the impact of certain factors on tuberculosis case detection (Okuonghae and Omosigho, 2011). The extended model now classifies the latently infected individuals by their level of tuberculosis awareness (as was done for the susceptible sub-population) and further expands the number of key factors that can positively affect the tuberculosis case detection rate. The effect of these identified factors on the associated reproduction number of the model is considered. It is shown that the system can undergo the phenomenon of backward bifurcation when the associated reproduction number of the model is less than unity; in a special case, the effect of exogenous re-infection on the backward bifurcation phenomenon is significantly dictated by the level of awareness of the latently infected individuals. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the model showed the effect of key identified factors on the dynamics of tuberculosis while suggesting a serious concentration on tuberculosis awareness programmes, active case finding strategies and use of active cough identification for identifying likely TB cases and sustaining awareness campaigns over a long period of time. PMID:26858691

  14. Short-course therapy for tuberculosis in infants and children. Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To improve efficacy of and compliance with therapy for tuberculosis in children. OPTIONS: Short-course (6-month) multi-drug therapy, either non-supervised or directly supervised, versus long-course (more than 6-month) multi-drug therapy. OUTCOMES: Success (more than 90% of cases cured without relapse or serious side effects), development of drug resistance and compliance with treatment. EVIDENCE: Review of published reports of efficacy trials of tuberculosis therapy in children, side effects and compliance studies; consensus of expert opinion. VALUES: Values were assigned to the evidence by the Infectious Disease and Immunization Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society through review of the data and consensus. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Improved efficacy and compliance with short-course protocols should lower the rate of treatment failure among children in Canada and the cost of tuberculosis care. RECOMMENDATIONS: A short-course (6-month) protocol of four drugs for the first 2 months and two drugs for the subsequent 4 months is recommended to treat pulmonary tuberculosis or extrapulmonary disease causing lymphadenopathy. Tuberculous meningitis, disease involving bones and joints and tuberculosis with HIV infection require longer courses of treatment. Asymptomatic tuberculosis should be treated with daily doses of isoniazid for 9 months. Intermittent directly observed therapy is recommended if compliance cannot be ensured. Routine liver function testing is not recommended for prepubescent children taking isoniazid, but monthly assessment for clinical symptoms and periodic liver function evaluation is advised in adolescent women, especially post partum. VALIDATION: This report was reviewed by the directors of the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Hepatitis and Special Pathogens Division of the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control and the Canadian Thoracic Society. The recommendations are similar to those of the American Academy of Pediatrics. SPONSOR

  15. Early dynamics of T helper cell cytokines and T regulatory cells in response to treatment of active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, S L; Tonby, K; Kvale, D; Dyrhol-Riise, A M

    2015-03-01

    Biomarkers that can identify tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as markers for efficient therapy are requested. We have studied T cell cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and degranulation (CD107a) as well as subsets of CD4(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs ) after in-vitro Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen stimulation [early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6, culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, antigen 85 (Ag85)] in 32 patients with active tuberculosis (TB) disease throughout 24 weeks of effective TB treatment. A significant decline in the fraction of Mtb-specific total IFN-γ and single IFN-γ-producing T cells was already observed after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas the pool of single IL-2(+) cells increased over time for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The Treg subsets CD25(high) CD127(low) , CD25(high) CD147(++) and CD25(high) CD127(low) CD161(+) expanded significantly after Mtb antigen stimulation in vitro at all time-points, whereas the CD25(high) CD127(low) CD39(+) Tregs remained unchanged. The fraction of CD25(high) CD127(low) Tregs increased after 8 weeks of treatment. Thus, we revealed an opposing shift of Tregs and intracellular cytokine production during treatment. This may indicate that functional signatures of the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can serve as immunological correlates of early curative host responses. Whether such signatures can be used as biomarkers in monitoring and follow-up of TB treatment needs to be explored further.

  16. Reporter phage and breath tests: emerging phenotypic assays for diagnosing active tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, and treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S; Bishai, William R; Hatfull, Graham F; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R

    2011-11-15

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics.

  17. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  18. Tuberculosis in elephants-a reemergent disease: diagnostic dilemmas, the natural history of infection, and new immunological tools.

    PubMed

    Maslow, J N; Mikota, S K

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants has been described since ancient times. However, it was not until 1996 when infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified in a herd of circus elephants that significant research into this disease began. The epidemiology and natural history of TB were unknown in elephants since there had been no comprehensive screening programs, and diagnostic techniques developed for cervidae and bovidae were of unknown value. And, while precepts of test and slaughter were the norm for cattle and deer, this was considered untenable for an endangered species. With no precedent for the treatment of TB in animals, treatment regimens for elephants were extrapolated from human protocols, which guided changes to the Guidelines for the Control of Tuberculosis in Elephants. In the absence of diagnostic testing to confirm cure in elephants, the efficacy of these treatment regimens is only beginning to be understood as treated elephants die and are examined postmortem. However, because of pressures arising from public relations related to elephant husbandry and the added considerations of TB infection in animals (whether real or imagined), sharing of information to aid in research and treatment has been problematic. Here we review the challenges and successes of the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants and discuss the natural history of the disease to put the work of Landolfi et al on the immunological response to tuberculosis in elephants in perspective.

  19. Differential expression of miRNAs and their relation to active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Zhou, Aiping; Ni, Jinjing; Zhang, Qiufen; Wang, Ying; Lu, Jie; Wu, Wenjuan; Karakousis, Petros C; Lu, Shuihua; Yao, Yufeng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to screen miRNA signatures dysregulated in tuberculosis to improve our understanding of the biological role of miRNAs involved in the disease. Datasets deposited in publically available databases from microarray studies on infectious diseases and malignancies were retrieved, screened, and subjected to further analysis. Effect sizes were combined using the inverse-variance model and between-study heterogeneity was evaluated by the random effects model. 35 miRNAs were differentially expressed (12 up-regulated, 23 down-regulated; p < 0.05) by combining 15 datasets of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. 15 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially regulated (7 up-regulated, 8 down-regulated; p < 0.05) by combining 53 datasets of tuberculosis and malignancies. Most of the miRNA signatures identified in this study were found to be involved in immune responses and metabolism. Expression of these miRNA signatures in serum samples from TB subjects (n = 11) as well as healthy controls (n = 10) was examined by TaqMan miRNA array. Taken together, the results revealed differential expression of miRNAs in TB, but available datasets are limited and these miRNA signatures should be validated in future studies.

  20. 65 FR 63227 - Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-10-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis Bovine tuberculosis (tuberculosis) is a chronic debilitating disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The... animal health agencies to eradicate tuberculosis from domestic livestock in the United States...

  1. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  2. Tuberculosis in indigenous communities of Antioquia, Colombia: epidemiology and beliefs.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sarmiento, José Mauricio; Dávila Osorio, Victoria Lucia; Martínez Sánchez, Lina María; Restrepo Serna, Laura; Grajales Ospina, Diana Carolina; Toro Montoya, Andrés Eduardo; Arango Urrea, Verónica; Vargas Grisales, Natalia; Estrada Gómez, Manuela; Lopera Valle, Johan Sebastián; García Gil, Juan José; Restrepo, Lady; Mejía, Gloria; Zapata, Elsa; Gómez, Verónica; Lopera, Diver; Domicó Domicó, José Leonardo; Robledo, Jaime

    2013-02-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by tuberculosis are increased in most of the Latin-American indigenous communities. Factors that could explain this situation are poverty and limited health services access due to social conflicts and geographical isolation. We determined the frequency of tuberculosis in Colombian indigenous communities and described their knowledge related to transmission and control. We developed a descriptive study and health survey. Interviews were performed to find ancestral knowledge about tuberculosis. Sputum samples from patients with respiratory symptoms were analyzed. 10 indigenous communities were studied, which tuberculosis incidence was 291/100,000. Communities believe that tuberculosis is a body and spirit disease, which transmission is by direct contact or by witchcraft. Tuberculosis incidence in the studied communities was ninefold higher than that of the general population from Antioquia Department. Knowledge exchange could facilitate the community empowerment and implementation of educational activities which might improve the control of the disease.

  3. Use of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in the Diagnosis and Monitoring of Treatment Efficacy in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Wang, Pin-Hui; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The value of QuantiFERON in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and in the monitoring of the response to anti-tuberculosis treatment is unclear. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and in the monitoring of the response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Between January 2013 and December 2015, 133 cases with active PTB and 133 controls with no mycobacterial infection, matched by age (within 3 years) and by the week that they visited Tainan Chest Hospital, were enrolled in the study. Serial testing by QFT-GIT at baseline and after 2 and 6 months of treatment was performed. At these time points, a comparison of the performance of QFT-GIT with that of sputum culture status among study subjects was conducted. Compared to baseline, 116 (87.2%) cases showed a decreased response, whereas 17 (12.8%) showed persistent or stronger interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses at 2 months. PTB patients IFN-γ responses declined significantly from baseline to 2 months (median, 6.32 vs. 4.12; p < 0.005). The sensitivity values of the QFT-GIT test for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis at cut-off points of 0.35 IU/mL, 0.20 IU/mL, and 0.10 IU/mL were 74.4%, 78.2%, and 80.5%, respectively. The specificity values at cut-off points of 0.35 IU/mL, 0.20 IU/mL, and 0.10 IU/mL were 66.2%, 63.9%, and 57.1%, respectively. Our results support the QFT-GIT assay as a potential tool for diagnosing tuberculosis and for monitoring the efficacy of anti-tuberculosis treatment. PMID:28264462

  4. Cytokine profile during latent and slowly progressive primary tuberculosis: a possible role for interleukin-15 in mediating clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Abebe, F; Mustafa, T; Nerland, A H; Bjune, G A

    2006-01-01

    Recently, mouse models for latent (LTB) and slowly progressive primary tuberculosis (SPTB) have been established. However, cytokine profiles during the two models are not well established. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) we studied the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha during the course of LTB and SPTB in the lungs and spleens of B6D2F1Bom mice infected with the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The results show that, except for IL-4, cytokine expression levels were significantly higher during SPTB than LTB in both the lungs and spleens. During LTB, all the cytokines (except IL-2 in the lungs) had higher expression levels during the initial period of infection both in the lungs and spleens. During SPTB, the expression levels of IL-15 increased significantly from phases 1 to 3 in the lungs. The expression levels of IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased significantly from 2 to 3 in the lungs. IL-10 and IL-15 increased significantly from phases 2 to 3, whereas that of TNF-alpha decreased significantly and progressively from phases 1 to 3 in the spleens. Over-expression of proinflammatory cytokines during active disease has been well documented, but factor(s) underlying such over-expression is not known. In the present study, there was a progressive and significant increase in the expression levels of IL-15, together with Th1 cytokines (IL-12 and IFN-gamma) during SPTB but a significant decrease during LTB. IL-15 is known to up-regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha and has an inhibitory effect on activation-induced cell death. IL-15 is known to be involved in many proinflammatory disease states such as rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune diabetes, etc. Our results, together with the above observations

  5. Role of the Infectious Disease Consultant in Management of Patients With Tuberculosis-Associated Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Marjorie M.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Wongskhaluang, Jeff V.; Ferenchak, Kevin; Asano, Matthew K.; Becker, Norbert; DeMarais, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a disease with continued worldwide prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Tuberculosis-associated ocular inflammation (TB-AOI) is a manifestation that can occur with pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB. Evaluation of these ocular presentations and treatment in the United States are limited. Our objective was to describe cases in an urban area and assess the role of the infectious diseases specialist in managing these complex patients. Methods. We performed a retrospective case series of all patients referred to our infectious disease clinic for presumed TB-AOI from 2005 through 2013. Patients with ocular inflammation were determined to have presumed TB-AOI based on clinical presentation with correlative positive tuberculin skin test and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold. Attempts were made to exclude other diagnoses. Data were collected and analyzed with respect to demographics, ocular manifestations, and treatment. Results. Sixty eyes of 42 patients were included in the study; anterior uveitis was the most common site of involvement. The median age was 46 years, and 33 patients (79%) were foreign born. Forty patients (95%) received a course of antituberculous therapy with 38% experiencing treatment-related side effects. A 6-month duration was recommended in 78% cases. There was improvement or stability of the vision in 42 eyes (74%) of those treated. Conclusions. Ocular involvement is an uncommon but important manifestation of TB. Our data further characterize TB-AOI cases in the United States. Treatment provides significant benefit to properly selected patients. A multidisciplinary approach, with care provided by ophthalmology and infectious disease providers, should be used to allow for the most efficacious treatment. PMID:26811844

  6. Relevance of bovine tuberculosis research to the understanding of human disease: Historical perspectives, approaches, and immunologic mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pioneer studies on infectious disease and immunology by Jenner, Pasteur, Koch, Von Behring, Nocard, Roux, and Ehrlich forged a path for the dual-purpose with dual benefit approach, demonstrating a profound relevance of veterinary studies for biomedical applications. Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due ...

  7. Mycotic aneurysm and subarachnoid hemorrhage following tubercular meningitis in an infant with congenital tuberculosis and cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kirti; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Suri, Deepti; Sharma, Kusum; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Singhi, Pratibha

    2012-10-01

    We describe autopsy findings in a 5-month-old infant with disseminated tuberculosis and congenital cytomegalovirus disease. The infant manifested with tubercular meningitis complicating as ruptured mycotic right middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Infiltrative, proliferative, and necrotizing vascular pathologies have been described; however, the occurrence of these is dependent on the duration of illness. The vessel pathology appears to be a payback of its immersion in the local inflammatory cell-rich exudates. Strokes early in the course of the disease are believed to be a consequence of vasospasm, and those occurring later during the disease course are due to proliferative intimal disease. Intracranial mycotic aneurysm following tubercular meningitis developing at such a young age has not been reported in the literature. The lung lesions in a congenitally transmitted tuberculosis and cytomegalovirus disease have also been elaborated.

  8. Role of casual contacts in the recent transmission of tuberculosis in settings with high disease burden

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibing; Mathema, Barun; Hu, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Weili, Jiang; Xu, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is expected that combining multiple molecular methods will further help in focusing contact investigations. We performed a population-based molecular epidemiologic study in 6 sites in China between 1 June 2009 and 31 December 2010. A genotyping method combining 7-loci MIRU-VNTR and IS6110-based RFLP was employed to determine predictors of recent transmission. A second interview was performed with the clustered patients to identify potential epidemiological links. The molecular clustering analysis revealed that 187 isolates (15.3%) were clustered by sharing identical VNTR-IS6110 combined patterns, with an estimated recent transmission index being 8.9%. None of these patients reported having contacts with other members within the same cluster. Nineteen of 121 reported having a history of contact to a TB case within 2 years before the current TB diagnosis. Additionally, geographic correlation was established for 19 cases in 9 clusters, while only one possible epidemiological link was established in secondary interview. The results underscore the role of casual contact or reactivation of latent TB as a driving factor maintaining the current endemicity in rural China with high disease burdens of tuberculosis. PMID:24941878

  9. Pseudo-Behçet's disease associated with tuberculosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koichiro; Hayashi, Ryuji; Taki, Hirofumi; Hounoki, Hiroyuki; Makino, Teruhiko; Nomoto, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Orogenital ulcer is one of the clinical manifestations of Behçet's disease (BD). However, orogenital ulcer may be observed in various conditions, such as complex aphthous dermatitis and herpes simplex virus infections. Therefore, orogenital ulcer along with skin lesions, including acne or erythema nodosum, may be misdiagnosed as BD, but is actually pseudo-BD instead. We report here a case of pseudo-BD due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in which anti-tuberculous treatment resulted in complete resolution. Furthermore, we review the literature regarding the association of BD and M. tuberculosis infection.

  10. Factors causing delay of access to tuberculosis diagnosis among new, active tuberculosis patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shu, Wen; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Shiyu; Hou, Yongchun; Mei, Jian; Bai, Liqiong; Xu, Weiguo; Zhou, Lin; Nie, Shaofa; Cheng, Shiming; Xu, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined, in a prospective cohort study, factors causing delay of access to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis among new, active TB patients. A prospective cohort study (2009-2011) was carried out among 408 889 Chinese. Data on known/potential influencing factors were obtained from baseline questionnaires. We used stepwise logistic regression models to analyze the association between several known/potential influencing factors and diagnosis delay, assessed the current situation, and explored determinants of diagnosis delay. During follow-up and final visits, 202 new, active TB patients were found. Median patient delay was 5.4 (quartile 2.7-26) weeks, health system delay was 0 (quartile 0-1.6) weeks, and diagnosis delay was 9.9 (quartile 3.1-28.1) weeks. The influencing factors on patient delay were age and duration of symptoms. Smoking and sputum smear status were influencing factors for health system delay, and duration of symptoms was one of the factors for diagnosis delay. These findings provide information on the current situation of diagnosis delay and evidence for specific strategy development for TB control in China.

  11. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences, Results, and Implications for Tuberculosis Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Guesly J.; Fort, Dumesle St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Haiti has the highest tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in the Americas with 254 cases per 100,000 persons. Case detection relies on passive detection and TB services in many regions suffer from poor diagnostic and clinical resources. Methods. Mache Chache (“Go and Seek”) was a TB REACH Wave 3 funded TB case finding project in Port-au-Prince between July 2013 and September 2014, targeting four intervention areas with insufficient TB diagnostic performance. Results. Based on a verbal symptom screen emphasizing the presence of cough, the project identified 11,150 (11.75%) of all screened persons as TB subjects and 2.67% as smear-positive (SS+) TB cases. Enhanced case finding and strengthening of laboratory services led to a 59% increase in bacteriologically confirmed cases in the evaluation population. In addition, smear grades dropped significantly, suggesting earlier case detection. Xpert® MTB/RIF was successfully introduced and improved TB diagnosis in HIV-infected, smear-negative clinic patients, but not in HIV-negative, smear-negative TB suspects in the community. However, the number needed to screen for one additional SS+ case varied widely between clinic and community screening activities. Conclusion. Enhanced and active TB case finding in Haiti can improve TB diagnosis and care. However, screening algorithms have to be tailored to individual settings, necessitating long-term commitment. PMID:27668093

  12. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  13. [Health examination in future at the era of low tuberculosis incidence--from contacts examination toward active epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideo; Shirai, Chika

    2013-03-01

    Japan is still "intermediate burden" country as medium-incidence of tuberculosis (TB). But the incidence of TB varies by public health units. The priority for TB control would be lowering in the areas where the incidence of TB is relatively low. In addition, younger age groups get low prevalence of TB infection than elderly persons. As a result, fewer experiences for TB diagnosis and treatment in the hospital and the medical facility would cause the delay in the detection of TB patients which eventually cause outbreaks. Although there are differences in population density and population mobility between urban and rural areas, the socially economic vulnerable patients and foreign patients are the common risks. Any public health units' policies of TB should correspond to the individual situation. At the era of low tuberculosis incidence, the infection risk is to be "From ubiquitous to the uneven distribution". This makes TB detection much more difficult. At this symposium, each speaker presented the case for actually experienced with QFT test and/or VNTR analysis. They mainly focused on the paradigm shift in TB control which is indispensable for resolving the gaps in regional differences and the differences in diagnostic capability. Although the cases in this symposium were not for the low incidence situation, the pioneering approaches presented here would boost the future application of QFT and VNTR analysis nationwide. The discussions also partially covered the technical infrastructure for molecular epidemiology which covers the whole country. By making full use of QFT test and VNTR analysis as a contact screening tool, we can appropriately understand the risk of TB infection in the region from a buildup of bacteria and patient information. Now is the time to prepare for. Active surveillance of TB by this way would clarify the risk of the disease and lead to the advocacy essential for the resolution. 1. Current situation and challenge of contact survey by using QFT

  14. Transmission and Progression to Disease of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phylogenetic Lineages in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Verhagen, Lilly M; Borgdorff, Martien W; van Soolingen, Dick

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if mycobacterial lineages affect infection risk, clustering, and disease progression among Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases in The Netherlands. Multivariate negative binomial regression models adjusted for patient-related factors and stratified by patient ethnicity were used to determine the association between phylogenetic lineages and infectivity (mean number of positive contacts around each patient) and clustering (as defined by number of secondary cases within 2 years after diagnosis of an index case sharing the same fingerprint) indices. An estimate of progression to disease by each risk factor was calculated as a bootstrapped risk ratio of the clustering index by the infectivity index. Compared to the Euro-American reference, Mycobacterium africanum showed significantly lower infectivity and clustering indices in the foreign-born population, while Mycobacterium bovis showed significantly lower infectivity and clustering indices in the native population. Significantly lower infectivity was also observed for the East African Indian lineage in the foreign-born population. Smear positivity was a significant risk factor for increased infectivity and increased clustering. Estimates of progression to disease were significantly associated with age, sputum-smear status, and behavioral risk factors, such as alcohol and intravenous drug abuse, but not with phylogenetic lineages. In conclusion, we found evidence of a bacteriological factor influencing indicators of a strain's transmissibility, namely, a decreased ability to infect and a lower clustering index in ancient phylogenetic lineages compared to their modern counterparts. Confirmation of these findings via follow-up studies using tuberculin skin test conversion data should have important implications on M. tuberculosis control efforts.

  15. Transmission and Progression to Disease of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phylogenetic Lineages in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Lilly M.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; van Soolingen, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if mycobacterial lineages affect infection risk, clustering, and disease progression among Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases in The Netherlands. Multivariate negative binomial regression models adjusted for patient-related factors and stratified by patient ethnicity were used to determine the association between phylogenetic lineages and infectivity (mean number of positive contacts around each patient) and clustering (as defined by number of secondary cases within 2 years after diagnosis of an index case sharing the same fingerprint) indices. An estimate of progression to disease by each risk factor was calculated as a bootstrapped risk ratio of the clustering index by the infectivity index. Compared to the Euro-American reference, Mycobacterium africanum showed significantly lower infectivity and clustering indices in the foreign-born population, while Mycobacterium bovis showed significantly lower infectivity and clustering indices in the native population. Significantly lower infectivity was also observed for the East African Indian lineage in the foreign-born population. Smear positivity was a significant risk factor for increased infectivity and increased clustering. Estimates of progression to disease were significantly associated with age, sputum-smear status, and behavioral risk factors, such as alcohol and intravenous drug abuse, but not with phylogenetic lineages. In conclusion, we found evidence of a bacteriological factor influencing indicators of a strain's transmissibility, namely, a decreased ability to infect and a lower clustering index in ancient phylogenetic lineages compared to their modern counterparts. Confirmation of these findings via follow-up studies using tuberculin skin test conversion data should have important implications on M. tuberculosis control efforts. PMID:26224845

  16. Contribution of efflux activity to isoniazid resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to isoniazid (INH), one of the main drugs used in tuberculosis (TB) therapy, is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in target genes. However, approximately 20-30% of INH resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates do not have mutations in any of the genes associated with INH resistance. This suggests that other mechanism(s) may be involved, namely efflux pump systems capable of extruding the drug to the exterior of the cell. In a previous work, we have induced clinical INH susceptible M. tuberculosis isolates and the H37Rv reference strain to high-level resistance to INH, by gradual exposure to increasing concentrations of this drug. In the present study, we have characterized these strains and Mycobacterium bovis BCG induced to INH resistance with respect to their efflux activity and its contribution to INH resistance using the following approach: determination of the susceptibility to INH in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors (EIs) chlorpromazine, thioridazine and verapamil; evaluation of efflux activity by a semi-automated fluorometric method; and quantification of the expression level of genes coding for efflux pumps by real-time RT-qPCR. The EIs decreased INH resistance in the INH induced strains, in particular verapamil promoted a reversal of resistance in some of the strains tested. The induced strains presented an increased efflux activity that was inhibited by the EIs and showed overexpression of the efflux pump genes efpA, mmpL7, mmr, p55 and the Tap-like gene Rv1258c. Altogether, these results correlate efflux activity with INH resistance and demonstrate that efflux pumps play an important role in acquired INH resistance in M. tuberculosis complex. The development of EIs that can restore the antimicrobial activity of the antibiotic subject to efflux is an approach that can be useful in order to prevent the emergence of this resistance and guide the development of new effective anti-TB therapeutical approaches.

  17. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  18. Deregulated microRNAs in CD4+ T cells from individuals with latent tuberculosis versus active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Li, Jianhua; Li, Ruifang

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection remain elusive. Roles of microRNA (miRNA) have been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify miRNAs involved in the immune response to TB, expression profiles of miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells from patients with latent TB, active TB and healthy controls were investigated by microarray assay and validated by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were used to analyse the significant functions and involvement in signalling pathways of the differentially expressed miRNAs. To identify potential target genes for miR-29, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression was measured by RT-qPCR. Our results showed that 27 miRNAs were deregulated among the three groups. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. We observed an inverse correlation between miR-29 level and IFN-γ mRNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that the possible target genes of deregulated miRNAs were significantly enriched in mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway, focal adhesion and extracellular matrix receptor interaction, which might be involved in the transition from latent to active TB. In all, for the first time, our study revealed that some miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells were altered in latent and active TB. Function and pathway analysis highlighted the possible involvement of miRNA-deregulated mRNAs in TB. The study might help to improve understanding of the relationship between miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells and TB, and laid an important foundation for further identification of the underlying mechanisms of latent TB infection and its reactivation.

  19. Control measures to trace ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; de Melo, Angelita Cristine; de Oliveira, Lílian Ruth Silva; Froede, Emerson Lopes; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This was descriptive study carried out in a medium-sized Brazilian city. In ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, we assessed compliance with the Brazilian national guidelines for tuberculosis control. We interviewed 43 contacts and their legal guardians. Approximately 80% of the contacts were not assessed by the municipal public health care system, and only 21% underwent tuberculin skin testing. The results obtained with the Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector method suggest that health care teams have a biased attitude toward assessing such contacts and underscore the need for training health professionals regarding tuberculosis control programs. PMID:26578137

  20. New approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With nearly 9 million new active disease cases and 2 million deaths occurring worldwide every year, tuberculosis continues to remain a major public health problem. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to active disease in only ~10% people. An effective immune response in remaining individuals stops M. tuberculosis multiplication. However, the pathogen is completely eradicated in ~10% people while others only succeed in containment of infection as some bacilli escape killing and remain in non-replicating (dormant) state (latent tuberculosis infection) in old lesions. The dormant bacilli can resuscitate and cause active disease if a disruption of immune response occurs. Nearly one-third of world population is latently infected with M. tuberculosis and 5%-10% of infected individuals will develop active disease during their life time. However, the risk of developing active disease is greatly increased (5%-15% every year and ~50% over lifetime) by human immunodeficiency virus-coinfection. While active transmission is a significant contributor of active disease cases in high tuberculosis burden countries, most active disease cases in low tuberculosis incidence countries arise from this pool of latently infected individuals. A positive tuberculin skin test or a more recent and specific interferon-gamma release assay in a person without overt signs of active disease indicates latent tuberculosis infection. Two commercial interferon-gamma release assays, QFT-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB have been developed. The standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection is daily therapy with isoniazid for nine months. Other options include therapy with rifampicin for 4 months or isoniazid + rifampicin for 3 months or rifampicin + pyrazinamide for 2 months or isoniazid + rifapentine for 3 months. Identification of latently infected individuals and their treatment has lowered tuberculosis incidence in rich, advanced countries. Similar approaches also hold great promise for other

  1. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  2. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  3. In vitro and in vivo activities of the nitroimidazole CGI 17341 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, D R; Costa-Perira, R; Nagrajan, K; Vishvanathan, N; Bhatt, A D; Rittel, W

    1993-01-01

    CGI 17341 (2-ethyl-5-nitro-2,3-dihydro[2-1b]imidazo-oxazole) is a novel orally active representative of the 5-nitroimidazole series of antimicrobial agents. At concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 micrograms/ml, CGI 17341 inhibited the drug-susceptible and multi-drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. CGI 17341 had no cross-resistance with isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, or ethambutol. While the in vitro activity of CGI 17341 against M. tuberculosis was comparable to those of isoniazid and rifampin, it was superior to those of streptomycin, ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin, and oxazolidinone DuP 721. The MIC of CGI 17341 was not affected when the pH of the medium was decreased from 6.8 to 5.6, while four- to sixfold increases in the MICs of ciprofloxacin and isoniazid were observed. In mice infected with M. tuberculosis, the 50% effective dose for CGI 17341 was 7.7 mg/kg of body weight (95% confidence limits, 3.5 and 10.27) when administered on days 11 and 12 postinfection. CGI 17341 gave a dose-dependent (r = 0.995) and significant increase in the survival time. Our data indicate that the 5-nitroimidazole CGI 17341 is a promising and novel antituberculosis compound with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Further investigations on this compound are warranted. PMID:8452346

  4. Clinical management of concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis and the implications for patient services

    PubMed Central

    Riza, Anca Lelia; Pearson, Fiona; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van de Vijver, Steven; Panduru, Nicolae M; Hill, Philip C; Ruslami, Rovina; Moore, David; Aarnoutse, Rob; Critchley, Julia A; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes triples the risk for active tuberculosis, thus the increasing burden of type 2 diabetes will help to sustain the present tuberculosis epidemic. Recommendations have been made for bidirectional screening, but evidence is scarce about the performance of specific tuberculosis tests in individuals with diabetes, specific diabetes tests in patients with tuberculosis, and screening and preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infections in individuals with diabetes. Clinical management of patients with both diseases can be difficult. Tuberculosis patients with diabetes have a lower concentration of tuberculosis drugs and a higher risk of drug toxicity than tuberculosis patients without diabetes. Good glycaemic control, which reduces long-term diabetes complications and could also improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes, is hampered by chronic inflammation, drug-drug interactions, suboptimum adherence to drug treatments, and other factors. Besides drug treatments for tuberculosis and diabetes, other interventions, such as education, intensive monitoring, and lifestyle interventions, might be needed, especially for patients with newly diagnosed diabetes or those who need insulin. From a health systems point of view, delivery of optimum care and integration of services for tuberculosis and diabetes is a huge challenge in many countries. Experience from the combined tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS epidemic could serve as an example, but more studies are needed that include economic assessments of recommended screening and systems to manage concurrent tuberculosis and diabetes. PMID:25194887

  5. Clinical management of concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis and the implications for patient services.

    PubMed

    Riza, Anca Lelia; Pearson, Fiona; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van de Vijver, Steven; Panduru, Nicolae M; Hill, Philip C; Ruslami, Rovina; Moore, David; Aarnoutse, Rob; Critchley, Julia A; van Crevel, Reinout

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes triples the risk for active tuberculosis, thus the increasing burden of type 2 diabetes will help to sustain the present tuberculosis epidemic. Recommendations have been made for bidirectional screening, but evidence is scarce about the performance of specific tuberculosis tests in individuals with diabetes, specific diabetes tests in patients with tuberculosis, and screening and preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infections in individuals with diabetes. Clinical management of patients with both diseases can be difficult. Tuberculosis patients with diabetes have a lower concentration of tuberculosis drugs and a higher risk of drug toxicity than tuberculosis patients without diabetes. Good glycaemic control, which reduces long-term diabetes complications and could also improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes, is hampered by chronic inflammation, drug-drug interactions, suboptimum adherence to drug treatments, and other factors. Besides drug treatments for tuberculosis and diabetes, other interventions, such as education, intensive monitoring, and lifestyle interventions, might be needed, especially for patients with newly diagnosed diabetes or those who need insulin. From a health systems point of view, delivery of optimum care and integration of services for tuberculosis and diabetes is a huge challenge in many countries. Experience from the combined tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS epidemic could serve as an example, but more studies are needed that include economic assessments of recommended screening and systems to manage concurrent tuberculosis and diabetes.

  6. Risk of disease from wildlife reservoirs: badgers, cattle, and bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Scantlebury, M; Hutchings, M R; Allcroft, D J; Harris, S

    2004-02-01

    Livestock face complex foraging options associated with optimizing nutrient intake while being able to avoid areas posing risk of parasites or disease. Areas of tall nutrient-rich swards around fecal deposits may be attractive for grazing, but might incur fitness costs from parasites. We use the example of dairy cattle and the risks of tuberculosis transmission posed to them by pastures contaminated with badger excreta to examine this trade-off. A risk may be posed either by aerosolized inhalation through investigation or by ingestion via grazing contaminated swards. We quantified the levels of investigation and grazing of 150 dairy cows at badger latrines (accumulations of feces and urine) and crossing points (urination-only sites). Grazing behavior was compared between strip-grazed and rotation-grazed fields. Strip grazing had fields subdivided for grazing periods of <24 h, whereas rotational grazing involved access to whole fields for 1 to 7 d each. A higher proportion of the herd investigated badger latrines than crossing points or controls. Cattle initially avoided swards around badger latrines but not around crossing points. Avoidance periods were shorter in strip-compared with rotation-grazing systems. In rotation-grazing management, latrines were avoided for longer times, but there were more investigative contacts than with strip-grazing management. If investigation is a major route of tuberculosis transmission, the risk to cattle is greatest in extensive rotation-grazing systems. However, if ingestion of fresh urine is the primary method of transmission, strip-grazing management may pose a greater threat. Farming systems affect the level and type of contact between livestock and wildlife excreta and thus the risks of disease.

  7. Ocular inflammatory disease and ocular tuberculosis in a cohort of patients co-infected with HIV and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence and the patterns of ocular inflammatory disease and ocular tuberculosis (TB) are largely undocumented among Multidrug Resistant TB (MDR-TB) patients co-infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Lilavati Hospital and Research Center and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) organized a cross-sectional ophthalmological evaluation of HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients followed in an MSF-run HIV-clinic in Mumbai, India, which included measuring visual acuity, and slit lamp and dilated fundus examinations. Results Between February and April 2012, 47 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients (including three patients with extensively drug-resistant TB) were evaluated. Sixty-four per cent were male, mean age was 39 years (standard deviation: 8.7) and their median (IQR) CD4 count at the time of evaluation was 264 cells/μL (158–361). Thirteen patients (27%) had detectable levels of HIV viremia (>20 copies/ml). Overall, examination of the anterior segments was normal in 45/47 patients (96%). A dilated fundus examination revealed active ocular inflammatory disease in seven eyes of seven patients (15.5%, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI); 5.1-25.8%). ‘These included five eyes of five patients (10%) with choroidal tubercles, one eye of one patient (2%) with presumed tubercular chorioretinitis and one eye of one patient (2%) with evidence of presumed active CMV retinitis. Presumed ocular tuberculosis was thus seen in a total of six patients (12.7%, 95% CI; 3.2-22.2%). Two patients who had completed anti-TB treatment had active ocular inflammatory disease, in the form of choroidal tubercles (two eyes of two patients). Inactive scars were seen in three eyes of three patients (6%). Patients with extrapulmonary TB and patients <39 years old were at significantly higher risk of having ocular TB [Risk Ratio: 13.65 (95% CI: 2.4-78.5) and 6.38 (95% CI: 1.05-38.8) respectively]. Conclusions Ocular

  8. The Activity of a Hexameric M17 Metallo-Aminopeptidase Is Associated With Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andre F.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Neves, David; Kipnis, Andre; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana P.; de Santana, Jaime M.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent human pathogens causing millions of deaths in the last years. Moreover, tuberculosis (TB) treatment has become increasingly challenging owing to the emergence of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Thus, there is an immediate need for the development of new anti-TB drugs. Proteases appear to be a promising approach and may lead to shortened and effective treatments for drug-resistant TB. Although the M. tuberculosis genome predicts more than 100 genes encoding proteases, only a few of them have been studied. Aminopeptidases constitute a set of proteases that selectively remove amino acids from the N-terminus of proteins and peptides and may act as virulence factors, essential for survival and maintenance of many microbial pathogens. Here, we characterized a leucine aminopeptidase of M. tuberculosis (MtLAP) as a cytosolic oligomeric metallo-aminopeptidase. Molecular and enzymatic properties lead us to classify MtLAP as a typical member of the peptidase family M17. Furthermore, the aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin strongly inhibited MtLAP activity, in vitro M. tuberculosis growth and macrophage infection. In murine model of TB, bestatin treatment reduced bacterial burden and lesion in the lungs of infected mice. Thus, our data suggest that MtLAP participates in important metabolic pathways of M. tuberculosis necessary for its survival and virulence and consequently may be a promising target for new anti-TB drugs.

  9. Review of genitourinary tuberculosis with focus on end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Neiberg A; Vasconcelos, Carol C; Filgueira, Pedro Henrique O; Kretzmann, Meissa; Sindeaux, Ticiano A S; Feitosa Neto, Beni; Silva Junior, Geraldo B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious disease. Recent studies indicate that genitourinary TB is the third most common form of extra-pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of renal TB can be hypothesized in a non-specific bacterial cystitis associated with a therapeutic failure or a urinalysis with a persistent leukocyturia in the absence of bacteriuria. We report on the case of a 33-year-old man who presented on admission end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to renal TB and a past history of pulmonary TB with important radiologic findings. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings despite all cultures being negative. Empiric treatment with tuberculostatic drugs was started and the patient became stable. He was discharged with no symptom, but without renal function recovery. He is on maintenance hemodialysis three times a week. TB is an important cause of kidney disease and can lead to irreversible renal function loss.

  10. Dilution effect in bovine tuberculosis: risk factors for regional disease occurrence in Africa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng Y X; de Boer, Willem F; van Langevelde, Frank; Xu, Chi; Ben Jebara, Karim; Berlingieri, Francesco; Prins, Herbert H T

    2013-08-22

    Changes in host diversity have been postulated to influence the risk of infectious diseases, including both dilution and amplification effects. The dilution effect refers to a negative relationship between biodiversity and disease risk, whereas the amplification effect occurs when biodiversity increases disease risk. We tested these effects with an influential disease, bovine tuberculosis (BTB), which is widespread in many countries, causing severe economic losses. Based on the BTB outbreak data in cattle from 2005 to 2010, we also tested, using generalized linear mixed models, which other factors were associated with the regional BTB presence in cattle in Africa. The interdependencies of predictors and their correlations with BTB presence were examined using path analysis. Our results suggested a dilution effect, where increased mammal species richness was associated with reduced probability of BTB presence after adjustment for cattle density. In addition, our results also suggested that areas with BTB infection in the preceding year, higher cattle density and larger percentage of area occupied by African buffalo were more likely to report BTB outbreaks. Climatic variables only indirectly influenced the risk of BTB presence through their effects on cattle density and wildlife distribution. Since most studies investigating the role of wildlife species on BTB transmission only involve single-species analysis, more efforts are needed to better understand the effect of the structure of wildlife communities on BTB dynamics.

  11. Tuberculosis Disease during Pregnancy and Treatment Outcomes in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Women at a Referral Hospital in Cape Town

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, Adrie; Schaaf, Hendrik S.; Draper, Heather R.; Kriel, Magdalena; Hesseling, Anneke C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis during pregnancy and treatment outcomes are poorly defined in high prevalence tuberculosis and HIV settings. Methods A prospective cohort study of pregnant and postpartum women identified to be routinely on antituberculosis treatment was conducted at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, from January 2011 through December 2011. Maternal tuberculosis disease spectrum and tuberculosis-exposed newborns were characterized by maternal HIV status. Maternal tuberculosis treatment outcomes were documented and a multivariable regression model identified predictors of unfavourable tuberculosis treatment outcomes. Infant outcomes were also described. Results Seventy-four women with tuberculosis, 53 (72%) HIV-infected, were consecutively enrolled; 35 (47%) were diagnosed at delivery or postpartum and 22 (30%) of women reported previous antituberculosis treatment. HIV-infected women were 5.67 times more likely to have extrapulmonary tuberculosis (95% CI 1.18–27.25, p = 0.03). All 5 maternal deaths were amongst HIV-infected women. Birth outcomes were available for 75 newborns (2 sets of twins, missing data for 1 stillbirth). Of the 75 newborns, 49 (65%) were premature and 44 (59%) were low birth weight (LBW; <2500 grams). All 6 infants who died and the 4 stillbirths were born to HIV-infected women. Unfavourable tuberculosis treatment outcomes were documented in 33/74 (45%) women. Unfavourable maternal tuberculosis outcome was associated with delivery of LBW infants (OR 3.83; 95% CI 1.40–10.53, p = 0.009). Conclusions A large number of pregnant women with tuberculosis presented at a provincial referral hospital. All maternal and infant deaths occurred in HIV-infected women and their newborns. Maternal tuberculosis treatment outcomes were poor. PMID:27812086

  12. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  13. Treatment of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Adults: Current Standards and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ronald G.; Leff, Richard D.; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a global pandemic, with 9 million new cases of the disease and approximately 2 million deaths each year. More than 98% of patients treated for tuberculosis in the United States between 1993 and 2007 had drug-susceptible strains. The standard treatment regimen for drug-susceptible tuberculosis has not changed in decades and was developed on the basis of empiric observations of different treatment regimens. Only recently has the veracity of the scientific basis for standard therapy been examined. The backbone of therapy is still isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide, although fluoroquinolones are being investigated as a replacement for isoniazid. Recent population pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated the importance of individualized dosing of isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampin. Isoniazid serum clearance differs depending on the patient’s number of N-acetyltransferase 2 gene *4 (NAT2*4) alleles. Pyrazinamide serum clearance has been shown to increase with increases in body weight. Rifampin’s volume of distribution, clearance, and absorption have wide between-patient and within-patient variability. Microbial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indexes and targets to optimize microbial killing and minimize resistance have been identified for rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and the fluoroquinolones. These PK-PD indexes suggest that different doses and dosing schedules than those currently recommended could optimize therapy and perhaps shorten duration of therapy. Efflux pump inhibition is also being investigated to enhance first-line antituberculosis drug therapy. Comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus and genetically determined iron overload syndromes have been associated with significantly worse patient outcomes. Therapy for these and other patient groups needs further improvement. These patient factors, the covariates for pharmacokinetic variability, and PK-PD factors suggest the need to individualize therapy for patients with

  14. Experience of active tuberculosis case finding in nearly 5 million households in India.

    PubMed

    Prasad, B M; Satyanarayana, S; Chadha, S S; Das, A; Thapa, B; Mohanty, S; Pandurangan, S; Babu, E R; Tonsing, J; Sachdeva, K S

    2016-03-21

    In India, to increase tuberculosis (TB) case detection under the National Tuberculosis Programme, active case finding (ACF) was implemented by the Global Fund-supported Project Axshya, among high-risk groups in 300 districts. Between April 2013 and December 2014, 4.9 million households covering ~20 million people were visited. Of 350 047 presumptive pulmonary TB cases (cough of ⩾2 weeks) identified, 187 586 (54%) underwent sputum smear examination and 14 447 (8%) were found to be smear-positive. ACF resulted in the detection of a large number of persons with presumptive pulmonary TB and smear-positive TB. Ensuring sputum examination of all those with presumptive TB was a major challenge.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-associated tuberculosis in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: strain predominance, clustering, and polyclonal disease.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lisa V; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Arbeit, Robert D; Soini, Hanna; Mtei, Lillian; Matee, Mecky; Bakari, Muhammad; Lahey, Timothy; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Shashkina, Elena; Kurepina, Natalia; Driscoll, Jeffrey R; Pallangyo, Kisali; Horsburgh, C Robert; von Reyn, C Fordham

    2012-08-01

    Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be used to elucidate the epidemiology of tuberculosis, including the rates of clustering, the frequency of polyclonal disease, and the distribution of genotypic families. We performed IS6110 typing and spoligotyping on M. tuberculosis strains isolated from HIV-infected subjects at baseline or during follow-up in the DarDar Trial in Tanzania and on selected community isolates. Clustering occurred in 203 (74%) of 275 subjects: 124 (80%) of 155 HIV-infected subjects with baseline isolates, 56 (69%) of 81 HIV-infected subjects with endpoint isolates, and 23 (59%) of 39 community controls. Overall, 113 (41%) subjects had an isolate representing the East Indian "GD" family. The rate of clustering was similar among vaccine and placebo recipients and among subjects with or without cellular immune responses to mycobacterial antigens. Polyclonal disease was detected in 6 (43%) of 14 patients with multiple specimens typed. Most cases of HIV-associated tuberculosis among subjects from this study in Dar es Salaam resulted from recently acquired infection. Polyclonal infection was detected and isolates representing the East Indian GD strain family were the most common.

  16. INCIDENCE OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS DISEASE IN CHILDREN: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND GLOBAL ESTIMATES

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Helen E.; Tolman, Arielle W.; Yuen, Courtney M.; Parr, Jonathan B.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Pérez-Vélez, Carlos M.; Pagano, Marcello; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Cohen, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) threatens to reverse recent reductions in global tuberculosis (TB) incidence. Although children under 15 years of age constitute >25% of the worldwide population, the global incidence of MDR-TB disease in children has never been quantified. Methods Our approach for estimating regional and global annual incidence of MDR-TB in children required development of two models: one to estimate the setting-specific risk of MDR-TB among child TB cases, and a second to estimate the setting-specific incidence of TB disease in children. The model for MDR-TB risk among children with TB required a systematic literature review. We multiplied the setting-specific estimates of MDR-TB risk and TB incidence to estimate regional and global incidence of MDR-TB disease in children in 2010. Findings We identified 3,403 papers, of which 97 studies met inclusion criteria for the systematic review of MDR-TB risk. Thirty-one studies reported the risk of MDR-TB among both children and treatment-naïve adults with TB and were used for evaluating the linear association between MDR-TB risk in these two patient groups. We found that the setting-specific risk of MDR-TB was nearly identical in children and treatment-naïve adults with TB, consistent with the assertion that MDR-TB in both groups reflects the local risk of transmitted MDR-TB. Applying these calculated risks, we estimated that around 1,000,000 (95% Confidence Interval: 938,000 – 1,055,000) children developed TB disease in 2010, among whom 32,000 (95% Confidence Interval: 26,000 – 39,000) had MDR-TB. Interpretation Our estimates highlight a massive detection gap for children with TB and MDR-TB disease. Future estimates can be refined as more and better TB data and new diagnostic tools become available. PMID:24671080

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  18. Reduced frequency of memory T cells and increased Th17 responses in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marín, Nancy D; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4(+) CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and an increased frequency of CD4(+) CD45RO(-) CD27(+) T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response.

  19. Reduced Frequency of Memory T Cells and Increased Th17 Responses in Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; París, Sara C.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4+ CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and an increased frequency of CD4+ CD45RO− CD27+ T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response. PMID:22914361

  20. miRNA Signatures in Sera of Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Ilaria C.; Norbis, Luca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bosu, Roberta; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Codecasa, Luigi R.; Goletti, Delia; Matteelli, Alberto; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Aloi, Francesco; Heinrich, Norbert; Reither, Klaus; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies showed that assessing levels of specific circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) is a non-invasive, rapid, and accurate method for diagnosing diseases or detecting alterations in physiological conditions. We aimed to identify a serum miRNA signature to be used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). To account for variations due to the genetic makeup, we enrolled adults from two study settings in Europe and Africa. The following categories of subjects were considered: healthy (H), active pulmonary TB (PTB), active pulmonary TB, HIV co-infected (PTB/HIV), latent TB infection (LTBI), other pulmonary infections (OPI), and active extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). Sera from 10 subjects of the same category were pooled and, after total RNA extraction, screened for miRNA levels by TaqMan low-density arrays. After identification of “relevant miRNAs”, we refined the serum miRNA signature discriminating between H and PTB on individual subjects. Signatures were analyzed for their diagnostic performances using a multivariate logistic model and a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model. A leave-one-out-cross-validation (LOOCV) approach was adopted for assessing how both models could perform in practice. The analysis on pooled specimens identified selected miRNAs as discriminatory for the categories analyzed. On individual serum samples, we showed that 15 miRNAs serve as signature for H and PTB categories with a diagnostic accuracy of 82% (CI 70.2–90.0), and 77% (CI 64.2–85.9) in a RVM and a logistic classification model, respectively. Considering the different ethnicity, by selecting the specific signature for the European group (10 miRNAs) the diagnostic accuracy increased up to 83% (CI 68.1–92.1), and 81% (65.0–90.3), respectively. The African-specific signature (12 miRNAs) increased the diagnostic accuracy up to 95% (CI 76.4–99.1), and 100% (83.9–100.0), respectively. Serum miRNA signatures represent an interesting source of biomarkers for TB disease with the

  1. Molecular Basis of the Activity and the Regulation of the Eukaryotic-like S/T Protein Kinase PknG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lisa, María-Natalia; Gil, Magdalena; André-Leroux, Gwénaëlle; Barilone, Nathalie; Durán, Rosario; Biondi, Ricardo M; Alzari, Pedro M

    2015-06-02

    Tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest human diseases, with a high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains. A molecular understanding of processes underlying regulation and adaptation of bacterial physiology may provide novel avenues for the development of antibiotics with unconventional modes of action. Here, we focus on the multidomain S/T protein kinase PknG, a soluble enzyme that controls central metabolism in Actinobacteria and has been linked to Mtb infectivity. Our biochemical and structural studies reveal how different motifs and domains flanking the catalytic core regulate substrate selectivity without significantly affecting the intrinsic kinase activity, whereas a rubredoxin-like domain is shown to downregulate catalysis through specific intramolecular interactions that modulate access to a profound substrate-binding site. Our findings provide the basis for the selective and specific inhibition of PknG, and open new questions about regulation of related bacterial and eukaryotic protein kinases.

  2. Role of Metal Ions on the Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamidase

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Patricia; Ferrer, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Christiansen, Gina; Moreno-Román, Paola; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Sotelo, Jun; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Fuentes, Patricia; Rueda, Daniel; Flores, Myra; Olivera, Paula; Solis, José; Pesaresi, Alessandro; Lamba, Doriano; Zimic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    Pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the conversion of pyrazinamide to the active molecule pyrazinoic acid. Reduction of pyrazinamidase activity results in a level of pyrazinamide resistance. Previous studies have suggested that pyrazinamidase has a metal-binding site and that a divalent metal cofactor is required for activity. To determine the effect of divalent metals on the pyrazinamidase, the recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase corresponding to the H37Rv pyrazinamide-susceptible reference strain was expressed in Escherichia coli with and without a carboxy terminal. His-tagged pyrazinamidase was inactivated by metal depletion and reactivated by titration with divalent metals. Although Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ restored pyrazinamidase activity, only Co2+ enhanced the enzymatic activity to levels higher than the wild-type pyrazinamidase. Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Mg2+ did not restore the activity under the conditions tested. Various recombinant mutated pyrazinamidases with appropriate folding but different enzymatic activities showed a differential pattern of recovered activity. X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorbance spectroscopy showed that recombinant wild-type pyrazinamidase expressed in E. coli most likely contained Zn. In conclusion, this study suggests that M. tuberculosis pyrazinamidase is a metalloenzyme that is able to coordinate several ions, but in vivo, it is more likely to coordinate Zn2+. However, in vitro, the metal-depleted enzyme could be reactivated by several divalent metals with higher efficiency than Zn. PMID:22764307

  3. Detection and confirmation of alkaloids in leaves of Justicia adhatoda and bioinformatics approach to elicit its anti-tuberculosis activity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Panda, Likun; Lavanya, P; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2012-11-01

    The extraction and determination of alkaloids was performed and confirmed by phytochemical analysis. Six different quinazoline alkaloids (vasicoline, vasicolinone, vasicinone, vasicine, adhatodine and anisotine) were found in the leaf of Justicia adhatoda (J. adhatoda). The presence of the peaks obtained through HPLC indicated the diverse nature of alkaloid present in the leaf. The enzyme β-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase III that catalyses the initial step of fatty acid biosynthesis (FabH) via a type II fatty acid synthase has unique structural features and universal occurrence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Thus, it was considered as a target for designing of anti-tuberculosis compounds. Docking simulations were conducted on the above alkaloids derived from J. adhatoda. The combination of docking/scoring provided interesting insights into the binding of different inhibitors and their activity. These results will be useful for designing inhibitors for M. tuberculosis and also will be a good starting point for natural plant-based pharmaceutical chemistry.

  4. The characteristic profiles of PD-1 and PD-L1 expressions and dynamic changes during treatment in active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Shi, Hong; Gao, Yan; Ou, Qinfang; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Wenhong; Fan, Lin; Shao, Lingyun

    2016-12-01

    PD-1 is a cell surface receptor of activated T and B lymphocytes and it's role in tuberculosis is controversial because of lack of congruence between clinical study and animal model. To investigate the immunological pathogenesis mechanisms of tuberculosis and to develop the immune therapy target essential for controlling tuberculosis, here we explored the expression characteristics and dynamic changes of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in different CD4+T cell subsets. We enrolled 24 human subjects including 15 active tuberculosis (ATB) patients and 9 healthy donors (HD). The expressions of PD-1 and PD-L1 on CD4+T cells increased significantly in ATB patients than HD. ATB patients had a higher proportion of regulatory T cells (Treg, CD4(+)CD25 + Foxp3+) than HD. The expressions of PD-1 and PD-L1 increased remarkably on CD4+T cell subsets, including Treg cells, Tresp (CD4(+)CD25(-)) cells and Teff (CD4(+)CD25 + Foxp3-) cells. Finally, clinical improvement following effective anti-TB therapy is correlated with significantly decreased expression of PD-1 in Tresp and Teff cells, but not in Treg cells. Thus, expression profiles of PD-1 in T cell subpopulations may be used as a candidate to predict the clinical efficacy of anti-tuberculosis therapy. Modulation of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in CD4 subsets may offer an immunotherapy target for the control of tuberculosis.

  5. Efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis play a significant role in antituberculosis activity of potential drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Balganesh, Meenakshi; Dinesh, Neela; Sharma, Sreevalli; Kuruppath, Sanjana; Nair, Anju V; Sharma, Umender

    2012-05-01

    Active efflux of drugs mediated by efflux pumps that confer drug resistance is one of the mechanisms developed by bacteria to counter the adverse effects of antibiotics and chemicals. To understand these efflux mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we generated knockout (KO) mutants of four efflux pumps of the pathogen belonging to different classes. We measured the MICs and kill values of two different compound classes on the wild type (WT) and the efflux pump (EP) KO mutants in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and l-phenylalanyl-l-arginyl-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Among the pumps studied, the efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) class, encoded by Rv1218c, and the SMR (small multidrug resistance) class, encoded by Rv3065, appear to play important roles in mediating the efflux of different chemical classes and antibiotics. Efflux pumps encoded by Rv0849 and Rv1258c also mediate the efflux of these compounds, but to a lesser extent. Increased killing is observed in WT M. tuberculosis cells by these compounds in the presence of either verapamil or PAβN. The efflux pump KO mutants were more susceptible to these compounds in the presence of efflux inhibitors. We have shown that these four efflux pumps of M. tuberculosis play a vital role in mediating efflux of different chemical scaffolds. Inhibitors of one or several of these efflux pumps could have a significant impact in the treatment of tuberculosis. The identification and characterization of Rv0849, a new efflux pump belonging to the MFS (major facilitator superfamily) class, are reported.

  6. Systematic Survey of Serine Hydrolase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Defines Changes Associated with Persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, Corrie; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Frando, Andrew; Sadler, Natalie C.; Brown, Robert W.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Grundner, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    The transition between replication and non-replication underlies much of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenicity, as non- or slowly replicating Mtb are responsible for persistence and poor treatment outcomes. Therapeutic targeting of non-replicating, persistent populations is a priority for tuberculosis treatment, but only few drug targets in non-replicating Mtb are currently known. Here, we directly measure the activity of the highly diverse and druggable serine hydrolases (SHs) during active replication and non-replication by activity-based proteomics. We predict serine hydrolase activity for 78 proteins, including 27 proteins with previously unknown function, and identify 37 SHs that remain active even in the absence of replication, providing a set of candidate persistence targets. Non-replication was associated with large shifts in the activity of the majority of SHs. These activity changes were largely independent of SH abundance, indicating extensive post-translational regulation. By probing a large cross-section of druggable Mtb enzyme space during replication and non-replication, we identify new SHs and suggest new persistence targets.

  7. Unusual presentation of renal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aunp P; Ranganath, Ravi; Pavan, Malleshappa

    2011-07-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis (TB) is a common late manifestation of an earlier symptomatic or asymptomatic pulmonary TB infection. A latency period ranging from 5 to 40 years between the time of the initial infection and the expression of urogenital TB frequently occurs. As one of the most common sites of involvement of extrapulmonary TB, urogenital TB accounts for 15% to 20% of the infections. We present a patient who had culture-negative active tubercular kidney disease due to silent tuberculous infection. Our case demonstrates the limitations of noninvasive testing in establishing the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis.

  8. The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 23), active TB disease (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ = –1.53, p = 0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008), foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004), or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans

  9. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  10. [Osteoarticular tuberculosis in children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bumbic, S; Zegarac, D; Lukac, R

    1978-01-01

    A group of sixteen children suffering from osteoarticular tuberculosis were seen over the past five years in the Belgrade Paediatric Surgery Clinic. This disease is now extremely rare and effects chiefly children born outside maternity departments and not receiving BCG vaccination at birth for different reasons. The osteoarticular tuberculosis rate in the Socialist Republic of Serbia over this period was thus one in 500,000 children. The disease is three times as common in male children, most often affecting the hip and presenting above all at about the age of nine. At the time of admission, eight children had tuberculosis lesions affecting the lungs, visible and active or latent, partially or completely. In five children, one of the parents was receiving treatment for active pulmonary tuberculosis at the time of onset of the disease. Conservative treatment (immobilisation, tuberculous bacteriostatic therapy and general measures) was used in fifteen children and only one underwent surgery, in addition to the standard treatment described. In only one child, there was ankylosis of the hip and the end of treatment, the others having less sequelae of returning completely to normal. In one girl, osteoarticular tuberculosis was complicated by exsudative tuberculosis pericarditis.

  11. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious and often ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis (TB) a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one ...

  12. Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Han-Lim; Kim, Dong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Even in an era of remarkable medical advances, there is an issue of why tuberculosis remains in the list of disastrous diseases, afflicting humans and causing suffering. There has not been a plausible answer to this, and it has been suggested that clinicians and medical scientists could presently not win the war against the tubercle bacilli. With regards to this issue, based on the authors' own clinical and research experiences, in this review, the available literature was revisited in order to address the raised questions and to provide recent information on characteristics of tubercle bacilli and possible ways to more effectively treat tuberculosis. PMID:28243382

  13. Association of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates of BOVIS and Central Asian (CAS) genotypic lineages with extrapulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lari, N; Rindi, L; Cristofani, R; Rastogi, N; Tortoli, E; Garzelli, C

    2009-06-01

    The association between isolate genotype, defined as in the international spoligotype database SpolDB4, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis was determined among 1009 patients in a population-based, 4-year survey performed in Tuscany, Italy. Extrapulmonary disease occurred in 24.2% of patients. A statistically significant association with extrapulmonary disease was found for the BOVIS (adjusted OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.2-8.1) and for the Central Asian (CAS) lineages (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.0-5.1). These findings support the view that Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains within individual genotypic lineages might have evolved unique pathogenic characteristics that are capable of influencing the clinical outcome of the infection.

  14. Tuberculosis: a Re-emerging Disease at the Interface of Domestic Animals and Wildlife

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the early 20th century there were large numbers of tuberculous cattle in many countries. An association was made between the number of M. bovis infected humans and the prevalence of tuberculosis in cattle. Mandatory pasteurization of milk caused the prevalence of human tuberculosis due to M. bovi...

  15. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease.

  16. Being active when you have heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - activity; CAD - activity; Coronary artery disease - activity; Angina - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or ...

  17. Typical and unusual cases of female genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, E; Dubrovina, S

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease with myriad presentations and manifestations; it can affect any organ or tissue, excluding only hair and nails. Doctors who are not familiar with extrapulmonary tuberculosis often overlook this disease. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of TB in countries with severe epidemic situation and the third most common form in regions with low incidence of TB. The term "Urogenital tuberculosis" includes kidney tuberculosis; male and female tuberculosis and urinary tract tuberculosis as complication of kidney tuberculosis. We describe rarest case of tuberculosis of a placenta in young woman, suffered from genital tuberculosis, which was overlooked before delivery, as well as typical tubo-ovarian tuberculomas.

  18. A real-time PCR signature to discriminate between tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Laux da Costa, Lucas; Delcroix, Melaine; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Prestes, Isaías V; Milano, Mariana; Francis, Steve S; Unis, Gisela; Silva, Denise R; Riley, Lee W; Rossetti, Maria L R

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a host gene signature that can distinguish tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases (OPD). We conducted real-time PCR on whole blood samples from patients in Brazil. TB and OPD patients (asthma and non-TB pneumonia) differentially expressed granzyme A (GZMA), guanylate binding protein 5 (GBP5) and Fc gamma receptor 1A (CD64). Receiver operating characteristic, tree classification and random forest analyses were applied to evaluate the discriminatory power of the three genes and find the gene panel most predictive of patients' disease classification. Tree classification produced a model based on GBP5 and CD64 expression. In random forest analysis, the combination of the three genes provided a robust biosignature to distinguish TB from OPD with 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity. Our results suggest that GBP5 and CD64 in tandem may be the most predictive combination. However, GZMA contribution to the prediction model requires further investigation. Regardless, these three genes show promise as a rapid diagnostic marker separating TB from OPD.

  19. A real-time PCR signature to discriminate between tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Lucas Laux; Delcroix, Melaine; Dalla Costa, Elis R.; Prestes, Isaías V.; Milano, Mariana; Francis, Steve S.; Unis, Gisela; Silva, Denise R.; Riley, Lee W.; Rossetti, Maria L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a host gene signature that can distinguish tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases (OPD). We conducted real-time PCR on whole blood samples from patients in Brazil. TB and OPD patients (asthma and non-TB pneumonia) differentially expressed granzyme A (GZMA), guanylate binding protein 5 (GBP5) and Fc gamma receptor 1A (CD64). Receiver operating characteristic, tree classification and random forest analyses were applied to evaluate the discriminatory power of the three genes and find the gene panel most predictive of patients’ disease classification. Tree classification produced a model based on GBP5 and CD64 expression. In random forest analysis, the combination of the three genes provided a robust biosignature to distinguish TB from OPD with 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity. Our results suggest that GBP5 and CD64 in tandem may be the most predictive combination. However, GZMA contribution to the prediction model requires further investigation. Regardless, these three genes show promise as a rapid diagnostic marker separating TB from OPD. PMID:26025597

  20. Tuberculosis terminal ileitis: A forgotten entity mimicking Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Molnar, Calin; Contac, Anca Otilia; Fetyko, Annamaria; Jung, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon lesion for which differential diagnosis can be difficult. We present a case of a 53-year-old male and a systematic review of the literature, from clinical symptoms to differential diagnosis, unusual complications and therapy. The patient was admitted to the hospital with signs of acute abdomen as a result of a perforated terminal ileitis. Based on the skip lesions of the terminal ileum and cecum, Crohn’s disease (CD) was clinically suspected. An emergency laparotomy and right colectomy with terminal ileum resection was performed and systematic antibiotherapy was prescribed. The patient’s status deteriorated and he died 4 d after the surgical intervention. At the autopsy, TB ileotyphlitis was discovered. The clinical criteria of the differential diagnosis between intestinal TB and CD are not very well established. Despite the large amount of published articles on this subject, only 50 papers present new data regarding intestinal TB. Based on these studies and our experience, we present an update focused on the differential diagnosis and therapy of intestinal TB. We highlight the importance of considering intestinal TB as a differential diagnosis for inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the modern techniques of diagnosis and therapy, the fulminant evolution of TB can still lead to a patient’s death. PMID:27672643

  1. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  2. Tuberculosis in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Rouzier, Vanessa; Vilbrun, Stalz Charles; Morose, Willy; Collins, Sean E; Joseph, Patrice; Decome, Diessy; Ocheretina, Oksana; Galbaud, Stanislas; Hashiguchi, Lauren; Pierrot, Julma; Pape, Jean William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem In 2010, Haiti sustained a devastating earthquake that crippled the health-care infrastructure in the capital city, Port-au-Prince, and left 1.5 million people homeless. Subsequently, there was an increase in reported tuberculosis in the affected population. Approach We conducted active tuberculosis case finding in a camp for internally displaced persons and a nearby slum. Community health workers screened for tuberculosis at the household level. People with persistent cough were referred to a physician. The National Tuberculosis Program continued its national tuberculosis reporting system. Local setting Even before the earthquake, Haiti had the highest tuberculosis incidence in the Americas. About half of the tuberculosis cases occur in the Port-au-Prince region. Relevant changes The number of reported tuberculosis cases in Haiti has increased after the earthquake, but data are too limited to determine if this is due to an increase in tuberculosis burden or to improved case detection. Compared to previous national estimates (230 per 100 000 population), undiagnosed tuberculosis was threefold higher in a camp for internally displaced persons (693 per 100 000) and fivefold higher in an urban slum (1165 per 100 000). With funding from the World Health Organization (WHO), active case finding is now being done systematically in slums and camps. Lessons learnt Household-level screening for prolonged cough was effective in identifying patients with active tuberculosis in this study. Without accurate data, early detection of rising tuberculosis rates is challenging; data collection should be incorporated into pragmatic disease response programmes. PMID:26170508

  3. Disease Control in Wildlife: Evaluating a Test and Cull Programme for Bovine Tuberculosis in African Buffalo.

    PubMed

    le Roex, N; Cooper, D; van Helden, P D; Hoal, E G; Jolles, A E

    2016-12-01

    Providing an evidence base for wildlife population management is difficult, due to limited opportunities for experimentation and study replication at the population level. We utilized an opportunity to assess the outcome of a test and cull programme aimed at limiting the spread of Mycobacterium bovis in African buffalo. Buffalo act as reservoirs of M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (BTB), which can have major economic, ecological and public health impacts through the risk of infection to other wildlife species, livestock and surrounding communities. BTB prevalence data were collected in conjunction with disease control operations in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa, from 1999 to 2006. A total of 4733 buffalo (250-950 per year) were tested for BTB using the single comparative intradermal tuberculin (SCIT) test, with BTB-positive animals culled, and negative animals released. BTB prevalence was spatially and temporally variable, ranging from 2.3% to 54.7%. Geographic area was a strong predictor of BTB transmission in HiP, owing to relatively stable herds and home ranges. Herds experiencing more intensive and frequent captures showed reduced per capita disease transmission risk and less increase in herd prevalence over time. Disease hot spots did not expand spatially over time, and BTB prevalence in all but the hot spot areas was maintained between 10% and 15% throughout the study period. Our data suggest that HiP's test and cull programme was effective at reducing BTB transmission in buffalo, with capture effort and interval found to be the crucial components of the programme. The programme was thus successful with respect to the original goals; however, there are additional factors that should be considered in future cost/benefit analyses and decision-making. These findings may be utilized and expanded in future collaborative work between wildlife managers, veterinarians and scientists, to optimize wildlife disease control programmes and

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2882c Protein Induces Activation of Macrophages through TLR4 and Exhibits Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    Back, Yong Woo; Park, Hye-Soo; Bae, Hyun Shik; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages constitute the first line of defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are critical in linking innate and adaptive immunity. Therefore, the identification and characterization of mycobacterial proteins that modulate macrophage function are essential for understanding tuberculosis pathogenesis. In this study, we identified the novel macrophage-activating protein, Rv2882c, from M. tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins. Recombinant Rv2882c protein activated macrophages to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and express co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules via Toll-like receptor 4, myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88, and Toll/IL-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta. Mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in Rv2882c-induced macrophage activation. Further, Rv2882c-treated macrophages induced expansion of the effector/memory T cell population and Th1 immune responses. In addition, boosting Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination with Rv2882c improved protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis in our model system. These results suggest that Rv2882c is an antigen that could be used for tuberculosis vaccine development. PMID:27711141

  5. Non-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrol, E D; Clark, J E; Cant, A J

    2001-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease of global importance, with a rising incidence in the developed world in recent years. Tuberculous lymphadenitis, tuberculous meningitis, osteoarticular tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis are some of the more well-recognised manifestations of non-pulmonary TB in childhood. The diagnosis of non-pulmonary TB poses a particular challenge for clinicians because of the protean ways in which the disease presents. The omission of tuberculosis from the differential diagnosis of patients with obscure illnesses and the relatively insensitive bacteriological methods for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis add to the complexity of the problem. A high index of suspicion is required in order to avoid delays in diagnosis which may influence treatment outcome. The advent of DNA amplification techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction may herald a promising new era in the prompt and accurate management of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  6. Childhood tuberculosis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Jaganath, Devan; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2012-12-15

    Despite the burden of both malnutrition and tuberculosis in children worldwide, there are few studies on the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. From available research, it appears that malnutrition is a predictor of tuberculosis disease and is associated with worse outcomes. This is supported through several lines of evidence, including the role of vitamin D receptor genotypes, malnutrition's effects on immune development, respiratory infections among malnourished children, and limited work specifically on pediatric tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation has yet to suggest significant benefits on the course of tuberculosis in children. There is a critical need for research on childhood tuberculosis, specifically on how nutritional status affects the risk and progression of tuberculosis and whether nutritional supplementation improves clinical outcomes or prevents disease.

  7. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis infection in the dialysis patients with end stage renal diseases: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-fang; Han, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) seems relatively difficult due to the absence of specific symptoms and signs in patients on peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. We report four cases of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis on dialysis, with two cases on peritoneal dialysis and two cases on hemodialysis. The presentations, therapy, and outcomes of TB infection in these patients were reviewed. Otherwise, the English literature published in the PubMed database associating extra-pulmonary tuberculosis on dialysis over the last three decades is reviewed. A total of 61 studies containing 70 cases were included. The most common primary disease was diabetic nephropathy (22.86%, 16/70). The peritoneum (31.42%, 22/70), bone (21.42%, 15/70), and lymph node (20%, 14/70) were the most frequently infected. Single organ infection was common (90%, 63/70). Fever (58.57%, 41/70), pain (35.71%, 25/70), and enlarged lymph node (20%, 14/70) were the most common symptoms. Biopsy (67.14%, 47/70) and culture (40%, 28/70) provided most reliable methods for clear diagnosis of tuberculosis. The combined treatment of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol (44.29%, 31/70) was the most common therapy. The majority of patients improved (82.86%, 58/70); however, 12 cases got worse (17.14%), with 10 of them dying (14.29%). Physicians should be aware of the non-specific symptoms and location of infection, and consider tuberculosis in their differential diagnoses in dialysis patients presenting with symptoms such as fever, pain, and weight loss.

  8. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  9. Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis by extract of South African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mativandlela, Sannah Patience Nkami; Meyer, Jacob Jacobus Marion; Hussein, Ahmed A; Houghton, Peter J; Hamilton, Chris J; Lall, Namrita

    2008-06-01

    Seven ethnobotanically selected medicinal plants were screened for their antimycobacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four plants namely Artemisia afra, Dodonea angustifolia, Drosera capensis and Galenia africana ranged from 0.781 to 6.25 mg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. G. africana showed the best activity exhibiting an MIC of 0.78 mg/mL and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 mg/mL. The MICs of ethanol extracts of D. angustifolia and G. africana against M. tuberculosis were found to be 5.0 and 1.2 mg/mL respectively. The mammalian cytotoxicity IC(50) value of the most active antimycobacterial extract, from G. africana, was found to be 101.3 microg/mL against monkey kidney Vero cells. Since the ethanol G. africana displayed the best antimycobacterial activity, it was subjected to fractionation which led to the isolation of a flavone, 5,7,2'-trihydroxyflavone. The MIC of this compound was found to be 0.031 mg/mL against M. smegmatis and 0.10 mg/mL against M. tuberculosis. This study gives some scientific basis to the traditional use of these plants for TB-related symptoms.

  10. [Tuberculosis, today].

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    Tuberculosis is still a major health and social problem because, on the one hand, we have witnessed the dismantling of the sanatoriums, with a reduced level of diagnostic suspicion, knowledge and expertise on the management of the disease, while, the other side, are considered migratory flows, the lower socio-economic faced by immigrants, the states of immunosuppression associated with HIV prevalence of malnutrition and other diseases, and the phenomenon of multidrug-resistance, which often turns out to be iatrogenic. The success of the strategy of control/elimination of tuberculosis promoted by the World Health Organization requires a well coordinated multidisciplinary approach in which everyone does their part, the general practitioner, the pulmonologist, the infectious disease specialist, and the microbiologist.

  11. Characterization of regulatory T cells identified as CD4+CD25highCD39+ in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chiacchio, T; Casetti, R; Butera, O; Vanini, V; Carrara, S; Girardi, E; Di Mitri, D; Battistini, L; Martini, F; Borsellino, G; Goletti, D

    2009-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) is a transcription factor whose expression characterizes regulatory T cells (Treg), but it is also present on activated T cells, thus hindering correct Treg identification. Using classical markers for Treg recognition, discordant results were found in terms of Treg expansion during active tuberculosis (TB) disease. Recently CD39 has been shown to be an accurate marker for Treg detection. The objectives of this study were: (i) to identify Treg expressing CD39 in patients with TB and to compare the results with those obtained by the standard phenotypic markers; (ii) to evaluate if Treg are expanded in vitro by exogenous interleukin (IL)-2 or by antigen-specific stimulation; and (iii) to characterize Treg function on the modulation of antigen-specific responses. We enrolled 13 patients with pulmonary TB and 12 healthy controls. Treg were evaluated by flow cytometry ex vivo and after antigen-specific in vitro stimulation using CD25, FoxP3, CD127 and CD39 markers. Results indicate that CD39+ cells within the CD4+CD25high cells have Treg properties (absence of interferon-γ production and transforming growth factor-β1 release upon stimulation). Ex vivo analysis did not show significant differences between TB patients and controls of Treg by classical or novel markers. In contrast, a significantly higher percentage of Treg was found in TB patients after antigen-specific stimulation both in the presence or absence of IL-2. Depletion of CD39+ Treg increased RD1-specific responses significantly. In conclusion, CD39 is an appropriate marker for Treg identification in TB. These results can be useful for future studies to monitor Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific response during TB. PMID:19438599

  12. Identification and structure-activity relationship study of carvacrol derivatives as Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alokam, Reshma; Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Matikonda, Siddharth Sai; Peddi, Santosh; Alvala, Mallika; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we identified carvacrol, a major phenolic component of oregano oil as a novel small molecule inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) chorismate mutase (CM) enzyme with IC50 of 1.06 ± 0.4 µM. Virtual screening of the BITS-Pilani in-house database using the crystal structure of the MTB CM bound transition state intermediate (PDB: 2FP2) as framework identified carvacrol as a potential lead. Further various carvacrol derivatives were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit MTB CM enzyme, whole cell MTB and cytotoxicity as steps toward the derivation of structure-activity relationships (SAR) and lead optimization.

  13. A model to predict anti-tuberculosis activity: value proposition for marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Grkovic, Tanja; Zhang, Lixin; Liu, Xueting; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The development of new antibiotics effective against all strains of tuberculosis (TB) is needed. To evaluate the potential of marine microbe-derived natural products as anti-TB leads, we analyzed and compared the physico-chemical properties of 39 current TB drugs and candidates against 60 confirmed mycobacteria-active natural products. We showed that anti-TB natural products sourced from marine microbes have a large overlap with TB drug-like space. A model to predict potential anti-TB drugs is proposed.

  14. Synthesis and Anti-Tuberculosis Activity of the Marine Natural Product Caulerpin and Its Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Canché Chay, Cristina I.; Gómez Cansino, Rocío; Espitia Pinzón, Clara I.; Torres-Ochoa, Rubén O.; Martínez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Caulerpin (1a), a bis-indole alkaloid from the marine algal Caulerpa sp., was synthesized in three reaction steps with an overall yield of 11%. The caulerpin analogues (1b–1g) were prepared using the same synthetic pathway with overall yields between 3% and 8%. The key reaction involved a radical oxidative aromatic substitution involving xanthate (3) and 3-formylindole compounds (4a–4g). All bis-indole compounds synthesized were evaluated against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, and 1a was found to display excellent activity (IC50 0.24 µM). PMID:24681629

  15. Non-transpeptidase binding arylthioether β-lactams active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Tim N; Lloyd, Dina; Kuskovsky, Rostislav; Minah, Jeanette; Arora, Kriti; Plotkin, Balbina J; Green, Jacalyn M; Boshoff, Helena I; Barry, Clifton; Deschamps, Jeffrey; Konaklieva, Monika I

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of drug resistance in both clinical and community settings as a consequence of alterations of biosynthetic pathways, enzymes or cell wall architecture is a persistent threat to human health. We have designed, synthesized, and tested a novel class of non-transpeptidase, β-lactamase resistant monocyclic β-lactams that carry an arylthio group at C4. These thioethers exhibit inhibitory and cidal activity against serine β-lactamase producing Mycobacterium tuberculosis wild type strain (Mtb) and multiple (n=8) β-lactamase producing Moraxella catarrhalis clinical isolates.

  16. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  17. The role of quality improvement in disease management: a statewide tuberculosis control success story.

    PubMed

    Fos, Peter J; Lee, Jae Eun; Sung, Jung Hye; Zuniga, Miguel A; Amy, Brian W

    2005-01-01

    This study describes Mississippi's statewide latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) control management efforts to improve treatment outcomes using scientific quality improvement tools. LTBI medication completion rates were observed by month and by nine administrative health districts for a 12-month period. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to see if there was any significant change between preintervention and postintervention in medication completion rates. Regression analysis was performed to test the linearity of change across the monthly rates. A change from a rate of 79.7 percent to 90.5 percent completion of the LTBI medication regimen was observed after the quality improvement intervention was instituted. During the quality improvement intervention, the mean reached 96.5 percent completion, followed by a slight decline at the end of the intervention to 90.5 percent. The analysis revealed that the mean LTBI medication completion rate across the nine administrative health districts was significantly increased and variability was decreased across all administrative health districts, with minor exceptions. A quality improvement team approach was shown to be effective in disease management by increasing LTBI medication completion. New baseline expectations can be established when quality improvement initiatives are implemented. This success can be linked, in part, to the use of scientific methods, precise and valid data, persuasive and clear goal setting, appropriate feedback, and ongoing monitoring.

  18. Visceral Fat as a Useful Parameter in the Differential Diagnosis of Crohn's Disease and Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kwon; Kim, Jin Ok; Song, Soon Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Oh Young; Han, Dong Soo; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon; Hahm, Joon Soo; Kim, Sang-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Because of the similarities in the clinical presentations of Crohn's disease (CD) and intestinal tuberculosis (ITB), differential diagnosis is critical. Mesenteric adipose tissue hypertrophy and creeping fat are characteristic features of CD. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of visceral fat for the differential diagnosis of CD and ITB. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 50 patients with findings of CD or ITB between January 2005 and July 2008. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed on all subjects during their first evaluation. The abdominal fat area was assessed using quantitative abdominal CT. Results The ratio of visceral fat to total fat (VF/TF) was significantly higher in male CD patients than in male ITB patients. The ratio of visceral fat to subcutaneous fat (VF/SF) was also higher in CD patients than in patients with ITB. For a VF/TF cut-off value of 0.46, the sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CD were 42.1% and 93.3% respectively, with positive and negative predictive values of 88.9% and 56.0%, respectively. Conclusion Measurement of the abdominal fat area using CT can be clinically useful for the differential diagnosis of CD and ITB. PMID:25349562

  19. The consequences of vaccination with the Johne's disease vaccine, Gudair, on diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coad, M; Clifford, D J; Vordermeier, H M; Whelan, A O

    2013-03-09

    The single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin skin-test (SICCT) remains the primary surveillance tool to diagnose bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the UK. Therefore, understanding the potential confounding influences on this test is important. This study investigated the effects of vaccination against Johne's disease (JD) on the immunodiagnosis of BTB using a Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination model as a surrogate of M bovis infection. Calves were vaccinated with either BCG (an attenuated live vaccine) or the JD vaccine, Gudair (a heat-inactivated suspension of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis), or a combination of both, and SICCT responses were measured approximately six and 12 weeks postvaccination. Animals vaccinated with Gudair only were negative to the SICCT test, thus supporting the specificity of the SICCT test following Gudair vaccination. However, while animals vaccinated with BCG-only demonstrated a bovine tuberculin-biased response as expected, covaccination with Gudair resulted in a bias towards avian tuberculin in the SICCT test. Therefore, our model demonstrates the potential of the Gudair vaccine to reduce the sensitivity of the SICCT. In addition, while we also demonstrate that Gudair vaccination can compromise the specificity of serological tests to detect JD, the specificity of defined M bovis antigens in serological or interferon gamma-based blood assays was not compromised by the vaccine.

  20. [Tuberculosis and malaria global prophylaxis in the light of decisions of the Big Eight].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    At the present time about two million people, one third of the Earth's population, are carriers of tuberculosis agent. Though tuberculosis is curable disease, it continues to take away lives of about 4400 persons; most of them are young and are in the most productive age. The most active incidence rate of tuberculosis occurs in the countries of Africa to the south of Sahara (29% of all cases of tuberculosis per head); half of new cases of tuberculosis fall on Asian countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines. The governments of Big Eight maintain activities that have stabilized morbidity of tuberculosis on a world scale. Over 11 years (1995 - 2006) World Health Organization (WHO) implemented the DOTS strategy (Directly Observed Treatment with Short course of chemotherapy) in 183 countries and tested it on 26 millions patients with tuberculosis. Global data acquisition in 2005 found out morbidity of tuberculosis in 59% (the aim is 70%) and successful cure in 84% cases (the aim is 85 %). In 2006 WHO started realization of the Global Plan "Stop tuberculosis" (2006 - 2012). At the present time Global Fund use about 17% its resources to finance programs against tuberculosis. These funds help to reveal 5 millions extra cases of tuberculosis and cure 3 millions patients in the network of DOTS.

  1. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  3. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  4. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  5. B cells as multi-functional players during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Willem J; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, André G

    2016-03-01

    Immunity to tuberculosis is still understood to be driven and maintained by T-cell derived immune responses. With a steady influx of data, it is becoming clear that B cells, the mediators of humoral immunity, have the capacity to function in roles not previously appreciated within the traditional B cell dogma. In this review we aim to discuss B cells, from its generation through to its functioning as effectors in both the innate and adaptive immune response, within the tuberculosis domain.

  6. Characterization of activity and expression of isocitrate lyase in Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Höner Zu Bentrup, K; Miczak, A; Swenson, D L; Russell, D G

    1999-12-01

    Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that Mycobacterium avium expresses several proteins unique to an intracellular infection. One abundant protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa was isolated, and the N-terminal sequence was determined. It matches a sequence in the M. tuberculosis database (Sanger) with similarity to the enzyme isocitrate lyase of both Corynebacterium glutamicum and Rhodococcus fascians. Only marginal similarity was observed between this open reading frame (ORF) (termed icl) and a second distinct ORF (named aceA) which exhibits a low similarity to other isocitrate lyases. Both ORFs can be found as distinct genes in the various mycobacterial databases recently published. Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle and is essential as an anapleurotic enzyme for growth on acetate and certain fatty acids as carbon source. In this study we express and purify Icl, as well as AceA proteins, and show that both exhibit isocitrate lyase activity. Various known inhibitors for isocitrate lyase were effective. Furthermore, we present evidence that in both M. avium and M. tuberculosis the production and activity of the isocitrate lyase is enhanced under minimal growth conditions when supplemented with acetate or palmitate.

  7. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  8. The Diagnostic Value of Polymerase Chain Reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Distinguish Intestinal Tuberculosis from Crohn's Disease: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ting; Fei, Baoying; Zhang, Yu; He, Xujun

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn's disease (CD) are important differential diagnoses that can be difficult to distinguish. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an efficient and promising tool. This meta-analysis was performed to systematically and objectively assess the potential diagnostic accuracy and clinical value of PCR for MTB in distinguishing ITB from CD. Materials and Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies, and nine articles with 12 groups of data were identified. The included studies were subjected to quality assessment using the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. Results: The summary estimates were as follows: sensitivity 0.47 (95% CI: 0.42–0.51); specificity 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93–0.97); the positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 10.68 (95% CI: 6.98–16.35); the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.49 (95% CI: 0.33–0.71); and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) 21.92 (95% CI: 13.17–36.48). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9311, with a Q* value of 0.8664. Heterogeneity was found in the NLR. The heterogeneity of the studies was evaluated by meta-regression analysis and subgroup analysis. Conclusions: The current evidence suggests that PCR for MTB is a promising and highly specific diagnostic method to distinguish ITB from CD. However, physicians should also keep in mind that negative results cannot exclude ITB for its low sensitivity. Additional prospective studies are needed to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PCR. PMID:28139494

  9. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  10. Relationship between education and training activities and tuberculosis case detection in Fiji, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Delai, M Y; Gounder, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Van den Bergh, R; Harries, A D

    2012-12-21

    Due to concerns about under-reporting of the tuberculosis (TB) case burden in Fiji, efforts have been put into national training, education and awareness activities in the formal health sector and among village health workers, health volunteers and the community since 2010. There has been an absolute increase in TB registrations, and TB case notification rates during the period of training activities in 2010 (21.3 per 100 000 population) and 2011 (23.6/100 000) were significantly increased compared with TB case notification rates in 2008 (12.4/100 000) and 2009 (14.6/100 000), when no training activities took place (P < 0.01). These findings support the use of ongoing training efforts.

  11. Systematic expression profiling analysis mines dys-regulated modules in active tuberculosis based on re-weighted protein-protein interaction network and attract algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Weng, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Yan, Xiang; Guo, Lei; Wang, Jia; Song, Xin; Yuan, Ying; Chang, Fu-Ye; Wang, Chun-Ling

    2017-03-18

    About 90% of tuberculosis (TB) patients latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) show no symptoms, yet have a 10% chance in lifetime to progress active TB. Nevertheless, current diagnosis approaches need improvement in efficiency and sensitivity. The objective of this work was to detect potential signatures for active TB to further improve the understanding of the biological roles of functional modules involved in this disease. First, targeted networks of active TB and control groups were established via re-weighting protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks using Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC). Candidate modules were detected from the targeted networks, and the modules with Jaccard score >0.7 were defined as attractors. After that, identification of dys-regulated modules was conducted from the attractors using attract method, Subsequently, gene oncology (GO) enrichment analyses were implemented for genes in the dys-regulated modules. We obtained 33 and 65 candidate modules from the targeted networks of control and active TB groups, respectively. Overall, 13 attractors were identified. Using the cut-off criteria of false discovery rate <0.05, there were 4 dys-regulated modules (Module 1, 2, 3, and 4). Based on the GO annotation results, genes in Modules 1, 2 and 4 were only involved in translation. Most genes in Module 1, 2 and 4 were associated with ribosomes. Accordingly, these dys-regulated modules might serve as potential biomarkers of active TB, facilitating the development for a more efficient, and sensitive diagnostic assay for active TB.

  12. Understanding and intervening in HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; Wilkinson, Robert John

    2015-12-01

    HIV-associated tuberculosis can present as extremes, ranging from acute life-threatening disseminated disease to occult asymptomatic infection. Both ends of this spectrum have distinct pathological correlates and require specific diagnostic and treatment approaches. Novel therapeutics, targeting both pathogen and host, are needed to augment pathogen clearance. In latent tuberculosis infection, enhancement of immune activation could be desirable. Antiretroviral therapy augments the beneficial effects of antitubercular therapy. However, in the context of high bacillary burden, antiretroviral therapy can also result in pathology (tuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). In the immune reconstituting patient, modulation of immune activation controls tissue destruction. Interventions should also be appropriate and sustainable within the programmatic setting.

  13. Short communication: Plasma levels of vitamin D in HIV patients initiating antiretroviral therapy do not predict immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia; Haddow, Lewis J; Affandi, Jacquita; Agarwal, Upasna; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Elliott, Julian; French, Martyn; Kumar, Manoj; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Oliver, Benjamin; Singh, Sarman; Sola, Marcelo; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Vun, Mean Chhi

    2012-10-01

    Immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB IRD) is clinically important among HIV patients commencing antiretroviral therapy in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Vitamin D affects dendritic cell and T cell function and the antimicrobial activity of monocytes. Plasma levels of vitamin D and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor may affect tuberculosis, and HIV infection associates with vitamin D deficiency. Here we assess whether plasma vitamin D levels may predict TB IRD. Samples were available from prospective studies of TB IRD in Cambodia (26 cases), India (19 cases), and South Africa (29 cases). IRD cases and controls from each site were similar in age and baseline CD4(+) T cell count. Plasma samples were assessed using 25(OH) vitamin D immunoassay plates. DNA samples were available from a subset of patients and were genotyped for the VDR FokI (F/f) [C/T, rs10735810] SNP. When data from each cohort were pooled to assess ethnic/geographic differences, 25(OH)D levels were higher in Cambodian than Indian or South African patients (p<0.0001) and higher in South African than Indian patients (p<0.0001). TB IRD was not associated with differences in levels of 25(OH)D in any cohort (p=0.36-0.82), irrespective of the patients' prior TB diagnoses/treatment. Carriage of the minor allele of VDR FokI (F/f) was marginally associated with TB IRD in Indian patients (p=0.06) with no association in Cambodians. Neither plasma levels of vitamin D nor the vitamin D allele will usefully predict TB IRD in diverse populations from TB endemic regions.

  14. Transcriptional Blood Signatures Distinguish Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Sarcoidosis, Pneumonias and Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Chloe I.; Graham, Christine M.; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-pei; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Rationale New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. Objectives To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. Methods We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. Measurements and Main Results An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Conclusions Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the

  15. Heterogeneous disease progression and treatment response in a C3HeB/FeJ mouse model of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Lenaerts, Anne J.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mice are the most commonly used species for non-clinical evaluations of drug efficacy against tuberculosis (TB). Unlike commonly used strains, C3HeB/FeJ mice develop caseous necrosis in the lung, which might alter the representation of drug efficacy in a way that is more like human TB. Because the development of such pathology requires time, we investigated the effect of infection incubation period on the activity of six drugs in C3HeB/FeJ and BALB/c mice. Mice were aerosol infected and held for 6, 10 or 14 weeks before receiving therapy with rifampin (RIF), rifapentine (RPT), pyrazinamide (PZA), linezolid (LZD), sutezolid (PNU) or metronidazole (MTZ) for 4-8 weeks. Outcomes included pathological assessments, pH measurements of liquefied caseum and assessment of colony-forming unit (CFU) counts from lung cultures. Remarkable heterogeneity in the timing and extent of disease progression was observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice, largely independent of incubation period. Likewise, drug efficacy in C3HeB/FeJ mice was not affected by incubation period. However, for PZA, LZD and PNU, dichotomous treatment effects correlating with the presence or absence of large caseous lesions were observed. In the case of PZA, its poor activity in the subset of C3HeB/FeJ mice with large caseous lesions might be explained by the pH of 7.36±0.09 measured in liquefied caseum. This study highlights the potential value of C3HeB/FeJ mice for non-clinical efficacy testing, especially for investigating the interaction of lesion pathology and drug effect. Careful use of this model could enhance the bridging of non-clinical results with clinical outcomes. PMID:26035868

  16. Heterogeneous disease progression and treatment response in a C3HeB/FeJ mouse model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Lenaerts, Anne J; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2015-06-01

    Mice are the most commonly used species for non-clinical evaluations of drug efficacy against tuberculosis (TB). Unlike commonly used strains, C3HeB/FeJ mice develop caseous necrosis in the lung, which might alter the representation of drug efficacy in a way that is more like human TB. Because the development of such pathology requires time, we investigated the effect of infection incubation period on the activity of six drugs in C3HeB/FeJ and BALB/c mice. Mice were aerosol infected and held for 6, 10 or 14 weeks before receiving therapy with rifampin (RIF), rifapentine (RPT), pyrazinamide (PZA), linezolid (LZD), sutezolid (PNU) or metronidazole (MTZ) for 4-8 weeks. Outcomes included pathological assessments, pH measurements of liquefied caseum and assessment of colony-forming unit (CFU) counts from lung cultures. Remarkable heterogeneity in the timing and extent of disease progression was observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice, largely independent of incubation period. Likewise, drug efficacy in C3HeB/FeJ mice was not affected by incubation period. However, for PZA, LZD and PNU, dichotomous treatment effects correlating with the presence or absence of large caseous lesions were observed. In the case of PZA, its poor activity in the subset of C3HeB/FeJ mice with large caseous lesions might be explained by the pH of 7.36±0.09 measured in liquefied caseum. This study highlights the potential value of C3HeB/FeJ mice for non-clinical efficacy testing, especially for investigating the interaction of lesion pathology and drug effect. Careful use of this model could enhance the bridging of non-clinical results with clinical outcomes.

  17. Evaluation of the anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and in vivo acute toxicity of Annona sylvatic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of extensively multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has further complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is an urgent need for the development of new molecular candidates antitubercular drugs. Medicinal plants have been an excellent source of leads for the development of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of 28 alcoholic extracts and essential oils of native and exotic Brazilian plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to further study these extracts through chemical fractionation, the isolation of their constituents, and an evaluation of the in vivo acute toxicity of the active extracts. To the best of our knowledge this is the first chemical characterization, antituberculosis activity and acute toxicity evaluation of Annona sylvatica. Methods The anti-mycobacterial activity of these extracts and their constituent compounds was evaluated using the resazurin reduction microtiter assay (REMA). To investigate the acute toxicity of these extracts in vivo, female Swiss mice were treated with the extracts at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg · kg-1 of body weight. The extracts were characterized by LC-MS, and the constituents were isolated and identified by chromatographic analysis of spectroscopic data. Results Of the 28 extracts, the methanol extract obtained from the leaves of Annona sylvatica showed anti-mycobacterial activity with an minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 184.33 μg/mL, and the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) resulting from liquid-liquid partitioning of the A. sylvatica extract showed an MIC of 115.2 μg/mL. The characterization of this extract by LC-MS identified flavonoids and acetogenins as its main constituents. The phytochemical study of the A. sylvatica EAF resulted in the isolation of quercetin, luteolin, and almunequin. Conclusions Among the compounds isolated from the EAF, luteolin and almunequin were the most promising, with MICs of 236.8

  18. Differential expression of antimicrobial peptides in active and latent tuberculosis and its relationship with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Lopez-Lopez, Nallely; Araujo, Zaida; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Gandara-Jasso, Benjamin; Macias-Segura, Noe; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important infectious diseases, causing 1.8 million deaths annually worldwide. This problem has increased because of the association with human immmunodeficiency virus and diabetes mellitus type 2, mainly in developing countries. In the past few years it has been highlighted the significance of antimicrobial peptides in the immunopathogenesis of TB ex vivo and in experimental models studies. In this study we analyzed the expression of CAMP, DEFA1, DEFB4, and DEFB103A in patients with latent TB and progressive TB with and without comorbidity with diabetes mellitus type 2. Antimicrobial peptide gene expression increased during progressive TB, which could be used as a biomarker for reactivation. By contrast, patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 have lower antimicrobial peptides gene expression, suggesting that the lack of its proper production in these patients contribute to enhance the risk for TB reactivation.

  19. Updates on Knowledge, Attitude and Preventive Practices on Tuberculosis among Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Farhanah Abd; Abdullah, Sarimah; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Jaafar, Hasnan; Noor, Siti Suraiya Md; Mohammad, Wan Mohd Zahiruddin Wan; Yusoff, Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Tharakan, John; Bhaskar, Shalini; Sangu, Muthuraju; Mahmood, Mohd Shah; Kassim, Fauziah; Rafia, Md. Hanip; Haspani, Mohammed Safari Mohammed; Alias, Azmi; Pando, Rogelio Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Ranking as the most communicable disease killer worldwide, tuberculosis, has accounted with a total of 9.6 million new tuberculosis cases with 1.5 million tuberculosis-related deaths reported globally in 2014. Tuberculosis has remain as an occupational hazard for healthcare workers since 1920s and due to several tuberculosis outbreaks in healthcare settings in the early 1990s, the concern about the transmission to both patients and healthcare workers has been raised. Healthcare workers have two to three folds greater the risk of active tuberculosis than the general population. Several studies on knowledge, attitude and practices on tuberculosis among healthcare workers worldwide have revealed that majority of the participated healthcare workers had good knowledge on tuberculosis. Most of the healthcare workers from South India and South Africa also reported to have positive attitude whereas a study in Thailand reported that most of the healthcare providers have negative attitude towards tuberculosis patients. Nevertheless, majority of the healthcare workers have low level of practice on tuberculosis prevention. An improved communication between healthcare workers and the patients as well as their families is the key to better therapeutic outcomes with good knowledge, attitude and preventive practice towards tuberculosis. PMID:28090176

  20. Rifapentine is not more active than rifampin against chronic tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Noton K; Illei, Peter B; Peloquin, Charles A; Pinn, Michael L; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E; Nuermberger, Eric L; Grosset, Jacques H; Karakousis, Petros C

    2012-07-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ~200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening.

  1. Weekly Moxifloxacin and Rifapentine Is More Active Than the Denver Regimen in Murine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ian M.; Williams, Kathy; Tyagi, Sandeep; Vernon, Andrew A.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Bishai, William R.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Treatment of tuberculosis with an efficacious once-weekly regimen would be a significant achievement in improving patient adherence. Currently, the only recommended once-weekly continuation phase regimen of isoniazid plus rifapentine (10 mg/kg) is inferior to standard twice-weekly therapy with isoniazid plus rifampin and is, therefore, restricted to non–high-risk patients. The substitution of moxifloxacin, a new 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone, for isoniazid and an increase in the dose of rifapentine could augment the activity of once-weekly regimens. Methods: To test this hypothesis we evaluated the sterilizing activity of improved once-weekly rifapentine-based continuation phase regimens in a murine model that mimics the treatment of high-risk patients with tuberculosis. The bactericidal activity of standard daily therapy and standard intermittent therapy (“Denver” regimen) was also assessed to evaluate the effect of intermittent drug administration during the initial phase of therapy. Results: After 2 mo of treatment, lung colony-forming unit counts were 1 log10 lower in mice treated with standard daily therapy than with the Denver regimen. During the continuation phase, the sterilizing activity of once-weekly moxifloxacin plus rifapentine (15 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of the predominantly twice-weekly Denver regimen of isoniazid plus rifampin. No significant difference in sterilizing activity was detected between once-weekly isoniazid plus rifapentine (15 mg/kg) and the Denver regimen. Conclusions: These results suggest that the efficacy of the once-weekly isoniazid plus rifapentine continuation phase regimen can be increased by substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid and by increasing the dose of rifapentine to a clinically acceptable level of 15 mg/kg. PMID:16141439

  2. Rifapentine Is Not More Active than Rifampin against Chronic Tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Illei, Peter B.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Pinn, Michael L.; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ∼200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening. PMID:22547623

  3. Structure-activity relationships of compounds targeting mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jialin; Eoh, Hyungjin; He, Rong; Wang, Yuehong; Wan, Baojie; Franzblau, Scott G; Crick, Dean C; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    We report on a target-based approach to identify possible Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXS inhibitors from the structure of a known transketolase inhibitor. A small focused library of analogs was assembled in order to begin elucidating some meaningful structure-activity relationships of 3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-5-benzyl-4H-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-one. Ultimately we found that 2-methyl-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-4H-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-one, although still weak, was able to inhibit M. tuberculosis DXS with an IC(50) of 10.6 microM.

  4. The association between sterilizing activity and drug distribution into tuberculosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Brendan; Via, Laura E.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Eum, Seokyong; Sarathy, Jansy; O’Brien, Paul; Chen, Chao; Kaya, Firat; Weiner, Danielle M.; Chen, Pei-Yu; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Cho, Sang Nae; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Finding new treatment-shortening antibiotics to improve cure rates and curb the alarming emergence of drug resistance is the major objective of tuberculosis (TB) drug development. Using a MALDI mass spectrometry imaging suite in a biosafety containment facility, we show that the key sterilizing drugs rifampicin and pyrazinamide efficiently penetrate the sites of TB infection in lung lesions. Rifampicin even accumulates in necrotic caseum, a critical lesion site where persisting tubercle bacilli reside1. In contrast, moxifloxacin which is active in vitro against persisters, a sub-population of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that persists in specific niches under drug pressure, and achieved treatment shortening in mice2, does not diffuse well in caseum, concordant with its failure to shorten therapy in recent clinical trials. We also suggest that such differential spatial distribution and kinetics of accumulation in lesions may create temporal and spatial windows of monotherapy in specific niches, allowing the gradual development of multidrug resistant TB. We propose an alternative working model to prioritize new antibiotic regimens based on quantitative and spatial distribution of TB drugs in the major lesion types found in human lungs. The finding that lesion penetration contributes to treatment outcome has wide implications for TB. PMID:26343800

  5. ATP-dependent motor activity of the transcription termination factor Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Heygère, François; Schwartz, Annie; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand; Boudvillain, Marc

    2015-07-13

    The bacterial transcription termination factor Rho-a ring-shaped molecular motor displaying directional, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase activity-is an interesting therapeutic target. Recently, Rho from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbRho) has been proposed to operate by a mechanism uncoupled from molecular motor action, suggesting that the manner used by Rho to dissociate transcriptional complexes is not conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom. Here, however, we demonstrate that MtbRho is a bona fide molecular motor and directional helicase which requires a catalytic site competent for ATP hydrolysis to disrupt RNA duplexes or transcription elongation complexes. Moreover, we show that idiosyncratic features of the MtbRho enzyme are conferred by a large, hydrophilic insertion in its N-terminal 'RNA binding' domain and by a non-canonical R-loop residue in its C-terminal 'motor' domain. We also show that the 'motor' domain of MtbRho has a low apparent affinity for the Rho inhibitor bicyclomycin, thereby contributing to explain why M. tuberculosis is resistant to this drug. Overall, our findings support that, in spite of adjustments of the Rho motor to specific traits of its hosting bacterium, the basic principles of Rho action are conserved across species and could thus constitute pertinent screening criteria in high-throughput searches of new Rho inhibitors.

  6. Tuberculosis: Medico-Legal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vetrugno, G.; De-Giorgio, F.; D’Alessandro, F.; Scafetta, I.; Berloco, F.; Buonsenso, D.; Abbate, F.; Scalise, G.; Pascali, V.L.; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90–95%) of the latter – which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed – remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of “epidemic” and “disease,” it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of “epidemic,” and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily—and in some cases permanently—disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  7. Tuberculosis versus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Baig, Zahid Farooq; Raja, Khalid Mahmood; Abbas, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis (Wegeners Granulomatosis and Microscopic Polyangiitis) and Tuberculosis share many features including constitutional symptoms and respiratory tract involvement. The presence of kidney involvement with new onset azotaemia and active urine sediment support the diagnosis of vasculitis. We describe two cases that were diagnosed to be suffering from tuberculosis and placed on anti-tuberculosis therapy. On further workup they were found to be suffering from pauci- immune glomerulonephritis and recovered well with treatment.

  8. Mycobacterium microti Tuberculosis in Its Maintenance Host, the Field Vole (Microtus agrestis): Characterization of the Disease and Possible Routes of Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kipar, A.; Burthe, S. J.; Hetzel, U.; Abo Rokia, M.; Telfer, S.; Lambin, X.; Birtles, R. J.; Begon, M.; Bennett, M.

    2014-01-01

    The field vole (Microtus agrestis) is a known maintenance host of Mycobacterium microti. Previous studies have shown that infected animals develop tuberculosis. However, the disease is also known in cats and is sporadically reported from humans and other mammalian species. We examined trapped field voles from an endemic area, using a range of diagnostic approaches. These confirmed that a combination of gross and histological examination with culture is most appropriate to identify the true prevalence of the disease, which was shown to be more than 13% at times when older animals that have previously been shown to be more likely to develop the disease dominate the population. The thorough pathological examination of diseased animals showed that voles generally develop systemic disease with most frequent involvement of spleen and liver, followed by skin, lymph nodes, and lungs. The morphology of the lesions was consistent with active disease, and their distribution suggested skin wounds or oral and/or aerogenic infection as the main portal of entry. The demonstration of mycobacteria in open skin lesions, airways, and salivary glands indicated bacterial shedding from the skin and with sputum and saliva. This suggests not only the environment but also direct contact and devouring as likely sources of infection. PMID:24334995

  9. Mycobacterium microti tuberculosis in its maintenance host, the field vole (Microtus agrestis): characterization of the disease and possible routes of transmission.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Burthe, S J; Hetzel, U; Rokia, M Abo; Telfer, S; Lambin, X; Birtles, R J; Begon, M; Bennett, M

    2014-09-01

    The field vole (Microtus agrestis) is a known maintenance host of Mycobacterium microti. Previous studies have shown that infected animals develop tuberculosis. However, the disease is also known in cats and is sporadically reported from humans and other mammalian species. We examined trapped field voles from an endemic area, using a range of diagnostic approaches. These confirmed that a combination of gross and histological examination with culture is most appropriate to identify the true prevalence of the disease, which was shown to be more than 13% at times when older animals that have previously been shown to be more likely to develop the disease dominate the population. The thorough pathological examination of diseased animals showed that voles generally develop systemic disease with most frequent involvement of spleen and liver, followed by skin, lymph nodes, and lungs. The morphology of the lesions was consistent with active disease, and their distribution suggested skin wounds or oral and/or aerogenic infection as the main portal of entry. The demonstration of mycobacteria in open skin lesions, airways, and salivary glands indicated bacterial shedding from the skin and with sputum and saliva. This suggests not only the environment but also direct contact and devouring as likely sources of infection.

  10. [Optimisation of diagnostics and differential diagnostics disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Demikhova, O V; Karpina, N L; Lepekha, L N; Bagirov, M A; Amansakhedov, R B

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons of dramatic situation with tuberculosis in Russia is untimely diagnostics of tuberculosis. The aim of the study was to identify the causes of diagnostic mistakes when we deal with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis at current stage and to modernize the diagnostic process. The analysis of the diagnostic activity of the consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute of Russian Academy Medical Sciences for 2011 was performed with special attention on the results of the survey of 505 patients with pulmonary dissemination. The frequency of discrepancies of disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostics was 96.1%. Based on the studies carried out the main causes diagnostic mistakes in patients with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis were determined. New directions of improving of tuberculosis diagnostics were developed: overall high-technology examination of patient, adherence to the diagnostic procedure, developed by consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute (CTRI), timely performing fiber-optic bronchoscopy with complex biopsy and diagnostic surgery procedures, further training of primary health care doctors. Implementation of proposed activities will significantly (by 3-5 times) reduce the time for diagnostics of respiratory system disease.

  11. Tuberculosis 2004: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues as a major public health challenge worldwide. HIV-TB coinfection is especially concerning as it accelerates progression of infection to active disease and amplifies spread of TB including drug resistant disease. Application of molecular biology and insights from classic microbiology to TB control have resulted in important innovations in diagnosis and treatment. Radiometric assay and, particularly, PCR, with nucleic acid probing, have reduced the time to diagnosis. Moreover, the sensitivity of these techniques is potentially log orders of magnitude more sensitive. Molecular techniques can be adapted to drug susceptibility testing. The differential activity and post-antibiotic effect of various drugs against TB have led to highly effective briefer regimens and to directly observed therapy. Insights into basic host defense against TB and description of the M. tuberculosis genome have created optimism for developing new treatments and effective vaccines in the years to come. PMID:16555622

  12. Comparison of tuberculin skin testing and T-SPOT.TB for diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Hulya; Alpar, Sibel; Ucar, Nazire; Aksu, Funda; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gözalan, Aysegul; Cesur, Salih; Ertek, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The T-SPOT.TB test does not cross-react with Bacille Calmette-Guérin or most non-tuberculosis mycobacterium species, and is based on IFN-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. The objective of this study was to compare tuberculin skin test (TST) with T-SPOT.TB results used in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) as well as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A total of 136 subjects participated in three different groups (47 patients with active pulmonary TB, 47 healthy persons without M. tuberculosis exposure, and 42 hospital members with a history of close contact with active TB patients). The T-SPOT.TB sensitivity (83.0%) and the negative predictive value (NPV) (82.6%) in the diagnosis of active TB were significantly higher than those of TST. The sensitivity and NPV of the TST were 38.3 and 60.8%, respectively. The T-SPOT.TB specificity (80.9%) and positive predictive value (81.3%) were lower than those of TST (95.7 and 90.0%, respectively). The performance of T-SPOT.TB and TST for diagnosing LTBI was the same (54.8%). T-SPOT.TB was superior in terms of sensitivity (83.0%); TST detected only 18, whereas T-SPOT.TB test detected 39 out of 47 patients with active TB. T-SPOT.TB is thought to have better performance than TST due to false-negative results in diagnosing active TB. However, it is considered that large prospective longitudinal studies are needed for diagnosing LTBI.

  13. Evaluation of a whole-blood chemiluminescent immunoassay of IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 for diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Li, Hang; Yang, Yourong; Liu, Jianyang; Yu, Ting; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-10-01

    The study explored the use of IP-10, MCP-1, and IFN-γ as biomarkers to improve the diagnoses of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy. We enrolled 267 individuals, including 134 TB patients, 93 patients with non-tuberculous pulmonary diseases, and 40 healthy controls. Whole bloods were stimulated in vitro with rCFP-10/ESAT-6 protein antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The levels of IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 in cultured supernatants of whole bloods were detected by a chemiluminescence immunoassay. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the cutoff value for diagnosing TB and to evaluate the diagnostic efficacies of the IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 for TB. The antigen-specific release of each cytokine, IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1, was significantly higher in the TB groups than in either the non-tuberculous pulmonary disease group (p < 0.001) or the healthy control group (p < 0.001). The ROC curves indicated cutoff values for IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 at 147.8, 160.4, and 496.4 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and diagnostic efficiency for IFN-γ were 85.8%, 70.7%, 74.7%, 83.2%, and 78.3%, respectively; for IP-10 were 72.4%, 75.9%, 75.2%, 73.2%, and 74.2%, respectively; and for MCP-1 were 90.3%, 97.0%, 96.8%, 90.8%, and 93.6%, respectively. IFN-γ combined MCP-1 improved the sensitivity to 97.8% compared with IFN-γ (p < 0.001). Our findings indicate high sensitivity and specificity of MCP-1 as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy.

  14. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  15. Spinal Tuberculosis and Cold Abscess without Known Primary Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gannamani, Vedavyas; Shay, Emily; Alcid, David

    2016-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is uncommon but not rare. Bone and joint involvement constitute about 10% of extrapulmonary TB cases, with the spine being the most frequently affected site. Spinal TB patients typically present with back pain but other constitutional or pulmonary symptoms may be absent, rendering the diagnosis difficult. This case explores challenges in the diagnosis of spinal TB. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with vague back swelling for many years. Imaging revealed osteomyelitis of the spine but initial studies and cultures were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed weeks later when cultures demonstrated Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Considering the severe complications of untreated spinal TB including paraplegia and need for surgical intervention, high suspicion is critical in early diagnosis. PMID:28070429

  16. New strain multidrug resistant tuberculosis G24767 in Puerto Rico: Old disease a continuous threat.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Hiram José; Cruz, Michael; Nieves, Joel; Rivera, Kelvin; Fernández, Ricardo; Colón, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is defined as a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain resistant to two or more first-line anti-tuberculous drugs. Tuberculosis (TB) is a global threat to society despite improvement in therapy as it continues to be an economic burden especially in underdeveloped countries. The downfall of global economics and growing travel destinations in developing countries has escalade the exposure of organism not previously encountered in industrialized nations. Most cases of MDR-TB are reported on immunosuppressed patients with risk factors and from endemic areas. Nevertheless new strains with higher transmission degree are emerging as a threat in patients who have low risk factors for the development of MDR-TB.

  17. Anti-tubercular and antioxidant activities of C-glycosyl carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: towards the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zaro, María J; Bortolotti, Ana; Riafrecha, Leonardo E; Concellón, Analía; Morbidoni, Héctor R; Colinas, Pedro A

    2016-12-01

    During the treatment of tuberculosis infection, oxidative stress due to anti-tubercular drugs may result in tissue inflammation. It was suggested that treatment with antioxidant drugs could be beneficial as an adjunct to anti-tuberculosis drug therapy. Recently our group has shown that several C-glycosides are inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1). In an effort to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents against tuberculosis, the anti-tubercular and antioxidant activities of a series of C-glycosides containing the phenol or the methoxyaryl moiety were studied. Many compounds showed inhibition of growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and good antioxidant ability. A glycomimetic incorporating the 3-hydroxyphenyl moiety showed the best activity profile and therefore this functionality represents lead for the development of novel anti-tubercular agents with dual mechanisms of action.

  18. New strategies and paradigm for drug target discovery: a special focus on infectious diseases tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Srimath-Tirumala-Peddinti, Ravi C P K; Nammi, Deepthi; Pasupuleti, Amita C M

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and exploitation of new drug targets is a key focus for both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. To provide an insight into trends in the exploitation of new drug targets, we have analysed different methods during the past six decades and advances made in drug target discovery. A special focus remains on different methods used for drug target discovery on infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Gastritis, Malaria, Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis. We herewith provide a paradigm that is can be used for drug target discovery in the near future.

  19. Plasma drug activity in patients on treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mpagama, Stellah G; Ndusilo, Norah; Stroup, Suzanne; Kumburu, Happiness; Peloquin, Charles A; Gratz, Jean; Houpt, Eric R; Kibiki, Gibson S; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about plasma drug concentrations relative to quantitative susceptibility in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We previously described a TB drug activity (TDA) assay that determines the ratio of the time to detection of plasma-cocultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis versus control growth in a Bactec MGIT system. Here, we assess the activity of individual drugs in a typical MDR-TB regimen using the TDA assay. We also examined the relationship of the TDA to the drug concentration at 2 h (C2) and the MICs among adults on a MDR-TB regimen in Tanzania. These parameters were also compared to the treatment outcome of sputum culture conversion. Individually, moxifloxacin yielded superior TDA results versus ofloxacin, and only moxifloxacin and amikacin yielded TDAs equivalent to a -2-log killing. In the 25 patients enrolled on a regimen of kanamycin, levofloxacin, ethionamide, pyrazinamide, and cycloserine, the C2 values were found to be below the expected range for levofloxacin in 13 (52%) and kanamycin in 10 (40%). Three subjects with the lowest TDA result (<1.5, a finding indicative of poor killing) had significantly lower kanamycin C2/MIC ratios than subjects with a TDA of ≥1.5 (9.8 ± 8.7 versus 27.0 ± 19.1; P = 0.04). The mean TDAs were 2.52 ± 0.76 in subjects converting to negative in ≤2 months and 1.88 ± 0.57 in subjects converting to negative in >2 months (P = 0.08). In Tanzania, MDR-TB drug concentrations were frequently low, and a wide concentration/MIC range was observed that affected plasma drug activity ex vivo. An opportunity exists for pharmacokinetic optimization in current MDR-TB regimens, which may improve treatment response.

  20. A VSEIR model for transmission of tuberculosis (TB) disease in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangkuti, Yulita M.; Sinaga, Marlina S.; Marpaung, F.; Side, Syafruddin

    2014-12-01

    In this work, Vaccination (V), Susceptible (S) Infected (I), and Recovered (R) (VSIR) model for transmission of Tuberculosis in North Sumatera is modified. An exposed class is adopted to VSIR model so called VSEIR to determine the probability of people who infectious before infected. This model is written in ordinary differential equation (ODEs) in five classes. Determination the equilibrium point and stability analysis of the model is discussed to determine the dynamic behaviour of systems. A simulation is also discussed to see the suitable model to North Sumatera data. The simulation of VSEIR model indicates Tuberculosis has not endemic in North Sumatera.

  1. A preliminary investigation of tuberculosis and other diseases in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kalema-Zikusoka, G; Bengis, R G; Michel, A L; Woodford, M H

    2005-06-01

    A survey to determine the prevalence of bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis and certain other infectious diseases was conducted on 42 free-ranging African buffaloes, (Syncerus caffer) from May to June 1997 in the Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Using the gamma interferon test, exposure to M. bovis was detected in 21.6% of the buffaloes. One dead buffalo and an emaciated warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) that was euthanased, were necropsied; both had miliary granulomas from which M. bovis was isolated. None of the buffaloes sampled in Sector A of the park, which has no cattle interface, tested positive for bovine tuberculosis (BTB) exposure. The prevalence and distribution of BTB does not appear to have changed significantly since the 1960s, but this may be due to fluxes in the buffalo population. Serological testing for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) demonstrated positive exposure of 57.1% of the buffaloes sampled, with types A, O and SAT 1-3, which is the first known report of FMD antibodies to A and O types in free ranging African buffaloes. Foot-and-mouth disease virus types SAT 1 and SAT 3 were isolated from buffalo probang samples. Two percent of the buffaloes had been exposed to brucellosis. None of the buffaloes tested had antibodies to rinderpest, leptospirosis or Q fever.

  2. The geographic epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease in Baltimore, 1971-1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obasanjo, Olugbenga Olufemi

    Given the reemergence of Tuberculosis (TB) in the United States (U.S.) in the 1980s and 1990s, several strategies have emerged to combat the disease. A successful tool has been Directly Observed Therapy (DOT). Chaulk, et al. showed that DOT was responsible for the maintaining the decline in TB rates in Baltimore through the corresponding period of an upswing in rates nationally. In this study, we measure the impact of DOT on the geographic pattern of TB in Baltimore. We used Geographical Information System (GIS) methods to compare the geographic patterns of TB in Baltimore before and after the introduction of DOT in the city. We identified both predictors of TB, and differences in geographic units in Baltimore over time. We measured the impact of the introduction of DOT and Rifampin on various treatment outcomes for TB at about the same time. Despite the drop in numbers of TB cases, the spatial distribution of cases generally remained unchanged until 1995. This was confirmed by the fact that similar predictors were identified in all of the years that were analyzed. However, higher proportions of TB cases were found among blacks and females in more recent years. Death rates have increased significantly while corresponding relapse rates and the mean length of therapy have declined significantly. Rifampin was associated with a longer length of therapy before DOT, but with a shorter duration of therapy following the introduction of DOT. In all of the years analyzed, losses to follow-up (LTFU) do not differ from those completing therapy and are not spatially clustered relative to those completing therapy. DOT has been effective in reducing the numbers of TB cases in Baltimore city-wide without an emphasis on so-called "high-risk" patients for LTFU. Thus, any declines in TB case rates are not due to a decline in a particular group or geographic sector of the city. Universal DOT is effective and does not cause a geographic clustering of difficult-to-reach patients. This

  3. Polymorphisms in the RANTES gene increase susceptibility to active tuberculosis in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Harizi, Hedi; Bougmiza, Iheb; Ben Kahla, Imen; Letaief, Mahmoud; Boukadida, Jalel

    2011-10-01

    RANTES plays a pivotal role in attracting and activating various leukocyte populations that control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The present study investigated the relationship between the RANTES polymorphisms (-28C/G; rs2280788, and -403G/A; rs2107538) and susceptibility to active tuberculosis (TB) in Tunisian populations. A total of 168 patients with pulmonary TB (pTB), 55 with extrapulmonary TB (epTB), and 150 control subjects were studied. Genotype analyses were carried out using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We found that the -28 GG genotype was significantly associated with susceptibility to pTB (odds ratio [OR]=11.19; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 5.14-25; P corrected for the number of genotypes [Pc]=10(-8)) and epTB (OR=11.67; 95% CI, 4.74-29.33; Pc=10(-8)). However, the -28 CC genotype was found to be significantly associated with resistance to pTB (OR=0.08; 95% CI, 0.04-0.16; Pc=10(-8)) and epTB development (OR=0.11; 95% CI, 0.05-0.27; Pc=10(-8)). -403A allele was associated with increased risk development of epTB (OR=2.21; 95% CI, 1.18-4.14; p=0.007). G-G and A-C haplotypes and the AG/GC diplotype were associated with increase susceptibility to pTB (OR=7.88, 95% CI, 5.38-11.55; Pc=3.10(-8); OR=2.32, 95% CI, 1.32-4.11; Pc=3.10(-3); OR=13.26, 95% CI, 6.06-29.89; Pc=3.10(-8); respectively) and epTB (OR=6.64, 95% CI, 4-11.05; Pc=3.10(-8); OR=2.6, 95% CI, 1.26-5.35; Pc=12.10(-3); OR=11.26, 95% CI, 4.44-29.28; Pc=3.10(-8); respectively). Collectively, our findings suggested an association of the RANTES -28C/G and -403G/A functional polymorphisms with susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Tunisian populations.

  4. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  5. Active tuberculosis among Iraqi schoolchildren with positive skin tests and their household contacts.

    PubMed

    Al Kubaisy, W; Al Dulayme, A; Hashim, D S

    2003-07-01

    In a prospective cohort study in Iraq, schoolchildren with a positive tuberculin skin test during the nationwide survey in 2000 were followed up in 2002 to determine prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and risk factors among household contacts. Of 205 children, 191 remained skin-test positive in 2002. Based on X-ray and clinical examination, 9 children (4.4%) were active TB cases. Among 834 household contacts, there were 144 new TB cases, giving a cumulative incidence of 17.3%. Risk factors for TB among household contacts were: age > or = 15 years; technical/professional job; smoking; low body mass index; diabetes mellitus; steroid therapy; and closeness of contact with the index cases. Based on past history of TB in index children and their contacts, 77.2% of new TB cases were attributable to household contacts.

  6. [Surgery of late complications of previous active treatment of lung tuberculosis with extrapleural plombage].

    PubMed

    Teschner, M

    1998-02-01

    Between January 1984 and February 1997 10 patients with late complications of a former active collapse therapy were operated. In case of our patients between 1943 and 1960 the collaps therapy was carried out with the extrapleural instillation of plombs for therapy of pulmonary tuberculosis. At present main complications were infections of plombs with pleurobronchial and pleurocutaneus fistulas and perforation of plombs. By all patients both extirpation and pleurectomy were necessary. In case of 5 patients additionally lung resection was required, in case of 3 patients a thoracoplasty and by 1 patient a myoplasty. Although there are considerable destructions of lung parenchym in a part the results of long-term follow up are satisfactory: 6 patients are so far without complaints; only 1 patient died 10 years postoperative. Prerequisite for a successful therapy are the knowledge of the surgical methods of the collaps area, the used materials, the pathomorphological pulmonary changes and the good cooperation between pneumologists and thoracic surgeons.

  7. Fatal paradoxical cryptic miliary tuberculosis and immune reconstitution disease in a young non-HIV immunocompromised male patient: case report with autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Man, Milena Adina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Man, Sorin; Streba, Costin Teodor; Olteanu, Mihai; Nitu, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    Non-HIV immunocompromised patients may develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) as an abnormal response to invading microorganisms, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). IRIS consists in a sudden change in the dominant T-helper responses to inflammation, which is not balanced by anti-inflammatory response, playing a critical role in microbial pathogenesis. A patient with restoration of host immunity during anti-tuberculosis treatment can become gravely ill with a paradoxical severe form of tuberculosis (TB) disease named TB immune reconstitution disease (IRD).The diagnosis of acute cryptic miliary TB is difficult and requires an accurate histopathology. We report a fatal association between a generalized lymphadenitis tuberculosis and IRD in a 34-year-old male patient, non-smoker, non-HIV immunocompromised, but with a previously co-morbid diabetes mellitus (DM) type I. The purpose of this report is to describe an unusual and rare case of a progressive extrapulmonary TB disease to a liver involvement, mimicking a hepatotoxicity secondary to anti-tuberculosis therapy. The diagnosis of disseminated miliary TB with cryptic pulmonary was confirmed later after performing necropsy. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pulmonary and extrapulmonary miliary foci were processed for histology and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. This rare entity of cryptic miliary involvement of the lungs is described more in elderly than in young individuals. In the reported case, IRD induced a paradoxical progressive dissemination of TB lesions leading to death in a patient with an apparent uncomplicated form of lymphadenitis TB.

  8. Recent tuberculosis diagnosis toward the end TB strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Cho, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jeonghyo; Lee, Jaebeom; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite global TB eradication efforts, it is still a global public health concern, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Most of the active TB infections are curable with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, but drug-resistant TB is difficult and expensive to treat in immunocompetent as well as immunocompromised individuals. Thus, rapid, economic, and accurate point-of care tools for TB diagnosis are required urgently. This review describes the history of M. tuberculosis detection methods up to date and the recent advances using nanotechnology for point-of-care testing of TB diagnosis.

  9. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2016-04-05

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, the truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria.

  10. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; ...

    2016-03-21

    Here, the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb. Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, themore » truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria.« less

  11. The use of biodiversity as source of new chemical entities against defined molecular targets for treatment of malaria, tuberculosis, and T-cell mediated diseases--a review.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luiz Augusto; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Moreira, Icaro de Souza; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Calixto, João Batista; Astolfi Filho, Spartaco; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2005-10-01

    The modern approach to the development of new chemical entities against complex diseases, especially the neglected endemic diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria, is based on the use of defined molecular targets. Among the advantages, this approach allows (i) the search and identification of lead compounds with defined molecular mechanisms against a defined target (e.g. enzymes from defined pathways), (ii) the analysis of a great number of compounds with a favorable cost/benefit ratio, (iii) the development even in the initial stages of compounds with selective toxicity (the fundamental principle of chemotherapy), (iv) the evaluation of plant extracts as well as of pure substances. The current use of such technology, unfortunately, is concentrated in developed countries, especially in the big pharma. This fact contributes in a significant way to hamper the development of innovative new compounds to treat neglected diseases. The large biodiversity within the territory of Brazil puts the country in a strategic position to develop the rational and sustained exploration of new metabolites of therapeutic value. The extension of the country covers a wide range of climates, soil types, and altitudes, providing a unique set of selective pressures for the adaptation of plant life in these scenarios. Chemical diversity is also driven by these forces, in an attempt to best fit the plant communities to the particular abiotic stresses, fauna, and microbes that co-exist with them. Certain areas of vegetation (Amazonian Forest, Atlantic Forest, Araucaria Forest, Cerrado-Brazilian Savanna, and Caatinga) are rich in species and types of environments to be used to search for natural compounds active against tuberculosis, malaria, and chronic-degenerative diseases. The present review describes some strategies to search for natural compounds, whose choice can be based on ethnobotanical and chemotaxonomical studies, and screen for their ability to bind to immobilized drug targets

  12. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R S; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase Src as a

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of M. tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI) inhibitors designed to probe plasticity in the active site.

    PubMed

    Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Cergol, Katie M; Salam, Noeris K; Bulloch, Esther M M; Chi, Gamma; Pang, Angel; Britton, Warwick J; West, Nicholas P; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Payne, Richard J

    2012-12-14

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI) catalyses the first committed step in the biosynthesis of mycobactin T, an iron-chelating siderophore essential for the virulence and survival of M. tuberculosis. Co-crystal structures of MbtI with members of a first generation inhibitor library revealed large inhibitor-induced rearrangements within the active site of the enzyme. This plasticity of the MbtI active site was probed via the preparation of a library of inhibitors based on a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate scaffold with a range of substituted phenylacrylate side chains appended to the C3 position. Most compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against the enzyme, with inhibition constants in the micromolar range, while several dimethyl ester variants possessed promising anti-tubercular activity in vitro.

  14. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bhatter, Purva D.; Gupta, Pooja D.; Birdi, Tannaz J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity. PMID:26941797

  15. Modulation of the Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LipY by Its PE Domain.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Christopher K; Broadwell, Lindsey J; Hayne, Cassandra K; Neher, Saskia B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors over 160 genes encoding PE/PPE proteins, several of which have roles in the pathogen's virulence. A number of PE/PPE proteins are secreted via Type VII secretion systems known as the ESX secretion systems. One PE protein, LipY, has a triglyceride lipase domain in addition to its PE domain. LipY can regulate intracellular triglyceride levels and is also exported to the cell wall by one of the ESX family members, ESX-5. Upon export, LipY's PE domain is removed by proteolytic cleavage. Studies using cells and crude extracts suggest that LipY's PE domain not only directs its secretion by ESX-5, but also functions to inhibit its enzymatic activity. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the role of LipY's PE domain in the regulation of its enzymatic activity. First, we established an improved purification method for several LipY variants using detergent micelles. We then used enzymatic assays to confirm that the PE domain down-regulates LipY activity. The PE domain must be attached to LipY in order to effectively inhibit it. Finally, we determined that full length LipY and the mature lipase lacking the PE domain (LipYΔPE) have similar melting temperatures. Based on our improved purification strategy and activity-based approach, we concluded that LipY's PE domain down-regulates its enzymatic activity but does not impact the thermal stability of the enzyme.

  16. In Vitro Activity of Copper(II) Complexes, Loaded or Unloaded into a Nanostructured Lipid System, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Patricia B.; de Souza, Paula C.; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Lopes, Erica de O.; Frem, Regina C. G.; Netto, Adelino V. G.; Mauro, Antonio E.; Pavan, Fernando R.; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused mainly by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), presenting 9.5 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate a nanostructured lipid system (NLS) composed of 10% phase oil (cholesterol), 10% surfactant (soy phosphatidylcholine, sodium oleate), and Eumulgin® HRE 40 ([castor oil polyoxyl-40-hydrogenated] in a proportion of 3:6:8), and an 80% aqueous phase (phosphate buffer pH = 7.4) as a tactic to enhance the in vitro anti-Mtb activity of the copper(II) complexes [CuCl2(INH)2]·H2O (1), [Cu(NCS)2(INH)2]·5H2O (2) and [Cu(NCO)2(INH)2]·4H2O (3). The Cu(II) complex-loaded NLS displayed sizes ranging from 169.5 ± 0.7095 to 211.1 ± 0.8963 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) varying from 0.135 ± 0.0130 to 0.236 ± 0.00100, and zeta potential ranging from −0.00690 ± 0.0896 to −8.43 ± 1.63 mV. Rheological analysis showed that the formulations behave as non-Newtonian fluids of the pseudoplastic and viscoelastic type. Antimycobacterial activities of the free complexes and NLS-loaded complexes against Mtb H37Rv ATCC 27294 were evaluated by the REMA methodology, and the selectivity index (SI) was calculated using the cytotoxicity index (IC50) against Vero (ATCC® CCL-81), J774A.1 (ATCC® TIB-67), and MRC-5 (ATCC® CCL-171) cell lines. The data suggest that the incorporation of the complexes into NLS improved the inhibitory action against Mtb by 52-, 27-, and 4.7-fold and the SI values by 173-, 43-, and 7-fold for the compounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The incorporation of the complexes 1, 2 and 3 into the NLS also resulted in a significant decrease of toxicity towards an alternative model (Artemia salina L.). These findings suggest that the NLS may be considered as a platform for incorporation of metallic complexes aimed at the treatment of TB. PMID:27196901

  17. In Vitro Activity of Copper(II) Complexes, Loaded or Unloaded into a Nanostructured Lipid System, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricia B da; Souza, Paula C de; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Lopes, Erica de O; Frem, Regina C G; Netto, Adelino V G; Mauro, Antonio E; Pavan, Fernando R; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-05-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused mainly by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), presenting 9.5 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate a nanostructured lipid system (NLS) composed of 10% phase oil (cholesterol), 10% surfactant (soy phosphatidylcholine, sodium oleate), and Eumulgin(®) HRE 40 ([castor oil polyoxyl-40-hydrogenated] in a proportion of 3:6:8), and an 80% aqueous phase (phosphate buffer pH = 7.4) as a tactic to enhance the in vitro anti-Mtb activity of the copper(II) complexes [CuCl₂(INH)₂]·H₂O (1), [Cu(NCS)₂(INH)₂]·5H₂O (2) and [Cu(NCO)₂(INH)₂]·4H₂O (3). The Cu(II) complex-loaded NLS displayed sizes ranging from 169.5 ± 0.7095 to 211.1 ± 0.8963 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) varying from 0.135 ± 0.0130 to 0.236 ± 0.00100, and zeta potential ranging from -0.00690 ± 0.0896 to -8.43 ± 1.63 mV. Rheological analysis showed that the formulations behave as non-Newtonian fluids of the pseudoplastic and viscoelastic type. Antimycobacterial activities of the free complexes and NLS-loaded complexes against Mtb H37Rv ATCC 27294 were evaluated by the REMA methodology, and the selectivity index (SI) was calculated using the cytotoxicity index (IC50) against Vero (ATCC(®) CCL-81), J774A.1 (ATCC(®) TIB-67), and MRC-5 (ATCC(®) CCL-171) cell lines. The data suggest that the incorporation of the complexes into NLS improved the inhibitory action against Mtb by 52-, 27-, and 4.7-fold and the SI values by 173-, 43-, and 7-fold for the compounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The incorporation of the complexes 1, 2 and 3 into the NLS also resulted in a significant decrease of toxicity towards an alternative model (Artemia salina L.). These findings suggest that the NLS may be considered as a platform for incorporation of metallic complexes aimed at the treatment of TB.

  18. Prevalence of Latent and Active Tuberculosis among Dairy Farm Workers Exposed to Cattle Infected by Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Gonzalez, Pedro; Soberanis-Ramos, Orbelin; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Chavez-Mazari, Barbara; Barrios-Herrera, Ma Teresa; Torres-Rojas, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Singh, Mahavir; Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian; Ponce de Leon-Garduño, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Background Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW) exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4–80.9%) by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0–64.0%) by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31–5.64) and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30) adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. Conclusions We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting. PMID:23638198

  19. Field evaluation of a blood based test for active tuberculosis in endemic settings.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Aasia; Ravindran, Resmi; Hussainy, Syed Fahadulla; Krishnan, Viwanathan V; Ambreen, Atiqa; Yusuf, Noshin Wasim; Irum, Shagufta; Rashid, Abdul; Jamil, Muhammad; Zaffar, Fareed; Chaudhry, Muhammad Nawaz; Gupta, Puneet K; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed; Khan, Imran H

    2017-01-01

    Over 9 million new active tuberculosis (TB) cases emerge each year from an enormous pool of 2 billion individuals latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb.) worldwide. About 3 million new TB cases per year are unaccounted for, and 1.5 million die. TB, however, is generally curable if diagnosed correctly and in a timely manner. The current diagnostic methods for TB, including state-of-the-art molecular tests, have failed in delivering the capacity needed in endemic countries to curtail this ongoing pandemic. Efficient, cost effective and scalable diagnostic approaches are critically needed. We report a multiplex TB serology panel using microbead suspension array containing a combination of 11 M.tb. antigens that demonstrated overall sensitivity of 91% in serum/plasma samples from TB patients confirmed by culture. Group wise sensitivities for sputum smear positive and negative patients were 95%, and 88%, respectively. Specificity of the test was 96% in untreated COPD patients and 91% in general healthy population. The sensitivity of this test is superior to that of the frontline sputum smear test with a comparable specificity (30-70%, and 93-99%, respectively). The multiplex serology test can be performed with scalability from 1 to 360 patients per day, and is amenable to automation for higher (1000s per day) throughput, thus enabling a scalable clinical work flow model for TB endemic countries. Taken together, the above results suggest that well defined antibody profiles in blood, analyzed by an appropriate technology platform, offer a valuable approach to TB diagnostics in endemic countries.

  20. Sterilizing Activity of Second-Line Regimens Containing TMC207 in a Murine Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lounis, Nacer; Andries, Koen; Jarlier, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The sterilizing activity of the regimen used to treat multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) has not been studied in a mouse model. Objective and Methods Swiss mice were intravenously inoculated with 6 log10 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) strain H37Rv, treated with second-line drug combinations with or without the diarylquinoline TMC207, and then followed without treatment for 3 more months to determine relapse rates (modified Cornell model). Measurements Bactericidal efficacy was assessed by quantitative lung colony-forming unit (CFU) counts. Sterilizing efficacy was assessed by measuring bacteriological relapse rates 3 months after the end of treatment. Main Results The relapse rate observed after 12 months treatment with the WHO recommended MDR TB regimen (amikacin, ethionamide, pyrazinamide and moxifloxacin) was equivalent to the relapse rate observed after 6 months treatment with the recommended drug susceptible TB regimen (rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide). When TMC207 was added to this MDR TB regimen, the treatment duration needed to reach the same relapse rate dropped to 6 months. A similar relapse rate was also obtained with a 6-month completely oral regimen including TMC207, moxifloxacin and pyrazinamide but excluding both amikacin and ethionamide. Conclusions In this murine model the duration of the WHO MDR TB treatment could be reduced to 12 months instead of the recommended 18–24 months. The inclusion of TMC207 in the WHO MDR TB treatment regimen has the potential to further shorten the treatment duration and at the same time to simplify treatment by eliminating the need to include an injectable aminoglycoside. PMID:21408613

  1. Performance of a lateral flow immunochromatography test for the rapid diagnosis of active tuberculosis in a large multicentre study in areas with different clinical settings and tuberculosis exposure levels

    PubMed Central

    Manga, Selene; Perales, Rocio; Reaño, Maria; D’Ambrosio, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) continues to cause an outsized burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide, still missing efficient and largely accessible diagnostic tools determining an appropriate control of the disease. Serological tests have the potentially to impact TB diagnosis, in particular in extreme clinical settings. Methods The diagnostic performances of the TB-XT HEMA EXPRESS (HEMA-EXPRESS) immunochromatographic rapid test for active TB diagnosis, based on use of multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific antigens, have been evaluated in a large study multicentre TB case-finding study, in populations with different exposure level to TB. A total of 1,386 subjects were enrolled in the six participating centres in Peru: 290 active-TB and 1,096 unaffected subjects. Results The TB prevalence (overall 20.5%) varied between 4.0% and 41.1% in the different study groups. Overall, the HEMA-EXPRESS test had 30.6% sensitivity (range 3.9–77.9%) and 84.6% specificity (range 51.6–97.3%). A significant inverse correlation between test accuracy (overall 73.5%, range 40.4–96.4%) and TB prevalence in the various study populations was observed (Pearson’s r=−0.7985; P=0.05). Conclusions HEMA-EXPRESS, is rapid and relatively inexpensive test suitable for routine use in TB diagnosis. In low TB prevalence conditions, test performance appears in line with WHO Target Product Profile for TB diagnostics. Performances appear suboptimal in high TB prevalence settings. Appropriate set-up in operative clinical settings has to be considered for novel serological tests for TB diagnosis, particularly for formats suitable for point-of-care use. PMID:28066611

  2. Tim-3 pathway affects NK cell impairment in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Weiyong; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-12-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) patients show impaired NK cell function, and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we confirmed the decrease in activation, cytokine secretion, and degranulation potential of NK cells in active TB patients. We further investigated whether coinhibitory receptor Tim-3 was involved with impairment of NK cells. Our results revealed that the expression of Tim-3 on NK cells was increased in active TB patients. Tim-3 expression was inversely correlated with IL-12-stimualted IFN-γ production. Moreover, blocking the Tim-3 pathway restored IFN-γ secretion and degranulation of NK cells. Blocking this pathway also increased NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 target cells, and improved the ability of NK cells to control Mtb growth in monocyte-derived macrophages. The Tim-3 expression on NK cells was also observed to be significantly decreased in TB patients post-treatment. In this study, we have identified that Tim-3 is involved with NK cell impairment in TB patients.

  3. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Social Context of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Winetsky, Daniel E.; Almukhamedov, Olga; Pulatov, Dilshod; Vezhnina, Natalia; Dooronbekova, Aizhan; Zhussupov, Baurzhan

    2014-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. Objective To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. Design We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. Results We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%). Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40–18.28), history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27–16.63) and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67–5.62). Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. Conclusion In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan’s prisons. PMID:24465861

  4. Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saltini, Cesare

    2006-12-01

    Since after the first streptomycin 1944 trials, anti-tuberculous chemotherapy research has been focused upon establishing drug combination regimens capable of overcoming drug resistance and amenable to ambulatory treatment in resource strapped countries. The first milestone being the 1959 Madras trial comparing home and sanatorium treatment in South India. Subsequently, the MRC trials led Fox and Mitchison to indicate rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide as the first line drugs for short course, 6 month, regimens and the 1982 Hong Kong Chest Service trials established intermittent therapy as the ambulatory treatment standard for directly observed therapy (DOT). The rising of the HIV epidemic at the beginning of the 1980s has refuelled tuberculosis spread in Africa and Asia and contributed to the expansion of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide making the development of new drugs and drug regimens for ambulatory treatment a top priority. Led by biotechnological advances, molecular biology has been brought into TB laboratory diagnosis for the highly sensitive and specific rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in biological samples. The field of immunological diagnosis of TB infection, dominated since the early 1900s by the intradermal tuberculin reaction has been put back in motion by the discovery of M. tuberculosis-specific proteins and peptides, now employed in blood tests of high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of latent TB which may help with the identification of contacts at higher risk of active disease and the eradication of epidemic cases.

  5. Microarray and network-based identification of functional modules and pathways of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhong-Rui; Yin, Juan; Sun, Wen; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2017-02-08

    Diagnose of active tuberculosis (TB) is challenging and treatment response is also difficult to efficiently monitor. The aim of this study was to use an integrated analysis of microarray and network-based method to the samples from publically available datasets to obtain a diagnostic module set and pathways in active TB. Towards this goal, background protein-protein interactions (PPI) network was generated based on global PPI information and gene expression data, following by identification of differential expression network (DEN) from the background PPI network. Then, ego genes were extracted according to the degree features in DEN. Next, module collection was conducted by ego gene expansion based on EgoNet algorithm. After that, differential expression of modules between active TB and controls was evaluated using random permutation test. Finally, biological significance of differential modules was detected by pathways enrichment analysis based on Reactome database, and Fisher's exact test was implemented to extract differential pathways for active TB. Totally, 47 ego genes and 47 candidate modules were identified from the DEN. By setting the cutoff-criteria of gene size >5 and classification accuracy ≥0.9, 7 ego modules (Module 4, Module 7, Module 9, Module 19, Module 25, Module 38 and Module 43) were extracted, and all of them had the statistical significance between active TB and controls. Then, Fisher's exact test was conducted to capture differential pathways for active TB. Interestingly, genes in Module 4, Module 25, Module 38, and Module 43 were enriched in the same pathway, formation of a pool of free 40S subunits. Significant pathway for Module 7 and Module 9 was eukaryotic translation termination, and for Module 19 was nonsense mediated decay enhanced by the exon junction complex (EJC). Accordingly, differential modules and pathways might be potential biomarkers for treating active TB, and provide valuable clues for better understanding of molecular

  6. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  7. Tuberculosis DALY-Gap: Spatial and Quantitative Comparison of Disease Burden Across Urban Slum and Non-slum Census Tracts.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Mariel A; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Sales, Carolina Maia Martins; Gomes, Teresa; Snyder, Robert E; Daumas, Regina Paiva; Riley, Lee W

    2015-08-01

    To quantitatively assess disease burden due to tuberculosis between populations residing in and outside of urban informal settlements in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we compared disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), or "DALY-gap." Using the 2010 Brazilian census definition of informal settlements as aglomerados subnormais (AGSN), we allocated tuberculosis (TB) DALYs to AGSN vs non-AGSN census tracts based on geocoded addresses of TB cases reported to the Brazilian Information System for Notifiable Diseases in 2005 and 2010. DALYs were calculated based on the 2010 Global Burden of Disease methodology. DALY-gap was calculated as the difference between age-adjusted DALYs/100,000 population between AGSN and non-AGSN. Total TB DALY in Rio in 2010 was 16,731 (266 DALYs/100,000). DALYs were higher in AGSN census tracts (306 vs 236 DALYs/100,000), yielding a DALY-gap of 70 DALYs/100,000. Attributable DALY fraction for living in an AGSN was 25.4%. DALY-gap was highest for males 40-59 years of age (501 DALYs/100,000) and in census tracts with <60% electricity (12,327 DALYs/100,000). DALY-gap comparison revealed spatial and quantitative differences in TB burden between slum vs non-slum census tracts that were not apparent using traditional measures of incidence and mortality. This metric could be applied to compare TB burden or burden for other diseases in mega-cities with large informal settlements for more targeted resource allocation and evaluation of intervention programs.

  8. Chronic respiratory disease in adults treated for tuberculosis in Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Osman, R K; Mortimer, K; Bjune, G; El Sony, A I

    2016-09-01

    Background: Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the global CRD epidemic collides with the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in many low- and middle-income country settings, the risk of TB-associated CRD is not well described in countries with a high burden of TB. Methods: We recruited 136 patients with a history of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) from the TB clinic at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan, and 136 age- and sex-matched community controls, between 28 July 2013 and 30 December 2013. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires and spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator. Results: The mean age of the subjects with previous PTB and controls was respectively 44.0 years (SD 8.5) and 44.5 years (SD 8.6), with 27.2% females in both groups. Chronic respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough (OR 6.67, 95%CI 2.98-14.90, P < 0.001) and the presence of chronic airflow obstruction (OR 12.4, 95%CI 1.56-98.40, P = 0.02) were both strongly associated with a past history of PTB after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion: The clinical features of CRDs are strongly associated with past history of PTB. An integrated approach to improve the management of these common conditions should be considered. Contexte : Les maladies respiratoires chroniques (MRC) sont à l'origine d'une morbidité et d'une mortalité considérables dans le monde. Bien que l'épidémie mondiale des MRC entre en conflit avec l'épidémie de tuberculose (TB) dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible ou moyen, le risque de MRC associée à la TB n'est pas bien décrit dans les pays durement frappés par la TB. Méthodes : Nous avons recruté 136 patients ayant des antécédents de tuberculose pulmonaire (TBP) à frottis positif dans le service de pneumologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Omdurman à Khartoum, Soudan, et 136 témoins de la communauté, appariés sur l'âge et le sexe, entre le 28

  9. Chronic respiratory disease in adults treated for tuberculosis in Khartoum, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, K.; Bjune, G.; El Sony, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the global CRD epidemic collides with the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in many low- and middle-income country settings, the risk of TB-associated CRD is not well described in countries with a high burden of TB. Methods: We recruited 136 patients with a history of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) from the TB clinic at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan, and 136 age- and sex-matched community controls, between 28 July 2013 and 30 December 2013. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires and spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator. Results: The mean age of the subjects with previous PTB and controls was respectively 44.0 years (SD 8.5) and 44.5 years (SD 8.6), with 27.2% females in both groups. Chronic respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough (OR 6.67, 95%CI 2.98–14.90, P < 0.001) and the presence of chronic airflow obstruction (OR 12.4, 95%CI 1.56–98.40, P = 0.02) were both strongly associated with a past history of PTB after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion: The clinical features of CRDs are strongly associated with past history of PTB. An integrated approach to improve the management of these common conditions should be considered. Contexte : Les maladies respiratoires chroniques (MRC) sont à l'origine d'une morbidité et d'une mortalité considérables dans le monde. Bien que l'épidémie mondiale des MRC entre en conflit avec l'épidémie de tuberculose (TB) dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible ou moyen, le risque de MRC associée à la TB n'est pas bien décrit dans les pays durement frappés par la TB. Méthodes : Nous avons recruté 136 patients ayant des antécédents de tuberculose pulmonaire (TBP) à frottis positif dans le service de pneumologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Omdurman à Khartoum, Soudan, et 136 témoins de la communauté, appariés sur l'âge et le sexe, entre le 28

  10. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    PubMed

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region.

  11. Autophagy in the fight against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bento, Carla F; Empadinhas, Nuno; Mendes, Vítor

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB.

  12. Autophagy in the Fight Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB. PMID:25607549

  13. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  14. Biochemical characterization of quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and inhibition of its activity by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase.

  15. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 μg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael – acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  16. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: tuberculous meningitis new developments.

    PubMed

    Galimi, R

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) can involve any organ system in the body. Extrapulmonary involvement can occur in isolation or along with a pulmonary focus as in the case of patients with disseminated tuberculosis. Tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. TBM a medical emergency, is still a major cause of serious illness in many parts of the world. TBM remains difficult to diagnose, and it is usually due to hematogenous dissemination of the tubercle bacillus. The exact incidence and prevalence are not known. The clinical spectrum is broad and may be non-specific making early diagnosis difficult. Improved outcome requires early recognition and treatment of these conditions. Clinical features included fever for more than 7 days, headache, or neck stiffness. While TBM is a disease of childhood, tuberculomas and spinal tuberculosis are invariably an adult manifestation. In HIV infection, TB is often atypical in presentation, frequently causing extrapulmonary disease, and patients have a high incidence of TBM. Clinical response to antituberculous therapy in all forms of neurotuberculosis is excellent if the diagnosis is made early before irreversible neurological deficit is established. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, neuroimaging abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluid changes and the response to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Diagnosis is best made with lumbar puncture and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suspect TBM if there is a CSF leucocytosis (predominantly lymphocytes), the CSF protein is raised, and the CSF plasma glucose is <50%. Rapid techniques based on nucleic acid amplification such as PCR are more sensitive and specific as they attempt to detect specific DNA sequences of the organism. The hallmark pathological processes are meningeal inflammation, basal exudates, vasculitis and hydrocephalus. Treatment delay is strongly associated with death and empirical anti-tuberculosis therapy should be

  17. Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Expansion during Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Is Associated with High Nitric Oxide Plasma Level

    PubMed Central

    El Daker, Sary; Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Carducci, Claudia; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Colizzi, Vittorio; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still the principal cause of death caused by a single infectious agent, and the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms reflects the different manifestations of the pathology. The aim of this work was to study the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during active pulmonary tuberculosis at the site of infection. We observed an expansion of MDSCs in the lung and blood of patients with active TB, which are correlated with an enhanced amount of nitric oxide in the plasma. We also found that these cells have the remarkable ability to suppress T-cell response, suggesting an important role in the modulation of the immune response against TB. Interestingly, a trend in the diminution of MDSCs was found after an efficacious anti-TB therapy, suggesting that these cells may be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring anti-TB therapy efficacy. PMID:25879532

  18. 2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides Are Active against Drug-Susceptible and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides have been described as potent in vitro inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. Herein, additional chemical modifications of lead compounds were carried out, yielding highly potent antitubercular agents with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.05 μM. Further, the synthesized compounds were active against drug-resistant strains and were devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero and HaCat cells (IC50s ≥ 20 μM). In addition, the 2-(quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides showed intracellular activity against the bacilli in infected macrophages with action similar to rifampin, low risk of drug–drug interactions, and no sign of cardiac toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) at 1 and 5 μM. Therefore, these data indicate that this class of compounds may furnish candidates for future development to, hopefully, provide drug alternatives for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26985307

  19. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  20. Impact of infectious disease epidemics on tuberculosis diagnostic, management, and prevention services: experiences and lessons from the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Ansumana, Rashid; Keitell, Samuel; Roberts, Gregory M T; Ntoumi, Francine; Petersen, Eskild; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2017-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Tuberculosis Report 2015 states that 28% of the world's 9.6 million new tuberculosis (TB) cases are in the WHO Africa Region. The Mano River Union (MRU) countries of West Africa-Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia-have made incremental sustained investments into TB control programmes over the past two decades. The devastating Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak of 2014-2015 in West Africa impacted significantly on all sectors of the healthcare systems in the MRU countries, including the TB prevention and control programmes. The EVD outbreak also had an adverse impact on the healthcare workforce and healthcare service delivery. At the height of the EVD outbreak, numerous staff members in all MRU countries contracted EBV at the Ebola treatment units and died. Many healthcare workers were also infected in healthcare facilities that were not Ebola treatment units but were national hospitals and peripheral health units that were unprepared for receiving patients with EVD. In all three MRU countries, the disruption to TB services due to the EVD epidemic will no doubt have increased Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission, TB morbidity and mortality, and decreased patient adherence to TB treatment, and the likely impact will not be known for several years to come. In this viewpoint, the impact that the EVD outbreak had on TB diagnostic, management, and prevention services is described. Vaccination against TB with BCG in children under 5 years of age was affected adversely by the EVD epidemic. The EVD outbreak was a result of global failure and represents yet another 'wake-up call' to the international community, and particularly to African governments, to reach a consensus on new ways of thinking at the national, regional, and global levels for building healthcare systems that can sustain their function during outbreaks. This is necessary so that other disease control programmes (like those for TB, malaria, and HIV) are not

  1. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care.

  2. [Dealing with tuberculosis in primary care. Contact tracing procedures].

    PubMed

    Teruel, F; Castilla, J; Hueto, J

    2007-01-01

    Although the number of cases of tuberculosis in Navarre has fallen in recent years, it is necessary to adapt the control programs to the new situation. The keys to advancing in its prevention and control are: obtaining an early diagnosis and an effective treatment of patients and detecting and treating people with a latent infection. Primary care plays an important role in both activities. Half of the cases of active tuberculosis that are diagnosed have been contacts by bacilliferous TB patients or else have had a high personal predisposition to developing the disease. That is why detection and treatment of the latent infection in our setting must be carried out: 1) through screening persons at high risk of becoming infected and developing the disease, and 2) trough a systematic study of contacts of persons with the disease. In the treatment of both active tuberculosis and latent infection it is essential to obtain good patient adherence.

  3. [Head and neck tuberculosis: a still urgent problem].

    PubMed

    Bruzgielewicz, A; Wysocki, J; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, E

    1995-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is an unusual site for tuberculous infection. Most of the cases are secondary to active pulmonary tuberculosis. We present thirty five cases of tuberculosis localize in the head and neck region. There were twelve patients with lymphonodular tuberculosis, eleven patients with laryngeal tuberculosis, six patients with oral and pharyngeal tuberculosis, three patients with partoid gland tuberculosis, two patients with nose and paranasal sinuses tuberculosis and one patient with middle ear tuberculosis. This cases exemplifies the difficulty in diagnosis of tuberculosis in such an unusual sites.

  4. Effect of Active Case Finding on Prevalence and Transmission of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Dhaka Central Jail, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Sayera; Rahman, Md. Toufiq; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Khatun, Razia; Khan, Md. Siddiqur Rahman; Rahman, Md. Mojibur; Uddin, Syed Iftekhar; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Heffelfinger, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding tuberculosis (TB) transmission dynamics is essential for establishing effective TB control strategies in settings where the burden and risk of transmission are high. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of active screening on controlling TB transmission and also to characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains for investigating transmission dynamics in a correctional setting. Methods The study was carried out in Dhaka Central Jail (DCJ), from October 2005 to February 2010. An active case finding strategy for pulmonary TB was established both at the entry point to the prison and inside the prison. Three sputum specimens were collected from all pulmonary TB suspects and subjected to smear microscopy, culture, and drug susceptibility testing as well as genotyping which included deletion analysis, spoligotyping and analysis of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). Results A total of 60,585 inmates were screened during the study period. We found 466 inmates with pulmonary TB of whom 357 (77%) had positive smear microscopy results and 109 (23%) had negative smear microscopy results but had positive results on culture. The number of pulmonary TB cases declined significantly, from 49 cases during the first quarter to 8 cases in the final quarter of the study period (p=0.001). Deletion analysis identified all isolates as M. tuberculosis and further identified 229 (70%) strains as ‘modern’ and 100 (30%) strains as ‘ancestral’. Analysis of MIRU showed that 347 strains (85%) exhibited unique patterns, whereas 61 strains (15%) clustered into 22 groups. The largest cluster comprised eight strains of the Beijing M. tuberculosis type. The rate of recent transmission was estimated to be 9.6%. Conclusions Implementation of active screening for TB was associated with a decline in TB cases in DCJ. Implementation of active screening in prison settings might substantially reduce the national burden of TB in Bangladesh

  5. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Calophyllum brasiliense Extracts Obtained by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pires, Claudia T A; de L Scodro, Regiane B; Brenzan, Mislaine A; Cortez, Diógenes A G; Siqueira, Vera L D; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio; Goncalves, Renata M; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany R; Cardoso, Rosilene F

    2016-01-01

    The conventional techniques used to extract natural products have many disadvantages, and alternative methods have been used, such as supercritical fluid extraction (SFE-CO2). We compared the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity and cytotoxicity of extracts and major pure compounds were obtained from the leaves of Calophyllum brasiliense by SFE-CO2, maceration and Soxhlet. Anti-M tuberculosis activity was evaluated by resazurin microtiter assay plate and cytotoxicity assay was performed using 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. The (-) mammea A/BB, (-) mammea B/BB, mammea B/BB cyclo D, ponnalide, mammea A/BA cyclo D, and amentoflavone were identified as the majority compounds. SFE-CO2, especially at 313 K and 10.92 MPa showed better yield for (-) mammea A/BB. Anti-M. tuberculosis activity (62.5 μg/mL) and cytotoxicity (Selectivity Index = 0.320-0.576) were similar for the three extracts. Mammea B/BB cyclo D had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 125 μg/mL, and ponnalide and mammea A/BA cyclo D had MICs > 250 μg/mL. The pure compounds isolated showed low Selectivity Index (< 0.09). SFE-CO2 may be more promising than conventional methods for the extraction of compound (-) mammea A/BB, which presented the best anti-M. tuberculosis activity in our previous study. This is important for current industrial requirements to obtain extracts from medicinal plants using clean technologies.

  6. IL-32 is a molecular marker of a host defense network in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Dennis; Inkeles, Megan S.; Liu, Phillip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Teles, Rosane M. B.; Vaidya, Poorva; Munoz, Marcos A.; Schenk, Mirjam; Swindell, William R.; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Horvath, Steve; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease–related death worldwide; however, only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop disease. Factors that contribute to protection could prove to be promising targets for M. tuberculosis therapies. Analysis of peripheral blood gene expression profiles of active tuberculosis patients has identified correlates of risk for disease or pathogenesis. We sought to identify potential human candidate markers of host defense by studying gene expression profiles of macrophages, cells that, upon infection by M. tuberculosis, can mount an antimicrobial response. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed an association between the cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) and the vitamin D antimicrobial pathway in a network of interferon-γ– and IL-15–induced “defense response” genes. IL-32 induced the vitamin D–dependent antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4 and to generate antimicrobial activity in vitro, dependent on the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In addition, the IL-15–induced defense response macrophage gene network was integrated with ranked pairwise comparisons of gene expression from five different clinical data sets of latent compared with active tuberculosis or healthy controls and a coexpression network derived from gene expression in patients with tuberculosis undergoing chemotherapy. Together, these analyses identified eight common genes, including IL-32, as molecular markers of latent tuberculosis and the IL-15–induced gene network. As maintaining M. tuberculosis in a latent state and preventing transition to active disease may represent a form of host resistance, these results identify IL-32 as one functional marker and potential correlate of protection against active tuberculosis. PMID:25143364

  7. Comparison of ranging behaviour in a multi-species complex of free-ranging hosts of bovine tuberculosis in relation to their use as disease sentinels.

    PubMed

    Yockney, I J; Nugent, G; Latham, M C; Perry, M; Cross, M L; Byrom, A E

    2013-07-01

    Sentinel species are increasingly used by disease managers to detect and monitor the prevalence of zoonotic diseases in wildlife populations. Characterizing home-range movements of sentinel hosts is thus important for developing improved disease surveillance methods, especially in systems where multiple host species co-exist. We studied ranging activity of major hosts of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in an upland habitat of New Zealand: we compared home-range coverage by ferrets (Mustela furo), wild deer (Cervus elaphus), feral pigs (Sus scrofa), brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and free-ranging farmed cattle (Bos taurus). We also report in detail the proportional utilization of a seasonal (4-monthly) range area for the latter four species. Possums covered the smallest home range (<30 ha), ferrets covered ~100 ha, pigs ~4 km(2), deer and cattle both >30 km2. For any given weekly period, cattle, deer and pigs were shown to utilize 37–45% of their estimated 4-month range, while possums utilized 62% during any weekly period and 85% during any monthly period of their estimated 4-month range. We suggest that present means for estimating TB detection kernels, based on long-term range size estimates for possums and sentinel species, probably overstate the true local surveillance coverage per individual.

  8. Tuberculosis screening and compliance with return for skin test reading among active drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Malotte, C K; Rhodes, F; Mais, K E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the independent and combined effects of different levels of monetary incentives and a theory-based educational intervention on return for tuberculosis (TB) skin test reading in a sample of active injection drug and crack cocaine users. Prevalence of TB infection in this sample was also determined. METHODS: Active or recent drug users (n = 1004), recruited via street outreach techniques, were skin tested for TB. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 levels of monetary incentive ($5 and $10) provided at return for skin test reading, alone or in combination with a brief motivational education session. RESULTS: More than 90% of those who received $10 returned for skin test reading, in comparison with 85% of those who received $5 and 33% of those who received no monetary incentive. The education session had no impact on return for skin test reading. The prevalence of a positive tuberculin test was 18.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Monetary incentives dramatically increase the return rate for TB skin test reading among drug users who are at high risk of TB infection. PMID:9585747

  9. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Interventions Among Immigrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Gualano, Gina; Piselli, Pierluca; Mazza, Marta; D’Angelo, Donatella; Fasciani, Francesca; Barbieri, Alberto; Rocca, Giorgia; Gnolfo, Filippo; Olivani, Piefranco; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In Italy tuberculosis (TB) is largely concentrated in vulnerable groups such as migrants and in urban settings. We analyzed three TB case finding interventions conducted at primary centers and mobile clinics for regular/irregular immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers performed over a four-year period (November 2009-March 2014) at five different sites in Rome and one site in Milan, Italy. TB history and presence of symptoms suggestive of active TB were investigated by verbal screening through a structured questionnaire in migrants presenting for any medical condition to out-patient and mobile clinics. Individuals reporting TB history or symptoms were referred to a TB clinic for diagnostic workup. Among 6347 migrants enrolled, 891 (14.0%) reported TB history or symptoms suggestive of active TB and 546 (61.3%) were referred to the TB clinic. Of them, 254 (46.5%) did not present for diagnostic evaluation. TB was diagnosed in 11 individuals representing 0.17% of those screened and 3.76% of those evaluated. The overall yield of this intervention was in the range reported for other TB screening programs for migrants, although we recorded an unsatisfactory adherence to diagnostic workup. Possible advantages of this intervention include low cost and reduced burden of medical procedures for the screened population. PMID:27403270

  10. Target-based identification of whole-cell active inhibitors of biotin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick E; Wilson, Daniel J; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha P; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P; Bittker, Joshua A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Finzel, Barry C; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-22

    Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counterscreen in biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counterscreen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were cocrystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts.

  11. UvrD2 is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its helicase activity is not required.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alan; Güthlein, Carolin; Beresford, Nicola; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard; Davis, Elaine O

    2011-09-01

    UvrD is an SF1 family helicase involved in DNA repair that is widely conserved in bacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has two annotated UvrD homologues; here we investigate the role of UvrD2. The uvrD2 gene at its native locus could be knocked out only in the presence of a second copy of the gene, demonstrating that uvrD2 is essential. Analysis of the putative protein domain structure of UvrD2 shows a distinctive domain architecture, with an extended C terminus containing an HRDC domain normally found in SF2 family helicases and a linking domain carrying a tetracysteine motif. Truncated constructs lacking the C-terminal domains of UvrD2 were able to compensate for the loss of the chromosomal copy, showing that these C-terminal domains are not essential. Although UvrD2 is a functional helicase, a mutant form of the protein lacking helicase activity was able to permit deletion of uvrD2 at its native locus. However, a mutant protein unable to hydrolyze ATP or translocate along DNA was not able to compensate for lack of the wild-type protein. Therefore, we concluded that the essential role played by UvrD2 is unlikely to involve its DNA unwinding activity and is more likely to involve DNA translocation and, possibly, protein displacement.

  12. Tomographic Aspects of Advanced Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Evaluation of Sequelae following Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Domenico; Mafort, Thiago; Mogami, Roberto; Rodrigues, Rosana de Souza; Menna Barreto, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate tomographic changes in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), degree of agreement among three radiologists regarding tomographic diagnoses, and sequelae following treatment. Methods. Cross-sectional and descriptive study of 74 TB patients confirmed by sputum culture and chest computed tomography before (CT1) and 6 months after (CT2) drug therapy. Results were performed by three radiologists blinded to clinical and laboratory results. Results. Main findings in CT1 included nodules indicating the presence of a tree-in-bud pattern in 93% of cases, ill-defined nodules in 84% of cases, consolidation in 77% of cases, architectural distortion in 71% of cases, cavitary lesions in 62% of cases, and ground glass opacities in 37% of cases. Airway involvement, characterized by increased thickness and dilatation of the bronchial walls, occurred in 93% of cases. Pleural involvement occurred in 54%. There was an agreement on active TB among the three radiologists in 85% of cases. The results in CT2 indicated the presence of architectural distortion in 91% of cases and cylindrical bronchiectasis in 86%. Conclusions. The study established a tomographic pattern for diagnosis of active TB characterized by the presence of airway nodules, consolidation, architectural distortion, and cavitary lesions, and an almost complete degree of agreement (Kappa) was observed among the radiologists (0.85). CT after treatment assists in defining the cure. PMID:28261498

  13. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit.

  14. Target-Based Identification of Whole-Cell Active Inhibitors of Biotin Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick; Wilson, Daniel; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P.; Bittker, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart; Finzel, Barry C.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counter-screen in either biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counter-screen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off-target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were co-crystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts. PMID:25556942

  15. Structure-activity relationship of new anti-tuberculosis agents derived from oxazoline and oxazole benzyl esters.

    PubMed

    Moraski, Garrett C; Chang, Mayland; Villegas-Estrada, Adriel; Franzblau, Scott G; Möllmann, Ute; Miller, Marvin J

    2010-05-01

    During the syntheses and studies of natural iron chelators (mycobactins), we serendipitously discovered that a simple, small molecule, oxazoline-containing intermediate 3 displayed surprising anti-tuberculosis activity (MIC of 7.7 microM, average). Herein we report elaboration of SAR around this hit as well as the syntheses and evaluation of a hundred oxazoline- and oxazole-containing compounds derived from an efficient three step process: 1) formation of beta-hydroxy amides with serine or threonine; 2) cyclization to afford oxazolines; and 3) dehydration to give the corresponding oxazoles. A number of compounds prepared by this method were shown to possess impressive activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, extremely low toxicity and therefore high therapeutic indexes, as well as activity against even the more recalcitrant non-replicating form of M. tuberculosis. The uniqueness of their structures and their simplicity should allow them to be further optimized to meet ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) requirements. The syntheses of eight of the most potent in vitro compounds were scaled up and the compounds were tested in an in vivo mouse infection model to evaluate their efficacy before engaging upon more elaborate compound design and optimization.

  16. Bacterial expression and antibiotic activities of recombinant variants of human β-defensins on pathogenic bacteria and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Garcia, Ligia; Ortiz, Ernesto; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-05-01

    Five variants of human β-defensins (HBDs) were expressed in Escherichia coli using two vector systems (pET28a(+) and pQE30) with inducible expression by IPTG. The last vector has not been previously reported as an expression system for HBDs. The recombinant peptides were different in their lengths and overall charge. The HBDs were expressed as soluble or insoluble proteins depending on the expression system used, and the final protein yields ranged from 0.5 to 1.6 mg of peptide/g of wet weight cells, with purities higher than 90%. The recombinant HBDs demonstrated a direct correlation between antimicrobial activity and the number of basic charged residues; that is, their antimicrobial activity was as follows: HBD3-M-HBD2 > HBD3 = HBD3-M = HB2-KLK > HBD2 when assayed against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, HBD2 had the best antimicrobial activity against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv (1.5 μM) and the heterologous tandem peptide, HBD3-M-HBD2, had the best minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value (2.7 μM) against a multidrug resistance strain (MDR) of M. tuberculosis, demonstrating the feasibility of the use of HBDs against pathogenic M. tuberculosis reported to be resistant to commercial antibiotics.

  17. Exploration of Serum Proteomic Profiling and Diagnostic Model That Differentiate Crohn's Disease and Intestinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fenming; Xu, Chengfu; Ning, Longgui; Hu, Fengling; Shan, Guodong; Chen, Hongtan; Yang, Ming; Chen, Wenguo; Yu, Jiekai; Xu, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore the diagnostic models of Crohn’s disease (CD), Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and the differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB by analyzing serum proteome profiles. Methods Serum proteome profiles from 30 CD patients, 21 ITB patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs) were analyzed by using weak cationic magnetic beads combined with MALDI-TOF-MS technique to detect the differentially expressed proteins of serum samples. Three groups were made and compared accordingly: group of CD patients and HCs, group of ITB patients and HCs, group of CD patients and ITB patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to screen the ten most differentiated protein peaks (P < 0.05). Genetic algorithm combining with support vector machine (SVM) was utilized to establish the optimal diagnostic models for CD, ITB and the optimal differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB. The predictive effects of these models were evaluated by Leave one out (LOO) cross validation method. Results There were 236 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and HCs, 305 protein peaks differently expressed between group of ITB patients and HCs, 332 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and ITB patients. Ten most differentially expressed peaks were screened out between three groups respectively (P < 0.05) to establish diagnostic models and differential diagnostic model. A diagnostic model comprising of four protein peaks (M/Z 4964, 3029, 2833, 2900) can well distinguish CD patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 96.7% and 96.7% respectively. A diagnostic model comprising four protein peaks (M/Z 3030, 2105, 2545, 4210) can well distinguish ITB patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 93.3% and 95.2% respectively. A differential diagnostic model comprising three potential biomarkers protein peaks (M/Z 4267, 4223, 1541) can well distinguish CD patients and ITB patients, with a specificity and sensitivity of 76

  18. [Tuberculosis in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Desgrandchamps, D

    1995-10-03

    In Switzerland, in 1992, 957 persons suffered from tuberculosis; 52.3% were Swiss, 47.7% foreigners. Most of the swiss TB patients were more than 65 years old, whereas the foreigners generally were young patients originating from countries with high TB-infection rates. Asylum seekers had much higher TB-case rates (131 cases per 100,000) than other foreigners (27 cases per 100,000) or Swiss (9 cases per 100,000). Special refuge reception centers have been set up in Switzerland, in charge of tuberculosis screening procedures in this high-risk group on arrival to this country. Although HIV and AIDS patients bear a much higher risk of developing tuberculosis once infected, the HIV epidemic did not lead to an increase of tuberculosis in Switzerland so far, since young Swiss are rarely infected with tuberculosis. HIV-infected, drug addicts, homeless persons and alcoholics run a higher risk of contracting tuberculosis only when congregating with a person suffering from active tuberculosis not yet diagnosed or improperly treated. In order to maintain low levels of tuberculosis in Switzerland DOT (directly observed therapy) must be implemented in all patients with uncertain compliance, especially as cultural and social backgrounds become increasingly complex.

  19. Tuberculosis epidemiology in Croydon.

    PubMed

    Harding, M J; Pilkington, P; Thomas, J

    1995-07-01

    A survey of tuberculosis in Croydon between 1988 and 1991, using Chest Clinic health visitor records, showed that the disease occurred most frequently in those of Indian Sub-Continent (ISC) ethnic origin. Of the 222 cases during the 4-year period, 65% were of ISC ethnic origin, 22% were Caucasian and 11% Afro-Caribbean. Non-Caucasian cases were younger (P < 0.0001), and more likely to be female (P = 0.064) or present with non-pulmonary disease (P = 0.064). One-quarter of ISC patients developed active tuberculosis more than 15 years after immigration into the UK. Only seven cases were children. The contact tracing procedure resulted in three additional cases, all of whom were contacts of smear-positive index cases. There were significantly fewer Heaf or radiologically positive contacts of non-smear positive pulmonary, or non-pulmonary index cases (P = 0.0002). The value of the current contact tracing system is discussed.

  20. [Epidemiology of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mjid, M; Cherif, J; Ben Salah, N; Toujani, S; Ouahchi, Y; Zakhama, H; Louzir, B; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Beji, M

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It represents, according to World Health Organization (WHO), one of the most leading causes of death worldwide. With nearly 8 million new cases each year and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis is still a public health problem. Despite of the decrease in incidence, morbidity and mortality remain important partially due to co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus and emergence of resistant bacilli. All WHO regions are not uniformly affected by TB. Africa's region has the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The epidemiological situation is also worrying in Eastern European countries where the proportion of drug-resistant tuberculosis is increasing. These regional disparities emphasize to develop screening, diagnosis and monitoring to the most vulnerable populations. In this context, the Stop TB program, developed by the WHO and its partner's, aims to reduce the burden of disease in accordance with the global targets set for 2015.

  1. Modulation of the Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LipY by Its PE Domain

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher K.; Broadwell, Lindsey J.; Hayne, Cassandra K.; Neher, Saskia B.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors over 160 genes encoding PE/PPE proteins, several of which have roles in the pathogen’s virulence. A number of PE/PPE proteins are secreted via Type VII secretion systems known as the ESX secretion systems. One PE protein, LipY, has a triglyceride lipase domain in addition to its PE domain. LipY can regulate intracellular triglyceride levels and is also exported to the cell wall by one of the ESX family members, ESX-5. Upon export, LipY’s PE domain is removed by proteolytic cleavage. Studies using cells and crude extracts suggest that LipY’s PE domain not only directs its secretion by ESX-5, but also functions to inhibit its enzymatic activity. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the role of LipY’s PE domain in the regulation of its enzymatic activity. First, we established an improved purification method for several LipY variants using detergent micelles. We then used enzymatic assays to confirm that the PE domain down-regulates LipY activity. The PE domain must be attached to LipY in order to effectively inhibit it. Finally, we determined that full length LipY and the mature lipase lacking the PE domain (LipYΔPE) have similar melting temperatures. Based on our improved purification strategy and activity-based approach, we concluded that LipY’s PE domain down-regulates its enzymatic activity but does not impact the thermal stability of the enzyme. PMID:26270534

  2. Cutaneous Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Amylynne; Penrose, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis occurs rarely, despite a high and increasing prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterrium bovis, and the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine can cause tuberculosis involving the skin. Cutaneous tuberculosis can be acquired exogenously or endogenously and present as a multitude of differing clinical morphologies. Diagnosis of these lesions can be difficult, as they resemble many other dermatological conditions that are often primarily considered. Further, microbiological confirmation is poor, despite scientific advances, such as the more frequent use of polymerase chain reaction. The authors report a case that illustrates the challenges faced by dermatologists when considering a diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:20725570

  3. The Effects of Socioeconomic Status, Clinical Factors, and Genetic Ancestry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease in Northeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Young, Bonnie N.; Rendón, Adrian; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian; Baker, Jack; Healy, Meghan; Gross, Jessica M.; Long, Jeffrey; Burgos, Marcos; Hunley, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI) to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic differences in TB

  4. The effects of socioeconomic status, clinical factors, and genetic ancestry on pulmonary tuberculosis disease in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Young, Bonnie N; Rendón, Adrian; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian; Baker, Jack; Healy, Meghan; Gross, Jessica M; Long, Jeffrey; Burgos, Marcos; Hunley, Keith L

    2014-01-01

    Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI) to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic differences in TB

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Hip1 Dampens Macrophage Proinflammatory Responses by Limiting Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Madan-Lala, Ranjna; Peixoto, Katia Vitorello; Re, Fabio; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly successful human pathogen that evades host innate immunity by interfering with macrophage functions. In addition to avoiding macrophage microbicidal activities, M. tuberculosis triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines induced by clinical M. tuberculosis isolates are thought to play an important role in determining tuberculosis disease progression and severity, but the mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis modulates the magnitude of inflammatory responses remain unclear. Here we show that M. tuberculosis restricts robust macrophage activation and dampens proinflammatory responses through the cell envelope-associated serine hydrolase Hip1 (hydrolase important for pathogenesis 1). By transcriptionally profiling macrophages infected with either wild-type or hip1 mutant bacteria, we found that the hip1 mutant induced earlier and significantly higher levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We show that increased activation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and MyD88-dependent signaling pathways mediates the enhanced cytokine secretion induced by the hip1 mutant. Thus, Hip1 restricts the onset and magnitude of proinflammatory cytokines by limiting TLR2-dependent activation. We also show that Hip1 dampens TLR2-independent activation of the inflammasome and limits secretion of interleukin-18 (IL-18). Dampening of TLR2 signaling does not require viable M. tuberculosis or phagocytosis but does require Hip1 catalytic activity. We propose that M. tuberculosis restricts proinflammatory responses by masking cell surface interactions between TLR2 agonists on M. tuberculosis and TLR2 on macrophages. This strategy may allow M. tuberculosis to evade early detection by host immunity, delay the onset of adaptive immune responses, and accelerate disease progression. PMID:21947769

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Promotes Anti-apoptotic Activity of the Macrophage by PtpA Protein-dependent Dephosphorylation of Host GSK3α*

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Valérie; Bach, Horacio; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis tyrosine phosphatase PtpA inhibits two key cellular events in macrophages required for the elimination of invading organisms, phagosome acidification, and maturation. Kinome analysis revealed multiple PtpA-dependent changes to the phosphorylation status of macrophage proteins upon M. tuberculosis infection. Among those proteins we show that PtpA dephosphorylates GSK3α on amino acid Tyr279, which leads to modulation of GSK3α anti-apoptotic activity, promoting pathogen survival early during infection. PMID:25187516

  7. Disease dynamics in cyclic populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis): cowpox virus and vole tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti).

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Rachel D; Lambin, Xavier; Ergon, Torbjørn; Bennett, Malcolm; Graham, Isla M; van Soolingen, Dick; Begon, Michael

    2004-04-22

    The possible role of pathogens in rodent population cycles has been largely neglected since Elton's 'epidemic hypothesis' of 1931. To revisit this question, 12 adjacent, cyclic but out-of-phase populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in North East England were studied and the initial results are presented here. The prevalences of antibodies to cowpox virus and of clinical signs of Mycobacterium microti infection (vole tuberculosis) showed delayed (not direct) density dependence (with a lag of three to six months). This did not result from changes in population structure, even though there were such changes associated with the different phases of the cycle. The prevalences rose as vole numbers rose, and peaked as numbers declined. The apparent lag in the numerical response of infection prevalence to changes in host abundance is consistent with the hypothesis that diseases, singly or in combination, play a hitherto underestimated role in the dynamics of cyclic populations.

  8. Disease dynamics in cyclic populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis): cowpox virus and vole tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti).

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Rachel D.; Lambin, Xavier; Ergon, Torbjørn; Bennett, Malcolm; Graham, Isla M.; van Soolingen, Dick; Begon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The possible role of pathogens in rodent population cycles has been largely neglected since Elton's 'epidemic hypothesis' of 1931. To revisit this question, 12 adjacent, cyclic but out-of-phase populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in North East England were studied and the initial results are presented here. The prevalences of antibodies to cowpox virus and of clinical signs of Mycobacterium microti infection (vole tuberculosis) showed delayed (not direct) density dependence (with a lag of three to six months). This did not result from changes in population structure, even though there were such changes associated with the different phases of the cycle. The prevalences rose as vole numbers rose, and peaked as numbers declined. The apparent lag in the numerical response of infection prevalence to changes in host abundance is consistent with the hypothesis that diseases, singly or in combination, play a hitherto underestimated role in the dynamics of cyclic populations. PMID:15255106

  9. New nitrofurans amenable by isocyanide multicomponent chemistry are active against multidrug-resistant and poly-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krasavin, Mikhail; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Kantin, Grigory; Manicheva, Olga; Dogonadze, Marine; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Karge, Bianka; Brönstrup, Mark

    2017-03-15

    A set of structurally diverse N-amino δ-lactams decorated with a 5-nitro-2-furyl moiety was synthesized using isocyanide-based multicomponent chemistry and evaluated for antibacterial activity. Three compounds displayed a selective and potent (MIC 22-33μM) inhibition of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain growth, while other Gram-positive (MRSA and E. faecium) or Gram-negative (E. coli, P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae) pathogens were not affected. The compounds also displayed moderate-low cytotoxicity, as demonstrated in cell line viability assays. Several multidrug- and poly-resistant patient-derived M. tuberculosis strains were found to be susceptible to treatment with these compounds. The three most potent compounds share a significant structural similarity which provides a basis for further scaffold-hopping analog design.

  10. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of benzoxazinorifamycin KRM-1648 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Simon, B; Heifets, L

    1996-01-01

    Inhibitory and bactericidal activities of KRM-1648 were determined against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages and extracellular M. tuberculosis and M. avium. MICs and MBCs of KRM-1648 against intracellular and extracellular bacteria were substantially lower than those of rifampin. The MICs and MBCs of either drug against the intracellular bacteria were only twofold lower than or equal to the values found for extracellular bacteria. The prolonged effect of KRM-1648 found in this study is probably associated with high ratios of intracellular accumulation, which were 50- to 100-fold higher than that found for rifampin. Further studies on intracellular distribution of KRM-1648 and on the sites of actual interaction between the drug and bacteria residing in macrophages are necessary, as well as evaluation of combined effects of KRM-1648 with other drugs in long-term macrophage culture experiments. PMID:8726023

  11. Unique role for ATG5 in neutrophil-mediated immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Huynh, Jeremy P; Weiss, Leslie A; Park, Sunmin; Kambal, Amal; Debnath, Jayanta; Virgin, Herbert W; Stallings, Christina L

    2015-12-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major global health threat, replicates in macrophages in part by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion, until interferon-γ (IFNγ) activates the macrophage to traffic M. tuberculosis to the lysosome. How IFNγ elicits this effect is unknown, but many studies suggest a role for macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy), a process by which cytoplasmic contents are targeted for lysosomal degradation. The involvement of autophagy has been defined based on studies in cultured cells where M. tuberculosis co-localizes with autophagy factors ATG5, ATG12, ATG16L1, p62, NDP52, BECN1 and LC3 (refs 2-6), stimulation of autophagy increases bacterial killing, and inhibition of autophagy increases bacterial survival. Notably, these studies reveal modest (~1.5-3-fold change) effects on M. tuberculosis replication. By contrast, mice lacking ATG5 in monocyte-derived cells and neutrophils (polymorponuclear cells, PMNs) succumb to M. tuberculosis within 30 days, an extremely severe phenotype similar to mice lacking IFNγ signalling. Importantly, ATG5 is the only autophagy factor that has been studied during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo and autophagy-independent functions of ATG5 have been described. For this reason, we used a genetic approach to elucidate the role for multiple autophagy-related genes and the requirement for autophagy in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, autophagic capacity does not correlate with the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Instead, ATG5 plays a unique role in protection against M. tuberculosis by preventing PMN-mediated immunopathology. Furthermore, while Atg5 is dispensable in alveolar macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection, loss of Atg5 in PMNs can sensitize mice to M. tuberculosis. These findings shift our understanding of the role of ATG5 during M. tuberculosis infection, reveal new outcomes of ATG5 activity, and shed light on early events in innate

  12. Declaring a tuberculosis outbreak over with genomic epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Hatherell, Hollie-Ann; Didelot, Xavier; Pollock, Sue L.; Tang, Patrick; Crisan, Anamaria; Johnston, James C.; Colijn, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    We report an updated method for inferring the time at which an infectious disease was transmitted between persons from a time-labelled pathogen genome phylogeny. We applied the method to 48 Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes as part of a real-time public health outbreak investigation, demonstrating that although active tuberculosis (TB) cases were diagnosed through 2013, no transmission events took place beyond mid-2012. Subsequent cases were the result of progression from latent TB infection to active disease, and not recent transmission. This evolutionary genomic approach was used to declare the outbreak over in January 2015. PMID:28348853

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsX extracellular domain activates the peptidoglycan hydrolase, RipC

    PubMed Central

    Mavrici, Daniela; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Holton, James M.; Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Gee, Christine L.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth and cell division are coordinated with hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan (PG) layer of the cell wall, but the mechanisms of regulation of extracellular PG hydrolases are not well understood. Here we report the biochemical, structural, and genetic analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis homolog of the transmembrane PG-hydrolase regulator, FtsX. The purified FtsX extracellular domain binds the PG peptidase Rv2190c/RipC N-terminal segment, causing a conformational change that activates the enzyme. Deletion of ftsEX and ripC caused similar phenotypes in Mycobacterium smegmatis, as expected for genes in a single pathway. The crystal structure of the FtsX extracellular domain reveals an unprecedented fold containing two lobes connected by a flexible hinge. Mutations in the hydrophobic cleft between the lobes reduce RipC binding in vitro and inhibit FtsX function in M. smegmatis. These studies suggest how FtsX recognizes RipC and support a model in which a conformational change in FtsX links the cell division apparatus with PG hydrolysis. PMID:24843173

  14. Comparison of activities of rifapentine and rifampin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Simon, B; Mezo, N; Heifets, L

    1995-01-01

    The activities of rifapentine and rifampin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages were determined. The MICs and MBCs of rifapentine for intracellular bacteria were two- to fourfold lower than those of rifampin. For extracellular bacteria, this difference was less noticeable. Nevertheless, the more favorable pharmacokinetics of rifapentine over rifampin was addressed in other experimental models. These models s