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Sample records for active tuberculosis infection

  1. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  2. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  3. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  4. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  5. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  6. Circulating B-lymphocytes as potential biomarkers of tuberculosis infection activity.

    PubMed

    Sebina, Ismail; Biraro, Irene A; Dockrell, Hazel M; Elliott, Alison M; Cose, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection activity would significantly improve early diagnosis, treatment and management of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesised that circulating B-lymphocytes may be useful biomarkers of tuberculosis (TB) infection status in highly TB-endemic settings. Ex-vivo and in-vitro mycobacteria-specific B-cell ELISPOT assays were used to examine the plasmablast (PB) and memory B-cell (MBC) responses in the peripheral blood of adult, healthy, community controls (n = 151) and of active TB patients (n = 48) living in Uganda. Frequencies of mycobacteria-specific PBs were markedly higher in active TB patients compared to healthy controls, and, conversely, MBCs were markedly higher in the healthy controls compared to active TB patients. In addition, the community controls with evidence of latent TB infection had higher peripheral blood PB and MBC responses than those without evidence of TB infection. These data demonstrate that peripheral blood B-cell responses are differentially modulated during latent and active M. tuberculosis infection, and suggest that the PB to MBC ratio may be a useful biomarker of TB infection activity.

  7. Comparative Proteomics of Activated THP-1 Cells Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identifies Putative Clearance Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewseekhao, Benjawan; Naranbhai, Vivek; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namwat, Wises; Paemanee, Atchara; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Faksri, Kiatichai

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for determining clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection during anti-tuberculosis therapy or following exposure could facilitate enhanced monitoring and treatment. We screened for biomarkers indicating clearance of Mtb infection in vitro. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using GeLC MSI/MS. Intracellular and secreted proteomes from activated THP-1 cells infected with the Mtb H37Rv strain (MOI = 1) and treated with isoniazid and rifampicin for 1 day (infection stage) and 5 days (clearance stage) were analyzed. Host proteins associated with early infection (n = 82), clearance (n = 121), sustained in both conditions (n = 34) and suppressed by infection (n = 46) were elucidated. Of the potential clearance markers, SSFA2 and CAECAM18 showed the highest and lowest protein intensities, respectively. A western blot of CAECAM18 validated the LC MS/MS result. For three clearance markers (SSFA2, PARP14 and PSME4), in vivo clinical validation was concordantly reported in previous patient cohorts. A network analysis revealed that clearance markers were enriched amongst four protein interaction networks centered on: (i) CD44/CCND1, (ii) IFN-β1/NF-κB, (iii) TP53/TGF-β and (iv) IFN-γ/CCL2. After infection, proteins associated with proliferation, and recruitment of immune cells appeared to be enriched possibly reflecting recruitment of defense mechanisms. Counteracting proteins (CASP3 vs. Akt and NF-κB vs. TP53) associated with apoptosis regulation and its networks were enriched among the early and sustained infection biomarkers, indicating host-pathogen competition. The BRCA1/2 network was suppressed during infection, suggesting that cell proliferation suppression is a feature of Mtb survival. Our study provides insights into the mechanisms of host-Mtb interaction by comparing the stages of infection clearance. The identified clearance biomarkers may be useful in monitoring tuberculosis treatment.

  8. Fc gamma receptors regulate immune activation and susceptibility during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Xu, Jiayong; Casadevall, Arturo; Chan, John

    2008-03-01

    The critical role of cellular immunity during tuberculosis (TB) has been extensively studied, but the impact of Abs upon this infection remains poorly defined. Previously, we demonstrated that B cells are required for optimal protection in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice. FcgammaR modulate immunity by engaging Igs produced by B cells. We report that C57BL/6 mice deficient in inhibitory FcgammaRIIB (RIIB-/-) manifested enhanced mycobacterial containment and diminished immunopathology compared with wild-type controls. These findings corresponded with enhanced pulmonary Th1 responses, evidenced by increased IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells, and elevated expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 in the lungs. Upon M. tuberculosis infection and immune complex engagement, RIIB-/- macrophages produced more of the p40 component of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-12. These data strongly suggest that FcgammaRIIB engagement can dampen the TB Th1 response by attenuating IL-12p40 production or activation of APCs. Conversely, C57BL/6 mice lacking the gamma-chain shared by activating FcgammaR had enhanced susceptibility and exacerbated immunopathology upon M. tuberculosis challenge, associated with increased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Thus, engagement of distinct FcgammaR can divergently affect cytokine production and susceptibility during M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  10. Evaluation of heat shock proteins for discriminating between latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Seema D; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is of the utmost concern. The available tests, the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT-G) cannot discriminate between active TB and LTBI. Therefore, the aim of the study is to identify new biomarkers that can discriminate between active TB and LTBI and can also assess the risk of the individual developing active TB. In total, 55 blood samples were collected, of which 10 samples were from the active TB infection group, 10 were from the high-risk exposure group, 23 were from the low-risk exposure group, and 12 were from healthy controls living in a non-TB endemic area. A panel of heat shock proteins (Hsps), including host Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Hsp16, were evaluated in all of the collected samples using ELISA. The levels of the host Hsp(s) (Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90) and MTB Hsp16 were significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the active TB group compared to the high-risk exposure group, the low-risk exposure group and the control group. Notably, the levels of the same panel of Hsp(s) were elevated in the high-risk exposure group compared to the low-risk exposure group. On follow-up, out of the 10 high-risk exposure participants, 3 converted into active TB, indicating that this group has the highest risk of developing TB. Thus, the evaluated panel of Hsp(s) can discriminate between LTBI and active TB. They can also identify individuals who are at the highest risk of developing active TB. Because they can be rapidly detected, Hsp(s) have an edge over the existing diagnostic tools for LTBI. The evaluation of these proteins will be useful in designing better diagnostic methods for LTBI.

  11. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  12. [Primary infection and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Toujani, S; Ben Salah, N; Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ouahchy, Y; Zakhama, H; Daghfous, J; Beji, M; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Louzir, B

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem worldwide. Indeed, a third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and more than 8 million new cases of tuberculosis each year. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common location. Its diagnosis is difficult and often established with a delay causing a spread of infection. The diagnosis of tuberculosis infection is mainly based on immunological tests represented by the tuberculin skin test and detection of gamma interferon, while the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is suspected on epidemiological context, lasting general and respiratory symptoms, contrasting usually with normal lung examination, and a chest radiography showing suggestive lesions. The radioclinical feature may be atypical in patients with extreme ages and in case of immunodeficiency. Confirmation of tuberculosis is bacteriological. Conventional bacteriological methods remain the reference. Innovative tests using the technique of molecular biology have improved the diagnosis of tuberculosis in terms of sensitivity and especially speed. However, those techniques are of limited use.

  13. Host Protein Biomarkers Identify Active Tuberculosis in HIV Uninfected and Co-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Cortes, Laetitia; Croteau, Pascal; Yanofsky, Corey; Mentinova, Marija; Rajotte, Isabelle; Schirm, Michael; Zhou, Yiyong; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Larsen, Michelle; Allard, René; Hunter, Joanna; Paramithiotis, Eustache

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed to improve rapid TB diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify serum protein expression changes associated with TB but not latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), uninfected states, or respiratory diseases other than TB (ORD). Serum samples from 209 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and co-infected (HIV+) individuals were studied. In the discovery phase samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and in the verification phase biologically independent samples were analyzed via a multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay. Compared to LTBI and ORD, host proteins were significantly differentially expressed in TB, and involved in the immune response, tissue repair, and lipid metabolism. Biomarker panels whose composition differed according to HIV status, and consisted of 8 host proteins in HIV− individuals (CD14, SEPP1, SELL, TNXB, LUM, PEPD, QSOX1, COMP, APOC1), or 10 host proteins in HIV+ individuals (CD14, SEPP1, PGLYRP2, PFN1, VASN, CPN2, TAGLN2, IGFBP6), respectively, distinguished TB from ORD with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.96 for HIV− TB, 0.95 for HIV+ TB). These results warrant validation in larger studies but provide promise that host protein biomarkers could be the basis for a rapid, blood-based test for TB. PMID:26501113

  14. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  15. Discriminating Active Tuberculosis from Latent Tuberculosis Infection by flow cytometric measurement of CD161-expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianting; Xu, Qian; Chen, Qi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Mingxia; Cai, Yi; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Yiping; Deng, Guofang; Deng, Qunyi; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) significantly increases the possibility for early diagnosis of tuberculosis, but IGRAs alone cannot discriminate active TB from LTBI. Therefore, fast and reliable discrimination of active tuberculosis, especially bacteriology negative tuberculosis, from LTBI is a great necessity. Here we established an assay based on flow cytometric multiparameter assay assessing expression of CD161 along with CD3, CD4, and CD8, whereby a set of indices formulated by the percentages of CD3+CD161+, CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ T cells multiplied with lymphocyte/monocyte ratio were established. Application of the CD3+CD8+CD161+ index to compare a cohort of active tuberculosis with a cohort of LTBI or health control yielded 0.7662 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6559–0.8552) or 0.7922 (95%  CI 0.6846–0.8763) for sensitivity and 0.9048 (95%  CI 0.8209–0.9580) or 0.8939 (95% CI 0.8392–0.9349) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB+; the corresponding results were 0.7481 (95%  CI 0.6648–0.8198) or 0.7557 (95%  CI 0.6730–0.8265) for sensitivity and 0.8571 (95%  CI 0.7637–0.9239) or 0.8603 (95%  CI 0.8008–0.9075) for specificity when the TB cohort was AFB−. Our results reveal that in combination with IGRAs, CD161-based indices provide a novel, fast diagnostic solution addressing the limitation of current tuberculosis diagnostics. PMID:26643453

  16. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  17. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit.

  18. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-05

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes.

  19. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease.

  20. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB.

  1. Antigen-Specific IFN-γ Responses Correlate with the Activity of M. tuberculosis Infection but Are Not Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nikitina, Irina Yu.; Panteleev, Alexander V.; Karpina, Natalya L.; Bagdasarian, Tatef R.; Burmistrova, Irina A.; Andreevskaya, Sofia N.; Chernousova, Larisa N.; Vasilyeva, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    IFN-γ is a key cytokine in antituberculosis (TB) defense. However, how the levels of its secretion affect M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is not clear. We have analyzed associations between IFN-γ responses measured in QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-tube (QFT) assay, TB disease severity, and Mtb infection activity. TB severity was evaluated based on the results of radiological, microbiological, and clinical examinations. Antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion did not correlate with TB severity. Mitogen-induced IFN-γ secretion correlated inversely with the form of pulmonary pathology and the area of affected pulmonary tissue; the levels of spontaneous IFN-γ secretion correlated with patients' age (r = 0.395, p = 0.001). Mtb infection activity was evaluated based on radiological data of lung tissue infiltration, destruction, dissemination or calcification, and condensation. The rate of positive QFT results and the levels of antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion increased in a row: patients with residual TB lesions < patients with low TB activity < patients with high TB activity. Thus, antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion and QFT results did not associate with TB severity but associated with the infection activity. The results suggest that quantitative parameters of IFN-γ secretion play a minor role in determining the course of TB disease but mirror the activity of the infectious process. PMID:28042583

  2. Antigen-Specific IFN-γ Responses Correlate with the Activity of M. tuberculosis Infection but Are Not Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Irina Yu; Panteleev, Alexander V; Sosunova, Ekaterina V; Karpina, Natalya L; Bagdasarian, Tatef R; Burmistrova, Irina A; Andreevskaya, Sofia N; Chernousova, Larisa N; Vasilyeva, Irina A; Lyadova, Irina V

    2016-01-01

    IFN-γ is a key cytokine in antituberculosis (TB) defense. However, how the levels of its secretion affect M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is not clear. We have analyzed associations between IFN-γ responses measured in QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-tube (QFT) assay, TB disease severity, and Mtb infection activity. TB severity was evaluated based on the results of radiological, microbiological, and clinical examinations. Antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion did not correlate with TB severity. Mitogen-induced IFN-γ secretion correlated inversely with the form of pulmonary pathology and the area of affected pulmonary tissue; the levels of spontaneous IFN-γ secretion correlated with patients' age (r = 0.395, p = 0.001). Mtb infection activity was evaluated based on radiological data of lung tissue infiltration, destruction, dissemination or calcification, and condensation. The rate of positive QFT results and the levels of antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion increased in a row: patients with residual TB lesions < patients with low TB activity < patients with high TB activity. Thus, antigen-driven IFN-γ secretion and QFT results did not associate with TB severity but associated with the infection activity. The results suggest that quantitative parameters of IFN-γ secretion play a minor role in determining the course of TB disease but mirror the activity of the infectious process.

  3. Cellular interactions in bovine tuberculosis: release of active mycobacteria from infected macrophages by antigen‐stimulated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Liébana, E; Aranaz, A; Aldwell, F E; McNair, J; Neill, S D; Smyth, A J; Pollock, J M

    2000-01-01

    The outcome of Mycobacterium bovis infections depends on the interactions of infected macrophages with T lymphocytes. Several studies in humans and in mouse models have suggested an important role for cytotoxicity in the protective immune response to mycobacterial infections, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been shown to elicit appropriate cytolytic activity. The present study investigated in vitro interactions of T cells with M. bovis‐infected macrophages in bovine tuberculosis. The results showed that following interaction with antigen‐stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected cattle, there was an increased presence of M. bovis in the extracellular compartment of infected macrophage cultures, as measured by incorporation of [3H]uracil into mycobacterial RNA. Furthermore, out of a panel of T‐cell clones from infected cattle, it was found that a higher proportion of CD8+ clones produced an increase in the number of metabolically active extracellular M. bovis organisms compared with CD4+ clones. Finally, a positive correlation between percentage of antigen‐dependent release of mycobacteria and total uracil uptake by M. bovis within culture systems was detected. This could be regarded as an indication of preferential intracellular control of mycobacteria by activated macrophages. PMID:10651937

  4. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M; Sherman, David R; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L; Andersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress-induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56.

  5. Response to region of difference 1 (RD1) epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals enrolled with suspected active tuberculosis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, D; Carrara, S; Butera, O; Bizzoni, F; Casetti, R; Girardi, E; Goletti, D

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent co-infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, and which still presents diagnostic difficulties. Recently we set up an assay based on interferon (IFN)-γ response to region of difference 1 (RD1) peptides selected by computational analysis which is associated with active Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication. The objective of this study was to investigate the response to RD1 selected peptides in HIV-1-infected individuals in a clinical setting. The mechanisms of this immune response and comparison with other immune assays were also investigated. A total of 111 HIV-infected individuals with symptoms and signs consistent with active tuberculosis were enrolled prospectively. Interferon (IFN)-γ responses to RD1 selected peptides and recall antigens were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Results were correlated with CD4− T cell counts, individuals' characteristics, tuberculin skin test, QuantiFERON-TB Gold and T-SPOT.TB. Results from 21 (19%) individuals were indeterminate due to in vitro cell anergy. Among ‘non-anergic’ individuals, sensitivity for active tuberculosis of the assay based on RD1 selected peptides was 67% (24 of 36), specificity was 94% (three of 54). The assay also resulted positive in cases of extra-pulmonary and smear-negative pulmonary active tuberculosis. The response was mediated by CD4− effector/memory T cells and correlated with CD4− T cell counts, but not with plasma HIV-RNA load. Moreover, the RD1 selected peptides assay had the highest diagnostic odds ratio for active tuberculosis compared to tuberculin skin test (TST), QuantiFERON-TB Gold and T-SPOT.TB. RD1 selected peptides assay is associated with M. tuberculosis replication in HIV-infected individuals, although T cell anergy remains an important obstacle to be overcome before the test can be proposed as a diagnostic tool. PMID:17680823

  6. Hyperthermostable binding molecules on phage: Assay components for point-of-care diagnostics for active tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Spencer, John; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2017-03-15

    Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The low sensitivity, extended processing time, and high expense of current diagnostics are major challenges to the detection and treatment of tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ornithine transcarbamylase (Mtb OTC, Rv1656) has been identified in the urine of patients with active TB infection and is a promising target for point-of-care diagnostics. Specific binding proteins with low nanomolar affinities for Mtb OTC were selected from a phage display library built upon a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold. Phage particles displaying Sso7d variants were utilized to generate a sandwich ELISA-based assay for Mtb OTC. The assay response is linear between 2 ng/mL and 125 ng/mL recombinant Mtb OTC and has a limit of detection of 400 pg/mL recombinant Mtb OTC. The assay employing a phage-based detection reagent is comparable to commercially-available antibody-based biosensors. Importantly, the assay maintains functionality at both neutral and basic pH in presence of salt and urea over the range of concentrations typical for human urine. Phage-based diagnostic systems may feature improved physical stability and cost of production relative to traditional antibody-based reagents, without sacrificing specificity and sensitivity.

  7. Association of autophagy-related IRGM polymorphisms with latent versus active tuberculosis infection in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Qian; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Feng; Wang, Chunyu; Wang, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    The autophagy-related immunity-related GTPase family M protein, IRGM, plays an important role in the defense against tuberculosis (TB) infection. IRGM polymorphisms are associated with TB infection susceptibility, and recent studies demonstrate host genetic differences between active and latent TB. Here, we investigated the association between IRGM polymorphisms and TB infection type in a Chinese population. We recruited 268 and 321 patients with confirmed or latent TB, respectively, and 475 TB-free healthy controls. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs10065172, rs10051924, and rs13361189 within IRGM were genotyped using TaqMan-based assays. Interferon-gamma release levels were tested by T-SPOT. rs10065172 (P = 0.024, OR 0.67 (95% CI 0.48-0.95)), rs10051924 (P = 0.01, OR 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.90)), and rs13361189 (P = 0.055, OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.51-1.01)) were associated with a protective role against latent TB progression. Haplotype analysis showed that TCC was protective for latent TB (P = 0.022, OR 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.96)) whereas TTC conferred a higher risk of active TB. Additionally, patients with the rs10065172 TT genotype had a higher response to TB specific antigens. Thus, IRGM polymorphism differences between latent and active TB suggests that genetic differences in autophagy might partly affect host TB infection status.

  8. Type I IFN Inhibits Alternative Macrophage Activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Leads to Enhanced Protection in the Absence of IFN-γ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Jeremy; McNab, Finlay W.; Torrado, Egídio; Cardoso, Filipa; Machado, Henrique; Castro, Flávia; Cardoso, Vânia; Gaifem, Joana; Wu, Xuemei; Appelberg, Rui; Castro, António Gil; O’Garra, Anne; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis causes ∼1.5 million deaths every year, thus remaining a leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the world. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that type I IFN plays a detrimental role in tuberculosis pathogenesis, likely by interfering with IFN-γ–dependent immunity. In this article, we reveal a novel mechanism by which type I IFN may confer protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the absence of IFN-γ signaling. We show that production of type I IFN by M. tuberculosis–infected macrophages induced NO synthase 2 and inhibited arginase 1 gene expression. In vivo, absence of both type I and type II IFN receptors led to strikingly increased levels of arginase 1 gene expression and protein activity in infected lungs, characteristic of alternatively activated macrophages. This correlated with increased lung bacterial burden and pathology and decreased survival compared with mice deficient in either receptor. Increased expression of other genes associated with alternatively activated macrophages, as well as increased expression of Th2-associated cytokines and decreased TNF expression, were also observed. Thus, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, type I IFN suppressed the switching of macrophages from a more protective classically activated phenotype to a more permissive alternatively activated phenotype. Together, our data support a model in which suppression of alternative macrophage activation by type I IFN during M. tuberculosis infection, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, contributes to host protection. PMID:27849167

  9. Disseminated Tuberculosis Presenting as Baker's Cyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Sami; Waqar, Sana

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of coexisting immunocompromised state and lack of specific symptoms a reactivation of treated mycobacterial tuberculosis (MTB) infection is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis of leg pain. We present a unique case of disseminated tuberculosis presenting as an infected Baker's cyst in a 73-year-old immunocompetent male. PMID:28163945

  10. [Tuberculosis in HIV-infected and AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanova, A G; Stepanova, E V; Romanova, E I; Evseeva, I D

    2003-01-01

    The course of the combined infection (tuberculosis plus HIV-infection) has been analysed in 41 patients. Of them, 24 patients developed tuberculosis in the presence of HIV-infection (group 1) and 17 were infected with HIV when they already had tuberculosis running up to 5 years. HIV-infection in group 1 ran a more severe course, the patients developed generalized, disseminated and complicated forms of tuberculosis with more frequent lethal outcome. 39 patients of both groups received specific antituberculous therapy including 1-5 drugs. A response to treatment was achieved in 23 (60%) patients (52 and 47.8% at early and late HIV-infection stages, respectively). Treatment failure was explained by development of severe opportunistic infections and secondary diseases (generalized cytomegalovirus infection, advanced candidiasis, toxoplasmosis), poor compliance, asocial life style, advanced tuberculosis process, late diagnosis, inadequate treatment. It is shown that in late HIV-infection positive results of treatment can be expected only in early detection of tuberculosis and active long-term treatment.

  11. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  12. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  13. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  15. The pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an old enemy of the human race, with evidence of infection observed as early as 5000 years ago. Although more host-restricted than Mycobacterium bovis, which can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, M. tuberculosis can infect, and cause morbidity and mortality in, several veterinary species as well. As M. tuberculosis is one of the earliest described bacterial pathogens, the literature describing this organism is vast and overwhelming. This review strives to distill what is currently known about this bacterium and the disease it causes for the veterinary pathologist.

  16. Prevalence of Latent and Active Tuberculosis among Dairy Farm Workers Exposed to Cattle Infected by Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Gonzalez, Pedro; Soberanis-Ramos, Orbelin; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Chavez-Mazari, Barbara; Barrios-Herrera, Ma Teresa; Torres-Rojas, Martha; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Singh, Mahavir; Gonzalez-Aguirre, Adrian; Ponce de Leon-Garduño, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Background Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW) exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4–80.9%) by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0–64.0%) by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31–5.64) and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30) adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. Conclusions We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting. PMID:23638198

  17. The Biology of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Giovanni; Sali, Michela; Fadda, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a major threat to mankind and during the last thirty years we have seen a recrudescence of the disease even in countries where TB was thought to be conquered. It is common opinion that more effective control tools such as new diagnostics, a new vaccine and new drugs are urgently needed to control the global pandemic, though the so far insufficient understanding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mechanism of pathogenesis is a major obstacle for the development of these control tools. In this review, we will summarize the recent advancement in the understanding of Mtb biology and on the pathogenesis of Mtb infection with emphasis on latent infection, with the change in paradigm of the last few years where the dichotomy between latent and active disease has been reconsidered in favor of a dynamic equilibrium between the host and the bacilli, encompassing a continuous spectrum of conditions that has been named TB spectrum. Implications for the diagnosis and control of disease in certain population will also be discussed. PMID:24363885

  18. Potential Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Specific IL-2 and IFN-γ Responses in Discriminating between Latent Infection and Active Disease after Long-Term Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qin; Wei, Wei; Sha, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) could accurately diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection. However, these assays do not discriminate between latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis disease (ATB). Here, a total of 177 subjects, including 65 patients with ATB, 43 subjects with LTBI, and 69 TB-uninfected controls (CON group) were enrolled. The concentration of IFN-γ, IP-10, and IL-2 was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after short-term (24h) or long-term (72h) stimulation with TB antigens including ESAT-6/CFP-10 (EC) and purified protein derivative (PPD).EC-stimulated IL-2 and gamma interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) release (24h and 72h) showed a good diagnostic performance in distinguishing between TB-infected and TB-uninfected individuals, but failed to discriminate between ATB and LTBI. After 72h of incubation, the release of IL-2 was higher in LTBI patients after stimulation with EC and PPD. The PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after 72h incubation had the diagnostic potential to discriminate between ATB and LTBI, with a sensitivity of 90.8% and a specificity of 97.7%. In addition, these new biomarkers, combined with T-SPOT test in a two-step strategy, were validated with high levels of accuracy in a prospective clinical-based cohort. Collectively, the PPD-stimulated IL-2/IFN-γ ratio after long-term incubation may be an alternative diagnostic biomarker in distinguishing between active TB patients and subjects with latent infection. PMID:28033330

  19. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  20. Prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    de Navarro, Pedro Daibert; de Almeida, Isabela Neves; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Ceccato, Maria das Graças; Maciel, Mônica Maria Delgado; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of and the factors associated with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in prisoners in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional cohort study conducted in two prisons in Minas Gerais. Tuberculin skin tests were performed in the individuals who agreed to participate in the study. Results: A total of 1,120 individuals were selected for inclusion in this study. The prevalence of LTBI was 25.2%. In the multivariate analysis, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients within prisons (adjusted OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.05-2.18) and use of inhaled drugs (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13). Respiratory symptoms were identified in 131 (11.7%) of the participants. Serological testing for HIV was performed in 940 (83.9%) of the participants, and the result was positive in 5 (0.5%). Two cases of active tuberculosis were identified during the study period. Conclusions: Within the prisons under study, the prevalence of LTBI was high. In addition, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients and with the use of inhaled drugs. Our findings demonstrate that it is necessary to improve the conditions in prisons, as well as to introduce strategies, such as chest X-ray screening, in order to detect tuberculosis cases and, consequently, reduce M. tuberculosis infection within the prison system. PMID:27812634

  1. Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Pawar, Santosh; Myers, Amy; Pegu, Amarenda; Fuhrman, Carl; Reinhart, Todd A.; Capuano, Saverio V.; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the early events of infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cynomolgus macaque is a useful model of tuberculosis, with strong similarities to human tuberculosis. In this study, eight cynomolgus macaques were infected bronchoscopically with low-dose M. tuberculosis; clinical, immunologic, microbiologic, and pathologic events were assessed 3 to 6 weeks postinfection. Gross pathological abnormalities were observed as early as 3 weeks, including Ghon complex formation by 5 weeks postinfection. Caseous granulomas were observed in the lung as early as 4 weeks postinfection. Only caseous granulomas were observed in the lungs at these early time points, reflecting a rigorous initial response. T-cell activation (CD29 and CD69) and chemokine receptor (CXCR3 and CCR5) expression appeared localized to different anatomic sites. Activation markers were increased on cells from airways and only at modest levels on cells in peripheral blood. The priming of mycobacterium-specific T cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon occurred slowly, with responses seen only after 4 weeks of infection. These responses were observed from T lymphocytes in blood, airways, and hilar lymph node, with responses predominantly localized to the site of infection. From these studies, we conclude that immune responses to M. tuberculosis are relatively slow in the local and peripheral compartments and that necrosis occurs surprisingly quickly during granuloma formation. PMID:16790751

  2. Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ... Tuberculosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Infection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...resistant state, sometimes reactivating to cause tuberculosis (TB) decades after the primary infection , has puzzled scientists for years. This

  3. Tuberculosis, AIDS and tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection in a large city

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Nanci Michele; de Oliveira, Helenice Bosco

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB), AIDS and tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection in the municipality of Campinas, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in the period 2001 – 2009. A historical trend study, it uses secondary data from the Tuberculosis Surveillance Database of the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and the São Paulo State STD-AIDS Center of Excellence and Training. It included new cases of TB, AIDS, and of tuberculosis-AIDS reported in the municipality of Campinas. A decrease in cases of TB until 2007 was observed, with an increase in 2008 and 2009. There was a general reduction in AIDS from 2007, but with an increase among men aged 60 or over, in the years 2007 to 2009. For tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection, the tendency was to reduce. The proportion of HIV tests not undertaken, among patients with tuberculosis, was high (27.5%). This scenario shows the need for integration of the databanks into the planning and control activities. PMID:22990163

  4. Treatment guidelines for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been established as valid for patients at high risk for developing active tuberculosis. Treatment of LTBI is also considered an important strategy for eliminating tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. In recent years, interferon-gamma release assays have come into widespread use; isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy for HIV patients has come to be recommended worldwide; and there have been increases in both types of biologics used in the treatment of immune diseases as well as the diseases susceptible to treatment. In light of the above facts, the Prevention Committee and the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have jointly drafted these guidelines. In determining subjects for LTBI treatment, the following must be considered: 1) risk of TB infection/ development; 2) infection diagnosis; 3) chest image diagnosis; 4) the impact of TB development; 5) the possible manifestation of side effects; and 6) the prospects of treatment completion. LTBI treatment is actively considered when relative risk is deemed 4 or higher, including risk factors such as the following: HIV/AIDS, organ transplants (immunosuppressant use), silicosis, dialysis due to chronic renal failure, recent TB infection (within 2 years), fibronodular shadows in chest radiographs (untreated old TB), the use of biologics, and large doses of corticosteroids. Although the risk is lower, the following risk factors require consideration of LTBI treatment when 2 or more of them are present: use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, use of other immunosuppressants, diabetes, being underweight, smoking, gastrectomy, and so on. In principle, INH is administered for a period of 6 or 9 months. When INH cannot be used, rifampicin is administered for a period of 4 or 6 months. It is believed that there are no reasons to support long-term LTBI treatment for immunosuppressed patients in Japan, where the risk of infection is not considered markedly high

  5. New approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With nearly 9 million new active disease cases and 2 million deaths occurring worldwide every year, tuberculosis continues to remain a major public health problem. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to active disease in only ~10% people. An effective immune response in remaining individuals stops M. tuberculosis multiplication. However, the pathogen is completely eradicated in ~10% people while others only succeed in containment of infection as some bacilli escape killing and remain in non-replicating (dormant) state (latent tuberculosis infection) in old lesions. The dormant bacilli can resuscitate and cause active disease if a disruption of immune response occurs. Nearly one-third of world population is latently infected with M. tuberculosis and 5%-10% of infected individuals will develop active disease during their life time. However, the risk of developing active disease is greatly increased (5%-15% every year and ~50% over lifetime) by human immunodeficiency virus-coinfection. While active transmission is a significant contributor of active disease cases in high tuberculosis burden countries, most active disease cases in low tuberculosis incidence countries arise from this pool of latently infected individuals. A positive tuberculin skin test or a more recent and specific interferon-gamma release assay in a person without overt signs of active disease indicates latent tuberculosis infection. Two commercial interferon-gamma release assays, QFT-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB have been developed. The standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection is daily therapy with isoniazid for nine months. Other options include therapy with rifampicin for 4 months or isoniazid + rifampicin for 3 months or rifampicin + pyrazinamide for 2 months or isoniazid + rifapentine for 3 months. Identification of latently infected individuals and their treatment has lowered tuberculosis incidence in rich, advanced countries. Similar approaches also hold great promise for other

  6. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI.

  7. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  8. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Badger social networks correlate with tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nicola; Carter, Stephen P; Dall, Sasha R X; Delahay, Richard J; McDonald, Jennifer L; Bearhop, Stuart; McDonald, Robbie A

    2013-10-21

    Although disease hosts are classically assumed to interact randomly [1], infection is likely to spread across structured and dynamic contact networks [2]. We used social network analyses to investigate contact patterns of group-living European badgers, Meles meles, which are an important wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (TB). We found that TB test-positive badgers were socially isolated from their own groups but were more important for flow, potentially of infection, between social groups. The distinctive social position of infected badgers may help explain how social stability mitigates, and social perturbation increases, the spread of infection in badgers.

  10. Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Biyikli, Oguz Oben; Baysak, Aysegul; Ece, Gulfem; Oz, Adnan Tolga; Ozhan, Mustafa Hikmet; Berdeli, Afig

    2016-01-01

    Background One-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Investigation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has revealed new information regarding the immunopathogenesis of this disease. Toll-like receptors can recognize various ligands with a lipoprotein structure in the bacilli. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 have been identified in association with tuberculosis infection. Objectives The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between TLR polymorphism and infection progress. Methods Twenty-nine patients with a radiologically, microbiologically, and clinically proven active tuberculosis diagnosis were included in this 25-month study. Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR-4 polymorphisms and allele distributions were compared between these 29 patients and 100 healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood samples were taken from all patients. Genotyping of TLR-2, TLR-4, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor was performed. The extraction step was completed with a Qiagen mini blood purification system kit (Qiagen, Ontario, Canada) using a peripheral blood sample. The genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results In total, 19 of the 29 patients with tuberculosis infection had a TLR-2 polymorphism, and 20 of the 100 healthy subjects had a TLR-2 polymorphism (P < 0.001). The TLR-4 polymorphism and interferon-γ allele distributions were not statistically correlated. Conclusions Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphism is a risk factor for tuberculosis infection. The limiting factor in this study was the lack of investigation of the interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, which are important in the development of infection. Detection of lower levels of these cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, especially among patients with TLR-2 defects, will provide new data that may support the results of this study. PMID:27942355

  11. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  12. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-03-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs.

  13. Early dynamics of T helper cell cytokines and T regulatory cells in response to treatment of active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, S L; Tonby, K; Kvale, D; Dyrhol-Riise, A M

    2015-03-01

    Biomarkers that can identify tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as markers for efficient therapy are requested. We have studied T cell cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and degranulation (CD107a) as well as subsets of CD4(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs ) after in-vitro Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen stimulation [early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6, culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, antigen 85 (Ag85)] in 32 patients with active tuberculosis (TB) disease throughout 24 weeks of effective TB treatment. A significant decline in the fraction of Mtb-specific total IFN-γ and single IFN-γ-producing T cells was already observed after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas the pool of single IL-2(+) cells increased over time for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The Treg subsets CD25(high) CD127(low) , CD25(high) CD147(++) and CD25(high) CD127(low) CD161(+) expanded significantly after Mtb antigen stimulation in vitro at all time-points, whereas the CD25(high) CD127(low) CD39(+) Tregs remained unchanged. The fraction of CD25(high) CD127(low) Tregs increased after 8 weeks of treatment. Thus, we revealed an opposing shift of Tregs and intracellular cytokine production during treatment. This may indicate that functional signatures of the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can serve as immunological correlates of early curative host responses. Whether such signatures can be used as biomarkers in monitoring and follow-up of TB treatment needs to be explored further.

  14. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis During Infection: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is considered one of the biggest infectious disease killers worldwide. A significant amount of attention has been directed toward revealing genes involved in the virulence and pathogenesis of this air-born pathogen. With the advances in technologies for transcriptional profiling, several groups, including ours, took advantage of DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional units differentially regulated by M. tuberculosis within a host. The main idea behind this approach is that pathogens tend to regulate their gene expression levels depending on the host microenvironment, and preferentially express those needed for survival. Identifying this class of genes will improve our understanding of pathogenesis. In our case, we identified an in vivo expressed genomic island that was preferentially active in murine lungs during early infection, as well as groups of genes active during chronic tuberculosis. Other studies have identified additional gene groups that are active during macrophage infection and even in human lungs. Despite all of these findings, one of the lingering questions remaining was whether in vivo expressed transcripts are relevant to the virulence, pathogenesis, and persistence of the organism. The work of our group and others addressed this question by examining the contribution of in vivo expressed genes using a strategy based on gene deletions followed by animal infections. Overall, the analysis of most of the in vivo expressed genes supported a role of these genes in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Further, these data suggest that in vivo transcriptional profiling is a valid approach to identify genes required for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:21738523

  15. Tuberculosis and the Risk of Infection with Other Intracellular Bacteria: a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, M. A.; Fiske, C. T.; Jones, T. F.; Warkentin, J.; Shepherd, B. E.; Ingram, L.A.; Maruri, F.; Sterling, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Persons who develop tuberculosis may have subtle immune defects that could predispose to other intracellular bacterial infections (ICBIs). We obtained data on tuberculosis and five ICBIs (Chlamydia trachomatis,Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., and Listeria monocytogenes) reported to the Tennessee Department of Health, USA, 2000–2011. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) comparing ICBIs in persons who developed tuberculosis and ICBIs in the Tennessee population, adjusted for age, sex, race and ethnicity were estimated. IRRs were not significantly elevated for all ICBIs combined (IRR, 0.87, 95%CI: 0.71–1.06). C. trachomatis rate was lowest in the year post-tuberculosis diagnosis (IRR, 0.17; 95%CI, 0.04–0.70). More Salmonella infections occurred in extrapulmonary tuberculosis compared to pulmonary tuberculosis patients (IRR, 14.3, 95%CI: 1.67–122); however, this appeared to be related to HIV-coinfection. Tuberculosis was not associated with an increased risk of other ICBIs. In fact, fewer C. trachomatis infections occurred after recent tuberculosis diagnosis. Reasons for this association, including reduced exposure, protection conferred by anti-tuberculosis drugs or macrophage activation by M. tuberculosis infection warrant further investigation. PMID:25148655

  16. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases proposed for treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-a therapy. When TB (LTBI or AT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-a therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-a therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. If TST is performed in immunosuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-a therapy, even in the presence of a negative test.

  17. One Episode of Self-Resolving Plasmodium yoelii Infection Transiently Exacerbates Chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Jannike; Eggers, Lars; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas; Schneider, Bianca E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and tuberculosis (Tb) are two of the main causes of death from infectious diseases globally. The pathogenic agents, Plasmodium parasites and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are co-endemic in many regions in the world, however, compared to other co-infections like HIV/Tb or helminth/Tb, malaria/Tb has been given less attention both in clinical and immunological studies. Due to the lack of sufficient human data, the impact of malaria on Tb and vice versa is difficult to estimate but co-infections are likely to occur very frequently. Due to its immunomodulatory properties malaria might be an underestimated risk factor for latent or active Tb patients particularly in high-endemic malaria settings were people experience reinfections very frequently. In the present study, we used the non-lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii to investigate, how one episode of self-resolving malaria impact on a chronic M. tuberculosis infection. P. yoelii co-infection resulted in exacerbation of Tb disease as demonstrated by increased pathology and cellular infiltration of the lungs which coincided with elevated levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. T cell responses were not impaired in co-infected mice but enhanced and likely contributed to increased cytokine production. We found a slight but statistically significant increase in M. tuberculosis burden in co-infected animals and increased lung CFU was positively correlated with elevated levels of TNFα but not IL-10. Infection with P. yoelii induced the recruitment of a CD11c+ population into lungs and spleens of M. tuberculosis infected mice. CD11c+ cells isolated from P. yoelii infected spleens promoted survival and growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro. 170 days after P. yoelii infection changes in immunopathology and cellular immune responses were no longer apparent while M. tuberculosis numbers were still slightly higher in lungs, but not in spleens of co-infected mice. In conclusion, one episode of P. yoelii co-infection

  18. Activation of apoptosis, but not necrosis, during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection correlated with decreased bacterial growth: role of TNF-alpha, IL-10, caspases and phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Arcila, Mary Luz; Sánchez, María Dulfary; Ortiz, Blair; Barrera, Luis Fernando; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2007-10-01

    Monocyte/macrophage cell death is an important event during mycobacterial infection. To get insights about the influence of mononuclear phagocyte maturation in this event we compared the response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection of fresh isolated monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from healthy tuberculin positive individuals. Both monocytes and MDM underwent apoptosis, however, there was a higher numbers of apoptotic macrophages with active Caspases 8 and 9. We also compared Mtb-induced cell death in U937 pro-monocytes and PMA-differentiated cells (U937D). In response to Mtb infection, U937D cells underwent apoptosis and promonocytes both apoptosis and necrosis. There were high number of U937D cells producing TNF-alpha and high number of IL-10+ promonocytes. These evidences suggest that U937 could be a valid model to study the mechanisms that rule Mtb-induced cell death. Experiments with the cell line and fresh isolated mononuclear cells with pharmacological inhibitors showed that induction of necrosis involved calcium and cAMP signals resulting in IL-10 production. Necrosis also correlated with Caspase 3, PLA2 activity and bacterial growth. In U937D cells and monocytes from healthy donors there was activation of calcium, TNF-alpha and Caspase 8 activation and decreased bacterial load. Understanding the mechanisms that control the dichotomy events between apoptosis and necrosis/oncosis associated with cell maturity might open new strategies to better control the course of mycobacterial infections.

  19. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  20. Immunoinformatics study on highly expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi, Le Thuy; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Calero, Romel; Camacho, Frank; Reyes, Fatima; Hossain, Md Murad; Gonzalez, Gustavo Sierra; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-09-01

    The most important targets for vaccine development are the proteins that are highly expressed by the microorganisms during infection in-vivo. A number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins are also reported to be expressed in-vivo at different phases of infection. In the present study, we analyzed multiple published databases of gene expression profiles of Mtb in-vivo at different phases of infection in animals and humans and selected 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. We predicted T- and B-cell epitopes from the selected proteins using HLAPred for T-cell epitope prediction and BCEPred combined with ABCPred for B-cell epitope prediction. For each selected proteins, regions containing both T- and B-cell epitopes were identified which might be considered as important candidates for vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  1. CD8 T cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis can persist and replicate in macrophages in vivo, usually in organized cellular structures called granulomas. There is substantial evidence for the importance of CD4 T cells in control of tuberculosis, but the evidence for a requirement for CD8 T cells in this infection has not been proven in humans. However, animal model data support a non-redundant role for CD8 T cells in control of M. tuberculosis infection. In humans, infection with this pathogen leads to generation of specific CD8 T cell responses. These responses include classical (MHC Class I restricted) and non-classical CD8 T cells. Here, we discuss the potential roles of CD8 T cells in defense against tuberculosis, and our current understanding of the wide range of CD8 T cell types seen in M. tuberculosis infection.

  2. The influence of influenza virus infections on the development of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    de Paus, Roelof A; van Crevel, Reinout; van Beek, Ruud; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Marzuki, Sangkot; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; van Dissel, Jaap T; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van de Vosse, Esther

    2013-05-01

    Recently, it was shown that interferon-γ mediated immune responses, which play a major role in the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), can be inhibited by type I interferons. Since type I interferons are abundantly induced during viral infections, we hypothesized that infections with influenza viruses might play a role in the development of active TB disease either directly after exposure to Mtb or through reactivation of latent Mtb infection. To explore this hypothesis we investigated in a retrospective study whether newly diagnosed adult tuberculosis patients from Indonesia had had recent influenza infection. Plasma samples from TB patients and controls were assayed for antibodies against two subtypes of at that time relevant, seasonal influenza A viruses. Overall, no correlation was observed with the presence of antibodies and manifest tuberculosis. Still, antibody titers against circulating A/H3N2 influenza virus were slightly enhanced in tuberculosis patients as compared to controls, and highest in cases of advanced tuberculosis. This suggests that tuberculosis patients were recently infected with influenza, before clinical manifestation of the disease. Alternatively, the production of antibodies and susceptibility to tuberculosis may be influenced by a common confounding factor, for example the ability of patients to induce interferon-α. We conclude that in an endemic country like Indonesia, an influenza virus infection is not a major determinant for developing clinically manifest tuberculosis.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M.; Dragoo, Gwen A.; Saiers, Rhonda L.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Daley, Charles L.; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun

    2017-01-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted. PMID:28221115

  4. Unique role for ATG5 in neutrophil-mediated immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Huynh, Jeremy P; Weiss, Leslie A; Park, Sunmin; Kambal, Amal; Debnath, Jayanta; Virgin, Herbert W; Stallings, Christina L

    2015-12-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major global health threat, replicates in macrophages in part by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion, until interferon-γ (IFNγ) activates the macrophage to traffic M. tuberculosis to the lysosome. How IFNγ elicits this effect is unknown, but many studies suggest a role for macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy), a process by which cytoplasmic contents are targeted for lysosomal degradation. The involvement of autophagy has been defined based on studies in cultured cells where M. tuberculosis co-localizes with autophagy factors ATG5, ATG12, ATG16L1, p62, NDP52, BECN1 and LC3 (refs 2-6), stimulation of autophagy increases bacterial killing, and inhibition of autophagy increases bacterial survival. Notably, these studies reveal modest (~1.5-3-fold change) effects on M. tuberculosis replication. By contrast, mice lacking ATG5 in monocyte-derived cells and neutrophils (polymorponuclear cells, PMNs) succumb to M. tuberculosis within 30 days, an extremely severe phenotype similar to mice lacking IFNγ signalling. Importantly, ATG5 is the only autophagy factor that has been studied during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo and autophagy-independent functions of ATG5 have been described. For this reason, we used a genetic approach to elucidate the role for multiple autophagy-related genes and the requirement for autophagy in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, autophagic capacity does not correlate with the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Instead, ATG5 plays a unique role in protection against M. tuberculosis by preventing PMN-mediated immunopathology. Furthermore, while Atg5 is dispensable in alveolar macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection, loss of Atg5 in PMNs can sensitize mice to M. tuberculosis. These findings shift our understanding of the role of ATG5 during M. tuberculosis infection, reveal new outcomes of ATG5 activity, and shed light on early events in innate

  5. Differentiation of antigen-specific T cells with limited functional capacity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Jeon, Bo-Young; Gu, Sun-Hwa; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Chang, Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Despite the generation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell immune responses during the course of infection, only 5 to 10% of exposed individuals develop active disease, while others develop a latent infection. This phenomenon suggests defective M. tuberculosis-specific immunity, which necessitates more careful characterization of M. tuberculosis-specific T cell responses. Here, we longitudinally analyzed the phenotypes and functions of M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. In contrast to the functional exhaustion of T cells observed after chronic infection, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells differentiated into either effector (CD127(lo) CD62L(lo)) or effector memory (CD127(hi) CD62L(lo)) cells, but not central memory cells (CD127(hi) CD62L(hi)), with low programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression, even in the presence of high levels of bacteria. Additionally, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells produced substantial levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin 2 (IL-2), upon in vitro restimulation. Among M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells, CD127(hi) effector memory cells displayed slower ongoing turnover but greater survival potential. In addition, these cells produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and displayed lytic activity upon antigen stimulation. However, the effector function of M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) CD127(hi) effector memory T cells was inferior to that of canonical CD8(+) CD127(hi) memory T cells generated after acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Collectively, our data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis-specific T cells can differentiate into memory T cells during the course of M. tuberculosis infection independent of the bacterial burden but with limited functionality. These results provide a framework for further understanding the mechanisms of M. tuberculosis infection that can be used to develop more effective vaccines.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  7. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yee Man Tracy; Pillinger, Toby; Luqmani, Asad; Cooper, Nichola

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal condition that can be primary or secondary. Secondary HLH can occur in association with infections, most commonly viral infections, but has also been reported in association with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Prompt identification of the underlying cause of HLH is important as it guides treatment decisions. Early initiation of appropriate treatment (eg, anti-TB treatment) reduces morbidity and mortality. We present a case of HLH associated with TB infection. Initial TB investigations were negative and standard combination chemoimmunotherapy for HLH resulted in a limited clinical response. On apparent relapse of HLH, further investigation revealed TB with changes on CT chest, granuloma on bone marrow and eventual positive TB culture on bronchoalveolar lavage. Subsequent treatment with quadruple anti-TB treatment resulted in rapid clinical response and disease remission. We advocate continued monitoring for TB infection in patients with HLH, and prophylaxis or full treatment for those at high risk. PMID:25870214

  8. Macrophage polarization drives granuloma outcome during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Marino, Simeone; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Mattila, Joshua T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), induces formation of granulomas, structures in which immune cells and bacteria colocalize. Macrophages are among the most abundant cell types in granulomas and have been shown to serve as both critical bactericidal cells and targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation throughout the course of infection. Very little is known about how these processes are regulated, what controls macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity, or why some granulomas control bacteria and others permit bacterial dissemination. We take a computational-biology approach to investigate mechanisms that drive macrophage polarization, function, and bacterial control in granulomas. We define a "macrophage polarization ratio" as a metric to understand how cytokine signaling translates into polarization of single macrophages in a granuloma, which in turn modulates cellular functions, including antimicrobial activity and cytokine production. Ultimately, we extend this macrophage ratio to the tissue scale and define a "granuloma polarization ratio" describing mean polarization measures for entire granulomas. Here we coupled experimental data from nonhuman primate TB granulomas to our computational model, and we predict two novel and testable hypotheses regarding macrophage profiles in TB outcomes. First, the temporal dynamics of granuloma polarization ratios are predictive of granuloma outcome. Second, stable necrotic granulomas with low CFU counts and limited inflammation are characterized by short NF-κB signal activation intervals. These results suggest that the dynamics of NF-κB signaling is a viable therapeutic target to promote M1 polarization early during infection and to improve outcome.

  9. [Tuberculosis and HIV infection: experience of the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti: 1990-1996].

    PubMed

    Renoux, E; Matan, A Barreh; Sevre, J P; Mohamed Ali, I; Chami, D; Vincent, V

    2002-01-01

    Based on analysis of data collected from the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti between 1990 and 1996, the authors analyzed the relationship between HIV infection and tuberculosis. The study cohort comprised a total of 22,000 patients including 14,000 with documented HIV infection. Although HIV infection probably worsened the situation, it was neither the only nor the main factor involved in the resurgence of tuberculosis. Demographic growth, higher population density, and increasing poverty as well as the quality of the national tuberculosis prevention program must be taken into account. The incidence of smear-negative tuberculosis was not significantly higher in HIV-infected patients (incidence of smear positive cases, > 92%). Extrapulmonary tuberculosis especially of pleural involvement was more common (15% versus 9.4%). Treatment was effective in HIV-infected patients. If directly observed (DOT) therapy was used, there was no risk of emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains. Drug side-effects associated with the protocols used in Djibouti were not greater in HIV-infected patients. Most additional mortality observed in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients (10.5% versus 2%) was due to progression of HIV infection.

  10. Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment and Control

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Paul D.; Wilson, Douglas; Colijn, Caroline; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Warren, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Numerous studies have reported that individuals can simultaneously harbor multiple distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To date, there has been limited discussion of the consequences for the individual or the epidemiological importance of mixed infections. Here, we review studies that documented mixed infections, highlight challenges associated with the detection of mixed infections, and discuss possible implications of mixed infections for the diagnosis and treatment of patients and for the community impact of tuberculosis control strategies. We conclude by highlighting questions that should be resolved in order to improve our understanding of the importance of mixed-strain M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:23034327

  11. M2 macrophages or IL-33 treatment attenuate ongoing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Piñeros, A. R.; Campos, L. W.; Fonseca, D. M.; Bertolini, T. B.; Gembre, A. F.; Prado, R. Q.; Alves-Filho, J. C.; Ramos, S. G.; Russo, M.; Bonato, V. L. D.

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of mycobacterial infections on lung allergy are well documented. However, the inverse relationship between tuberculosis and type 2 immunity is still elusive. Although type 1 immunity is essential to protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis it might be also detrimental to the host due to the induction of extensive tissue damage. Here, we determined whether lung type 2 immunity induced by allergen sensitization and challenge could affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We used two different protocols in which sensitization and allergen challenge were performed before or after M. tuberculosis infection. We found an increased resistance to M. tuberculosis only when allergen exposure was given after, but not before infection. Infected mice exposed to allergen exhibited lower bacterial load and cellular infiltrates in the lungs. Enhanced resistance to infection after allergen challenge was associated with increased gene expression of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) and IL-33 levels. Accordingly, either adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages or systemic IL-33 treatment was effective in attenuating M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, the enhanced resistance induced by allergen exposure was dependent on IL-33 receptor ST2. Our work indicates that IL-33 might be an alternative therapeutic treatment for severe tuberculosis. PMID:28128217

  12. Infection with Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Sharon; de Jong, Bouke C.; Solnick, Jay V.; la Luz Sanchez, Maria de; Yang, Shufang; Lin, Philana Ling; Hansen, Lori M.; Talat, Najeeha; Hill, Philip C.; Hussain, Rabia; Adegbola, Richard A.; Flynn, JoAnne; Canfield, Don; Parsonnet, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-γ and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29%) meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI), 45 (46%) were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-γ responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA), and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36–0.83, p = 0.005), though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63–2.9] p = 0.44). Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12–0.80], p = 0.04). Conclusions/Significance H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for

  13. Role of cholesterol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Miner, Maurine D; Chang, Jennifer C; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) acquisition and utilization of nutrients within the host cell is poorly understood, although it has been hypothesized that host lipids probably play an important role in MTB survival. Cholesterol has recently been identified as an important lipid for mycobacterial infection. The mce4 transport system is required for cholesterol import into bacterial cells, and deletion of mce4 locus resulted in severe attenuation in a chronic mouse model of infection. However, it has remained unclear what additional bacterial functions were required for utilization of this sterol. We have found that the igr locus, which was previously found essential for intracellular growth and virulence of MTB, is required for cholesterol metabolism: igr-deficient bacteria cannot grow using cholesterol as a primary carbon source. The growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as the delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout the course of infection, and that degradation of this sterol is crucial for bacterial persistence.

  14. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis infection in trans-membrane tumour necrosis factor mice.

    PubMed

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J F; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established.

  15. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis Infection in Trans-Membrane Tumour Necrosis Factor Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J. F.; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established. PMID:22132068

  16. [New drugs against tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections: a review].

    PubMed

    Amitani, R; Kuze, F

    1994-11-01

    The number of cases with tuberculosis is again increasing in many countries, and recently several nosocomial outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have occurred in the United States. The number of patients with disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in AIDS population, and patients with MAC pulmonary disease unassociated with HIV seem to be also increasing. It takes at least 6 to 9 months for an initial treatment of active tuberculosis due to drug-sensitive strains with the standard regimen which includes isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP). Treatment for the diseases caused by drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and MAC is much more time-consuming and more toxic than for the diseases caused by drug-sensitive strains, and often unsuccessful. For the reasons described above, the developments of new agents with potent antimycobacterial activities are highly desired. The new agents should also be useful for treating patients who have acquired resistance to many of the currently available drugs. In this review the new antimycobacterial drugs are summarized. Some of them have already been used clinically, but many are still in experimental evaluations. 1) Rifamycin derivatives: rifabutin (RBT), KRM-1648 (KRM), rifapentin (RPT), FCE-22250, FCE-22807, CGP-7040, SPA-S-565 and other rifamycin derivatives. New rifamycin derivatives including RBT, KRM have increased in vitro antimycobacterial activities. RBT and KRM are much more active in vitro and in vivo than RFP against both M. tuberculosis and MAC. KRM seems to be more potent than RBT against MAC in experimental studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone.

  18. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    PubMed Central

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  19. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  20. Combined Analysis of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT Supernatant Is Useful for Distinguishing Active Tuberculosis from Latent Infection.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT), an interferon-γ release assay, is used to diagnose Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but its inaccuracy in distinguishing active tuberculosis from latent infection is a major concern. There is thus a need for an easy and accurate tool for achieving that goal in daily clinical settings. This study aimed to identify candidate cytokines for specifically differentiating active tuberculosis from latent infection. Our study population consisted of 31 active TB (tuberculosis) patients, 29 LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) patients and 10 healthy control subjects. We assayed for 27 cytokines in QFT supernatants of both specific antigen-stimulated blood samples (TBAg) and negative-control samples (Nil). We analyzed their specificities and sensitivities by creating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and measuring the area under those curves (AUCs). In TBAg-Nil supernatants, IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-1RA showed high AUCs of 0.8120, 0.7842, 0.7419 and 0.7375, respectively. Compared with each cytokine alone, combined assay for these top four cytokines showed positive rates in diagnosing active TB, and GDA analysis revealed that MCP-1 and IL-5 are potent in distinguishing active TB from LTBI, with Wilk's lambda = 0.718 (p < 0.001). Furthermore, utilizing the unique characteristic of IL-2 that its TBAg-Nil supernatant levels are higher in LTBI compared to active TB, the difference between IFN-γ and IL-2 showed a large AUC of 0.8910. In summary, besides IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-10, IL-1RA and MCP-1 in QFT supernatants may be useful for distinguishing active TB from LTBI. Those cytokines may also help us understand the difference in pathogenesis between active TB and LTBI.

  1. Differentiation of human mononuclear phagocytes increases their innate response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneity of mononuclear phagocytes, partially explained by cell differentiation, influences the activation of innate responses. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits monocyte differentiation into either dendritic cells or macrophages. To evaluate whether the activation of effector mechanisms against M. tuberculosis differ between less and more differentiated mononuclear phagocytes, we compared monocytes differentiated in vitro for 24 h (MON24) and 120 h (MDM120) infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, H37Ra and the clinical isolate UT127 at different multiplicity of infection. MDM120 phagocytosed more M. tuberculosis, inhibited mycobacterial growth and did not die in response to the infection, compared with MON24. In contrast, MON24 become Annexin V and Propidium iodide positive after 36 h of M. tuberculosis infection. Although, there were striking differences between MON24 and MDM120, there were also some differences in the response to the mycobacterial strains used. Finally, in MDM120 infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a lower percentage of mycobacterial phagosomes accumulated transferrin and a higher percentage co-localized with cathelicidin than in MON24. These results demonstrate that innate responses induced by M. tuberculosis depends upon the stage of differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes and support that terminally differentiated cells are more efficient anti-mycobacterial effectors than the less differentiated ones.

  2. Comparison of interferon-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4 T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines during latent and active tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, J; Pandey, S; Filion, L G; Angel, J B; Kumar, A; Cameron, D W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the role and expression of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells and Th17 cytokines in human tuberculosis. We show that the basal proportion of interferon (IFN)-γ-, interleukin (IL)-17- and IL-22-expressing CD4(+) T cells and IL-22-expressing granulocytes in peripheral blood were significantly lower in latently infected healthy individuals and active tuberculosis patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast, CD4(+) T cells expressing IL-17, IL-22 and IFN-γ were increased significantly following mycobacterial antigens stimulation in both latent and actively infected patients. Interestingly, proinflammatory IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were increased following antigen stimulation in latent infection. Similarly, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, IL-22 and TNF-α were increased in the serum of latently infected individuals, whereas IL-6 and TNF-α were increased significantly in actively infected patients. Overall, we observed differential induction of IL-17-, IL-22- and IFN-γ-expressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-22-expressing granulocytes and proinflammatory cytokines in circulation and following antigenic stimulation in latent and active tuberculosis.

  3. The epidemiological consequences of leprosy-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, N; Voss-Böhme, A

    2013-02-01

    While in antiquity both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe, leprosy declined thereafter and, simultaneously, tuberculosis prevalence increased. Since both diseases are caused by mycobacterial infections, it has been suggested that there might be a causal relationship between both epidemics. Chaussinand observed the inverse prevalence of leprosy and tuberculosis and suggested that individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection are protected from acquiring leprosy. His cross-immunity hypothesis has been countered more recently by a co-infection hypothesis. The latter suggestion, proposed by Donoghue, states that people being infected with multi-bacillary leprosy are more susceptible to tuberculosis, which leads to increased mortality from the disease. This study utilizes mathematical modeling to explore the epidemiological consequences of the co-infection hypothesis for realistically confined parameter values. While the co-infection hypothesis appears plausible at first glance, a second thought reveals that it comprises also substantial consequences for tuberculosis epidemics: if co-infection raises the mortality rate above that of purely tuberculosis infected persons, then tuberculosis might as well be eradicated by leprosy. It is the specific interplay of both increased susceptibility towards tuberculosis and increased death rate when co-infected that determines the epidemiological fate. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that there is a large parameter region where the eventual disappearance of leprosy could indeed be explained by co-infection. This parameter region is considerably larger than that predicted by the cross-immunity hypothesis. This shows that the co-infection hypothesis should be considered a significant alternative to the cross-immunity hypothesis. The time scales at which the effects of co-infection are observed depend critically on the spatial distribution of the individuals but reach epidemiologically realistic values for

  4. Management of tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; Meintjes, Graeme; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Leung, Chi Chiu

    2013-08-01

    The syndemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection has grown as a result of the considerable sociogeographic overlaps between the two epidemics. The situation is particularly worrisome in countries with high or intermediate TB burden against the background of a variable HIV epidemic state. Early diagnosis of TB disease in an HIV-infected person is paramount but suffers from lack of sensitive and specific diagnostic tools. Enhanced symptom screening is currently advocated, and the wide application of affordable molecular diagnostics is urgently needed. Treatment of TB/HIV co-infection involves the concurrent use of standard antiretrovirals and antimycobacterials during which harmful drug interaction may occur. The pharmacokinetic interaction between rifamycin and antiretrovirals is a case in point, requiring dosage adjustment and preferential use of rifabutin, if available. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy is indicated, preferably at 2 weeks after starting TB treatment for patients with a CD4 of <50 cells/μL. Development of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) is however more frequent with early antiretroviral therapy. The diagnosis of TB-IRIS is another clinical challenge, and cautious use of corticosteroids is suggested to improve clinical outcome. As a preventive measure against active TB disease, the screening for latent TB infection should be widely practiced, followed by at least 6-9 months of isoniazid treatment. To date tuberculin skin test remains the only diagnostic tool in high TB burden countries. The role of alternative tests, for example, interferon-γ release assay, would need to be better defined for clinical application.

  5. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  6. Diabetes Mellitus as Hub for Tuberculosis Infection: A Snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Ansari, Moiz A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains the thorn in the flesh of efficient therapeutics affecting one-third of global population annually. There are several factors that enhance the susceptibility to TB infections including malnutrition, smoking, and immunocompromised conditions such as AIDS. In the recent years, growing body of evidence has gained considerable prominence which suggests that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is individual risk factor leading to complicated TB infections. In this article the authors have attempted to summarize the link of type 2 DM with TB, the mechanistic action of how DM sensitizes for developing the active TB infection from the latent infection, and problems faced during treatment followed by possible preventive measures. We have tried to give account of the alterations that occurred in DM making a person more prone to develop TB. PMID:27819024

  7. Diabetes Mellitus as Hub for Tuberculosis Infection: A Snapshot.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rahul; Ansari, Moiz A; Hameed, Saif; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains the thorn in the flesh of efficient therapeutics affecting one-third of global population annually. There are several factors that enhance the susceptibility to TB infections including malnutrition, smoking, and immunocompromised conditions such as AIDS. In the recent years, growing body of evidence has gained considerable prominence which suggests that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is individual risk factor leading to complicated TB infections. In this article the authors have attempted to summarize the link of type 2 DM with TB, the mechanistic action of how DM sensitizes for developing the active TB infection from the latent infection, and problems faced during treatment followed by possible preventive measures. We have tried to give account of the alterations that occurred in DM making a person more prone to develop TB.

  8. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection. PMID:28133458

  9. The association of tuberculosis and HIV infection in Burundi.

    PubMed

    Standaert, B; Niragira, F; Kadende, P; Piot, P

    1989-04-01

    AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) are both endemic in Bujumbura, Burundi. An 11% failure rate to standard antituberculosis treatment (n = 173) was observed at the Tuberculosis Treatment Center of Bujumbura (CATB) in 1985-1986. All resistant cases (n = 19) were HIV seropositive. Among 328 consecutive cases with tuberculosis at the CATB during a 3 month period in 1986, 54.5% were HIV seropositive, which is five times higher than the prevalence in the general population in Bujumbura. More female patients than male cases were HIV antibody positive (62 versus 49%, respectively; p less than 0.02). Persistent weight loss, cough, and an anergic tuberculin test were more common in the HIV-seropositive group. Among 48 household members of HIV-seropositive patients with tuberculosis, 6 (12.5%) new cases of tuberculosis were identified, compared with none among 28 household members of HIV-seronegative patients with tuberculosis (odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-33.2). HIV infection is a new risk factor for tuberculosis in Africa, and HIV-infected cases of tuberculosis may be more infectious than HIV-negative patients. The AIDS epidemic may drastically complicate the diagnosis, management, and control of tuberculosis in populations in which both infections are endemic.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  11. Indole-2-carboxamide-based MmpL3 Inhibitors Show Exceptional Antitubercular Activity in an Animal Model of Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Stec, Jozef; Onajole, Oluseye K; Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Merenbloom, Benjamin; Vistoli, Giulio; Bishai, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-07-14

    Our team had previously identified certain indolecarboxamides that represented a new chemical scaffold that showed promising anti-TB activity at both an in vitro and in vivo level. Based on mutational analysis using bacteria found resistant to one of these indolecarboxamides, we identified the trehalose monomycolate transporter MmpL3 as the likely target of these compounds. In the present work, we now further elaborate on the SAR of these compounds, which has led in turn to the identification of a new analog, 4,6-difluoro-N-((1R,2R,3R,5S)-2,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]heptan-3-yl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (26), that shows excellent activity against drug-sensitive (MIC = 0.012 μM; SI ≥ 16000), multidrug-resistant (MDR), and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, has superior ADMET properties, and shows excellent activity in the TB aerosol lung infection model. Compound 26 is also shown to work in synergy with rifampin. Because of these properties, we believe that indolecarboxamide 26 is a possible candidate for advancement to human clinical trials.

  12. Strain specific transcriptional response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a significant health problem worldwide with a third of the world population infected and nearly nine million new cases claiming 1.1 million deaths every year. The outcome following infection by Mtb is determined by a complex and dynamic host-pathogen interaction in which the phenotype of the pathogen and the immune status of the host play a role. However, the molecular mechanism by which Mtb strains induce different responses during intracellular infection of the host macrophage is not fully understood. To explore the early molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, we studied the transcriptional responses of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) to infection with two clinical Mtb strains, CDC1551 and HN878. These strains have previously been shown to differ in their virulence/immunogenicity in the mouse and rabbit models of pulmonary TB. Results In spite of similar intracellular growth rates, we observed that compared to HN878, infection by CDC1551 of BMM was associated with an increased global transcriptome, up-regulation of a specific early (6 hours) immune response network and significantly elevated nitric oxide production. In contrast, at 24 hours post-infection of BMM by HN878, more host genes involved in lipid metabolism, including cholesterol metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis were up-regulated, compared to infection with CDC1551. In association with the differences in the macrophage responses to infection with the 2 Mtb strains, intracellular CDC1551 expressed higher levels of stress response genes than did HN878. Conclusions In association with the early and more robust macrophage activation, intracellular CDC1551 cells were exposed to a higher level of stress leading to increased up-regulation of the bacterial stress response genes. In contrast, sub-optimal activation of macrophages and induction of a dysregulated host cell

  13. Tuberculosis infection and disease among schoolchildren: the influence of the HIV epidemic and of other factors

    PubMed Central

    Villalbi, J. R.; Galdos-Tanguis, H.; Cayla, J. A.; Casanas, P.; Ferrer, A.; Nebot, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The HIV/AIDS epidemic has caused an excess of tuberculosis cases in Spain and in other countries, but its impact on tuberculosis infection is less well understood. This study presents a massive screening undertaken to estimate the prevalence of tuberculous infection in a cohort of primary school entrants. The evolution of the risk of infection is studied by comparison with previous data in the same population. METHODS: Tuberculin skin test screening with 2TU of PPD RT 23 of first grade students in the primary schools of Barcelona, in the 1994-95 school year (cohort born in 1988). Information was also sought from families of unscreened children. Contacts of PPD+ children were traced to locate index cases. The results were also linked to the case registry of the tuberculosis control programme. RESULTS: The prevalence of tuberculin reactors free of BCG vaccination among the 11,080 schoolchildren screened belonging to the 1988 cohort was 0.76%. A 3% annual decline in the annual risk of infection is estimated by comparison with previous data. The identification of 24 cases with a previous history of tuberculosis disease and of 13 cases with active disease diagnosed after the screening was possible by the follow up of these tuberculin positive children and of the information provided by families of unscreened pupils. The screening detected 1.5 new cases of tuberculosis per 1000 tuberculin tests performed. Tuberculosis infection could be traced to HIV infected tuberculosis cases for at least 6% of the positive schoolchildren. CONCLUSIONS: The decline of the annual risk of infection continues in Barcelona, although at a slower pace than before the HIV/AIDS epidemic, probably attributable to the influence of injecting drug users with smear positive tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.   PMID:10396472

  14. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  15. Mean Platelet Volume in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hee Joo; Park, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mean platelet volume (MPV) has been thought as a useful index of platelet activation. It is supposed that MPV is also associated with several inflammatory and infectious diseases. Korea still has a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to investigate MPV as an inflammatory marker in TB patients. Materials and Methods. MPV were determined in 221 patients with TB and 143 individuals for control group. MPV was estimated by an Advia 2120 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results. In the TB patient group, a positive correlation was found between CRP and MPV. Age and MPV had a positive correlation in TB patient group. Conclusions. We conclude that there is a significant relation between MPV and inflammatory conditions. MPV can be an inflammatory marker to determine the disease activity in TB patients. PMID:27419136

  16. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  17. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by M. tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P.W.J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable variability exists in the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that M. africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. In a cohort study of tuberculosis patients and their household contacts in the Gambia, we categorized 1,808 HIV negative tuberculosis contacts according to exposure to M. tuberculosis or to M. africanum. A positive skin test indicated transmission and development of tuberculosis during 2 years of follow-up indicated progression to disease. Transmission was similar, but progression to disease was significantly lower in contacts exposed to M. africanum than to M. tuberculosis (1.0% vs 2.9%; Hazard Ratio (HR) 3.1, 95% CI 1.1–8.7). Within M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, contacts exposed to a Beijing family strain were most likely to progress to disease (5.6%; HR 6.7 (2.0–22) relative to M. africanum). M. africanum and M. tuberculosis transmit equally well to household contacts, but contacts exposed to M. africanum are less likely to progress to tuberculosis disease than those exposed to M. tuberculosis. The variable rate of progression by lineage suggests that TB variability matters in clinical settings and should be taken into account in studies evaluating tuberculosis vaccines and treatment regimens for latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:18702608

  18. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The risk of transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients to health care workers (HCWs) is a neglected problem in many countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among TB laboratory staff in Iran, and to elucidate the risk factors associated with LTBI. METHODS All TB laboratory staff (689 individuals) employed in the TB laboratories of 50 Iranian universities of medical sciences and a random sample consisting of 317 low-risk HCWs were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants with tuberculin skin test indurations of 10 mm or more were considered to have an LTBI. RESULTS The prevalence of LTBI among TB laboratory staff and low-risk HCWs was 24.83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.31 to 27.74%) and 14.82% (95% CI, 11.31 to 19.20%), respectively. No active TB cases were found in either group. After adjusting for potential confounders, TB laboratory staff were more likely to have an LTBI than low-risk HCWs (prevalence odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.17). CONCLUSIONS This study showed that LTBI are an occupational health problem among TB laboratory staff in Iran. This study reinforces the need to design and implement simple, effective, and affordable TB infection control programs in TB laboratories in Iran. PMID:28092930

  19. Transmission and Institutional Infection Control of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nardell, Edward A

    2015-08-20

    Tuberculosis (TB) transmission control in institutions is evolving with increased awareness of the rapid impact of treatment on transmission, the importance of the unsuspected, untreated case of transmission, and the advent of rapid molecular diagnostics. With active case finding based on cough surveillance and rapid drug susceptibility testing, in theory, it is possible to be reasonably sure that no patient enters a facility with undiagnosed TB or drug resistance. Droplet nuclei transmission of TB is reviewed with an emphasis on risk factors relevant to control. Among environmental controls, natural ventilation and upper-room ultraviolet germicidal ultraviolet air disinfection are the most cost-effective choices, although high-volume mechanical ventilation can also be used. Room air cleaners are generally not recommended. Maintenance is required for all engineering solutions. Finally, personal protection with fit-tested respirators is used in many situations where administrative and engineering methods cannot assure protection.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in recipients of solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia; Rodríguez, Claudia; Bouza, Emilio

    2005-02-15

    Tuberculosis is a serious opportunistic infection that may affect transplant recipients. The incidence of tuberculosis among such persons is 20-74 times higher than that for the general population, with a mortality rate of up to 30%. The most common form of acquisition of tuberculosis after transplantation is the reactivation of latent tuberculosis in patients with previous exposure. Clinical presentation is frequently atypical and diverse, with unsuspected and elusive sites of affection. Manifestations include fever of unknown origin and allograft dysfunction. Coinfection with other pathogens is not uncommon. New techniques, such as PCR and quantification of interferon- gamma , have been developed to achieve more-rapid and -accurate diagnoses. Treatment requires control of interactions between antituberculous drugs and immunosuppressive therapy. Prophylaxis against latent tuberculosis is the main approach to treatment, but many issues remain unsolved, because of the difficulty in identifying patients at risk (such as those with nonreactive purified protein derivative test results) and the toxicity of therapy.

  1. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate affects the response of human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Colas, Nicolas; Petit-Jentreau, Laetitia; Barreiro, Luis B; Durand, Sylvère; Soubigou, Guillaume; Lecointe, Cécile; Klibi, Jihène; Rezaï, Keyvan; Lokiec, François; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Gicquel, Brigitte; Tailleux, Ludovic

    2014-09-01

    Granulomas are the hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. As the host fails to control the bacteria, the center of the granuloma exhibits necrosis resulting from the dying of infected macrophages. The release of the intracellular pool of nucleotides into the surrounding medium may modulate the response of newly infected macrophages, although this has never been investigated. Here, we show that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) indirectly modulates the expression of 272 genes in human macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis and that it induces their alternative activation. ATP is rapidly hydrolyzed by the ecto-ATPase CD39 into adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and it is AMP that regulates the macrophage response through the adenosine A2A receptor. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for the purinergic pathway in the host response to M. tuberculosis. Dampening inflammation through signaling via the adenosine A2A receptor may limit tissue damage but may also favor bacterial immune escape.

  2. Tuberculosis: will it infect wild elk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Smith, B.

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis! Just the name conjures up images of a devastating, chronic, debilitating disease. And so it is in both humans and animals. Tuberculosis (TB) is not known to be present to any significant degree in the free-ranging elk herds of North America. But increasing reports of TB in deer species-including elk-on game ranches prompt grave concern.

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis associated with tuberculosis in HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvinderpal; Aditi; Aneja, Pooja; Kapoor, B K; Singh, S P; Purewal, Sukhpreet Singh

    2013-07-01

    Opportunistic infections are common complications of advanced immuno-deficiency in individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Following involvement of the lung, the central nervous system (CNS) is the second most commonly affected organ. We report two cases of concurrent cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis (TB) in HIV infected persons. A high suspicion of multiple opportunistic infections should be kept in mind in HIV seropositive individuals.

  4. Activation of the Wnt Pathway by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Wnt–Wnt Situation

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Madrid-Paulino, Edgardo; Maldonado-Bravo, Rafael; Urbán-Aragón, Antonio; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), an intracellular pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is the cause of tuberculosis (TB), a major worldwide human infectious disease. The innate immune system is the first host defense against M. tuberculosis. The recognition of this pathogen is mediated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors expressed on the host innate immune cells, including Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and C-type lectin receptors like Dectin-1, the Mannose receptor, and DC-SIGN. M. tuberculosis interaction with any of these receptors activates multiple signaling pathways among which the protein kinase C, the MAPK, and the NFκB pathways have been widely studied. These pathways have been implicated in macrophage invasion, M. tuberculosis survival, and impaired immune response, thus promoting a successful infection and disease. Interestingly, the Wnt signaling pathway, classically regarded as a pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in embryonic development, has recently been involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms in infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as TB, sepsis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge supporting a role for the Wnt signaling pathway during macrophage infection by M. tuberculosis and the regulation of the immune response against M. tuberculosis. Understanding the cross talk between different signaling pathways activated by M. tuberculosis will impact on the search for new therapeutic targets to fuel the rational design of drugs aimed to restore the immunological response against M. tuberculosis. PMID:28203237

  5. Activation of the Wnt Pathway by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Wnt-Wnt Situation.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Madrid-Paulino, Edgardo; Maldonado-Bravo, Rafael; Urbán-Aragón, Antonio; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), an intracellular pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, is the cause of tuberculosis (TB), a major worldwide human infectious disease. The innate immune system is the first host defense against M. tuberculosis. The recognition of this pathogen is mediated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors expressed on the host innate immune cells, including Toll-like receptors, Nod-like receptors, and C-type lectin receptors like Dectin-1, the Mannose receptor, and DC-SIGN. M. tuberculosis interaction with any of these receptors activates multiple signaling pathways among which the protein kinase C, the MAPK, and the NFκB pathways have been widely studied. These pathways have been implicated in macrophage invasion, M. tuberculosis survival, and impaired immune response, thus promoting a successful infection and disease. Interestingly, the Wnt signaling pathway, classically regarded as a pathway involved in the control of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in embryonic development, has recently been involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms in infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as TB, sepsis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the current knowledge supporting a role for the Wnt signaling pathway during macrophage infection by M. tuberculosis and the regulation of the immune response against M. tuberculosis. Understanding the cross talk between different signaling pathways activated by M. tuberculosis will impact on the search for new therapeutic targets to fuel the rational design of drugs aimed to restore the immunological response against M. tuberculosis.

  6. Effect of BCG vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A; Eisenhut, M; Harris, R J; Rodrigues, L C; Sridhar, S; Habermann, S; Snell, L; Mangtani, P; Adetifa, I; Lalvani, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether BCG vaccination protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection as assessed by interferon γ release assays (IGRA) in children. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches of electronic databases 1950 to November 2013, checking of reference lists, hand searching of journals, and contact with experts. Setting Community congregate settings and households. Inclusion criteria Vaccinated and unvaccinated children aged under 16 with known recent exposure to patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Children were screened for infection with M tuberculosis with interferon γ release assays. Data extraction Study results relating to diagnostic accuracy were extracted and risk estimates were combined with random effects meta-analysis. Results The primary analysis included 14 studies and 3855 participants. The estimated overall risk ratio was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.92), indicating a protective efficacy of 19% against infection among vaccinated children after exposure compared with unvaccinated children. The observed protection was similar when estimated with the two types of interferon γ release assays (ELISpot or QuantiFERON). Restriction of the analysis to the six studies (n=1745) with information on progression to active tuberculosis at the time of screening showed protection against infection of 27% (risk ratio 0.73, 0.61 to 0.87) compared with 71% (0.29, 0.15 to 0.58) against active tuberculosis. Among those infected, protection against progression to disease was 58% (0.42, 0.23 to 0.77). Conclusions BCG protects against M tuberculosis infection as well as progression from infection to disease. Trial registration PROSPERO registration No CRD42011001698 (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/). PMID:25097193

  7. Characterization of hepatitis C infection in tuberculosis patients in an urban city in the USA.

    PubMed

    Campo, M; Shrestha, A; Oren, E; Thiede, H; Duchin, J; Narita, M; Crothers, K

    2014-07-01

    The impact of hepatitis C virus infection (HCI), the most common bloodborne virus infection in the USA, on outcome of active tuberculosis (TB) treatment is largely unknown. We aimed to describe characteristics of TB patients with hepatitis C virus infection (TB-HCI) in King County, Washington, including TB treatment duration and outcome. We reviewed 1510 records of patients treated for active TB at the Public Health - Seattle & King County Tuberculosis Control Program between 2000 and 2010, and identified 53 with HCI. Advanced age, being born in the USA, HIV infection, homelessness and injection drug use were independently associated with HCI in TB cases. Independent factors associated with increased treatment duration included HIV infection, excess alcohol use, extrapulmonary TB, and any drug-resistant TB disease. Our findings suggest that TB-HCI patients can be successfully treated for active TB without extending treatment duration.

  8. Suppression of Mcl-1 induces apoptosis in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yu; Wang, Xin-Min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Jiang-Dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    The effect of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) inhibition on apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated and the primary signaling pathway associated with the transcriptional regulation of Mcl-1 was identified. Real-time PCR and western blotting indicated that Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression are upregulated during infection with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Xinjiang strains but not with attenuated M. tuberculosis strain H37Ra or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression were downregulated by specific inhibitors of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways (AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, respectively). The strongest inhibitor of Mcl-1 expression was PD98059, the MAPK inhibitor. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the rate of apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages is significantly higher in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and the rate of apoptosis is correlated with the virulence of the strain of M. tuberculosis. Apoptosis was found to be upregulated by AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, whereas inhibition of the MAPK pathway sensitized the infected macrophages to apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that specific downregulation of Mcl-1 significantly increases apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages and that the MAPK signaling pathway is the primary mediator of Mcl-1 expression.

  9. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  10. Recurrence due to Relapse or Reinfection With Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Whole-Genome Sequencing Approach in a Large, Population-Based Cohort With a High HIV Infection Prevalence and Active Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Houben, Rein M. G. J.; Crampin, Amelia C.; Mzembe, Themba; Mallard, Kim; Coll, Francesc; Khan, Palwasha; Banda, Louis; Chiwaya, Arthur; Pereira, Rui P. A.; McNerney, Ruth; Harris, David; Parkhill, Julian; Clark, Taane G.; Glynn, Judith R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis is a major health burden and may be due to relapse with the original strain or reinfection with a new strain. Methods. In a population-based study in northern Malawi, patients with tuberculosis diagnosed from 1996 to 2010 were actively followed after the end of treatment. Whole-genome sequencing with approximately 100-fold coverage was performed on all available cultures. Results of IS6110 restriction fragment-length polymorphism analyses were available for cultures performed up to 2008. Results. Based on our data, a difference of ≤10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was used to define relapse, and a difference of >100 SNPs was used to define reinfection. There was no evidence of mixed infections among those classified as reinfections. Of 1471 patients, 139 had laboratory-confirmed recurrences: 55 had relapse, and 20 had reinfection; for 64 type of recurrence was unclassified. Almost all relapses occurred in the first 2 years. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was associated with reinfection but not relapse. Relapses were associated with isoniazid resistance, treatment before 2007, and lineage-3 strains. We identified several gene variants associated with relapse. Lineage-2 (Beijing) was overrepresented and lineage-1 underrepresented among the reinfecting strains (P = .004). Conclusions. While some of the factors determining recurrence depend on the patient and their treatment, differences in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome appear to have a role in both relapse and reinfection. PMID:25336729

  11. Tuberculosis and histoplasmosis co-infection in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Carlos A; Restrepo, Carlos A; Molina, Diego A; Tobón, Angela M; Kauffman, Carol A; Murillo, Carolina; Restrepo, Angela

    2012-12-01

    Abstract. Coinfection with tuberculosis in some countries occurs in 8-15% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected patients who have histoplasmosis. This coinfection interferes with prompt diagnosis, and treatment is difficult because of drug interactions. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 14 HIV-infected patients who had concomitant tuberculosis and histoplasmosis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were weight loss (85.7%), asthenia (78.5%), and fever (64.2%). The diagnosis of histoplasmosis was made primarily by histopathology (71.4%), and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was made by means of direct microscopic examination (71.4%). Death occurred in two patients, and relapse of both infections occurred in one patient. Moxifloxacin was substituted for rifampicin in six patients, with good outcomes noted for both infections. The clinical presentation does not readily identify acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients who have tuberculosis and histoplasmosis. The use of a fluoroquinolone as an alternative agent in place of rifampicin for tuberculosis allows effective therapy with itraconazole for histoplasmosis.

  12. Spectrum of tuberculosis in patients with HIV infection in British Columbia: report of 40 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewska-Kosela, M; FitzGerald, J M; Vedal, S; Allen, E A; Schechter, M T; Lawson, L; Phillips, P; Black, W; Montaner, J S

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical features, treatment and outcome of all known cases of tuberculosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in British Columbia between 1984 and 1990. DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Provincial tuberculosis registry and university-affiliated HIV clinic. PATIENTS: All people with HIV infection in whom active tuberculosis was diagnosed during the study period. RESULTS: All 40 patients identified were men; their mean age was 38 years. Of the subjects 30 (75%) were homosexual, 6 (15%) were homosexual and used intravenous drugs, 2 (5%) just used intravenous drugs, and 1 (2%) had had heterosexual contact with prostitutes; for the remaining subject the risk factor for HIV infection was not established. In all cases cultures of specimens from 15 body sources yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thirty-five of the patients had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and five had HIV infection uncomplicated except for tuberculosis. In 28 (70%) of the cases no AIDS-defining disease had previously been diagnosed, and in 23 (58%) extrapulmonary tuberculosis represented the AIDS-defining disease. Symptoms at presentation included weight loss (in 80% of the cases), fever (in 75%), cough (in 70%) and night sweats (in 55%). The mean CD4 lymphocyte count was 0.2 x 10(9)/L (in 15 cases). Tuberculin skin test results were positive in 8 of 16 cases. The most striking radiologic finding was intrathoracic adenopathy. All except one of the 36 patients who received appropriate treatment responded favourably at first. Adverse reactions necessitating changes in treatment occurred in 12 (33%) of the cases. Relapse occurred after completion of therapy in two cases (one at 3 weeks and the other at 9 months after treatment was stopped). Tuberculosis was the cause of death in five cases. CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculosis in people with HIV infection commonly presents as extrapulmonary disease and precedes or coincides with other AIDS

  13. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  14. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  15. Tuberculosis: infection control in hospital and at home.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Miles

    This article examines infection control issues relating to tuberculosis (TB) in acute and community settings. Background information on TB is discussed briefly along with key challenges to global and national control. A programme to prevent infection composed of specific hierarchical levels is outlined, using national and international guidance, and suggestions are made for infection control in the community. The article will be useful for nurses involved in the care of patients with confirmed or suspected TB.

  16. The Endothelin System Has a Significant Role in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andre F.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Orme, Ian M.; Soares, Célia M. A.; Kipnis, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem, and although multiple studies have addressed the relationship between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host on an immunological level, few studies have addressed the impact of host physiological responses. Proteases produced by bacteria have been associated with important alterations in the host tissues, and a limited number of these enzymes have been characterized in mycobacterial species. M. tuberculosis produces a protease called Zmp1, which appears to be associated with virulence and has a putative action as an endothelin-converting enzyme. Endothelins are a family of vasoactive peptides, of which 3 distinct isoforms exist, and endothelin 1 (ET-1) is the most abundant and the best-characterized isoform. The aim of this work was to characterize the Zmp1 protease and evaluate its role in pathogenicity. Here, we have shown that M. tuberculosis produces and secretes an enzyme with ET-1 cleavage activity. These data demonstrate a possible role of Zmp1 for mycobacterium-host interactions and highlights its potential as a drug target. Moreover, the results suggest that endothelin pathways have a role in the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infections, and ETA or ETB receptor signaling can modulate the host response to the infection. We hypothesize that a balance between Zmp1 control of ET-1 levels and ETA/ETB signaling can allow M. tuberculosis adaptation and survival in the lung tissues. PMID:25267836

  17. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  18. Alternative activation deprives macrophages of a coordinated defense program to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Seiler, Peter; Stein, Maik; Bandermann, Silke; Hahnke, Karin; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2006-03-01

    A potent Th1 immune response is critical to the control of tuberculosis. The impact of an additive Th2 response on the course of disease has so far been insufficiently characterized, despite increased morbidity after co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Th2-eliciting helminths and possible involvement of Th2 polarization in reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Here, we describe the gene expression profile of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages alternatively activated by IL-4 in response to infection with M. tuberculosis. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of infected IL-4- and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages revealed delayed and partially diminished responses to intracellular bacteria in alternatively activated macrophages, characterized by reduced exposure to nitrosative stress and increased iron availability, respectively. Alternative activation of host macrophages correlated with elevated expression of the M. tuberculosis iron storage protein bacterioferritin as well as reduced expression of the mycobactin synthesis genes mbtI and mbtJ. The extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 was induced in alternatively activated macrophages in vitro, and MMP-12-expressing macrophages were abundant at late, but not early, stages of tuberculosis in murine lungs. Our findings emphasize that alternative activation deprives macrophages of control mechanisms that limit mycobacterial growth in vivo, thus supporting intracellular persistence of M. tuberculosis.

  19. [Tuberculosis surveys in Guerrero and new estimates of the magnitude of tuberculosis infection in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Ayala, V M; Bernal-Pérez, J; Cabrera-Coello, L; Stetler, H C; Pineda-Salgado, J; Guerrero-Reyes, P

    1989-01-01

    Tuberculosis infection surveys are carried out by tuberculin skin test (Mantoux) which is a simple, cheap, valid and reliable procedure for the estimation of prevalence and incidence rates. In 1987 a survey was undertaken in children of 6-7 years old who attended the elementary school and who were not vaccinated (BCG) in the region of Iguala, México. Out of 6,095 children of such age group, just 531 were not vaccinated, thus the prevalence figure was 2.5% (CL05 = 0.1%, 5.3%). On the basis of the findings by Izaguirre et al, 26 years ago, who reported that about 10% of the children of this age group were infected, it can be estimated that the annual risk of infection is about three newly infected each year per 1,000 population. It is necessary to provide better estimates of the whole tuberculosis incidence rate.

  20. Modulation of cAMP metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its effect on host infection.

    PubMed

    Barba, Jeannette; Alvarez, Angel H; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the single most relevant bacterial infectious agent as Tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. Like other microorganisms, M. tuberculosis needs to sense and adapt to changes in the several niches where it is found, ranging from the environment to a number of host-adapted programs, including infection of cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, epithelial cells and adipocytes. A strategy commonly used by cells to respond to such changes consists of producing small molecules known as second messengers. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the best-studied second messengers in many organisms, and in recent years its participation during the M. tuberculosis infection cycle has just begun to be thoroughly considered. In this work, we aimed to provide a perspective of how cAMP metabolism proceeds in M. tuberculosis, which genes are activated in response to cAMP signaling in this organism, and discuss the evidence for bacterially produced cAMP use during infection. Furthermore, key issues needing to be addressed for better understanding cAMP physiology in slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria are presented.

  1. Latent Tuberculosis Infection: Myths, Models, and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge on human latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) based on clinical studies and observations, as well as experimental in vitro and animal models. Several key terms are defined, including “latency,” “persistence,” “dormancy,” and “antibiotic tolerance.” Dogmas prevalent in the field are critically examined based on available clinical and experimental data, including the long-held beliefs that infection is either latent or active, that LTBI represents a small population of nonreplicating, “dormant” bacilli, and that caseous granulomas are the haven for LTBI. The role of host factors, such as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, T regulatory cells, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), in controlling TB infection is discussed. We also highlight microbial regulatory and metabolic pathways implicated in bacillary growth restriction and antibiotic tolerance under various physiologically relevant conditions. Finally, we pose several clinically important questions, which remain unanswered and will serve to stimulate future research on LTBI. PMID:25184558

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication by transcriptional activation at the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nakata, K; Weiden, M; Rom, W N

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as an epidemic fueled by the large number of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, especially those who are injecting drug users. We found a striking increase from 4- to 208-fold in p24 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from involved sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection vs uninvolved sites in three HIV+ patients. We used an in vitro cell culture model to determine if tuberculosis could activate replication of HIV-1. Mononuclear phagocyte cell lines U937 and THP-1 infected with HIV-1JR-CSF, in vitro and stimulated with live M. tuberculosis H37Ra, had a threefold increase in p24 in culture supernatants. Using the HIV-1 long terminal repeat with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter construct, live M. tuberculosis increased transcription 20-fold in THP-1 cells, and cell wall components stimulated CAT expression to a lesser extent. The nuclear factor-kappa B enhancer element was responsible for the majority of the increased CAT activity although two upstream nuclear factor-IL6 sites may also contribute to enhanced transcription. Antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-1 inhibited the increase in CAT activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by M. tuberculosis from 21-fold to 8-fold. Stimulation of HIV-1 replication by M. tuberculosis may exacerbate dysfunction of the host immune response in dually infected individuals. Images PMID:7738195

  3. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    first eight weeks (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.35; two trials, 1020 participants, very low quality evidence). However, supplementation may have little or no effect on weight gain during treatment (data not pooled; five trials, 2940 participants, low quality evidence), and no studies have assessed the effect on quality of life. Plasma levels of vitamin A appear to increase following initiation of tuberculosis treatment regardless of supplementation. In contrast, supplementation probably does improve plasma levels of zinc, vitamin D, vitamin E, and selenium, but this has not been shown to have clinically important benefits. Of note, despite multiple studies of vitamin D supplementation in different doses, statistically significant benefits on sputum conversion have not been demonstrated. Authors' conclusions There is currently insufficient research to know whether routinely providing free food, or energy supplements improves tuberculosis treatment outcomes, but it probably improves weight gain in some settings. Although blood levels of some vitamins may be low in people starting treatment for active tuberculosis, there is currently no reliable evidence that routinely supplementing above recommended daily amounts has clinical benefits. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis Cochrane researchers conducted a review of the effects of nutritional supplements for people being treated for tuberculosis. After searching for relevant studies up to 4 February 2016, they included 35 relevant studies with 8283 participants. Their findings are summarized below. What is active tuberculosis and how might nutritional supplements work? Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection which most commonly affects the lungs. Most people who get infected never develop symptoms as their immune system manages to control the bacteria. Active tuberculosis occurs when the infection is no longer contained by the immune system, and typical symptoms are

  4. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  5. Exosomes function in antigen presentation during an in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Victoria L.; Cheng, Yong; Bryant, Barry R.; Schorey, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells are limited in their ability to present antigen to CD4+ T cells suggesting that other mechanism of antigen presentation are driving the robust T cell response observed during an M. tuberculosis infection. These mechanisms could include antigens present in apoptotic bodies, necrotic debris, exosomes or even release of non-vesicular antigen from infected cells. However, there is limited data to support any of these mechanisms as important in driving T cell activation in vivo. In the present study we use Rab27a-deficient mice which show diminished trafficking of mycobacterial components to exosomes as well as M. tuberculosis strains that express recombinant proteins which traffic or fail to traffic to exosomes. We observed that exosomes released during a mouse M. tuberculosis infection contribute significantly to its T cell response. These finding imply that exosomes function to promote T cell immunity during a bacterial infection and are an important source of extracellular antigen. PMID:28262829

  6. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection: a 'danger-couple model' of disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki M; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Ellegård, Rada; Barathan, Muttiah; Chong, Yee K; Bador, M Kahar; Rukumani, Devi V; Sabet, Negar S; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection interfere and impact the pathogenesis phenomena of each other. Owing to atypical clinical presentations and diagnostic complications, HIV/TB co-infection continues to be a menace for healthcare providers. Although the increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a reduction in HIV-associated opportunistic infections and mortality, the concurrent management of HIV/TB co-infection remains a challenge owing to adverse effects, complex drug interactions, overlapping toxicities and tuberculosis -associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Several hypotheses have been put forward for the exacerbation of tuberculosis by HIV and vice versa supported by immunological studies. Discussion on the mechanisms produced by infectious cofactors with impact on disease pathology could shed light on how to design potential interventions that could decelerate disease progression. With no vaccine for HIV and lack of an effective vaccine for tuberculosis, it is essential to design strategies against HIV-TB co-infection.

  7. Exosomes function in antigen presentation during an in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victoria L; Cheng, Yong; Bryant, Barry R; Schorey, Jeffrey S

    2017-03-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages and dendritic cells are limited in their ability to present antigen to CD4+ T cells suggesting that other mechanism of antigen presentation are driving the robust T cell response observed during an M. tuberculosis infection. These mechanisms could include antigens present in apoptotic bodies, necrotic debris, exosomes or even release of non-vesicular antigen from infected cells. However, there is limited data to support any of these mechanisms as important in driving T cell activation in vivo. In the present study we use Rab27a-deficient mice which show diminished trafficking of mycobacterial components to exosomes as well as M. tuberculosis strains that express recombinant proteins which traffic or fail to traffic to exosomes. We observed that exosomes released during a mouse M. tuberculosis infection contribute significantly to its T cell response. These finding imply that exosomes function to promote T cell immunity during a bacterial infection and are an important source of extracellular antigen.

  8. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I.; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E.; Amiano, Nicolás O.; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M.; Tateosian, Nancy L.; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Gherardi, María M.; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; García, Verónica E.

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  9. 9 CFR 71.12 - Sodium orthophenylphenate as permitted disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. 71.12 Section 71.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. (a) A permitted brand of sodium orthophenylphenate in a proportion of at least one pound to 12 gallons of water is permitted in tuberculosis eradication work...

  10. 9 CFR 71.12 - Sodium orthophenylphenate as permitted disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. 71.12 Section 71.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. (a) A permitted brand of sodium orthophenylphenate in a proportion of at least one pound to 12 gallons of water is permitted in tuberculosis eradication work...

  11. 9 CFR 71.12 - Sodium orthophenylphenate as permitted disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. 71.12 Section 71.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. (a) A permitted brand of sodium orthophenylphenate in a proportion of at least one pound to 12 gallons of water is permitted in tuberculosis eradication work...

  12. 9 CFR 71.12 - Sodium orthophenylphenate as permitted disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. 71.12 Section 71.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. (a) A permitted brand of sodium orthophenylphenate in a proportion of at least one pound to 12 gallons of water is permitted in tuberculosis eradication work...

  13. 9 CFR 71.12 - Sodium orthophenylphenate as permitted disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. 71.12 Section 71.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... disinfectant for premises infected with tuberculosis. (a) A permitted brand of sodium orthophenylphenate in a proportion of at least one pound to 12 gallons of water is permitted in tuberculosis eradication work...

  14. Mathematical analysis of a tuberculosis model with differential infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Tewa, Jean Jules

    2009-11-01

    This paper deals with the global properties of a tuberculosis model with mass action incidence and two differential infectivity. The direct Lyapunov method enables us to prove that the considered model is globally stable: There is always a globally asymptotically stable equilibrium state. Depending on the value of the basic reproduction number R0 , this state can be either endemic (R0 > 1), or infection-free (R0 ⩽ 1). Numerical results are provided to illustrate analytical results.

  15. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis.

  16. Diagnosis & treatment of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Padmapriyadarsini, C.; Narendran, G.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in both the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Further, there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. Because of the poor performance of sputum smear microscopy in HIV-infected patients, newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resource-constrained settings. The treatment of co-infected patients requires antituberculosis and antiretroviral drugs to be administered concomitantly; challenges include pill burden and patient compliance, drug interactions, overlapping toxic effects, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Also important questions about the duration and schedule of anti-TB drug regimens and timing of antiretroviral therapy remain unanswered. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for TB and vice-versa requires good co-ordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programmes. Linkage of co-infected patients to antiretroviral treatment centres is critical if early mortality is to be prevented. We present here an overview of existing diagnostic strategies, new tests in the pipeline and recommendations for treatment of patients with HIV-TB dual infection. PMID:22310818

  17. Latent tuberculosis infection: screening and treatment in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Morano, Jamie P; Walton, Mary R; Zelenev, Alexei; Bruce, R Douglas; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-10-01

    Despite its benefit for treating active tuberculosis, directly observed therapy (DOT) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been largely understudied among challenging inner city populations. Utilizing questionnaire data from a comprehensive mobile healthcare clinic in New Haven, CT from 2003 to July 2011, a total of 2,523 completed tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) resulted in 356 new LTBIs. Multivariate logistic regression correlated covariates of the two outcomes (a) initiation of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) and (b) completion of 9 months of IPT. Of the 357 newly positive TSTs, 86.3 % (n = 308) completed screening chest radiographs (CXRs): 90.3 % (n = 278) were normal, and 0.3 % (n = 1) had active tuberculosis. Of those completing CXR screening, 44.0 % (n = 135) agreed to IPT: 69.6 % (n = 94) selected DOT, and 30.4 % (n = 41) selected self-administered therapy (SAT). Initiating IPT was correlated with undocumented status (AOR = 3.43; p < 0.001) and being born in a country of highest and third highest tuberculosis prevalence (AOR = 14.09; p = 0.017 and AOR = 2.25; p = 0.005, respectively). Those selecting DOT were more likely to be Hispanic (83.0 vs 53.7 %; p < 0.0001), undocumented (57.4 vs 41.5 %; p = 0.012), employed (p < 0.0001), uninsured (p = 0.014), and have stable housing (p = 0.002), no prior cocaine or crack use (p = 0.013) and no recent incarceration (p = 0.001). Completing 9 months of IPT was correlated with no recent incarceration (AOR 5.95; p = 0.036) and younger age (AOR 1.03; p = 0.031). SAT and DOT participants did not significantly differ for IPT duration (6.54 vs 5.68 months; p = 0.216) nor 9-month completion (59.8 vs 46.3 %; p = 0.155). In an urban mobile healthcare sample, screening completion for LTBI was high with nearly half initiating IPT. Undocumented, Hispanic immigrants from high prevalence tuberculosis countries were more likely to self-select DOT at the mobile

  18. Reduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Bacillus Calmette Guerin immunized people is due to training of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The currently used vaccine for prevention of tuberculosis is Bacillus Calmette Guerin, which has been associated with a protective effect of 51% against tuberculosis. New vaccination strategies based on an enhancement of adaptive T-cell based immunity have been unsuccessful in increasing the efficiency of BCG immunisation. The proposed hypothesis is that a reduction of Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in Bacillus Calmette Guerin immunized people is due to training of innate immunity. Evidence to support the hypothesis is a systematic review, which showed that BCG protects against M. tuberculosis infection as evident from negative interferon gamma release assay results in BCG immunised exposed people. BCG has been shown to enhance innate immunity in monocytes via nucleotide binding oligomerisation domain 2 receptor activation by muramyldipeptide. An alternative hypothesis may be that T-suppressor cells induced by BCG immunisation may be the reason for the absence of an interferon gamma response mimicking absence of infection in immunized people. In order to test the primary hypothesis an ultra-low dose mouse model of M. tuberculosis infection could be used. Innate immunity could be enhanced by administration of murabutide and groups with and without murabutide enhanced BCG immunisation and with and without elimination of T-suppressor cells compared. The contribution of training of innate immunity in reduction of infection could hereby be demonstrated by treatment of mice prior to immunisation with an inhibitor of epigenetic programming. Confirmation of the hypothesis could provide the foundation of a new approach to an improved vaccine against M. tuberculosis infection.

  19. Regulation of neutrophils by interferon-γ limits lung inflammation during tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Behar, Samuel M

    2011-10-24

    Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the host to restrict bacterial replication while preventing an over-exuberant inflammatory response. Interferon (IFN) γ is crucial for activating macrophages and also regulates tissue inflammation. We dissociate these two functions and show that IFN-γ(-/-) memory CD4(+) T cells retain their antimicrobial activity but are unable to suppress inflammation. IFN-γ inhibits CD4(+) T cell production of IL-17, which regulates neutrophil recruitment. In addition, IFN-γ directly inhibits pathogenic neutrophil accumulation in the infected lung and impairs neutrophil survival. Regulation of neutrophils is important because their accumulation is detrimental to the host. We suggest that neutrophilia during tuberculosis indicates failed Th1 immunity or loss of IFN-γ responsiveness. These results establish an important antiinflammatory role for IFN-γ in host protection against tuberculosis.

  20. Indoor environmental control of tuberculosis and other airborne infections.

    PubMed

    Nardell, E A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the airborne infection of global importance, although many environmental interventions to control TB apply to influenza and other infections with airborne potential. This review focuses on the global problem and the current state of available environmental interventions. TB transmission is facilitated in overcrowded, poorly ventilated congregate settings, such as hospitals, clinics, prisons, jails, and refugee camps. The best means of TB transmission control is source control- to identify unsuspected infectious cases and to promptly begin effective therapy. However, even with active case finding and rapid diagnostics, not every unsuspected case will be identified, and environmental control measures remain the next intervention of choice. Natural ventilation is the main means of air disinfection and has the advantage of wide availability, low cost, and high efficacy-under optimal conditions. It is usually not applicable all year in colder climates and may not be effective when windows are closed on cold nights in warm climates, for security, and for pest control. In warm climates, windows may be closed when air conditioning is installed for thermal comfort. Although mechanical ventilation, if properly installed and maintained, can provide adequate air disinfection, it is expensive to install, maintain, and operate. The most cost-effective way to achieve high levels of air disinfection is upper room germicidal irradiation. The safe and effective application of this poorly defined intervention is now well understood, and recently published evidence-based application guidelines will make implementation easier.

  1. A subunit vaccine based on rH-NS induces protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by inducing the Th1 immune response and activating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Suting; Pan, Bowen; Guan, Zhu; Yang, Zhenjun; Duan, Linfei; Cai, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a Gram-positive pathogen which causes tuberculosis in both animals and humans. All tested rH-NS formulations induced a specific Th1 response, as indicated by increased production of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) by lymphocytes in the spleen of mice which were immunized with rH-NS alone or with rH-NS and the adjuvant cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP). Serum from mice immunized with rH-NS with or without adjuvant also had higher levels of IL-12p40 and TNF-α, compared with those from control mice immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Both vaccines increased protective efficacy in mice which were challenged with Mtb H37Rv, as measured by reduced relative CFU counts in the lungs. We found that rH-NS induced the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40, which relied on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, and on the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. Additionally, we also found that rH-NS could interact with TLR2 but not TLR4 in pull-down assays. The rH-NS-induced cytokine production from TLR2-silenced RAW264.7 cells was lower than that from BALB/c macrophages. Prolonged exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rH-NS resulted in a significant enhancement in IFN-γ-induced MHC II expression, which was not found in shTLR2-treated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that rH-NS is a TLR2 agonist which induces the production of cytokines by macrophages and up-regulates macrophage function.

  2. Alteration of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis following anti-tuberculosis drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Imran Hussain; Ahmed, Albin Mostaque; Choudhuri, Subhadip; Sen, Aditi; Hazra, Avijit; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Bhattacharya, Basudev; Bahar, Bojlul

    2014-11-01

    Active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is associated with a failure of the host immune system to control the invading Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The objective of this study was to quantify and assess the role of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients following anti-tuberculosis drug (ATD) therapy. Blood samples were collected from APTB patients and normal healthy subjects (NHS) (total n=204) at baseline and 2, 4 and 6 months post-therapy and the abundance of serum inflammatory cytokines were measured by cytokine specific ELISA. Compared to NHS, APTB patients at baseline had higher levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 (P<0.001), IFN-γ (P<0.001), TNF-α (P<0.01), IL-1β (P<0.001) and IL-6 (P<0.001) and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 (P<0.001) and TGF-β1 (P<0.001) while there was no change in the level of IL-4. In APTB patients, the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 directly relate to the bacterial load while the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 relate to radiological severity. At baseline, the IL-6 level in NHS and APTB patients differed most and following ATD therapy, this level rapidly decreased and stabilized by 4-month in APTB patients. It is concluded that a subtle reduction in the serum level of IL-6 of the APTB patients following ATD therapy might play a vital role in immune-protection of the host against Mtb infection and hence the serum IL-6 level can be a useful marker to diagnose the effectiveness of therapy in the patients.

  3. Prominent role for T cell-derived Tumour Necrosis Factor for sustained control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Allie, Nasiema; Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Keeton, Roanne; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Court, Nathalie; Fremond, Cecile; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Shebzukhov, Yuriy; Ryffel, Bernhard; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Quesniaux, Valerie F. J.; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2013-01-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) is critical for host control of M. tuberculosis, but the relative contribution of TNF from innate and adaptive immune responses during tuberculosis infection is unclear. Myeloid versus T-cell-derived TNF function in tuberculosis was investigated using cell type-specific TNF deletion. Mice deficient for TNF expression in macrophages/neutrophils displayed early, transient susceptibility to M. tuberculosis but recruited activated, TNF-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and controlled chronic infection. Strikingly, deficient TNF expression in T-cells resulted in early control but susceptibility and eventual mortality during chronic infection with increased pulmonary pathology. TNF inactivation in both myeloid and T-cells rendered mice critically susceptible to infection with a phenotype resembling complete TNF deficient mice, indicating that myeloid and T-cells are the primary TNF sources collaborating for host control of tuberculosis. Thus, while TNF from myeloid cells mediates early immune function, T-cell derived TNF is essential to sustain protection during chronic tuberculosis infection. PMID:23657146

  4. Updated guidelines for using Interferon Gamma Release Assays to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection - United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Gerald H; Jereb, John; Vernon, Andrew; LoBue, Phillip; Goldberg, Stefan; Castro, Kenneth

    2010-06-25

    n 2005, CDC published guidelines for using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G) (Cellestis Limited, Carnegie, Victoria, Australia) (CDC. Guidelines for using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, United States. MMWR;54[No. RR-15]:49-55). Subsequently, two new interferon gamma (IFN- gamma) release assays (IGRAs) were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as aids in diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection, both latent infection and infection manifesting as active tuberculosis. These tests are the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) (Cellestis Limited, Carnegie, Victoria, Australia) and the T-SPOT.TB test (T-Spot) (Oxford Immunotec Limited, Abingdon, United Kingdom). The antigens, methods, and interpretation criteria for these assays differ from those for IGRAs approved previously by FDA. For assistance in developing recommendations related to IGRA use, CDC convened a group of experts to review the scientific evidence and provide opinions regarding use of IGRAs. Data submitted to FDA, published reports, and expert opinion related to IGRAs were used in preparing these guidelines. Results of studies examining sensitivity, specificity, and agreement for IGRAs and TST vary with respect to which test is better. Although data on the accuracy of IGRAs and their ability to predict subsequent active tuberculosis are limited, to date, no major deficiencies have been reported in studies involving various populations. This report provides guidance to U.S. public health officials, health-care providers, and laboratory workers for use of FDA-approved IGRAs in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in adults and children. In brief, TSTs and IGRAs (QFT-G, QFT-GIT, and T-Spot) may be used as aids in diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection. They may be used for surveillance purposes and to identify persons likely to benefit from treatment. Multiple additional recommendations are provided that address quality control, test

  5. Role of the CD137 ligand (CD137L) signaling pathway during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gómez, Julia María; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Yan, Benedict; Lin, Wenwei; Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Rahim, Siti Zarina Zainul; Pethe, Kevin; Schwarz, Herbert; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The role of the CD137-CD137 ligand (CD137L) signaling pathway in T cell co-stimulation has been well established. Dysregulated CD137 or CD137L stimulation can lead to pathological conditions such as inflammatory diseases or cancer. However, the contribution of CD137-CD137L interaction to the control of infectious diseases has not been extensively studied, with the few available reports focusing mainly on viral infections. Here we investigated the role of the CD137-CD137L interactions during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Using CD137L-deficient mice, we found that absence of the CD137L-mediated signaling pathway during M. tuberculosis infection resulted in delayed activation of CD4(+) T cells in the draining lymph nodes. This finding was supported by an in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction assay that revealed impaired priming of T cells by CD137L-deficient dendritic cells upon mycobacterial infection. In addition, greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells and antigen presenting cells were measured in the lungs of CD137L-deficient mice. Strikingly, the lung cytokine production profile was profoundly altered in M. tuberculosis-infected CD137L-deficient mice with lower levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-6 and elevated concentrations of IL-17 compared to their wild type counterparts. However and surprisingly, these tangible immunological disorders translated only into a mild and transient increase in the bacterial loads and a higher number of granulomatous lesions with impaired architecture in the lungs of the CD137L-deficient infected mice. Together, while our data support the engagement of the CD137L signaling pathway during M. tuberculosis infection, they underscore the functional redundancy and robustness of the host defense arsenal deployed against mycobacterial infection.

  6. Impaired Cytokine but Enhanced Cytotoxic Marker Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced CD8+ T Cells in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for tuberculosis among individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To explore the influence of DM on CD8(+) T-cell responses during latent M. tuberculosis infection, we estimated the cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression pattern in individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection with DM and those with latent M. tuberculosis infection without DM. Among individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection, those with DM had diminished frequencies of CD8(+) T-helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells following stimulation by M. tuberculosis antigen and enhanced frequencies of CD8(+) T cells expressing cytotoxic markers, compared with those without DM. Thus, our results suggest that coincident DM modulates CD8(+) T-cell function during latent M. tuberculosis infection.

  7. Chewing the fat: lipid metabolism and homeostasis during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lovewell, Rustin R; Sassetti, Christopher M; VanderVen, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipid metabolism, the immune response and lipid homeostasis in the host creates a complex and dynamic pathogen-host interaction. Advances in imaging and metabolic analysis techniques indicate that M. tuberculosis preferentially associates with foamy cells and employs multiple physiological systems to utilize exogenously derived fatty-acids and cholesterol. Moreover, novel insights into specific host pathways that control lipid accumulation during infection, such as the PPARγ and LXR transcriptional regulators, have begun to reveal mechanisms by which host immunity alters the bacterial micro-environment. As bacterial lipid metabolism and host lipid regulatory pathways are both important, yet inherently complex, components of active tuberculosis, delineating the heterogeneity in lipid trafficking within disease states remains a major challenge for therapeutic design.

  8. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I D; Yuan, L; Millson, M E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection drug users are at increased risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis (TB). The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection among injection drug users in Toronto, as indicated by a positive tuberculin skin test result. An additional objective was to identify predictors of a positive skin test result in this population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out involving self-selected injection drug users in the city of Toronto. A total of 171 participants were recruited through a downtown Toronto needle-exchange program from June 1 to Oct. 31, 1996. RESULTS: Of 167 subjects tested, 155 (92.8%) returned for interpretation of their skin test result within the designated timeframe (48 to 72 hours). Using a 5-mm cut-off, the prevalence rate of positive tuberculin skin test results was 31.0% (95% confidence interval 23.8% to 38.9%). Birth outside of Canada and increasing age were both predictive of a positive result. INTERPRETATION: There is a high burden of M. tuberculosis infection in this population of injection drug users. The compliance observed with returning for interpretation of skin test results indicates that successful TB screening is possible among injection drug users. PMID:10189423

  9. Temporal analysis of reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012 *

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Nunes, Natália; Nunes, Marina; Rodrigues, Vandilson Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. Methods: This was an observational study based on secondary time series data collected from the Brazilian Case Registry Database for the 2002-2012 period. The incidence of tuberculosis was stratified by gender, age group, geographical region, and outcome, as was that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection. Results: Nationally, the incidence of tuberculosis declined by 18%, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 3.8%. There was an overall decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis, despite a significant increase in that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased only in the 0- to 9-year age bracket, remaining stable or increasing in the other age groups. The incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 209% in the ≥ 60-year age bracket. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased in all geographical regions except the south, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by over 150% in the north and northeast. Regarding the outcomes, patients with tuberculosis-HIV co-infection, in comparison with patients infected with tuberculosis only, had a 48% lower chance of cure, a 50% greater risk of treatment nonadherence, and a 94% greater risk of death from tuberculosis. Conclusions: Our study shows that tuberculosis continues to be a relevant public health issue in Brazil, because the goals for the control and cure of the disease have yet to be achieved. In addition, the sharp increase in the incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women, in the elderly, and in the northern/northeastern region reveals that the population of HIV-infected individuals is rapidly becoming more female, older, and more impoverished. PMID:28117471

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a country with low tuberculosis incidence: role of immigration and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Lukas; Gagneux, Sebastien; Helbling, Peter; Battegay, Manuel; Rieder, Hans L; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Zwahlen, Marcel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Siegrist, Hans H; Fehr, Jan; Dolina, Marisa; Calmy, Alexandra; Stucki, David; Jaton, Katia; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Bodmer, Thomas; Ninet, Beatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Egger, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Immigrants from high-burden countries and HIV-coinfected individuals are risk groups for tuberculosis (TB) in countries with low TB incidence. Therefore, we studied their role in transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Switzerland. We included all TB patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort and a sample of patients from the national TB registry. We identified molecular clusters by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis and used weighted logistic regression adjusted for age and sex to identify risk factors for clustering, taking sampling proportions into account. In total, we analyzed 520 TB cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2008; 401 were foreign born, and 113 were HIV coinfected. The Euro-American M. tuberculosis lineage dominated throughout the study period (378 strains; 72.7%), with no evidence for another lineage, such as the Beijing genotype, emerging. We identified 35 molecular clusters with 90 patients, indicating recent transmission; 31 clusters involved foreign-born patients, and 15 involved HIV-infected patients. Birth origin was not associated with clustering (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 3.43; P = 0.25, comparing Swiss-born with foreign-born patients), but clustering was reduced in HIV-infected patients (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.93; P = 0.030). Cavitary disease, male sex, and younger age were all associated with molecular clustering. In conclusion, most TB patients in Switzerland were foreign born, but transmission of M. tuberculosis was not more common among immigrants and was reduced in HIV-infected patients followed up in the national HIV cohort study. Continued access to health services and clinical follow-up will be essential to control TB in this population.

  11. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in latently infected lungs by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo; Kaplan, Gilla

    2014-01-01

    Detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge in the diagnosis of asymptomatic, subclinical tuberculosis. We report the development of an immunofluorescence technique to visualize and enumerate M. tuberculosis in latently infected rabbit lungs where no acid-fast–stained organisms were seen and no cultivable bacilli were obtained by the agar-plating method. PMID:25161200

  12. Real-Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: “Real-Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ...Mycobacteria Meeting. Birmingham, Alabama. January 24-26, 2014. Energy and redox homeostasis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection . Adrie JC Steyn. 4... Infections . June 26- 29, 2014. Saltsjöbaden, Sweden. Metabolomic discovery of a redox and bioenergetic hierarchy in M. tuberculosis and in human TB. Adrie

  13. Tuberculosis incidence in developing countries with high prevalence of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, A; Veeken, H; Berra, A

    1992-10-01

    95% of tuberculosis (TB) cases in the world live in developing countries. HIV infection greatly increases the risk of developing active TB among those with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Thus researchers have used data from existing research to develop a mathematical model to gauge the increase in TB incidence in developing countries while considering rising HIV prevalence among adults. They look at 2 groups with sizable differences in risk of acquiring TB: adults with both HIV and M. tuberculosis infections and all other adults. The researchers plot the expected increase in TB incidence and percentage of TB cases that also have HIV infection against HIV prevalence. According to the model, when the prevalence of HIV infection hits 13% of adults in developing countries, the number of new TB cases doubles. Most of this increase will occur in areas that already lack diagnostic services, drugs, hospital beds, and other needed supplies. TB chemoprophylaxis treatment of HIV-positive people could result in a lower increase in TB incidence, however. WHO has set a goal of 50% reduction in TB incidence by 2002. Public health officials could use this model to plan TB control programs to bring about a reduction in the increase. Even though TB control programs can help stem the projected increase, it will be very difficult for developing countries with high HIV prevalence to hold back the projected rise in TB incidence. Developing countries must take considerable appropriate action soon to prevent doubling of TB incidence as HIV prevalence nears 13% of adults.

  14. IFNγ Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Risk of Infection and Disease in Household Contacts of Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; Marín, Diana M.; López, Lucelly; Henao, Hanna M.; Martínez, Teresita; Villa, Liliana; Barrera, Luis F.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Ramírez, María E.; Montes, Carlos J.; Oquendo, María C.; Arango, Lisandra M.; Riaño, Felipe; Aguirre, Carlos; Bustamante, Alberto; Belisle, John T.; Dobos, Karen; Mejía, Gloria I.; Giraldo, Margarita R.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Robledo, Jaime; Arbeláez, María P.; Rojas, Carlos A.; García, Luis F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Household contacts (HHCs) of pulmonary tuberculosis patients are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and early disease development. Identification of individuals at risk of tuberculosis disease is a desirable goal for tuberculosis control. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) using specific M. tuberculosis antigens provide an alternative to tuberculin skin testing (TST) for infection detection. Additionally, the levels of IFNγ produced in response to these antigens may have prognostic value. We estimated the prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection by IGRA and TST in HHCs and their source population (SP), and assessed whether IFNγ levels in HHCs correlate with tuberculosis development. Methods A cohort of 2060 HHCs was followed for 2–3 years after exposure to a tuberculosis case. Besides TST, IFNγ responses to mycobacterial antigens: CFP, CFP-10, HspX and Ag85A were assessed in 7-days whole blood cultures and compared to 766 individuals from the SP in Medellín, Colombia. Isoniazid prophylaxis was not offered to child contacts because Colombian tuberculosis regulations consider it only in children under 5 years, TST positive without BCG vaccination. Results Using TST 65.9% of HHCs and 42.7% subjects from the SP were positive (OR 2.60, p<0.0001). IFNγ response to CFP-10, a biomarker of M. tuberculosis infection, tested positive in 66.3% HHCs and 24.3% from the SP (OR = 6.07, p<0.0001). Tuberculosis incidence rate was 7.0/1000 person years. Children <5 years accounted for 21.6% of incident cases. No significant difference was found between positive and negative IFNγ responders to CFP-10 (HR 1.82 95% CI 0.79–4.20 p = 0.16). However, a significant trend for tuberculosis development amongst high HHC IFNγ producers was observed (trend Log rank p = 0.007). Discussion CFP-10-induced IFNγ production is useful to establish tuberculosis infection prevalence amongst HHC and identify those at highest risk of disease. The high

  15. Tuberculosis and leprosy infections in the Marshallese population of Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Victor Manuel; Orloff, Mohammed S; Kaminaga, Joseph; Cardenas, Irma Carrillo; Brown, Joeline; Hainline-Williams, Sandra; Duthie, Malcolm S; Gonzalez-Puche, Angela C; Mukasa, Leonard; Patil, Naveen; Mcelfish, Pearl Ann; Bates, Joseph H

    2016-03-01

    The cross-immunity between tuberculosis and leprosy is unknown. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the occurrence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. leprae infection in Marshallese adult volunteers in Springdale, Arkansas, U.S.A., a population that experiences high rates of leprosy and tuberculosis. We used immunodiagnostic testing for tuberculosis and leprosy infection and found significant prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (19.0%), and asymptomatic Mycobacterium leprae infection (22.2%). We found a negative association between presence of antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae and a positive interferon-γ release assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, prevalence odds ratio = 0.1 (95% CI = 0.0, 0.9). Although these findings require confirmation on a larger scale, they are supportive of the existence of cross-immunity.

  16. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  17. Mycobacterium microti Infection (Vole Tuberculosis) in Wild Rodent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Rachel; Begon, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Ergon, Torbjørn; Graham, Isla M.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Hart, C. A.; Koedam, Marianne; Kremer, Kristin; Lambin, Xavier; Roholl, Paul; Soolingen, Dick van

    2002-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti (vole tuberculosis) infections in small wild mammals were first described more than 60 years ago in several populations in Great Britain. Few studies of vole tuberculosis have been undertaken since then, and little is known about the relationship between M. microti isolates originating from different populations or at different times or of the prevalence of this infection in wild rodent populations, despite human cases of M. microti infections being increasingly reported. In this study, field voles (Microtus agrestis), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were found to be infected, with up to 8% having external tuberculous signs, in wild populations in Northumberland and Cheshire, England. Spoligotyping applied directly to the clinical material simultaneously detected and typed M. microti bacteria in skin lesions, lymph glands, and internal abcesses. IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of cultured bacteria was used to compare these isolates with previously isolated strains from both animals and humans. This demonstrated that although the current rodent isolates were distinct from those isolated from voles in the 1930s in Great Britain, they had a high degree of similarity to these strains and were distinct from the M. microti isolates from humans, a pig, and a ferret from The Netherlands. Thus, M. microti infection seems to be widespread in wild rodent populations, but more studies are needed to understand how M. microti might be transmitted from animals to humans and to determine better the zoonotic risk posed. PMID:12202566

  18. [Spontaneous pneumothorax associated to active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Rojas, F; Córdova Gutiérrez, H; Aguirre Gas, H

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviewed 8 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, associated to pulmonary tuberculosis during a period of time of two years at the A.L.M. General Hospital of Toluca, Mex. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical picture, radiology and bacteriology studies. Six males and two females proceding of the low class; farmers all of them. Their age ranged between 18 and 35 years. Two of the patients showed cavitary lesions, five had difusse fibrosis of the lung. We analized the clinical manifestations and reviewed the pathogenic mechanisms as well the medical and surgical treatment. No deaths ocurred en this series. We concluded that the direct relation between active pulmonary tuberculosis and spontaneous pneumothorax is not clear, but their association in this serie suggested further studies to stablished this. We emphasized the importance of this complication rare in the world literature.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement. PMID:27141534

  20. [The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sekiya; Sakaguchi, Nobuki; Hotta, Jyunnichi

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infects all organs in the body; however, lung infection is the primary lesion. The total number of infections is decreasing, but the percentage of infections in older people is rising. Because this disease is due to infection with M. tuberculosis, the diagnosis requires the presence of M. tuberculosis. Chest X-ray and CT are very powerful tools to suggest the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Pathological examination of the tissues also shows the typical findings of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the presence of the bacterium was not proven in certain cases of M. tuberculosis infection, and especially in cases of latent infection. Recently, the whole-blood interferon--gamma test (QuantiFERON-TB, QFT) became more popular than the tuberculin skin test. It is reported that the specificity and sensitivity of QFT are similar to or better than the tuberculin skin test. However, it should be noted that QFT positive does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of active M. tuberculosis infection and that QFT is one of the supplementary tests in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Currently, massive infection with M. tuberculosis is increasing. The precise responsible linkage in massive infection with M. tuberculosis needs DNA polymorphism analysis using variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) or restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  1. Distinct Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Signatures in Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection, BCG Vaccination and Clinically Resolved Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Yu, Tianwei; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4+ T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI) versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI) or uninfected (BCG) with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA−CD27−) antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA−CD27+) cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27+ and CD27− as well as PD-1+ and PD-1− antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27− antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4+ memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27−PD-1+ subsets in LTBI is driven by Mtb

  2. Quantitative Comparison of Active and Latent Tuberculosis in the Cynomolgus Macaque Model▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Rodgers, Mark; Smith, Le'kneitah; Bigbee, Matthew; Myers, Amy; Bigbee, Carolyn; Chiosea, Ion; Capuano, Saverio V.; Fuhrman, Carl; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2009-01-01

    We previously described that low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques results in a spectrum of disease similar to that of human infection: primary disease, latent infection, and reactivation tuberculosis (S. V. Capuano III, D. A. Croix, S. Pawar, A. Zinovik, A. Myers, P. L. Lin, S. Bissel, C. Fuhrman, E. Klein, and J. L. Flynn, Infect. Immun. 71:5831-5844, 2003). This is the only established model of latent infection, and it provides a unique opportunity to understand host and pathogen differences across of range of disease states. Here, we provide a more extensive and detailed characterization of the gross pathology, microscopic histopathology, and immunologic characteristics of monkeys in each clinical disease category. The data underscore the similarities between human and nonhuman primate M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, we describe novel methods of quantifying gross pathology and bacterial burden that distinguish between active disease and latent infection, and we extend the usefulness of this model for comparative studies. Early in infection, an abnormal chest X ray, M. tuberculosis growth by gastric aspirate, and increased mycobacterium-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were associated with the development of active disease. At necropsy, disease was quantified with respect to pathology and bacterial numbers. Microscopically, a spectrum of granuloma types are seen and differ with disease type. At necropsy, monkeys with active disease had more lung T cells and more IFN-γ from PBMC, BAL, and mediastinal lymph nodes than monkeys with latent infection. Finally, we have observed a spectrum of disease not only in monkeys with active disease but also in those with latent infection that provides insight into human latent tuberculosis. PMID:19620341

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manzanillo, Paolo S; Shiloh, Michael U; Portnoy, Daniel A; Cox, Jeffery S

    2012-05-17

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between "vacuolar" and "cytosolic" pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the Sting/Tbk1/Irf3 axis, resulting in IFN-β production. Surprisingly, Irf3(-/-) mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis.

  4. HIV-infected presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis: How many are eligible for antiretroviral therapy in Karnataka, India?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay M V; Singarajipura, Anil; Naik, Balaji; Guddemane, Deepak K; Patel, Yogesh; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Sunil; Deshmukh, Rajesh; Rewari, B B; Harries, Anthony David

    2017-03-01

    For certain subgroups within people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [active tuberculosis (TB), pregnant women, children <5years old, and serodiscordant couples], the World Health Organization recommends antiretroviral therapy (ART) irrespective of CD4 count. Another subgroup which has received increased attention is "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB". In this study, we assess the proportion of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients eligible for ART in Karnataka State (population 60million), India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients diagnosed in May 2015 abstracted from national TB and HIV program records. Of 42,585 presumptive TB patients, 28,964 (68%) were tested for HIV and 2262 (8%) were HIV positive. Of the latter, 377 (17%) had active TB. Of 1885 "presumptive TB patients without active TB", 1100 (58%) were already receiving ART. Of the remaining 785 who were not receiving ART, 617 (79%) were assessed for ART eligibility and of those, 548 (89%) were eligible for ART. About 90% of "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" were eligible for ART. This evidence supports a public health approach of starting all "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" on ART irrespective of CD4 count in line with global thinking about 'test and treat'.

  5. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Chukwuanukwu, R C; Onyenekwe, C C; Martinez-Pomares, L; Flynn, R; Singh, S; Amilo, G I; Agbakoba, N R; Okoye, J O

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune response to TB in the context of co-infection. We investigated the cytokine response to purified protein derivative (PPD) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from TB patients co-infected with HIV or malaria and compared it to that of malaria- and HIV-free TB patients. A total of 231 subjects were recruited for this study and classified into six groups; untreated TB-positive, TB positive subjects on TB drugs, TB- and HIV-positive, TB- and malaria-positive, latent TB and apparently healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrate maintenance of interferon (IFN)-γ production in HIV and malaria co-infected TB patients in spite of lower CD4 counts in the HIV-infected cohort. Malaria co-infection caused an increase in the production of the T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in PPD-stimulated cultures. These results suggest that malaria co-infection diverts immune response against M. tuberculosis towards a Th-2/anti-inflammatory response which might have important consequences for disease progression.

  6. A Novel Inhibitor of Gyrase B Is a Potent Drug Candidate for Treatment of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven M.; Hanzelka, Brian L.; Perola, Emanuele; Shoen, Carolyn M.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Ngwane, Andile H.; Wiid, Ian J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Betoudji, Fabrice; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Thomson, John A.

    2014-01-01

    New drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis are urgently needed. Extensively drug-resistant and probably the totally drug-resistant tuberculosis strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones like moxifloxacin, which target gyrase A, and most people infected with these strains die within a year. In this study, we found that a novel aminobenzimidazole, VXc-486, which targets gyrase B, potently inhibits multiple drug-sensitive isolates and drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro (MICs of 0.03 to 0.30 μg/ml and 0.08 to 5.48 μg/ml, respectively) and reduces mycobacterial burdens in lungs of infected mice in vivo. VXc-486 is active against drug-resistant isolates, has bactericidal activity, and kills intracellular and dormant M. tuberculosis bacteria in a low-oxygen environment. Furthermore, we found that VXc-486 inhibits the growth of multiple strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii (MICs of 0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml), as well as that of several strains of Nocardia spp. (MICs of 0.1 to 1.0 μg/ml). We made a direct comparison of the parent compound VXc-486 and a phosphate prodrug of VXc-486 and showed that the prodrug of VXc-486 had more potent killing of M. tuberculosis than did VXc-486 in vivo. In combination with other antimycobacterial drugs, the prodrug of VXc-486 sterilized M. tuberculosis infection when combined with rifapentine-pyrazinamide and bedaquiline-pyrazinamide in a relapse infection study in mice. Furthermore, the prodrug of VXc-486 appeared to perform at least as well as the gyrase A inhibitor moxifloxacin. These findings warrant further development of the prodrug of VXc-486 for the treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. PMID:25534737

  7. Targeting dendritic cells to accelerate T-cell activation overcomes a bottleneck in tuberculosis vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristin L.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Das, Shibali; Gopal, Radha; Horne, William; Connell, Terry D.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induces sterilizing immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been elusive. Absence of sterilizing immunity induced by TB vaccines may be due to delayed activation of mucosal dendritic cells (DCs), and subsequent delay in antigen presentation and activation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. Here we show that pulmonary delivery of activated M. tuberculosis antigen-primed DCs into vaccinated mice, at the time of M. tuberculosis exposure, can overcome the delay in accumulation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. In addition, activating endogenous host CD103+ DCs and the CD40–CD40L pathway can similarly induce rapid accumulation of vaccine-induced lung CD4+ T-cell responses and limit early M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, our study provides proof of concept that targeting mucosal DCs can accelerate vaccine-induced T-cell responses on M. tuberculosis infection, and provide insights to overcome bottlenecks in TB vaccine efficacy. PMID:28004802

  8. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals.

  9. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  10. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  11. Genetics-directed drug discovery for combating Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yuan; Xiong, Le; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the pathogen of tuberculosis (TB), is one of the most infectious bacteria in the world. The traditional strategy to combat TB involves targeting the pathogen directly; however, the rapid evolution of drug resistance lessens the efficiency of this anti-TB method. Therefore, in recent years, some researchers have turned to an alternative anti-TB strategy, which hinders Mtb infection through targeting host genes. In this work, using a theoretical genetic analysis, we identified 170 Mtb infection-associated genes from human genetic variations related to Mtb infection. Then, the agents targeting these genes were identified to have high potential as anti-TB drugs. In particular, the agents that can target multiple Mtb infection-associated genes are more druggable than the single-target counterparts. These potential anti-TB agents were further screened by gene expression data derived from connectivity map. As a result, some agents were revealed to have high interest for experimental evaluation. This study not only has important implications for anti-TB drug discovery, but also provides inspirations for streamlining the pipeline of modern drug discovery.

  12. Combining PMTCT with active case finding for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kali, Paula B N; Gray, Glenda E; Violari, Avy; Chaisson, Richard E; McIntyre, James A; Martinson, Neil A

    2006-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the preeminent manifestation of HIV infection and has become a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in high HIV-prevalence settings. Active TB in pregnant women has potentially serious consequences for fetuses and newborns. In Soweto, South Africa, there is a more than 90% uptake of voluntary counseling and HIV testing during routine antenatal care, and almost one third of pregnant women are HIV-infected. The posttest counseling session of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission program provides an opportunity to screen HIV-infected pregnant women for TB. In this study, 370 HIV-infected pregnant women were screened for symptoms of active TB by lay counselors at the posttest counseling session. If symptomatic, they were referred to nurses who investigated them further. Eight women were found to have previously undiagnosed, smear-negative, culture-confirmed TB (2160/100,000). The mean CD4 count in those with active TB compared to those without TB was 276 x 10(6) cells per liter vs 447 x 10(6) cells per liter (P = 0.051). Symptoms most associated with active TB were hemoptysis and fever. We conclude that rates of TB in HIV-infected pregnant women are high, and screening for TB during routine antenatal care should be implemented in high HIV-prevalence settings.

  13. Human lung hydrolases delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis-macrophage interactions and the capacity to control infection.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Sasindran, Smitha J; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60-80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proinflammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis-macrophage interactions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection).

  14. Immunotherapeutical Potential of Mycobacterium Vaccae on M. Tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Wang, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Gui, Xiangdong; Tao, Lifeng; Wei, Haiming

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the worldwide infectious disease. To identify the therapeutic potential of M. vaccae in treating tuberculosis, M. vaccae was injected into Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infected mice. The optimal dose of M. vaccae (22.5 µg/mouse) treated mice showed lower pathological change index, spleen weight index, lung weight index and vital M. tuberculosis count than those of the untreated group. Treatment with M. vaccae enhanced the percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells, IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells, innate immune cells including NK cells, NK1.1+ T cells and γδ T cells, and reduced the percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells. Therefore, M. vaccae could protect the mice from M. tuberculosis infection and improved mouse innate and adaptive cell-mediated immunity, suggesting that M. vaccae is a potential immunotherapeutic agent in pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:19254482

  15. Natural infection of guinea pigs exposed to patients with highly drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Ashwin S.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Van Der Walt, Martie L.; Weyer, Karin; Mphahlele, Matsie; Venter, Kobus; Jensen, Paul A.; First, Melvin W.; Parsons, Sydney; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.; Nardell, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    A natural TB infection model using guinea pigs may provide useful information for investigating differences in transmission efficiency and establishment of active disease by clinical TB strains in a highly susceptible host under controlled environmental conditions. We sought to examine the capacity of naturally transmitted multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis to establish infection and produce active disease in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed for 4 months to the exhaust air of a 6-bed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis inpatient hospital ward in South Africa. Serial tuberculin skin test reactions were measured to determine infection. All animals were subsequently evaluated for histologic disease progression at necropsy. Although 75% of the 362 exposed guinea pigs had positive skin test reactions [≥6mm], only 12% had histopathologic evidence of active disease. Reversions (≥ 6 mm change) in skin test reactivity were seen in 22% of animals, exclusively among those with reactions of 6 to 13 mm. Only two of 86 guinea pigs with reversion had histological evidence of disease compared to 47% (31/66) of guinea pigs with large, non-reverting reactions. Immunosuppression of half the guinea pigs across all skin test categories did not significantly accelerate disease progression. In guinea pigs that reverted a skin test, a second positive reaction in 27 (33%) of them strongly suggested re-infection due to ongoing exposure. These results show that a large majority of guinea pigs naturally exposed to human-source strains of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis became infected, but that many resolved their infection and a large majority failed to progress to detectable disease. PMID:21478054

  16. Undetected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis amplified by first-line therapy in mixed infection.

    PubMed

    Hingley-Wilson, Suzanne M; Casey, Rosalyn; Connell, David; Bremang, Samuel; Evans, Jason T; Hawkey, Peter M; Smith, Grace E; Jepson, Annette; Philip, Stuart; Kon, Onn Min; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-07-01

    Infections with >1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain(s) are underrecognized. We show, in vitro and in vivo, how first-line treatment conferred a competitive growth advantage to amplify a multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain in a patient with mixed infection. Diagnostic techniques that identify mixed tubercle bacilli populations are needed to curb the spread of multidrug resistance.

  17. An elucidation of neutrophil functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  18. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection. PMID:24312131

  19. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Andersson, Blanka; Eklund, Daniel; Ngoh, Eyler; Persson, Alexander; Svensson, Kristoffer; Lerm, Maria; Blomgran, Robert; Stendahl, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  20. [Development and study of structure-activity relationship of drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Baska, Ferenc; Székely, Edina Rita; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Bánhegyi, Péter; Hegymegi-Barakonyi, Bálint; Németh, Gábor; Breza, Nóra; Zsákai, Lilian; Greff, Zoltán; Pató, János; Kéri, György; Orfi, Lászlo

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is considered to be one of the major health problem not only in the less developed countries but in the economically developed countries as well. Roughly one third of the world's population are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a significant part of them are carriers of latent tuberculosis. From ten percent of these latent infections are developing the active TB disease and fifty percent of them die from the illness without appropriate treatment. The drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB, XDR-TB) and TB-HIV co-infection attracted attention to the most serious infectious disease. Inhibition of alternative signaling pathways were an important part of the research strategies for cancer and inflammatory diseases in recent years. In case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis such pathways were also identified, for example, three serine-threonine kinases (PknA, PknB, PknG) which are necessary and essential for bacterial growth. In this paper we summarize our best anti-TB active compounds, their biological effects and structure-activity relationships using in silico modeling, biochemical measurements and tests on active bacteria.

  1. Mexican immigrants' explanatory model of latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Marylyn M

    2005-10-01

    This article reveals how the multiple and disparate explanations of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from the U.S. and Mexico professional health sectors and the popular sector are used to inform the explanatory model (EM) of LTBI for Mexican immigrants residing in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Fourteen immigrants, nine diagnosed with LTBI (n = 9) and their spouses (n = 5) participated in this critical ethnographic study. Because care seeking and treatment decisions are influenced by EMs, the results indicate that it is imperative that interventions for Mexican immigrants with LTBI are built on an understanding of their illness experience and are contextually meaningful.

  2. Efficacy of Microencapsulated Rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Staas, Jay K.; Winchester, Gary A.; Barrow, Esther L. W.; Barrow, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Rifampin is a first-line drug useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. By using biocompatible polymeric excipients of lactide and glycolide copolymers, two microsphere formulations were developed for targeted and sustained delivery of rifampin, with minimal dosing. A small-microsphere formulation, with demonstrated ability to inhibit intracellularly replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, was tested along with a large-microsphere formulation in an infected mouse model. Results revealed that by using a single treatment of the large-microsphere formulation, it was possible to achieve a significant reduction in M. tuberculosis H37Rv CFUs in the lungs of mice by 26 days postinfection. A combination of small (given as two injections on day 0 and day 7) and large (given as one injection at day 0) rifampin-loaded microsphere formulations resulted in significant reductions in CFUs in the lungs by 26 days, achieving a 1.23 log10 reduction in CFUs. By comparison, oral treatment with 5, 10, or 20 mg of rifampin/kg of body weight, administered every day, resulted in a reduction of 0.42, 1.7, or 1.8 log10 units, respectively. Thus the microsphere formulations, administered in one or two doses, were able to achieve results in mice similar to those obtained with a daily drug regimen within the range of the highest clinically tolerated dosage in humans. These results demonstrate that microsphere formulations of antimycobacterial drugs such as rifampin can be used for therapy of tuberculosis with minimal dosing. PMID:10223927

  3. [Advances in the research of an animal model of wound due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Jia, Chiyu

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis ranks as the second deadly infectious disease worldwide. The incidence of tuberculosis is high in China. Refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection ranks high in misdiagnosis, and it is accompanied by a protracted course, and its pathogenic mechanism is still not so clear. In order to study its pathogenic mechanism, it is necessary to reproduce an appropriate animal model. Up to now the study of the refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is just beginning, and there is still no unimpeachable model for study. This review describes two models which may reproduce a wound similar to the wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, so that they could be used to study the pathogenesis and characteristics of a tuberculosis wound in an animal.

  4. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Anthony M; Flynn, JoAnne L; Fortune, Sarah M

    2016-04-05

    Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease.

  5. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: screening and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Swaminathan, Soumya; Andrews, Jason R; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2011-06-18

    Globally, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV interact in deadly synergy. The high burden of TB among HIV-infected individuals underlies the importance of TB diagnosis, treatment and prevention for clinicians involved in HIV care. Despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV infection in resource-limited settings, many individuals in need of therapy initiate ART too late and have already developed clinically significant TB by the time they present for care. Many co-infected individuals are in need of concurrent ART and anti-TB therapy, which dramatically improves survival, but also raises several management challenges, including drug interactions, shared drug toxicities and TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Due to the survival benefits of promptly initiating ART among all HIV-infected individuals, including those with TB, it is recommended that co-infected individuals receive treatment for both diseases, regardless of CD4+ cell count. We review current screening and treatment strategies for TB and HIV co-infection. Recent findings and ongoing studies will assist clinicians in managing the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV co-infection, which remains a major global health challenge.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses host-derived carbon monoxide during macrophage infection.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Michael U; Manzanillo, Paolo; Cox, Jeffery S

    2008-05-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) expresses a set of genes known as the dormancy regulon in vivo. These genes are expressed in vitro in response to nitric oxide (NO) or hypoxia, conditions used to model MTB persistence in latent infection. Although NO, a macrophage product that inhibits respiration, and hypoxia are likely triggers in vivo, additional cues could activate the dormancy regulon during infection. Here, we show that MTB infection stimulates expression of heme oxygenase (HO-1) by macrophages and that the gaseous product of this enzyme, carbon monoxide (CO), activates expression of the dormancy regulon. Deletion of macrophage HO-1 reduced expression of the dormancy regulon. Furthermore, we show that the MTB DosS/DosT/DosR two-component sensory relay system is required for the response to CO. Together, these findings demonstrate that MTB senses CO during macrophage infection. CO may represent a general cue used by pathogens to sense and adapt to the host environment.

  7. The lymphotoxin beta receptor is critically involved in controlling infections with the intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Stefan; Hölscher, Christoph; Scheu, Stefanie; Tertilt, Christine; Hehlgans, Thomas; Suwinski, Johanna; Endres, Robert; Pfeffer, Klaus

    2003-05-15

    Containment of intracellularly viable microorganisms requires an intricate cooperation between macrophages and T cells, the most potent mediators known to date being IFN-gamma and TNF. To identify novel mechanisms involved in combating intracellular infections, experiments were performed in mice with selective defects in the lymphotoxin (LT)/LT beta R pathway. When mice deficient in LT alpha or LT beta were challenged intranasally with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, they showed a significant increase in bacterial loads in lungs and livers compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a role for LT alpha beta heterotrimers in resistance to infection. Indeed, mice deficient in the receptor for LT alpha(1)beta(2) heterotrimers (LT beta R-knockout (KO) mice) also had significantly higher numbers of M. tuberculosis in infected lungs and exhibited widespread pulmonary necrosis already by day 35 after intranasal infection. Furthermore, LT beta R-KO mice were dramatically more susceptible than wild-type mice to i.p. infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Compared with wild-type mice, LT beta R-KO mice had similar transcript levels of TNF and IFN-gamma and recruited similar numbers of CD3(+) T cells inside granulomatous lesions in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs. Flow cytometry revealed that the LT beta R is expressed on pulmonary macrophages obtained after digestion of M. tuberculosis-infected lungs. LT beta R-KO mice showed delayed expression of inducible NO synthase protein in granuloma macrophages, implicating deficient macrophage activation as the most likely cause for enhanced susceptibility of these mice to intracellular infections. Since LIGHT-KO mice proved to be equally resistant to M. tuberculosis infection as wild-type mice, these data demonstrate that signaling of LT alpha(1)beta(2) heterotrimers via the LT beta R is an essential prerequisite for containment of intracellular pathogens.

  8. Codominance of TLR2-dependent and TLR2-independent modulation of MHC class II in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kincaid, Eleanor Z; Wolf, Andrea J; Desvignes, Ludovic; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean C; Brennan, Patrick J; Pavelka, Martin S; Ernst, Joel D

    2007-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an exceptionally successful human pathogen. A major component of this success is the ability of the bacteria to infect immunocompetent individuals and to evade eradication by an adaptive immune response that includes production of the macrophage-activating cytokine, IFN-gamma. Although IFN-gamma is essential for arrest of progressive tuberculosis, it is insufficient for efficacious macrophage killing of the bacteria, which may be due to the ability of M. tuberculosis to inhibit selected macrophage responses to IFN-gamma. In vitro studies have determined that mycobacterial lipoproteins and other components of the M. tuberculosis cell envelope, acting as agonists for TLR2, inhibit IFN-gamma induction of MHC class II. In addition, M. tuberculosis peptidoglycan and IL-6 secreted by infected macrophages inhibit IFN-gamma induction of MHC class II in a TLR2-independent manner. To determine whether TLR2-dependent inhibition of macrophage responses to IFN-gamma is quantitatively dominant over the TLR2-independent mechanisms in vivo, we prepared mixed bone marrow chimeric mice in which the hemopoietic compartment was reconstituted with a mixture of TLR(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) cells. When the chimeric mice were infected with M. tuberculosis, the expression of MHC class II on TLR2(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) macrophages from the lungs of individual infected chimeric mice was indistinguishable. These results indicate that TLR2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of inhibition of responses to IFN-gamma are equivalent in vivo, and that M. tuberculosis uses multiple pathways to abrogate the action of an important effector of adaptive immunity. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants AI 065357-AI 020010.

  9. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  10. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  11. Tuberculosis in Birds: Insights into the Mycobacterium avium Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Mahendran, Mahesh; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dayal Singh, Shambhu; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Shoorvir; Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a List B disease of World Organization for Animal Health, caused by M. avium or M. genavense predominantly affects poultry and pet or captive birds. Clinical manifestations in birds include emaciation, depression and diarrhea along with marked atrophy of breast muscle. Unlike tuberculosis in animals and man, lesions in lungs are rare. Tubercular nodules can be seen in liver, spleen, intestine and bone marrow. Granulomatous lesion without calcification is a prominent feature. The disease is a rarity in organized poultry sector due to improved farm practices, but occurs in zoo aviaries. Molecular techniques like polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene probes aid in rapid identification and characterization of mycobacteria subspecies, and overcome disadvantages of conventional methods which are slow, labour intensive and may at times fail to produce precise results. M. avium subsp. avium with genotype IS901+ and IS1245+ causes infections in animals and human beings too. The bacterium causes sensitivity in cattle to the tuberculin test. The paper discusses in brief the M. avium infection in birds, its importance in a zoonotic perspective, and outlines conventional and novel strategies for its diagnosis, prevention and eradication in domestic/pet birds and humans alike. PMID:21776352

  12. Factors associated with tuberculosis treatment default among HIV-infected tuberculosis patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Burapat, Channawong; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Watthanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Sirinak, Chawin; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Jittimanee, Suksont; Pobkeeree, Vallerut; Varma, Jay K

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring completion of tuberculosis (TB) treatment remains a major public health problem. In HIV-infected patients, TB is the most common severe opportunistic infection. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for TB treatment default in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a prospective, observational study of HIV-infected TB patients in Thailand. Patients underwent standardised evaluations at the beginning of TB treatment, at the end of the intensive phase and at the end of TB treatment. TB treatment outcomes were assessed according to WHO guidelines. The analysis was limited to patients who defaulted or who had treatment success. Of the 554 patients analysed, 61 (11%) defaulted. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with TB treatment default included incarceration history [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7), smoking (AOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.1) and having a symptom complaint score >15 (AOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-8.0); one marker of wealth, namely owning a refrigerator, was protective (AOR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). Default during TB treatment was a significant problem in HIV-infected patients. Reducing default may require enhancing services for patients with a history of incarceration or smoking and designing patient-centred systems to address poverty and patient wellness.

  13. Stress and host immunity amplify Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypic heterogeneity and induce nongrowing metabolically active forms.

    PubMed

    Manina, Giulia; Dhar, Neeraj; McKinney, John D

    2015-01-14

    Nonreplicating and metabolically quiescent bacteria are implicated in latent tuberculosis infections and relapses following "sterilizing" chemotherapy. However, evidence linking bacterial dormancy and persistence in vivo is largely inconclusive. Here we measure the single-cell dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication and ribosomal activity using quantitative time-lapse microscopy and a reporter of ribosomal RNA gene expression. Single-cell dynamics exhibit heterogeneity under standard growth conditions, which is amplified by stressful conditions such as nutrient limitation, stationary phase, intracellular replication, and growth in mouse lungs. Additionally, the lungs of chronically infected mice harbor a subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active bacteria, which are absent in mice lacking interferon-γ, a cytokine essential for antituberculosis immunity. These cryptic bacterial forms are prominent in mice treated with the antituberculosis drug isoniazid, suggesting a role in postchemotherapeutic relapses. Thus, amplification of bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity in response to host immunity and drug pressure may contribute to tuberculosis persistence.

  14. Accidental infection of veterinary personnel with Mycobacterium tuberculosis at necropsy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Posthaus, H; Bodmer, T; Alves, L; Oevermann, A; Schiller, I; Rhodes, S G; Zimmerli, S

    2011-05-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main cause of human tuberculosis. Infection in companion animals is mainly acquired from close contact to a diseased human patient and hence rarely diagnosed in countries with low tuberculosis incidence rates. Therefore the general awareness of the disease might be low. Here we report the potential risk of infection for veterinary personnel with M. tuberculosis during the clinical and pathological examination of a dog with unexpected disseminated tuberculosis. The dog had presented with symptoms of a central nervous system disease; rapid deterioration prevented a complete clinical workup, however. Post-mortem examination revealed systemic mycobacteriosis, and M. tuberculosis was identified by PCR amplification of DNA extracts from paraffin-embedded tissue sections and spoligotyping. Contact investigations among the owners and veterinary personnel using an IFN-γ release assay indicated that the index dog did not infect humans during its lifetime. Serological and IFN-γ release assay results of one of two cats in direct contact with the index dog, however, suggested that transmission of M. tuberculosis might have occurred. Importantly, all three pathologists performing the necropsy on the dog tested positive. Accidental infection was most likely due to inhalation of M. tuberculosis containing aerosols created by using an electric saw to open the brain cavity. As a consequence routine necropsy procedures have been adapted and a disease surveillance program, including tuberculosis, has been initiated. Our results highlight the importance of disease awareness and timely diagnosis of zoonotic infectious agents in optimizing work safety for veterinary personnel.

  15. Determinants of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Ambo Hospital, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mengiste, Bezatu; Mesfin, Frehiwot; Godana, Wanzahun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis seen in cases in Ambo Hospital, Ethiopia. Design A facility-based prospective case-control study. Setting Patients attending Ambo Hospital from 01 December 2011 to 29 March 2012. Participants The sample included 312 adult patients attending Ambo Hospital. The main outcome measure was presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Explanatory measures Age, gender, occupation, educational status, marital status, place of residence, patient history of TB, family history of TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, smoking, alcohol intake, khat chewing, body mass index (BMI), employment, diabetes, history of asthma, previous history of worm infestation, history of hospitalisation, number of adults living in the household (HH), person per room, housing condition. Results A total of 312 study participants, including 104 active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases (cases) and 208 non-active PTB cases (controls), were recruited for the present study. Having one or more family member with a history of TB (OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.50–12.90), marital status (OR = 7.6; 95% CI: 2.2–12.6), male gender (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7), rural residence (OR = 3.3; P = 0.012), being a current or past smoker (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.1–7.2), BMI < 18.5 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.03–4.2), HIV infection (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.4–23.8) and a history of worm infestation (OR = 6.4; 95% CI: 2.6–15.4) remained significant independent host-related factors for active PTB. Conclusion Patients who came from a compound with more than two HHs were more likely to develop active PTB than those who came from a compound with only one HH. Those who lived in houses with no windows were more likely to develop active PTB than those who lived in houses with one or more windows, had a family history of TB, lived in rural areas. Sex of the patient was a predicting factor. Not being the owner of the house was

  16. Vitamin D induces interleukin-1β expression: paracrine macrophage epithelial signaling controls M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Verway, Mark; Bouttier, Manuella; Wang, Tian-Tian; Carrier, Marilyn; Calderon, Mario; An, Beum-Soo; Devemy, Emmanuelle; McIntosh, Fiona; Divangahi, Maziar; Behr, Marcel A; White, John H

    2013-01-01

    Although vitamin D deficiency is a common feature among patients presenting with active tuberculosis, the full scope of vitamin D action during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is poorly understood. As macrophages are the primary site of Mtb infection and are sites of vitamin D signaling, we have used these cells to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying modulation of the immune response by the hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D). We found that the virulent Mtb strain H37Rv elicits a broad host transcriptional response. Transcriptome profiling also revealed that the profile of target genes regulated by 1,25D is substantially altered by infection, and that 1,25D generally boosts infection-stimulated cytokine/chemokine responses. We further focused on the role of 1,25D- and infection-induced interleukin 1β (IL-1β) expression in response to infection. 1,25D enhanced IL-1β expression via a direct transcriptional mechanism. Secretion of IL-1β from infected cells required the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome. The impact of IL-1β production was investigated in a novel model wherein infected macrophages were co-cultured with primary human small airway epithelial cells. Co-culture significantly prolonged survival of infected macrophages, and 1,25D/infection-induced IL-1β secretion from macrophages reduced mycobacterial burden by stimulating the anti-mycobacterial capacity of co-cultured lung epithelial cells. These effects were independent of 1,25D-stimulated autophagy in macrophages but dependent upon epithelial IL1R1 signaling and IL-1β-driven epithelial production of the antimicrobial peptide DEFB4/HBD2. These data provide evidence that the anti-microbial actions of vitamin D extend beyond the macrophage by modulating paracrine signaling, reinforcing its role in innate immune regulation in humans.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipolytic Enzymes as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Belinda; Lecoufle, Mélanie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Dedieu, Luc; Canaan, Stéphane; Valverde, Viviane; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Background New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB) burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452) as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. Methods Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. Results A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. Conclusion These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent biomarkers providing high

  18. Short-Course Therapy with Daily Rifapentine in a Murine Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Zhang, Ming; Rosenthal, Ian M.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Regimens recommended to treat latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are 3 to 9 months long. A 2-month rifampin+pyrazinamide regimen is no longer recommended. Shorter regimens are highly desirable. Because substituting rifapentine for rifampin in the standard regimen for active tuberculosis halves the treatment duration needed to prevent relapse in mice, we hypothesized daily rifapentine-based regimens could shorten LTBI treatment to 2 months or less. Objectives: To improve an existing model of LTBI chemotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of daily rifapentine-based regimens. Methods: Mice were immunized with a more immunogenic recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guérin strain (rBCG30) and received very low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish a stable lung bacterial burden below 104 CFU without drug treatment. Mice received a control (isoniazid alone, rifampin alone, rifampin+isoniazid, rifampin+pyrazinamide) or test (rifapentine alone, rifapentine+isoniazid, rifapentine+pyrazinamide, rifapentine+isoniazid+pyrazinamide) regimen for 8 weeks. Rifamycin doses were 10 mg/kg/d, analogous to the same human doses. Outcomes were biweekly lung CFU counts and relapse after 4 to 8 weeks of treatment. Measurements and Main Results: M. tuberculosis CFU counts remained stable around 3.65 log10 in immunized, untreated mice. Isoniazid or rifampin left all or most mice culture-positive at week 8. Rifampin+isoniazid cured 0 and 53% of mice and rifampin+pyrazinamide cured 47 and 100% of mice in 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. Rifapentine-based regimens were more active than rifampin+isoniazid and indistinguishable from rifampin+pyrazinamide. Conclusions: In this improved murine model of LTBI chemotherapy with very low lung burden, existing regimens were well represented. Daily rifapentine-based regimens were at least as active as rifampin+pyrazinamide, suggesting they could effectively treat LTBI in 6 to 8 weeks. PMID:19729664

  19. Tuberculosis and the risk of infection with other intracellular bacteria: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Huaman, M A; Fiske, C T; Jones, T F; Warkentin, J; Shepherd, B E; Ingram, L A; Maruri, F; Sterling, T R

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY Persons who develop tuberculosis (TB) may have subtle immune defects that could predispose to other intracellular bacterial infections (ICBIs). We obtained data on TB and five ICBIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Listeria monocytogenes) reported to the Tennessee Department of Health, USA, 2000-2011. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) comparing ICBIs in persons who developed TB and ICBIs in the Tennessee population, adjusted for age, sex, race and ethnicity were estimated. IRRs were not significantly elevated for all ICBIs combined [IRR 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71-1.06]. C. trachomatis rate was lowest in the year post-TB diagnosis (IRR 0.17, 95% CI 0.04-0.70). More Salmonella infections occurred in extrapulmonary TB compared to pulmonary TB patients (IRR 14.3, 95% CI 1.67-122); however, this appeared to be related to HIV co-infection. TB was not associated with an increased risk of other ICBIs. In fact, fewer C. trachomatis infections occurred after recent TB diagnosis. Reasons for this association, including reduced exposure, protection conferred by anti-TB drugs or macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection warrant further investigation.

  20. Activation of JAK2/STAT1-alpha-dependent signaling events during Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mauricio; Olivier, Martin; García, Luis F

    2002-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage involves TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production and caspase cascade activation; however, the intracellular signaling pathways implicated remain to be established. Our results indicate that infection of the B10R murine macrophage line with M. tuberculosis induces apoptosis independent of mycobacterial phagocytosis and that M. tuberculosis induces protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity, JAK2/STAT1-alpha phosphorylation, and STAT1-alpha nuclear translocation. Inhibitors of PTK (AG-126), or JAK2 (AG-490) inhibited TNF-alpha and NO production, caspase 1 activation and apoptosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis-induction of these events depends on JAK2/STAT1-alpha activation. In addition, we have obtained evidence that ManLAM capacity to inhibit M. tuberculosis-induced apoptosis involves the activation of the PTP SHP-1. The finding that M. tuberculosis infection activate JAK2/STAT1-alpha pathway suggests that M. tuberculosis might mimic macrophage-activating stimuli.

  1. Problems connected with estimating the incidence of tuberculosis infection*

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Raj; Nair, S. S.; Chandrasekhar, P.; Rao, G. Ramanatha

    1966-01-01

    Many problems have to be faced in the estimation of an apparently simple but valuable index—namely, the incidence of tuberculosis infection. Very little attention seems to have been paid to these problems so far. Records from 50 villages in a district of South India, whose populations were tested with 1 TU of PPD RT 23 in Tween 80 diluent and retested after 18 months, have been examined for a reappraisal of existing methods. As a result, it has been found that some of these methods are subject to gross errors and that available figures are unreliable. For estimating the newly infected, a new approach based on the drawing of a curve for the distribution of differences in reaction size from one round of tuberculin testing to another is presented. Further, it is shown that the newly infected probably constitute a homogeneous group with an increase in mean reaction size of about 24 mm and standard deviation of 4 mm. Accordingly, 98% of the newly infected show an increase in reaction size of 16 mm or more. There are others who show similarly large increases in allergy on a retest, even in the absence of infection. The number of persons in the latter category rises with age and is likely to be greater in areas with a high prevalence of non-specific allergy. PMID:5296384

  2. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project.

    PubMed

    Turusbekova, N; Ljungqvist, I; Davidavičiene, E; Mikaityte, J; van der Werf, M J

    2016-03-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan.

  3. Executive summary of the guidelines for the use of interferon-γ release assays in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-05-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guideline for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations) methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at the risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health.

  4. Executive Summary of the Guidelines for the Use of interferon-gamma Release Assays in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guide-line for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health.

  5. Potential Economic Viability of Two Proposed Rifapentine-Based Regimens for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Holland, David P.; Sanders, Gillian D.; Hamilton, Carol D.; Stout, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Rifapentine-based regimens for treating latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are being considered for future clinical trials, but even if they prove effective, high drug costs may limit their economic viability. Objectives To inform clinical trial design by estimating the potential costs and effectiveness of rifapentine-based regimens for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Methods We used a Markov model to estimate cost and societal benefits for three regimens for treating LTBI: Isoniazid/rifapentine daily for one month, isoniazid/rifapentine weekly for three months (self-administered and directly-observed), and isoniazid daily for nine months; a strategy of “no treatment” used for comparison. Costs, quality-adjusted life-years gained, and instances of active tuberculosis averted were calculated for all arms. Results Both daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month and weekly isoniazid/rifapentine for three months were less expensive and more effective than other strategies under a wide variety of clinically plausibly parameter estimates. Daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month was the least expensive and most effective regimen. Conclusions Daily isoniazid/rifapentine for one month and weekly isoniazid/rifapentine for three months should be studied in a large-scale clinical trial for efficacy. Because both regimens performed well even if their efficacy is somewhat reduced, study designers should consider relaxing non-inferiority boundaries. PMID:21789248

  6. IL-21 signaling is essential for optimal host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Booty, Matthew G.; Barreira-Silva, Palmira; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Jacques, Miye K.; Stowell, Britni L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa; Beamer, Gillian; Behar, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    IL-21 is produced predominantly by activated CD4+ T cells and has pleiotropic effects on immunity via the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R), a member of the common gamma chain (γc) cytokine receptor family. We show that IL-21 signaling plays a crucial role in T cell responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by augmenting CD8+ T cell priming, promoting T cell accumulation in the lungs, and enhancing T cell cytokine production. In the absence of IL-21 signaling, more CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in chronically infected mice express the T cell inhibitory molecules PD-1 and TIM-3. We correlate these immune alterations with increased susceptibility of IL-21R−/− mice, which have increased lung bacterial burden and earlier mortality compared to WT mice. Finally, to causally link the immune defects with host susceptibility, we use an adoptive transfer model to show that IL-21R−/− T cells transfer less protection than WT T cells. These results prove that IL-21 signaling has an intrinsic role in promoting the protective capacity of T cells. Thus, the net effect of IL-21 signaling is to enhance host resistance to M. tuberculosis. These data position IL-21 as a candidate biomarker of resistance to tuberculosis. PMID:27819295

  7. staffTRAK-TB: software for surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Burwen, D R; Seawright, M F

    1999-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends periodic tuberculin skin testing of healthcare workers with potential exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, many healthcare facilities have neither a system to identify workers due for their skin test nor a means of analyzing aggregate data. To illustrate some of the complexities involved in tuberculin skin test (TST) tracking and analysis, and how these might be addressed, this report describes a software package called staffTRAK-TB, developed by the CDC to facilitate surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers. staffTRAK-TB records data for each healthcare worker, including demographic information, occupation, work location, multiple TST results, and results of evaluations to determine if clinically active tuberculosis is present. Programmed reports include lists of workers due and overdue for skin tests, and skin test conversion rates by occupation or worksite. Standardization of types of occupations and locations allows data from multiple facilities to be aggregated and compared. Data transfer to the CDC can be performed via floppy diskettes. staffTRAK-TB illustrates important issues in software structure, standardization of occupation and work-location information, relevant data items, and reports and analyses that would be useful in practice. Developing software that adequately addresses the epidemiological issues is complex, and the lessons learned may serve as a model for hospital epidemiologists, infection control personnel, occupational health personnel, and computer programmers considering software development in this area or trying to optimize their facility's TST surveillance.

  8. Tuberculosis infection causing intestinal perforations in 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    González, Luis A; Muñoz, Carolina; Restrepo, Mauricio; Vanegas, Adriana Lucía; Vásquez, Gloria

    2014-08-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a higher incidence rate of tuberculosis and a more frequent extrapulmonary involvement than the general population. We present 2 SLE patients who developed gastrointestinal tuberculosis complicated with intestinal perforation, a rare but serious complication that could be confused with lupus-associated intestinal vasculitis. Opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis must be suspected in SLE patients with abdominal symptoms on immunosuppressive therapy because its early recognition could prevent catastrophic complications such as intestinal perforation and subsequent peritonitis.

  9. Unexpected role for IL-17 in protective immunity against hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Slight, Samantha; Uche, Uzodinma; Blanchard, Emmeline; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Stallings, Christina L; Reinhart, Todd A; Kolls, Jay K; Kaushal, Deepak; Nagarajan, Uma; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects one third of the world's population. Among these infections, clinical isolates belonging to the W-Beijing appear to be emerging, representing about 50% of Mtb isolates in East Asia, and about 13% of all Mtb isolates worldwide. In animal models, infection with W-Beijing strain, Mtb HN878, is considered "hypervirulent" as it results in increased mortality and causes exacerbated immunopathology in infected animals. We had previously shown the Interleukin (IL) -17 pathway is dispensable for primary immunity against infection with the lab adapted Mtb H37Rv strain. However, it is not known whether IL-17 has any role to play in protective immunity against infection with clinical Mtb isolates. We report here that lab adapted Mtb strains, such as H37Rv, or less virulent Mtb clinical isolates, such as Mtb CDC1551, do not require IL-17 for protective immunity against infection while infection with Mtb HN878 requires IL-17 for early protective immunity. Unexpectedly, Mtb HN878 induces robust production of IL-1β through a TLR-2-dependent mechanism, which supports potent IL-17 responses. We also show that the role for IL-17 in mediating protective immunity against Mtb HN878 is through IL-17 Receptor signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, mediating the induction of the chemokine, CXCL-13, which is required for localization of T cells within lung lymphoid follicles. Correct T cell localization within lymphoid follicles in the lung is required for maximal macrophage activation and Mtb control. Since IL-17 has a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity against TB, our results have far reaching implications for the design of vaccines and therapies to prevent and treat emerging Mtb strains. In addition, our data changes the existing paradigm that IL-17 is dispensable for primary immunity against Mtb infection, and instead suggests a differential role for IL-17 in early protective immunity against

  10. Genome scan of M. tuberculosis infection and disease in Ugandans.

    PubMed

    Stein, Catherine M; Zalwango, Sarah; Malone, LaShaunda L; Won, Sungho; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mugerwa, Roy D; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Thompson, Cheryl L; Cartier, Kevin C; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K; Boom, W Henry; Whalen, Christopher C

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI) or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-); this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate). We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10(-3)) was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002). We also observed linkage at the nominal alpha = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02), IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01), IL12BR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.006), IL12A (TB p = 0.02) and IFNGR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.002). These results confirm not

  11. Genome Scan of M. tuberculosis Infection and Disease in Ugandans

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Catherine M.; Zalwango, Sarah; Malone, LaShaunda L.; Won, Sungho; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mugerwa, Roy D.; Leontiev, Dmitry V.; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Cartier, Kevin C.; Elston, Robert C.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Boom, W. Henry; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI) or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-); this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate). We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10−3) was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002). We also observed linkage at the nominal α = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02), IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01), IL12BR2 (TNFα p = 0.006), IL12A (TB p = 0.02) and IFNGR2 (TNFα p = 0.002). These results

  12. Acquired latent tuberculosis infection in psoriasis patients treated with etanercept in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Rang; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Chen, Min; Jia, Wei-Xue; Yao, Xu; Feng, Su-Ying; Jia, Hong; Gong, Juan-Qin; Yang, Xue-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background TNF-α plays a key role in host defense against mycobacterial infection, and patients receiving TNF-α blocker treatment have increased susceptibility to tuberculosis disease. In the People’s Republic of China, an intermediate tuberculosis-burden country, the latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) risk in patients with psoriasis who are treated with etanercept, the safest kind of TNF-α blocker, is unknown. Objectives This study reports the LTBI risk in patients with psoriasis after etanercept treatment and aims to answer the question of how often rescreening for LTBI should be done in order to reduce active tuberculosis infection of patients and further reduce the incidence of active tuberculosis disease. Patients and methods: This retrospective review evaluated patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis between 2009 and 2013. All patients were excluded tuberculosis infection and received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly, then the patients were checked for LTBI 3 months after etanercept treatment to observe the incidence of LTBI and assess the need for rescreening for LTBI every 3 months. Results We retrospectively analyzed 192 patients with psoriasis with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque whose tuberculin skin test and chest X-rays were negative and who received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly. Eighteen of them were excluded because they received less than 3 months of etanercept therapy. After treatment with etanercept, four patients were found to have LTBI. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of LTBI after 3 months was four in 192 (2.1%), which is higher than the annual incidence of LTBI in the People’s Republic of China (0.72%), so LTBI could be expected to occur within 3 months in psoriasis patients on etanercept. Periodic screening for LTBI in the therapy course, as well as before initiating treatment, is necessary in those patients who use a TNF-α blocker. We recommend rescreening for LTBI every 3 months. PMID:26508833

  13. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug

  14. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10-40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains

  15. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diego L; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Amaral, Eduardo P; Arora, Kriti; Chao, Alex; Mittereder, Lara R; Maiga, Mamoudou; Boshoff, Helena I; Barry, Clifton E; Goulding, Celia W; Andrade, Bruno B; Sher, Alan

    2016-10-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function.

  16. Isoniazid Therapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV Clinics, Los Angeles, California

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Chang, Alicia H.; Ghosh, Jo Kay C.; Dubé, Michael P.; Bolan, Robert; Yang, Otto O.; Kerndt, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Setting Publicly-funded HIV clinics in Los Angeles County, California, USA. Objective HIV-infected persons are a high priority group for targeted testing and treatment for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the United States. We describe rates of isoniazid initiation and completion among HIV-1 and M. tuberculosis co-infected persons in Los Angeles County. Design We conducted a cross-sectional study using routinely collected surveillance data from publicly-funded HIV clinics. We examined differences in isoniazid treatment initiation and completion between four clinic categories: the three largest clinics (Clinics A, B, and C) and “Other” clinics (pooled data for remaining 10 clinics). Results During 2010–2013, 802 (5.3%) of 15,029 HIV-1-infected persons tested positive for M. tuberculosis infection. Isoniazid was initiated in 581 (72.4%) persons, of whom 457 (78.7%) completed therapy. We found significant differences between clinics for treatment initiation (range: 59.1% – 93.4%) and completion (range: 58.8% – 82.3%). Overall, 57% (457/802) of HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected persons completed the recommended treatment (range across clinics: 34.8% – 76.3%). Conclusion We identified significant gaps in treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected persons in Los Angeles County. Interventions are needed to improve initiation and completion of treatment for M. tuberculosis infection in this population. PMID:27287651

  17. TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION MIGHT INCREASE THE RISK OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Xiao-Hua; GAO, Yun-Chao; ZHANG, Yi; TANG, Zheng-Hao; YU, Yong-Sheng; ZANG, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Deep Candida infections commonly occur in immunosuppressed patients. A rare case of a multiple deep organ infection with Candida albicansand spinal tuberculosis was reported in a healthy young man. The 19-year-old man complained of month-long fever and lower back pain. He also had a history of scalded mouth syndrome. Coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans was diagnosed using the culture of aspirates from different regions. Symptoms improved considerably after antifungal and antituberculous therapy. This case illustrates that infection with tuberculosis might impair the host's immune system and increase the risk of invasive candidiasis in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:26200971

  18. Nasopharyngeal Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Mechanism of Infection, Clinical Manifestations, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sittitrai, Pichit

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal tuberculosis (NPTB) is a noteworthy disease especially in its worldwide spread of the Mycobacterium infection. Although NPTB has been identified in less than one percent of TB cases, recent multiple case reports indicate an either increased awareness or incidence of this disease. The most helpful diagnostic tool is an uncomplicated nasopharyngeal biopsy. However, NPTB is usually ignored because it has varied clinical manifestations and similar presentations with other more common head and neck diseases. Furthermore, the most common presenting symptom is cervical lymphadenopathy mimicking nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a more common and serious disease. Treatment outcomes of NPTB are good in both HIV-positive or HIV-negative patients. In addition, pulmonary tuberculosis association was reported in wide range between 8.3% and 82% which should be considered in a treatment program. In conclusion, early diagnosis and management in NPTB can be achieved by (1) increased awareness of this disease, (2) improvement in knowledge regarding clinical manifestations, and (3) improvement of diagnostic techniques. PMID:27034677

  19. Nasopharyngeal Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Mechanism of Infection, Clinical Manifestations, and Management.

    PubMed

    Srivanitchapoom, Chonticha; Sittitrai, Pichit

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal tuberculosis (NPTB) is a noteworthy disease especially in its worldwide spread of the Mycobacterium infection. Although NPTB has been identified in less than one percent of TB cases, recent multiple case reports indicate an either increased awareness or incidence of this disease. The most helpful diagnostic tool is an uncomplicated nasopharyngeal biopsy. However, NPTB is usually ignored because it has varied clinical manifestations and similar presentations with other more common head and neck diseases. Furthermore, the most common presenting symptom is cervical lymphadenopathy mimicking nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a more common and serious disease. Treatment outcomes of NPTB are good in both HIV-positive or HIV-negative patients. In addition, pulmonary tuberculosis association was reported in wide range between 8.3% and 82% which should be considered in a treatment program. In conclusion, early diagnosis and management in NPTB can be achieved by (1) increased awareness of this disease, (2) improvement in knowledge regarding clinical manifestations, and (3) improvement of diagnostic techniques.

  20. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  1. Rapid Accumulation of Eosinophils in Lung Lesions in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasco, Todd M.; Turner, Oliver C.; Cassone, Lynne; Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophils were positively identified in bronchoalveolar lavage populations and in the lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs. It is possible that the rapid influx of these cells, and their subsequent degranulation during acute pulmonary tuberculosis, may play a key role in the susceptibility of this animal model. PMID:14742563

  2. Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery to Aid in the Unambiguous Detection of Bovine Tuberculosis Infection in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic infection caused by Mycobacterium bovis (MBO), a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The disease is generally asymptomatic with a long incubation period and good early diagnostics are lacking. Current surveillance for bovine TB is a laborious mul...

  3. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  4. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  5. The formation of the granuloma in tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Orme, Ian M; Basaraba, Randall J

    2014-12-01

    The development of the granuloma and its subsequent degeneration and necrosis, is the hallmark of infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These structures probably evolved as primitive particle responses, but in mammals they are facilitated by the emerging acquired immune response, in which cytokines and chemokines help control their formation and integrity. In this brief review we discuss the pathology of these lesions in the two most widely used animal models (mice and guinea pigs). In addition, we argue against the idea that there is a balance between host immunity and bacterial survival, and that the latter possess mechanisms that control this, as some currently believe, and moreover discuss newer information regarding the ability of bacilli to persist in these structures long enough to eventually escape and become retransmitted.

  6. Ficolin-2 defends against virulent Mycobacteria tuberculosis infection in vivo, and its insufficiency is associated with infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Wang, Yubin; Wang, Qilong; Wu, Yanhong; Pan, Qin; Fang, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2013-01-01

    Human ficolin-2 (ficolin-2/P35) is a lectin complement pathway activator that is present in normal human plasma and is associated with infectious diseases; however, little is known regarding the roles and mechanisms of ficolin-2 during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Here, we describe our novel findings that the ficolin-2 serum levels of 107 pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients were much lower compared with 107 healthy controls. In vitro analysis showed that ficolin-2 bound to the virulent Mtb H37Rv strain much more strongly than to the non-virulent M. bovis BCG and M. smegmatis. Ficolin-2 bound to the surface glycolipid portion of H37Rv and blocked H37Rv infection in human lung A549 cells. Opsonophagocytosis was also promoted by ficolin-2. Importantly, we found that administration of exogenous ficolin-2 had a remarkable protective effect against virulent Mtb H37Rv infection in both C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. Ficolin-A (a ficolin-2-like molecule in mouse) knockout mice exhibited increased susceptibility to H37Rv infection. We further demonstrated that ficolin-2 could defend against virulent Mtb H37Rv infection at least partially by activating JNK phosphorylation and stimulating the secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and nitric oxide (NO) production by macrophages. Our data provide a new immunotherapeutic strategy against TB based on the innate immune molecule ficolin-2 and indicate that ficolin-2 insufficiency is associated with higher susceptibility to infection in humans.

  7. Substantial molecular evolution and mutation rates in prolonged latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Marvig, Rasmus L; Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Andersen, Åse Bengård; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-11-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of latently infected individuals may hold the key to understanding the processes that lead to reactivation and progression to clinical disease. We report here analysis of pairs of Mtb isolates from putative prolonged latent TB cases. We identified two confirmed cases, and used whole genome sequencing to investigate the mutational processes that occur over decades in latent Mtb. We found an estimated mutation rate between 0.2 and 0.3 over 33 years, suggesting that latent Mtb accumulates mutations at rates similar to observations from cases of active disease.

  8. [Head and neck tuberculosis: a still urgent problem].

    PubMed

    Bruzgielewicz, A; Wysocki, J; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, E

    1995-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is an unusual site for tuberculous infection. Most of the cases are secondary to active pulmonary tuberculosis. We present thirty five cases of tuberculosis localize in the head and neck region. There were twelve patients with lymphonodular tuberculosis, eleven patients with laryngeal tuberculosis, six patients with oral and pharyngeal tuberculosis, three patients with partoid gland tuberculosis, two patients with nose and paranasal sinuses tuberculosis and one patient with middle ear tuberculosis. This cases exemplifies the difficulty in diagnosis of tuberculosis in such an unusual sites.

  9. 1,25 (OH)2D3 treatment alters the granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Kamlesh; Rafi, Wasiulla; Shah, Neel; Christakos, Sylvia; Salgame, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Induction of cathelicidin-mediated antimicrobial pathway against intracellular M. tuberculosis by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, has been documented in vitro. However, in in vivo studies related to inflammatory disorders, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been demonstrated to induce an anti-inflammatory response. We therefore examined whether in the murine model of tuberculosis, the anti-inflammatory effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 would affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We show here that administration of 1,25(OH)2D3 to M. tuberculosis infected mice led to a change in lung granuloma architecture, characterized by a marked decrease in B cell lymphocytic aggregates. Consistent with the altered granulomas, 1,25(OH)2D3-treated mice also exhibited significantly higher bacterial burden in the lungs compared to the control group. These findings highlight the need to further investigate the effect of vitamin D on host immunity to M. tuberculosis in the context of the granulomatous response. PMID:27698450

  10. High incidence of tuberculosis in patients treated for hepatitis C chronic infection.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Uehara, Silvia Naomi; Emori, Christini Takemi; Perez, Renata Mello; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cassia Jacintho; de Souza Paiva Ferreira, Adalgisa; de Castro Amaral Feldner, Ana Cristina; Silva, Antonio Eduardo Benedito; Filho, Roberto José Carvalho; de Souza E Silva, Ivonete Sandra; Ferraz, Maria Lucia Cardoso Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the 22 countries that concentrates 80% of global tuberculosis cases concomitantly to a large number of hepatitis C carriers and some epidemiological risk scenarios are coincident for both diseases. We analyzed tuberculosis cases that occurred during α-interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C in reference centers in Brazil between 2001 and 2012 and reviewed their medical records. Eighteen tuberculosis cases were observed in patients submitted to hepatitis C α-interferon-based therapy. All patients were human immunodeficiency virus-negative. Nine patients (50%) had extra-pulmonary tuberculosis; 15 (83%) showed significant liver fibrosis. Hepatitis C treatment was discontinued in 12 patients (67%) due to tuberculosis reactivation and six (33%) had sustained virological response. The majority of patients had a favorable outcome but one died. Considering the evidences of α-IFN interference over the containment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune impairment of cirrhotic patients, the increase of tuberculosis case reports during hepatitis C treatment with atypical and severe presentations and the negative impact on sustained virological response, we think these are strong arguments for latent tuberculosis infection screening before starting α-interferon-based therapy for any indication and even to consider IFN-free regimens against hepatitis C when a patient tests positive for latent tuberculosis infection.

  11. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  12. Influence of phthiocerol dimycocerosate on CD4(+) T cell priming and persistence during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rachel; Nambiar, Jonathan K; Leotta, Lisa; Counoupas, Claudio; Britton, Warwick J; Triccas, James A

    2016-07-01

    The characterisation of mycobacterial factors that influence or modulate the host immune response may aid the development of more efficacious TB vaccines. We have previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis deficient in export of Phthiocerol Dimycocerosates (DIM) (MT103(ΔdrrC)) is more attenuated than wild type M. tuberculosis and provides sustained protective immunity compared to the existing BCG vaccine. Here we sought to define the correlates of immunity associated with DIM deficiency by assessing the impact of MT103(ΔdrrC) delivery on antigen presenting cell (APC) function and the generation of CD4(+) T cell antigen-specific immunity. MT103(ΔdrrC) was a potent activator of bone marrow derived dendritic cells, inducing significantly greater expression of CD86 and IL-12p40 compared to BCG or the MT103 parental strain. This translated to an increased ability to initiate early in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells compared to BCG with enhanced release of IFN-γ and TNF upon antigen-restimulation. The heightened immunity induced by MT103(ΔdrrC) correlated with greater persistence within the spleen compared to BCG, however both MT103(ΔdrrC) and BCG were undetectable in the lung at 70 days post-vaccination. In immunodeficient RAG (-/-) mice, MT103(ΔdrrC) was less virulent than the parental MT103 strain, yet MT103(ΔdrrC) infected mice succumbed more rapidly compared to BCG-infected animals. These results suggest that DIM translocation plays a role in APC stimulation and CD4(+) T cell activation during M. tuberculosis infection and highlights the potential of DIM-deficient strains as novel TB vaccine candidates.

  13. New tools for detecting latent tuberculosis infection: evaluation of RD1-specific long-term response

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    antigens may be used to detect past infection with M. tuberculosis and may help to identify additional individuals with LTBI who resulted negative in the short-term tests. These data may provide useful information for improving immunodiagnostic tests for tuberculosis infection, especially in individuals at high risk for active TB. PMID:19930588

  14. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control. PMID:27589214

  15. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-08-25

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control.

  16. Understanding virulence mechanisms in M. tuberculosis infection via a circuit-based simulation framework.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Oprea, Tudor I.; Joo, Jaewook; Misra, Milind; Leitao, Andrei; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2008-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a growing international health crisis. Mtb is able to persist in host tissues in a non-replicating persistent (NRP) or latent state. This presents a challenge in the treatment of TB. Latent TB can re-activate in 10% of individuals with normal immune systems, higher for those with compromised immune systems. A quantitative understanding of latency-associated virulence mechanisms may help researchers develop more effective methods to battle the spread and reduce TB associated fatalities. Leveraging BioXyce's ability to simulate whole-cell and multi-cellular systems we are developing a circuit-based framework to investigate the impact of pathogenicity-associated pathways on the latency/reactivation phase of tuberculosis infection. We discuss efforts to simulate metabolic pathways that potentially impact the ability of Mtb to persist within host immune cells. We demonstrate how simulation studies can provide insight regarding the efficacy of potential anti-TB agents on biological networks critical to Mtb pathogenicity using a systems chemical biology approach

  17. [A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yosuke; Kurosawa, Takayuki; Hosaka, Kiminori

    2014-09-01

    A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion is very rare. We report a case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis. A 44-year-old man presented to a clinic with a productive cough, sputum, and loss of appetite for several months. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion, centrilobular nodules and infiltrative shadows with cavities in the bilateral lung fields. The direct smear examination showed positive acid-fast bacilli (Gaffky 5). He was referred to our hospital for suspected recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. We started anti-tuberculosis drugs because pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleurisy was first suspected from the findings of high ADA level (78.6 IU/l) of the effusion and positive result of interferon-gamma release assay (QuantiFERON TB-2G). But Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex was not identified by the polymerase chain reaction method and the culture of the sputum was negative. At a later date, Mycobacterium kansasii was detected by sputum culture. The patient was diagnosed as pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs including RFP resulted in a good clinical response. This case was a rare case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. Mining large-scale response networks reveals ‘topmost activities’ in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sambarey, Awanti; Prashanthi, Karyala; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis owes its high pathogenic potential to its ability to evade host immune responses and thrive inside the macrophage. The outcome of infection is largely determined by the cellular response comprising a multitude of molecular events. The complexity and inter-relatedness in the processes makes it essential to adopt systems approaches to study them. In this work, we construct a comprehensive network of infection-related processes in a human macrophage comprising 1888 proteins and 14,016 interactions. We then compute response networks based on available gene expression profiles corresponding to states of health, disease and drug treatment. We use a novel formulation for mining response networks that has led to identifying highest activities in the cell. Highest activity paths provide mechanistic insights into pathogenesis and response to treatment. The approach used here serves as a generic framework for mining dynamic changes in genome-scale protein interaction networks. PMID:23892477

  19. The Wnt Blows: On the Functional Role of Wnt Signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Julius; Reiling, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the Wnt signaling pathway, known for its essential functions in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, exerts immunomodulatory functions during inflammation and infection. Most functional studies indicate that Wnt5a exerts pro-inflammatory functions on its cellular targets, which include various types of immune and non-immune cells. Wnt5a expression has also been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Activation of beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling, e.g., by Wnt3a, has however been shown to limit inflammation by interfering with the nuclear factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-kappaB) pathway. This review focuses on the regulation of Wnt5a, Wnt3a, and the recently identified Wnt6 and their functional role in bacterial infections with a primary focus on pulmonary tuberculosis, a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. PMID:28082976

  20. Tetrahdroxysqualene from Rhus taitensis Shows Antimycobacterial Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Jeffrey C.; Barrows, Louis R.; Gideon, Osia G.; Ireland, Chris M.; Koch, Michael; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Piskaut, Pius; Pond, Christopher D.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis has become a major health problem, in particular with the emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB). In our search for new therapeutic leads against TB, we isolated a new triterpene (1) from the plant Rhus taitensis collected in Papua New Guinea. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of R. taitensis leaves and twigs. The structure of tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was elucidated on the basis of HRESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) exhibited anti–tuberculosis activity with an MIC of 10.0 μg/mL while showing only modest cytotoxicity. PMID:18710283

  1. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  2. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  3. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Blower, Tim R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-02-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94). M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water-metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrA(A90)) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone-gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrA(A90) and GyrA(D94) cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge-enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone-enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrA(A90V) and GyrA(D94G). 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug-enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis.

  4. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  5. Multiscale Model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Maps Metabolite and Gene Perturbations to Granuloma Sterilization Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Pienaar, Elsje; Matern, William M.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Granulomas are a hallmark of tuberculosis. Inside granulomas, the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis may enter a metabolically inactive state that is less susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding M. tuberculosis metabolism within granulomas could contribute to reducing the lengthy treatment required for tuberculosis and provide additional targets for new drugs. Two key adaptations of M. tuberculosis are a nonreplicating phenotype and accumulation of lipid inclusions in response to hypoxic conditions. To explore how these adaptations influence granuloma-scale outcomes in vivo, we present a multiscale in silico model of granuloma formation in tuberculosis. The model comprises host immunity, M. tuberculosis metabolism, M. tuberculosis growth adaptation to hypoxia, and nutrient diffusion. We calibrated our model to in vivo data from nonhuman primates and rabbits and apply the model to predict M. tuberculosis population dynamics and heterogeneity within granulomas. We found that bacterial populations are highly dynamic throughout infection in response to changing oxygen levels and host immunity pressures. Our results indicate that a nonreplicating phenotype, but not lipid inclusion formation, is important for long-term M. tuberculosis survival in granulomas. We used virtual M. tuberculosis knockouts to predict the impact of both metabolic enzyme inhibitors and metabolic pathways exploited to overcome inhibition. Results indicate that knockouts whose growth rates are below ∼66% of the wild-type growth rate in a culture medium featuring lipid as the only carbon source are unable to sustain infections in granulomas. By mapping metabolite- and gene-scale perturbations to granuloma-scale outcomes and predicting mechanisms of sterilization, our method provides a powerful tool for hypothesis testing and guiding experimental searches for novel antituberculosis interventions. PMID:26975995

  6. Granzyme A as a potential biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Guggino, Giuliana; Orlando, Valentina; Cutrera, Stella; La Manna, Marco P; Di Liberto, Diana; Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Dieli, Francesco; Goletti, Delia; Caccamo, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic molecules such as granulysin, perforin and granzymes produced by cytolytic T cells directly contribute to immune defense against tuberculosis (TB). In search for novel TB biomarkers, we have evaluated the levels of granzyme A in plasma obtained from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In tube (QFT-IT) assays from patients with active TB disease and subjects with latent TB infection (LTBI). Granzyme A serum levels in TB patients were significantly lower than values found in LTBI subjects even after subtraction of the unstimulated levels from the antigen-stimulated responses. The receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis comparing TB patients and LTBI groups, showed that at a cut-off value of granzyme A of <3.425pg/ml, the sensitivity and the specificity of the assay were 29.41% and 94.74%, respectively. Our results suggest that granzyme A could be considered another biomarker of TB, that can be used, other than IFN-γ, to discriminate between patients with active TB and LTBI subjects in a well characterized cohort of confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected individuals.

  7. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  8. Pulmonary tuberculosis in severely-malnourished or HIV-infected children with pneumonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Hossain, Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-09-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/ very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  9. Modification of Rifamycin Polyketide Backbone Leads to Improved Drug Activity against Rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N.; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-01-01

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. PMID:24923585

  10. Modification of rifamycin polyketide backbone leads to improved drug activity against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-07-25

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains.

  11. Type I, II, and III Interferons: Regulating Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Travar, Maja; Petkovic, Miroslav; Verhaz, Antonija

    2016-02-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens or tumor cells. The aim of this review was to present the previously known and new findings about the role of interferons type I and II, and recently discovered type III in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection control. Infection of various cell types with M. tuberculosis induce both IFN-α and IFN-β synthesis. The majority of the studies support the findings that IFN type I actually promotes infection with M. tuberculosis. It has been well establish that IFN-γ has protective function against M. tuberculosis and the other mycobacteria and that the primary source of this cytokine are CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Recently, it has been shown that also the innate lymphocytes, γδ T cells, natural killer (NK) T cells, and NK cells can also be the source of IFN-γ in response to mycobacterial infection. Several studies have shown that CD4(+) T cells protect mice against M. tuberculosis independently of IFN-γ. The balance between IFN-γ and different cytokines such as IL-10 and other Th2 cell cytokines is likely to influence disease outcome. Type I IFN appears to be detrimental through at least three separate, but overlapping, type I IFN-mediated mechanisms: induction of excessive apoptosis, specific suppression of Th1 and IFN-γ responses, and dampening of the immune response by strong IL-10 induction. Recently it has been found that M. tuberculosis infection in A549 lung epithelial cells stimulate up-regulation of IFN-λ genes in vitro. IFN-λs also have a role in modulation of Th1/Th2 response. IFN-λs are not essential for M. tuberculosis infection control, but can give some contribution in immune response to this pathogen.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induces an Atypical Cell Death Mode to Escape from Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinhee; Repasy, Teresa; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage cell death following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a central role in tuberculosis disease pathogenesis. Certain attenuated strains induce extrinsic apoptosis of infected macrophages but virulent strains of M. tuberculosis suppress this host response. We previously reported that virulent M. tuberculosis induces cell death when bacillary load exceeds ∼20 per macrophage but the precise nature of this demise has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the characteristics of cell death in primary murine macrophages challenged with virulent or attenuated M. tuberculosis complex strains. We report that high intracellular bacillary burden causes rapid and primarily necrotic death via lysosomal permeabilization, releasing hydrolases that promote Bax/Bak-independent mitochondrial damage and necrosis. Cell death was independent of cathepsins B or L and notable for ultrastructural evidence of damage to lipid bilayers throughout host cells with depletion of several host phospholipid species. These events require viable bacteria that can respond to intracellular cues via the PhoPR sensor kinase system but are independent of the ESX1 system. Conclusions/Significance Cell death caused by virulent M. tuberculosis is distinct from classical apoptosis, pyroptosis or pyronecrosis. Mycobacterial genes essential for cytotoxicity are regulated by the PhoPR two-component system. This atypical death mode provides a mechanism for viable bacilli to exit host macrophages for spreading infection and the eventual transition to extracellular persistence that characterizes advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:21483832

  13. Age- and Sex-Specific Social Contact Patterns and Incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Peter J.; Looker, Clare; Plumb, Ian D.; Bond, Virginia; Schaap, Ab; Shanaube, Kwame; Muyoyeta, Monde; Vynnycky, Emilia; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Beyers, Nulda; Ayles, Helen; White, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to model the incidence of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among adults using data on infection incidence in children, disease prevalence in adults, and social contact patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of adults in 2011, enumerating “close” (shared conversation) and “casual” (shared indoor space) social contacts in 16 Zambian communities and 8 South African communities. We modeled the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in all age groups using these contact patterns, as well as the observed incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in children and the prevalence of tuberculosis disease in adults. A total of 3,528 adults participated in the study. The reported rates of close and casual contact were 4.9 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 4.6, 5.2) and 10.4 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 9.3, 11.6), respectively. Rates of close contact were higher for adults in larger households and rural areas. There was preferential mixing of close contacts within age groups and within sexes. The estimated incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in adults was 1.5–6 times higher (2.5%–10% per year) than that in children. More than 50% of infections in men, women, and children were estimated to be due to contact with adult men. We conclude that estimates of infection incidence based on surveys in children might underestimate incidence in adults. Most infections may be due to contact with adult men. Treatment and control of tuberculosis in men is critical to protecting men, women, and children from tuberculosis. PMID:26646292

  14. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F.; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Clark, Taane G.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:28176867

  15. Primary macrophages and J774 cells respond differently to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Nuria; Phelan, Jody; de Sessions, Paola F; Cliff, Jacqueline M; Clark, Taane G; Hibberd, Martin L

    2017-02-08

    Macrophages play an essential role in the early immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are the cell type preferentially infected in vivo. Primary macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines are commonly used as infection models, although the physiological relevance of cell lines, particularly for host-pathogen interaction studies, is debatable. Here we use high-throughput RNA-sequencing to analyse transcriptome dynamics of two macrophage models in response to M. tuberculosis infection. Specifically, we study the early response of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and cell line J774 to infection with live and γ-irradiated (killed) M. tuberculosis. We show that infection with live bacilli specifically alters the expression of host genes such as Rsad2, Ifit1/2/3 and Rig-I, whose potential roles in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection have not yet been investigated. In addition, the response of primary macrophages is faster and more intense than that of J774 cells in terms of number of differentially expressed genes and magnitude of induction/repression. Our results point to potentially novel processes leading to immune containment early during M. tuberculosis infection, and support the idea that important differences exist between primary macrophages and cell lines, which should be taken into account when choosing a macrophage model to study host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Assessing the effects of multiple infections and long latency in the dynamics of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve a better understanding of multiple infections and long latency in the dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we analyze a simple model. Since backward bifurcation is well documented in the literature with respect to the model we are considering, our aim is to illustrate this behavior in terms of the range of variations of the model's parameters. We show that backward bifurcation disappears (and forward bifurcation occurs) if: (a) the latent period is shortened below a critical value; and (b) the rates of super-infection and re-infection are decreased. This result shows that among immunosuppressed individuals, super-infection and/or changes in the latent period could act to facilitate the onset of tuberculosis. When we decrease the incubation period below the critical value, we obtain the curve of the incidence of tuberculosis following forward bifurcation; however, this curve envelops that obtained from the backward bifurcation diagram. PMID:21059256

  17. The Activity of a Hexameric M17 Metallo-Aminopeptidase Is Associated With Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andre F.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Neves, David; Kipnis, Andre; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana P.; de Santana, Jaime M.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most prevalent human pathogens causing millions of deaths in the last years. Moreover, tuberculosis (TB) treatment has become increasingly challenging owing to the emergence of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Thus, there is an immediate need for the development of new anti-TB drugs. Proteases appear to be a promising approach and may lead to shortened and effective treatments for drug-resistant TB. Although the M. tuberculosis genome predicts more than 100 genes encoding proteases, only a few of them have been studied. Aminopeptidases constitute a set of proteases that selectively remove amino acids from the N-terminus of proteins and peptides and may act as virulence factors, essential for survival and maintenance of many microbial pathogens. Here, we characterized a leucine aminopeptidase of M. tuberculosis (MtLAP) as a cytosolic oligomeric metallo-aminopeptidase. Molecular and enzymatic properties lead us to classify MtLAP as a typical member of the peptidase family M17. Furthermore, the aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin strongly inhibited MtLAP activity, in vitro M. tuberculosis growth and macrophage infection. In murine model of TB, bestatin treatment reduced bacterial burden and lesion in the lungs of infected mice. Thus, our data suggest that MtLAP participates in important metabolic pathways of M. tuberculosis necessary for its survival and virulence and consequently may be a promising target for new anti-TB drugs.

  18. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  19. TISSUE FACTOR EXPRESSION BY MYELOID CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST Mycobacterium tuberculosis INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TFΔ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2 like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. PMID:26471500

  20. An important role of prostanoid receptor EP2 in host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Vandana; Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Singh, Yogesh; Van Kaer, Luc; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2012-12-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, resides and replicates within susceptible hosts by inhibiting host antimicrobial mechanisms. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), produced by M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages, exerts a variety of immunomodulatory functions via 4 receptors (EP1-EP4), each mediating distinct PGE(2) functions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulates EP2 messenger RNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. We found that EP2 deficiency in mice increases susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, which correlated with reduced antigen-specific T-cell responses and increased levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells. These findings have revealed an important role for EP2 in host immune defense against tuberculosis. As a G protein-coupled receptor, EP2 could serve as a target for immunotherapy of tuberculosis.

  1. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hella, Jerry; Said, Khadija; Kamwela, Lujeko; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Maroa, Thomas; Chiryamkubi, Magreth; Mhalu, Grace; Schindler, Christian; Reither, Klaus; Knopp, Stefanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Background Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB) disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania. Methodology Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years) sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB. Principal findings A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972) were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597) and 25.9% (97/375) among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161), followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87) and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55). An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–1.80, p = 0.22), but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03–4.45, p = 0.040). Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38–5.26, p = 0.004) and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12–1.16, p = 0.088). Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB

  2. Completion of screening for latent tuberculosis infection among immigrants.

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, A. C. C.; Saleri, N.; El-Hamad, I.; Tedoldi, S.; Capone, S.; Pezzoli, M. C.; Zaccaria, M.; Pizzocolo, A.; Scarcella, C.; Matteelli, A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the sociodemographic factors associated with completion of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among undocumented immigrants in Brescia, Italy. Screening for LTBI was offered to 649 immigrants; 213 (33%) immigrants completed the first step of screening; only 44% (55/124) of individuals with a positive tuberculin skin test result started treatment for LTBI. The univariate analysis showed that being unmarried, of Senegalese nationality and being interviewed by a health-care worker with the same native language as the immigrant were significantly associated with completion of screening for LTBI. In the multiple logistic regression, being interviewed in the native language of the health-care worker (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.8, P = 0.004) and being of Senegalese origin (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.6, P = 0.0005) were independently associated with adherence to LTBI screening. Our results suggest that knowledge of the sociodemographic characteristics of immigrants, and the participation of health-care workers of the same cultural origin as the immigrant during the visits, can be an important tool to improve completion of screening for LTBI. PMID:15724725

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Free-Roaming Wild Asian Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Umashankar, Kunigal Srinivasa; Nandini, Poojappa; Giridhar, Papanna; Byregowda, Somenahalli Munivenkatappa; Shrinivasa, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a wild Asian elephant at Rajiv Gandhi National Park, India, revealed nodular lesions, granulomas with central caseation, and acid-fast bacilli in the lungs. PCR and nucleotide sequencing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study indicates that wild elephants can harbor M. tuberculosis that can become fatal. PMID:28221114

  4. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-04-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens.

  5. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  6. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; ...

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  7. Occult hepatitis B virus infection: clinical implications in tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Trigo, C; do Brasil, P E A A; Costa, M J M; de Castro, L

    2016-12-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is characterized by the absence of HBsAg and persistence of the virus genome (HBV-DNA) in liver tissue and/or blood. OBI has been reported in several clinical contexts. However, the clinical significance of OBI in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is unknown. We investigated the OBI prevalence and its impact on the risk of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) during TB treatment. This was a prospective cohort study with one hundred patients who were treated for TB from 2008 to 2015. Laboratory, clinical and demographic data of TB patients were extracted from medical records. Based on HBV-DNA testing of serum samples, an OBI prevalence of 12% was established; almost half of these patients had both anti-HBc and anti-HBs serological markers. Low CD4(+) cell counts have been shown to be a risk factor for OBI among TB patients co-infected with HIV (P=.036). High DILI incidence was observed in this study. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was conducted and identified OBI (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.30-6.86) as the strongest predictor for DILI when adjusted to CD4(+) cell count (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.90), ALT before TB treatment (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.81-2.32) and TB extrapulmonary clinical form (HR 2.91, 95% CI 1.75-7.21). The main aim of this study was to highlight DILI as a clinical outcome during treatment of TB patients with OBI. Therefore, HBV-DNA testing should be considered routinely in monitoring DILI, and also in other clinical implications associated with OBI, reduce morbidity and mortality.

  8. Asymptomatic Tuberculosis-Induced Ileal Perforation in an HIV- Infected Individual; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Moslemi, Sam; Tahamtan, Maryam; Taheri, Lohrasb; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    The co-existence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality because of a widespread organ involvement. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for localization of opportunistic microorganisms in AIDS. However, surgical abdominal emergencies such as intestinal perforation resulted from tuberculosis are uncommon in these patients. The asymptomatic occurrence of such intestinal perforation has not been reported our knowledge. We represent an HIV and HCV co-infected man with miliary tuberculosis and an incidentally detected free air under  diaphragm in the chest X-ray eventually resulting in exploratory laparotomy which then revealed two tubercular-induced intestinal perforations. It seems that as the tuberculosis is increasing in incidence, mostly due to reactivation in HIV-infected patients especially in developing countries, we should not underestimate its acute abdominal emergencies such as bowel perforation. PMID:27162854

  9. HIV infection and tuberculosis in South Africa: an urgent need to escalate the public health response.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, Salim S; Churchyard, Gavin J; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Lawn, Stephen D

    2009-09-12

    One of the greatest challenges facing post-apartheid South Africa is the control of the concomitant HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. HIV continues to spread relentlessly, and tuberculosis has been declared a national emergency. In 2007, South Africa, with 0.7% of the world's population, had 17% of the global burden of HIV infection, and one of the world's worst tuberculosis epidemics, compounded by rising drug resistance and HIV co-infection. Until recently, the South African Government's response to these diseases has been marked by denial, lack of political will, and poor implementation of policies and programmes. Nonetheless, there have been notable achievements in disease management, including substantial improvements in access to condoms, expansion of tuberculosis control efforts, and scale-up of free antiretroviral therapy (ART). Care for acutely ill AIDS patients and long-term provision of ART are two issues that dominate medical practice and the health-care system. Decisive action is needed to implement evidence-based priorities for the control of the HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. By use of the framework of the Strategic Plans for South Africa for tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we provide prioritised four-step approaches for tuberculosis control, HIV prevention, and HIV treatment. Strong leadership, political will, social mobilisation, adequate human and financial resources, and sustainable development of health-care services are needed for successful implementation of these approaches.

  10. HIV infection and tuberculosis in South Africa: an urgent need to escalate the public health response

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Lawn, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing post-apartheid South Africa is the control of the concomitant HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. HIV continues to spread relentlessly, and tuberculosis has been declared a national emergency. In 2007, South Africa, with 0·7% of the world’s population, had 17% of the global burden of HIV infection, and one of the world’s worst tuberculosis epidemics, compounded by rising drug resistance and HIV co-infection. Until recently, the South African Government’s response to these diseases has been marked by denial, lack of political will, and poor implementation of policies and programmes. Nonetheless, there have been notable achievements in disease management, including substantial improvements in access to condoms, expansion of tuberculosis control efforts, and scale-up of free antiretroviral therapy (ART). Care for acutely ill AIDS patients and long-term provision of ART are two issues that dominate medical practice and the health-care system. Decisive action is needed to implement evidence-based priorities for the control of the HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. By use of the framework of the Strategic Plans for South Africa for tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we provide prioritised four-step approaches for tuberculosis control, HIV prevention, and HIV treatment. Strong leadership, political will, social mobilisation, adequate human and financial resources, and sustainable development of health-care services are needed for successful implementation of these approaches. PMID:19709731

  11. BCG vaccination enhances resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs fed a low casein diet.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    In order to examine the relationship between malnutrition and tuberculosis development in vivo, a malnourished guinea pig model fed with a low casein (5%) diet was developed. After being fed with the low casein diet, the guinea pigs were infected with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis Kurono strain by aerosol infection, and seven weeks later were subjected to histopathologic examination, colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-12 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA. Another group of guinea pigs were vaccinated subcutaneously with 10(6) CFU BCG Tokyo for three weeks and then similarly infected by aerosol. Eighty-eight% (7/8) of the malnourished guinea pigs succumbed to mycobacterial infection within 85 days after infection, while the malnourished guinea pigs vaccinated with BCG Tokyo survived. CFU assay showed that lung and splenic CFUs were higher in the low casein diet-fed groups than in the control diet (20% casein)-fed groups, although both groups had significantly lower CFUs after vaccination with BCG Tokyo (p<0.01). Examination of lung histopathology revealed that pulmonary granulomas were large and disorganized in the groups fed the low casein diet. The number of visible lesions on the surfaces of the fixed lungs in guinea pigs fed control diet+BCG and low casein diet+BCG was low significantly. Pan T-, CD4-, CD8- and Mac antigen-positive cells were also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and Pan T-, CD4- and Mac antigen-positive cells increased after vaccination with BCG Tokyo. Expression of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12 and iNOS mRNA was also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha mRNA expression was enhanced with BCG vaccination. These results indicate that

  12. Leukotrienes are not essential for the efficacy of a heterologous vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, L H; Paula, M Oliveira e; Wowk, P F; Fonseca, D M da; Sérgio, C A; Fedatto, P F; Gembre, A F; Ramos, S G; Silva, C L; Medeiros, A I; Faccioli, L H; Bonato, V L D

    2010-07-01

    Leukotrienes are reported to be potent proinflammatory mediators that play a role in the development of several inflammatory diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. Leukotrienes have also been associated with protection against infectious diseases. However, the role of leukotrienes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is not understood. To answer this question, we studied the role of leukotrienes in the protective immune response conferred by prime-boost heterologous immunization against tuberculosis. We immunized BALB/c mice (4-11/group) with subcutaneous BCG vaccine (1 x 10(5) M. bovis BCG) (prime) followed by intramuscular DNA-HSP65 vaccine (100 microg) (boost). During the 30 days following the challenge, the animals were treated by gavage daily with MK-886 (5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) to inhibit leukotriene synthesis. We showed that MK-886-treated mice were more susceptible to M. tuberculosis infection by counting the number of M. tuberculosis colony-forming units in lungs. The histopathological analysis showed an impaired influx of leukocytes to the lungs of MK-886-treated mice after infection, confirming the involvement of leukotrienes in the protective immune response against experimental tuberculosis. However, prime-boost-immunized mice treated with MK-886 remained protected after challenge with M. tuberculosis, suggesting that leukotrienes are not required for the protective effect elicited by immunization. Protection against M. tuberculosis challenge achieved by prime-boost immunization in the absence of leukotrienes was accompanied by an increase in IL-17 production in the lungs of these animals, as measured by ELISA. Therefore, these data suggest that the production of IL-17 in MK-886-treated, immunized mice could contribute to the generation of a protective immune response after infection with M. tuberculosis.

  13. Effects of dexamethasone and transient malnutrition on rabbits infected with aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, Anup K; Mendez, Susana E; Hatem, Christine L; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Aird, Katherine; Pitt, M Louise M; Dannenberg, Arthur M; Manabe, Yukari C

    2005-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in the developing world, where tuberculosis is often endemic. Rabbits infected with aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis that subsequently became inadvertently and transiently malnourished had compromised cell-mediated immunity comparable to that of the rabbits immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. They had significant leukopenia and reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity responses. Malnutrition dampened cell-mediated immunity and would interfere with diagnostic tests that rely on intact CD4 T-cell responses.

  14. Post-delivery mycobacterium tuberculosis infection misdiagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Li Yu; Shrestha, Bikash; Lu, Yi Lu; Ping, Fu

    2016-12-30

    Tuberculosis is a common infectious mycobacterial disease having a wide range of clinical and serological manifestations that are similar to rheumatic disease. Differential diagnosis is a crucial aspect in any rheumatic disease as many other infectious diseases portray clinical similarities and autoantibody positivity. Our case report illustrates of a young woman just after the delivery of a child presented an unusual case of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection initially misdiagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

  15. Purification of modified mycobacterial A60 antigen by affinity chromatography and its use for rapid diagnostic tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Yari, Sh; Hadizadeh Tasbiti, A; Fateh, A; Karimi, A; Yari, F; Sakhai, F; Ghazanfari, M; Bahrmand, A

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has been declared a global emergency. The mainstay for its control is the rapid and accurate identification of infected individual. Antibodies to A60, one of the macromolecular antigen complexes of mycobacteria were commonly used in the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to prepare specific antibodies against A60 for detection of tuberculosis infection. Specific polyclonal antibodies against A60, (A60-Ab) were prepared in rabbits using 2 boosted injections of the antigen (A60). The antibodies were purified and treated with normal oral flora to remove any non-specific and cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were conjugated to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B and used to isolate subunits of A60 with more specificity for M. tuberculosis. A new affinity column was designed to prepare modified (purified) A60 antigen. Purified A60 antigen (PA60-Ag) was used to develop antibody production by Immunoaffinity chromatography. 113 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pulmonary TB at Pasteur Institute were selected for the study. The specificity of the results was analyzed with TB-rapid test by using PA60-antibodies. TB-rapid test revealed that normal oral flora-absorbed antibodies could lead to more specific results than that of the non-absorbed antibodies. The developed, modified A60 antibodies, (PA60-Ab)-rapid test showed higher sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) and overall efficiency (93.0%, 86.0%, 90.0%, 91.0%, and 90.0% respectively) for the detection of the Mycobacterium antigen. Moreover, PA60-Ag showed only two protein bands of molecular weight 45 and 66kDa in SDS-PAGE while untreated A60 showed multiple bands. Thus, our study helped in the purification of a novel and well characterized A60 antigen and good diagnostic potential for detecting tuberculosis infection.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  17. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  18. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K.; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully. PMID:25624598

  20. Pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis co-infection in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Deepak; Chander, Jagdish; Janmeja, Ashok K; Katyal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of infections which pose management difficulties. Herein, we report a case of diabetic patient who developed combined pulmonary tuberculosis and mucormycosis. The case illustrates management of this rare co-infection which despite being potentially fatal was treated successfully.

  1. Multi-Stage Tuberculosis Subunit Vaccine Candidate LT69 Provides High Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxia; Peng, Jinxiu; Bai, Chunxiang; Liu, Xun; Hu, Lina; Luo, Yanping; Wang, Bingxiang; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jianzhu; Yu, Hongjuan; Xian, Qiaoyang; Zhu, Bingdong

    2015-01-01

    Effective tuberculosis (TB) vaccine should target tubercle bacilli with various metabolic states and confer long-term protective immunity. In this study, we constructed a novel multi-stage TB subunit vaccine based on fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-HspX (LT69 for short) which combined early expressed antigens and latency-associated antigen. The fusion protein was mixed with an adjuvant being composed of N, N'-dimethyl-N, N'-dioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA) and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (PolyI:C) to construct subunit vaccine, whose immunogenicity and protective ability were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice. The results showed that LT69 had strong immunogenicity and high protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) H37Rv aerosol challenge. Low-dose (2 μg) of LT69 generated long-term immune memory responses and provided effective protection, which was even higher than traditional vaccine BCG did at 30 weeks post the last vaccination. In conclusion, multistage subunit vaccine LT69 showed high and long-term protection against M. tuberculosis infection in mice, whose effect could be enhanced by using a relative low dosage of antigen.

  2. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F J

    2016-03-02

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b(+) Gr1(high) cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable.

  3. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b+ Gr1high cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable. PMID:26931771

  4. Pathogen-derived biomarkers for active tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Paula; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Marin, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Despite the availability of effective treatments, TB remains a major public health concern in most low and middle-income countries, representing worldwide the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease. Inadequate case detection and failures to classify the disease status hamper proper TB control. The limitations of the conventional diagnostic methods have encouraged much research activities in this field, but there is still an urgent need for an accurate point of care test for active TB diagnosis. A rapid, precise, and inexpensive TB diagnostic test would allow an earlier implementation of an appropriate treatment and the reduction of disease transmission. Pathogen-derived molecules present in clinical specimens of affected patients are being validated for that purpose. This short review aims to summarize the available data regarding biomarkers derived from M. tuberculosis, and their current usage in active TB diagnosis.

  5. A Focused Screen Identifies Antifolates with Activity on Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuradha; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Pérez, Esther; Gonzalez, Ruben R.; Torres, Pedro; Calvo, David; Gómez, Ruben M.; Ortega, Fátima; Jiménez, Elena; Gabarro, Raquel C.; Rullás, Joaquín; Ballell, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Antifolates are widely used to treat several diseases but are not currently used in the first-line treatment of tuberculosis, despite evidence that some of these molecules can target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli in vitro. To identify new antifolate candidates for animal-model efficacy studies of tuberculosis, we paired knowledge and tools developed in academia with the infrastructure and chemistry resources of a large pharmaceutical company. Together we curated a focused library of 2508 potential antifolates, which were then tested for activity against live Mtb. We identified 210 primary hits, confirmed the on-target activity of potent compounds, and now report the identification and characterization of 5 hit compounds, representative of 5 different chemical scaffolds. These antifolates have potent activity against Mtb and represent good starting points for improvement that could lead to in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:26771003

  6. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Promotes Anti-apoptotic Activity of the Macrophage by PtpA Protein-dependent Dephosphorylation of Host GSK3α*

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Valérie; Bach, Horacio; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis tyrosine phosphatase PtpA inhibits two key cellular events in macrophages required for the elimination of invading organisms, phagosome acidification, and maturation. Kinome analysis revealed multiple PtpA-dependent changes to the phosphorylation status of macrophage proteins upon M. tuberculosis infection. Among those proteins we show that PtpA dephosphorylates GSK3α on amino acid Tyr279, which leads to modulation of GSK3α anti-apoptotic activity, promoting pathogen survival early during infection. PMID:25187516

  8. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  9. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  10. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, P P; Retnakumar, R J; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation.

  11. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, P. P.; Retnakumar, R. J.; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation. PMID:26876331

  12. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  13. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  14. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  15. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  16. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board...

  17. Early Changes by (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography coregistered with computed tomography predict outcome after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M Teresa; Maiello, Pauline; Tomko, Jaime; Frye, Lonnie James; Fillmore, Daniel; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Lin, Philana Ling

    2014-06-01

    Cynomolgus macaques infected with low-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop both active tuberculosis and latent infection similar to those of humans, providing an opportunity to study the clinically silent early events in infection. (18)Fluorodeoxyglucose radiotracer with positron emission tomography coregistered with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) provides a noninvasive method to measure disease progression. We sought to determine temporal patterns of granuloma evolution that distinguished active-disease and latent outcomes. Macaques (n = 10) were infected with low-dose M. tuberculosis with FDG PET/CT performed during infection. At 24 weeks postinfection, animals were classified as having active disease (n = 3) or latent infection (n = 6), with one "percolator" monkey. Imaging characteristics (e.g., lesion number, metabolic activity, size, mineralization, and distribution of lesions) were compared among active and latent groups. As early as 3 weeks postinfection, more pulmonary granulomas were observed in animals that would later develop active disease than in those that would develop latent infection. Over time, new lesions developed in active-disease animals but not in latent animals. Granulomas and mediastinal lymph nodes from active-disease but not latent animals consistently increased in metabolic activity at early time points. The presence of fewer lesions at 3 weeks and the lack of new lesion development in animals with latent infection suggest that innate and rapid adaptive responses are critical to preventing active tuberculosis. A greater emphasis on innate responses and/or rapid recruitment of adaptive responses, especially in the airway, should be emphasized in newer vaccine strategies.

  18. High level of IFN-γ released from whole blood of human tuberculosis infections following stimulation with Rv2073c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kun; Zhang, Jingyan; Teng, Xindong; Liang, Jinping; Wang, Xiaochun; Yuan, Xuefeng; Tian, Maopeng; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-07-01

    More efficacious and specific biomarkers are urgently needed for better control of tuberculosis (TB), the second leading infectious cause of mortality worldwide. The region of difference 9 (RD9) presents the genome of the causative pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis rather than other species of the genus Mycobacterium, which might be promising targets for specific diagnosis, vaccine development and pathogenesis. In this study, two proteins Rv2073c and Rv2074, encoded by the RD9 were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli system. Following stimulation with both proteins, the levels of IFN-γ secreted by T cells from a total of 49 whole blood samples obtained from clinically diagnosed active TB patients, patients with latent TB infections (LTBIs), and healthy donors, were compared with those of the incubation with recombinant fusion protein of CFP21 and MPT64 (rCM). Our results demonstrated that only Rv2073c could induce a higher level of IFN-γ in TB infections than healthy controls and there was a positive correlation between Rv2073c- and rCM-specific IFN-γ levels in TB infections and healthy donors, respectively. These findings indicate that Rv2073c might be a promising antigen for specific diagnostic reagents and vaccine candidates of TB.

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis: virulence of Mycobacterium africanum and relevance in HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian G; Scarisbrick, Genevieve; Niemann, Stefan; Browne, Edmund N L; Chinbuah, Margaret Amanua; Gyapong, John; Osei, Ivy; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Kubica, Tanja; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Thye, Thorsten; Horstmann, Rolf D

    2008-09-01

    Although Mycobacterium africanum is being isolated in a significant proportion of cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in West Africa, its pathogenic potential remains a matter of discussion. Recent reports leave the question of whether M. africanum causes more severe pathology than M. tuberculosis or resembles opportunistic pathogens and might gain importance in the course of the HIV pandemic. Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis associated with M. africanum (n=556) and M. tuberculosis (n=1350) were studied in Ghana, West Africa, and compared regarding self-reported signs and symptoms, chest radiography, HIV status, mycobacterial drug resistance and mycobacterial clustering as determined by spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprints. The rate of M. africanum infections was similar in HIV-positive (27%) and HIV-negative (30%) patients. M. africanum clustered less than M. tuberculosis (21% vs 79%; OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5; p<0.001) corresponding to its lower prevalence (29% vs 70%). Clinically and radiographically, no significant differences were found except that M. africanum caused lower-lobe disease less frequently than M. tuberculosis (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.2-0.7; Pc=0.01), whereby this association applied to HIV-negative patients only. No difference in virulence, as assessed by the severity of radiological presentation, was found when the two M. africanum subtypes West African 1 and West African 2 were compared. In the population studied, M. africanum closely resembled M. tuberculosis in pathology and cannot be considered an opportunistic pathogen.

  20. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  1. An Important Role of Prostanoid Receptor EP2 in Host Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Vandana; Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Singh, Yogesh; Van Kaer, Luc; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, resides and replicates within susceptible hosts by inhibiting host antimicrobial mechanisms. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by M. tuberculosis–infected macrophages, exerts a variety of immunomodulatory functions via 4 receptors (EP1–EP4), each mediating distinct PGE2 functions. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulates EP2 messenger RNA expression in CD4+ T cells. We found that EP2 deficiency in mice increases susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection, which correlated with reduced antigen-specific T-cell responses and increased levels of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells. These findings have revealed an important role for EP2 in host immune defense against tuberculosis. As a G protein-coupled receptor, EP2 could serve as a target for immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:23033144

  2. Alu repeats as transcriptional regulatory platforms in macrophage responses to M. tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Bouttier, Manuella; Laperriere, David; Memari, Babak; Mangiapane, Joseph; Fiore, Amanda; Mitchell, Eric; Verway, Mark; Behr, Marcel A.; Sladek, Robert; Barreiro, Luis B.; Mader, Sylvie; White, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional response of macrophages during early-stage M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, we performed ChIPseq analysis of H3K4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a marker of poised or active enhancers. De novo H3K4me1 peaks in infected cells were associated with genes implicated in host defenses and apoptosis. Our analysis revealed that 40% of de novo regions contained human/primate-specific Alu transposable elements, enriched in the AluJ and S subtypes. These contained several transcription factor binding sites, including those for members of the MEF2 and ATF families, and LXR and RAR nuclear receptors, all of which have been implicated in macrophage differentiation, survival, and responses to stress and infection. Combining bioinformatics, molecular genetics, and biochemical approaches, we linked genes adjacent to H3K4me1-associated Alu repeats to macrophage metabolic responses against Mtb infection. In particular, we show that LXRα signaling, which reduced Mtb viability 18-fold by altering cholesterol metabolism and enhancing macrophage apoptosis, can be initiated at response elements present in Alu repeats. These studies decipher the mechanism of early macrophage transcriptional responses to Mtb, highlighting the role of Alu element transposition in shaping human transcription programs during innate immunity. PMID:27604870

  3. Tuberculosis in HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Margot R; Harris, D Robert; Abreu, Thalita; Ferreira, Fabiana G; Ruz, Noris Pavia; Worrell, Carol; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the occurrence, clinical presentations and diagnostic methods for tuberculosis (TB) in a cohort of HIV-infected infants, children and adolescents from Latin America. Methods A retrospective analysis of children with TB and HIV was performed within a prospective observational cohort study conducted at multiple clinical sites in Latin America. Results Of 1114 HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents followed from 2002-2011, 69 that could be classified as having confirmed or presumed TB were included in this case series; 52.2% (95% CI: 39.8-64.4%) had laboratory-confirmed TB, 15.9% (95% CI: 8.2-26.7%) had clinically-confirmed disease and 31.9% (95% CI: 21.2-44.2%) had presumed TB. Sixty-six were perinatally HIV-infected. Thirty-two (61.5%) children had a history of contact with an adult TB case; however information on exposure to active TB was missing for 17 participants. At the time of TB diagnosis, 39 were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen of these cases may have represented immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Conclusions Our study emphasizes the need for adequate contact tracing of adult TB cases and screening for HIV or TB in Latin American children diagnosed with either condition. Preventive strategies in TB-exposed, HIV-infected children should be optimized. PMID:25307683

  4. Bis-biguanide dihydrochloride inhibits intracellular replication of M. tuberculosis and controls infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongbo; Wang, Feifei; Zeng, Gucheng; Shen, Ling; Cheng, Han; Huang, Dan; Wang, Richard; Rong, Lijun; Chen, Zheng W.

    2016-01-01

    While there is an urgent need to develop new and effective drugs for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB), repurposing FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) -approved drugs for development of anti-TB agents may decrease time and effort from bench to bedside. Here, we employed host cell-based high throughput screening (HTS) assay to screen and characterize FDA-approved, off-patent library drugs for anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) activities. The cell-based HTS allowed us to identify an anti-cancer drug of bis-biguanide dihydrochloride (BBD) as potent anti-mycobacteria agent. Further characterization showed that BBD could inhibit intracellular and extracellular growth of M. smegmatis and slow-growing M. bovis BCG. BBD also potently inhibited replication of clinically-isolated MTB and MDR-TB strains. The proof-of-concept study showed that BBD treatment of MTB-infected mice could significantly decrease CFU counts in the lung and spleen. Notably, comparative evaluation showed that MTB CFU counts in BBD-treated mice were lower than those in rifampicin-treated mice. No apparent BBD side effects were found in BBD-treated mice. Thus, our findings support further studies to develop BBD as a new and effective drug against TB and MDR-TB. PMID:27601302

  5. Prevalence of Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections among Tuberculosis Suspects in Iran: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Dabiri, Hossein; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The infections due to Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) are becoming an important health problem in many countries in the world. Globally, an increase in NTM infections has been reported from many countries around the world. However, limited information is available about the prevalence of NTM infections in Iran. Material and Methods The data of the prevalence of NTM infections were collected from databases such as PubMed, Web of science, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, Iranmedex, and Scientific Information Database. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (V2.0, Biostat) software was used to analyze the data. Results The meta-analyses showed that the prevalence of NTM infections was 10.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 6.3-15.9) among culture-positive cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Iran. The further stratified analyses indicated that the prevalence of NTM was higher in studies that were done after year 2000. Additionally, M. simiae (43.3% [95% CI 36.8-50.0]), M. intracellucar (27.3% [95% CI 0.7-95.5]) and M. fortuitum (22.7% [95% CI 16.1-30.9]) were the most prevalent NTM species, respectively. Discussion The relatively high prevalence of NTM infections (10.2%) among culture positive cases for TB underlines the need for greater enforcement of infection control strategies. Establishment of appropriate diagnostic criteria and management guidelines for NTM diseases and expanding the number and quality of regional reference laboratories may facilitate more accurate action for prevention and control of NTM infections in Iran. PMID:26052701

  6. Clofazimine Contributes Sustained Antimicrobial Activity after Treatment Cessation in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Rosemary V.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Ngcobo, Bongani; Adamson, John; Moodley, Chivonne; Dorasamy, Afton; Moodley, Sashen; Mgaga, Zinhle; Bester, Linda A.; Singh, Sanil D.; Almeida, Deepak V.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the antileprosy drug clofazimine may contribute treatment-shortening activity when included in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Clofazimine accumulates to high levels in tissues, has a long half-life, and remains in the body for months after administration is stopped. We hypothesized that in tuberculosis treatment, accumulated clofazimine may contribute sustained antimicrobial activity after treatment cessation, and we used the BALB/c mouse model of chronic tuberculosis chemotherapy to address this hypothesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were treated for 4 weeks or 8 weeks with either isoniazid alone, clofazimine alone, the first-line regimen rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide-ethambutol, or a first-line regimen where clofazimine was administered in place of ethambutol. To evaluate posttreatment antimicrobial activity, bacterial regrowth in the lungs and spleens was assessed at the day of treatment cessation and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment was stopped. Bacterial regrowth was delayed in all mice receiving clofazimine, either alone or in combination, compared to the mice that did not receive clofazimine. This effect was especially evident in mice receiving multidrug therapy. In mice not receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth began almost immediately after treatment was stopped, while in mice receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth was delayed for up to 6 weeks, with the duration of sustained antimicrobial activity being positively associated with the time that serum clofazimine levels remained at or above the 0.25-μg/ml MIC for M. tuberculosis. Thus, sustained activity of clofazimine may be important in the treatment-shortening effect associated with this drug. PMID:26926638

  7. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host’s immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host’s immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23522098

  8. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-03-22

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host's immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host's immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  9. Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis impairs HIV-Specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Pillay, Mona; Ghebremichael, Musie; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Porichis, Filippos; Kasprowicz, Victoria O

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antigen-specific T cells to simultaneously produce multiple cytokines is thought to correlate with the functional capacity and efficacy of T cells. These 'polyfunctional' T cells have been associated with control of HIV. We aimed to assess the impact of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) on HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. We assessed T cell functionality in 34 South African adults by investigating the IFN-y, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-21 and IL-17 cytokine secretion capacity, using polychromatic flow cytometry, following HIV Gag-specific stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that MTB is associated with lower HIV-specific T cell function in co-infected as compared to HIV mono-infected individuals. This decline in function was greatest in co-infection with active Tuberculosis (TB) compared to co-infection with latent MTB (LTBI), suggesting that mycobacterial load may contribute to this loss of function. The described impact of MTB on HIV-specific T cell function may be a mechanism for increased HIV disease progression in co-infected subjects as functionally impaired T cells may be less able to control HIV.

  10. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, differential transcriptional responses of RAW264.7 cells infected with two forms of Mtb, CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb, were studied by microarray analysis. Some of the differentially regulated genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR in both RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway was used to analyze functions of differentially expressed genes. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb group. Mapt was up-regulated, while NOS2 and IL-11 were down-regulated in CWD-Mtb infected RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages compared with normal Mtb infected ones. Many deregulated genes were found to be related to macrophages activation, immune response, phagosome maturation, autophagy and lipid metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in MAPK signaling pathway, nitrogen metabolism, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and focal adhesion. Taken together, the present study showed that differential macrophage responses were induced by intracellular CWD-Mtb an normal Mtb infection, which suggested that interactions between macrophages and different phenotypic Mtb are very complex. The results provide evidence for further understanding of pathogenesis of CWD-Mtb and may help in improving strategies to eliminate intracellular CWD-Mtb. PMID:25552926

  11. [Tuberculosis in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Desgrandchamps, D

    1995-10-03

    In Switzerland, in 1992, 957 persons suffered from tuberculosis; 52.3% were Swiss, 47.7% foreigners. Most of the swiss TB patients were more than 65 years old, whereas the foreigners generally were young patients originating from countries with high TB-infection rates. Asylum seekers had much higher TB-case rates (131 cases per 100,000) than other foreigners (27 cases per 100,000) or Swiss (9 cases per 100,000). Special refuge reception centers have been set up in Switzerland, in charge of tuberculosis screening procedures in this high-risk group on arrival to this country. Although HIV and AIDS patients bear a much higher risk of developing tuberculosis once infected, the HIV epidemic did not lead to an increase of tuberculosis in Switzerland so far, since young Swiss are rarely infected with tuberculosis. HIV-infected, drug addicts, homeless persons and alcoholics run a higher risk of contracting tuberculosis only when congregating with a person suffering from active tuberculosis not yet diagnosed or improperly treated. In order to maintain low levels of tuberculosis in Switzerland DOT (directly observed therapy) must be implemented in all patients with uncertain compliance, especially as cultural and social backgrounds become increasingly complex.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Manipulates the Glycosylation Machinery and the N-Glycoproteome of Human Macrophages and Their Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hare, Nathan J; Lee, Ling Y; Loke, Ian; Britton, Warwick J; Saunders, Bernadette M; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2017-01-06

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a prevalent and lethal infectious disease. The glycobiology associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of frontline alveolar macrophages is still unresolved. Herein, we investigated the regulation of protein N-glycosylation in human macrophages and their secreted microparticles (MPs) used for intercellular communication upon M. tb infection. LC-MS/MS-based proteomics and glycomics were performed to monitor the regulation of glycosylation enzymes and receptors and the N-glycome in in vitro-differentiated macrophages and in isolated MPs upon M. tb infection. Infection promoted a dramatic regulation of the macrophage proteome. Most notably, significant infection-dependent down-regulation (4-26 fold) of 11 lysosomal exoglycosidases, e.g., β-galactosidase, β-hexosaminidases and α-/β-mannosidases, was observed. Relative weak infection-driven transcriptional regulation of these exoglycosidases and a stronger augmentation of the extracellular hexosaminidase activity demonstrated that the lysosome-centric changes may originate predominantly from infection-induced secretion of the lysosomal content. The macrophages showed heterogeneous N-glycan profiles and displayed significant up-regulation of complex-type glycosylation and concomitant down-regulation of paucimannosylation upon infection. Complementary intact N-glycopeptide analysis supported a subcellular-specific manipulation of the glycosylation machinery and altered glycosylation patterns of lysosomal N-glycoproteins within infected macrophages. Interestingly, the corresponding macrophage-derived MPs displayed unique N-glycome and proteome signatures supporting a preferential packaging from plasma membranes. The MPs were devoid of infection-dependent N-glycosylation signatures, but interestingly displayed increased levels of the glyco-initiating oligosaccharyltransferase complex and associated α-glucosidases that correlated with increased formation, N-glycan precursor levels

  13. Effects of B Cell Depletion on Early Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Jiayao; Wong, Eileen A.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M. Teresa; Hendricks, Matthew R.; Ruden, Rachel; Cirrincione, Lauren R.; Chan, John; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies in mice have shown that components of B cell and humoral immunity can modulate the immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the roles of these components in human and nonhuman primate infections are unknown. The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of M. tuberculosis infection closely mirrors the infection outcomes and pathology in human tuberculosis (TB). The present study used rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to deplete B cells in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques to examine the contribution of B cells and humoral immunity to the control of TB in nonhuman primates during the acute phase of infection. While there was no difference in the overall pathology, disease profession, and clinical outcome between the rituximab-treated and untreated macaques in acute infection, analyzing individual granulomas revealed that B cell depletion resulted in altered local T cell and cytokine responses, increased bacterial burden, and lower levels of inflammation. There were elevated frequencies of T cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, and IL-17 and decreased IL-6 and IL-10 levels within granulomas from B cell-depleted animals. The effects of B cell depletion varied among granulomas in an individual animal, as well as among animals, underscoring the previously reported heterogeneity of local immunologic characteristics of tuberculous granulomas in nonhuman primates. Taken together, our data clearly showed that B cells can modulate the local granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques during acute infection. The impact of these alterations on disease progression and outcome in the chronic phase remains to be determined. PMID:26883591

  14. Rifapentine for latent tuberculosis infection treatment in the general population and human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: summary of evidence.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Júlia Souza; Silva, Marcus Tolentino; Sanchez, Mauro Niskier

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-coinfection are challenges in the control of tuberculosis transmission. We aimed to assess and summarize evidence available in the literature regarding the treatment of LTBI in both the general and HIV-positive population, in order to support decision making by the Brazilian Tuberculosis Control Program for LTBI chemoprophylaxis. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Trip database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and the Brazilian Theses Repository to identify systematic reviews, randomized clinical trials, clinical guidelines, evidence-based synopses, reports of health technology assessment agencies, and theses that investigated rifapentine and isoniazid combination compared to isoniazid monotherapy. We assessed the quality of evidence from randomized clinical trials using the Jadad Scale and recommendations from other evidence sources using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations approach. The available evidence suggests that there are no differences between rifapentine + isoniazid short-course treatment and the standard 6-month isoniazid therapy in reducing active tuberculosis incidence or death. Adherence was better with directly observed rifapentine therapy compared to self-administered isoniazid. The quality of evidence obtained was moderate, and on the basis of this evidence, rifapentine is recommended by one guideline. Available evidence assessment considering the perspective of higher adherence rates, lower costs, and local peculiarity context might support rifapentine use for LTBI in the general or HIV-positive populations. Since novel trials are ongoing, further studies should include patients on antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xu-Guang; Ji, Tian-Xing; Xia, Yong; Ma, Yue-Yun

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  16. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 Protein as a Diagnostic Marker of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Kanunfre, Kelly; Dhiman, Rakesh; Restrepo, Blanca I.; Zarate, Izelda; Pino, Paula A.; Mora-Guzman, Francisco; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Michel, Gerd; Kashino, Suely S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of an accurate antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) would represent a major clinical advance. Here, we demonstrate that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 protein is a biomarker for active TB with potential diagnostic utility. We initially identified, by mass spectroscopy, peptides from the Rv1681 protein in urine specimens from 4 patients with untreated active TB. Rabbit IgG anti-recombinant Rv1681 detected Rv1681 protein in lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis and immunoprecipitated it from pooled urine specimens from two TB patients. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formatted with these antibodies detected Rv1681 protein in unconcentrated urine specimens from 11/25 (44%) TB patients and 1/21 (4.8%) subjects in whom TB was initially clinically suspected but then ruled out by conventional methods. Rv1681 protein was not detected in urine specimens from 10 subjects with Escherichia coli-positive urine cultures, 26 subjects with confirmed non-TB tropical diseases (11 with schistosomiasis, 5 with Chagas' disease, and 10 with cutaneous leishmaniasis), and 14 healthy subjects. These results provide strong validation of Rv1681 protein as a promising biomarker for TB diagnosis. PMID:23390284

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 4-Defective C3H/HeJ Mice Are Not More Susceptible than Other C3H Substrains to Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Arati B.; Alt, Jennifer; Debbabi, Hajer; Behar, Samuel M.

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a variety of molecules capable of activating Toll-like receptors, a family of pattern recognition receptors expressed by macrophages and a variety of other cells. To determine whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was critical in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection, we compared the morbidity and mortality of TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice to those of TLR4-sufficient C3H mouse substrains. TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice and TLR4-sufficient C3H/HeSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected by the aerosol route with M. tuberculosis. TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice had levels of cytokines in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and in vitro mycobacterial antigen-specific recall responses similar to those of other C3H mouse substrains. In addition, bacterial replication and long-term survival of mice following infection appeared to be independent of TLR4. Interestingly, C3HeB/FeJ mice were significantly more susceptible to M. tuberculosis infection, indicating that genetic heterogeneity among inbred C3H mouse substrains modifies resistance to infection. Therefore, cautious interpretation is required when the C3H/HeJ strain is used as a model of a TLR4-defective mouse strain, as there are significant allelic differences between C3H/HeJ and other C3H mouse substrains in response to M. tuberculosis infection. With this caveat, our data indicate that TLR4 may not be required for optimal immunity of mice to M. tuberculosis. PMID:12819102

  18. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  19. Encapsulation of Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs within Mesoporous Silica and Intracellular Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin; Pethe, Kevin; Kim, Ryangyeo; Ballell, Lluis; Barros, David; Cechetto, Jonathan; Jeon, HeeKyoung; Kim, Kideok; Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major problem in public health. While new effective treatments to combat the disease are currently under development, they tend suffer from poor solubility often resulting in low and/or inconsistent oral bioavailability. Mesoporous materials are here investigated in an in vitro intracellular assay, for the effective delivery of compound PA-824; a poorly soluble bactericidal agent being developed against Tuberculosis (TB). Mesoporous materials enhance the solubility of PA-824; however, this is not translated into a higher antibacterial activity in TB-infected macrophages after 5 days of incubation, where similar values are obtained. The lack of improved activity may be due to insufficient release of the drug from the mesopores in the context of the cellular environment. However, these results show promising data for the use of mesoporous particles in the context of oral delivery with expected improvements in bioavailability.

  20. Sensitivity of C-Tb: a novel RD-1-specific skin test for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Soren T; Peter, Jonathan G; Theron, Grant; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tingskov, Pernille N; Aggerbeck, Henrik; Kolbus, Daniel; Ruhwald, Morten; Andersen, Peter; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-03-01

    C-Tb, a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target/10-kDa culture filtrate protein (ESAT-6/CFP-10)-specific skin test, has high specificity in bacille Calmette-Guerin-vaccinated healthy controls. However, the sensitivity of C-Tb has hitherto not been determined. The objective was to determine the sensitivity of C-Tb in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) in comparison with the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT).C-Tb and TST were randomly administered in a double-blinded fashion to one or the other forearm in 253 patients with active TB with or without HIV co-infection. QFT-GIT testing was performed prior to skin testing.Using a receiver operating characteristic curve-derived cut-point of 5 mm, C-Tb sensitivity was similar to QFT-GIT (73.9 (95% CI 67.8-79.3) versus 75.1 (95% CI 69.3-80.2)), and similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients (76.7 (95% CI 69.0-83.3) versus 69.5 (95% CI 59.2-78.5)). However, sensitivity was significantly diminished in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts <100 cells·mm(-3). C-Tb and QFT-GIT combined had significantly higher sensitivity than C-Tb alone (p<0.0001). C-Tb was safe with no significant adverse events. The 5 mm cut-point corresponded to that found in the previously published specificity study (TESEC-04).C-Tb has similar sensitivity compared with QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Sensitivity was reduced only in HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. Further studies in different settings are required to validate the proposed 5 mm cut-point.

  1. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  2. [Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare personnel at a primary level general hospital in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Sol Vidiella, Josep; Catalán Gómez, Teresa; Callau Casanova, Cristina; Lejeune, Marylène

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors in healthcare personnel at the Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta (Tarragona, Spain). This was a cross-sectional study of 398 workers at this hospital who underwent tuberculin skin testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) between 2001 and 2012.We also analyzed the relationship between LTBI and age, sex, job and work area according to their risk of exposure to tuberculosis(high, low, uncertain). The total prevalence of LTBI in our sample was 11.1% (95%CI 8.3%-14.5%). LBTI was associated with age and work area. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LTBI increased by 6.4% per 1 year increase in age. The prevalence of LTBI in this population approximates that of the general population in Spain.

  3. Diverging biological roles among human monocyte subsets in the context of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Balboa, Luciana; Barrios-Payan, Jorge; González-Domínguez, Erika; Lastrucci, Claire; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Schierloh, Pablo; Kviatcovsky, Denise; Neyrolles, Olivier; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; Sasiain, María del Carmen; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2015-08-01

    Circulating monocytes (Mo) play an essential role in the host immune response to chronic infections. We previously demonstrated that CD16(pos) Mo were expanded in TB (tuberculosis) patients, correlated with disease severity and were refractory to dendritic cell differentiation. In the present study, we investigated whether human Mo subsets (CD16(neg) and CD16(pos)) differed in their ability to influence the early inflammatory response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We first evaluated the capacity of the Mo subsets to migrate and engage a microbicidal response in vitro. Accordingly, CD16(neg) Mo were more prone to migrate in response to different mycobacteria-derived gradients, were more resistant to M. tuberculosis intracellular growth and produced higher reactive oxygen species than their CD16(pos) counterpart. To assess further the functional dichotomy among the human Mo subsets, we carried out an in vivo analysis by adapting a hybrid mouse model (SCID/Beige, where SCID is severe combined immunodeficient) to transfer each Mo subset, track their migratory fate during M. tuberculosis infection, and determine their impact on the host immune response. In M. tuberculosis-infected mice, the adoptively transferred CD16(neg) Mo displayed a higher lung migration index, induced a stronger pulmonary infiltration of murine leucocytes expressing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and significantly decreased the bacterial burden, in comparison with CD16(pos) Mo. Collectively, our results indicate that human Mo subsets display divergent biological roles in the context of M. tuberculosis infection, a scenario in which CD16(neg) Mo may contribute to the anti-mycobacterial immune response, whereas CD16(pos) Mo might promote microbial resilience, shedding light on a key aspect of the physiopathology of TB disease.

  4. Increased frequency and cell death of CD16+ monocytes with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-09-01

    Monocytes from tuberculosis patients exhibit functional and phenotypical alterations compared with healthy controls. To determine whether these discrepancies can be explained by changes in monocyte subsets, the expression of CD14 and CD16 was evaluated in tuberculosis patients and healthy controls; additionally, some markers related to the mononuclear phagocytes maturation, differentiation and function, such as CD1a, CD1c, CD11b, CD11c, CD13, CD33, CD36, CD40, CD64, CD68, CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, CCR2, CCR5, and non-specific esterases (NSE) were determined in monocyte subsets. Patients had increased percentage of circulating CD14(Hi)CD16(+) and CD14(Lo)CD16(+) monocytes. The percentage of monocytes expressing CD11b, CD36, CD64, CD68, CD80, CD86, CCR2 and NSE was lower in CD14(Hi)CD16(+) and CD14(Lo)CD16(+) cells than in CD14(Hi)CD16(-) monocytes. M. tuberculosis infected CD16(+) monocytes produced more TNF-α and less IL-10 than CD16(-) cells at 6 h post-infection. Isolated CD16(+) monocytes spontaneously underwent apoptosis during differentiation into macrophages; in contrast to CD16(-) monocytes that became differentiated into monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) with a minimal induction of cell death. In addition, there were more Annexin V and propidium iodide positive monocytes in the CD16(+) subset infected with live M. tuberculosis at 24 h than CD16(-) monocytes. Under the culture conditions established for this study, the monocyte subsets did not differentiate into dendritic cells. These results show that tuberculosis patients have an augmented frequency of CD16(+) circulating monocytes which are more prone to produce TNF-α and to undergo cell death in response to M. tuberculosis infection.

  5. Anti-tubercular and antioxidant activities of C-glycosyl carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: towards the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zaro, María J; Bortolotti, Ana; Riafrecha, Leonardo E; Concellón, Analía; Morbidoni, Héctor R; Colinas, Pedro A

    2016-12-01

    During the treatment of tuberculosis infection, oxidative stress due to anti-tubercular drugs may result in tissue inflammation. It was suggested that treatment with antioxidant drugs could be beneficial as an adjunct to anti-tuberculosis drug therapy. Recently our group has shown that several C-glycosides are inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1). In an effort to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents against tuberculosis, the anti-tubercular and antioxidant activities of a series of C-glycosides containing the phenol or the methoxyaryl moiety were studied. Many compounds showed inhibition of growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and good antioxidant ability. A glycomimetic incorporating the 3-hydroxyphenyl moiety showed the best activity profile and therefore this functionality represents lead for the development of novel anti-tubercular agents with dual mechanisms of action.

  6. Detection of lipomannan in cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early and rapid detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is critical to controlling the spread of this disease in cattle and other animals. In this study, we demonstrate the development of an immunoassay for the direct detection of the bovine bTB biomarker, lipomannan (LM) in serum using a waveguide-...

  7. Miliary tuberculosis infection during hepatitis C treatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir plus ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Ballester-Ferré, Maria Pilar; Martínez, Fernando; Garcia-Gimeno, Natalia; Mora, Francisco; Serra, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last 5 years, treatment for HCV infection has experienced a marked development. In 2014, the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir with or without concomitant weight-based ribavirin was approved with a very significant increase in the sustained virological response. However, new side effects have been associated. We report the first case of an HCV infected patient treated for 12 wk with the combination of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir plus ribavirin who developed a miliary tuberculosis (TB) infection while on therapy. The patient was a 65-year-old woman, who referred malaise, asthenia, hyporexia, 7 kg weight loss, productive cough, evening fever and night sweats, right after finishing the treatment. The chest computed tomography-scan revealed a superior mediastinal widening secondary to numerous lymphadenopathies with extensive necrosis and bilateral diffuse lung miliary pattern with little subsequent bilateral pleural effusion, highly suggestive of lymph node tuberculosis with lung miliary spread. A bronchoscopy was performed and bronchial suction showed more than 50 acid-alcohol resistant bacillus per line. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA was detected in blood by polymerase chain reaction, which confirmed the diagnosis of miliary tuberculosis. Some cases of TB infection have been identified with α-interferon-based therapy and with the triple therapy of pegylated interferon, ribavirin and boceprevir or telaprevir. However, significant infection has not been reported with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir plus ribavirin. We believe that the case is relevant to increase awareness of opportunistic infections and particularly TB infection. Although the international guidelines offer no recommendation regarding TB screening, we wonder whether it would be advisable to screen for opportunistic infections prior to the introduction of HCV therapy. PMID:28217253

  8. Miliary tuberculosis infection during hepatitis C treatment with sofosbuvir and ledipasvir plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Ferré, Maria Pilar; Martínez, Fernando; Garcia-Gimeno, Natalia; Mora, Francisco; Serra, Miguel A

    2017-01-28

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last 5 years, treatment for HCV infection has experienced a marked development. In 2014, the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir with or without concomitant weight-based ribavirin was approved with a very significant increase in the sustained virological response. However, new side effects have been associated. We report the first case of an HCV infected patient treated for 12 wk with the combination of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir plus ribavirin who developed a miliary tuberculosis (TB) infection while on therapy. The patient was a 65-year-old woman, who referred malaise, asthenia, hyporexia, 7 kg weight loss, productive cough, evening fever and night sweats, right after finishing the treatment. The chest computed tomography-scan revealed a superior mediastinal widening secondary to numerous lymphadenopathies with extensive necrosis and bilateral diffuse lung miliary pattern with little subsequent bilateral pleural effusion, highly suggestive of lymph node tuberculosis with lung miliary spread. A bronchoscopy was performed and bronchial suction showed more than 50 acid-alcohol resistant bacillus per line. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA was detected in blood by polymerase chain reaction, which confirmed the diagnosis of miliary tuberculosis. Some cases of TB infection have been identified with α-interferon-based therapy and with the triple therapy of pegylated interferon, ribavirin and boceprevir or telaprevir. However, significant infection has not been reported with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir plus ribavirin. We believe that the case is relevant to increase awareness of opportunistic infections and particularly TB infection. Although the international guidelines offer no recommendation regarding TB screening, we wonder whether it would be advisable to screen for opportunistic infections prior to the introduction of HCV therapy.

  9. Evaluation of the impact of polyclonal infection and heteroresistance on treatment of tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kargarpour Kamakoli, Mansour; Sadegh, Hamid Reza; Farmanfarmaei, Ghazaleh; Masoumi, Morteza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Javadi, Gholamreza; Rahimi Jamnani, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Farzam; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed strain infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis make diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis (TB) more difficult. This study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between mixed infections, antibiotic resistance patterns and treatment of TB patients. In this study, among 2850 suspected TB clinical samples, a total of ninety-six clinical samples from 66 TB confirmed patients were subjected to the 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat method to evaluate the prevalence of mixed infections. For all studied strains, 288 colonies (three individual clones for each sample) were isolated from different colonies and separately analyzed by the Drug Susceptibility Test (DST). For all patients, follow up was done after 6 months of treatment. Based on direct 24 loci MIRU-VNTR, in the 66 TB patients, 53% (35/66) showed mixed infection. In the mixed samples, 45.71% (16/35) showed different antibiotic resistant patterns. Among the mixed infection patients, eight (22.9%; 8/35) showed treatment failure after six- month therapy. Six of these non-treated patients (75%; 6/8) had different antibiotic resistant patterns. We conclude that mixed infections, have a negative impact on treatment of TB patients especially when co-infecting M. tuberculosis strains display heteroresistance. PMID:28120910

  10. ESX1-dependent fractalkine mediates chemotaxis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans☆

    PubMed Central

    Hingley-Wilson, Suzanne M.; Connell, David; Pollock, Katrina; Hsu, Tsungda; Tchilian, Elma; Sykes, Anny; Grass, Lisa; Potiphar, Lee; Bremang, Samuel; Kon, Onn Min; Jacobs, William R.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced cellular aggregation is essential for granuloma formation and may assist establishment and early spread of M. tuberculosis infection. The M. tuberculosis ESX1 mutant, which has a non-functional type VII secretion system, induced significantly less production of the host macrophage-derived chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1). Upon infection of human macrophages ESX1-dependent fractalkine production mediated selective recruitment of CD11b+ monocytic cells and increased infection of neighbouring cells consistent with early local spread of infection. Fractalkine levels were raised in vivo at tuberculous disease sites in humans and were significantly associated with increased CD11b+ monocytic cellular recruitment and extent of granulomatous disease. These findings suggest a novel fractalkine-dependent ESX1-mediated mechanism in early tuberculous disease pathogenesis in humans. Modulation of M. tuberculosis-mediated fractalkine induction may represent a potential treatment option in the future, perhaps allowing us to switch off a key mechanism required by the pathogen to spread between cells. PMID:24631198

  11. ESX1-dependent fractalkine mediates chemotaxis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Hingley-Wilson, Suzanne M; Connell, David; Pollock, Katrina; Hsu, Tsungda; Tchilian, Elma; Sykes, Anny; Grass, Lisa; Potiphar, Lee; Bremang, Samuel; Kon, Onn Min; Jacobs, William R; Lalvani, Ajit

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced cellular aggregation is essential for granuloma formation and may assist establishment and early spread of M. tuberculosis infection. The M. tuberculosis ESX1 mutant, which has a non-functional type VII secretion system, induced significantly less production of the host macrophage-derived chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1). Upon infection of human macrophages ESX1-dependent fractalkine production mediated selective recruitment of CD11b+ monocytic cells and increased infection of neighbouring cells consistent with early local spread of infection. Fractalkine levels were raised in vivo at tuberculous disease sites in humans and were significantly associated with increased CD11b+ monocytic cellular recruitment and extent of granulomatous disease. These findings suggest a novel fractalkine-dependent ESX1-mediated mechanism in early tuberculous disease pathogenesis in humans. Modulation of M. tuberculosis-mediated fractalkine induction may represent a potential treatment option in the future, perhaps allowing us to switch off a key mechanism required by the pathogen to spread between cells.

  12. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  13. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  14. Highly Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis of Quantiferon Supernatants To Identify Biomarkers of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Higgins, Michael; Hraha, Thomas; Wall, Kirsten; Wilson, Michael L.; Sterling, David G.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Reves, Randall

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are limited by a poor predictive value for identifying people at the highest risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) and have various sensitivities and specificities in different populations. Identifying a more robust signature for LTBI is important for TB prevention and elimination. A pilot study was conducted with samples from immigrants to the United States that were screened for LTBI by the three commercially approved tests, namely, the tuberculin skin test (TST), the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), and the T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT). QFT-GIT supernatants from 13 people with concordant positive results and 26 people with concordant negative results were analyzed via the highly multiplexed SOMAscan proteomic assay. The proteins in the stimulated supernatants that distinguished LTBI from controls included interleukin-2 (IL-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14, also known as LIGHT), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and granzyme B (P <0.00001). In addition, antigen stimulation increased the expression of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and activin AB in LTBI samples. In nil tubes, LIGHT was the most significant marker (P <0.0001) and was elevated in LTBI subjects. Other prominent markers in nonstimulated QFT-GIT supernatants were the complement-3 components C3b, iC3b, and C3d, which were upregulated in LTBI and markedly decreased upon stimulation. We found known and novel proteins that warrant further studies for developing improved tests for LTBI, for predicting progression to active disease, and for discriminating LTBI from active TB. PMID:27852671

  15. NK-CD11c+ Cell Crosstalk in Diabetes Enhances IL-6-Mediated Inflammation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheekatla, Satyanarayana Swamy; Tripathi, Deepak; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Nathella, Pavan Kumar; Paidipally, Padmaja; Ishibashi, Munenori; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Babu, Subash; Kornfeld, Hardy; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we developed a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using streptozotocin and nicotinamide and identified factors that increase susceptibility of T2DM mice to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). All Mtb-infected T2DM mice and 40% of uninfected T2DM mice died within 10 months, whereas all control mice survived. In Mtb-infected mice, T2DM increased the bacterial burden and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs relative to those in uninfected T2DM mice and infected control mice. Levels of IL-6 also increased. Anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody treatment of Mtb-infected acute- and chronic-T2DM mice increased survival (to 100%) and reduced pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. CD11c+ cells were the major source of IL-6 in Mtb-infected T2DM mice. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) cells in Mtb-infected T2DM mice further increased IL-6 production by autologous CD11c+ cells through their activating receptors. Anti-NK1.1 antibody treatment of Mtb-infected acute-T2DM mice increased survival and reduced pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Furthermore, IL-6 increased inflammatory cytokine production by T lymphocytes in pulmonary tuberculosis patients with T2DM. Overall, the results suggest that NK-CD11c+ cell interactions increase IL-6 production, which in turn drives the pathological immune response and mortality associated with Mtb infection in diabetic mice.

  16. NK-CD11c+ Cell Crosstalk in Diabetes Enhances IL-6-Mediated Inflammation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheekatla, Satyanarayana Swamy; Tripathi, Deepak; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Nathella, Pavan Kumar; Paidipally, Padmaja; Ishibashi, Munenori; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Babu, Subash; Kornfeld, Hardy; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using streptozotocin and nicotinamide and identified factors that increase susceptibility of T2DM mice to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). All Mtb-infected T2DM mice and 40% of uninfected T2DM mice died within 10 months, whereas all control mice survived. In Mtb-infected mice, T2DM increased the bacterial burden and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs relative to those in uninfected T2DM mice and infected control mice. Levels of IL-6 also increased. Anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody treatment of Mtb-infected acute- and chronic-T2DM mice increased survival (to 100%) and reduced pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. CD11c+ cells were the major source of IL-6 in Mtb-infected T2DM mice. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) cells in Mtb-infected T2DM mice further increased IL-6 production by autologous CD11c+ cells through their activating receptors. Anti-NK1.1 antibody treatment of Mtb-infected acute-T2DM mice increased survival and reduced pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Furthermore, IL-6 increased inflammatory cytokine production by T lymphocytes in pulmonary tuberculosis patients with T2DM. Overall, the results suggest that NK-CD11c+ cell interactions increase IL-6 production, which in turn drives the pathological immune response and mortality associated with Mtb infection in diabetic mice. PMID:27783671

  17. B cells and antibodies in the defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Chan, John; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Better understanding of the immunological components and their interactions necessary to prevent or control Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection in humans is critical for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development strategies. Although the contributory role of humoral immunity in the protection against Mtb infection and disease is less defined than the role of T cells, it has been well-established for many other intracellular pathogens. Here we update and discuss the increasing evidence and the mechanisms of B cells and antibodies in the defense against Mtb infection. We posit that B cells and antibodies have a variety of potential protective roles at each stage of Mtb infection and postulate that such roles should be considered in the development strategies for TB vaccines and other immune-based interventions.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  19. Paradoxical Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child.

    PubMed

    Kalk, Emma; Technau, Karl; Hendson, Willy; Coovadia, Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurs in a subset of HIV-infected individuals as the immune system recovers secondary to antiretroviral therapy. An exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response to antigens of viable or nonviable organisms is characteristic, with clinical deterioration despite improvement in laboratory indicators. We describe a fatal case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child and review the literature.

  20. Rv3168 phosphotransferase activity mediates kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2013-11-28

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide epidemic disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with an estimated one-third of the human population currently affected. Treatment of this disease with aminoglycoside antibiotics has become less effective owing to antibiotic resistance. Recent determination of the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis Rv3168 protein suggests a structure similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis APH(3')-IIIa, and that this protein may be an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. To determine whether Rv3168 confers antibiotic resistance against kanamycin, we performed dose-response antibiotic resistance experiments using kanamycin. Expression of the Rv3168 protein in Escherichia coli conferred antibiotic resistance against 100 μM kanamycin, a concentration that effected cell growth arrest in the parental E. coli strain and an E. coli strain expressing the Rv3168(D249A) mutant, in which the catalytic Asp249 residue was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, we detected phosphotransferase activity of Rv3168 against kanamycin as a substrate. Moreover, docking simulation of kanamycin into the Rv3168 structure suggests that kanamycin fits well into the substrate binding pocket of the protein, and that the phosphorylation-hydroxyl-group of kanamycin was located at a position similar to that in E. faecalis APH(3')-IIIa. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the Rv3168 mediates kanamycin resistance in M. tuberculosis, likely through phosphotransferase targeting of kanamycin.

  1. Evaluation of a domestic interferon-gamma release assay for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongliang; Ou, Mingzhan; He, Shuizhen; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Yanyan; Xiong, Junhui; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Shengxiang

    2015-07-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been demonstrated to be useful in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. However, IGRAs have not been recommended for clinical usage in most low-income countries due to the shortage of clinical data available resulting from their high test cost. Recently, a cheaper domestic TB-IGRA was approved in China. In this study, we compared TB-IGRA with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) for MTB infection diagnosis in 253 active TB patients, 48 non-TB lung disease patients, 115 healthcare workers and 216 healthy individuals. The proportion of positive TB-IGRA results in active TB patients, patients with non-TB lung disease, healthcare workers and healthy individuals was 88.3%, 27.1%, 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, which was similar to the results of QFT-GIT, with an overall agreement of 95% (κ = 0.89) and a high correlation between their responses (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) being observed. In conclusion, the TB-IGRA has comparable clinical performance with QFT-GIT.

  2. Passive serum therapy with polyclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis protects against post-chemotherapy relapse of tuberculosis infection in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Guirado, Evelyn; Amat, Isabel; Gil, Olga; Díaz, Jorge; Arcos, Virginia; Caceres, Neus; Ausina, Vicenç; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the protective role of immune-sera against reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in SCID mice and found that passive immunization with sera obtained from mice treated with detoxified M. tuberculosis extracts (delivered in liposomes in a composition known as RUTI) exerted significant protection. Our SCID mouse model consisted of aerosol infection by M. tuberculosis, followed by 3 to 8weeks of chemotherapy with isoniazid+rifampicin (INH+RIF) (25 and 10mg/kg, respectively). After infection and antibiotic administration, two groups of mice were treated for up to 10weeks with intraperitoneal passive immunization using hyperimmune serum (HS) obtained from mice infected with M. tuberculosis, treated with chemotherapy (INH+RIF) for 8weeks and inoculated with RUTI (HS group) or with normal serum (CT group). Significant differences were found between HS and CT groups in the number of bacilli in the lungs (3.68+/-2.02 vs. 5.72+/-1.41log(10) c.f.u.), extent of pulmonary granulomatomous infiltration (10.33+/-0.67 vs. 31.2+/-1.77%), and percentage of animals without pulmonary abscesses (16.7% vs. 45.5%). These data strongly suggest a protective role of specific antibodies against lung dissemination of M. tuberculosis infection.

  3. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefanie; Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-10-19

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.).

  4. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.) PMID:26482301

  5. Reduced frequency of memory T cells and increased Th17 responses in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marín, Nancy D; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4(+) CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and an increased frequency of CD4(+) CD45RO(-) CD27(+) T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO(+) CD27(+) T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response.

  6. Reduced Frequency of Memory T Cells and Increased Th17 Responses in Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nancy D.; París, Sara C.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic and functional alterations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis T cell subsets have been reported in patients with active tuberculosis. A better understanding of these alterations will increase the knowledge about immunopathogenesis and also may contribute to the development of new diagnostics and prophylactic strategies. Here, the ex vivo phenotype of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequency and phenotype of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing cells elicited in short-term and long-term cultures following CFP-10 and purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation were determined in noninfected persons (non-TBi), latently infected persons (LTBi), and patients with active tuberculosis (ATB). Phenotypic characterization of T cells was done based on the expression of CD45RO and CD27. Results show that ATB had a reduced frequency of circulating CD4+ CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and an increased frequency of CD4+ CD45RO− CD27+ T cells. ATB also had a higher frequency of circulating IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells than did LTBi after PPD stimulation, whereas LTBi had more IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells than did non-TBi. The phenotype of IFN-γ-producing cells at 24 h differs from the phenotype of IL-17-producing cells with no differences between LTBi and ATB. At 144 h, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were mainly CD45RO+ CD27+ T cells and they were more frequent in ATB. These results suggest that M. tuberculosis infection induces alterations in T cells which interfere with an adequate specific immune response. PMID:22914361

  7. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  8. Difference in Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in Japanese Tuberculosis Patients Infected with the Beijing/Non-Beijing Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingge; Okumura, Masao; Yanai, Hideki; Matsumoto, Makoto; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Kenji; Oda, Tetsuya; Ashino, Yugo; Matsuba, Takashi; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), notorious for its virulence and predisposition to relapse, could be identified by spoligotyping based on genetic heterogeneity. The plasma samples from 20 cases of Beijing and 16 cases of non-Beijing MTB infected individuals and 24 healthy controls (HCs) were collected, and antibodies against 11 antigens (Rv0679c142Asn, Rv0679c142Lys, Ag85B, Ag85A, ARC, TDM-M, TDM-K, HBHA, MDP-1, LAM, and TBGL) were measured by ELISA. Compared to the HCs, the MTB infected subjects showed higher titers of anti-Ag85B IgG (positivity 58.2%) and anti-ACR IgG (positivity 48.2%). Of note, anti-ACR IgG showed higher titer in Beijing MTB infected tuberculosis (TB) patients than in HC (Kruskal–Wallis test, p < 0.05), while the levels of anti-Ag85B, anti-TBGL, anti-TDM-K, and anti-TDM-M IgG were higher in non-Beijing TB patients than in HC. Moreover, anti-Ag85B IgG showed higher response in non-Beijing TB patients than in Beijing TB patients (p < 0.05; sensitivity, 76.9% versus 44.4%). The sensitivity and specificity analysis showed that 78.8% Beijing infected individuals were negative in anti-TBGL-IgG or/and anti-Ag85B-IgG, while 75.0% of those were positive in anti-TBGL-IgA or/and anti-ACR-IgG tests. These results indicate the possibility of developing antibody-based test to identify Beijing MTB. PMID:28182078

  9. In vitro and in vivo activities of the nitroimidazole CGI 17341 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, D R; Costa-Perira, R; Nagrajan, K; Vishvanathan, N; Bhatt, A D; Rittel, W

    1993-01-01

    CGI 17341 (2-ethyl-5-nitro-2,3-dihydro[2-1b]imidazo-oxazole) is a novel orally active representative of the 5-nitroimidazole series of antimicrobial agents. At concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 micrograms/ml, CGI 17341 inhibited the drug-susceptible and multi-drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. CGI 17341 had no cross-resistance with isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, or ethambutol. While the in vitro activity of CGI 17341 against M. tuberculosis was comparable to those of isoniazid and rifampin, it was superior to those of streptomycin, ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin, and oxazolidinone DuP 721. The MIC of CGI 17341 was not affected when the pH of the medium was decreased from 6.8 to 5.6, while four- to sixfold increases in the MICs of ciprofloxacin and isoniazid were observed. In mice infected with M. tuberculosis, the 50% effective dose for CGI 17341 was 7.7 mg/kg of body weight (95% confidence limits, 3.5 and 10.27) when administered on days 11 and 12 postinfection. CGI 17341 gave a dose-dependent (r = 0.995) and significant increase in the survival time. Our data indicate that the 5-nitroimidazole CGI 17341 is a promising and novel antituberculosis compound with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Further investigations on this compound are warranted. PMID:8452346

  10. The biodistribution of 5-[18F]fluoropyrazinamide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice determined by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Jones, Peter; Wang, Hui; Gogarty, Kayla R.; Daryaee, Fereidoon; Bambarger, Lauren E.; Chang, Yong S.; Jain, Sanjay K.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    5-[18F]F-pyrazinamide (5-[18F]F-PZA), a radiotracer analog of the first-line tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA), was employed to determine the biodistribution of PZA using PET imaging and ex vivo analysis. 5-[18F]F-PZA was synthesized in 60 min using a halide exchange reaction. The overall decay-corrected yield of the reaction was 25% and average specific activity was 2.6 × 106 kBq (70 mCi)/μmol. The biodistribution of 5-[18F]F-PZA was examined in a pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis mouse model, where rapid distribution of the tracer to the lung, heart, liver, kidney, muscle, and brain was observed. The concentration of 5-[18F]F-PZA was not significantly different between infected and uninfected lung tissue. Biochemical and microbiological studies revealed substantial differences between 5-F-PZA and PZA. 5-F-PZA was not a substrate for pyrazinamidase, the bacterial enzyme that activates PZA, and the minimum inhibitory concentration for 5-F-PZA against M. tuberculosis was more than 100-fold higher than that for PZA. PMID:28151985

  11. Tuberculosis and histoplasmosis among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Adenis, Antoine; Nacher, Mathieu; Hanf, Matthieu; Basurko, Célia; Dufour, Julie; Huber, Florence; Aznar, Christine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    In disease-endemic areas, histoplasmosis is the main differential diagnosis for tuberculosis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. However, no study has compared the two diseases. Thus, the objective of this study was to compare tuberculosis and histoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients. A population of 205 HIV-infected patients (99 with tuberculosis and 106 with histoplasmosis) hospitalized in Cayenne, French Guiana during January 1, 1997-December 31, 2008 were selected retrospectively from the French Hospital Database on HIV. Multivariate analysis showed that tuberculosis was associated with cough (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.05-0.73) and a C-reactive protein level > 70 mg/L (AOR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97-0.99). Variables associated with disseminated histoplasmosis were a γ-glutamyl transferase level > 72 IU/L (AOR = 4.99, 95% CI = 1.31-18.99), origin from French Guiana (AOR = 5.20, 95% CI = 1.30-20.73), disseminated localization (AOR = 6.40, 95% CI = 1.44-28.45), a concomitant opportunistic infection (AOR = 6.71, 95% CI = 1.50-29.96), a neutrophil count < 2,750 cells/mm(3) (AOR = 10.54, 95% CI = 2.83-39.24), a CD4 cell count < 60 cells/mm(3) (AOR = 11.62, 95% CI = 2.30-58.63), and a platelet count < 150,000/mm(3) (AOR = 19.20, 95% CI = 3.35-110.14). Tuberculosis and histoplasmosis have similarities, but some factors show a greater association with one of these diseases. Thus, adapted therapeutic choices can be made by using simple clinical and paraclinical criteria.

  12. Tuberculosis of the bladder without previous renal infection.

    PubMed

    Pommerville, Peter John; Zakus, Paul; van der Westhuizen, Nicholas; Kibsey, Pamela Catherine

    2006-04-01

    Tuberculous (TB) infections are usually limited to the pulmonary system but the hematogenous spread of TB can result in secondary infections in any part of the body. Genitourinary TB is uncommon and follows hematogenous spread from a primary pulmonary infection to the kidneys. A rare case of a TB infection of the bladder without renal involvement is described.

  13. Species dependent impact of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Direct effect on the innate anti-mycobacterial response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Susmita K.; McKay, Derek M.

    2017-01-01

    Background In countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis there is high coincident of helminth infections that might worsen disease outcome. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gives rise to a pro-inflammatory Th1 response, a Th2 response is typical of helminth infections. A strong Th2 response has been associated with decreased protection against tuberculosis. Principal findings We investigated the direct effect of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages, hypothesizing that helminths would render macrophages less capable of controlling Mtb. Measuring cytokine output, macrophage surface markers with flow cytometry, and assessing bacterial replication and phagosomal maturation revealed that antigens from different species of helminth directly affect macrophage responses to Mtb. Antigens from the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta and the nematode Trichuris muris caused an anti-inflammatory response with M2-type polarization, reduced macrophage phagosome maturation and ability to activate T cells, along with increased Mtb burden, especially in T. muris exposed cells which also induced the highest IL-10 production upon co-infection. However, antigens from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni had the opposite effect causing a decrease in IL-10 production, M1-type polarization and increased control of Mtb. Conclusion We conclude that, independent of any adaptive immune response, infection with helminth parasites, in a species-specific manner can influence the outcome of tuberculosis by either enhancing or diminishing the bactericidal function of macrophages. PMID:28192437

  14. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (α/β) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (α/β) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection

  15. Serial T-SPOT.TB and quantiFERON-TB-Gold In-Tube assays to monitor response to antitubercular treatment in Italian children with active or latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Elena; Bonsignori, Francesca; Mangone, Giusi; Galli, Luisa; Mazzantini, Rachele; Sollai, Sara; Azzari, Chiara; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-09-01

    We performed a prospective study to investigate T-SPOT.TB and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G-IT) dynamics during antitubercular treatment in active tuberculosis (TB) or latent TB. Eighteen children with latent TB and 26 with TB were enrolled. At 6 months of follow-up reversion rate was 5.88% (95% CI:0-13.79) for QFT-G-IT; 9.09% (95% CI:0.59-17.58) for T-SPOT.TB (P=0.921) in TB cases. Significant decline in quantitative response was observed exclusively in TB cases. Our results suggest that serial IGRA have limited use in children receiving antitubercular treatment.

  16. Controlled Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice under treatment with anti-IL-17A or IL-17F antibodies, in contrast to TNFα neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Segueni, Noria; Tritto, Elaine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Rose, Stéphanie; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Jacobs, Muazzam; Di Padova, Franco; Stiehl, Daniel P.; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kammüller, Michael; Quesniaux, Valerie F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor IL-17RA show unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis. These therapies, by neutralizing critical mediators of immunity, may increase susceptibility to infections. Here, we compared the effect of antibodies neutralizing IL-17A, IL-17F or TNFα on murine host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by evaluating lung transcriptomic, microbiological and histological analyses. Coinciding with a significant increase of mycobacterial burden and pathological changes following TNFα blockade, gene array analyses of infected lungs revealed major changes of inflammatory and immune gene expression signatures 4 weeks post-infection. Specifically, gene expression associated with host-pathogen interactions, macrophage recruitment, activation and polarization, host-antimycobacterial activities, immunomodulatory responses, as well as extracellular matrix metallopeptidases, were markedly modulated by TNFα blockade. IL-17A or IL-17F neutralization elicited only mild changes of few genes without impaired host resistance four weeks after M. tuberculosis infection. Further, the absence of both IL-17RA and IL-22 pathways in genetically deficient mice did not profoundly compromise host control of M. tuberculosis over a 6-months period, ruling out potential compensation between these two pathways, while TNFα-deficient mice succumbed rapidly. These data provide experimental confirmation of the low clinical risk of mycobacterial infection under anti-IL-17A therapy, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment. PMID:27853279

  17. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  18. Tuberculosis of the manubriosternal joint and concurrent asymptomatic active pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient presenting with a chest wall mass.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Ayala-Carbonero, Ana María; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; García Latorre, Raquel; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented to our hospital with an anterior chest wall swelling. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed findings consistent with an infectious arthritis of the manubriosternal joint, and CT images also demonstrated multiple centrilobular nodules in both lungs, suggesting an infectious bronchiolitis. A CT-guided fine needle aspiration of a presternal mass yielded growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed an active pulmonary tuberculosis. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare.

  19. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  20. Infection of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) by oryx bacillus, a rare member of the antelope clade of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Perrett, Keith D; Michel, Anita L; Keet, Dewald F; Hlokwe, Tiny; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species cause tuberculosis disease in animals and humans. Although they share 99.9% similarity at the nucleotide level, several host-adapted ecotypes of the tubercule bacilli have been identified. In the wildlife setting, probably the most well-known member of this complex is Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The recently described oryx bacillus is an extremely rare slow-growing member of the antelope clade of the M. tuberculosis complex and is closely related to the dassie bacillus, Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium microti. The antelope clade is a group of strains apparently host adapted to antelopes, as most described infections were associated with deer and antelope, most specifically the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx). In this study, oryx bacillus was isolated from a free-ranging adult female African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), in good physical condition, which tested strongly positive on three consecutive comparative intradermal tuberculin tests. Upon necropsy, a single pulmonary granuloma and an active retropharyngeal lymph node was found. Comprehensive molecular genetic assays were performed, which confirmed that the causative microorganism was not M. bovis but oryx bacillus. Oryx bacillus has never been reported in Southern Africa and has never been found to infect African buffalo. The identification of this microorganism in buffalo is an important observation in view of the large and ever-increasing epidemic of the closely related M. tuberculosis complex species M. bovis in some African buffalo populations in South Africa.

  1. Optimal control of a two-strain tuberculosis-HIV/AIDS co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Agusto, F B; Adekunle, A I

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). The risk for TB infection greatly increases with HIV infection; TB disease occurs in 7-10% of patients with HIV infection each year, increasing the potential for transmission of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this paper a deterministic model is presented and studied for the transmission of TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection. Optimal control theory is then applied to investigate optimal strategies for controlling the spread of the disease using treatment of infected individuals with TB as the system control variables. Various combination strategies were examined so as to investigate the impact of the controls on the spread of the disease. And incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used to investigate the cost effectiveness of all the control strategies. Our results show that the implementation of the combination strategy involving the prevention of treatment failure in drug-sensitive TB infectious individuals and the treatment of individuals with drug-resistant TB is the most cost-effective control strategy. Similar results were obtained with different objective functionals involving the minimization of the number of individuals with drug-sensitive TB-only and drug-resistant TB-only with the efforts involved in applying the control.

  2. The Role of B Cells and Humoral Immunity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kozakiewicz, Lee; Phuah, Jiayao; Flynn, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious threat to public health, causing 2 million deaths annually world-wide. The control of TB has been hindered by the requirement of long duration of treatment involving multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the HIV-infected population, and the development of multi-drug resistant and extensively resistant strains of tubercle bacilli. An efficacious and cost-efficient way to control TB is the development of effective anti-TB vaccines. This measure requires thorough understanding of the immune response to M. tuberculosis. While the role of cell-mediated immunity in the development of protective immune response to the tubercle bacillus has been well established, the role of B cells in this process is not clearly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that B cells and humoral immunity can modulate the immune response to various intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. These lymphocytes form conspicuous aggregates in the lungs of tuberculous humans, non-human primates, and mice, which display features of germinal center B cells. In murine TB, it has been shown that B cells can regulate the level of granulomatous reaction, cytokine production, and the T cell response. This chapter discusses the potential mechanisms by which specific functions of B cells and humoral immunity can shape the immune response to intracellular pathogens in general, and to M. tuberculosis in particular. Knowledge of the B cell-mediated immune response to M. tuberculosis may lead to the design of novel strategies, including the development of effective vaccines, to better control TB. PMID:23468112

  3. T cell reactivity against mycolyl transferase antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB coinfected subjects and in AIDS patients suffering from tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Launois, Pascal; Drowart, Annie; Bourreau, Eliane; Couppie, Pierre; Farber, Claire-Michèle; Van Vooren, Jean-Paul; Huygen, Kris

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B) group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  4. Differences between tuberculosis cases infected with Mycobacterium africanum, West African type 2, relative to Euro-American Mycobacterium tuberculosis: an update.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Bouke C; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Walther, Brigitte; Hill, Philip C; Antonio, Martin; Ota, Martin; Adegbola, Richard A

    2010-02-01

    Mycobacterium africanum (MAF) is a common cause of human pulmonary tuberculosis in West Africa. We previously described phenotypic differences between MAF and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) among 290 patients. In the present analysis, we compared 692 tuberculosis patients infected with the two most common lineages within the (MTB) complex found in the Gambia, namely MAF West African type 2 (39% prevalence) and Euro-American MTB (55% prevalence). We identified additional phenotypic differences between infections with these two organisms. MAF patients were more likely to be older and HIV infected. In addition, they had worse disease on chest X-ray, despite complaining of cough for an equal duration, and were more likely severely malnourished. In this cohort, the prevalence of MAF did not change significantly over a 7-year period.

  5. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background: The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. Objective: We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. Case Description: A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Clinical findings and diagnosis: Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Treatment and Outcome: Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Clinical relevance: Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients. PMID:27546933

  6. Latent Tuberculosis Infection Screening in Foreign-Born Populations: A Successful Mobile Clinic Outreach Model

    PubMed Central

    Zelenev, Alexei; Walton, Mary R.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the efficacy of a mobile medical clinic (MMC) screening program for detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis. Methods. A LTBI screening program in a MMC in New Haven, Connecticut, used medical surveys to examine risk factors and tuberculin skin test (TST) screening eligibility. We assessed clinically relevant correlates of total (prevalent; n = 4650) and newly diagnosed (incident; n = 4159) LTBI from 2003 to 2011. Results. Among 8322 individuals, 4159 (55.6%) met TST screening eligibility criteria, of which 1325 (31.9%) had TST assessed. Similar to LTBI prevalence (16.8%; 779 of 4650), newly diagnosed LTBI (25.6%; 339 of 1325) was independently correlated with being foreign-born (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 8.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.54, 13.02), Hispanic (AOR = 3.12; 95% CI = 1.88, 5.20), Black (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.31, 3.55), employed (AOR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.14, 2.28), and of increased age (AOR = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.05). Unstable housing (AOR = 4.95; 95% CI = 3.43, 7.14) and marijuana use (AOR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.05, 2.37) were significantly correlated with incident LTBI, and being male, heroin use, interpersonal violence, employment, not having health insurance, and not completing high school were significantly correlated with prevalent LTBI. Conclusions. Screening for TST in MMCs successfully identifies high-risk foreign-born, Hispanic, working, and uninsured populations and innovatively identifies LTBI in urban settings. PMID:24922157

  7. Severity of Bovine Tuberculosis Is Associated with Co-Infection with Common Pathogens in Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M.; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L.; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  8. Severity of bovine tuberculosis is associated with co-infection with common pathogens in wild boar.

    PubMed

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  9. Developing vaccines to prevent sustained infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Conference proceedings: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Rockville, Maryland USA, November 7, 2014.

    PubMed

    2015-06-12

    On November 7, 2014, Aeras and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a conference entitled "Vaccine Prevention of Sustained Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection." The purpose of this meeting was to explore the biologic plausibility, potential public health and economic impact, and regulatory feasibility in attempting to develop a vaccine to prevent sustained infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Currently there are two main goals for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development, to develop a vaccine that could serve as a booster to Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination and prevent active TB in adolescents and adults, and to develop an improved vaccine to replace BCG in infants. Although prevention of sustained Mtb infection is being used as a proof of biological activity for vaccines in mid-Phase 2 development, there currently are no plans for pursuing a prevention of Mtb infection licensure indication for TB vaccines. Ultimately, pursuing a prevention of sustained Mtb infection indication for TB vaccines, in parallel with ongoing efforts to develop vaccines to prevent active TB disease, was deemed a potentially important effort, but would require further resources, particularly to improve diagnostic assays, to increase the regulatory feasibility of this endeavor.

  10. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  11. Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-based agents active against tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Marco; Tipparaju, Suresh K; Lun, Shichun; Song, Yang; Sturm, A Willem; Bishai, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2011-02-07

    The struggle against tuberculosis (TB) is still far from over. TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the deadliest infections worldwide. Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains have further increased the burden for this disease. Herein, we report the discovery of 2-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1H,5H-pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-4-carbonitrile as an effective antitubercular agent and the structural modifications of this molecule that have led to analogues with improved potency and lower toxicity. A number of these derivatives were also active at sub-micromolar concentrations against resistant TB strains and devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero cells, thereby underscoring their value as novel scaffolds for the development of new anti-TB drugs.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Shin, N S; Kwon, S W; Han, D H; Bai, G H; Yoon, J; Cheon, D S; Son, Y S; Ahn, K; Chae, C; Lee, Y S

    1995-10-01

    A respiratory disorder was noted in a 5-year-old female orangutan kept in the Yongin Farmland. Radiographically, multiple radiodense foci ranging from 2 to 6 mm diameter were seen throughout the lung lobes. Grossly, the thoracic cavity revealed a firm texture and grayish-pink discoloration of the left apical lung lobe. Histopathologically, multifocal areas of granulomatous pneumonia present the right and left apical lung lobes. Both primers from IS1081 and IS6110 targeting 196 bp and 245 bp respectively were used in polymerase chain reaction, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from liver and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Mathematical Model Of Tuberculosis Transmission With Reccurent Infection And Vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainggolan, J.; Supian, Sudradjat; Supriatna, A. K.; Anggriani, N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a model of tuberculosis transmission with vaccination by explicitely considering the total number of recovered individuals, either from natural recovery or due to vaccination. In this paper the endemic and nonendemic fixed points, basic reproduction number, and vaccination reproduction number are given. Some results regarding the stability of the fixed points and the relation to the basic reproduction numbers are analysed. At the end of this study, the numerical computation presented and it shows that vaccination is capable to reduce the number of laten and infectious populations.

  14. Anaerobic incubation conditions enhance pyrazinamide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mary Margaret; Zhang, Ying

    2004-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an unconventional front line tuberculosis drug characterized by high in vivo sterilizing activity, but poor in vitro activity. This disparity in PZA activity may reflect differences between the in vivo tissue environment and in vitro culture conditions. This study examined the effect of anaerobic conditions, which exist in granulomatous lesions in vivo, on PZA activity in vitro. Low oxygen enhanced the activity of PZA against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with anaerobic conditions resulting in greater enhancement than microaerobic conditions. ATPase and respiratory chain enzyme inhibitors enhanced PZA activity under normal atmospheric conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the inhibitors did not enhance isoniazid or rifampicin activity. Nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor antagonized PZA activity under anaerobic conditions. These findings provide further support for a proposed mechanism of action of PZA in which the active form of PZA (pyrazinoic acid) depletes the membrane energy reserve. They also provide another explanation for the higher sterilizing activity of PZA within in vivo lesions with low oxygen than under in vitro drug susceptibility testing conditions with ambient oxygen.

  15. Magnitude and sources of bias in the detection of mixed strain M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Plazzotta, Giacomo; Cohen, Ted; Colijn, Caroline

    2015-03-07

    High resolution tests for genetic variation reveal that individuals may simultaneously host more than one distinct strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Previous studies find that this phenomenon, which we will refer to as "mixed infection", may affect the outcomes of treatment for infected individuals and may influence the impact of population-level interventions against tuberculosis. In areas where the incidence of TB is high, mixed infections have been found in nearly 20% of patients; these studies may underestimate the actual prevalence of mixed infection given that tests may not be sufficiently sensitive for detecting minority strains. Specific reasons for failing to detect mixed infections would include low initial numbers of minority strain cells in sputum, stochastic growth in culture and the physical division of initial samples into parts (typically only one of which is genotyped). In this paper, we develop a mathematical framework that models the study designs aimed to detect mixed infections. Using both a deterministic and a stochastic approach, we obtain posterior estimates of the prevalence of mixed infection. We find that the posterior estimate of the prevalence of mixed infection may be substantially higher than the fraction of cases in which it is detected. We characterize this bias in terms of the sensitivity of the genotyping method and the relative growth rates and initial population sizes of the different strains collected in sputum.

  16. Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Infection in an Endemic Area of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felicio, João Soares; Sales, Lúcia Helena Messias; Bahia, Jeann Ricardo da Costa; Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista

    2013-01-01

    The majority of investigations of the epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have focused on highly developed nations with a low prevalence of tuberculosis. In contrast, the Para state of north Brazil represents an area of high tuberculosis prevalence and increasing NTM incidence. Toward the goal of understanding the dynamics of infection by all Mycobacterium species, we report patient characteristics and the identification of NTM strains isolated from sputum samples from patients that were residents of Para, a state in the Amazon region, Northern of Brazil, over the period January 2010 through December 2011 (2 years). The 29 NTM patients comprised 13.5% of positive mycobacterial cultures over the 2-year period. A major risk factor for NTM pulmonary disease was previous tuberculosis (76%). Further, the average age of NTM patients (52 years) was significantly higher than that of tuberculosis patients (39 years) and more were female (72.4% vs. 37.4%). Unlike other Brazilian states, NTM pulmonary patients in Para were infected with a different spectrum of mycobacteria; primarily the rapidly growing Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium simiae complex. PMID:23875055

  17. Supervised preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection in illegal immigrants in Italy.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, A; Casalini, C; Raviglione, M C; El-Hamad, I; Scolari, C; Bombana, E; Bugiani, M; Caputo, M; Scarcella, C; Carosi, G

    2000-11-01

    In a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label study of isoniazid-preventive therapy (IPT) for latent tuberculosis infection, illegal immigrants from countries where tuberculosis is highly endemic were enrolled at two clinical sites in Northern Italy. Of 208 eligible subjects, 82 received supervised IPT at a dose of 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen A), 73 received unsupervised IPT 900 mg twice weekly for 6 mo (Regimen B), and 53 received unsupervised IPT 300 mg daily for 6 mo (Regimen C). Supervised IPT was delivered at either one tuberculosis clinic or one migrant clinic. The probability of completing a 26-wk regimen was 7, 26, and 41% in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p < 0.005, Log- rank test calculated using Kaplan-Meier plots). The mean time to dropout was 3. 8, 6, and 6.2 wk in Regimens A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.003 for regimen A versus either Regimens B or C). Treatment was stopped in five subjects (2.4%) because of adverse events. The rate of completion of preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infection among illegal immigrants was low. Supervised, clinic-based administration of IPT significantly reduced adherence. Alternative strategies to implement preventive therapy in illegal immigrants are clearly required.

  18. [Latent tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors among the tuberculosis contacts in one of district in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Xie, X; Tang, L H; Huang, X X; Wu, Y; Su, H L

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection(LTBI) and associated risk factors among the tuberculosis(TB) contacts in Minhang District of Shanghai. Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was used to acquire socio-demographic information and to assess the degree of exposure to index cases. LTBI screening was performed by T-SPOT.TB assay. Pearson chi-square test and Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with LTBI among the TB contacts. Results: A total of 137 contacts from 59 mycobacterial (culture) positive pulmonary TB patients were enrolled in this study. In these contacts, there were 54 men and 83 women, with the average age of 42. LTBI was identified in 20% (27/137) of these contacts. Several risk factors were found by logistic analyses in this study. The worse the ventilation in the exposure location was, the more likely to develop LTBI. Contacts aged more than 60 (42.1%) were 3.9 times more likely to develop LTBI than those aged less than 60 (16.1%). Individuals in contact with TB patients for more than 40 h/week(25.8%) had a 4.2 times risk of LTBI as compared to those for less than 40 h/week(6.8%). Conclusion: The prevalence of LTBI was 20% among the TB contacts in this study, highlighting the need of TB screening and intervention among TB contacts.

  19. A tuberculosis model: The case of ‘reasonable’ and ‘unreasonable’ infectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyabadza, Farai; Mukwembi, Simon; Rodrigues, Bernardo Gabriel

    2009-05-01

    Epidemics such as tuberculosis (TB), can be represented by a finite number of states and transition rules that govern the spread of the disease in each discrete time step. This paper uses a graph theoretic approach to investigate TB interactions in a community where infectives are categorized. A threshold value, α=1-{1}/{n}, for ‘reasonable’ infectives is proposed. The results show that an epidemic will not ensue as long as the threshold is surpassed. Simulations presented show that unreasonable infectives can amplify the epidemic.

  20. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    PubMed Central

    de Prince, Karina Andrade; Sordi, Renata; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Barreto Santos, Adolfo Carlos; Araujo, Angela R.; Leite, Sergio R.A.; Leite, Clarice Q. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib.) B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae), cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA) and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties. PMID:24031821

  1. Effectiveness of the First Dose of BCG against Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected, Predominantly Immunodeficient Children.

    PubMed

    Van-Dunem, Joaquim C V D; Rodrigues, Laura C; Alencar, Luiz Claudio Arraes; Militão-Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the protective effect of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis among (predominantly immunodeficient) HIV-infected children in Angola. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted with 230 cases, children coinfected with tuberculosis, and 672 controls, HIV-infected children from the same hospital, aged 18 months to 13 years. The presence of a vaccination scar was taken as a proxy marker for BCG vaccination. The crude effectiveness was 8% (95% CI: -26 to 32) and the adjusted effectiveness was 30% (95% CI: -75 to 72). The present study suggests that BCG does not have a protective effect against tuberculosis among immunodeficient HIV-infected children. Since BCG is no longer given to HIV-infected children, the study may not be replicated. Accepting that these findings should be considered with caution, they are nonetheless likely to be the last estimate of BCG efficacy in a sufficiently powered study.

  2. Lipophilic pyrazinoic acid amide and ester prodrugs stability, activation and activity against M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Valente, Emília; Gómez, M José Rodríguez; Anes, Elsa; Constantino, Luís

    2009-06-28

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against M. tuberculosis and is a first line agent for the treatment of human tuberculosis. PZA is itself a prodrug that requires activation by a pyrazinamidase to form its active metabolite pyrazinoic acid (POA). Since the specificity of cleavage is dependent on a single bacterial enzyme, resistance to PZA is often found in tuberculosis patients. Esters of POA have been proposed in the past as alternatives to PZA however the most promising compounds were rapidly degraded in the presence of serum. In order to obtain compounds that could survive during the transport phase, we synthesized lipophilic ester and amide POA derivatives, studied their activity against M. tuberculosis, their stability in plasma and rat liver homogenate and also their activation by a mycobacterial homogenate. The new lipophilic ester prodrugs were found to be active in concentrations 10-fold lower than those needed for PZA to kill sensitive M. tuberculosis and also have a suitable stability in the presence of plasma. Amides of POA although more stable in plasma have lower activity. The reason can probably be found in the rate of activation of both types of prodrugs; while esters are easily activated by mycobacterial esterases, amides are resistant to activation and are not transformed into POA at a suitable rate.

  3. Tuberculosis in European badgers (Meles meles) and the control of infection with bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination.

    PubMed

    Corner, L A L; Murphy, D; Costello, E; Gormley, E

    2009-10-01

    The eradication of tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) from cattle herds may be compromised if infected wildlife species, such as European badgers (Meles meles), share the same environment and contribute to transfer of infection. Options for dealing with tuberculosis in this wild reservoir host are limited by conservation and social concerns, despite a clear implication that infected badgers are involved with the initiation of tuberculosis in cattle herds. Vaccination of badgers against M. bovis, if successfully employed, would directly facilitate the completion of bovine tuberculosis eradication in affected areas. Vaccine trials in captive badgers have established that the M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine can induce a protective response that limits the distribution and severity of tuberculosis disease following experimental challenge. The protective effect of the vaccine has been demonstrated when the vaccine was delivered by subcutaneous injection, deposited on mucous membranes, and given orally in a lipid formulation. A large-scale field trial of oral BCG vaccine has been designed to measure the protection generated in wild badgers subjected to natural transmission of infection and to estimate vaccine efficacy. These parameters will be estimated by comparing the prevalence of M. bovis infection in vaccinated and nonvaccinated badgers. The results will provide a framework for the development and implementation of a national strategy to eliminate the disease in badger populations and if successful will remove this major impediment to bovine tuberculosis eradication.

  4. Biomarkers for risk of developing active tuberculosis in contacts of TB patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Richard, Vincent; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Gicquel, Brigitte; Doherty, T Mark; Zumla, Alimuddin; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-10-01

    Identifying those Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent-infected individuals most at risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) using routine clinical and laboratory tests remains a huge challenge in TB control efforts. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of clinical and laboratory markers associated with the risk of developing active TB in contacts with latent M. tuberculosis infection.HIV-negative household contacts (n=296) of pulmonary TB patients underwent monitoring of clinical features, full blood cell counts, tuberculin skin text (TST) and chest radiography performed regularly during 18 months of follow-up. Paired statistical tests, a Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard modelling were performed on variables between contacts progressing or not progressing to active TB.The appearance of TB disease symptoms in contacts was significantly associated with an elevated peripheral percentage of blood monocytes (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 6.25, 95% CI 1.63-23.95; p<0.01), a ≥14 mm TST response (aHR 5.72, 95% CI 1.22-26.80; p=0.03) and an increased monocyte:lymphocyte ratio (aHR 4.97, 95% CI 1.3-18.99; p=0.03). Among contacts having TST ≥14 mm, a strong association with risk of progression to TB was found with an elevated blood monocyte percentage (aHR 8.46, 95% CI 1.74-41.22; p<0.01).Elevated percentage of peripheral blood monocytes plus an elevated TST response are potential biomarkers for identifying contacts of TB patients at highest risk of developing active TB.

  5. Rv0216, a Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Myocbacterium Tuberculosis that is Essential for Bacterial Survival During Infection, has a Double Hotdog Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Castell,A.; Johansson, P.; Unge, T.; Jones, T.; Backbro, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains about 4000 genes, of which approximately a third code for proteins of unknown function or are classified as conserved hypothetical proteins. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of one of these, the rv0216 gene product, which has been shown to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth in vivo. The structure exhibits the greatest similarity to bacterial and eukaryotic hydratases that catalyse the R-specific hydration of 2-enoyl coenzyme A. However, only part of the catalytic machinery is conserved in Rv0216 and it showed no activity for the substrate crotonyl-CoA. The structure of Rv0216 allows us to assign new functional annotations to a family of seven other M. tuberculosis proteins, a number if which are essential for bacterial survival during infection and growth.

  6. Elevated Circulating Concentrations of Interferon-Gamma in Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Deepe, George S.; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been associated with increased immune activation. We assessed circulating concentrations of interferon-gamma in persons with LTBI. Methods We used the 2011–2012 National Health Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) to identify adults with and without LTBI by QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) results. Non-LTBI persons were 1:1 age-, gender-, and race-matched to LTBI persons using propensity scores. We compared the plasma concentrations of interferon-gamma measured from the unstimulated, negative control QFT tube between LTBI and non-LTBI persons. We used Mann-Whitney tests and ordered logistic regressions for comparisons. Results There were 430 LTBI and 430 non-LTBI matched persons included in the analysis. LTBI was associated with higher circulating concentrations of interferon-gamma (median, 3 pg/mL; IQR, 2 – 5) compared to non-LTBI (median, 2.5 pg/mL; IQR, 1.5 – 3.5); P < 0.001. LTBI remained associated with higher interferon-gamma concentrations after adjusting for age, gender, race, diabetes, hypertension, tobacco use, HIV status, body mass index, lipid profile, and lymphocyte count (odds ratio, 1.79, 95% CI, 1.26 – 2.53). Results remained similar when tuberculin skin testing defined LTBI. Conclusions LTBI was associated with increased circulating interferon-gamma concentrations. Future studies are needed to further characterize immune activation in LTBI and its potential long-term consequences. PMID:27853753

  7. Treatment strategies for HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis: ongoing and planned clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Francois-Xavier; Havlir, Diane V; Onyebujoh, Philip C; Thim, Sok; Goldfeld, Anne E; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois

    2007-08-15

    Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients with active tuberculosis (TB), the leading cause of death among individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in resource-limited areas. Four trials to take place in Southeast Asian, African, and South American countries will address the unresolved question of the optimal timing for initiation of HAART in patients with AIDS and TB: (1) Cambodian Early versus Late Introduction of Antiretrovirals (CAMELIA [ANRS 1295/NIH-CIPRA KH001]), (2) Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5221, (3) START, and (4) a trial sponsored by the World Health Organization/Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Two other clinical questions regarding patients with TB and HIV-1 coinfection are also undergoing evaluation: (1) the benefits of short-term HAART when CD4 cell counts are >350 cells/mm(3) (PART [NIH 1 R01 AI051219-01A2]) and (2) the efficacy of a once-daily HAART regimen in treatment-naive patients (BKVIR [ANRS 129]). Here, we present an overview of these ongoing or planned clinical studies, which are supported by international agencies.

  8. Nutritional status of persons with HIV infection, persons with HIV infection and tuberculosis, and HIV-negative individuals from southern India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Padmapriyadarsini, C; Sukumar, B; Iliayas, Sheikh; Kumar, S Ramesh; Triveni, C; Gomathy, P; Thomas, Beena; Mathew, Minnie; Narayanan, P R

    2008-03-15

    We compared the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection alone, individuals with HIV infection and tuberculosis (after completion of antituberculosis treatment), and HIV-negative individuals and found that malnutrition, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia were most pronounced among HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis. Weight loss was associated with loss of fat in female patients and with loss of body cell mass in male patients.

  9. Deep Whole-Genome Sequencing to Detect Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Mingyu; Liu, Qingyun; Yang, Chongguang; Gao, Qian; Luo, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Mixed infection by multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains is associated with poor treatment outcome of tuberculosis (TB). Traditional genotyping methods have been used to detect mixed infections of MTB, however, their sensitivity and resolution are limited. Deep whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been proved highly sensitive and discriminative for studying population heterogeneity of MTB. Here, we developed a phylogenetic-based method to detect MTB mixed infections using WGS data. We collected published WGS data of 782 global MTB strains from public database. We called homogeneous and heterogeneous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) of individual strains by mapping short reads to the ancestral MTB reference genome. We constructed a phylogenomic database based on 68,639 homogeneous SNVs of 652 MTB strains. Mixed infections were determined if multiple evolutionary paths were identified by mapping the SNVs of individual samples to the phylogenomic database. By simulation, our method could specifically detect mixed infections when the sequencing depth of minor strains was as low as 1× coverage, and when the genomic distance of two mixed strains was as small as 16 SNVs. By applying our methods to all 782 samples, we detected 47 mixed infections and 45 of them were caused by locally endemic strains. The results indicate that our method is highly sensitive and discriminative for identifying mixed infections from deep WGS data of MTB isolates. PMID:27391214

  10. Persisting PET-CT lesion activity and M. tuberculosis mRNA after pulmonary tuberculosis cure

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Shenai, Shubhada; Ronacher, Katharina; Loxton, Andre G.; Dolganov, Gregory; Kriel, Magdalena; Van, Tran; Chen, Ray Y.; Warwick, James; Via, Laura E.; Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Schoolnik, Gary; Tromp, Gerard; Alland, David; Barry, Clifton E.; Winter, Jill; Walzl, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The absence of a gold standard to determine when antibiotics have induced sterilizing cure confounds the development of new approaches to treat pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). We detected PET-CT imaging response patterns consistent with active disease along with the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples in a substantial proportion of adult, HIV-negative PTB patients after standard 6-month treatment plus one year follow-up, including patients with a durable cure and others who later developed recurrent disease. The presence of MTB mRNA in the context of non-resolving and intensifying lesions on PET-CT might indicate ongoing transcription, suggesting that even apparently curative PTB treatment may not eradicate all organisms in most patients. This suggests an important complementary role for the immune response in maintaining a disease-free state. Sterilizing drugs or host-directed therapies and better treatment response markers are likely needed for the successful development of improved and shortened PTB treatment strategies. PMID:27595324

  11. Passive transfer of interferon-γ over-expressing macrophages enhances resistance of SCID mice to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Martin, William J; Kesavalu, Banu Rekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2017-02-23

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is associated with increased deaths worldwide. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) play a critical role in host defense against infection with this pathogen. In this work we tested the hypothesis that passive transfer of normal AMs, IFN-γ activated AMs, or macrophages transduced to over-express IFN-γ into the lungs of immunosuppressed SCID mice, where resident macrophages are present but not functional, would enhance alveolar immunity and increase clearance of pulmonary M.tb infection. Accordingly, SCID mice were infected with M.tb intratracheally (I.T.), following which they received either control macrophages or macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ (J774A.1). The extent of M.tb infection was assessed at 30days post-M.tb infection. SCID mice administered macrophages over-expressing IFN-γ showed a significant decrease in M.tb burden and increased survival compared to J774A.1 control macrophages or untreated mice. This was further associated with a significant increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression, as well as NF-κB (p65) mRNA, in the lungs. The increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α lung levels was inversely proportional to the number of M.tb organisms recovered. These results provide evidence that administration of macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ inhibit M.tb growth in vivo and may enhance host defense against M.tb infection.

  12. Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Pavia province, Lombardy, Northern Italy, 1998-2013.

    PubMed

    Fronti, Elisa; Vecchia, Marco; Scudeller, Luigia; Praticò, Liliana; Marone, Piero; Muzzi, Alba; Minoli, Lorenzo; Seminari, Elena

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the epidemiology of tuberculosis in the last 16 years in the province of Pavia, Lombardy, Northern Italy. The objective was to evaluate the clinical pattern of tuberculosis in immigrant groups compared with Italians in an observational retrospective study conducted from 1998 to 2013. In all, 615 tuberculosis cases were admitted, 354 males (57.3%), median age 47-years, 425 (69.1%) Italian-born patients, 190 (30.9%) immigrants. The ratio between the immigrant group and the Italian-born group of patients increased from 1.7% to 54.5% in the study period (p=0.001). HIV was the most common comorbidity, affecting 48 patients (7.8%), followed by diabetes in 35 (5.7%) and COPD in 30 (4.9%). The overall admission-associated mortality was 5.5%. Italian-born patients were older than non-Italian born subjects and had at least one comorbidity, 162 (38.1%) and 22 (11.6%), respectively (p<0,0001). Mortality was increased among Italian-born compared with non-Italian-born patients (7.3% versus 1.6%, p=0.004). No significant variation in extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) prevalence occurred. Considering specific form of EPTB, HIV infection was associated with an increased risk of EPTB (RR 2.02, 95%CI 1.09-3.74, p=0.026). There was a high risk of tuberculosis among immigrants, whereas a decreasing trend was consistently observed among Italian-born patients. Italian-born patients show a higher tuberculosis-associated mortality risk due to older age and comorbidities.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock proteins use diverse Toll-like receptor pathways to activate pro-inflammatory signals.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Hayrapetian, Linda; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-06-03

    Although the Toll-like receptors used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane and secreted factors are known, the pathways activated by M. tuberculosis heat shock proteins are not. An efficient immune response against the intracellular pathogen M. tuberculosis is critically dependent on rapid detection of the invading pathogen by the innate immune system and coordinated activation of the adaptive immune response. Macrophage phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis is accompanied by activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and secretion of inflammatory mediators that play an important role in granuloma formation and immune protection during M. tuberculosis infection. The interaction between M. tuberculosis and the various Toll-like receptors is complex, and it appears that distinct mycobacterial components may interact with different members of the Toll-like receptor family. Here we show that recombinant, purified, mycobacterial heat shock proteins 65 and 70 induce NF-kappaB activity in a dose-dependent manner in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, we show that whereas mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 signals exclusively through Toll-like receptor 4, heat shock protein 70 also signals through Toll-like receptor 2. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65-induced NF-kappaB activation was MyD88-, TIRAP-, TRIF-, and TRAM-dependent and required the presence of MD-2. A better understanding of the recognition of mycobacterial heat shock proteins and their role in the host immune response to the pathogen may open the way to a better understanding of the immunological processes induced by this important human pathogen and the host-pathogen interactions and may help in the rational design of more effective vaccines or vaccine adjuvants.

  14. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Pollara, Gabriele; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tomlinson, Gillian S; Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Roe, Jennifer; Meldau, Richard; Miller, Robert F; Ramsay, Alan; Chain, Benjamin M; Dheda, Keertan; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-03-01

    Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th)1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST) to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral blood. TST

  15. Latent tuberculosis infection in a Malaysian prison: implications for a comprehensive integrated control program in prisons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prisons continue to fuel tuberculosis (TB) epidemics particularly in settings where access to TB screening and prevention services is limited. Malaysia is a middle-income country with a relatively high incarceration rate of 138 per 100,000 population. Despite national TB incidence rate remaining unchanged over the past ten years, data about TB in prisons and its contribution to the overall national rates does not exist. This survey was conducted to address the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods From July to December 2010, all HIV-infected and a comparative group of HIV-uninfected prisoners housed separately in Kajang prison were asked to participate in the survey after explaining the study protocol. Subjects providing informed consent were interviewed using a structured questionnaire followed by the placement of tuberculin skin test (TST) with 2 TU of PPD RT-23 to subjects not being treated for active TB. TST was read after 48-72 hours and indurations of ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 10 mm were considered positive among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects, respectively. Additionally, HIV-infected inmates underwent phlebotomy for CD4 lymphocyte count assessment. A logistic regression model was explored to determine factors associated with TST positivity. Results Overall, 286 subjects (138 HIV-infected and 148 HIV-uninfected) had complete data and TST results. The majority were men (95.1%), less than 40 years old (median age 36.0, SD 7.87), and Malaysians (93.3%). Most (82.5%) had been previously incarcerated and more than half (53.1%) reported sharing needles just prior to their incarceration. TST was positive in 88.8% (84.7% among HIV-infected and 92.5% among HIV-uninfected subjects) and was independently associated with being HIV-uninfected (AOR = 2.97, p = 0.01) and with frequent previous incarcerations (AOR = 1.22 for every one previous incarceration, p = 0.01) after adjusting for other

  16. Safety and Adherence for 12 Weekly Doses of Isoniazid and Rifapentine for Pediatric Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea T; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Traditional treatment of tuberculosis infection (TBI) is efficacious, but adherence is low. Eighty children with TBI received a 12-dose once-weekly isoniazid/rifapentine regimen; 79 (99%) completed therapy, 94% reported no adverse events, 1 child had mildly elevated transaminases but 1 adolescent later developed pulmonary TB. Isoniazid/rifapentine is safe, is well tolerated and has much higher completion rates than traditional TBI regimens.

  17. Interferon-γ release assays for diagnosis of tuberculosis infection and disease in children.

    PubMed

    Starke, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important problem among children in the United States and throughout the world. Although diagnosis and treatment of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (also referred to as latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI] or TB infection) remain the lynchpins of TB prevention, there is no diagnostic reference standard for LTBI. The tuberculin skin test (TST) has many limitations, including difficulty in administration and interpretation, the need for a return visit by the patient, and false-positive results caused by significant cross-reaction with Mycobacterium bovis-bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines and many nontuberculous mycobacteria. Interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) are blood tests that measure ex vivo T-lymphocyte release of interferon-γ after stimulation by antigens specific for M tuberculosis. Because these antigens are not found on M bovis-BCG or most nontuberculous mycobacteria, IGRAs are more specific tests than the TST, yielding fewer false-positive results. However, IGRAs have little advantage over the TST in sensitivity, and both methods have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised children, including children with severe TB disease. Both methods have a higher positive predictive value when applied to children with risk factors for LTBI. Unfortunately, neither method distinguishes between TB infection and TB disease. The objective of this technical report is to review what IGRAs are most useful for: (1) increasing test specificity in children who have received a BCG vaccine and may have a false-positive TST result; (2) using with the TST to increase sensitivity for finding LTBI in patients at high risk of developing progression from LTBI to disease; and (3) helping to diagnose TB disease.

  18. Eighteenth-century genomes show that mixed infections were common at time of peak tuberculosis in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Gemma L.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Zhou, Zhemin; Chan, Jacqueline Z.-M.; Millard, Andrew; Quick, Joshua; Szikossy, Ildikó; Pap, Ildikó; Spigelman, Mark; Loman, Nicholas J.; Achtman, Mark; Donoghue, Helen D.; Pallen, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was once a major killer in Europe, but it is unclear how the strains and patterns of infection at ‘peak TB' relate to what we see today. Here we describe 14 genome sequences of M. tuberculosis, representing 12 distinct genotypes, obtained from human remains from eighteenth-century Hungary using metagenomics. All our historic genotypes belong to M. tuberculosis Lineage 4. Bayesian phylogenetic dating, based on samples with well-documented dates, places the most recent common ancestor of this lineage in the late Roman period. We find that most bodies yielded more than one M. tuberculosis genotype and we document an intimate epidemiological link between infections in two long-dead individuals. Our results suggest that metagenomic approaches usefully inform detection and characterization of historical and contemporary infections. PMID:25848958

  19. Etanercept Exacerbates Inflammation and Pathology in a Rabbit Model of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Fallows, Dorothy; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonists has been associated with increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We examined the usefulness of the rabbit model of active pulmonary TB for studying the impact of the human immune modulatory reagent etanercept on the host immune response. Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, disease pathology, and the global transcriptional response in Mtb-infected lungs of rabbits were studied. Etanercept treatment exacerbated disease pathology and reduced bacillary control in the lungs, compared with infected untreated animals. Reduced collagen and fibrin deposition in the granulomas was associated with significant downregulation of the collagen metabolism and fibrosis network genes and upregulation of genes in the inflammatory response and cell recruitment networks in the lungs of etanercept treated, compared with untreated rabbits. Our results suggest that targeting the TNF-α signaling pathway disrupts the tissue remodeling process, which is required for the formation and maintenance of well-differentiated granulomas and for control of Mtb growth in the lungs. These results validate the use of the rabbit model for investigating the impact of selected human immune modulatory drugs, such as a TNF-α antagonist, on the host immune response and pathogenesis in TB. PMID:24831609

  20. Bilateral patellar tuberculosis masquerading as infected infrapatellar bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Ravi; Haq, Rehan Ul

    2017-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and swelling in bilateral infrapatellar regions and a discharging sinus in the right knee over the duration of one year. Radiographs showed lytic regions in bilateral patellae. Samples sent from material curetted from sinus yielded no organism but histopathology reported granulomatous inflammation. Following a fresh magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan that revealed the infrapatellar pad of fat communicating with the patellar lesions, an exploration and evacuation was done. Material sent revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with caseous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis (TB). The patient was put on first line anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) and has responded favourably with healing of sinus and patellar lesions. Bilateral infrapatellar bursitis is not rare. However patellar TB as a cause for OMIT is not a common diagnosis. A bilateral patellar involvement has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  1. Quantitative and qualitative profiles of circulating monocytes may help identifying tuberculosis infection and disease stages

    PubMed Central

    La Manna, Marco Pio; Orlando, Valentina; Dieli, Francesco; Di Carlo, Paola; Cascio, Antonio; Cuzzi, Gilda; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Goletti, Delia

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important cause of morbidity and death among infectious diseases, and continuous efforts are needed to improve diagnostic tools and therapy. Previous published studies showed that the absolute cells number of monocytes or lymphocytes in peripheral blood or yet the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes displayed the ability to predict the risk of active TB. In the present study we evaluated the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes variation and we also analyzed the ex-vivo expression of CD64 on monocytes as tools to identify biomarkers for discriminating TB stages. Significant differences were found when the average ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes of active TB patients was compared with latent TB infection (LTBI) subjects, cured TB and healthy donors (HD). By the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis the cut-off value of 0.285, allowed the discrimination of active TB from HD, with a sensitivity of 91.04% and a specificity of 93.55% (95% of confidence interval: 0.92–0.99). The ROC curve analysis comparing TB patients and LTBI groups, led to a sensitivity and the specificity of the assay of 85.07% and 85.71%, respectively (95% of confidence interval: 0.85 to 0.96). The upregulation of CD64 expression on circulating monocytes in active TB patients could represent an additional biomarker for diagnosis of active TB. In conclusion, we found that the ML ratio or monocyte absolute count or phenotypic measures show predictive value for active TB. PMID:28208160

  2. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  3. The effect of iron on the expression of cytokines in macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Serafín-López, J; Chacón-Salinas, R; Muñoz-Cruz, S; Enciso-Moreno, J A; Estrada-Parra, S A; Estrada-García, I

    2004-10-01

    Iron is known to play an important role in different bacterial infections and, in particular, in their development. One example is infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis where iron contributes to growth and survival of the bacteria within the host cell. The majority of studies performed on tuberculosis have focused on the direct effect of iron on bacterial growth; however, little is known about how iron modifies the mycobacterial-host interaction. In order to address this, we have investigated the effect of iron on intracellular growth of M. tuberculosis in J774 macrophages and the molecular mechanisms that are affected during this interaction. We observed that iron modifies intracellular growth of the mycobacteria and that their growth kinetics was modified from that observed for the extracellular situation in the presence of iron. Similarly, when iron was present during the infection, there was a reduced release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and it was related to a higher number of bacilli inside the host cell and low expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 mRNA. Hence, this work demonstrates that iron, besides promoting mycobacterial growth, also regulates the relationship between macrophage and bacteria.

  4. Deregulated microRNAs in CD4+ T cells from individuals with latent tuberculosis versus active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Li, Jianhua; Li, Ruifang

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection remain elusive. Roles of microRNA (miRNA) have been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify miRNAs involved in the immune response to TB, expression profiles of miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells from patients with latent TB, active TB and healthy controls were investigated by microarray assay and validated by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were used to analyse the significant functions and involvement in signalling pathways of the differentially expressed miRNAs. To identify potential target genes for miR-29, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression was measured by RT-qPCR. Our results showed that 27 miRNAs were deregulated among the three groups. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. We observed an inverse correlation between miR-29 level and IFN-γ mRNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that the possible target genes of deregulated miRNAs were significantly enriched in mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway, focal adhesion and extracellular matrix receptor interaction, which might be involved in the transition from latent to active TB. In all, for the first time, our study revealed that some miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells were altered in latent and active TB. Function and pathway analysis highlighted the possible involvement of miRNA-deregulated mRNAs in TB. The study might help to improve understanding of the relationship between miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells and TB, and laid an important foundation for further identification of the underlying mechanisms of latent TB infection and its reactivation.

  5. Risk of tuberculosis infection in anti-TNF-α biological therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Li, Fen; Chen, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jia

    2014-08-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) biological agents, including soluble TNF-α receptors and anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibodies, bring new hope for treating rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, but also increase the risk of infection, especially tuberculosis (TB) infection. Recent findings have shown that the physiological TNF-mediated signaling was somehow impaired by TNF antagonists, leading to the exacerbation of chronic infection associated with aberrant granuloma formation and maintenance. Although both receptor and antibody agents appear to pose an equally high risk in causing development of new TB infections, monoclonal anti-TNF-α antibody seems more inclined to reactivate latent TB infection. This review is focused on the underlying mechanisms that cause the TB risk in the anti-TNF-α therapy and also the strategies to deal with it, with the aim of reducing the TB incidence during anti-TNF-α biological therapies.

  6. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts' defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host's killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host's genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible.

  7. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M. M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts’ defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host’s killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host’s genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible. PMID:27175205

  8. Effectiveness of in-room air filtration and dilution ventilation for tuberculosis infection control

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Leiden, S.; Lobascio, C.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Macher, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a public health problem that may pose substantial risks to health care workers and others. TB infection occurs by inhalation of airborne bacteria emitted by persons with active disease. We experimentally evaluated the effectiveness of in-room air filtration systems, specifically portable air filters (PAFs) and ceiling-mounted air filters (CMAFs), in conjunction with dilution ventilation, for controlling TB exposure in high-risk settings. For each experiment, a test aerosol was continuously generated and released into a full-sized room. With the in-room air filter and room ventilation system operating, time-averaged airborne particle concentrations were measured at several points. The effectiveness of in-room air filtration plus ventilation was determined by comparing particle concentrations with and without device operation. The four PAFs and three CMAFs we evaluated reduced room-average particle concentrations, typically by 30% to 90%, relative to a baseline scenario with two air-changes per hour of ventilation (outside air) only. Increasing the rate of air flow recirculating through the filter and/or air flow from the ventilation did not always increase effectiveness. Concentrations were generally higher near the emission source than elsewhere in the room. Both the air flow configuration of the filter and its placement within the room were important. 46 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of tuberculosis infection control guidelines in a pediatric HIV clinic in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, J. G.; Jin, L.; Mohapi, E. Q.; Mandalakas, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Setting: A well-established pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic in Lesotho with initial infection control (IC) measures prioritizing blood-borne disease. In line with international recommendations, services have been expanded to include the management of patients with tuberculosis (TB). The creation of comprehensive IC guidelines with an emphasis on TB has become a priority. Objective: To provide a model for developing and implementing IC guidelines in ambulatory care facilities in limited-resource settings with high HIV and TB prevalence. Activities: An IC plan that includes guidance covering both general IC measures and TB-specific guidelines was created by integrating local and international recommendations and emphasizing the importance of administrative measures, environmental controls, and disease-specific precautions. An interdisciplinary committee was established to oversee its implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Discussion: Development and implementation of IC guidelines in resource-limited settings are feasible and should be a priority in high HIV and TB prevalence areas. Education should be the cornerstone of such endeavors. Many interventions can be implemented with minimal expertise and material resources. Administrative support and institutional investment are essential to the sustainability of an effective IC program. PMID:26400595

  10. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  11. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences, Results, and Implications for Tuberculosis Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Guesly J.; Fort, Dumesle St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Haiti has the highest tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in the Americas with 254 cases per 100,000 persons. Case detection relies on passive detection and TB services in many regions suffer from poor diagnostic and clinical resources. Methods. Mache Chache (“Go and Seek”) was a TB REACH Wave 3 funded TB case finding project in Port-au-Prince between July 2013 and September 2014, targeting four intervention areas with insufficient TB diagnostic performance. Results. Based on a verbal symptom screen emphasizing the presence of cough, the project identified 11,150 (11.75%) of all screened persons as TB subjects and 2.67% as smear-positive (SS+) TB cases. Enhanced case finding and strengthening of laboratory services led to a 59% increase in bacteriologically confirmed cases in the evaluation population. In addition, smear grades dropped significantly, suggesting earlier case detection. Xpert® MTB/RIF was successfully introduced and improved TB diagnosis in HIV-infected, smear-negative clinic patients, but not in HIV-negative, smear-negative TB suspects in the community. However, the number needed to screen for one additional SS+ case varied widely between clinic and community screening activities. Conclusion. Enhanced and active TB case finding in Haiti can improve TB diagnosis and care. However, screening algorithms have to be tailored to individual settings, necessitating long-term commitment. PMID:27668093

  12. The convergence of the global smoking, COPD, tuberculosis, HIV, and respiratory infection epidemics.

    PubMed

    van Zyl-Smit, Richard N; Brunet, Laurence; Pai, Madhukar; Yew, Wing-Wai

    2010-09-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century, we are facing the convergence of several epidemics. These include tobacco smoking, tuberculosis, HIV infection, influenza, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These epidemics interact by way of increasing disease susceptibility and worsening outcomes. To control these interacting epidemics, we need to better understand each infection and how it influences the others. Multifaceted approaches will be necessary to reduce the impact on those in developing nations most likely to be affected by the convergence of all epidemics.

  13. [HIV infection in tuberculosis patients in Madagascar. Situation in 1-93].

    PubMed

    Morvan, J M; Auregan, G; Rasamindrakotroka, A J; de Ravel, T; Roux, J F

    1994-01-01

    In Madagascar, the estimated incidence of tuberculosis is high (320 per 100,000) when human immunodeficiency virus (VIH) infection progress slowly. The authors have studied HIV seroprevalence in a group of tubercular patients and in two reference groups (general population and outpatients of the Clinical Biology Centre of Institut Pasteur). Circulation of HIV1 virus was observed with a low prevalence rate in all the 3 groups. There was no significant difference between tubercular patients and healthy population. Tubercular people ought to be a watch group for the epidemiological surveillance of HIV infection evolution in Madagascar.

  14. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  15. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection. In other species, Tcm’s pose low activation threshold and a...

  16. Intestinal parasite co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis cases without human immunodeficiency virus infection in a rural county in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47-6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17-5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03-10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  17. TLR2 contributes to trigger immune response of pleural mesothelial cells against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hwanga, Eun-Ha; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Jung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ha, Sang-Jun; Yang, Soo-Jin; Shin, Sung Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2017-02-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a causative agent leading to pleural effusion, characterized by the accumulation of fluid and immune cells in the pleural cavity. Although this phenomenon has been described before, detailed processes or mechanisms associated with the pleural effusion are still not well understood. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) are specialized epithelial cells that cover the body wall and internal organs in pleural cavity playing a central role in pleural inflammation. Toll-like receptors are expressed in various cell types including mesothelial cells and initiate the recognition and defense against mycobacterial infection. In the present study, we investigated direct immune responses of PMCs against two mycobacterial strains, M. bovis vaccine strain Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and M. tuberculosis virulent strain H37Rv, and the role of TLR2 in such responses. Infection with BCG and H37Rv increased the production of IL-6, CXCL1, and CCL2 in WT PMCs, which was partially impaired in TLR2-deficient cells. In addition, the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs induced by BCG and H37Rv was suppressed in TLR2-deficient PMCs, as compared with the WT cells. TLR2 deficiency led to the decrease of nitric oxide (NO) production through the delayed gene expression of iNOS in PMCs. TLR2 was also shown to be essential for optimal expression of cellular adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in PMCs in response to BCG and H37Rv. These findings strongly suggest that TLR2 participates in mycobacteria-induced innate immune responses in PMCs and may play a role in pathogenesis of tuberculosis pleural effusion.

  18. Combination of gene expression patterns in whole blood discriminate between tuberculosis infection states

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic factors are involved in susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Apart from gene polymorphisms and mutations, changes in levels of gene expression, induced by non-genetic factors, may also determine whether individuals progress to active TB. Methods We analysed the expression level of 45 genes in a total of 47 individuals (23 healthy household contacts and 24 new smear-positive pulmonary TB patients) in Addis Ababa using a dual colour multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (dcRT-MLPA) technique to assess gene expression profiles that may be used to distinguish TB cases and their contacts and also latently infected (LTBI) and uninfected household contacts. Results The gene expression level of BLR1, Bcl2, IL4d2, IL7R, FCGR1A, MARCO, MMP9, CCL19, and LTF had significant discriminatory power between sputum smear-positive TB cases and household contacts, with AUCs of 0.84, 0.81, 0.79, 0.79, 0.78, 0.76, 0.75, 0.75 and 0.68 respectively. The combination of Bcl2, BLR1, FCGR1A, IL4d2 and MARCO identified 91.66% of active TB cases and 95.65% of household contacts without active TB. The expression of CCL19, TGFB1, and Foxp3 showed significant difference between LTBI and uninfected contacts, with AUCs of 0.85, 0.82, and 0.75, respectively, whereas the combination of BPI, CCL19, FoxP3, FPR1 and TGFB1 identified 90.9% of QFT- and 91.6% of QFT+ household contacts. Conclusions Expression of single and especially combinations of host genes can accurately differentiate between active TB cases and healthy individuals as well as between LTBI and uninfected contacts. PMID:24885723

  19. BCG Induces Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in the Wistar Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Amit; Mathys, Vanessa; Kiass, Mehdi; Creusy, Colette; Delaire, Baptiste; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Dartois, Véronique; Kaplan, Gilla; Bifani, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the correlation of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-mediated immune responses and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still limited. We have recently characterized a Wistar rat model of experimental tuberculosis (TB). In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of BCG vaccination in this model. Upon Mtb challenge, BCG vaccinated rats controlled growth of the bacilli earlier than unvaccinated rats. Histopathology analysis of infected lungs demonstrated a reduced number of granulomatous lesions and lower parenchymal inflammation in vaccinated animals. Vaccine-mediated protection correlated with the rapid accumulation of antigen specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the infected lungs. Immunohistochemistry further revealed higher number of CD8+ cells in the pulmonary granulomas of vaccinated animals. Evaluation of pulmonary immune responses in vaccinated and Mtb infected rats by real time PCR at day 15 post-challenge showed reduced expression of genes responsible for negative regulation of Th1 immune responses. Thus, early protection observed in BCG vaccinated rats correlated with a similarly timed shift of immunity towards the Th1 type response. Our data support the importance of (i) the Th1-Th2 balance in the control of mycobacterial infection and (ii) the value of the Wistar rats in understanding the biology of TB. PMID:22162757

  20. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A.; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a “chemokine storm” in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process. PMID:25621360

  1. Cross-Reactive Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR Regulon-Encoded Antigens in Individuals Infected with Environmental, Nontuberculous Mycobacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, May Young; Reddy, T. B. K.; Arend, Sandra M.; Friggen, Annemieke H.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Verduyn, Marleen J. C.; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Klein, Michel R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded antigens are highly immunogenic in M. tuberculosis-infected humans and are associated with latent tuberculosis infection. We have investigated the hypothesis that infection with or exposure to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can induce cross-reactive immunity to M. tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded antigens since responsiveness has been observed in non-M. tuberculosis-exposed but purified protein derivative-responsive individuals. M. tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded antigen-specific T-cell responses were studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of NTM-infected/exposed individuals. BLASTP was used to determine the presence of M. tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded protein orthologs among environmental mycobacteria and nonmycobacteria. Significant gamma interferon production was observed in PBMCs from NTM-infected/exposed individuals in response to M. tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded antigens. DosR regulon-encoded protein orthologs were prominently present in tuberculous and environmental mycobacteria and surprisingly also in nonmycobacteria. The ubiquitous presence of the highly conserved DosR master regulator protein Rv3133c suggests that this is a general adaptive bacterial response regulator. We report a first series of M. tuberculosis antigens to which cross-reactive immunity is induced by NTM infection/exposure. The high conservation of M. tuberculosis DosR regulon-encoded antigens most likely enables them to induce cross-reactive T-cell responses. PMID:19737909

  2. IL-10 down-regulates costimulatory molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-pulsed macrophages and impairs the lytic activity of CD4 and CD8 CTL in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    de la Barrera, S; Aleman, M; Musella, R; Schierloh, P; Pasquinelli, V; Garcia, V; Abbate, E; Sasiain, M del C

    2004-10-01

    Activation of T cells requires both TCR-specific ligation and costimulation through accessory molecules during T cell priming. IFNgamma is a key cytokine responsible for macrophage activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection while IL-10 is associated with suppression of cell mediated immunity in intracellular infection. In this paper we evaluated the role of IFNgamma and IL-10 on the function of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and on the modulation of costimulatory molecules in healthy controls and patients with active tuberculosis (TB). gamma-irradiated-Mtb (i-Mtb) induced IL-10 production from CD14(+) cells from TB patients. Moreover, CD3(+) T cells of patients with advanced disease also produced IL-10 after i-Mtb stimulation. In healthy donors, IL-10 decreased the lytic activity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells whereas it increased gammadelta-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that the presence of IL-10 induced a loss of the alternative processing pathways of antigen presentation along with a down-regulation of the expression of costimulatory molecule expression on monocytes and macrophages from healthy individuals. Conversely, neutralization of endogenous IL-10 or addition of IFNgamma to either effector or target cells from TB patients induced a strong lytic activity mediated by CD8(+) CTL together with an up-regulation of CD54 and CD86 expression on target cells. Moreover, we observed that macrophages from TB patients could use alternative pathways for i-Mtb presentation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the presence of IL-10 during Mtb infection might contribute to mycobacteria persistence inside host macrophages through a mechanism that involved inhibition of MHC-restricted cytotoxicity against infected macrophages.

  3. The role of B cells and humoral immunity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, John; Mehta, Simren; Bharrhan, Sushma; Chen, Yong; Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Casadevall, Arturo; Flynn, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a major public health burden. It is generally thought that while B cell- and antibody-mediated immunity plays an important role in host defense against extracellular pathogens, the primary control of intracellular microbes derives from cellular immune mechanisms. Studies on the immune regulatory mechanisms during infection with M. tuberculosis, a facultative intracellular organism, has established the importance of cell-mediated immunity in host defense during tuberculous infection. Emerging evidence suggest a role for B cell and humoral immunity in the control of intracellular pathogens, including obligatory species, through interactions with the cell-mediated immune compartment. Recent studies have shown that B cells and antibodies can significantly impact on the development of immune responses to the tubercle bacillus. In this review, we present experimental evidence supporting the notion that the importance of humoral and cellular immunity in host defense may not be entirely determined by the niche of the pathogen. A comprehensive approach that examines both humoral and cellular immunity could lead to better understanding of the immune response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:25458990

  4. In silico interaction of methyl isocyanate with immune protein responsible for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection using molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Yasir, Mohammad; Tripathi, Manish; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports in silico analysis of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on different key immune proteins against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The analysis shows that MIC is released in the Bhopal gas tragedy in 1984, which is highly toxic and extremely hazardous to human health. In this study, we have selected immune proteins to perform molecular docking with the help of Autodock 4.0. Results show that the CD40 ligand and alpha5beta1 integrin have higher inhibition compared to plasminogen activator urokinase, human glutathione synthetase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK 14), surfactant protein-B, -D (SP-D), and pulmonary SP-D. MIC interacted with His-125, Try-146 residue of CD40 ligand and Ala-149, and Arg-152 residue of alpha5beta1 integrin and affects the proteins functioning by binding on their active sites. These inhibitory conformations were energetically and statistically favored and supported the evidence from wet laboratory experiments reported in the literature. We can conclude that MIC directly or indirectly affects these proteins, which shows that survivals of the disaster suffer from the diseases like tuberculosis infection and lung cancer.

  5. Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspected to be the specific infection in a case of recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Lukšić, Boris; Kljajić, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Forempoher, Gea; Grgić, Duška; Janković-Katalinić, Vera; Goić-Barišić, Ivana

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old man with recurrent tonsillitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For a period of 5 months, the patient had tonsillitis seven times and was treated with several oral or parenteral antibiotics. On one of these occasions, tonsillitis was complicated with a peritonsillar abscess that was treated by incision. According to relevant bibliographic data, this is the first case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confirmed by direct molecular microbiology methods from the tonsillar tissue of a young immunocompetent male reported in Europe. In a case of recurrent tonsillitis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be considered as a possible cause.

  6. Tuberculosis rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Lisa; Li, Jiehui; Hanna, David B; Harris, Tiffany G

    2010-06-01

    We calculated population-based tuberculosis (TB) rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City from 2001 through 2005 using data from the city's TB and HIV/AIDS surveillance registries, and we examined those rates using linear trend tests and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). HIV-infected individuals had 16 times the TB rate of a "non-HIV" population (HIV status negative or unknown; IRR = 16.0; 95% confidence interval = 14.9, 17.2). TB rates declined significantly among the US-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) < .001) but not among the foreign-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) = .355). Such disparities must be addressed if further declines are to be achieved.

  7. Tuberculosis infection control strategies in a biosafety level-3 laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.M.; Martinez, K.F.

    1996-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request to conduct an evaluation at a state public health mycobacteriology laboratory. The request concerned the potential for transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the laboratory resulting from the handling of incoming samples, from the preparation of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smears, and from culturing clinical specimens potentially containing Mtb. NIOSH representatives evaluated the tuberculin skin testing (TST) program, assessed laboratory practices, reviewed the use of safety equipment, and determined the operational status of the ventilation system. In summary, NIOSH representatives concluded that a health hazard existed for the laboratory employees who may be exposed to infectious aerosols generated in the laboratory. These hazards were present due to deficiencies in the design of the laboratory and operation of the ventilation system, and the lack of appropriate respiratory protection. Exhaust ductwork, located in the ceiling plenum above the ante-room in the TB containment laboratory, was disconnected thereby allowing potentially contaminated air to reach the return air plenum. Perforated ceiling tiles were present throughout the containment laboratory, rather than a {open_quotes}hard-surfaced{close_quotes} sealed ceiling which is recommended by CDC and NIH. Without the BSC fan operating, the TB laboratory was under positive pressure. The laboratory should be under negative pressure regardless of the operation of the BSC. According to the calculated air changes per hour (ACH), all three rooms were achieving greater than six ACH. Based on the observations and measurements compiled during the evaluation, recommendations regarding the maintenance of the existing ventilation system and the design of the laboratory were provided.

  8. Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus: an overview and motivation for systems approaches.

    PubMed

    Deffur, Armin; Mulder, Nicola J; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2013-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that accounts for a high proportion of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide. HIV-1 co-infection exacerbates tuberculosis. Enhanced understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection is required. While reductionist approaches have yielded many valuable insights into disease pathogenesis, systems approaches are required that develop data-driven models able to predict emergent properties of this complex co-infection system in order to develop novel therapeutic approaches and to improve diagnostics. Here, we provide a pathogenesis-focused overview of HIV-TB co-infection followed by an introduction to systems approaches and concrete examples of how such approaches are useful.

  9. [Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: clinical trial under the coordination of the Institut Pasteur in Cambodia].

    PubMed

    Borand, Laurence; Pheng, Phearavin; Saman, Manil; Leng, Chanthy; Chea, Phalla; Sarady Ay, Sao; Suom, Sophea; Roat Men, Nimul; Nerrienet, Eric; Marcy, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of death among adults infected by HIV. The CAMELIA (ANRS 1295/CIPRA KH001) randomized clinical trial aimed to determine the optimal timing of ARV initiation after tuberculosis treatment onset to reduce mortality. Here, we describe the trial implementation in five hospitals in Cambodia under the coordination of the Institut Pasteur in Cambodia, its conduct, the challenges and public health benefits in Cambodia and beyond.

  10. Comparison of tuberculin skin testing and T-SPOT.TB for diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Hulya; Alpar, Sibel; Ucar, Nazire; Aksu, Funda; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gözalan, Aysegul; Cesur, Salih; Ertek, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The T-SPOT.TB test does not cross-react with Bacille Calmette-Guérin or most non-tuberculosis mycobacterium species, and is based on IFN-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. The objective of this study was to compare tuberculin skin test (TST) with T-SPOT.TB results used in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) as well as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A total of 136 subjects participated in three different groups (47 patients with active pulmonary TB, 47 healthy persons without M. tuberculosis exposure, and 42 hospital members with a history of close contact with active TB patients). The T-SPOT.TB sensitivity (83.0%) and the negative predictive value (NPV) (82.6%) in the diagnosis of active TB were significantly higher than those of TST. The sensitivity and NPV of the TST were 38.3 and 60.8%, respectively. The T-SPOT.TB specificity (80.9%) and positive predictive value (81.3%) were lower than those of TST (95.7 and 90.0%, respectively). The performance of T-SPOT.TB and TST for diagnosing LTBI was the same (54.8%). T-SPOT.TB was superior in terms of sensitivity (83.0%); TST detected only 18, whereas T-SPOT.TB test detected 39 out of 47 patients with active TB. T-SPOT.TB is thought to have better performance than TST due to false-negative results in diagnosing active TB. However, it is considered that large prospective longitudinal studies are needed for diagnosing LTBI.

  11. Plasma drug activity assay for treatment optimization in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Heysell, Scott K; Mtabho, Charles; Mpagama, Stellah; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Pholwat, Suporn; Ndusilo, Norah; Gratz, Jean; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Kibiki, Gibson S; Houpt, Eric R

    2011-12-01

    Low antituberculosis (TB) drug levels are common, but their clinical significance remains unclear, and methods of measurement are resource intensive. Subjects initiating treatment for sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were enrolled from Kibong'oto National TB Hospital, Tanzania, and levels of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide were measured at the time of typical peak plasma concentration (C(2 h)). To evaluate the significance of the effect of observed drug levels on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth, a plasma TB drug activity (TDA) assay was developed using the Bactec MGIT system. Time to detection of plasma-cocultured M. tuberculosis versus time to detection of control growth was defined as a TDA ratio. TDA assays were later performed using the subject's own M. tuberculosis isolate and C(2 h) plasma from the Tanzanian cohort and compared to drug levels and clinical outcomes. Sixteen subjects with a mean age of 37.8 years ± 10.7 were enrolled. Fourteen (88%) had C(2 h) rifampin levels and 11 (69%) had isoniazid levels below 90% of the lower limit of the expected range. Plasma spiked with various concentrations of antituberculosis medications found TDA assay results to be unaffected by ethambutol or pyrazinamide. Yet with a range of isoniazid and rifampin concentrations, TDA exhibited a statistically significant correlation with drug level and drug MIC, and a TDA of ~1.0 indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant TB. In Tanzania, low (≤ 2.0) TDA was significantly associated with both lower isoniazid and rifampin C(2 h) levels, and very low (≤ 1.5) TDA corresponded to a trend toward lack of cure. Study of TDA compared to additional clinical outcomes and as a therapeutic management tool is warranted.

  12. Screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected patients in resource-rich settings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ada W C; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Current international guidelines recommend screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in HIV-infected patients in all settings. The main factors affecting the risk of TB in HIV-infected patients include the level of immunosuppression, coverage of antiretroviral therapy and local TB burden. In resource-rich settings where antiretroviral therapy is more accessible and HIV-infected patients are expected to be diagnosed at an earlier stage, local TB burden remains a key factor on their risk of TB. This article reviewed the epidemiology of latent TB infection among the adult HIV-infected patients, and the use and benefit of screening and treatment of latent TB infection in resource-rich settings in the past decade. While such practice should be continued in countries with medium or high TB burden, targeted screening and treatment only for HIV-infected patients with additional risk factors for TB might be a more practical option in resource-rich countries with low TB burden.

  13. Short-Course Chemotherapy with TMC207 and Rifapentine in a Murine Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Li, Si-Yang; Williams, Kathy N.; Andries, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) is an emerging global health threat. Proper management of close contacts of infectious patients is increasingly important. However, no evidence-based recommendations for treating latent TB infection (LTBI) after MDR/XDR-TB exposure (DR-LTBI) exist. An ultrashort regimen for LTBI caused by drug-susceptible strains (DS-LTBI) is also desirable. TMC207 has bactericidal and sterilizing activity in animal models of TB and improves the activity of current MDR-TB therapy in patients. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether TMC207 might enable short-course treatment of DR-LTBI and ultrashort treatment of DS-LTBI. Methods: Using an established experimental model of LTBI chemotherapy in which mice are aerosol-immunized with a recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine before low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the efficacy of TMC207 alone and in combination with rifapentine was compared with currently recommended control regimens as well as once-weekly rifapentine + isoniazid and daily rifapentine ± isoniazid. Measurements: Outcomes included monthly lung colony-forming unit counts and relapse rates. Main Results: Lung colony-forming unit counts were stable at about 3.75 log10 for up to 7.5 months postinfection in untreated mice. Rifamycin-containing regimens were superior to isoniazid monotherapy. TMC207 exhibited sterilizing activity at least as strong as that of rifampin alone and similar to that of rifampin + isoniazid, but daily rifapentine +/− isoniazid was superior to TMC207. Addition of TMC207 to rifapentine did not improve the sterilizing activity of rifapentine in this model. Conclusions: TMC207 has substantial sterilizing activity and may enable treatment of DR-LTBI in 3–4 months. PMID:21659613

  14. Differential virulence and disease progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Via, Laura E; Weiner, Danielle M; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B; Flynn, Joanne L; Barry, Clifton E

    2013-08-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades.

  15. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 μg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael – acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  16. Routine analysis of induced sputum is not an effective strategy for screening persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Pneumocystis carinii. Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study Group.

    PubMed

    Kvale, P A; Hansen, N I; Markowitz, N; Rosen, M J; Jordan, M C; Meiselman, L; Glassroth, J; Reichman, L B; Wallace, J M; Stansell, J D

    1994-09-01

    A prospective multicenter cohort study comprising 1,171 individuals who were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) but did not have AIDS at the time of enrollment and 182 HIV-seronegative controls, was studied by means of routine induced-sputum analysis in an attempt to detect occult tuberculosis or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. One occult case of tuberculosis was discovered upon the patient's enrollment (at baseline); none were discovered during follow-up. Two additional Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were recovered (one at baseline, one during follow-up) from subjects with symptoms or abnormalities evident on chest roentgenograms. Three specimens were false-positive (one for M. tuberculosis, two for P. carinii). Five pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates were recovered during follow-up. Nonpathogenic, nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 51 (4.6%) of 1,113 baseline specimens and 56 (3.7%) of 1,518 follow-up specimens, primarily at a center where the water supply was contaminated. We conclude that routine induced-sputum analysis is not an effective strategy for screening HIV-infected asymptomatic subjects for tuberculosis or P. carinii pneumonia before the onset of clinically recognizable disease activity.

  17. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  18. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  19. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR